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Pompano Pelican
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00090900/00319
 Material Information
Title: Pompano Pelican
Uniform Title: Pompano Pelican
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: Pompano Pelican
Place of Publication: Pompano Beach
Publication Date: 09-28-2012
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Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Pompano Beach
Coordinates: 26.234722 x -80.125556 ( Place of Publication )
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00090900:00319

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Friday, September 28, 2012 Vol. XX, Issue 39 Wherever you are, read The Pelican @ pompanopelican.com • Send news to siren2415@gmail.com Pompano Beach • Deer eld Beach • Lighthouse Point • Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Wilton Manors • Oakland Park • Hillsboro Beach • The Galt • Palm Aire The P e l i c a n Pelican 60 days left in 2012 Hurricane season Members of the Oakland Park Garden Club transformed parking spaces into a park-like center on “PARK(ing) Day recently. The event took place at Oakland Park Boulevard and Northeast 6 Avenue. From left are Laurence Pengelly, club secretary; Bonnie Seibert, president; and Linda Gordon, treasurer. The group meets at 6:30 p.m. the third Tuesday of the month at Jaco Pastorius Community Center, 1098 NE 40 Court. [Staff photo by Judy Vik] Property values on the rise so millage is slightly reduced By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFLauderdale-By-The-Sea – Town commissioners unanimously agreed to lower the millage rate to the recommended 3.9312 during a special public hearing Monday. The rate was the same as tentatively approved Sept. 12. The tax rate is down from the current rate of 3.9999 and is fourth lowest in the county. Property values in LBTS are $1.761 billion, a 1.7 percent increase from this year’s $1.759 billion, the rst increase since 2007-2008. With the increase in values, the lower tax rate will raise the same amount of revenues as last year, Tony Bryan, nance director, noted. See LBTS TAX on page 19 Oakland Park resident embarks on 100mile journey for cancer ghtBy Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFOakland Park – Mike Fitzpatrick has done plenty of walks to raise money and awareness to ght against breast cancer, but never one that lasted 100 miles. Today starting at Big Dog Station in Oakland Park, Fitzpatrick, an Oakland Park resident, will be walking to Jupiter – a 100-mile See 100-MILE TREK on page 20But city says it’s all legalBy Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach – When residents on NW 21 Ct. woke up Monday, they saw four 25-foot tanks within 50 feet of their homes. The tanks were lined up in back of Walmart on Copans Road. Large valves and hoses connected the tanks. On Tuesday, residents met with Walmart representatives, Mayor Lamar Fisher, an engineer from Kimley-Horn and other city of cials to get some answers. Lucas Anthony from KimleyHorn explained that the work and the equipment were staged for drainage improvements to the Walmart Shopping Center. He said oil and Residents want relief from Walmart’s drainage project, tree removal fuel leaks from cars in the parking lot combined with automobiles from Mercedes-Benz and Champion Motors dealerships have impacted the water quality for years. Flooding has been an issue on the property since its construction in the late 80s. During Hurricane Irene, several cars were ooded, and pools of water after a rain are common. The tanks, on lease from Carbonair, are charcoal ltering mechanisms positioned to clean polluted ground water from the runoff. In preparation for the project, which will be completed early next year, two ponds behind Walmart have been drained, deepened and expanded as retention ponds for a new drainage See WALMART on page 14 RMA gets continuing contract to market culinary districtBy Judy VikPELICAN STAFF Oakland Park – City commissioners have approved a $254,615 contract with Redevelopment Management Associates, RMA, to implement a ve-year redevelopment plan and to market downtown as a culinary district. The agreement calls for another $150,000 for incentives and marketing collaterals to promote development in the CRA. In July, commissioners authorized an agreement with RMA to complete a general review of the city’s CRA See RMA on page 9 Sushi in Lauderdale-By-The-Sea. See page 17.

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2 The PelicanFriday, September 28, 2012 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach – When he was a young teen, Jeff Graves learned the intricacies of embroidery and threaded a complex, colorful design on the back of a denim jacket. Jump ahead several decades and he is doing the same type of artwork using high-tech computer software instead of a metal hook.Keeping up with the times, photographer creates ne digital art works Photographer Jeff Graves has created a series of ne digital art pieces depicting south Florida. That’s typical of the Deer eld Beach photographer who has always evolved in his work place as the graphics industry evolved. Backed up by the latest computer programs, Graves is now creating ne digital art works. It is tedious and time consuming, but the result is a photograph or other image that is markedly enhanced with minute brushstrokes, See GRAVES on page 3

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The Pelican 3 Friday, September 28, 2012 Advertise with The Pelican 954-783-8700!custom backgrounds and vivid colors. For years, he worked with markers and pens to be a freehand illustrator. But this digital age has brought him new options. The computer, he says, actually releases his creative juices while being far less messy than traditional oils, markers or water colors. Nowadays, his airbrush is a special pen that he moves across a digital art pad. “If you have a creative hand, you can do anything you want,” Graves said showing off the blunt-edged instrument. Graves can start with a template – the outline of an image – and add his own special brush strokes, colors and background, draw original art, or enhance photographs such as the ones with this article of his friends Ann Marie and Charley Termini of Pompano Beach. [Right] In his self-contained studio, Graves can print the digital art onto either special paper or canvas and secure it to a frame in a relatively short time. A native of Chicago, Graves was educated at College of DuPage and earned his master craftsman degree in applied science at Columbia College. He went to work as a staff photographer for Chicago Bridge and Iron, a builder of industrial and nuclear structures. It was a job that took him to more than 30 countries and into dangerous locations where he photographed some of the world’s largest manmade installations. Along the way, always inventive, he experimented with new lm, new cameras, new methods of developing prints. He arrived in Deer eld Beach July 4, 1999, “in time to see the reworks,” he said. Since then, he has moved into lm making, editing and video work staying ahead of the eld each time new technology comes along. He is also a well-known gure around the area working civic and charity functions. Now, he has a body of his new work ready for public display. It is a series of south Florida scenes – subjects as ordinary as the city hall clock tower or as exotic as an Indian alligator wrestler. Because his material costs are minimal, these originals sell for far less than what might be expected and can be viewed on his website www. jaguarcomm.com. GravesContinued from page 2

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4 The PelicanFriday, September 28, 2012 See FIFTH on page 26 Fun-lovers sad to see Fifth Avenue Grill close its doorsBy Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFLighthouse Point – The abrupt closing of the Fifth Avenue Grill this week has left a saddened community. “It was a surprise, “said LHP Mayor Fred Schorr. The food was very good, the atmosphere was great… I am sad to see them go.” Opened here around 1998, the restaurant was known for its prime rib and summer lobster specials. The plantation -style building at 4650 N. Federal Highway had become iconic – a gathering place for residents of the tri-cities: LHP, Pompano Beach and Deerfield Beach. The succinct message, “Meet me at 5 at the Fifth,” confirmed many a happy hour date. Schorr remembers it for having a large selection of very good wines stored on the second floor where the proper temperature was insured by a special generator. “And that is a beautiful bar. I wonder what will happen to that?” the mayor said. Later this week the answer became clear. The contents of the building will be auctioned Tuesday, Oct. 2. Both Cheryl Jalbert and Marge Hanley said they were at the Fifth the day it opened and thereafter celebrated their birthday’s there, Jalbert’s just a few weeks ago. “I am going to miss the place terribly, “Hanley said. “No place will match it for convenience. I was there Saturday night. It was so comfortable.” Her 85th birthday was toasted at the Fifth in May. The restaurant closed its door after serving dinner Sunday with apparently no notice to its employees. Monday morning a handmade sign saying “Building Sold” covered the familiar monument marker on the highway. “My family is visiting this week and my daughter loved the prime rib there. I bet she thought we would have dinner there tonight,” Hanley said. “For some reason I thought the place would never close,” said Jalbert. “Many of us in Lighthouse Point are not at all happy. I feel very sad.” Jalbert said that she was close with some of Fifth’s longtime employees. “It’s like losing

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The Pelican 5 Friday, September 28, 2012 Rotary Club among the rst to enjoy new venueBy Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach – Three men experienced in the movie-theater business have formed a partnership that continues to change the way people think about going to the movies. It’s no longer about what to do on a rainy day. It’s no longer about a bag of popcorn, a box of Milk Duds and gum on the oor. Movie-going today has become an outing enhanced by the latest lm technology, upscale surroundings, premium seating, adult game rooms, expanded menus, VIP screenings, a glass of wine or beer and in some cases the option to bowl or enjoy a cocktail in a full-service lounge. Said Niki Wilson, marketing director for Paragon Theaters headquartered in Deer eld Beach, “Here, it’s about the experience … and big luxurious seats at half the price.” Paragon is one of the companies taking moviegoing to a higher level. Under the leadership of Michael Whalen, Mike Wilson and Hank Lightstone, all former executives with Muvico Upscale movie experience now available in Deer eld BeachExterior of the Paragon Theater in Deer eld Beach shows a slick, new face.Rotary bene t What Showing of “Taken 2.” When – Sunday, Oct. 7, 2 p.m. Where – Paragon Theater, 3984 W. Hillsboro Blvd. Who – Liam Neeson, Famke, Janssen, Maggie Grace. Why – To raise money for Deer eld Beach Rotary Charities. To reserve tickets at $10 each, call 561-213-6493. See PARAGON on page 24

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6 The PelicanFriday, September 28, 2012 Deer eld Beach, Pompano Beach, Lighthouse Point, LauderdaleBy-The-Sea, Wilton Manors and Oakland ParkWilton Manors • Oakland Park • Hillsboro Beach The Pompano Pelican is published weekly on FridaysStreet Address: 1500-A E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, FL 33060 Telephone: 954-783-8700 • Fax: 954-783-0093Letters to the Editor are encouraged and accepted for print if signed, although a writer’s name will be withheld on request; letters must also include a daytime telephone number. Advertising rates are available upon request. Subscription rate is $31.80 including tax for one year’s delivery in Greater Pompano Beach; $95.40/per year including tax for others in the United States; call 954-783-8700 for rates abroad. The Pelican is a nonpartisan newspaper and reserves the right to decline advertising. Copyright 2012. Reproduction of this publication in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission of the publisher. The Pelican is a member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, Deer eld Beach Chamber and the LBTS Chamber. The Pelican is a state certi ed woman-owned minority business. The Pelican is delivered to businesses, libraries, schools, of ces, hospitals, news racks and single family homes. All advertising and copy is published at the sole discretion of the publisher. We welcome your critiques and ideas concerning this publication. Anne Siren, publisherExecutive Assistant: Mary Hudson Graphics: Rachel Ramirez Windsheimer Bookkeeper: John White Classi eds: Fran Shelby Contributing Writers: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Judy Wilson, Malcolm McClintock, Judy Vik, Michael d’Oliveira Account Executives: Paul Shroads, Carolyn Mann, Bill Heaton, Bill Fox Special Of ce Assistant: Cathy Siren ESTABLISHED 1993 • Volume XX, Issue 39 Founding Editor and PublisherAnne Hanby Siren OpinionRegister to vote before Oct. 9 and vote on Nov. 6 Walmart on Copans Road may be a giant corporation, but in Pompano Beach, the store just became a bad neighbor. The problem began with a “drainage project,” planned months ago. Now it is a nightmare to the residents whose homes abut the Walmart property. Here’s why. Without warning or notice, dozens of shade trees disappeared from around two retention ponds that lie between Walmart and the residents on Northwest 21 Avenue. Without warning, four charcoal lter tanks upwards of 25 feet high and half as wide, appeared within 50 feet of some of these homes. Water was drained from the two retention ponds and dumped into another pond raising the sea level too high for comfort during the hurricane season. The tanks are used to clean ground water than has been polluted over the years from rainwater runoff from the parking lot. Fuel leaks from vehicles at Mercedes-Benz and Champion Motors are part of these spills. We know that cleaning ground water is a necessary chore for lots such as Walmart. This is a clean-up operation. What’s the big secret? There is no buffer between the homes and the store, so the work that is going on is out in the open. With these homes in such close proximity, we wonder how far the soil contamination goes. And so do the residents who live there. Through no fault of their own, their own properties could be at risk. None of this had to happen if the right people had been informed, and that would be the people living right next to Walmart. They were not. Walmart has an obligation to prove to the neighbors that their soil has not been contaminated from fuel spill-offs. They should build a safety fence around these 20-foot-deep lakes that will attract children, especially on hot summer days. This is an opportunity for the giant corporation to create a new and safe environment for those who live on the borders of Walmart. The opportunity is at hand. I know the people who are leading this battle for their environment, their quality of life and for their children. They are good people; they are people of faith, and they are courageous. But they are not doormats. No one should tolerate this kind of arrogance aimed at this or any community. But when mutual respect and responsibility come to the table, the right forward steps can begin. If arrogance and money continue to rule the day, nothing will come other than a continued battle. And my points are not going to be with Walmart.Walmart can still do right by the residents who are their neighbors

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The Pelican 7 Friday, September 28, 2012 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFOakland Park – With October just around the corner, it’s time for Oktoberfest in Oakland Park, the largest of its kind in Broward or Miami-Dade counties and one of the most popular in Florida, according to Siegi Constantine, executive director of Oakland Park Main Street. The annual event is set for Friday, Oct. 5, and Saturday, Oct. 6, at Jaco Pastorius Park, 4000 N. Dixie Highway. Hours are 5 to 11 p.m. Friday and 1 to 11 p.m. Saturday. “Everything about our Oktoberfest is authentic – Area’s largest Oktoberfest ready to roll out the beer barrel, German food and musicfrom the food and beer to the bands performing traditional Bavarian party music,” Constantine said. “We have increased our entertainment budget to book one of the nation’s nest Oktoberfest bands, the ‘Alpine Express.’” More than 10,000 people are expected to attend, so large amounts of authentic German food and beer will be available, as well as plenty of dance space under large tents. Hans Huber, owner of the award-winning Ambry Restaurant in Fort Lauderdale, will operate the Bavarianstyle “Biergarten” offering a selection of popular German favorites such as bratwurst, knockwurst, spicy currywurst, haxen semmel (roast pork), goulash soup, sauerkraut and German potato salad. Baked pretzels, brotchen and apple strudel also will be for sale. In addition to soft drinks, a selection of German wines, avored schnapps and authentic German -brewed Tucher Oktoberfest beers will be available, including a commemorative 32-ounce mug. “Oktoberfest is meant to be a celebration for all ages, and we encourage a lot of singing and dancing,” said Eric Waters, city special event coordinator. Performances are planned by the “Edelweiss Schuhplattler Dancers,” a children’s dance troupe, and the original “Auerhahn Schuhplattler Dancers”, an adult troupe. Also scheduled are the popular “Dachshund Dash,” a race for about 50 dachshunds; Oktoberfest games and contests, beer stein races and an apple strudel eating contest. The Broward Sheriff’s Of ce will exhibit their K-9 unit featuring trained German shepherds performing various police drills on command. A special attraction will be Oakland Park’s own Lindsey Way, “Miss Hooters International 2011.” See OKTOBERFEST on page 25 10-1 – Preschool Storytime from 10:30 to 11 a.m. at Richard C. Sullivan Public Library, 500 NE 26 St., Wilton Manors. Ages two to ve. 954-390-2195. 10-3 – Friends of the Wilton Manors Library Board meeting at 6:30 p.m. at the library, 500 NE 26 Street. 954-390-2195. 10-3 – Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce hosts Business With A Twist from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at Two Georges at the Cove, 1754 SW 3 Ct., Deer eld Beach. See SIGHTINGS on page 12SightingsA community calendar for Northeast Broward County. Send your event information to mdpelican@yahoo.com

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8 The PelicanFriday, September 28, 2012 Business matters The Pelican takes a look at local business owners. You can tell your story here because business matters. 954-783-8700. By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFF“We’re on staff at North Broward, Imperial Point and Holy Cross,” says Dr. Waskin. “We follow our patients from our of ce suite to the hospital. Because all of our records are electronic, we have instant and complete information on the health history of each patient available on our iPads. We can avoid duplication, wasted time, errors in diagnosis, and can share information quickly with each other and concerned family.” Interviewed in his of ces at 2701 NE 14 St. in Pompano Beach, Dr. Waskin says, “I’ve been in practice here in Pompano Beach for 12 years. Our group consists of a very quali ed of ce staff, Megan Goitia, a licensed nurse practitioner who is my right arm, and me. We are an HMO and Medicare provider accepting most major insurances. We’re proud of the care we provide. Our patient approach is prevention.” Asked how he prevents serious health issues, he explains. “Prevention relies on educating the patient to the important factors that cause major health problems. For example, serious heart problems are the result of many factors. He ticked off a few of the known causes for serious heart trouble… blood pressure, cholesterol, weight, inherited tendencies and smoking. We try to eliminate the causes before the bad result happens. Each person has an individual health history which usually explains the symptoms that he or she comes to us with. We determine the source of the symptoms and hopefully teach the patient how to eliminate the symptoms and change the outcome for the better.” “As a trained doctor of osteopathic medicine, I treat Glen A. Waskin, D.O. and Megan Goitia, ARNP at Broward Family Medical Group have you covered 24/7the entire body, not just the symptoms. In fact, osteopathic medicine was created by a medical doctor who wanted to diagnose and treat core problems rather than the one resulting problem. And that’s what we do here. We have physical therapy in the of ce. I am trained to treat musculoskeletal issues which means that we can sometimes nd and solve a problem right here in the of ce instead of referring a patient for unnecessary testing.” Broward Family Medical Group serves all ages from children to seniors, including women’s basic gynecology. An on-site lab means blood work and routine lab tests can be done in of ce, saving patients another stop. Megan Goitia is a family nurse practitioner, Board Certi ed by the ANCC, or American Nursing Credentials Center. She works under Dr. Waskin’s license and according to him, is his right arm. “We see patients together and work as a team,” she says. “In Florida, we can do almost everything a physician can do. As it happens, we coordinate everything we do on our electronic medical record system. My specialty is diabetes and cardiovascular risk reduction. I do this by trying to prevent complications in these areas through education of the patient and monitoring areas of danger to control the condition.” In keeping with a focus on prevention, Waskins and Goitia conduct frequent education seminars in their large reception area. Alerted through yers and advertising, attendance is high. Waskins says, “We usually pack this area with about 30 patients who want to know more about diabetes, breast cancer, prostrate problems, cholesterol and more. We try to alert patients to recognize symptoms before they become big problems.” In October a seminar is planned to discuss the new medicare bene ts for 2013. The doctor says the most frequently asked question is: How will the new health care plan affect me and my existing policy? He adds, “We’re meeting with different health plans right now to nd out what their new bene ts are so that we can present an unbiased seminar to enlighten the public. The window for changing plans Broward Family Medical Group includes a professional of ce staff under the direction of Glen a Waskin, D.O. and nurse practitioner, Megan Goitia. The team offers patient care and preventive medicine. An HMO and Medicare provider, most insurances are accepted. See MEDICAL GROUP on page 9 County bans misleading gas pricesBroward – This month, Broward Commissioners banned “misleading” gas prices. Previously, some gas stations would advertise lower prices but when customers begin to pump they realized that the advertised price was cash only. “Paying for gas should not be guess work. Now when you see a posted price at the gas station, you’ll know that’s the most you’ll be charged. It should do away with the bait and switch practice of advertising one price if you pay with cash and a higher non-advertised price if you plan to use a credit or cash card,” said Commissioner Lois Wexler. Failure to comply with the county ordinance will result in a ne of $250 for the rst violation and $500 for repeat violations.Youth soccer registrationOakland Park – Registration is underway for the city’s upcoming youth soccer season. All players must be between the ages of 4 and 16 as of November 12, 2012. The registration fee is $55 for residents and $100 for non-residents. Practices and games are held at the Wimberly Athletic Complex, Stevens Field and Northeast High School. Registration will end on October 12 or when the league is full. For more information, visit www. oaklandpark .gov or call 954630-4515. Send your news to mdpelican@ yahoo.com

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The Pelican 9 Friday, September 28, 2012 keeps shrinking. This year, the open period will be Oct. 15 to Dec.7. Our information will help patients decide what options HMO or private pay insurance plans offer and what might work best for them. Medications and co-pay costs are considerations.”Patients give them thumbs upNaomi Lewis says going to Dr. Waskin four years ago was the best decision she ever made. “I had very high blood pressure which he has put under control with medicine and counseling. I watch my weight by eating properly. He gets right to the point and keeps me in line because he cares, and I know it. He’s challenging, handles patients very well, and I can’t say enough good things about him.” Richard Romano calls Dr. Waskin, “the doctor with golden hands. I’ve been going to him for nine or 10 years. He diagnosed me with diverticulitis when I was already infected. He probably saved my life. I was hospitalized, and he saw me every day including Sundays. I also have a form of leukemia so he watches me carefully. He has sent me to specialists when something doesn’t seem right. He’s a caring doctor, and his entire staff is the same.” This group prides itself on its friendly and courteous of ce staff and exible hours to accommodate people who can’t come in during the day because of work schedules. Patients who are sick will be seen without an appointment. Open Mon.,Tues.,Thurs. and Fri. from 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Wed. from 8:30 to 7 p.m. Call 954-545-1560 for appointment. Medical groupContinued from page 10plan, the Redevelopment Capital Program or RCP, and develop a strategic plan for the next ve years. Ray Lubomski, community and economic development director, reported that one of the main accomplishments last year was reprogramming Broward County’s RCP funds into projects that further the ve-year plan. Two properties were purchased, and several public improvement projects were funded with RCP monies, including fountains on 12th Avenue and a plaza near Oakland Park Station. A major tenant for the Oakland Station, the Funky Buddha Brewery, has signed a lease with the landlord to locate a craft brewery and tasting room at Oakland Park Station. This business, along with a Green Market and a future restaurant will establish the north anchor of the downtown culinary center. RMA has recommended that the parcel at 1299 Oakland Park Blvd. [the former Players Club] be developed as a south anchor to the Culinary Arts District as a culinary or hospitality school. Lubomski said RMA and his staff are working with the property owner to recruit culinary-related businesses with an emphasis on culinary schools. RMAContinued from page 1By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFWilton Manors – Water rates are increasing 6.3 percent and sewage rates 3.4 percent starting Oct. 1. Wilton Manors, which gets its water from Fort Lauderdale, allowed for the increase when it passed its $24 million budget and 6.9605 percent millage rate on Water, sewage rates go up in Wilton ManorsMonday. To maintain the city’s water and sewage systems, city of cials say they were forced to pass the increase onto residents. “We’re not going to build ourselves a water plant because of the cost,” said Commissioner Scott Newton. “All they do is supply us with water. I think it’s disgraceful [they’re increasing it this much],” said Newton. “[Water’s] still relatively cheap,” said Commissioner Ted Galatis. Commissioners were a little more upbeat about the budget, millage rate and property values. “For the rst time in ve years, values in Wilton Manors have increased,” See WILTON MANORS RATES on page 21 Send your news to mdpelican@yahoo. com

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10 The PelicanFriday, September 28, 2012 Making a DifferencePhyllis J. Neuberger wants your suggestions about people who are making a difference. Phyllis’s new book, China Dahl, is available on amazon.com. Call 954-7838700. Briefs By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFPeek in on a weekly meeting and watch these dedicated volunteers working away at St. Paul of the Apostle Church Social Hall at 2700 E. Sample Road in Lighthouse Point. They are as busy as Santa’s elves producing crafts for their annual Christmas Bazaar. On November 10 and 11, holiday shoppers will nd small trees already trimmed, ornaments, nativity sets, crocheted blankets, Thanksgiving place cards, placemats, aprons, pillows and many other items, handmade with love. Group President, Cathie Desjean and Vice President DeeDee Coulombe were interviewed by The Pelican as they worked. Cathie says, “We use the money we raise to provide scholarships to Council of Catholic Women of St. Paul of the Apostle Church volunteer around the calendar to help those in needparishioners who want to send their children to parochial schools.” She went on to say, “We just nished our dresses for the Haiti project which was a big success and very gratifying to all of us. Parishioners donated new and used pillow cases and our group turned them into little slip dresses for children from infancy to 14 years of age. We bought 147 pair of panties to go with our 147 dresses. They were delivered by Food for the Poor to the community of Titanyen, Cabaret, Haiti. We kept busy on this project for three months, cutting, sewing, ironing etc. It was more than worthwhile when we saw pictures of the smiling little girls in their dresses. It made every one of us very happy.” Asked how many women are in the group, DeeDee says, “ There are about 75 members, 45 of whom are active. We’re all elderly, but we manage to show up every week for about three hours and we work on events around the calendar. We would love to have some young blood, but it seems most of the young women are working women.” She paused to introduce Emma Francem who is 97. Emma was very busy making individual ower puffs which would later be sewn together to create an exquisite throw. After the Holiday Bazaar, the women get busy on Aunt Marie’s Attic Sale in February. Cathie says, “ Our entire parish contributes to this rummage sale, but it is our Council of Catholic Women who run it. It’s always a big success proving that one person’s junk is the next person’s treasure.” She laughed. “Some of us end up buying as much as we donated.” Continuing, “We have an annual fashion show at the Lighthouse Point Yacht Club. We model clothes from different retailers. This year, Stein Mart has generously offered to work with us.” DeeDee ticks off another event. “At Christmas we work with Operation Christmas Child. This is a wonderful effort. This year we hope to ll 80 shoe boxes with personal necessities and little items. These boxes are shipped around the world to be given to children in need.” “We’re not through yet,” Cathie says. “There’s still another new yearly event. We love this one because it’s so easy. We Shop for a Cause in partnership with Macy’s. We sell Macy Shopping Passes See CATHOLIC WOMEN on page 12Emma Francem may be 97, but her nimble ngers keep working away on a beautiful throw, made of individual ower puffs which will be sewn together to make a throw. Creating holiday ornaments and stuffed animals are Marie McGill, Angie Peters and Carol Kosobucki. [Photos by Phyllis J. Neuberger] Trimming trees for the Holiday Bazaar are DeeDee Coulombe, Cathie Desjean and Diana Marcinka. The Council of Catholic Women turned pillow cases into 147 dresses for little girls in Haiti. Delivered by Food for the Poor, here are a few of the happy recipients. [Photo courtesy of Food for the Poor in Titanyen, Cabaret, Haiti]Florida Trail Association meetsCoconut Creek – The Florida Trail Association meets Thursday, Oct. 11 at 7:30 p.m. at Fern Forest Nature Center, 201 Lyons Road South. The topic is Camping Equipment 101. Members will share their latest and greatest equipment advice. The Florida Trail Association helps maintain and promote the Florida National Scenic Trail and provides an opportunity for hiking and camping in Florida. For more information, call 954-6094727.Hire students with disabilities Fort Lauderdale – To encourage employers to hire students with disabilities, the Businesses Building Bridges Showcase will be held Monday, Oct. 1 from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at Fort Lauderdale High School, 1600 NE 4 Ave., Fort Lauderdale. Business leaders attending will hear representatives from Memorial Hospital Miramar and Sunshine Cleaning Systems share their experiences of hiring students with disabilities for permanent and internship positions, and the positive impact it has made in their businesses. Businesses that want to attend should RSVP by Sept. 26 by contacting Gail Fallon at 754-321-2008. Appetizers and beverages will be served at the event. Send your news to mdpelican@ yahoo.com or call 954-7838700

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The Pelican 11 Friday, September 28, 2012

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12 The PelicanFriday, September 28, 2012 Breathe! Doggonit!This week, Pompano Beach Fire-Rescue rescued two chihuahua puppies from a trailer re on Ninth Drive. No people were home at the time of the re, but re ghters found one Cockatoo bird deceased in its cage. The two dogs rescued were one pregnant female named “Princess and one male named “Borom Bola.” Borom Bola was unconscious and in critical condition. Fire ghters revived both dogs by administering oxygen. Both dogs were then brought to an animal hospital across the street from the trailer park. [Photo courtesy of Pompano Beach Fire Department]for one day. The charity gets a 25 percent discount and we get $5 for each pass sold. We all love this event because all we have to do is shop and that’s easy for most women isn’t it?” At back to school time in the fall, this group contributes back packs lled with supplies. They contribute to other small, but meaningful projects throughout the year to help the less fortunate around them. “We meet once a month from October to May,” Cathie says. “I’ve been president for four years. Nobody wants the job because it’s so time consuming, but I feel it’s worth it because the rewards are endless.” DeeDee, who has also served as president, agrees, saying, “I wake up every morning and thank God that I can continue to do this.” Anyone who is interested in joining the Council of Catholic Women who work nonstop for a variety of worthy causes can call 954783-5122. Thank you for all that you do for your community and beyond. Catholic WomenContinued from page 10 Cost is $10 for Chamber members who RSVP by Oct. 1 and $15 for non-members. 954~941-2940. 10-4 – Breakfast N’ Deer eld from 7:30 to 9 a.m. at Deer eld Chamber of Commerce Banquet Hall, 1601 E Hillsboro Blvd. Featured speaker is Florida Senator Jeremy Ring. Cost is $12.50 for members and $17.50 for non-members. 954427-1050. 10-4 – Complimentary breakfast for seniors and up to two friends at Galuppi’s, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach, at 9:45 a.m. Dr. Paula Hedglon presents “Bringing Back Life To Seniors, Naturally.” Please RSVP by Oct. 2. 954-2492277. 10-5 – Boca Raton – The SightingsContinued from page 7 See SIGHTINGS on page 16

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The Pelican 13 Friday, September 28, 2012

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14 The PelicanFriday, September 28, 2012 system. This community has a few more months of living with a rock-pit and a charcoal ltering system. But everything is legal and permitted according to city hall. That wasn’t good enough for Robert Holmes, president of the Sanders Park Homeowners Association. “[Walmart] had a moral obligation to advise us of this project,” said Holmes. Attorney Susan Motley, on behalf of Walmart, said the residents had been noti ed. But when the addresses were reviewed, those who had received the 12 letters lived at least one-quarter mile east of the project. No one on the abutting street received noti cation. “Walmart did what they wanted to do without respect to the neighborhood,” said Holmes. Residents here have already experienced one shock. They found that dozens of sea grape trees that had served as noise and vision barriers to Walmart and I-95 had been removed. Congeniality would not describe Monday’s meeting. Said The Rev. Marguerite Luster, spokesperson for the Liberty Park Homeowners Association, “We had birds, butter ies and plants. Now we have erosion.” Luster wants the sea grape trees back in place. That won’t happen soon. Although a landscape plan for the completed project includes trees, sea grapes were not on the list. Oaks and Sabal Palms were recommended, but Mayor Lamar Fisher suggested the tree plan could be redrawn. Ed Phillips, former city commissioner, was more concerned about the proposed 20-foot deep retention pond that could be a danger to young children living in the neighborhood. On Wednesday, four young boys with shing poles had already hopped the fence. To their dismay, they were quickly spotted by Commissioner Woody Poitier who had been on location with Luster. One city of cial said there is no requirement for fencing the lake. In fact, he said, the lake is the buffer zone WalmartContinued from page 1 See WALMART on page 15Residents living on the shore of the rock pit are concerned about erosion. There are no plans for a seawall, Walmart will be replacing trees. [Staff photos]

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The Pelican 15 Friday, September 28, 2012 between Walmart and the community. Walmart, unlike more recent commercial projects, is not required to adhere to a city code that requires a strict buffer zone between the residential community and the commercial entity because Walmart was approved prior to the 1990 passage of a buffer code.WalmartContinued from page 14 Today, the code requires a 10-foot high “wall or opaque fence” with landscaping on both sides. Frustrated by a future of visual blight, noise pollution and possible erosion, Luster said she would continue her ght. “This problem is bigger than us,” she said. Four tanks provide charcoal ltration to polluted water prior to lling the rock pit. Some residents want this pit fenced in, calling it a danger to young children. Send your news to mdpelican@yahoo.com or 954-783-8700!

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16 The PelicanFriday, September 28, 2012 40th anniversary celebration of Boca Raton Christian School takes place Friday, Oct. 5 from 7 to 8:30 p.m. at Boca Raton Community Church Sanctuary, 601 NW 4 Ave. Free admission. 561391-2727. 10-7 – 16th Annual Dunn’s Run takes place at 7:30 a.m. at the main Deer eld Beach Parking lot located on Ocean Way and Southeast 2 Street and proceeds bene t the Boys & Girls Clubs of Broward County. Visit www.dunnsrun. com or call 954-563-2822. 10-16 – Wilton Manors Candidates Night at 7 p.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive. All four candidates for city commission will attend to answer questions. Refreshments will be served. 954-783-8700.SightingsContinued from page 12

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The Pelican 17 Friday, September 28, 2012 By Malcolm McClintockPELICAN STAFFSushi By The Sea238 E. Commercial Blvd. Lauderdale-By-The-Sea954-267-8819There is always a great pleasure in discovering an unassuming eatery that packs a stupendous culinary punch. In this particular case, the tiny and impeccably clean Sushi By The Sea delivers an astoundingly fresh array of made-to-order sushi offerings and, as a bonus, some mouthwatering Peruvian favorites on the side. The indefatigable husband and wife team of Michihiro Hirano and Vivian Ophelan have nurtured a surprisingly satisfying juxtaposition of traditional gastronomy from the former’s native Nippon and tempting delicacies from the latter’s home region in Peru. The gregarious Vivian studied at the world-renowned Johnson & Wales Culinary school and then at the Art Institute of Fort Lauderdale “but I really learned the most by working in Japanese restaurants. In fact, that is where I met my husband!” Indeed, the couple met at the now defunct Sagami Japanese restaurant where Michihiro, who also happens to have a degree in business, plied his trade as a Master Sushi Chef. After the birth of their second child, the epicurean duo decided to open their own restaurant in beautiful Lauderdale-By-TheSea. “The sushi boom of 1995Sushi By The Sea serves up authentic Japanese and Peruvian specialties on the sunny shores of Lauderdale-By-The-SeaSee SUSHI on page 18 This popular Bento Box version features salmon, snapper, eel, tuna and shrimp nigiri along with seaweed salad, kanisu, edamame and a sliced California roll. [Photos by Malcolm McClintock]

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18 The Pelican Friday, September 28, 2012 2005 led to too many sushi restaurants being opened. Unfortunately, this created a situation where the quality of the product got diluted,” laments Vivian. “For more than 17 years, my husband was trained by some of the top Masters in Tokyo and the U.S. That’s why I know that we offer the most authentic and traditionally prepared sushi anywhere around. And since we are small, we can keep the prices very reasonable.” For starters, Sushi By The Sea proposes a good selection of tantalizing appetizers such as pan-fried Gyoza beef dumplings, melt-in-yourmouth seared Tuna Tataki with Ponzu sauce, spicy octopus or conch salads, avocado with miso dressing or even a simple serving of Edamame with sea salt. Of course, a cornucopia of sushi rolls also makes an appearance on the menu. From Salmon California to the Spider with soft shell crab to the Scallop Volcano to the Lobster Feast, each will provide the deep satisfaction expected from an expertly and creatively prepared roll. “It takes a minimum of ten years apprenticeship to become a sushi master and even after that, you are not finished learning. Luckily, my own Master comes to visit me every Monday,” says Michihiro of his mentor Nobuyuki Higuchi [best known as Nobi]. “That’s why it is a great day to try our daily special because it will likely have been prepared by the Grand Master himself!” For those who appreciate the delicate simplicity of sashimi [sliced raw fish] or nigiri [sliced raw fish on rice], Michihiro’s bite-size masterpieces will titillate the senses with the clean, harmonious essence of his gastronomic deftness. “I go to the fish market myself to select my own seafood because I know exactly what to look for to ensure the highest quality. For example, I only buy Scottish salmon because it has a much richer texture and deeper flavors.” If a hot meal is desired, the outstanding chicken or salmon Teriyaki with rice are customer favorites. Served with either miso soup or Asian salad with ginger dressing, they provide a deeply satisfying meal at any time of the day. Also worth investigating is the wondrous Tempura Soba featuring hearty Udon noodles in a rich chicken broth topped with lightly battered and fried shrimp. Not to be outdone, Vivian is always on hand to whip up a tasty Peruvian style Shrimp & Red Snapper Ceviche bathing in a citrus and Andean pepper marinade. Customers also rave about the Parmesan cheese baked scallops with lime juice and parsley. “Personally, I really like our filet mignon sauted with onions, peppers and tomatoes over white rice,” says the mother of two who also emphasizes the availability of vegetarian dishes. Most sushi rolls are $4, combo platters around $10 and hot meals start at $5. Get a delectable entre with large Sake for $15! Several wines and Japanese beers are also available. Peruvian options are in the $8 to $12 range. Catering parties and office functions are specialties.SushiContinued from page 17 The best $5 lunch deal in town – a tender, avorful Teriyaki chicken breast and rice served with either miso soup or Asian salad with homemade ginger dressing.

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The Pelican 19 Friday, September 28, 2012 Connie Hoffmann, town manager, said the town is budgeting conservatively. “We have seen others that didn’t. [They] are getting into trouble,” she said. The town property tax accounts for 20 percent of the total tax bill. Other agencies, including Broward County and the Broward County School Board, account for the rest. “I wish the other 80 percent were as conscientious as we are,” said Commissioner Stuart Dodd. Commissioners also approved the town manager’s recommended annual budget of $20 million, up from $17.7 million. The budget includes a 50 percent reduction in the water utility tax, which cuts $145,000. Vice Mayor Scot Sasser said he would like to go after the rest of that tax in the new year. “I want to keep pressing to keep the tax rate as low as possible,” he said. The budget includes $5.9 million in capital improvements, including streetscape and drainage improvements and sewer repairs. About $1.5 million will go to improvements on Bougainvilla, 19th Street in Bel Air and in the Hibiscus Avenue, Allenwood Drive, Tropic Drive area. Work on Bougainvilla started this week. No debt funding is required. All the improvements are being made with existing funds. Parking revenues are up $571,000 over what was budgeted for this scal year. Those funds will be used for new parking on South Bougainvilla, re-con guring the A1A parking lot and a public safety lot. Parking revenues in the new year will be impacted by improvements planned on Commercial Boulevard and recon guring the A1A lot. The town has saved $100,000 by contracting out the parking operation, Hoffmann said. Commissioners earlier unanimously approved a re assessment fee for single-family residents of $130, the same as the current fee, and the fourth lowest in the county. The fees will raise $1 million for re protection services. LBTS TaxContinued from page 1“Phooning” Photo ContestPompano Beach – Festival Flea Market Mall is holding a “Phooning” photo contest until Oct. 21. “Phooning” is a pose where a person stands on one foot, tilted at the waist with one arm held out in front, the other bent behind. Photos can be taken of a person “phooning” and submit it to Festival Flea Market Mall’s Facebook page at www.facebook.com/ FestivalFleaMarket. Photos must be taken in front of the “phooning” backdrop. The contest is open to students, faculty, staff and parents associated with any public or private K-12 school in Broward, Miami-Dade or Palm Beach counties. Photos will be judged based on school spirit, originality and creativity. Finalists will be selected Oct. 22 through Nov. 1. Online voting will take place Nov. 3 through 16 and the winners will be announced Nov. 17. The school receiving the most votes will get $5,000 for its Parent Teacher Association. First and second runner-ups will receive $1,000 and $500. Visit www.festival. com for more information.

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20 The Pelican Friday, September 28, 2012 100-mile trekContinued from page 1journey spanning three or four days – and back again with the goal of raising about $2,500 for the American Cancer Society in Broward and Palm Beach counties. “It’s all about support for breast cancer. This is the longest [walk] by far. I’ve been training for a good part of eight months. I’ve walked 20 miles twice,” said Fitzpatrick, who will mostly travel along A1A and Federal Highway. “I’m an avid walker. I think it’s a health bene t, and maybe it will motivate other people to get out and walk.” Helping Fitzpatrick in his walk for breast cancer is Gabriel Bartice and the “Party Patrol” which will ride ahead of Fitzpatrick soliciting donations along the way. “One-hundred percent of the proceeds will go straight to breast cancer [research]. I think anybody will be impressed with anyone who can walk a hundred miles,” said Bartice, who volunteered with Fitzpatrick as a board member for the American Cancer Society’s Oakland Park Relay for Life, which occurred in April. “I am a cancer survivor myself. I had a rare form of pancreatic cancer. It affects one in two million and I was the one,” said Fitzpatrick, who learned about the full rami cations of his disease in an unusual way. “The doctor wrote on a cocktail napkin ‘it’s like changing your oil. You got to take this out, that out. The only thing is you can’t put anything back.’ I guess that cocktail napkin was the only thing he had in front of him,” said Fitzpatrick, who lost half his stomach, half his small intestine and half his pancreas during the 13-hour surgical procedure that ultimately saved his life. “I told them ‘don’t touch the liver,’” he joked. Bartice has also been touched by cancer but not as closely as Fitzpatrick. “My grandmother suffered from breast cancer and thank god she’s a survivor,” said Bartice, who mails his grandmother a shirt for each breast cancer walk he does “just to let her know that someone’s walking for her.” And on Saturday, Oct. 6 those wishing to donate further to the cause of ghting breast cancer can join Fitzpatrick and Batrice at a fundraiser at American Legion Post 222, 4250 NE 5 Ave., Oakland Park, from 6 to 10 p.m. Along with the American Cancer Society, the event bene ts Feeding America, which provides food assistance to needy individuals and families. The $20 entrance buys a night of live entertainment by The Ink Spots Generations and the Shambala Band and a pasta meal. For each person who attends, Ford will donate 40 meals to Feed America. To donate to Fitzpatrick’s walk or for more information about the charity event, call 954708-3765. Today Mike Fitzpatrick, left, takes the rst steps of his 100-mile journey from Oakland Park to Jupiter and back again. The goal of the walk is to raise $2,500 to bene t the American Cancer Society in Broward and Palm Beach counties. Gabriel Bartice, right, will be riding ahead of Bartice during the walk to solicit funds. [Staff Photo]By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach – Mayor Lamar Fisher had one main message for those who attended the State of the City Address yesterday: redevelopment is a big part of the city’s recent past, its present and its future. Fisher, who said he was excited about the progress the city was making in reshaping itself, said developers, small businesses and city government were all working Mayor touts redevelopment in State of the City address See CITY on page 21FISHER

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The Pelican 21 Friday, September 28, 2012 The Pelican 954-783-8700 Gallegos. According to the city, re nancing and the increase in property values led to a lower parks debt service rate, 0.2508, and city hall debt service rate, 0.5029. Those debts and the operating millage rate of 6.2068 combined to make the total tax assessment 6.9605 mils. Taxable property values increased by 3.63 percent in Wilton Manors. That increase led to an additional $140,000 in revenue for the city’s budget. Overall, taxable value rose county-wide by 1.48 percent. As part of the budget, commissioners gave themselves a $50-a-month raise, something that hasn’t happened in eight years, and gave the general employees a one percent cost of living adjustment. While Vice Mayor Tom Green and Commissioner Julie Carson voted against the raise, some residents expressed support for giving commissioners an even bigger increase. Currently, commissioners make $7,200 a year and the mayor makes $8,400. With the increase, commissioners will make $7,800 and the mayor $9,000. “It’s not a great budget, but it’s a good budget,” said Green. But while congratulating city staff, commissioners also expressed worries about the budgets that have yet to be formulated – especially the future costs of re and emergency services, pensions and the possible loss of $650,000 in revenue that stems from communications taxes. Wilton Manors ratesContinued from page 9to redevelop various existing buildings and empty pieces of land throughout Pompano. Speaking to members of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce at the Elks Lodge, Fisher went through a list of public and private projects that were either recently finished, in the process of being built or are on the drawing board including: two new fire stations, the Broward County Library and Civic Campus to be built next to city hall, redevelopment of the Pompano Pier, streetscape and parking improvements along Atlantic Boulevard, plans to revamp and redesign the Atlantic Boulevard Intracoastal bridge and the city’s planned Martin Luther King Boulevard retail development which broke ground recently. “We’re in the process of redesigning the Atlantic Boulevard Bridge. That is going to make a dynamic impact on our community,” said Fisher. The two new fire stations include Fire Station 11, located north of Atlantic Boulevard on the beach, and a new one to be built in the Cresthaven neighborhood. “The [current] Fire Station 11 is over 50 years old,” he said, adding that the city specifically raised fire assessment fees to fund the construction of the Cresthaven station.CityContinued from page 20Private redevelopment includes the recently completed Publix on Atlantic Boulevard, which the mayor dubbed the signature project along Atlantic Boulevard, a planned Madison’s Steakhouse on Atlantic Boulevard next to the Intracoastal, a new Marriott on the beach currently under construction and the Whole Foods going into the former Kmart at Copans Road and Federal Highway. The breakfast is an annual event of the Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce. This year’s breakfast sponsor was iberiabank. For more information about chamber membership, call 954-0412940.

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22 The Pelican Friday, September 28, 2012 Classi eds Call 954-545-0013 Call The Pelican at 954-783-8700! HELP WANTEDAFRAID OF DOWNSIZING? Start building a business to supplement your income. Great earnings potential on a part-time basis with Primerica. Call 954729-0192. 9-7SEEKING EMPLOYMENTHHA – I Will Take Excellent Care Of The Elderly / Companion Aid – Experienced & Certi ed / Have References. Call 845-709-5275. 10-5 HHA – Seeks Live In Or Out. Will Do Light Housekeeping, Prepare Meals, Doctor’s Visit. Speak English. US Citizen. Experienced. References Available. Willing To Travel. 561-908-1017. 9-28 CAREGIVER / COMPANION Caucasian Woman With 25 Yrs. Exp. To Assist & Care For Your Loved Ones. Days / Eves / Nights. References Available. 954-482-5494. 9-28 HOME HEALTH AIDE – Hortense Steadman, Private, Certi ed, Providing Loving And Professional Care. Honest & Reliable. Affordable Rates. References Available. 954678-7754. LPN AT CNA PRICES! Will Drive To Dr. Appointments, Lunch, Shopping, Etc. East Broward Area Only! 954-8957850. 10-5 CNA / HHA – I OFFER GOOD PROFESSIONAL CARE For Your Loved One! 28 Years Experience. References – Reliable. Please Call 954805-4545. 9-28 MALE CNA / HHA / COMPANION. Broward County Area. Former EMT. All Certi cations / Compassionate, References. Call Ron 954-2322832. Very Reasonable! 9-28 SERVICES DANNY BOY ELECTRIC – Lic & Insured. Lic. #EC13004811. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. 24/Hr Service. 954-290-1443. Beat Any Written Estimate. Sr, Discount. 10-19 GOT JUNK? TRASH HAULING – CONDO CLEANUPS – Trees – Landscape – Yard Fill – Pressure Wash – Roofs – Home Repairs – Welding – Etc. Dave 954-818-9538. 9-28 HANDYMAN – PAINTING – CARPENTRY – Pressure Cleaning. Decks! Everything Around The House. No Job Too Small. FREE Estimates! Call 561-350-3781. 9-28 GINGERS HOUSEKEEPING – 20 YRS EXP. (Licensed) References Available. Honest & Reliable – Love To Clean Windows! Refrigerators – Ovens – No Problem. FREE Estimates. 954-200-4266. 105 HONEST HANDYMAN – HOME & BUILDING Maintenance/Improvements. No Job Too Small. Fast Friendly Service. Reasonable Rates. Local Resident/Homeowner. Call Today For Your FREE Upfront Quote. No Deposit Required. 754-366-1915. 928 GARAGE SALESHUGE CHARITY YARD SALE SAT. SEPT. 29 –8amNoon. Collectibles, Electronics, Furniture, Clothing, Linens. Balistreri Realty 1350 N Federal Hwy. Pompano Beach. (Rear Parking Lot) BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIESNew GREEN technology. New defroster control saves energy in home refrigerators, commercial chillers. Patented. All optical. Simple mfg. Strategic partners needed..www.NewAvionics.Com. 954-568-1991. C MUSICIANS WANTEDThe America Legion Symphonic Band is now accepting new members for the 2012-2013 season. College age to “seasoned Seniors” are welcome. Rehearsals are held on Wed. evening at American Legion Post 142 in Pompano. Clarinet, bass clarinet, bassoon, French horn, baritone, trombone and percussion players are especially needed. If you enjoy “making music”, call Jim McGonigal, Music Director at 954-647-0700. CMOBILE HOMESDEERFIELD DOUBLE WIDE 2 / 2 – TIDEWATER ESTATES 55+. Background / Credit Check Required. $685 Mo Lot Rent. $5,000 Firm. 954-4260500. 10-5 HOMES FOR RENTLIGHTHOUSE POINT Spacious 2/2 Furn. + Library / Office. Breakfast Bar With Den Off Kitchen. Large Covered Patio. Pool. Many Amenities. 954-8182388. 9-28 ROOMS FOR RENTPOMPANO PVT ROOM & BATH $500 Month. Includes Utilities, Cable, Internet. Walking Distance To Shopping. Call 954-793-1363. 9-28 REAL ESTATE WANTEDI BUY HOUSES!! CASH!! AS IS! QUICK CLOSE! ANY AREA – ANY CONDITION! NO EQUITY OK. CALL NOW 954-914-2355. 10-19 DUPLEXESLIGHTHOUSE POINT E Of Federal. Updated Cozy 1 / 1 Duplex. Washer/Dryer. Screened Porch. Small Pet. Lovely Landscaping. $850 Monthly. 954-804-2296. 9-28 POMPANO BEACH E OF Federal Hwy. 2/1 – Enclosed Porch W/Washer & Dryer. Central Air. New Tile Floors. No Pets $1,100 Mo. 954-8229395. 10-19 CONDOS FOR SALEPOMPANO BEACH DIRECT INTRACOASTAL! Feels Like You’re On A Boat. Pool On Intracoastal. Wrap-A-Round Balcony. Spacious 1 / 1.5 $178K. Also For Rent $1350 Month. 954-588-0562. 10-12 POMPANO BEACH Sea Haven. Magni cent Waterfront Resort Type Condos. Covered Parking. 2 Blocks Beach. Heated Pool, Security. 1 / 1.5 & 2 / 2 – Screened Balcony. From $110K. Coldwell Banker 954-629-1324. 10-12CONDOS FOR RENTFT LAUDERDALE ICW Gated Community. 1 / 1.5 – Furnished / Unfurnished. Granite, Wood Floors, Lots Of Amenities. Great Location. No Pets. $950 Month. Call 954588-1644. 9-28 POMPANO BEACH Sea Haven 1 / 1.5 or 2 / 2. Walk To Beach. Covered Parking. Security. Heated Pool. Exercise Room. BBQ. Resort Type Waterfront Complex. From $900. Call 954-629-1324.

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The Pelican 23 Friday, September 28, 2012 Classi eds Call 954-545-0013 Pelican Classi eds work for you! POMPANO BEACH 55+ Community. Renovated 2 / 1 Pool! Sunroom – Ground Floor, Beautifully Furnished. On Golf Course. $750 Mo. 1 Year +. Good Credit. 917-5440771. 9-28 POMPANO BEACH 1 Block To Ocean – 1/1 Fully Furnished. Flat Screens, DVD, Pool, Laundry, Private Parking, BBQ. Monthly Thru December $850. 954-540-9724. 9-28 LIGHTHOUSE PT 2 / 2 ---1st Floor – 55+. Pool, Storage, Laundry Facilities. $895 Month / Water Included. Dorothy Bassano – Better Homes & Gardens Real Estate. 954-5624919. 9-28 POMPANO INTRACOASTAL AT IT’S BEST. Breathtaking Views! Feels Like You’re On A Boat, Pool Deck On Intracoastal. Spacious 1 / 1.5 $1350 Month. A1A S.E. Corner – Unobstructed Views. 2/2 $1,500 Month. 954-588-0562. LEISUREVILLE 55+ 2 / 1 Unfurnished / Furnished $795 / $875 1st & Last. 1st Floor. Free Golf – By Pool / Clubhouse. 954-590-8177. 9-28 POMPANO BEACH FURNISHED 1 / 1.5 On Intracoastal / Canals. Tile Floors. Ceiling To Floor Windows / GREAT Views! $975 Month Yearly Lease. 954-7857571 Or 954-649-4373. APTS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH 1 BR & 2 BR APTS FOR RENT. Remodeled, Paint, Tile, Etc. Washer / Dryer On Site. Pool. Pet Friendly. George 954809-5030. POMPANO MCNAB RD & NE 18 AVENUE – 1 & 2 Bedrooms Furnished / Unfurnished. $650 $895 And Up. Pool, Tile Floors. Central A / C. 954-610-2327. 9-28 BOX B OLD POMPANO 1 / 1 APT. $700 Month Yearly Lease. Pool, Off Federal Hwy. Pet OK! Call Anthony 954-857-5207. 10-5 POMPANO BEACH 1/1 $650 – NW – NE 2/1 $950 – 2/1,5 Townhouse -Pool $1095 SW 1/1 $750 – 2/1 $925 – 2/2 $950 – ALL FREE WATER. Rent + $70 App Mov-U-In. 954781-6299. POMPANO ATLANTIC / FEDERAL Efficiency $175 Week. No Security. Cable, Electric, Internet, FREE W / D. Good Job. No Drug Charges. No Evictions. 954-709-0694. 9-28 LAUDERDALE BY THE SEA 1 / 1 Ground Floor. Central A / C. Parking Out Back Door. Laundry, Courtyard. 200 Steps Beach. $1,100. 954-8685560 Wayne. 10-19 BEST DEAL IN POMPANO BEACH – Efficiency With Kitchen, Laundry & Pool. No Pets. Weekly – Monthly – Season. 500’ To Beach. 954294-8483 Or 248-736-1533. POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 Bedroom From $500. Easy Move-in. 1/2 OFF DEPOSIT. Remodeled. Great Location. 954-783-1088 For More Info. 12-14 COMMERCIAL FOR RENT-SALEPOMPANO COMMERCIAL OFFICE Spaces Available. Ranging From As Low As $500 To $700 Depending On Square Footage. Please Call Darci At 954-7833723. 10-5 DEERFIELD BEACH – Retail Of ce Warehouse – 700 Sq Ft With Loft. A/C, Bathroom. $575 Per Month. Call For More Info 561-654-1331 Or 561-9985681. 10-19

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24 The Pelican Friday, September 28, 2012 WORSHIP DIRECTORY: Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad. Rev. Hyvenson Joseph Entertainment LLC, Paragon has retro tted four old, failing movie houses, has built two new ones, and is in the process of renovating a seventh location. The theater here at Powerline Road and Hillsboro Blvd., is headquarters for Paragon Entertainment Group, LLC. Whalen is the CEO, Wilson is in charge of architectural design and Lightstone is senior vice president and head buyer for the Film Group, an entity that books lms for not only Paragon Theaters, but Muvico, Bow-Tie Cinemas and Rave Cinemas. Whalen, whose background is in nance, was CEO of Muvico from 2006-09 and initiated the concept of stateof-the-art theaters. Later, he was responsible for the sale of four Muvico locations, including Airport Road in Boca Raton, to Cinemark for $50 million. He is a resident of Parkland. Wilson, an architect, was in charge of corporate development at Muvico at about the same time and created Muvico’s signature, themed images. He lives in Boca Raton. Lightstone began his career at United Artists and established the strongest lm-buying department in the industry. He served as COO before founding his own Denverbased production and distribution company, New Deal Pictures. The brand they are offering the public gives them luxury amenities at traditional movie prices. They do this by retro tting existing theaters and retail space that has become available due to high vacancy rates. Where they do new builds, they look for other entertainment opportunities such as bowling. The company opened its rst theater in April 2010 in Fredericksburg, VA with 12 high-de nition digital screens, VIP seating, a bar and lounge, a 16-lane bowling alley and gourmet restaurant. The second theater opened two months later in Coconut Grove in an old AMC venue that underwent a $4 million upgrade. In 2011, Paragon acquired and renovated two theaters in Minnesota. That same year in May, it opened the 8-screen theater in Deer eld Beach once owned by General Cinema and then Sunrise Theaters. The space was completely renovated with The Lot Bar and Lounge, PepsiMax Extreme Theater for 3D offerings, Sony 4K digital projections, VIP luxury seating, expanded food offering and reserved seating. According to a Paragon news release, sales are up over 50 percent from previous levels. Newest locations are at Ocean Walk Shoppes in Daytona Beach and in Newport News, both currently being renovated. Whalen wants to add a community component to the theaters offering special viewings for charity and space for corporate and private parties. Recently Sheriff Al Lamberti picked Paragon for a political fundraiser. Several schools and youth groups have held functions here as well. He also arranged at the request of City Commissioner Ben Preston for a special showing this summer of “Red Tails” for a group of local teenagers. Next Sunday, Oct. 7, 2 p.m., the Deer eld Beach Rotary Club will raise money for its charities by selling $10 tickets to “Taken 2,” the story of a retired CIA agent whose former wife is kidnapped in Istanbul by individuals he confronted in the 2008 movie “Taken.” The lm stars Liam Neeson, Famke Janssen and Maggie Grace. The club will realize $4 for every ticket sold and 50 percent of food and bar sales from an expanded menu that includes atbreads, pulled pork sandwiches, quesadillas, a chipotle chicken wrap, fries, and a killer brownie dessert. “We hope the theater will be utilized more,” Niki Wilson said. “There is indoor and outdoor seating areas and enough lobby and patio space to stage parties.” ParagonContinued from page 5Help for seniorsBroward – The County’s Elder Helpline is administered by the Aging and Disability Resource Center of Broward County. Bilingual staff, able to respond to calls in English, Creole Spanish, are available from 8 a.m. until 5 p.m. Monday through Friday to provide assistance regarding programs and services for Broward residents 60 years of age and older. To reach the Elder Helpline, call 954-7459779. Pelican Classi eds save you money! 954-Send your news to mdpelican@ yahoo.com

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The Pelican 25 Friday, September 28, 2012 Tell The Pelican about your news! mdpelican@ yahoo.com or 954783-8700! Sal’s Towing of Oakland Park has offered to provide free transportation home for those who may not feel t to drive, and the nearby Days Inn Hotel at Oakland Park Boulevard/I-95 offers discounted Oktoberfest rates for the weekend. Long-time presenting sponsors Lipton Toyota/Scion and the city of Oakland Park are joined by Broward Health Imperial Point. Other sponsors include the Ambry Restaurant, Around Town Newspaper, Algae to Omega, AOW Select, Central Bark Doggy DayCare, Days Inn, FPL, Holy Cross Hospital, Pelican Newspaper, Sal’s Towing, S. Mark Graphics, The Agenda/ GuyMag.com, and TSAO Design Group. For sponsorships, vendor opportunities, activities schedule and other information, visit www.oaklandparkmainstreet.com, which includes a link to the event’s Facebook page. Or call Constantine at 954-565-2627 or 754-2140041. Adult admission is a $5 donation, and children 12 and under are admitted free. Free off-site parking is available at city lots. OktoberfestContinued from page 7Pelican Classi eds save you money! 954-783-8700!

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26 The Pelican Friday, September 28, 2012 an old friend.” According to Jalbert some employees that she knew were not told until Monday they should not come to work. The Grill was owned by Restaurant Holdings LLC in Delray Beach along with The Banana Boat and Prime Catch in Boynton Beach. A familyrun operation, Luke Therien said it had become difficult for his father John to manage the business from his home in Palm Beach. “We had 15 good years there and we built that restaurant from the ground up.” Therien said mounting competition from steakhouses in Boca Raton hurt business in northeast Broward. Along with the recession, it was the high number of high end restaurants that opened within a 15-minute drive that closed the doors at Fifth. “Our draw was from south Boca. Can you count the number of steakhouses that have opened in the Boca corridor? You are talking about at least seven highend restaurants. In order to compete we had to bring down our prices because the people who want to spend good money on steak are in Boca. “But we had a good bar business until the end.” Buyer of the property is Fred Hunter Funeral Homes another family-operated company with funeral homes in Fort Lauderdale, Davie/ Cooper City and Hollywood and well as a crematorium and a cemetery. This location will be its first in north Broward. After renovating the building they plan to open by the end of the year Therien said. The demise of the restaurant FifthContinued from page 4 See FIFTH on page 27

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The Pelican 27 Friday, September 28, 2012 also disturbs Gil Pierson who, like his LHP neighbors, has been a regular there. “I had heard they were trying to sell it for some time,” he said. “But I didn’t it expect to close without warning. I’ve been going there 15 years. It was one of the nicest places we had around here.” According to the tax rolls, the location is assessed at $1.7 million by the county tax appraiser and in 2011 the owner paid $34,000 in property taxes. Several weeks ago a restaurant that predated Fifth Avenue by many years, Fin and Claw, closed its doors in the Shoppes at Beacon Light. And this week, one of the Shoppes’ longtime tenants Pat Anderson is closing her art shop Saturday night. Anderson, well-known for her tropical designs, also owned a retail clothing and gift store in the Shoppes which she closed last year after her husband Pete died. “I could not be an artist and a business person too,” Anderson said. “I had not painted in two years!” To reduce her art shop inventory, Anderson is selling everything at deep discounts today and tomorrow. Anderson admits that the reason for her getting out of retail is the “lack of business” but she also says, “I want to share my art so I will be much more accessible.” She will continue to design a Christmas ornament for the Hillsboro Lighthouse Preservation Society and work with the historic McDougald House. So also has become involved with a cultural arts society in The Keys that envisions embellishing the Overseas Highway with colorful art. FifthContinued from page 26Boaters wanted for Holiday Boat ParadePompano Beach – Own a boat? Want to show it off? The Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce is looking for boats to be part of its 50th Annual Pompano Beach Holiday Boat Parade. Entry is free and every boat that participates will receive a hand-painted collectible glass ornament designed by local artist Pat Anderson. Big and small boats with few or many decorations will be accepted. The parade will be held Sunday, Dec. 9 starting at 6 p.m. Sponsorship opportunities are also available. To enter, call 954-941-2940.Sushi celebrationLauderdale-By-The-Sea – Sushi By The Sea, 238 E. Commercial Blvd., is celebrating its 1st anniversary on Monday, Oct. 1 from 7 to 9 p.m. There will be free maki and sake and live music. Call 954-267-8819.

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Friday, September 28, 2012 Vol. XX, Issue 39 Wherever you are, read The Pelican @ pompanopelican.com Send news to siren2415@gmail.com Pompano Beach Deer eld Beach Lighthouse Point Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Wilton Manors Oakland Park Hillsboro Beach The Galt Palm Aire The Pelican Pelican 60 days left in 2012 Hurricane season Members of the Oakland Park Garden Club transformed parking spaces into a park-like center on PARK(ing) Day recently. The event took place at Oakland Park Boulevard and Northeast 6 Avenue. From left are Laurence Pengelly, club secretary; Bonnie Seibert, president; and Linda Gordon, treasurer. The group meets at 6:30 p.m. the third Tuesday of the month at Jaco Pastorius Community Center, 1098 NE 40 Court. [Staff photo by Judy Vik] Property values on the rise so millage is slightly reduced By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFLauderdale-By-The-Sea Town commissioners unanimously agreed to lower the millage rate to the recommended 3.9312 during a special public hearing Monday. The rate was the same as tentatively approved Sept. 12. The tax rate is down from the current rate of 3.9999 and is fourth lowest in the county. Property values in LBTS are $1.761 billion, a 1.7 percent increase from this years $1.759 billion, the rst increase since 2007-2008. With the increase in values, the lower tax rate will raise the same amount of revenues as last year, Tony Bryan, nance director, noted. See LBTS TAX on page 19 Oakland Park resident embarks on 100mile journey for cancer ghtBy Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFOakland Park Mike Fitzpatrick has done plenty of walks to raise money and awareness to ght against breast cancer, but never one that lasted 100 miles. Today starting at Big Dog Station in Oakland Park, Fitzpatrick, an Oakland Park resident, will be walking to Jupiter a 100-mile See 100-MILE TREK on page 20But city says its all legalBy Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach When residents on NW 21 Ct. woke up Monday, they saw four 25-foot tanks within 50 feet of their homes. The tanks were lined up in back of Walmart on Copans Road. Large valves and hoses connected the tanks. On Tuesday, residents met with Walmart representatives, Mayor Lamar Fisher, an engineer from Kimley-Horn and other city of cials to get some answers. Lucas Anthony from KimleyHorn explained that the work and the equipment were staged for drainage improvements to the Walmart Shopping Center. He said oil and Residents want relief from Walmarts drainage project, tree removal fuel leaks from cars in the parking lot combined with automobiles from Mercedes-Benz and Champion Motors dealerships have impacted the water quality for years. Flooding has been an issue on the property since its construction in the late 80s. During Hurricane Irene, several cars were ooded, and pools of water after a rain are common. The tanks, on lease from Carbonair, are charcoal ltering mechanisms positioned to clean polluted ground water from the runoff. In preparation for the project, which will be completed early next year, two ponds behind Walmart have been drained, deepened and expanded as retention ponds for a new drainage See WALMART on page 14 RMA gets continuing contract to market culinary districtBy Judy VikPELICAN STAFF Oakland Park City commissioners have approved a $254,615 contract with Redevelopment Management Associates, RMA, to implement a ve-year redevelopment plan and to market downtown as a culinary district. The agreement calls for another $150,000 for incentives and marketing collaterals to promote development in the CRA. In July, commissioners authorized an agreement with RMA to complete a general review of the citys CRA See RMA on page 9 Sushi in Lauderdale-By-The-Sea. See page 17.

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2 The PelicanFriday, September 28, 2012 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach When he was a young teen, Jeff Graves learned the intricacies of embroidery and threaded a complex, colorful design on the back of a denim jacket. Jump ahead several decades and he is doing the same type of artwork using high-tech computer software instead of a metal hook.Keeping up with the times, photographer creates ne digital art works Photographer Jeff Graves has created a series of ne digital art pieces depicting south Florida. Thats typical of the Deer eld Beach photographer who has always evolved in his work place as the graphics industry evolved. Backed up by the latest computer programs, Graves is now creating ne digital art works. It is tedious and time consuming, but the result is a photograph or other image that is markedly enhanced with minute brushstrokes, See GRAVES on page 3

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The Pelican 3 Friday, September 28, 2012 Advertise with The Pelican 954-783-8700!custom backgrounds and vivid colors. For years, he worked with markers and pens to be a freehand illustrator. But this digital age has brought him new options. The computer, he says, actually releases his creative juices while being far less messy than traditional oils, markers or water colors. Nowadays, his airbrush is a special pen that he moves across a digital art pad. If you have a creative hand, you can do anything you want, Graves said showing off the blunt-edged instrument. Graves can start with a template the outline of an image and add his own special brush strokes, colors and background, draw original art, or enhance photographs such as the ones with this article of his friends Ann Marie and Charley Termini of Pompano Beach. [Right] In his self-contained studio, Graves can print the digital art onto either special paper or canvas and secure it to a frame in a relatively short time. A native of Chicago, Graves was educated at College of DuPage and earned his master craftsman degree in applied science at Columbia College. He went to work as a staff photographer for Chicago Bridge and Iron, a builder of industrial and nuclear structures. It was a job that took him to more than 30 countries and into dangerous locations where he photographed some of the worlds largest manmade installations. Along the way, always inventive, he experimented with new lm, new cameras, new methods of developing prints. He arrived in Deer eld Beach July 4, 1999, in time to see the reworks, he said. Since then, he has moved into lm making, editing and video work staying ahead of the eld each time new technology comes along. He is also a well-known gure around the area working civic and charity functions. Now, he has a body of his new work ready for public display. It is a series of south Florida scenes subjects as ordinary as the city hall clock tower or as exotic as an Indian alligator wrestler. Because his material costs are minimal, these originals sell for far less than what might be expected and can be viewed on his website www. jaguarcomm.com. GravesContinued from page 2

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4 The PelicanFriday, September 28, 2012 See FIFTH on page 26 Fun-lovers sad to see Fifth Avenue Grill close its doorsBy Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFLighthouse Point The abrupt closing of the Fifth Avenue Grill this week has left a saddened community. It was a surprise, said LHP Mayor Fred Schorr. The food was very good, the atmosphere was great I am sad to see them go. Opened here around 1998, the restaurant was known for its prime rib and summer lobster specials. The plantation -style building at 4650 N. Federal Highway had become iconic a gathering place for residents of the tri-cities: LHP, Pompano Beach and Deerfield Beach. The succinct message, Meet me at 5 at the Fifth, confirmed many a happy hour date. Schorr remembers it for having a large selection of very good wines stored on the second floor where the proper temperature was insured by a special generator. And that is a beautiful bar. I wonder what will happen to that? the mayor said. Later this week the answer became clear. The contents of the building will be auctioned Tuesday, Oct. 2. Both Cheryl Jalbert and Marge Hanley said they were at the Fifth the day it opened and thereafter celebrated their birthdays there, Jalberts just a few weeks ago. I am going to miss the place terribly, Hanley said. No place will match it for convenience. I was there Saturday night. It was so comfortable. Her 85th birthday was toasted at the Fifth in May. The restaurant closed its door after serving dinner Sunday with apparently no notice to its employees. Monday morning a handmade sign saying Building Sold covered the familiar monument marker on the highway. My family is visiting this week and my daughter loved the prime rib there. I bet she thought we would have dinner there tonight, Hanley said. For some reason I thought the place would never close, said Jalbert. Many of us in Lighthouse Point are not at all happy. I feel very sad. Jalbert said that she was close with some of Fifths longtime employees. Its like losing

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The Pelican 5 Friday, September 28, 2012 Rotary Club among the rst to enjoy new venueBy Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach Three men experienced in the movie-theater business have formed a partnership that continues to change the way people think about going to the movies. Its no longer about what to do on a rainy day. Its no longer about a bag of popcorn, a box of Milk Duds and gum on the oor. Movie-going today has become an outing enhanced by the latest lm technology, upscale surroundings, premium seating, adult game rooms, expanded menus, VIP screenings, a glass of wine or beer and in some cases the option to bowl or enjoy a cocktail in a full-service lounge. Said Niki Wilson, marketing director for Paragon Theaters headquartered in Deer eld Beach, Here, its about the experience and big luxurious seats at half the price. Paragon is one of the companies taking moviegoing to a higher level. Under the leadership of Michael Whalen, Mike Wilson and Hank Lightstone, all former executives with Muvico Upscale movie experience now available in Deer eld BeachExterior of the Paragon Theater in Deer eld Beach shows a slick, new face.Rotary bene t What Showing of Taken 2. When Sunday, Oct. 7, 2 p.m. Where Paragon Theater, 3984 W. Hillsboro Blvd. Who Liam Neeson, Famke, Janssen, Maggie Grace. Why To raise money for Deer eld Beach Rotary Charities. To reserve tickets at $10 each, call 561-213-6493. See PARAGON on page 24

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6 The PelicanFriday, September 28, 2012 Deer eld Beach, Pompano Beach, Lighthouse Point, LauderdaleBy-The-Sea, Wilton Manors and Oakland ParkWilton Manors Oakland Park Hillsboro Beach The Pompano Pelican is published weekly on FridaysStreet Address: 1500-A E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, FL 33060 Telephone: 954-783-8700 Fax: 954-783-0093Letters to the Editor are encouraged and accepted for print if signed, although a writers name will be withheld on request; letters must also include a daytime telephone number. Advertising rates are available upon request. Subscription rate is $31.80 including tax for one years delivery in Greater Pompano Beach; $95.40/per year including tax for others in the United States; call 954-783-8700 for rates abroad. The Pelican is a nonpartisan newspaper and reserves the right to decline advertising. Copyright 2012. Reproduction of this publication in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission of the publisher. The Pelican is a member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, Deer eld Beach Chamber and the LBTS Chamber. The Pelican is a state certi ed woman-owned minority business. The Pelican is delivered to businesses, libraries, schools, of ces, hospitals, news racks and single family homes. All advertising and copy is published at the sole discretion of the publisher. We welcome your critiques and ideas concerning this publication. Anne Siren, publisherExecutive Assistant: Mary Hudson Graphics: Rachel Ramirez Windsheimer Bookkeeper: John White Classi eds: Fran Shelby Contributing Writers: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Judy Wilson, Malcolm McClintock, Judy Vik, Michael dOliveira Account Executives: Paul Shroads, Carolyn Mann, Bill Heaton, Bill Fox Special Of ce Assistant: Cathy Siren ESTABLISHED 1993 Volume XX, Issue 39 Founding Editor and PublisherAnne Hanby Siren OpinionRegister to vote before Oct. 9 and vote on Nov. 6 Walmart on Copans Road may be a giant corporation, but in Pompano Beach, the store just became a bad neighbor. The problem began with a drainage project, planned months ago. Now it is a nightmare to the residents whose homes abut the Walmart property. Heres why. Without warning or notice, dozens of shade trees disappeared from around two retention ponds that lie between Walmart and the residents on Northwest 21 Avenue. Without warning, four charcoal lter tanks upwards of 25 feet high and half as wide, appeared within 50 feet of some of these homes. Water was drained from the two retention ponds and dumped into another pond raising the sea level too high for comfort during the hurricane season. The tanks are used to clean ground water than has been polluted over the years from rainwater runoff from the parking lot. Fuel leaks from vehicles at Mercedes-Benz and Champion Motors are part of these spills. We know that cleaning ground water is a necessary chore for lots such as Walmart. This is a clean-up operation. Whats the big secret? There is no buffer between the homes and the store, so the work that is going on is out in the open. With these homes in such close proximity, we wonder how far the soil contamination goes. And so do the residents who live there. Through no fault of their own, their own properties could be at risk. None of this had to happen if the right people had been informed, and that would be the people living right next to Walmart. They were not. Walmart has an obligation to prove to the neighbors that their soil has not been contaminated from fuel spill-offs. They should build a safety fence around these 20-foot-deep lakes that will attract children, especially on hot summer days. This is an opportunity for the giant corporation to create a new and safe environment for those who live on the borders of Walmart. The opportunity is at hand. I know the people who are leading this battle for their environment, their quality of life and for their children. They are good people; they are people of faith, and they are courageous. But they are not doormats. No one should tolerate this kind of arrogance aimed at this or any community. But when mutual respect and responsibility come to the table, the right forward steps can begin. If arrogance and money continue to rule the day, nothing will come other than a continued battle. And my points are not going to be with Walmart.Walmart can still do right by the residents who are their neighbors

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The Pelican 7 Friday, September 28, 2012 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFOakland Park With October just around the corner, its time for Oktoberfest in Oakland Park, the largest of its kind in Broward or Miami-Dade counties and one of the most popular in Florida, according to Siegi Constantine, executive director of Oakland Park Main Street. The annual event is set for Friday, Oct. 5, and Saturday, Oct. 6, at Jaco Pastorius Park, 4000 N. Dixie Highway. Hours are 5 to 11 p.m. Friday and 1 to 11 p.m. Saturday. Everything about our Oktoberfest is authentic Areas largest Oktoberfest ready to roll out the beer barrel, German food and musicfrom the food and beer to the bands performing traditional Bavarian party music, Constantine said. We have increased our entertainment budget to book one of the nations nest Oktoberfest bands, the Alpine Express. More than 10,000 people are expected to attend, so large amounts of authentic German food and beer will be available, as well as plenty of dance space under large tents. Hans Huber, owner of the award-winning Ambry Restaurant in Fort Lauderdale, will operate the Bavarianstyle Biergarten offering a selection of popular German favorites such as bratwurst, knockwurst, spicy currywurst, haxen semmel (roast pork), goulash soup, sauerkraut and German potato salad. Baked pretzels, brotchen and apple strudel also will be for sale. In addition to soft drinks, a selection of German wines, avored schnapps and authentic German -brewed Tucher Oktoberfest beers will be available, including a commemorative 32-ounce mug. Oktoberfest is meant to be a celebration for all ages, and we encourage a lot of singing and dancing, said Eric Waters, city special event coordinator. Performances are planned by the Edelweiss Schuhplattler Dancers, a childrens dance troupe, and the original Auerhahn Schuhplattler Dancers, an adult troupe. Also scheduled are the popular Dachshund Dash, a race for about 50 dachshunds; Oktoberfest games and contests, beer stein races and an apple strudel eating contest. The Broward Sheriffs Of ce will exhibit their K-9 unit featuring trained German shepherds performing various police drills on command. A special attraction will be Oakland Parks own Lindsey Way, Miss Hooters International 2011. See OKTOBERFEST on page 25 10-1 Preschool Storytime from 10:30 to 11 a.m. at Richard C. Sullivan Public Library, 500 NE 26 St., Wilton Manors. Ages two to ve. 954-390-2195. 10-3 Friends of the Wilton Manors Library Board meeting at 6:30 p.m. at the library, 500 NE 26 Street. 954-390-2195. 10-3 Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce hosts Business With A Twist from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at Two Georges at the Cove, 1754 SW 3 Ct., Deer eld Beach. See SIGHTINGS on page 12SightingsA community calendar for Northeast Broward County. Send your event information to mdpelican@yahoo.com

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8 The PelicanFriday, September 28, 2012 Business matters The Pelican takes a look at local business owners. You can tell your story here because business matters. 954-783-8700. By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFWere on staff at North Broward, Imperial Point and Holy Cross, says Dr. Waskin. We follow our patients from our of ce suite to the hospital. Because all of our records are electronic, we have instant and complete information on the health history of each patient available on our iPads. We can avoid duplication, wasted time, errors in diagnosis, and can share information quickly with each other and concerned family. Interviewed in his of ces at 2701 NE 14 St. in Pompano Beach, Dr. Waskin says, Ive been in practice here in Pompano Beach for 12 years. Our group consists of a very quali ed of ce staff, Megan Goitia, a licensed nurse practitioner who is my right arm, and me. We are an HMO and Medicare provider accepting most major insurances. Were proud of the care we provide. Our patient approach is prevention. Asked how he prevents serious health issues, he explains. Prevention relies on educating the patient to the important factors that cause major health problems. For example, serious heart problems are the result of many factors. He ticked off a few of the known causes for serious heart trouble blood pressure, cholesterol, weight, inherited tendencies and smoking. We try to eliminate the causes before the bad result happens. Each person has an individual health history which usually explains the symptoms that he or she comes to us with. We determine the source of the symptoms and hopefully teach the patient how to eliminate the symptoms and change the outcome for the better. As a trained doctor of osteopathic medicine, I treat Glen A. Waskin, D.O. and Megan Goitia, ARNP at Broward Family Medical Group have you covered 24/7the entire body, not just the symptoms. In fact, osteopathic medicine was created by a medical doctor who wanted to diagnose and treat core problems rather than the one resulting problem. And thats what we do here. We have physical therapy in the of ce. I am trained to treat musculoskeletal issues which means that we can sometimes nd and solve a problem right here in the of ce instead of referring a patient for unnecessary testing. Broward Family Medical Group serves all ages from children to seniors, including womens basic gynecology. An on-site lab means blood work and routine lab tests can be done in of ce, saving patients another stop. Megan Goitia is a family nurse practitioner, Board Certi ed by the ANCC, or American Nursing Credentials Center. She works under Dr. Waskins license and according to him, is his right arm. We see patients together and work as a team, she says. In Florida, we can do almost everything a physician can do. As it happens, we coordinate everything we do on our electronic medical record system. My specialty is diabetes and cardiovascular risk reduction. I do this by trying to prevent complications in these areas through education of the patient and monitoring areas of danger to control the condition. In keeping with a focus on prevention, Waskins and Goitia conduct frequent education seminars in their large reception area. Alerted through yers and advertising, attendance is high. Waskins says, We usually pack this area with about 30 patients who want to know more about diabetes, breast cancer, prostrate problems, cholesterol and more. We try to alert patients to recognize symptoms before they become big problems. In October a seminar is planned to discuss the new medicare bene ts for 2013. The doctor says the most frequently asked question is: How will the new health care plan affect me and my existing policy? He adds, Were meeting with different health plans right now to nd out what their new bene ts are so that we can present an unbiased seminar to enlighten the public. The window for changing plans Broward Family Medical Group includes a professional of ce staff under the direction of Glen a Waskin, D.O. and nurse practitioner, Megan Goitia. The team offers patient care and preventive medicine. An HMO and Medicare provider, most insurances are accepted. See MEDICAL GROUP on page 9 County bans misleading gas pricesBroward This month, Broward Commissioners banned misleading gas prices. Previously, some gas stations would advertise lower prices but when customers begin to pump they realized that the advertised price was cash only. Paying for gas should not be guess work. Now when you see a posted price at the gas station, youll know thats the most youll be charged. It should do away with the bait and switch practice of advertising one price if you pay with cash and a higher non-advertised price if you plan to use a credit or cash card, said Commissioner Lois Wexler. Failure to comply with the county ordinance will result in a ne of $250 for the rst violation and $500 for repeat violations.Youth soccer registrationOakland Park Registration is underway for the citys upcoming youth soccer season. All players must be between the ages of 4 and 16 as of November 12, 2012. The registration fee is $55 for residents and $100 for non-residents. Practices and games are held at the Wimberly Athletic Complex, Stevens Field and Northeast High School. Registration will end on October 12 or when the league is full. For more information, visit www. oaklandpark .gov or call 954630-4515. Send your news to mdpelican@ yahoo.com

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The Pelican 9 Friday, September 28, 2012 keeps shrinking. This year, the open period will be Oct. 15 to Dec.7. Our information will help patients decide what options HMO or private pay insurance plans offer and what might work best for them. Medications and co-pay costs are considerations.Patients give them thumbs upNaomi Lewis says going to Dr. Waskin four years ago was the best decision she ever made. I had very high blood pressure which he has put under control with medicine and counseling. I watch my weight by eating properly. He gets right to the point and keeps me in line because he cares, and I know it. Hes challenging, handles patients very well, and I cant say enough good things about him. Richard Romano calls Dr. Waskin, the doctor with golden hands. Ive been going to him for nine or 10 years. He diagnosed me with diverticulitis when I was already infected. He probably saved my life. I was hospitalized, and he saw me every day including Sundays. I also have a form of leukemia so he watches me carefully. He has sent me to specialists when something doesnt seem right. Hes a caring doctor, and his entire staff is the same. This group prides itself on its friendly and courteous of ce staff and exible hours to accommodate people who cant come in during the day because of work schedules. Patients who are sick will be seen without an appointment. Open Mon.,Tues.,Thurs. and Fri. from 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Wed. from 8:30 to 7 p.m. Call 954-545-1560 for appointment. Medical groupContinued from page 10plan, the Redevelopment Capital Program or RCP, and develop a strategic plan for the next ve years. Ray Lubomski, community and economic development director, reported that one of the main accomplishments last year was reprogramming Broward Countys RCP funds into projects that further the ve-year plan. Two properties were purchased, and several public improvement projects were funded with RCP monies, including fountains on 12th Avenue and a plaza near Oakland Park Station. A major tenant for the Oakland Station, the Funky Buddha Brewery, has signed a lease with the landlord to locate a craft brewery and tasting room at Oakland Park Station. This business, along with a Green Market and a future restaurant will establish the north anchor of the downtown culinary center. RMA has recommended that the parcel at 1299 Oakland Park Blvd. [the former Players Club] be developed as a south anchor to the Culinary Arts District as a culinary or hospitality school. Lubomski said RMA and his staff are working with the property owner to recruit culinary-related businesses with an emphasis on culinary schools. RMAContinued from page 1By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFWilton Manors Water rates are increasing 6.3 percent and sewage rates 3.4 percent starting Oct. 1. Wilton Manors, which gets its water from Fort Lauderdale, allowed for the increase when it passed its $24 million budget and 6.9605 percent millage rate on Water, sewage rates go up in Wilton ManorsMonday. To maintain the citys water and sewage systems, city of cials say they were forced to pass the increase onto residents. Were not going to build ourselves a water plant because of the cost, said Commissioner Scott Newton. All they do is supply us with water. I think its disgraceful [theyre increasing it this much], said Newton. [Waters] still relatively cheap, said Commissioner Ted Galatis. Commissioners were a little more upbeat about the budget, millage rate and property values. For the rst time in ve years, values in Wilton Manors have increased, See WILTON MANORS RATES on page 21 Send your news to mdpelican@yahoo. com

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10 The PelicanFriday, September 28, 2012 Making a DifferencePhyllis J. Neuberger wants your suggestions about people who are making a difference. Phylliss new book, China Dahl, is available on amazon.com. Call 954-7838700. Briefs By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFPeek in on a weekly meeting and watch these dedicated volunteers working away at St. Paul of the Apostle Church Social Hall at 2700 E. Sample Road in Lighthouse Point. They are as busy as Santas elves producing crafts for their annual Christmas Bazaar. On November 10 and 11, holiday shoppers will nd small trees already trimmed, ornaments, nativity sets, crocheted blankets, Thanksgiving place cards, placemats, aprons, pillows and many other items, handmade with love. Group President, Cathie Desjean and Vice President DeeDee Coulombe were interviewed by The Pelican as they worked. Cathie says, We use the money we raise to provide scholarships to Council of Catholic Women of St. Paul of the Apostle Church volunteer around the calendar to help those in needparishioners who want to send their children to parochial schools. She went on to say, We just nished our dresses for the Haiti project which was a big success and very gratifying to all of us. Parishioners donated new and used pillow cases and our group turned them into little slip dresses for children from infancy to 14 years of age. We bought 147 pair of panties to go with our 147 dresses. They were delivered by Food for the Poor to the community of Titanyen, Cabaret, Haiti. We kept busy on this project for three months, cutting, sewing, ironing etc. It was more than worthwhile when we saw pictures of the smiling little girls in their dresses. It made every one of us very happy. Asked how many women are in the group, DeeDee says, There are about 75 members, 45 of whom are active. Were all elderly, but we manage to show up every week for about three hours and we work on events around the calendar. We would love to have some young blood, but it seems most of the young women are working women. She paused to introduce Emma Francem who is 97. Emma was very busy making individual ower puffs which would later be sewn together to create an exquisite throw. After the Holiday Bazaar, the women get busy on Aunt Maries Attic Sale in February. Cathie says, Our entire parish contributes to this rummage sale, but it is our Council of Catholic Women who run it. Its always a big success proving that one persons junk is the next persons treasure. She laughed. Some of us end up buying as much as we donated. Continuing, We have an annual fashion show at the Lighthouse Point Yacht Club. We model clothes from different retailers. This year, Stein Mart has generously offered to work with us. DeeDee ticks off another event. At Christmas we work with Operation Christmas Child. This is a wonderful effort. This year we hope to ll 80 shoe boxes with personal necessities and little items. These boxes are shipped around the world to be given to children in need. Were not through yet, Cathie says. Theres still another new yearly event. We love this one because its so easy. We Shop for a Cause in partnership with Macys. We sell Macy Shopping Passes See CATHOLIC WOMEN on page 12Emma Francem may be 97, but her nimble ngers keep working away on a beautiful throw, made of individual ower puffs which will be sewn together to make a throw. Creating holiday ornaments and stuffed animals are Marie McGill, Angie Peters and Carol Kosobucki. [Photos by Phyllis J. Neuberger] Trimming trees for the Holiday Bazaar are DeeDee Coulombe, Cathie Desjean and Diana Marcinka. The Council of Catholic Women turned pillow cases into 147 dresses for little girls in Haiti. Delivered by Food for the Poor, here are a few of the happy recipients. [Photo courtesy of Food for the Poor in Titanyen, Cabaret, Haiti]Florida Trail Association meetsCoconut Creek The Florida Trail Association meets Thursday, Oct. 11 at 7:30 p.m. at Fern Forest Nature Center, 201 Lyons Road South. The topic is Camping Equipment 101. Members will share their latest and greatest equipment advice. The Florida Trail Association helps maintain and promote the Florida National Scenic Trail and provides an opportunity for hiking and camping in Florida. For more information, call 954-6094727.Hire students with disabilities Fort Lauderdale To encourage employers to hire students with disabilities, the Businesses Building Bridges Showcase will be held Monday, Oct. 1 from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at Fort Lauderdale High School, 1600 NE 4 Ave., Fort Lauderdale. Business leaders attending will hear representatives from Memorial Hospital Miramar and Sunshine Cleaning Systems share their experiences of hiring students with disabilities for permanent and internship positions, and the positive impact it has made in their businesses. Businesses that want to attend should RSVP by Sept. 26 by contacting Gail Fallon at 754-321-2008. Appetizers and beverages will be served at the event. Send your news to mdpelican@ yahoo.com or call 954-7838700

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12 The PelicanFriday, September 28, 2012 Breathe! Doggonit!This week, Pompano Beach Fire-Rescue rescued two chihuahua puppies from a trailer re on Ninth Drive. No people were home at the time of the re, but re ghters found one Cockatoo bird deceased in its cage. The two dogs rescued were one pregnant female named Princess and one male named Borom Bola. Borom Bola was unconscious and in critical condition. Fire ghters revived both dogs by administering oxygen. Both dogs were then brought to an animal hospital across the street from the trailer park. [Photo courtesy of Pompano Beach Fire Department]for one day. The charity gets a 25 percent discount and we get $5 for each pass sold. We all love this event because all we have to do is shop and thats easy for most women isnt it? At back to school time in the fall, this group contributes back packs lled with supplies. They contribute to other small, but meaningful projects throughout the year to help the less fortunate around them. We meet once a month from October to May, Cathie says. Ive been president for four years. Nobody wants the job because its so time consuming, but I feel its worth it because the rewards are endless. DeeDee, who has also served as president, agrees, saying, I wake up every morning and thank God that I can continue to do this. Anyone who is interested in joining the Council of Catholic Women who work nonstop for a variety of worthy causes can call 954783-5122. Thank you for all that you do for your community and beyond. Catholic WomenContinued from page 10 Cost is $10 for Chamber members who RSVP by Oct. 1 and $15 for non-members. 954~941-2940. 10-4 Breakfast N Deer eld from 7:30 to 9 a.m. at Deer eld Chamber of Commerce Banquet Hall, 1601 E Hillsboro Blvd. Featured speaker is Florida Senator Jeremy Ring. Cost is $12.50 for members and $17.50 for non-members. 954427-1050. 10-4 Complimentary breakfast for seniors and up to two friends at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach, at 9:45 a.m. Dr. Paula Hedglon presents Bringing Back Life To Seniors, Naturally. Please RSVP by Oct. 2. 954-2492277. 10-5 Boca Raton The SightingsContinued from page 7 See SIGHTINGS on page 16

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The Pelican 13 Friday, September 28, 2012

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14 The PelicanFriday, September 28, 2012 system. This community has a few more months of living with a rock-pit and a charcoal ltering system. But everything is legal and permitted according to city hall. That wasnt good enough for Robert Holmes, president of the Sanders Park Homeowners Association. [Walmart] had a moral obligation to advise us of this project, said Holmes. Attorney Susan Motley, on behalf of Walmart, said the residents had been noti ed. But when the addresses were reviewed, those who had received the 12 letters lived at least one-quarter mile east of the project. No one on the abutting street received noti cation. Walmart did what they wanted to do without respect to the neighborhood, said Holmes. Residents here have already experienced one shock. They found that dozens of sea grape trees that had served as noise and vision barriers to Walmart and I-95 had been removed. Congeniality would not describe Mondays meeting. Said The Rev. Marguerite Luster, spokesperson for the Liberty Park Homeowners Association, We had birds, butter ies and plants. Now we have erosion. Luster wants the sea grape trees back in place. That wont happen soon. Although a landscape plan for the completed project includes trees, sea grapes were not on the list. Oaks and Sabal Palms were recommended, but Mayor Lamar Fisher suggested the tree plan could be redrawn. Ed Phillips, former city commissioner, was more concerned about the proposed 20-foot deep retention pond that could be a danger to young children living in the neighborhood. On Wednesday, four young boys with shing poles had already hopped the fence. To their dismay, they were quickly spotted by Commissioner Woody Poitier who had been on location with Luster. One city of cial said there is no requirement for fencing the lake. In fact, he said, the lake is the buffer zone WalmartContinued from page 1 See WALMART on page 15Residents living on the shore of the rock pit are concerned about erosion. There are no plans for a seawall, Walmart will be replacing trees. [Staff photos]

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The Pelican 15 Friday, September 28, 2012 between Walmart and the community. Walmart, unlike more recent commercial projects, is not required to adhere to a city code that requires a strict buffer zone between the residential community and the commercial entity because Walmart was approved prior to the 1990 passage of a buffer code.WalmartContinued from page 14 Today, the code requires a 10-foot high wall or opaque fence with landscaping on both sides. Frustrated by a future of visual blight, noise pollution and possible erosion, Luster said she would continue her ght. This problem is bigger than us, she said. Four tanks provide charcoal ltration to polluted water prior to lling the rock pit. Some residents want this pit fenced in, calling it a danger to young children. Send your news to mdpelican@yahoo.com or 954-783-8700!

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16 The PelicanFriday, September 28, 2012 40th anniversary celebration of Boca Raton Christian School takes place Friday, Oct. 5 from 7 to 8:30 p.m. at Boca Raton Community Church Sanctuary, 601 NW 4 Ave. Free admission. 561391-2727. 10-7 16th Annual Dunns Run takes place at 7:30 a.m. at the main Deer eld Beach Parking lot located on Ocean Way and Southeast 2 Street and proceeds bene t the Boys & Girls Clubs of Broward County. Visit www.dunnsrun. com or call 954-563-2822. 10-16 Wilton Manors Candidates Night at 7 p.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive. All four candidates for city commission will attend to answer questions. Refreshments will be served. 954-783-8700.SightingsContinued from page 12

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The Pelican 17 Friday, September 28, 2012 By Malcolm McClintockPELICAN STAFFSushi By The Sea238 E. Commercial Blvd. Lauderdale-By-The-Sea954-267-8819There is always a great pleasure in discovering an unassuming eatery that packs a stupendous culinary punch. In this particular case, the tiny and impeccably clean Sushi By The Sea delivers an astoundingly fresh array of made-to-order sushi offerings and, as a bonus, some mouthwatering Peruvian favorites on the side. The indefatigable husband and wife team of Michihiro Hirano and Vivian Ophelan have nurtured a surprisingly satisfying juxtaposition of traditional gastronomy from the formers native Nippon and tempting delicacies from the latters home region in Peru. The gregarious Vivian studied at the world-renowned Johnson & Wales Culinary school and then at the Art Institute of Fort Lauderdale but I really learned the most by working in Japanese restaurants. In fact, that is where I met my husband! Indeed, the couple met at the now defunct Sagami Japanese restaurant where Michihiro, who also happens to have a degree in business, plied his trade as a Master Sushi Chef. After the birth of their second child, the epicurean duo decided to open their own restaurant in beautiful Lauderdale-By-TheSea. The sushi boom of 1995Sushi By The Sea serves up authentic Japanese and Peruvian specialties on the sunny shores of Lauderdale-By-The-SeaSee SUSHI on page 18 This popular Bento Box version features salmon, snapper, eel, tuna and shrimp nigiri along with seaweed salad, kanisu, edamame and a sliced California roll. [Photos by Malcolm McClintock]

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18 The Pelican Friday, September 28, 2012 2005 led to too many sushi restaurants being opened. Unfortunately, this created a situation where the quality of the product got diluted, laments Vivian. For more than 17 years, my husband was trained by some of the top Masters in Tokyo and the U.S. Thats why I know that we offer the most authentic and traditionally prepared sushi anywhere around. And since we are small, we can keep the prices very reasonable. For starters, Sushi By The Sea proposes a good selection of tantalizing appetizers such as pan-fried Gyoza beef dumplings, melt-in-yourmouth seared Tuna Tataki with Ponzu sauce, spicy octopus or conch salads, avocado with miso dressing or even a simple serving of Edamame with sea salt. Of course, a cornucopia of sushi rolls also makes an appearance on the menu. From Salmon California to the Spider with soft shell crab to the Scallop Volcano to the Lobster Feast, each will provide the deep satisfaction expected from an expertly and creatively prepared roll. It takes a minimum of ten years apprenticeship to become a sushi master and even after that, you are not finished learning. Luckily, my own Master comes to visit me every Monday, says Michihiro of his mentor Nobuyuki Higuchi [best known as Nobi]. Thats why it is a great day to try our daily special because it will likely have been prepared by the Grand Master himself! For those who appreciate the delicate simplicity of sashimi [sliced raw fish] or nigiri [sliced raw fish on rice], Michihiros bite-size masterpieces will titillate the senses with the clean, harmonious essence of his gastronomic deftness. I go to the fish market myself to select my own seafood because I know exactly what to look for to ensure the highest quality. For example, I only buy Scottish salmon because it has a much richer texture and deeper flavors. If a hot meal is desired, the outstanding chicken or salmon Teriyaki with rice are customer favorites. Served with either miso soup or Asian salad with ginger dressing, they provide a deeply satisfying meal at any time of the day. Also worth investigating is the wondrous Tempura Soba featuring hearty Udon noodles in a rich chicken broth topped with lightly battered and fried shrimp. Not to be outdone, Vivian is always on hand to whip up a tasty Peruvian style Shrimp & Red Snapper Ceviche bathing in a citrus and Andean pepper marinade. Customers also rave about the Parmesan cheese baked scallops with lime juice and parsley. Personally, I really like our filet mignon sauted with onions, peppers and tomatoes over white rice, says the mother of two who also emphasizes the availability of vegetarian dishes. Most sushi rolls are $4, combo platters around $10 and hot meals start at $5. Get a delectable entre with large Sake for $15! Several wines and Japanese beers are also available. Peruvian options are in the $8 to $12 range. Catering parties and office functions are specialties.SushiContinued from page 17 The best $5 lunch deal in town a tender, avorful Teriyaki chicken breast and rice served with either miso soup or Asian salad with homemade ginger dressing.

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The Pelican 19 Friday, September 28, 2012 Connie Hoffmann, town manager, said the town is budgeting conservatively. We have seen others that didnt. [They] are getting into trouble, she said. The town property tax accounts for 20 percent of the total tax bill. Other agencies, including Broward County and the Broward County School Board, account for the rest. I wish the other 80 percent were as conscientious as we are, said Commissioner Stuart Dodd. Commissioners also approved the town managers recommended annual budget of $20 million, up from $17.7 million. The budget includes a 50 percent reduction in the water utility tax, which cuts $145,000. Vice Mayor Scot Sasser said he would like to go after the rest of that tax in the new year. I want to keep pressing to keep the tax rate as low as possible, he said. The budget includes $5.9 million in capital improvements, including streetscape and drainage improvements and sewer repairs. About $1.5 million will go to improvements on Bougainvilla, 19th Street in Bel Air and in the Hibiscus Avenue, Allenwood Drive, Tropic Drive area. Work on Bougainvilla started this week. No debt funding is required. All the improvements are being made with existing funds. Parking revenues are up $571,000 over what was budgeted for this scal year. Those funds will be used for new parking on South Bougainvilla, re-con guring the A1A parking lot and a public safety lot. Parking revenues in the new year will be impacted by improvements planned on Commercial Boulevard and recon guring the A1A lot. The town has saved $100,000 by contracting out the parking operation, Hoffmann said. Commissioners earlier unanimously approved a re assessment fee for single-family residents of $130, the same as the current fee, and the fourth lowest in the county. The fees will raise $1 million for re protection services. LBTS TaxContinued from page 1Phooning Photo ContestPompano Beach Festival Flea Market Mall is holding a Phooning photo contest until Oct. 21. Phooning is a pose where a person stands on one foot, tilted at the waist with one arm held out in front, the other bent behind. Photos can be taken of a person phooning and submit it to Festival Flea Market Malls Facebook page at www.facebook.com/ FestivalFleaMarket. Photos must be taken in front of the phooning backdrop. The contest is open to students, faculty, staff and parents associated with any public or private K-12 school in Broward, Miami-Dade or Palm Beach counties. Photos will be judged based on school spirit, originality and creativity. Finalists will be selected Oct. 22 through Nov. 1. Online voting will take place Nov. 3 through 16 and the winners will be announced Nov. 17. The school receiving the most votes will get $5,000 for its Parent Teacher Association. First and second runner-ups will receive $1,000 and $500. Visit www.festival. com for more information.

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20 The Pelican Friday, September 28, 2012 100-mile trekContinued from page 1journey spanning three or four days and back again with the goal of raising about $2,500 for the American Cancer Society in Broward and Palm Beach counties. Its all about support for breast cancer. This is the longest [walk] by far. Ive been training for a good part of eight months. Ive walked 20 miles twice, said Fitzpatrick, who will mostly travel along A1A and Federal Highway. Im an avid walker. I think its a health bene t, and maybe it will motivate other people to get out and walk. Helping Fitzpatrick in his walk for breast cancer is Gabriel Bartice and the Party Patrol which will ride ahead of Fitzpatrick soliciting donations along the way. One-hundred percent of the proceeds will go straight to breast cancer [research]. I think anybody will be impressed with anyone who can walk a hundred miles, said Bartice, who volunteered with Fitzpatrick as a board member for the American Cancer Societys Oakland Park Relay for Life, which occurred in April. I am a cancer survivor myself. I had a rare form of pancreatic cancer. It affects one in two million and I was the one, said Fitzpatrick, who learned about the full rami cations of his disease in an unusual way. The doctor wrote on a cocktail napkin its like changing your oil. You got to take this out, that out. The only thing is you cant put anything back. I guess that cocktail napkin was the only thing he had in front of him, said Fitzpatrick, who lost half his stomach, half his small intestine and half his pancreas during the 13-hour surgical procedure that ultimately saved his life. I told them dont touch the liver, he joked. Bartice has also been touched by cancer but not as closely as Fitzpatrick. My grandmother suffered from breast cancer and thank god shes a survivor, said Bartice, who mails his grandmother a shirt for each breast cancer walk he does just to let her know that someones walking for her. And on Saturday, Oct. 6 those wishing to donate further to the cause of ghting breast cancer can join Fitzpatrick and Batrice at a fundraiser at American Legion Post 222, 4250 NE 5 Ave., Oakland Park, from 6 to 10 p.m. Along with the American Cancer Society, the event bene ts Feeding America, which provides food assistance to needy individuals and families. The $20 entrance buys a night of live entertainment by The Ink Spots Generations and the Shambala Band and a pasta meal. For each person who attends, Ford will donate 40 meals to Feed America. To donate to Fitzpatricks walk or for more information about the charity event, call 954708-3765. Today Mike Fitzpatrick, left, takes the rst steps of his 100-mile journey from Oakland Park to Jupiter and back again. The goal of the walk is to raise $2,500 to bene t the American Cancer Society in Broward and Palm Beach counties. Gabriel Bartice, right, will be riding ahead of Bartice during the walk to solicit funds. [Staff Photo]By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach Mayor Lamar Fisher had one main message for those who attended the State of the City Address yesterday: redevelopment is a big part of the citys recent past, its present and its future. Fisher, who said he was excited about the progress the city was making in reshaping itself, said developers, small businesses and city government were all working Mayor touts redevelopment in State of the City address See CITY on page 21FISHER

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The Pelican 21 Friday, September 28, 2012 The Pelican 954-783-8700 Gallegos. According to the city, re nancing and the increase in property values led to a lower parks debt service rate, 0.2508, and city hall debt service rate, 0.5029. Those debts and the operating millage rate of 6.2068 combined to make the total tax assessment 6.9605 mils. Taxable property values increased by 3.63 percent in Wilton Manors. That increase led to an additional $140,000 in revenue for the citys budget. Overall, taxable value rose county-wide by 1.48 percent. As part of the budget, commissioners gave themselves a $50-a-month raise, something that hasnt happened in eight years, and gave the general employees a one percent cost of living adjustment. While Vice Mayor Tom Green and Commissioner Julie Carson voted against the raise, some residents expressed support for giving commissioners an even bigger increase. Currently, commissioners make $7,200 a year and the mayor makes $8,400. With the increase, commissioners will make $7,800 and the mayor $9,000. Its not a great budget, but its a good budget, said Green. But while congratulating city staff, commissioners also expressed worries about the budgets that have yet to be formulated especially the future costs of re and emergency services, pensions and the possible loss of $650,000 in revenue that stems from communications taxes. Wilton Manors ratesContinued from page 9to redevelop various existing buildings and empty pieces of land throughout Pompano. Speaking to members of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce at the Elks Lodge, Fisher went through a list of public and private projects that were either recently finished, in the process of being built or are on the drawing board including: two new fire stations, the Broward County Library and Civic Campus to be built next to city hall, redevelopment of the Pompano Pier, streetscape and parking improvements along Atlantic Boulevard, plans to revamp and redesign the Atlantic Boulevard Intracoastal bridge and the citys planned Martin Luther King Boulevard retail development which broke ground recently. Were in the process of redesigning the Atlantic Boulevard Bridge. That is going to make a dynamic impact on our community, said Fisher. The two new fire stations include Fire Station 11, located north of Atlantic Boulevard on the beach, and a new one to be built in the Cresthaven neighborhood. The [current] Fire Station 11 is over 50 years old, he said, adding that the city specifically raised fire assessment fees to fund the construction of the Cresthaven station.CityContinued from page 20Private redevelopment includes the recently completed Publix on Atlantic Boulevard, which the mayor dubbed the signature project along Atlantic Boulevard, a planned Madisons Steakhouse on Atlantic Boulevard next to the Intracoastal, a new Marriott on the beach currently under construction and the Whole Foods going into the former Kmart at Copans Road and Federal Highway. The breakfast is an annual event of the Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce. This years breakfast sponsor was iberiabank. For more information about chamber membership, call 954-0412940.

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22 The Pelican Friday, September 28, 2012 Classi edsCall 954-545-0013 Call The Pelican at 954-783-8700! HELP WANTEDAFRAID OF DOWNSIZING? Start building a business to supplement your income. Great earnings potential on a part-time basis with Primerica. Call 954729-0192. 9-7SEEKING EMPLOYMENTHHA I Will Take Excellent Care Of The Elderly / Companion Aid Experienced & Certi ed / Have References. Call 845-709-5275. 10-5 HHA Seeks Live In Or Out. Will Do Light Housekeeping, Prepare Meals, Doctors Visit. Speak English. US Citizen. Experienced. References Available. Willing To Travel. 561-908-1017. 9-28 CAREGIVER / COMPANION Caucasian Woman With 25 Yrs. Exp. To Assist & Care For Your Loved Ones. Days / Eves / Nights. References Available. 954-482-5494. 9-28 HOME HEALTH AIDE Hortense Steadman, Private, Certi ed, Providing Loving And Professional Care. Honest & Reliable. Affordable Rates. References Available. 954678-7754. LPN AT CNA PRICES! Will Drive To Dr. Appointments, Lunch, Shopping, Etc. East Broward Area Only! 954-8957850. 10-5 CNA / HHA I OFFER GOOD PROFESSIONAL CARE For Your Loved One! 28 Years Experience. References Reliable. Please Call 954805-4545. 9-28 MALE CNA / HHA / COMPANION. Broward County Area. Former EMT. All Certi cations / Compassionate, References. Call Ron 954-2322832. Very Reasonable! 9-28 SERVICES DANNY BOY ELECTRIC Lic & Insured. Lic. #EC13004811. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. 24/Hr Service. 954-290-1443. Beat Any Written Estimate. Sr, Discount. 10-19 GOT JUNK? TRASH HAULING CONDO CLEANUPS Trees Landscape Yard Fill Pressure Wash Roofs Home Repairs Welding Etc. Dave 954-818-9538. 9-28 HANDYMAN PAINTING CARPENTRY Pressure Cleaning. Decks! Everything Around The House. No Job Too Small. FREE Estimates! Call 561-350-3781. 9-28 GINGERS HOUSEKEEPING 20 YRS EXP. (Licensed) References Available. Honest & Reliable Love To Clean Windows! Refrigerators Ovens No Problem. FREE Estimates. 954-200-4266. 105 HONEST HANDYMAN HOME & BUILDING Maintenance/Improvements. No Job Too Small. Fast Friendly Service. Reasonable Rates. Local Resident/Homeowner. Call Today For Your FREE Upfront Quote. No Deposit Required. 754-366-1915. 928 GARAGE SALESHUGE CHARITY YARD SALE SAT. SEPT. 29 amNoon. Collectibles, Electronics, Furniture, Clothing, Linens. Balistreri Realty 1350 N Federal Hwy. Pompano Beach. (Rear Parking Lot) BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIESNew GREEN technology. New defroster control saves energy in home refrigerators, commercial chillers. Patented. All optical. Simple mfg. Strategic partners needed..www.NewAvionics.Com. 954-568-1991. C MUSICIANS WANTEDThe America Legion Symphonic Band is now accepting new members for the 2012-2013 season. College age to seasoned Seniors are welcome. Rehearsals are held on Wed. evening at American Legion Post 142 in Pompano. Clarinet, bass clarinet, bassoon, French horn, baritone, trombone and percussion players are especially needed. If you enjoy making music, call Jim McGonigal, Music Director at 954-647-0700. CMOBILE HOMESDEERFIELD DOUBLE WIDE 2 / 2 TIDEWATER ESTATES 55+. Background / Credit Check Required. $685 Mo Lot Rent. $5,000 Firm. 954-4260500. 10-5 HOMES FOR RENTLIGHTHOUSE POINT Spacious 2/2 Furn. + Library / Office. Breakfast Bar With Den Off Kitchen. Large Covered Patio. Pool. Many Amenities. 954-8182388. 9-28 ROOMS FOR RENTPOMPANO PVT ROOM & BATH $500 Month. Includes Utilities, Cable, Internet. Walking Distance To Shopping. Call 954-793-1363. 9-28 REAL ESTATE WANTEDI BUY HOUSES!! CASH!! AS IS! QUICK CLOSE! ANY AREA ANY CONDITION! NO EQUITY OK. CALL NOW 954-914-2355. 10-19 DUPLEXESLIGHTHOUSE POINT E Of Federal. Updated Cozy 1 / 1 Duplex. Washer/Dryer. Screened Porch. Small Pet. Lovely Landscaping. $850 Monthly. 954-804-2296. 9-28 POMPANO BEACH E OF Federal Hwy. 2/1 Enclosed Porch W/Washer & Dryer. Central Air. New Tile Floors. No Pets $1,100 Mo. 954-8229395. 10-19 CONDOS FOR SALEPOMPANO BEACH DIRECT INTRACOASTAL! Feels Like Youre On A Boat. Pool On Intracoastal. Wrap-A-Round Balcony. Spacious 1 / 1.5 $178K. Also For Rent $1350 Month. 954-588-0562. 10-12 POMPANO BEACH Sea Haven. Magni cent Waterfront Resort Type Condos. Covered Parking. 2 Blocks Beach. Heated Pool, Security. 1 / 1.5 & 2 / 2 Screened Balcony. From $110K. Coldwell Banker 954-629-1324. 10-12CONDOS FOR RENTFT LAUDERDALE ICW Gated Community. 1 / 1.5 Furnished / Unfurnished. Granite, Wood Floors, Lots Of Amenities. Great Location. No Pets. $950 Month. Call 954588-1644. 9-28 POMPANO BEACH Sea Haven 1 / 1.5 or 2 / 2. Walk To Beach. Covered Parking. Security. Heated Pool. Exercise Room. BBQ. Resort Type Waterfront Complex. From $900. Call 954-629-1324.

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The Pelican 23 Friday, September 28, 2012 Classi edsCall 954-545-0013 Pelican Classi eds work for you! POMPANO BEACH 55+ Community. Renovated 2 / 1 Pool! Sunroom Ground Floor, Beautifully Furnished. On Golf Course. $750 Mo. 1 Year +. Good Credit. 917-5440771. 9-28 POMPANO BEACH 1 Block To Ocean 1/1 Fully Furnished. Flat Screens, DVD, Pool, Laundry, Private Parking, BBQ. Monthly Thru December $850. 954-540-9724. 9-28 LIGHTHOUSE PT 2 / 2 ---1st Floor 55+. Pool, Storage, Laundry Facilities. $895 Month / Water Included. Dorothy Bassano Better Homes & Gardens Real Estate. 954-5624919. 9-28 POMPANO INTRACOASTAL AT ITS BEST. Breathtaking Views! Feels Like Youre On A Boat, Pool Deck On Intracoastal. Spacious 1 / 1.5 $1350 Month. A1A S.E. Corner Unobstructed Views. 2/2 $1,500 Month. 954-588-0562. LEISUREVILLE 55+ 2 / 1 Unfurnished / Furnished $795 / $875 1st & Last. 1st Floor. Free Golf By Pool / Clubhouse. 954-590-8177. 9-28 POMPANO BEACH FURNISHED 1 / 1.5 On Intracoastal / Canals. Tile Floors. Ceiling To Floor Windows / GREAT Views! $975 Month Yearly Lease. 954-7857571 Or 954-649-4373. APTS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH 1 BR & 2 BR APTS FOR RENT. Remodeled, Paint, Tile, Etc. Washer / Dryer On Site. Pool. Pet Friendly. George 954809-5030. POMPANO MCNAB RD & NE 18 AVENUE 1 & 2 Bedrooms Furnished / Unfurnished. $650 $895 And Up. Pool, Tile Floors. Central A / C. 954-610-2327. 9-28 BOX B OLD POMPANO 1 / 1 APT. $700 Month Yearly Lease. Pool, Off Federal Hwy. Pet OK! Call Anthony 954-857-5207. 10-5 POMPANO BEACH 1/1 $650 NW NE 2/1 $950 2/1,5 Townhouse -Pool $1095 SW 1/1 $750 2/1 $925 2/2 $950 ALL FREE WATER. Rent + $70 App Mov-U-In. 954781-6299. POMPANO ATLANTIC / FEDERAL Efficiency $175 Week. No Security. Cable, Electric, Internet, FREE W / D. Good Job. No Drug Charges. No Evictions. 954-709-0694. 9-28 LAUDERDALE BY THE SEA 1 / 1 Ground Floor. Central A / C. Parking Out Back Door. Laundry, Courtyard. 200 Steps Beach. $1,100. 954-8685560 Wayne. 10-19 BEST DEAL IN POMPANO BEACH Efficiency With Kitchen, Laundry & Pool. No Pets. Weekly Monthly Season. 500 To Beach. 954294-8483 Or 248-736-1533. POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 Bedroom From $500. Easy Move-in. 1/2 OFF DEPOSIT. Remodeled. Great Location. 954-783-1088 For More Info. 12-14 COMMERCIAL FOR RENT-SALEPOMPANO COMMERCIAL OFFICE Spaces Available. Ranging From As Low As $500 To $700 Depending On Square Footage. Please Call Darci At 954-7833723. 10-5 DEERFIELD BEACH Retail Of ce Warehouse 700 Sq Ft With Loft. A/C, Bathroom. $575 Per Month. Call For More Info 561-654-1331 Or 561-9985681. 10-19

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24 The Pelican Friday, September 28, 2012 WORSHIP DIRECTORY: Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad. Rev. Hyvenson Joseph Entertainment LLC, Paragon has retro tted four old, failing movie houses, has built two new ones, and is in the process of renovating a seventh location. The theater here at Powerline Road and Hillsboro Blvd., is headquarters for Paragon Entertainment Group, LLC. Whalen is the CEO, Wilson is in charge of architectural design and Lightstone is senior vice president and head buyer for the Film Group, an entity that books lms for not only Paragon Theaters, but Muvico, Bow-Tie Cinemas and Rave Cinemas. Whalen, whose background is in nance, was CEO of Muvico from 2006-09 and initiated the concept of stateof-the-art theaters. Later, he was responsible for the sale of four Muvico locations, including Airport Road in Boca Raton, to Cinemark for $50 million. He is a resident of Parkland. Wilson, an architect, was in charge of corporate development at Muvico at about the same time and created Muvicos signature, themed images. He lives in Boca Raton. Lightstone began his career at United Artists and established the strongest lm-buying department in the industry. He served as COO before founding his own Denverbased production and distribution company, New Deal Pictures. The brand they are offering the public gives them luxury amenities at traditional movie prices. They do this by retro tting existing theaters and retail space that has become available due to high vacancy rates. Where they do new builds, they look for other entertainment opportunities such as bowling. The company opened its rst theater in April 2010 in Fredericksburg, VA with 12 high-de nition digital screens, VIP seating, a bar and lounge, a 16-lane bowling alley and gourmet restaurant. The second theater opened two months later in Coconut Grove in an old AMC venue that underwent a $4 million upgrade. In 2011, Paragon acquired and renovated two theaters in Minnesota. That same year in May, it opened the 8-screen theater in Deer eld Beach once owned by General Cinema and then Sunrise Theaters. The space was completely renovated with The Lot Bar and Lounge, PepsiMax Extreme Theater for 3D offerings, Sony 4K digital projections, VIP luxury seating, expanded food offering and reserved seating. According to a Paragon news release, sales are up over 50 percent from previous levels. Newest locations are at Ocean Walk Shoppes in Daytona Beach and in Newport News, both currently being renovated. Whalen wants to add a community component to the theaters offering special viewings for charity and space for corporate and private parties. Recently Sheriff Al Lamberti picked Paragon for a political fundraiser. Several schools and youth groups have held functions here as well. He also arranged at the request of City Commissioner Ben Preston for a special showing this summer of Red Tails for a group of local teenagers. Next Sunday, Oct. 7, 2 p.m., the Deer eld Beach Rotary Club will raise money for its charities by selling $10 tickets to Taken 2, the story of a retired CIA agent whose former wife is kidnapped in Istanbul by individuals he confronted in the 2008 movie Taken. The lm stars Liam Neeson, Famke Janssen and Maggie Grace. The club will realize $4 for every ticket sold and 50 percent of food and bar sales from an expanded menu that includes atbreads, pulled pork sandwiches, quesadillas, a chipotle chicken wrap, fries, and a killer brownie dessert. We hope the theater will be utilized more, Niki Wilson said. There is indoor and outdoor seating areas and enough lobby and patio space to stage parties. ParagonContinued from page 5Help for seniorsBroward The Countys Elder Helpline is administered by the Aging and Disability Resource Center of Broward County. Bilingual staff, able to respond to calls in English, Creole Spanish, are available from 8 a.m. until 5 p.m. Monday through Friday to provide assistance regarding programs and services for Broward residents 60 years of age and older. To reach the Elder Helpline, call 954-7459779. Pelican Classi eds save you money! 954-Send your news to mdpelican@ yahoo.com

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The Pelican 25 Friday, September 28, 2012 Tell The Pelican about your news! mdpelican@ yahoo.com or 954783-8700! Sals Towing of Oakland Park has offered to provide free transportation home for those who may not feel t to drive, and the nearby Days Inn Hotel at Oakland Park Boulevard/I-95 offers discounted Oktoberfest rates for the weekend. Long-time presenting sponsors Lipton Toyota/Scion and the city of Oakland Park are joined by Broward Health Imperial Point. Other sponsors include the Ambry Restaurant, Around Town Newspaper, Algae to Omega, AOW Select, Central Bark Doggy DayCare, Days Inn, FPL, Holy Cross Hospital, Pelican Newspaper, Sals Towing, S. Mark Graphics, The Agenda/ GuyMag.com, and TSAO Design Group. For sponsorships, vendor opportunities, activities schedule and other information, visit www.oaklandparkmainstreet.com, which includes a link to the events Facebook page. Or call Constantine at 954-565-2627 or 754-2140041. Adult admission is a $5 donation, and children 12 and under are admitted free. Free off-site parking is available at city lots. OktoberfestContinued from page 7Pelican Classi eds save you money! 954-783-8700!

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26 The Pelican Friday, September 28, 2012 an old friend. According to Jalbert some employees that she knew were not told until Monday they should not come to work. The Grill was owned by Restaurant Holdings LLC in Delray Beach along with The Banana Boat and Prime Catch in Boynton Beach. A familyrun operation, Luke Therien said it had become difficult for his father John to manage the business from his home in Palm Beach. We had 15 good years there and we built that restaurant from the ground up. Therien said mounting competition from steakhouses in Boca Raton hurt business in northeast Broward. Along with the recession, it was the high number of high end restaurants that opened within a 15-minute drive that closed the doors at Fifth. Our draw was from south Boca. Can you count the number of steakhouses that have opened in the Boca corridor? You are talking about at least seven highend restaurants. In order to compete we had to bring down our prices because the people who want to spend good money on steak are in Boca. But we had a good bar business until the end. Buyer of the property is Fred Hunter Funeral Homes another family-operated company with funeral homes in Fort Lauderdale, Davie/ Cooper City and Hollywood and well as a crematorium and a cemetery. This location will be its first in north Broward. After renovating the building they plan to open by the end of the year Therien said. The demise of the restaurant FifthContinued from page 4 See FIFTH on page 27

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The Pelican 27 Friday, September 28, 2012 also disturbs Gil Pierson who, like his LHP neighbors, has been a regular there. I had heard they were trying to sell it for some time, he said. But I didnt it expect to close without warning. Ive been going there 15 years. It was one of the nicest places we had around here. According to the tax rolls, the location is assessed at $1.7 million by the county tax appraiser and in 2011 the owner paid $34,000 in property taxes. Several weeks ago a restaurant that predated Fifth Avenue by many years, Fin and Claw, closed its doors in the Shoppes at Beacon Light. And this week, one of the Shoppes longtime tenants Pat Anderson is closing her art shop Saturday night. Anderson, well-known for her tropical designs, also owned a retail clothing and gift store in the Shoppes which she closed last year after her husband Pete died. I could not be an artist and a business person too, Anderson said. I had not painted in two years! To reduce her art shop inventory, Anderson is selling everything at deep discounts today and tomorrow. Anderson admits that the reason for her getting out of retail is the lack of business but she also says, I want to share my art so I will be much more accessible. She will continue to design a Christmas ornament for the Hillsboro Lighthouse Preservation Society and work with the historic McDougald House. So also has become involved with a cultural arts society in The Keys that envisions embellishing the Overseas Highway with colorful art. FifthContinued from page 26Boaters wanted for Holiday Boat ParadePompano Beach Own a boat? Want to show it off? The Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce is looking for boats to be part of its 50th Annual Pompano Beach Holiday Boat Parade. Entry is free and every boat that participates will receive a hand-painted collectible glass ornament designed by local artist Pat Anderson. Big and small boats with few or many decorations will be accepted. The parade will be held Sunday, Dec. 9 starting at 6 p.m. Sponsorship opportunities are also available. To enter, call 954-941-2940.Sushi celebrationLauderdale-By-The-Sea Sushi By The Sea, 238 E. Commercial Blvd., is celebrating its 1st anniversary on Monday, Oct. 1 from 7 to 9 p.m. There will be free maki and sake and live music. Call 954-267-8819.

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