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Pompano Pelican
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00090900/00318
 Material Information
Title: Pompano Pelican
Uniform Title: Pompano Pelican
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: Pompano Pelican
Place of Publication: Pompano Beach
Publication Date: 09-21-2012
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Pompano Beach
Coordinates: 26.234722 x -80.125556 ( Place of Publication )
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00090900:00318

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Friday, September 21, 2012 Vol. XX, Issue 38 Wherever you are, read The Pelican @ pompanopelican.com Send news to siren2415@gmail.com Pompano Beach Deer eld Beach Lighthouse Point Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Wilton Manors Oakland Park Hillsboro Beach The Galt Palm Aire The Pelican Pelican 67 days left in 2012 Hurricane season By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFThis week, the community learned that Dr. Ray McAllister died peacefully in his sleep at home on Monday. The following story was written in 2003, but Dr. McAllisters love of the inhabitants of the planet as well as those of the ocean can be told again. Dr. McAllister, a professor, ecologist, writer and diver, will be sorely missed by this and other communities.Obituary Dr. Ray McAllister fought non-stop for Floridas watersSee McALLISTER on page 26 Dr. Ray McAllister emerges from a dive on his 80th birthday. What could be more fun than exploring the beauty of the reef with 12 diving buddies on ones birthday? he asked. When we came back aboard the Seahorse there was cake and hugs from the lady divers. Not bad for the Dinosaur Diver! City getting serious about the rules for garbage and trash pick-upBy Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach Honey, take the garbage out! The list is on the fridge. It may not be as bad as all that, but Pompano Beach residents are going to have to pay a bit more attention to See GARBAGE on page 14By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach The last attempt to increase regulation on Floridas parasailing industry failed, but city of cials are hoping an upcoming attempt will succeed. The move stems from two deaths, ve years apart, which both occurred in Pompano Kathleen Miskell, 28, died on Aug. 15 after she plummeted more than 150 ft. to the water and A summer camp project at Kids in Training, an after care center on Powerline Road in Deer eld Beach, produced three decorated rain barrels which will be donated to the Deer eld Beach Cultural Committee for a fund-raiser. Encouraging the idea was art-lover and Deer eld resident Gabriella Gampl who paid for art supplies. The care center stresses programs in art and music as well as homework help. Owner Beverly Irwin said the camp theme was Underwater Adventures and Kioto Murata is pictured putting the nal touches to one of the rain barrels. [Photo by Judy Wilson] Pompano to lobby legislature to increase parasailing regulations Amber White, 15, died in 2007 when the cable connecting her to the boat snapped, and she drifted inland and was slammed into a nearby hotel. State Senator Maria Sachs said when the new legislative session begins in March of 2013, she plans to introduce legislation that would require additional safety regulations for parasailing operations. See PARASAIL on page 17 Re nancing will allow for development of maritime village at Sullivan Park By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach Commissioners gave nal approval to a $77.8 million operating budget this week that will be nanced in part by a property tax rate of 5.768 mils, no increase over the current year. The citys scal plan for 2012-13 requires no employee layoffs nor any increase in the re fee. Also approved was a $40 million loan from the Florida Municipal Bond Council to re nance prior loans and provide funds for local road projects, the development of a maritime village See DEERFIELD on page 20

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2 The PelicanFriday, September 21, 2012 The C. Scott Ellington Technological Business Incubator at FAU was dedicated last week in memory of Ellington, who was a Deer eld Beach resident and former executive director of the Research and Development Park. Attending the ceremony were Boca Raton Mayor Susan Whelchel; Palm Beach County Commissioner Steve Abrams and Ellingtons widow Linda as well as three of his grandchildren. The incubator occupies 14,000 square feet of a larger building and, open since March, houses 22 start-up companies, almost full capacity according to current R&D Director Andrew Duffel. Ellington honored at research centerBy Judy VikPELICAN STAFFLauderdale-By-The-Sea Window screenings are now required on vacant commercial buildings here. Town commissioners approved the new law Tuesday. The vote was 3-2 with Mayor Roseann Minnet and Commissioner Stuart Dodd dissenting. The new rules apply to buildings or individual storefronts that are not open to the public or clientele for more than 21 consecutive days due to lack of a business operation, repair or renovation. In the future, all transparent windows and doors visible from the public right of way must be screened so passersby cannot see inside. Decorative window treatments such as shutters, shades, curtains or blinds, may be used. Heavy paper and fabric also can be used. Screening material can also include artwork or photography but no text, including historical pictures or post cards of the town, artwork of a professional nature or designs or drawings provided by the town of town projects.Window dressings in orderSophia Hooper, Collin and Travis Ellington are pictured with the portrait of their late grandfather Scott Ellington at the ribbon-cutting marking the of cial opening of the C. Scott Ellington Technological Business Incubator at FAU.

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The Pelican 3 Friday, September 21, 2012 Wilton Manors Candidates NightWilton Manors On Tuesday, Oct. 16 at 7 p.m. there will be a Candidates Night featuring those running for Wilton Manors City Commission. The event, held at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, will include Vice Mayor Tom Green, Commissioner Julie Carson, Sal Torre and Kimber White. On Nov. 6, Wilton Manors residents will vote for two commissioners to serve four-year terms. Because the city is not separated into districts the top two vote-getters will be elected. Refreshments will be served. Cast Your Advertising Net to 7 Northeast Broward Cities The Pelican 954-783-8700

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4 The PelicanFriday, September 21, 2012 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFOakland Park An Oakland Park company that cultivates and harvests algae biomass is poised for growth as it expands its market to include cosmetic, vitamin, animal food and pharmaceutical companies. Algae to Omega has been the sole occupant of the massive Oakland Park Station building at 1201 NE 38 St. since May 2010. It occupies 60,000 square feet at the northern end of the former Sears warehouse. The CEO/president is Geronimos Dimitrelos, a former World Team wrestler, who was a candidate for the U.S. Olympic wrestling team until he broke his arm. Dimitrelos wanted to create his own vitamin supplements, so he began researching nutrients and compounds in vitamins. He Broward Algae growers embarking on a much larger market determined he would have to grow a lot of plants to extract the nutrients needed, or he could grow a much smaller amount of algae. Looking into the They start with algae strains in small vials and then move the strains gradually to larger vials and to tanks. [Right] Tom Moran, marketing director, points out one of the eight 3,000gallon tanks now in operation for extracting oil from algae at Algae to Omega in Oakland Park. (Staff photos by Judy Vik) technology of growing algae indoors or outdoors, he determined he would have more control over growth, less water loss and less contamination if he grew algae indoors. Next he had to gure out how to launch a company, said Tom Moran, Algae to Omega marketing director. A cousin introduced Dimitrelos to Ralph Dominguez, a consultant who specializes in business development. He structured the company, did a marketing plan and is now the senior vice president. In August 2009, the company was being run on the roof of the Ocean Manor Hotel on Fort Lauderdale beach. The men were offered the former boiler room if they would clear out the See ALGAE on page 19

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The Pelican 5 Friday, September 21, 2012 By Stephen FellerPELICAN WRITERPompano Beach Drivers in South Florida can scarcely go more than a block without seeing what may be the most effective form of businesses advertising: People holding signs and waving to passing cars. Since the downturn of the economy, local businesses have been searching for ways to draw customers to their lunch specials, furniture sales, ammo clearances and any other service or merchandise people arent coming in for. In recent weeks, several Broward County cities, including Hallandale and Margate, have outlawed signs held by people on the street. Pompano Beach, however, has made no move to do so, nor are they cracking down on them. Weve got bigger sh to fry, said Pompano Code Compliance Supervisor Mario Sotolongo. We address complaints, take a look and then move on. According to Sotolongo, sign spinners, the catchall term for people hired by businesses to hold the signs and get the attention of drivers, are not violating the law by standing on the sidewalk or in a swale. The law, he said, rules out any moveable sign, or something that is leaned against a structure, stuck in the ground, or attached to something. If a person has a sign in hand, thats considered freedom of speech, but as soon as it is put down, it has to be addressed under one of the codes, Sotolongo said. Sotolongo received a call earlier this week from an Sign-holding on street is legal, effective advertising in some citiesanonymous resident about a sign spinner on the corner of Atlantic Boulevard and Andrews Avenue. But the sign and spinner were both gone by the time a compliance of cer got there. Although it may not have been the same sign, several nearby business owners reported an A-frame sign perched at the intersection and a young woman standing next to it. Both of which, they said, are there most days. Ernie Alvarez, manager at Centerfold Cabaret, located a few blocks away at 1350 SW 2 St., said hes has had a sign and one of his employees out every day for the last few months to advertise the free lunch available to people coming to the club. From the moment we put it out there, people see it and respond, he said. The same has been true for Cheetahs Pompano, another adult club further west on Atlantic Boulevard, where employees have been holding a similar sign on a nearby corner for several months and which has created a bump in business. Several business owners along the US 1 corridor claim they received threats from code of cials six months or more ago and were forced to stop hiring people to hold signs for them. The bump it provides in business, however, for everything from lunch specials to haircuts, has them sending spinners back out despite the risks. Its not like the old days, where you can just open the doors, said Rick Rodriguez, chief operating of cer for Cheetahs in South Florida, echoing the remarks of business owners who declined to comment for this story. People dont have money. Were doing whatever we See SIGNS on page 7

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6 The PelicanFriday, September 21, 2012 Deer eld Beach, Pompano Beach, Lighthouse Point, LauderdaleBy-The-Sea, Wilton Manors and Oakland ParkWilton Manors Oakland Park Hillsboro Beach The Pompano Pelican is published weekly on FridaysStreet Address: 1500-A E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, FL 33060 Telephone: 954-783-8700 Fax: 954-783-0093Letters to the Editor are encouraged and accepted for print if signed, although a writers name will be withheld on request; letters must also include a daytime telephone number. Advertising rates are available upon request. Subscription rate is $31.80 including tax for one years delivery in Greater Pompano Beach; $95.40/per year including tax for others in the United States; call 954-783-8700 for rates abroad. The Pelican is a nonpartisan newspaper and reserves the right to decline advertising. Copyright 2012. Reproduction of this publication in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission of the publisher. The Pelican is a member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, Deer eld Beach Chamber and the LBTS Chamber. The Pelican is a state certi ed woman-owned minority business. The Pelican is delivered to businesses, libraries, schools, of ces, hospitals, news racks and single family homes. All advertising and copy is published at the sole discretion of the publisher. We welcome your critiques and ideas concerning this publication. Anne Siren, publisherExecutive Assistant: Mary Hudson Graphics: Rachel Ramirez Windsheimer Bookkeeper: John White Classi eds: Fran Shelby Contributing Writers: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Judy Wilson, Malcolm McClintock, Judy Vik, Michael dOliveira Account Executives: Paul Shroads, Carolyn Mann, Bill Heaton, Bill Fox Special Of ce Assistant: Cathy Siren ESTABLISHED 1993 Volume XX, Issue 38 Founding Editor and PublisherAnne Hanby Siren The Pelican wants to know what you think. Send your thoughts on local, state and national issues to siren2415@gmail.comOpinionImprovement funds should be granted to hotelierTo the Editor, From what I gather, Lauderdale-By-The-Seas Hotel Improvement Program was created by the towns commission to lend a nancial hand, matching expenditure of funds to those hotel owners who make improvements to the curb appeal of their respective hotels; not to their interiors. These improvements can include roof, gutters, facia, doors, windows, paint, pool, driveways, and landscaping. I suppose if a roof were unsightly, an eyesore if you will, it would need to be replaced. That not only is an improvement, but it also eliminates the eyesore! I believe hurricane windows fall in the same category, and Paul Novak should be granted matching funds. Landscaping also falls in the same category. Its not just a matter of removing debris and weeds, redoing the lawn and cutting branches off shrubs and trees; the grounds may be in need of some new plantings as well. I believe the $25,000 limit in matching funds is suf cient to prevent any abuse of the program. I certainly dont believe that the program ought to extended to individual homeowners. Dr. Erik H. Schot, PhD Lauderdale-By-The-Sea LettersCOURTESY OF THE LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERSThe countdown clock to Floridas voter registration deadline is ticking, with less than three weeks to go until Oct. 9. Thats why the League of Women Voters of Florida Education Fund has moved its already active voter registration and support campaign into even higher gear with the addition of a Voter Assistance Hotline, 1-855-FL-VOTER (1-855-358-6837). Hotline callers can get answers to their questions about how changes in Floridas election law affect them. They can also learn where and how to register to vote, how to check and verify their voter registration information, how to change a name or address, update their signature, nd the location of their polling place, and request a vote-by-mail ballot, along with other vital registration information. Registration is the key to ensuring that all voters have the chance to make their voices heard on Election Day. Every single vote counts, said League President Deirdre Macnab. Our members throughout the state are making renewed face-to-face efforts to boost registration and compensate for lost time, and were pleased to add this Voter Assistance Hotline to supplement their efforts. Through the Voter Assistance Hotline, callers can also schedule League speakers who stand ready to provide groups and organizations with information on the amendments and issues that will appear on the November 6 ballot. The Voter Assistance Hotline is just the latest addition to the Leagues growing list of resources for voters. The Leagues nonpartisan 2012 Florida Election and Voter Guide is available at public libraries and through local Leagues and other organizations in all 67 counties. In the coming week, the Guide (which is available in Spanish) will also be inserted in newspapers across the state. Also available online for voters, www.BeReadyToVote.org, a one-stop site packed with information for registered voters and those who want to register. The League of Women Voters of Florida, a nonpartisan political organization, encourages informed and active participation in government, works to increase understanding of major public policy issues, and in uences public policy through education and advocacy. For more information, please visit the Leagues website at: www.TheFloridaVoter.org.Register by Oct. 6 or you will not get to vote Amendment 8 will gut the foundation of public educationAmendment 8 Proposing an amendment to the State Constitution providing that no individual or entity may be denied, on the basis of religious identity or belief, governmental bene ts, funding, or other support, except as required by the First Amendment of the United States Constitution, and deleting the prohibition against using revenues from the public treasury directly or indirectly in aid of any church, sect, or religious denomination or in aid of any sectarian institution. Amendment 8 is introduced to Florida voters as the Florida Religious Freedom Amendment. The title has a great patriotic ring, but in fact this amendment tolls the death knell for public education. Amendment 8 sounds like its about religion; it sounds patriotic, but it misleads voters. A Yes on Amendment 8 will gut the budgets of local school boards. Funds dedicated to public education instead will be used to subsidize parochial and private schools. Lets not support the marriage of church and state. History proves that is a bad union. The amendment rst appeared as Amendment 7, but on Dec.14, 2011, it was rejected by Leon County Circuit Judge Terry Lewis who took it off the ballot. But State Attorney Pam Bondi rewrote the amendment, and now its back with a few changes but the same motive. Voters who make the mistake of approving this amendment will be granting tax money intended for public education to go to private and parochial institutions. Private and parochial schools are options for families who can afford to pay for that choice. They should continue to do so. If we subsidize private and parochial schools, we are slicing funds from public schools, funds that are sorely needed to repair schools and provide the materials and opportunities for every child in this state. Education in America has always been the great equalizer. Public schools offer the great escape route from poverty and ignorance. Disabling public education, which this amendment intends to do, removes that option. Tell Gov. Rick Scott NO at the ballot box on Nov. 6. Note: There are 11 amendments on the ballot. The League of Women Voters, a non-partisan group recommends a No vote on all 11 amendments. Register to vote before Oct. 9 and vote on Nov. 6

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The Pelican 7 Friday, September 21, 2012 SightingsA community calendar for Northeast Broward County. Send your event information to mdpelican@yahoo.com can. An employee at Hexstar, a company which buys and sells scrap metal, said the branding by people holding signs or banners is essential to their business. We moved from Hallandale because the regulations slowed our business, said the employee, who asked not to be named in print. They gave us more hurdles to jump through every time we xed an issue. Unlike a lunch special, which may prompt many drivers to swerve into a parking lot to get a good deal, Hexstars signs are needed for branding, so that people think of them when theyve got metal to unload. Though theyve been warned about Pompanos by-the-book approach to all signs by nearby businesses, the employee said there had not been any issues with the city yet. Sotolongo said the citys position is to approach sign holders only after theyve received complaints or if the sign holders are blatantly violating the code. In the two months hes been working in Pompano, he said, that there has been no deluge of complaints and, unless it becomes a safety issue of sidewalks being blocked, or something similar, this is not their priority. We have to abide by whats written, he said. Our inspectors arent out there making things up or trying to do things that arent on the books. The main problem is once you have a SignsContinued from pageOakland Park A wellness clinic for cats and dogs is set from 1 to 4 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 22, at Collins Community Center, 3900 NE Third Ave. Dogs will receive rabies, parvo/distemper vaccines. Cats will receive FVRP vaccine. Pet registration tags will be provided. Cost is $20. All dogs must be on leashes and cats in carriers. Call 954630-4500 for more information. Healthy pets clinic 9-22 Shred-A-Thon and Prescription Drug Take-Back event from 10 a.m. to noon at the Pride Center, 2040 N. Dixie Hwy, Wilton Manors. Donors who give unused prescription medication get a $5 gift card [one per family] while supplies last. First ve boxes of sensitive documents shredded for free. 954-8318902. 9-22 Wilton Manors Kiwanis Club Kids Day from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Wilton Manors Elementary School, 2401 NE 3 Ave. Free food, fun and games for elementary school students. 954-5607813. 9-22 Magical Sounds of the Harp concert from 4 to 6 p.m. at St. Nicholas Episcopal Church, 1111 E. Sample Road, Pompano Beach. Cost is $20 for advanced tickets, $20 at the door and $12 for students. 954-942-5887. 9-22 Codys Angels, a charity founded by BSO Motor Deputy John Meiers, is hosting its second annual golf tournament at Boca Lago Country Club, 8665 Juego Way, Boca Raton at 1:30 p.m. 954-288-7201. 9-23 Home for the Holidays musical to honor the men and women of the United States military from 2 to 3:30 p.m. at the Herb Skolnick Center, 800 SW 36 Ave., Pompano Beach. Tickets are $15. 954-2748537. 9-23 FAU professor and activist Mike Budd leads a discussion on Rachel Maddows new book, Drift: The Unmooring of American Military Power and the U.S. Love Affair with War. The event is free. Donations are See SIGHTINGS page 9number of these signs out there, how do you regulate something that at some point might become a visual clutter? Its a ne line we have to walk. The best we can do is follow the written ordinances the best way we can.Cast Your Advertising Net to 7 Northeast Broward Cities The Pelican 954-783-8700

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8 The PelicanFriday, September 21, 2012 Business matters The Pelican takes a look at local business owners. You can tell your story here because business matters. 954-783-8700. By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFOur history began back with my grandfather, Bernard Leo McIntee, Sr. who owned our familys rst funeral home in Rochester, New York in 1906, says Bernie McIntee the third. And here we are, over a hundred years later carrying on the family tradition. In 2004 my wife Marcia and I bought out the Kalis Funeral Home at 2505 North Dixie Hwy. in Wilton Manors to become one of the last independent funeral home providers in the area. Asked if being independent is an advantage, Marcia says, Indeed it is. We are able to accommodate any request made by the family of the deceased. No one has ever been refused service because of an economic position. Because we do not need to call a corporate of ce or Wall Street for a decision, we can work on the spot with every clients budget. Bernie elaborates. We are not controlled by any national chain or corporation. We can provide value and service that has become uncommon in an industry dominated by mergers and acquisitions. Its not hard for us to compete because we are accountable only to the families we serve. Bernie is a licensed funeral director and embalmer as are Ryan L. Waggoner and James D.Caudill, who are associates in this familys business. A licensed mortician must have a minimum of a two year associates degree in mortuary science, serve a one year internship and pass the national and state funeral director exams. And years of experience, such as we Kalis McIntee Funeral & Cremation Center is a third generation, family-owned and operated funeral provider Oakland Park In honor of Child Passenger Safety Week, the Broward Sheriffs Of ce is hosting a Car Seat Installation & Safety Day on Saturday, Sept. 22, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Lipton Toyota, 1700 W. Oakland Park Blvd. The event will include car seat safety information, free installation by specially trained BSO technicians and fun activities for the kids. Baby seat checkhave, certainly adds warmth and dimension to our quality of service, Bernie says. Marcia handles the business end of the funeral home and is quick to answer the question about changes over the years. Id estimate that 75 percent of arrangements chosen now are cremation. Bernie tells why. Although the traditional funeral is available, its chosen less and less because the corporate owned cemeteries charge so much for ground and crypt burial. Because of these high costs, more families are choosing cremation unless they already have a prepaid plot. Most city-owned cemeteries are much more affordable and we point this out to clients who want a traditional burial. For cremation, KalisMcIntee transports the deceased directly to their funeral home where he or she is held for 48 hours, required by law. This time period allows for the family and friends to say farewell informally or at a service. Our service will procure and handle all necessary documentation prior to the cremation, Bernie explains. If requested, we will ful ll any stated desire for disposition of the cremated remains, be it scattering or inurnment at a cemetery. Weve scattered ashes at sea, on golf courses, at the race track and other surprising places. He adds, Florida is such a melting pot, its not unusual to have requests for the deceased to be transported out of state and even out of country. Families are so spread out now that they seldom see each other except at weddings and funerals. Knowing that, we treat families who gather in our funeral home as if they are our own, providing celebration of life, church, chapel and home services. He cites a statistic. It is projected that a family will have a loss once every seven years. Pre-planning is a great help to surviving families. There are two options to pre-planning, funded and unfunded. We offer both for those who want to determine every detail of their nal arrangements. In either case, we keep all information on le so that the family does not have to make decisions See KALIS on page 16Bernie and Marcia McIntee sit still long enough to tell The Pelican all about their third generation funeral business, one of the last family-owned and operated, independent funeral providers in the area. Kalis-McIntee Funeral & Cremation Center is located at 2505 N. Dixie Hwy. in Wilton Manors.Garden Club meeting Pompano Beach The Pompano Beach Garden Club meeting will be Monday, Oct. 8, at 12:30 p.m. It will be held at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center,1801 NE 6 St. Pompano Beach and is open to the public The program Growing Backyard Vegetables & Tomatoes will be presented by Steve Marmot, Retired photographer & backyard gardener Refreshments will be served. Call Edie with any questions. 954-943-2699Budget hearing for Broward CountyBroward The nal public budget hearing for Broward County will be held on Thursday, Sept. 27, beginning at 5:01 p.m. at the Broward County Governmental Center, 115 S. Andrews Avenue, Room 422, in Fort Lauderdale. For more information, visit www. broward.org or call 954-8314000.

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The Pelican 9 Friday, September 21, 2012 Dunns Run offers more family-friendly entertainment this year By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach Arguably one of the most prestigious events for serious runners in the tri-county area, Dunns Run is now attracting families to the fold. The 16th annual event set for Sunday, Oct. 7 is planned with kids in mind. A kids fun run up and down Ocean Way, bounce houses and the Florida Panthers Street Team mobile game station, appearances by professional sports mascots and a chance for young artists to paint a BSO re truck are part of the day. In addition, rewards for those raising the most money include two family-friendly vacations, one in Kissimmee, the other, in Las Vegas. It takes about 2,000 people participants and volunteersto stage the Run which last year raised $109,000 for the Boys & Girls Club of Broward County. Hoping to appeal to all levels of runners, the Run includes USATF-certi ed 5mile and 5K runs and a 5K walk [a little more than 3 miles]. Prizes are given in multiple categories from serious male and female runners according to age to youngsters age nine and under. Annually, the Run attracts the largest racing eld in South Florida. The ve-mile run is the big draw for the serious runners, said Danielle Cox, senior events director for the Boys and Girls Clubs. Its a great training run for halfmarathoners. Jeweler Jim Dunn conceived the run to bring attention to Northeast Broward where he and his wife Ann Marie and son Sean have been in business in Lighthouse Point for 33 years. Said Cox, Jim Dunn and J.R. Dunn Jewelers have led this event for 16 years making it one of the premier races in South Florida. Because of community leaders like Jim Dunn we are able to make a Its almost time for the big race!See DUNNS RUN on page 15 requested. Event is at 1 p.m. at Unitarian Universalist Church of Ft Lauderdale, 3970 NW 21 Ave., Oakland Park. 908-477-7812. 9-24 Wilton Manors City Commission meeting at 7 p.m. at city hall, 2020 Wilton Drive. 9-24 Pompano Beach City Commission meeting at 7 p.m. at city hall, 100 W. Atlantic Blvd. 9-24 Lighthouse Point City Commission meeting at 7:30 p.m. at city hall, 2200 N.E. 38 St. 9-24 Lauderdale-ByThe-Sea Town Commission meeting at 7 p.m. at Jarvis Hall, 4501 Ocean Drive. 9-24 Alcoholics Anonymou s meeting from SightingsContinued from page 6 10 to 11 a.m. at St. Nicholas Episcopal Church, 1111 E. Sample Road, Pompano Beach. 954-942-5887. 9-25 Card party held by the Benevolent Patriotic Order of Does Drove 142 is scheduled from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Pompano Beach Elks Lodge, 700 NE 10 St. Open to the public. Bring your table of friends or group. Cost is $4 and includes dessert, coffee or tea. Call 561-479-2002 for reservations. 9-26 2012 Glam-ATHON from 6 to 9 p.m. at Stout Sports Bar and Grill, 3419 N. Andrews Ave., Oakland Park. Cost is $25 and includes two drinks and appetizers. Proceeds bene t those ghting cancer. 954907-4254. See SIGHTINGS page 15

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10 The PelicanFriday, September 21, 2012 Making a DifferencePhyllis J. Neuberger wants your suggestions about people who are making a difference. Phylliss new book, China Dahl, is available on amazon.com. Call 954-7838700. Briefs Community Day at Jaco Pastorius ParkOakland Park The Broward Sheriffs Of ce plans a Community Day from 3 to 8 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 29, at Jaco Pastorius Park, 4000 N. Dixie Highway. Area residents are invited to join Sheriff Al Lamberti and BSO personnel to view BSO displays, including the mounted unit, K-9 teams and aviation. A bounce house will be at the event for children, and youngsters will have a chance to paint a re truck. For more information, call 954-831-8902. By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFBlair Anderson, president of the local Pompano Beach Lions Club, says, I sometimes think were the best kept secret around and thats a shame because we do a lot of wonderful things for our immediate community and international communities as well. Lions international network has l.3 million men and women in 202 countries working together to answer the challenges and needs of people world wide. Locally, our group meets at Galuppis Restaurant, 1103 N. Federal Hwy. in Pompano every rst and third Monday for a dinner meeting at 7 p.m. We have 30 members including sunbirds and associates who come from Boca Raton, Deer eld, Pompano, New Port Richey, Canada and Alaska.Pompano Beach Lions Club celebrates 65 years of volunteer service to the local communityThis groups annual big event is the Back to School Shopping Spree which happened Aug. 11. Anderson lls in the details. We took 45 boys and girls, kindergarten through fourth grade, shopping at the Walmart store at 441 and Hillsboro Boulevard. Each child had $50 to spend on school clothing and supplies. One volunteer and usually a parent accompanied each child who shopped from a list that usually included sneakers or shoes, shirt, slacks, underwear and other needed items. In addition Broward County School System provided a back pack lled with necessary school supplies. It was thrilling to see these kids choose new clothing, often for rst time in their lives, and it was satisfying to know they would start school as well equipped as their more fortunate peers. The children involved were selected by school social workers or guidance counselors. They were all from Pompano Beach, Deer eld Beach and Coconut Creek. We had received about $7,000 in donations from local businesses to cover the cost of this rewarding event, says Anderson. He adds, As a club, we usually raise between $10,000 and $12,000 a year for good causes. Target is one of our biggest donors. We want everyone to see a better tomorrow. Thats why we support sight programs and services including vision screenings, eye banks, eyeglass recycling and services to those at risk of losing their sight. This past year we fund raised and donated to schools, disaster relief, Special Olympics, youth exchange and outreach. We speci cally donated to the Florida Lions Community Hearing Bank, Florida Lions Conklin Center which is the rst multi-handicapped center in the United States, Florida Lions Eye Bank, Florida Lions Foundation for the Blind, Dog Guides for the Deaf, Jose Sanchez Clinic, Lions Club International Foundation, Leader Dog for the Blind, Lions Association for Diabetes Awareness, Southeastern Guide Dog, Hearing Dog and more. The Lions Club members have a presence at most community events including White Cane Day, Kids Day in Lighthouse Point, Nautical Flea Market, Spring Fling, Music Under the Stars, Christmas in the Park and more. New members are welcome. Contact Anderson at 561-251-5471. To our local Lions Club, thank you for the many things you have done for the Pompano Beach area and the world at large. White Cane Day is one of many of the Pompano Beach Lions Club fund raisers. At right, President Blair Anderson holds a cane he designed of white PVC pipe with a convenient slot for contributions.High Holy Days at Chabad of North BrowardThe Chabad of North Broward Beaches, 4081 N. Federal Hwy., Suite 100A, Lighthouse Point, will hold its High Holy Days services starting tonight, Sept. 21, at 7 p.m. The candle lighting ceremony will begin at 7 p.m. Services will also be held Tuesday, Sept. 25, the eve of Yom Kippur, at 6:55 p.m. and end at 7:46 p.m. On Friday, Sept. 28 candles will be lit at 6:52 p.m. and the service ends at 7:43 p.m. Services will be held again on Sunday, Sept. 30 starting at 6:50 p.m. and at 7:41 p.m. on Monday, Oct. 1. Final services will be held on Tuesday, Oct. 2 at 7:40 p.m. Yom Kippur Day is Wednesday, Sept. 26 starting at 9:30 a.m. For more information, visit www. chabadofnbrowardbeaches. com or call 347-410-1106.Youth Soccer RegistrationOakland Park Registration is currently under way for the citys 2012-13 Youth Soccer Season. All players must be between the ages of 4 and 16 as of Nov. 12, 2012. Registration fee is $55 for residents and $100 for non-residents. Practices and games are held at the Wimberly Athletic Complex, Stevens Field and Northeast High School. Registration ends on Oct. 12 or when the league is full. To learn more about Youth Soccer, visit: www. oaklandpark .gov or call 954630-4515. Send your news to mdpelican@yahoo.com or 954-783-8700!

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The Pelican 11 Friday, September 21, 2012 By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach Kimi Farrington has 5,000 fewer reasons to worry about college. On Tuesday, Farrington received a $5,000 college scholarship from Sun Life Financial as part of its Rising Stars program. This will give me the motivation to continue with my college education, said Farrington, a senior at Pompano Beach High School with a 4.3 GPA. Farrington said she plans to attend Florida State University and study Constitutional law. Im going to be the rst African American female Supreme Pompano Beach High student receives $5,000 for Florida State Court justice, she said. Farrington received the scholarship because of an essay she wrote about education and her work as an administrative assistant with HANDY, an organization that works to empower vulnerable youth to become productive members of society. Presenting the scholarship was Miami Dolphins offensive lineman Mike Pouncey, who announced that Farrington was one of four students in South Florida to receive the scholarship from Sun Life and that she would also be part of a special pregame ceremony at a Miami Dolphins game on Nov. 10 at Sun Life Stadium. She just wrote a really good essay. A lot of what she said stuck with the See SCHOLARSHIP on page 12Kimi Farrington receives her giant novelty check from Miami Dolphins player Mike Pouncey. Farringtons real check, from Sun Life, is a $5,000 college scholarship. [Staff photo]

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12 The PelicanFriday, September 21, 2012 ScholarshipContinued from page judges, said Kimberly Heald, voluntary bene ts practice leader with Sun Life. Farrington, who lives with her grandmother, has also been the bene ciary of nancial support from HANDY. Mia McFadden, BRACE advisor at Pompano Beach High School, signed up Farrington with HANDY in 2010. I knew this organization would be what she needed to get to FSU, said McFadden. Im blessed, said Farrington. Were blessed to have her, said Kirk Brown, HANDYs senior vice president of programs and business development, about Farrington. She kept a positive attitude no matter what life threw at her. For Farringtons grandmother, Jill, its just part of who her granddaughter is. Shes a headstrong girl. Along with the scholarship, Sun Life awarded $50,000 to HANDY. Bike race to bene t Kids In DistressFort Lauderdale Bicyclers are invited to prepare and sign-up for the 11th Annual Inlet Challenge Bicycle Ride which takes place Sunday, Dec. 2 from 5 a.m. to 2 p.m. Each rider must raise $150. All proceeds bene t Kids In Distress. For more information, call 954390-7654.

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The Pelican 13 Friday, September 21, 2012

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14 The PelicanFriday, September 21, 2012 the way their garbage hits the streets. Robert McCaughan, public works director, explains that it is all about curb appeal. Residents were not complying with the original ordinance. And he blames it on a lack of education from the city. With garbage and bulk pick-up taking place eight times a month, nding one day with a street clear of bulk or trash cans is a rare scene, and city of cials want a cleaner look. The rst suggestion from public works was to limit bulk pick-up from eight times a month to once monthly, a suggestion shot down by city commissioners in July. Now, the changes are minimal and the city is sharing information. Here are some of the basic rules for a healthy and safe relationship with those who haul away the trash: 1. Tree trimmings that cannot be bagged, bundled or tied may be placed in the yard, ve feet from the road, for pick-up. 2. Vegetation that can otherwise be contained or tied, should be. 3. Glass or items that can cause harm must be placed in rigid containers. 4. Supermarket bags are not considered garbage bags. [Says McCaughan, Some people use Publix bags and placed several of them on the street for pick-up. These bags are often strewn throughout the neighborhood and they violate the code.] 5. Garbage bags are allowed. [While people have been using them for years, this is a new addition to the rules.] 6. Fluorescent lights and computers must be bagged and sealed if being legally discarded. [Mercury can be emitted if these products are broken.] The above rules are speci cally for single-family residences, duplexes and triplexes. Most people are responsible, says McCaughan. Our long-term goal is to get automated carts. [When that happens] if it doesnt go into the container, it wont be picked up. In two years, when the city places bids for garbage pickup, automated carts will be on the table. Meanwhile, residents who do not comply with the rules of garbage pick-up could receive violations and nes. For more information, visit mypompanobeach.com and search garbage for a full list of requirements. To recycle electronic items like uorescent lights, computers, television and other items at no cost, take them to 2780 N. Powerline Rd. just north of Copans Road on Fridays and Saturdays from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. GarbageContinued from page 1

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The Pelican 15 Friday, September 21, 2012 difference in the lives of our at-risk youth. Originally, the Run/Walk started on Northeast 26 Street in LHP and ended at the beach in Deer eld. Several years ago, the route was changed so that the entire event happens here. Both start and nish lines are on Ocean Way. Deer eld Beach Mayor Peggy Noland thinks the change of venue is a good move. It is much more cost effective and doesnt disrupt traf c or church-goers, she said. It is the smartest move they have made. More money can go to the Boys & Girls Club. Noland, who has walked the distance in the past, will be out of town for this years race. Participants can register online at Dunns Run for a pre-run fee of $30, at one of the two parties or at Runners Edge, 3195 N. Federal Hwy, Boca Raton. Packet parties are being held Sept. 29, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Two Georges in the Cove Shopping Center or Oct. 6, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Panera Bread, 3720 W. Hillsboro Blvd., Deer eld Beach. Panera is providing breakfast to participants and Starbucks and Monster Energy Drink will offer liquid refreshments. Other gifts for the most serious fund raisers include drit running shirts, Honora pearl necklaces, Nike running hoses, the Garmin Forerunner 210 watch which records how far, how fast and how hard the athlete worked, a Tag Heuer watch, Gents Swiss stainless steel watches and a toothwhitening procedure. Dunns RunContinued from page 9 9-27 Wilton Manors Business Association meeting from 12 to 1 p.m. at Shawn & Nicks Courtyard Caf, 2211 Wilton Drive. Visit www. wiltonmanorscourtyardcafe. com for more information. 9-27 Greater Pompano Beach Chamber hosts the State of the City at 7:45 a.m. at the Pompano Elks Lodge #1898, 700 NE 10 St. Mayor Lamar Fisher will talk about the past year and what the citys plans for the SightingsContinued from page 9 See SIGHTINGS page 17

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16 The PelicanFriday, September 21, 2012 at the time of need. Over and over we are told how grateful families are when pre arranged desires have been made known, eliminating this responsibility from the survivors. Marcia explains that Kalis-McIntee has embalming facilities on the premise, unlike the corporate funeral homes that use centralized systems. We also have a chapel and enough space to handle several services at one time. We can provide services for all religions and ethnic groups. We and our staff are all very community oriented and fortunately have many referrals from families pleased with our personalized service. Read what a few surviving families have written Surava Virsion writes, This is the second time I have used your services, and as I was the rst time, I am very satis ed. I chose you the rst time because you were the only one that did not try to sell me something over the phone. Instead you asked me what I was looking for. I will be glad to recommend your services and will use them again. Dear Bryan, Thank you for making this dif cult process manageable. We feel that you went above and beyond in the service rendered to my husband. I have adopted you as one of my sons. Sincerely, Evangeline and the Leontsinis Family. Dear Bryan, . No words can express my thanks to you. . My husband, Father Constantine, told me, I hope Bryan is around when I die to take care of me. Mrs. Evelyn Mitsos. Of cer Stilwell, president/ commander of Broward County Multi-Agency Honor Guard, writes: Thank you and the wonderful staff at the KalisMcIntee Funeral Center for your assistance with our Honor Guard training academy. We recently conducted a training course for 115 Police Of cers and Fire ghters from all over Florida on the practices and protocols on in the line-of-duty death police funeral services. With the assistance of your facility and the important working tools we needed it was a great success. As always you and your staff were willing to lend a hand to a very delicate subject. On behalf of all of our Broward County and the State of Florida Honor Guard Personnel, we thank you. Call 954-566-7621 or email kalismcintee@fdn.com Web site is: www. kalismcintee.comKalisContinued form page 8

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The Pelican 17 Friday, September 21, 2012 Under the White-Miskell ParasailContinued from page 1Bill, parasailing would be prohibited during certain weather conditions, or within certain proximities of power lines, wharfs or other xed objects. It would also require insurance coverage and inspection of ropes and harnesses and other provisions. With our dazzling white beaches and crystal clear water, Florida is a natural magnet for adventure-seeking tourists who want a birds eye view of the spectacular scenery, said Sachs in a statement. But we need to better ensure that they are as safe in the air as they are on the ground, and this legislation is designed to do just that. To help get the bill passed this time, Pompano has directed Russ Klenet & Associates and Becker & Poliakoff, the citys lobbying rms, to petition the leadership of the House and Senate; something the city didnt do before. Current state regulations dont require equipment inspections nor do parasailing operators need to be licensed or carry insurance. Regulations do require vessels towing parasailers to have Coast Guard-approved oatation devices. There must also be one person observing parasailing activity in addition to the person operating the vessel. Florida also prohibits parasailing companies from taking customers out 30 minutes before sunrise or 30 minutes after sunset. State Rep. Gwyn ClarkeReed said she may sign-on as a co-sponsor in the House when the bill is proposed. She views parasailing in the same way she views carnivals and fairs. When we allow carnivals and various attractions [to come to town] they have to be inspected prior to the carnival opening up. I put this in the same kind of category, said Clarke-Reed. There needs to be some kind of inspection [of parasailing equipment], just more oversight on the whole industry. City of cials recently passed a resolution urging the state legislature to pass the bill. Its such common sense. Why dont we regulate this industry? asked Mayor Lamar Fisher. Those who do it right are behind this [regulation]. Rep. James Frishe, a Republican who sponsored the last parasiling safety bill, said the parasailing industry approached him wanting to improve standards that would help weed out companies that dont practice good safety standards on their own. Frishe added that right now Tallahassee is adverse to any bills that involve an increase in regulation or oversight. Its really a challenge, particularly for Democrats, to get bills brought up, said Clarke-Reed. SightingsContinued from page 15 upcoming year are. The cost to attend is $25, includes breakfast and is open to the public. To RSVP send an email to info@pompanobeachchamber.com or call 954-941-2940. 9-27 Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce hosts the Pompano Beach State of the City at 7:45 a.m. at the Pompano Beach Elks Lodge #1898, 700 NE 10 St. Cost is $25, includes breakfast and is open to the public. 954-941-2940. 10-3 Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce hosts Business With A Twist from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at Two Georges at the Cove, 1754 SW 3 Ct., Deer eld Beach. Cost is $10 for Chamber members who RSVP by Oct. 1 and $15 for non-members. 954~941-2940. 10-4 Complimentary breakfast for seniors and up to two friends at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach, at 9:45 a.m. Dr. Paula Hedglon presents Bringing Back Life To Seniors, Naturally. Please RSVP by Oct. 2. 954-2492277.See SIGHTINGS page 19

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18 The Pelican Friday, September 21, 2012 Music Under the StarsPompano Beach The Weedline Band will be the featured performer for Pompanos latest Music Under the Stars concert tonight, Sept. 2, at 7 p.m. just south of the Pompano Beach Fishing Pier, 222 N. Pompano Beach Boulevard. Event is free. According to its website, The Weedline is a rock and roll party band that plays classic rock, modern rock, country, blues, funk and originals that draw from all the above. The sound can be thought of as rock and roll with an acoustic soul. For more information, visit www. pompanobeachcra.com or call 954-786-5535.ReadingPals to aid struggling readersPompano Beach Reading is key to success in school, but one third of Floridas third grade students struggle with this basic skill and cannot read at minimally pro cient levels. To address this problem, ReadingPals, a statewide, threeyear initiative sponsored by United Way, is being launched to engage, encourage and enhance early literacy among prekindergarten through third grade students in lower-performing schools. On Monday, Sept. 24 from 9 to 11 a.m. A ReadingPals training will be held at Pompano Beach Elementary School, 700 NE 13th Ave. Mentors will be trained and tour the school, meet the students and staff and begin reading with students. Two Broward schools will serve as pilot locations for the program. Beginning October 15, students at Pompano Beach Elementary School and Endeavour Primary Learning Center in Lauderhill will be teamed with trained volunteer mentors who will work one-on-one or with small groups with students to read a series of three books. When each book is completed, the students will get to keep it and take the book home. All pre-kindergarten through third grade students at both schools will receive the books, however, the number of students taking part in the ReadingPals program will be determined by the number trained volunteers available. Volunteer mentors will spend one hour a week for a minimum of 25 weeks. For more information on ReadingPals or to sign-up to become a volunteer, contact Lola Jordan at 954-462-4850.Tell The Pelican about your news! mdpelican@yahoo. com or 954-783-8700!

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The Pelican 19 Friday, September 21, 2012 boilers. So they built a lab and a demonstration indoor algae growing machine, or photo bio-reactor. Then they raised funds through family and friends and moved to the Oakland Park site. They needed room to design and build a commercial scale algae cultivation system. From small vials to huge tanks They begin with algae strains purchased from the University of Texas grown in small vials. The product is gradually moved to larger vials until it reaches a certain cell density and is ready for a large tank. Each tank holds 3,000 gallons of water and material. The water is separated from the algae in a centrifuge and the algae is moved to a hydrodynamic separator, like a homogenizer. The shell is cracked and the oil released. Algae is about 40 percent oil Omega 3, the good fat. The oil is blended with rosemary, Vitamin E and olive oil, which acts as a preservative and is used in vitamins and supplements. The water is treated by reverse osmosis and by ultraviolet light and is reused. Only about three percent is lost in this process. When algae is grown outdoors, about 35 percent of the water is lost through evaporation. The company is now starting to produce commercial scale quantities of algae biomass and extracting nutraceutical products, which they hope to sell to cosmetic and pharmaceutical companies. It is a popular ingredient in skin cream and sunscreen. Consumers are now demanding natural compounds in cosmetics, and the companies are getting away from chemicals, Moran said. The algae cake or shell has potential as an ingredient in sh food for commercial sh farms, Moran said. Currently, corn and soy products, which pollute the water, are used. The cake could also be used in foods for cows and pigs. Algae to Omega will soon conduct a taste test with sh to see which food is preferred, the corn and soy or algae cake. In the future, Moran said, batteries will be made from algae since it can produce 1,000 more charges than conventional material and is biodegradable. Algae to Omega has nine employees at the Oakland Park site and three at the corporate headquarters at 200 S. Andrews Ave. in downtown Fort Lauderdale. The Oakland Park employees have skills in plumbing, electricity, construction or a biology background. Algae is the key to all life. Seventy percent of the oxygen we breathe comes from algae, Moran said. AlgaeContinued from page 4 FridaysPompano Proud meets every second Friday of the month at McNab Park, 2250 E. Atlantic Blvd., from 8:30 to 11 a.m. Every second Sunday the group meets at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach, at 6 p.m. 954-562-3232. The Pompano Beach Rotary Club meets Fridays at 12:15 p.m. at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. 954-786-3274. Art Gallery 21 is open every Friday from 7 to 9 p.m. The gallery, located at the Womans Club of Wilton Manors, 600 NE 21 Court, features various artwork from various artists across the State of Florida. Admission is free. Visit www.canawm.org for more information.SaturdaysPony rides are available at Sand & Spurs Equestrian Park, 1600 NE 5 Ave., Pompano Beach, from 9 to 11:30 a.m. Cost is $3 per ride. 954-786-4507. The Pompano Beach Kiwanis Club Westside meets the rst and third Saturdays of the month at 8:30 a.m. at the E. Pat Larkins Community Center, 520 MLK Blvd., Pompano Beach. 954-782-8096. The Deer eld Beach West Kiwanis Club meets the second and fourth Saturdays of the month at 9 a.m. at Westside Park, 445 SW 2 St., Deer eld Beach. 954-54-7329883. Kayak rentals are available Saturdays and Sundays at Richardson Historic Park, 1937 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Visit www.AtlanticCoastKayak.com or 954-7810073 for rates. The Wilton Manors Green Market is held every Saturday and Sunday at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. 954-592-0381. The Deer eld Beach West Kiwanis Club meets the second and fourth Saturdays of the month at 9 a.m. at Westside Park, 445 SW 2 St., Deer eld Beach. 954-54-7329883. Pompano Green Market is held every Saturday from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the corner of Atlantic Boulevard and Cypress Road. Vendors wanted. 954-782-3015.MondaysPlay ping-pong from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Cost is $1. 954-3902130. SightingsContinued from page 17 See SIGHTINGS page 21

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20 The Pelican Friday, September 21, 2012 at Sullivan Park and improvements to the neighborhood west of the Cove Shopping Center. The size of the park, at Hillsboro Blvd. and the Intracoastal Waterway, was increased this year by the $2 million purchase of the former Riverview Restaurant site. It will be developed by the Community Redevelopment Agency and is anticipated to cost $4 million, 50 percent of that refundable through a grant from the Florida Inland Navigational District. Improvements to Cove Gardens, at a cost of $1.2 million, will include drainage, sidewalks, paving, landscaping and lighting.Agreement gives city more indoor recreational spaceDeer eld Beach The city is expanding its recreational facilities through an agreement with the Indoor Sports Complex at Powerline Road and SW 10 St. The parks and recreation department is making available its outdoor athletic facilities in return for the use of the indoor courts and arenas at the complex. Owners of the Sports Complex will have the use of four of the citys recreational facilities. The parks and recreation department will have access to the basketball/volleyball courts, roller hockey and skate rinks, soccer eld, tness center, and multi-purpose room within the Sports Complex. The agreement calls for the Sports Complex to meet all city rules and regulations. Scheduling will be done by parks and recreation personnel. Available for Sports Complex activities will be the city aquatic center, Westside Park and gymnasium, the middle school athletic complex and the beach sand volley ball courts.Pioneer resident dies; historical society marks 40th year hereDeer eld Beach Pioneer resident Jackie Stewart died this week. Born here in 1925, Stewart was the daughter of William Gaskin, owner of a general store on W. Hillsboro Blvd. and NW 1 Street. Gaskin was also the police chief for a time, a situation Amie Kay Tanner characterized as everyone had a lot of jobs in the old days. Stewart had two daughters and Tanner, president of the Deer eld Beach Historical Society, said visiting with the family this week was a walk through history. Tanner takes oral histories of the towns long time residents and told city commissioners Tuesday that, If we dont save yesterday today, it wont be here tomorrow. She also took time to remind the public that this year is the 40th anniversary of the local historical society headquartered at the Butler House at SE 4 Avenue and Hillsboro Blvd. Its the Ruby Celebration, Tanner said. So if you have any rubies you would like to donate, feel free. Vice Mayor Bill Ganz did not offer up any jewelry, but did say he intends to become a member of the historical society and urged other citizens to follow his lead.New recycling program is underwayDeer eld Beach The big blue recycling carts are being rolled out this week starting at the east end of town. The 65-gallon bins handle all household recyclables and residents will receive points based on the amount they recycle. Points will be redeemable at local stores. A bonus of 75 points will be awarded to those who turn in the handheld yellow and blue bins to the recycling center at 401 SW 4 ST., or they can be placed at the curb. The big blue carts are to be set three to ve feet away for other objectsmailboxes, other bins, etc., so they can be emptied by automated trucks. For more information on the new recycling program, go to the ALL IN link on the citys website, deer eld-beach.com.Womans Club hosting discussion of November ballot amendments Deer eld Beach The 11 amendments to the state constitution appearing on the November ballot will be explained by a representative of the League of Women Voters Tuesday, Oct. 9, 2 p.m. at a meeting being hosted by the Deer eld Beach Womans Club. The League is a nonpartisan organization that aims to educate voters on the issues. The amendments address issues ranging from additional Homestead Exemption bene ts for disabled veterans, their surviving spouses and low-income seniors to public funding of religious institutions to removal of privacy rights in cases of abortion. The League is urging no votes on all of the amendments. Persons interested in attending this session should call the Womans Club, 910 E. Hillsboro Blvd., 954-421-4700.McKeithan Pavilion being rebuiltDeer eld Beach The pavilion at Johnnie McKeithan Park, damaged last February by vandals who set re to the structure, is getting a new roof. Commissioners voted this week to spend $110,000 for a metal roof rather than less expensive shingles. The metal will last ve to 10 years longer, City Manager Burgess Hanson said. Also being replaced at the park at 629 N. Deer eld Ave. is an outdoor barbecue grill. Ocean Way closed for pier constructionDeer eld Beach Ocean Way will be closed next week as the entrance to the shing pier is being constructed. No traf c or parking will be permitted in front of the Wyndham Resort from NE 2 Street to the juncture of NE 21 Avenue from Sept 24 to 28. A guest drop-off area will be provided for the hotel.Commissioners getting meeting breaks Deer eld Beach Commissioners will meet only once a month for the next four months. Due to con icts presented by holidays, four regularly scheduled meetings have been cancelled. Still on the schedule are commission meetings on Tuesday, Oct. 15, Tuesday, Nov. 6, Tuesday, Dec. 4 and Tuesday, Jan. 15. Special meetings will be called as needed.Deer eldContinued form page1

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The Pelican 21 Friday, September 21, 2012 The Gold Coast Toastmasters Club meets on the second and third Monday of the month from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Dennys, 3151 NW 9 Ave., Fort Lauderdale. 954895-3555 or 954-782-9951.TuesdaysYoga every Tuesday from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Cost is $7 per class. Classes are also held Saturday mornings from 10:15 to 11:45 a.m. 954-607-3520. The Oakland Park Historical Society meets on the second Tuesday of every month at 5:30 p.m. at the at Oakland Park Library, 1298 NE 37 St. For more information, call 954-566-9957. Deer eld Beach Rotary Club meets every Tuesday at 12 p.m. at the Deer Creek Golf Club, 2801 Deer Creek Country Club Blvd., Deer eld Beach. 954-630-9593. Pompano Beach-Lighthouse Rotary Club meets every Tuesday at 7:30 a.m. at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. 954972-7178. The American Legion Auxiliary Unit 142, 171 SW 2 St., Pompano Beach, has Bingo on Tuesdays at 7 p.m. Food is available from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. 954-942-2448. A Yoga class is available for all levels at Hagen Park 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors, on Tuesday nights from 6:30 to 8 p.m. and Saturday mornings from 10:30 a.m. until noon. The cost is $7. 305-607-3520. Zonta International meets on the third Tuesday of the month at Duffys Diner, 401 N. Federal Hwy., Deer eld Beach, at 11:15 a.m. Zonta International works to advance the status of women. 561-392-2223.WednesdaysThe Deer eld Beach Historical Society meets on the third Wednesday of each month from 12 to 1 p.m. at the Old School Museum, 232 NE 2 St., Deer eld Beach. For more information, call 954429-0378. The Pompano Beach Historical Society meets on the third Wednesday of every month at 7 p.m. at the Dick & Miriam Hood Center, 217 NE 4 Ave., Pompano Beach. For more information, call 954292-8040. The Wilton Manors Kiwanis Club meets Wednesdays at 6:30 p.m. at 2749 NE 14 Ave., Wilton Manors. 954561-9785. The Oakland Park Kiwanis Club meets Wednesdays from 7:30 to 8:30 a.m. at Peter Pan Diner, 1216 E. Oakland Park Blvd., Oakland Park. 954-566-9957. The Pompano Beach Kiwanis Club meets Wednesdays at noon at the Riverside Grille at the Sands Resort, 125 N. Riverside Drive, Pompano Beach. 954-444-4815. The Greater Pompano Beach Senior Citizens Club meets on the second Wednesday of the month at the Emma Lou Olson Community Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach, at 10 a.m. 954-9437787. The Alzheimers CareSightingsContinued from page 19 See SIGHTINGS on page 24

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22 The Pelican Friday, September 21, 2012 Classi edsCall 954-545-0013 Pelican Classi eds work for you! 954-783-8700! HELP WANTED AFRAID OF DOWNSIZING? Start building a business to supplement your income. Great earnings potential on a part-time basis with Primerica. Call 954729-0192. 9-7SEEKING EMPLOYMENTHHA I Will Take Excellent Care Of The Elderly / Companion Aid Experienced & Certi ed / Have References. Call 845-709-5275. 9-21 HHA Seeks Live In Or Out. Will Do Light Housekeeping, Prepare Meals, Doctors Visit. Speak English. US Citizen. Experienced. References Available. Willing To Travel. 561-908-1017. 9-21 LPN AT CNA PRICES! Will Drive To Dr. Appointments, Lunch, Shopping, Etc. East Broward Area Only! 954-8957850. 9-21 MALE CNA / HHA / COMPANION. Broward County Area. Former EMT. All Certi cations / Compassionate, References. Call Ron 954-2322832. Very Reasonable! 9-21 SERVICES DANNY BOY ELECTRIC Lic & Insured. Lic. #EC13004811. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. 24/Hr Service. 954-290-1443. Beat Any Written Estimate. Sr, Discount. 9-21 GOT JUNK? TRASH HAULING CONDO CLEANUPS Trees Landscape Yard Fill Pressure Wash Roofs Home Repairs Welding Etc. Dave 954-818-9538. 9-28 HANDYMAN PAINTING CARPENTRY Pressure Cleaning. Decks! Everything Around The House. No Job Too Small. FREE Estimates! Call 561-350-3781. 9-28 HONEST HANDYMAN HOME & BUILDING Maintenance/Improvements. No Job Too Small. Fast Friendly Service. Reasonable Rates. Local Resident/Homeowner. Call Today For Your FREE Upfront Quote. No Deposit Required. 754-366-1915. BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIESNew GREEN technology. New defroster control saves energy in home refrigerators, commercial chillers. Patented. All optical. Simple mfg. Strategic partners needed..www.NewAvionics.Com. 954-568-1991. CMUSICIANS WANTEDADVANCED STUDENT MUSICIANS Being Accepted For 2012 2013 Membership in the American Legion Symphonic Band! Earn Community Service Points While Improving Your Performance Skills! Rehearsals On Wednesday Evenings from 7pm to 9pm at American Legion Post 142, 171 SW 2nd St., Pompano Beach, FL 33060. Band Director Recommendation Encouraged. Email Music Director James McGonigal at info.legionband@ gmail.com for more information. C OPEN HOUSEPOMPANO 2 / 1 OPEN 9 23 9AM-2PM. 2551 W Golf Blvd. Unit 101 Leisureville. 1st Floor Lakeview! $39,900. Kim Loucks RE-MAX IN MOTION. 954-609-9730. 9-21 REAL ESTATE SERVICESHOMEOWNERSHIP 45% Cheaper Than Renting! Low Interest Rate! NOW Is The Time To Buy! Yvette Gaussen YES WE CAN REALTY. 954-614-7773 954-773-8340. 9-21 REAL ESTATE WANTEDNEED TO BUY FOR CASH FAST!! Small Duplex Or Triplex With At Least One 3 / 2 Or 2 / 2 E Of Federal Hwy. 954-563-3533. 9-21MOBILE HOMESDEERFIELD DOUBLE WIDE 2 / 2 TIDEWATER ESTATES 55+. Background / Credit Check Required. $685 Mo Lot Rent. $5,000 Firm. 954-4260500. 9-21 CEMETERY PLOTS2 PREMIUM LOTS Forest Lawn Cemetery For Sale. $1,500 OBO Call 561-603-9383. OR 863-9461646. C. REAL ESTATE WANTEDI BUY HOUSES!! CASH!! AS IS! QUICK CLOSE! ANY AREA ANY CONDITION! NO EQUITY OK. CALL NOW 954-914-2355. 10-19 CONDOS FOR SALEPOMPANO BEACH DIRECT INTRACOASTAL! Feels Like Youre On A Boat. Pool On Intracoastal. Wrap-A-Round Balcony. Spacious 1 / 1.5 $178K. Also For Rent $1350 Month. 954-588-0562. 10-12 DEERFIELD CENTURY VILLAGE! Breathtaking, Stunning 2/2, Remodeled, Furnished 2nd Floor. Near Pool, Clubhouse, Restaurant. Fabulous Location. $150K. Jennifer Century Village RE. 954-650-5956. 9-21 POMPANO BEACH Sea Haven. Magni cent Waterfront Resort Type Condos. Covered Parking. 2 Blocks Beach. Heated Pool, Security. 1 / 1.5 & 2 / 2 Screened Balcony. From $110K. Coldwell Banker 954-629-1324. CONDOS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH 1 Block To Ocean 1 / 1 Fully Furnished. Flat Screens, DVD, Pool, Laundry, Private Parking, BBQ. Monthly Thru December $850. 954-540-9724. 9-21 FT LAUDERDALE ICW Gated Community. 1 / 1.5 Furnished / Unfurnished. Granite, Wood Floors, Lots Of Amenities. Great Location. No Pets. $950 Month. Call 954588-1644. 9-28 POMPANO BEACH Sea Haven 1 / 1.5 or 2 / 2. Walk To Beach. Covered Parking. Security. Heated Pool. Exercise Room. BBQ. Resort Type Waterfront Complex. From $900. Call 954-629-1324. POMPANO BEACH 55+ Community. Renovated 2 / 1 Pool! Sunroom Ground Floor, Beautifully Furnished. On Golf Course. $750 Mo. 1 Year +. Good Credit. 917-5440771. 9-28 LIGHTHOUSE PT 2 / 2 ---1st Floor 55+. Pool, Storage, Laundry Facilities. $900 Month / Water Included. Dorothy Bassano Better Homes & Gardens Real Estate. 954-5624919. 9-28 POMPANO INTRACOASTAL AT ITS BEST. Breathtaking Views! Feels Like Youre On A Boat, Pool Deck On Intracoastal. Spacious 1 / 1.5 $1350 Month. A1A S.E. Corner Unobstructed Views. 2/2 $1,500 Month. 954-588-0562. LEISUREVILLE 55+ 2 / 1 Unfurnished / Furnished $795 / $875 1st & Last. 1st Floor. Free Golf By Pool / Clubhouse. 954-590-8177. 9-28 APTS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH 1 BR & 2 BR APTS FOR RENT. Remodeled, Paint, Tile, Etc. Washer / Dryer On Site. Pool. Pet Friendly. George 954-8095030. 9-21 POMPANO MCNAB RD & NE 18 AVENUE 1 & 2 Bedrooms Furnished / Unfurnished. $650 $895 And Up. Pool, Tile Floors. Central A / C. 954-6102327. 9-21

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The Pelican 23 Friday, September 21, 2012 SightingsSightings is a calendar for Northeast Broward county. Send you event information to mdpelican@ yahoo.comClassi edsCall 954-545-0013 POMPANO BEACH 1/1 $650 NW NE 2/1 $950 2/1,5 Townhouse -Pool $1095 SW 1/1 $750 2/1 $925 2/2 $950 ALL FREE WATER. Rent + $70 App Mov-U-In. 954-7816299. 9-2 ATLANTIC / FEDERAL Efficiency $175 Week. No Security. Cable, Electric, Internet, FREE W / D. Good Job. No Drug Charges. No Evictions. 954-709-0694. 9-21 LAUDERDALE BY THE SEA 1 / 1 Ground Floor. Central A / C. Parking Out Back Door. Laundry, Courtyard. 200 Steps Beach. $1,100. 954-8685560 Wayne. 9-21 BEST DEAL IN POMPANO BEACH Efficiency With Kitchen, Laundry & Pool. No Pets. Weekly Monthly Season. 500 To Beach. 954294-8483 Or 248-736-1533. 10-5 POMPANO BEACH NE 13 Street. Furnished 1 / 1 All Included! No Pets. October Thru December. 1/2 Block To Beach. $925. Call 954-4100943. 9-21 POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 Bedroom From $500. Easy Movein. 1/2 OFF DEPOSIT. Remodeled. Great Location. 954-783-1088 For More Info. 12-14 COMMERCIAL FOR RENT-SALEPOMPANO COMMERCIAL OFFICE Spaces Available. Ranging From As Low As $500 To $700 Depending On Square Footage. Please Call Darci At 954-7833723. 10-5 DEERFIELD BEACH Retail Of ce Warehouse 700 Sq Ft With Loft. A/C, Bathroom. $575 Per Month. Call For More Info 561-654-1331 Or 561-9985681. 9-21 The Florida Humane Society is requesting donations to pay for the surgery costs of Micky [Above] which ran about $3,000. To donate, visit www. floridahumanesociety. org or call 954-9746152. Help Micky

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24 The Pelican Friday, September 21, 2012 WORSHIP DIRECTORY: Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad. Rev. Hyvenson Joseph Budget balanced with slight decrease in tax rateBy Judy WilsonPELICAN SATFFHillsboro Beach Commissioners have tentatively approved a $5 million operating budget financed chiefly by a millage rate of 3.49, slightly less than last year. The fiscal plan for 2012-13 includes $2.3 million for police department expenses, $244,000 more than the current year, enough to hire an additional sworn officer, buy a patrol car and begin an upgrade of the communications system. In making final tweaks to the proposed budget, the commission cut $15,000 in overtime expenses from the police budget and another $28,406 in police salaries based on new CPI figures, were able to reduce insurance costs by $8,000 and the price of trash hauling by $8,700. They also reduced their own annual stipend by $11,303, almost half of the current figure. Thats a very good sign for Hillsboro, said Steven Bloom, the towns financial consultant. Values in a lot of towns are still going down. Final approval of the budget was set for Thursday evening. givers Support Group meets Wednesdays from 10 a.m. to noon at the NE Focal Point Alzheimers Day Care Center, 301 NW 2 Ave., Deer eld BeachThursdaysThe Wilton Manors Historical Society meets on the third Thursday of the month at Wilton Manors City Hall, 2020 Wilton Drive, at 7 p.m. For more information, call 954-566-9019 or 954-5668219. The Rotary Club of Oakland Park/Wilton Manors meets every Thursday from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. at Tequila Sunrise Mexican Grill, 4711 N. Dixie Hwy., Oakland Park. 954-491-6158. The Deer eld Beach Kiwanis Club meets at noon every Thursday at the Deer eld Beach Hilton, 100 Fairway Dr., Deer eld Beach 954-242-6083. The Pompano Beach Republican Club meets on the fourth Thursday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach. 954-786-7536.Upcoming10-5 Boca Raton The 40th anniversary celebration of Boca Raton Christian School takes place Friday, Oct. 5 from 7 to 8:30 p.m. at Boca Raton Community Church Sanctuary, 601 NW 4 Ave. Free admission. 561391-2727. 10-7 16th Annual Dunns Run takes place at 7:30 a.m. at the main Deer eld Beach Parking lot located on Ocean Way and Southeast 2 Street and proceeds bene t the Boys & Girls Clubs of Broward County. Visit www.dunnsrun.com or call 954-563-2822. 10-17 Womens Health Expo at the North Broward Medical Center, 201 E. Sample Road, Deer eld Beach from 5 to 8 p.m. There will be food, shopping, activities and giveaways. 954-759-7400. 10-20 Grannys Attic Saturday, October 20 at 8:00am Emma Lou Olson Civic Center Are you looking for a bargain? If so, Grannys Attic is the place to be for great deals. With over 80 vendors selling trinkets and treasures you are sure to nd something you cant live without! Admission is free and the event is held from 8:00am 2:00pm. For more information contact 954-786-4111. Hope to see you there! 10-22 Senior Expo from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at South County Civic Center, 16700 Jog Road, Delray Beach. Expo will include 85 vendors showcasing products and services catered to seniors. Free admission and parking. Visit www.retirement-times.com or call 754-246-2874.Volunteer OpportunitiesThe Deer eld Beach Historical Society needs volunteers to help provide tours of our historic sites, organize photos and archives and to help with general maintenance of our properties; light duties such as general housekeeping. The Deer eld Beach Historical Society is a non pro t 501 (C)(3) organization and has four sites listed on the National Register of Historical Places. To volunteer, call 954-429-0378. Send your Sightings to mdpelican@yahoo.com or call 954-7813-8700!SightingsContinued from page 21Tell The Pelican about your news! mdpelican@ yahoo.com or 954783-8700!

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The Pelican 25 Friday, September 21, 2012 By Malcolm McClintockPELICAN STAFFBella Roma Italian Restaurant & Pizzeria40 B SW 15th Street Pompano Beach Tel: 954-784-3696Pompano Beach For three years now, this clean, cozy pizzeria situated at the corner of McNab Rd and S. Cypress has been impressing area residents and businesses with its endearing blend of authentic Italian fare and expeditious service. Owner Mike Buchinski, who has been operating a larger version of Bella Roma in Coconut Creek for the past 12 years, partnered with budding restaurateurs Paul Moschella and longtime associate Jeff Davis to create a second location that could reach customers all the way to A1A. I have been in this business almost 25 years. I worked in a pizzeria in high school and with some help was eventually able to purchase it, says the hardworking entrepreneur. In the meantime, I was mentored by many outstanding chefs who taught me everything I know and helped me develop my own style. The menu is replete with all the succulent classics. From chicken marsala to veal parmigiana to shrimp Fra Diavolo to baked ziti, Bella Roma offers a bevy of delectable tastes and smells for every palate. The roasted garlic chicken and broccoli in Asiago cream sauce is definitely one of Pompano Beachs Bella Roma restaurant delivers mouthwatering pizzas along with classic Italian faremy favorites, says staff member Jessica Connolly. Other tempting poultry treats include the chicken Francese with white wine lemon butter sauce and the Caprese with fresh mozzarella and oven roasted tomatoes on a bed of delicate fettuccini. The rigatoni a la vodka is one my favorites, says Buchinski a native Floridian who spent some time in NY before returning to the warmer climes of the Sunshine State. Locals know how good our food is. For example, our hand-made paninis and meatball parm subs are huge sellers, says co-owner Moschella who specializes in the promotion and marketing aspects of the business. Once you taste our food, you will be hooked! Seafood lovers can indulge in the eye-catching Zuppa de Pesce which overflows with jumbo shrimp, mussels, calamari and clams sauted with garlic and basil in either a red or white sauce that transports the diner back to the shores of the Mediterranean. Our vegetarian is the most popular of all, says Buchinski. It comes loaded with fresh tomatoes, garlic, spinach, broccoli, eggplant, green peppers, onion, olive oil and pecorino Romano. Even better, Bella Roma gets most of its vegetables from its immediate neighbor; the well-respected By Their Fruit produce market. We have great pizza, great food and a great reputation. People even recognize us from the Coconut Creek restaurant, adds Buchinski who already has plans to expand his eatery to a 40seat restaurant next spring. We use the highest quality ingredients and everything is made fresh to order. My mother Nol has been the biggest positive influence in my life. She has helped me through many tough times, especially after the passing of my brother and father. I really owe everything to her, says Buchinski who is dedicated to providing the best dining experience possible for his customers. Most large entres are in the $7 to $10 range at lunch [slightly higher in the evenings] and the smaller 14 pizzas start at $13. A host of daily specials are offered [be sure to try the $8 large pies on Tuesdays from 3 to 10 p.m.!] and there is ample free parking. Bella Romas huge delivery area stretches from Sample to Oakland Park and Powerline to A1A. Like them on Facebook for additional savings. We do a lot of catering for office functions, birthday parties and everything in between, says Buchinski. We are also very flexible with regard to special requests. If you want lobster tails, then just call ahead of time and we will prepare them for you! By the way, guests are encouraged to bring their own wine for which there is no corking fee. We even provide nice wine glasses! adds Moschella who says that a liquor license is in the offing once the expansion plans come to fruition. For a sweet ending, be sure to try cannoli, cheesecake or the always satisfying chocolate thunder cake. Buon appetito!Owner Mike Buchinski and business partner Paul Moschella show off a few Bella Roma specialties including the highly popular vegetarian pizza. A house specialty the rigatoni a la vodka with balsamic marinated grilled jumbo shrimp is enhanced by prosciutto, sauted shallots, hand-ground pecorino Romano cheese and pink vodka cream sauce. Another Bella Roma favorite is the chicken Porcini composed of a juicy chicken breast sauted in a Madeira wine cream sauce with portabella mushrooms and mascarpone stuffed homemade raviolis. The chicken Caprese features a plump grilled chicken breast topped with fresh mozzarella and oven roasted tomatoes on a bed of delicate fettuccini drenched in a sundried tomato Asiago cheese cream sauce.

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26 The Pelican Friday, September 21, 2012 Lighthouse Point Hes been called Doc Ray, Dr. Mac, Hey You, and The Diving Dinosaur, but he doesnt care what hes called, as long as the right ears listen to his message. And that message is: SAVE THE REEF! Our reef is as important to our economy as the rain forest is to the rest of the world, McAllister said in this interview in 2003. Putting it In the language of politicians, the reef keeps Florida green, meaning green bucks. What draws people to Florida? he asks. Is it not beaches, boats and the underwater world of the reef? And then, slipping into the familiar role of professor, he informs. ,000 years ago Florida had a surface barrier reef similar to Australias. Now submerged, ours runs from Miami to Jupiter or further. Our reef is vital to our ecology. It knocks out signi cant power from the waves of a hurricane. It provides sheries and a destination for the diving industry. And personally, it has given me countless hours of exploring pleasure. McAllister had just celebrated his 80th birthday aboard the Seahorse at the time of this interview. He recalled his party. diving friends and I dove off of the third reef (on Pompano Beach) where we spent about 40 minutes delighting in the beauty of the reef. When we came up, there was a cake and hugs from all the lady divers. Not bad for an old diving dinosaur, huh? Professor Emeritus of Ocean Engineering at Florida Atlantic University, McAllister spent the ten years after his retirement fighting for his beloved reef, underwater, on the telephone and on the computer, There have been many frustrations and few accomplishments, he admitted. One of his admirers said, The most impressive thing about Dr. Ray is that he personifies the right way to do things. Hes kept us active in conservation of biological and cultural resources. McAllister never quit. He was leaving for Amelia Island to present a paper to the Florida Shore and Beach Preservation Association. My paper is about lessons learned from the Hillsboro Inlet dredging disaster. The method used at Hillsboro was destructive to the live reef and it didnt need to be like that. A floating tow line could have prevented the entire problem. Boca Raton had a similar disaster in 1988. My goal is to help prevent still another such disaster. My efforts to help got me tossed out of the Hillsboro Inlet District. But despite my fate, I have a sense of accomplishment because the state is now looking at using identified gaps for future pipeline and cable routes which will avoid damage to the reef. I have explored from the Palm Beach inlet to Hallandale, identifying the locations of those gaps. The findings went to the Department of Environmental Protection of the State of Florida. The boat owner got a stipend for expenses. For me, it was a chance to save the reef which has given me 40 years of pleasure. Where did this love affair with the water world begin for this dedicated man with too many credentials to list. This educator, author, columnist, lecturer and defender of the deep says, I did my first dive into the Long Island Sound. I was 16 wearing a home made helmet and lucky I lived through it. In 1951, while teaching at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, I met my first real divers. I was hooked. Since then, there have been about 5,000 dives in the Atlantic, Pacific, Gulf of Mexico, South Pacific and most recently in Broward and Palm Beach Counties. On the third dive of my life, I was down almost 165 feet and ran out of air. I was lucky to live and somehow unwilling to quit. Since then, Ive hunted for buried treasure in the Keys, milked a whale in the Aleutian Islands and almost drowned jumping on the back of a whale in Bermuda. Its been so exciting. And if all of this isnt enough, McAllister remained an active member of the Lighthouse Point Writers Group. Im working on three books. One is for children entitled The Caveman OG and His Exploits. The second book is a condensation of my published columns about the ocean into book form. The third effort is an autobiography for my grandchildren. Dr. McAllister is survived by two sons, Keith and Kevin; a daughter Karen Day; granddaughters, Lisa and Maureen McAllister; Cristin Day and Kerry McAllister: grandsons, Matthew and Evan McAllister, Patrick Day and great grandchildren Nicholas and Isabella Memorial ServicesA funeral Mass will be offered on Saturday, Sept. 22 at 9:30 a.m. at St. Paul the Apostle Catholic Church, 2700 NE 36 St., Lighthouse Point. The Mass will be followed with a reception at 11 a.m. at The Pompano Beach Elks Lodge, No. 1898, 700 NE 10 St., Pompano Beach. In Lieu of flowers, Ray would appreciate contributions to Catholic Charities USA or Catholic Relief Services. Arrangements entrusted to Kraeer Funeral Home. McAllisterContinued from page 1

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The Pelican 27 Friday, September 21, 2012 Capt. RJ Boyle is an experienced angler in South Florida. His studio is located in Lighthouse Point. Call 954-420-5001. By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFLighthouse Point RJ Boyle has already caught more than a dozen sword sh, each over 200 lbs., and he says hes not done yet. Wednesday alone we caught 12 sh over 200 lbs. The past week has probably Bait migration makes for big catches this weekendthe best big sword sh catches ever recorded here, said Boyle, who added that this weekend should allow anglers to continue catching big sword sh. He credits the migration of bait for the big shing week so far. Basically, this is due to a migration of bait that has moved into our waters. Predominantly squid. Now these sh will stay here as long as that bait is here, and then theyre going to move on, said Boyle, who suspects the bait is moving south towards the Gulf of Mexico. But dont wait too long to get out on the Atlantic Ocean. Once the bait leaves the area so do the predators. The migration of predatory sh completely depends on the migration of bait, said Boyle.Boaters wanted for Holiday Boat ParadePompano Beach Own a boat? Want to show it off? The Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce is looking for boats to be part of its 50th Annual Pompano Beach Holiday Boat Parade. Entry is free and every boat that participates will receive a hand-painted collectible glass ornament designed by local artist Pat Anderson. Big and small boats with few or many decorations will be accepted. The parade will be held Sunday, Dec. 9 starting at 6 p.m. Sponsorship opportunities are also available. To enter, call 954941-2940.Pints for PreservationFort Lauderdale The Broward Trust for Historic Preservation will hold a fundraiser event on Thursday, Sept. 20 from 6 to 8 p.m. at Maguires Hill 16, 535 N. Andrews Ave. Cost is $35 and includes food and drinks and pays for an annual membership. For more information, call 954-357-5553.

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Friday, September 21, 2012 Vol. XX, Issue 38 Wherever you are, read The Pelican @ pompanopelican.com • Send news to siren2415@gmail.com Pompano Beach • Deer eld Beach • Lighthouse Point • Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Wilton Manors • Oakland Park • Hillsboro Beach • The Galt • Palm Aire The P e l i c a n Pelican 67 days left in 2012 Hurricane season By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFThis week, the community learned that Dr. Ray McAllister died peacefully in his sleep at home on Monday. The following story was written in 2003, but Dr. McAllister’s love of the inhabitants of the planet as well as those of the ocean can be told again. Dr. McAllister, a professor, ecologist, writer and diver, will be sorely missed by this and other communities.Obituary Dr. Ray McAllister fought non-stop for Florida’s watersSee McALLISTER on page 26 Dr. Ray McAllister emerges from a dive on his 80th birthday. “What could be more fun than exploring the beauty of the reef with 12 diving buddies on one’s birthday?” he asked. “When we came back aboard the Seahorse there was cake and hugs from the lady divers. Not bad for the Dinosaur Diver!” City getting serious about the rules for garbage and trash pick-upBy Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach “Honey, take the garbage out! The list is on the fridge.” It may not be as bad as all that, but Pompano Beach residents are going to have to pay a bit more attention to See GARBAGE on page 14By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach – The last attempt to increase regulation on Florida’s parasailing industry failed, but city of cials are hoping an upcoming attempt will succeed. The move stems from two deaths, ve years apart, which both occurred in Pompano – Kathleen Miskell, 28, died on Aug. 15 after she plummeted more than 150 ft. to the water and A summer camp project at Kids in Training, an after care center on Powerline Road in Deer eld Beach, produced three decorated rain barrels which will be donated to the Deer eld Beach Cultural Committee for a fund-raiser. Encouraging the idea was art-lover and Deer eld resident Gabriella Gampl who paid for art supplies. The care center stresses programs in art and music as well as homework help. Owner Beverly Irwin said the camp theme was Underwater Adventures and Kioto Murata is pictured putting the nal touches to one of the rain barrels. [Photo by Judy Wilson] Pompano to lobby legislature to increase parasailing regulations Amber White, 15, died in 2007 when the cable connecting her to the boat snapped, and she drifted inland and was slammed into a nearby hotel. State Senator Maria Sachs said when the new legislative session begins in March of 2013, she plans to introduce legislation that would require additional safety regulations for parasailing operations. See PARASAIL on page 17 Re nancing will allow for development of maritime village at Sullivan Park By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach – Commissioners gave nal approval to a $77.8 million operating budget this week that will be nanced in part by a property tax rate of 5.768 mils, no increase over the current year. The city’s scal plan for 2012-13 requires no employee layoffs nor any increase in the re fee. Also approved was a $40 million loan from the Florida Municipal Bond Council to re nance prior loans and provide funds for local road projects, the development of a maritime village See DEERFIELD on page 20

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2 The PelicanFriday, September 21, 2012 The C. Scott Ellington Technological Business Incubator at FAU was dedicated last week in memory of Ellington, who was a Deer eld Beach resident and former executive director of the Research and Development Park. Attending the ceremony were Boca Raton Mayor Susan Whelchel; Palm Beach County Commissioner Steve Abrams and Ellington’s widow Linda as well as three of his grandchildren. The incubator occupies 14,000 square feet of a larger building and, open since March, houses 22 start-up companies, almost full capacity according to current R&D Director Andrew Duffel. Ellington honored at research centerBy Judy VikPELICAN STAFFLauderdale-By-The-Sea – Window screenings are now required on vacant commercial buildings here. Town commissioners approved the new law Tuesday. The vote was 3-2 with Mayor Roseann Minnet and Commissioner Stuart Dodd dissenting. The new rules apply to buildings or individual storefronts that are not open to the public or clientele for more than 21 consecutive days due to lack of a business operation, repair or renovation. In the future, all transparent windows and doors visible from the public right of way must be screened so passersby cannot see inside. Decorative window treatments such as shutters, shades, curtains or blinds, may be used. Heavy paper and fabric also can be used. Screening material can also include artwork or photography but no text, including historical pictures or post cards of the town, artwork of a professional nature or designs or drawings provided by the town of town projects.Window dressings in orderSophia Hooper, Collin and Travis Ellington are pictured with the portrait of their late grandfather Scott Ellington at the ribbon-cutting marking the of cial opening of the C. Scott Ellington Technological Business Incubator at FAU.

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The Pelican 3 Friday, September 21, 2012 Wilton Manors Candidates NightWilton Manors – On Tuesday, Oct. 16 at 7 p.m. there will be a Candidates Night featuring those running for Wilton Manors City Commission. The event, held at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, will include Vice Mayor Tom Green, Commissioner Julie Carson, Sal Torre and Kimber White. On Nov. 6, Wilton Manors residents will vote for two commissioners to serve four-year terms. Because the city is not separated into districts the top two vote-getters will be elected. Refreshments will be served. Cast Your Advertising Net to 7 Northeast Broward Cities The Pelican • 954-783-8700

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4 The PelicanFriday, September 21, 2012 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFOakland Park – An Oakland Park company that cultivates and harvests algae biomass is poised for growth as it expands its market to include cosmetic, vitamin, animal food and pharmaceutical companies. Algae to Omega has been the sole occupant of the massive Oakland Park Station building at 1201 NE 38 St. since May 2010. It occupies 60,000 square feet at the northern end of the former Sears warehouse. The CEO/president is Geronimos Dimitrelos, a former World Team wrestler, who was a candidate for the U.S. Olympic wrestling team until he broke his arm. Dimitrelos wanted to create his own vitamin supplements, so he began researching nutrients and compounds in vitamins. He Broward Algae growers embarking on a much larger market determined he would have to grow a lot of plants to extract the nutrients needed, or he could grow a much smaller amount of algae. Looking into the They start with algae strains in small vials and then move the strains gradually to larger vials and to tanks. [Right] Tom Moran, marketing director, points out one of the eight 3,000gallon tanks now in operation for extracting oil from algae at Algae to Omega in Oakland Park. (Staff photos by Judy Vik) technology of growing algae indoors or outdoors, he determined he would have more control over growth, less water loss and less contamination if he grew algae indoors. Next he had to gure out how to launch a company, said Tom Moran, Algae to Omega marketing director. A cousin introduced Dimitrelos to Ralph Dominguez, a consultant who specializes in business development. He structured the company, did a marketing plan and is now the senior vice president. In August 2009, the company was being run on the roof of the Ocean Manor Hotel on Fort Lauderdale beach. The men were offered the former boiler room if they would clear out the See ALGAE on page 19

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The Pelican 5 Friday, September 21, 2012 By Stephen FellerPELICAN WRITERPompano Beach Drivers in South Florida can scarcely go more than a block without seeing what may be the most effective form of businesses advertising: People holding signs and waving to passing cars. Since the downturn of the economy, local businesses have been searching for ways to draw customers to their lunch specials, furniture sales, ammo clearances and any other service or merchandise people aren’t coming in for. In recent weeks, several Broward County cities, including Hallandale and Margate, have outlawed signs held by people on the street. Pompano Beach, however, has made no move to do so, nor are they cracking down on them. “We’ve got bigger sh to fry,” said Pompano Code Compliance Supervisor Mario Sotolongo. “We address complaints, take a look and then move on.” According to Sotolongo, sign spinners, the catchall term for people hired by businesses to hold the signs and get the attention of drivers, are not violating the law by standing on the sidewalk or in a swale. The law, he said, rules out any “moveable sign,” or something that is leaned against a structure, stuck in the ground, or attached to something. “If a person has a sign in hand, that’s considered freedom of speech, but as soon as it is put down, it has to be addressed under one of the codes,” Sotolongo said. Sotolongo received a call earlier this week from an Sign-holding on street is legal, effective advertising in some citiesanonymous resident about a sign spinner on the corner of Atlantic Boulevard and Andrews Avenue. But the sign and spinner were both gone by the time a compliance of cer got there. Although it may not have been the same sign, several nearby business owners reported an A-frame sign perched at the intersection and a young woman standing next to it. Both of which, they said, are there most days. Ernie Alvarez, manager at Centerfold Cabaret, located a few blocks away at 1350 SW 2 St., said he’s has had a sign and one of his employees out every day for the last few months to advertise the free lunch available to people coming to the club. “From the moment we put it out there, people see it and respond,” he said. The same has been true for Cheetah’s Pompano, another adult club further west on Atlantic Boulevard, where employees have been holding a similar sign on a nearby corner for several months and which has created a bump in business. Several business owners along the US 1 corridor claim they received threats from code of cials six months or more ago and were forced to stop hiring people to hold signs for them. The bump it provides in business, however, for everything from lunch specials to haircuts, has them sending spinners back out despite the risks. “It’s not like the old days, where you can just open the doors,” said Rick Rodriguez, chief operating of cer for Cheetah’s in South Florida, echoing the remarks of business owners who declined to comment for this story. “People don’t have money. We’re doing whatever we See SIGNS on page 7

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6 The PelicanFriday, September 21, 2012 Deer eld Beach, Pompano Beach, Lighthouse Point, LauderdaleBy-The-Sea, Wilton Manors and Oakland ParkWilton Manors • Oakland Park • Hillsboro Beach The Pompano Pelican is published weekly on FridaysStreet Address: 1500-A E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, FL 33060 Telephone: 954-783-8700 • Fax: 954-783-0093Letters to the Editor are encouraged and accepted for print if signed, although a writer’s name will be withheld on request; letters must also include a daytime telephone number. Advertising rates are available upon request. Subscription rate is $31.80 including tax for one year’s delivery in Greater Pompano Beach; $95.40/per year including tax for others in the United States; call 954-783-8700 for rates abroad. The Pelican is a nonpartisan newspaper and reserves the right to decline advertising. Copyright 2012. Reproduction of this publication in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission of the publisher. The Pelican is a member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, Deer eld Beach Chamber and the LBTS Chamber. The Pelican is a state certi ed woman-owned minority business. The Pelican is delivered to businesses, libraries, schools, of ces, hospitals, news racks and single family homes. All advertising and copy is published at the sole discretion of the publisher. We welcome your critiques and ideas concerning this publication. Anne Siren, publisherExecutive Assistant: Mary Hudson Graphics: Rachel Ramirez Windsheimer Bookkeeper: John White Classi eds: Fran Shelby Contributing Writers: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Judy Wilson, Malcolm McClintock, Judy Vik, Michael d’Oliveira Account Executives: Paul Shroads, Carolyn Mann, Bill Heaton, Bill Fox Special Of ce Assistant: Cathy Siren ESTABLISHED 1993 • Volume XX, Issue 38 Founding Editor and PublisherAnne Hanby Siren The Pelican wants to know what you think. Send your thoughts on local, state and national issues to siren2415@gmail.comOpinionImprovement funds should be granted to hotelierTo the Editor, From what I gather, Lauderdale-By-The-Sea’s Hotel Improvement Program was created by the town’s commission to lend a nancial hand, matching expenditure of funds to those hotel owners who make improvements to the curb appeal of their respective hotels; not to their interiors. These improvements can include roof, gutters, facia, doors, windows, paint, pool, driveways, and landscaping. I suppose if a roof were unsightly, an eyesore if you will, it would need to be replaced. That not only is an improvement, but it also eliminates the eyesore! I believe hurricane windows fall in the same category, and Paul Novak should be granted matching funds. Landscaping also falls in the same category. It’s not just a matter of removing debris and weeds, redoing the lawn and cutting branches off shrubs and trees; the grounds may be in need of some new plantings as well. I believe the $25,000 limit in matching funds is suf cient to prevent any abuse of the program. I certainly don’t believe that the program ought to extended to individual homeowners. Dr. Erik H. Schot, PhD Lauderdale-By-The-Sea LettersCOURTESY OF THE LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERSThe countdown clock to Florida’s voter registration deadline is ticking, with less than three weeks to go until Oct. 9. That’s why the League of Women Voters of Florida Education Fund has moved its already active voter registration and support campaign into even higher gear with the addition of a Voter Assistance Hotline, 1-855-FL-VOTER (1-855-358-6837). Hotline callers can get answers to their questions about how changes in Florida’s election law affect them. They can also learn where and how to register to vote, how to check and verify their voter registration information, how to change a name or address, update their signature, nd the location of their polling place, and request a vote-by-mail ballot, along with other vital registration information. “Registration is the key to ensuring that all voters have the chance to make their voices heard on Election Day. Every single vote counts,” said League President Deirdre Macnab. “Our members throughout the state are making renewed face-to-face efforts to boost registration and compensate for lost time, and we’re pleased to add this Voter Assistance Hotline to supplement their efforts.” Through the Voter Assistance Hotline, callers can also schedule League speakers who stand ready to provide groups and organizations with information on the amendments and issues that will appear on the November 6 ballot. The Voter Assistance Hotline is just the latest addition to the League’s growing list of resources for voters. The League’s nonpartisan 2012 Florida Election and Voter Guide is available at public libraries and through local Leagues and other organizations in all 67 counties. In the coming week, the Guide (which is available in Spanish) will also be inserted in newspapers across the state. Also available online for voters, www.BeReadyToVote.org, a one-stop site packed with information for registered voters and those who want to register. The League of Women Voters of Florida, a nonpartisan political organization, encourages informed and active participation in government, works to increase understanding of major public policy issues, and in uences public policy through education and advocacy. For more information, please visit the League’s website at: www.TheFloridaVoter.org.Register by Oct. 6 or you will not get to vote Amendment 8 will gut the foundation of public educationAmendment 8 Proposing an amendment to the State Constitution providing that no individual or entity may be denied, on the basis of religious identity or belief, governmental bene ts, funding, or other support, except as required by the First Amendment of the United States Constitution, and deleting the prohibition against using revenues from the public treasury directly or indirectly in aid of any church, sect, or religious denomination or in aid of any sectarian institution. Amendment 8 is introduced to Florida voters as the Florida Religious Freedom Amendment. The title has a great patriotic ring, but in fact this amendment tolls the death knell for public education. Amendment 8 sounds like it’s about religion; it sounds patriotic, but it misleads voters. A Yes on Amendment 8 will gut the budgets of local school boards. Funds dedicated to public education instead will be used to subsidize parochial and private schools. Let’s not support the marriage of church and state. History proves that is a bad union. The amendment rst appeared as Amendment 7, but on Dec.14, 2011, it was rejected by Leon County Circuit Judge Terry Lewis who took it off the ballot. But State Attorney Pam Bondi rewrote the amendment, and now it’s back with a few changes but the same motive. Voters who make the mistake of approving this amendment will be granting tax money intended for public education to go to private and parochial institutions. Private and parochial schools are options for families who can afford to pay for that choice. They should continue to do so. If we subsidize private and parochial schools, we are slicing funds from public schools, funds that are sorely needed to repair schools and provide the materials and opportunities for every child in this state. Education in America has always been the great equalizer. Public schools offer the great escape route from poverty and ignorance. Disabling public education, which this amendment intends to do, removes that option. Tell Gov. Rick Scott “NO” at the ballot box on Nov. 6. Note: There are 11 amendments on the ballot. The League of Women Voters, a non-partisan group recommends a “No” vote on all 11 amendments. Register to vote before Oct. 9 and vote on Nov. 6

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The Pelican 7 Friday, September 21, 2012 SightingsA community calendar for Northeast Broward County. Send your event information to mdpelican@yahoo.com can.” An employee at Hexstar, a company which buys and sells scrap metal, said the branding by people holding signs or banners is essential to their business. “We moved from Hallandale because the regulations slowed our business,” said the employee, who asked not to be named in print. “They gave us more hurdles to jump through every time we xed an issue.” Unlike a lunch special, which may prompt many drivers to swerve into a parking lot to get a good deal, Hexstar’s signs are needed for branding, so that people think of them when they’ve got metal to unload. Though they’ve been warned about Pompano’s by-the-book approach to all signs by nearby businesses, the employee said there had not been any issues with the city yet. Sotolongo said the city’s position is to approach sign holders only after they’ve received complaints or if the sign holders are blatantly violating the code. In the two months he’s been working in Pompano, he said, that there has been no deluge of complaints and, unless it becomes a safety issue of sidewalks being blocked, or something similar, this is not their priority. “We have to abide by what’s written,” he said. “Our inspectors aren’t out there making things up or trying to do things that aren’t on the books. The main problem is once you have a SignsContinued from pageOakland Park –A wellness clinic for cats and dogs is set from 1 to 4 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 22, at Collins Community Center, 3900 NE Third Ave. Dogs will receive rabies, parvo/distemper vaccines. Cats will receive FVRP vaccine. Pet registration tags will be provided. Cost is $20. All dogs must be on leashes and cats in carriers. Call 954630-4500 for more information. Healthy pets clinic 9-22 – Shred-A-Thon and Prescription Drug Take-Back event from 10 a.m. to noon at the Pride Center, 2040 N. Dixie Hwy, Wilton Manors. Donors who give unused prescription medication get a $5 gift card [one per family] while supplies last. First ve boxes of sensitive documents shredded for free. 954-8318902. 9-22 – Wilton Manors Kiwanis Club Kids Day from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Wilton Manors Elementary School, 2401 NE 3 Ave. Free food, fun and games for elementary school students. 954-5607813. 9-22 – Magical Sounds of the Harp concert from 4 to 6 p.m. at St. Nicholas Episcopal Church, 1111 E. Sample Road, Pompano Beach. Cost is $20 for advanced tickets, $20 at the door and $12 for students. 954-942-5887. 9-22 – Cody’s Angels, a charity founded by BSO Motor Deputy John Meiers, is hosting its second annual golf tournament at Boca Lago Country Club, 8665 Juego Way, Boca Raton at 1:30 p.m. 954-288-7201. 9-23 – Home for the Holidays musical to honor the men and women of the United States military from 2 to 3:30 p.m. at the Herb Skolnick Center, 800 SW 36 Ave., Pompano Beach. Tickets are $15. 954-2748537. 9-23 – FAU professor and activist Mike Budd leads a discussion on Rachel Maddow’s new book, Drift: The Unmooring of American Military Power and the U.S. Love Affair with War. The event is free. Donations are See SIGHTINGS page 9number of these signs out there, how do you regulate something that at some point might become a visual clutter? It’s a ne line we have to walk. The best we can do is follow the written ordinances the best way we can.”Cast Your Advertising Net to 7 Northeast Broward Cities The Pelican • 954-783-8700

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8 The PelicanFriday, September 21, 2012 Business matters The Pelican takes a look at local business owners. You can tell your story here because business matters. 954-783-8700. By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFF“Our history began back with my grandfather, Bernard Leo McIntee, Sr. who owned our family’s rst funeral home in Rochester, New York in 1906,” says Bernie McIntee the third. “And here we are, over a hundred years later carrying on the family tradition. In 2004 my wife Marcia and I bought out the Kalis Funeral Home at 2505 North Dixie Hwy. in Wilton Manors to become one of the last independent funeral home providers in the area.” Asked if being independent is an advantage, Marcia says, “Indeed it is. We are able to accommodate any request made by the family of the deceased. No one has ever been refused service because of an economic position. Because we do not need to call a corporate of ce or Wall Street for a decision, we can work on the spot with every client’s budget.” Bernie elaborates. “We are not controlled by any national chain or corporation. We can provide value and service that has become uncommon in an industry dominated by mergers and acquisitions. It’s not hard for us to compete because we are accountable only to the families we serve.” Bernie is a licensed funeral director and embalmer as are Ryan L. Waggoner and James D.Caudill, who are associates in this family’s business. A licensed mortician must have a minimum of a two year associates degree in mortuary science, serve a one year internship and pass the national and state funeral director exams. “And years of experience, such as we Kalis McIntee Funeral & Cremation Center is a third generation, family-owned and operated funeral provider Oakland Park In honor of Child Passenger Safety Week, the Broward Sheriff’s Of ce is hosting a Car Seat Installation & Safety Day on Saturday, Sept. 22, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Lipton Toyota, 1700 W. Oakland Park Blvd. The event will include car seat safety information, free installation by specially trained BSO technicians and fun activities for the kids. Baby seat checkhave, certainly adds warmth and dimension to our quality of service,” Bernie says. Marcia handles the business end of the funeral home and is quick to answer the question about changes over the years. “I’d estimate that 75 percent of arrangements chosen now are cremation.” Bernie tells why. “Although the traditional funeral is available, it’s chosen less and less because the corporate owned cemeteries charge so much for ground and crypt burial. Because of these high costs, more families are choosing cremation unless they already have a prepaid plot. Most city-owned cemeteries are much more affordable and we point this out to clients who want a traditional burial.” For cremation, KalisMcIntee transports the deceased directly to their funeral home where he or she is held for 48 hours, required by law. This time period allows for the family and friends to say farewell informally or at a service. “Our service will procure and handle all necessary documentation prior to the cremation,” Bernie explains. “If requested, we will ful ll any stated desire for disposition of the cremated remains, be it scattering or inurnment at a cemetery. We’ve scattered ashes at sea, on golf courses, at the race track and other surprising places.” He adds, “Florida is such a melting pot, it’s not unusual to have requests for the deceased to be transported out of state and even out of country. Families are so spread out now that they seldom see each other except at weddings and funerals. Knowing that, we treat families who gather in our funeral home as if they are our own, providing celebration of life, church, chapel and home services.” He cites a statistic. “It is projected that a family will have a loss once every seven years. Pre-planning is a great help to surviving families. There are two options to pre-planning, funded and unfunded. We offer both for those who want to determine every detail of their nal arrangements. In either case, we keep all information on le so that the family does not have to make decisions See KALIS on page 16Bernie and Marcia McIntee sit still long enough to tell The Pelican all about their third generation funeral business, one of the last family-owned and operated, independent funeral providers in the area. Kalis-McIntee Funeral & Cremation Center is located at 2505 N. Dixie Hwy. in Wilton Manors.Garden Club meeting Pompano Beach The Pompano Beach Garden Club meeting will be Monday, Oct. 8, at 12:30 p.m. It will be held at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center,1801 NE 6 St. Pompano Beach and is open to the public The program “Growing Backyard Vegetables & Tomatoes” will be presented by Steve Marmot, Retired photographer & backyard gardener Refreshments will be served. Call Edie with any questions. 954-943-2699Budget hearing for Broward CountyBroward The nal public budget hearing for Broward County will be held on Thursday, Sept. 27, beginning at 5:01 p.m. at the Broward County Governmental Center, 115 S. Andrews Avenue, Room 422, in Fort Lauderdale. For more information, visit www. broward.org or call 954-8314000.

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The Pelican 9 Friday, September 21, 2012 Dunn’s Run offers more family-friendly entertainment this year By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach – Arguably one of the most prestigious events for serious runners in the tri-county area, Dunn’s Run is now attracting families to the fold. The 16th annual event set for Sunday, Oct. 7 is planned with kids in mind. A kids’ fun run up and down Ocean Way, bounce houses and the Florida Panther’s Street Team mobile game station, appearances by professional sports mascots and a chance for young artists to paint a BSO re truck are part of the day. In addition, rewards for those raising the most money include two family-friendly vacations, one in Kissimmee, the other, in Las Vegas. It takes about 2,000 people – participants and volunteersto stage the Run which last year raised $109,000 for the Boys & Girls Club of Broward County. Hoping to appeal to all levels of runners, the Run includes USATF-certi ed 5mile and 5K runs and a 5K walk [a little more than 3 miles]. Prizes are given in multiple categories from serious male and female runners according to age to youngsters age nine and under. Annually, the Run attracts the largest racing eld in South Florida. “The ve-mile run is the big draw for the serious runners,” said Danielle Cox, senior events director for the Boys and Girls Clubs. “It’s a great training run for halfmarathoners.” Jeweler Jim Dunn conceived the run to bring attention to Northeast Broward where he and his wife Ann Marie and son Sean have been in business in Lighthouse Point for 33 years. Said Cox, “Jim Dunn and J.R. Dunn Jewelers have led this event for 16 years making it one of the premier races in South Florida. Because of community leaders like Jim Dunn we are able to make a It’s almost time for the big race!See DUNN’S RUN on page 15 requested. Event is at 1 p.m. at Unitarian Universalist Church of Ft Lauderdale, 3970 NW 21 Ave., Oakland Park. 908-477-7812. 9-24 – Wilton Manors City Commission meeting at 7 p.m. at city hall, 2020 Wilton Drive. 9-24 – Pompano Beach City Commission meeting at 7 p.m. at city hall, 100 W. Atlantic Blvd. 9-24 – Lighthouse Point City Commission meeting at 7:30 p.m. at city hall, 2200 N.E. 38 St. 9-24 – Lauderdale-ByThe-Sea Town Commission meeting at 7 p.m. at Jarvis Hall, 4501 Ocean Drive. 9-24 – Alcoholics Anonymou s meeting from SightingsContinued from page 6 10 to 11 a.m. at St. Nicholas Episcopal Church, 1111 E. Sample Road, Pompano Beach. 954-942-5887. 9-25 – Card party held by the Benevolent Patriotic Order of Does Drove 142 is scheduled from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Pompano Beach Elks Lodge, 700 NE 10 St. Open to the public. Bring your table of friends or group. Cost is $4 and includes dessert, coffee or tea. Call 561-479-2002 for reservations. 9-26 – 2012 Glam-ATHON from 6 to 9 p.m. at Stout Sports Bar and Grill, 3419 N. Andrews Ave., Oakland Park. Cost is $25 and includes two drinks and appetizers. Proceeds bene t those ghting cancer. 954907-4254. See SIGHTINGS page 15

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10 The PelicanFriday, September 21, 2012 Making a DifferencePhyllis J. Neuberger wants your suggestions about people who are making a difference. Phyllis’s new book, China Dahl, is available on amazon.com. Call 954-7838700. Briefs Community Day at Jaco Pastorius ParkOakland Park – The Broward Sheriff’s Of ce plans a Community Day from 3 to 8 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 29, at Jaco Pastorius Park, 4000 N. Dixie Highway. Area residents are invited to join Sheriff Al Lamberti and BSO personnel to view BSO displays, including the mounted unit, K-9 teams and aviation. A bounce house will be at the event for children, and youngsters will have a chance to paint a re truck. For more information, call 954-831-8902. By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFBlair Anderson, president of the local Pompano Beach Lions Club, says, “I sometimes think we’re the best kept secret around and that’s a shame because we do a lot of wonderful things for our immediate community and international communities as well. Lions international network has l.3 million men and women in 202 countries working together to answer the challenges and needs of people world wide.” “Locally, our group meets at Galuppi’s Restaurant, 1103 N. Federal Hwy. in Pompano every rst and third Monday for a dinner meeting at 7 p.m. We have 30 members including sunbirds and associates who come from Boca Raton, Deer eld, Pompano, New Port Richey, Canada and Alaska.”Pompano Beach Lions Club celebrates 65 years of volunteer service to the local communityThis group’s annual big event is the Back to School Shopping Spree which happened Aug. 11. Anderson lls in the details. “We took 45 boys and girls, kindergarten through fourth grade, shopping at the Walmart store at 441 and Hillsboro Boulevard. Each child had $50 to spend on school clothing and supplies. One volunteer and usually a parent accompanied each child who shopped from a list that usually included sneakers or shoes, shirt, slacks, underwear and other needed items. In addition Broward County School System provided a back pack lled with necessary school supplies. It was thrilling to see these kids choose new clothing, often for rst time in their lives, and it was satisfying to know they would start school as well equipped as their more fortunate peers.” The children involved were selected by school social workers or guidance counselors. They were all from Pompano Beach, Deer eld Beach and Coconut Creek. “We had received about $7,000 in donations from local businesses to cover the cost of this rewarding event,” says Anderson. He adds, “As a club, we usually raise between $10,000 and $12,000 a year for good causes. Target is one of our biggest donors. We want everyone to see a better tomorrow. That’s why we support sight programs and services including vision screenings, eye banks, eyeglass recycling and services to those at risk of losing their sight.” This past year we fund raised and donated to schools, disaster relief, Special Olympics, youth exchange and outreach. We speci cally donated to the Florida Lions Community Hearing Bank, Florida Lions Conklin Center which is the rst multi-handicapped center in the United States, Florida Lions Eye Bank, Florida Lions Foundation for the Blind, Dog Guides for the Deaf, Jose Sanchez Clinic, Lions Club International Foundation, Leader Dog for the Blind, Lions Association for Diabetes Awareness, Southeastern Guide Dog, Hearing Dog and more. The Lions Club members have a presence at most community events including White Cane Day, Kids Day in Lighthouse Point, Nautical Flea Market, Spring Fling, Music Under the Stars, Christmas in the Park and more. New members are welcome. Contact Anderson at 561-251-5471. To our local Lions Club, thank you for the many things you have done for the Pompano Beach area and the world at large. White Cane Day is one of many of the Pompano Beach Lions Club fund raisers. At right, President Blair Anderson holds a cane he designed of white PVC pipe with a convenient slot for contributions.High Holy Days at Chabad of North BrowardThe Chabad of North Broward Beaches, 4081 N. Federal Hwy., Suite 100A, Lighthouse Point, will hold its High Holy Days services starting tonight, Sept. 21, at 7 p.m. The candle lighting ceremony will begin at 7 p.m. Services will also be held Tuesday, Sept. 25, the eve of Yom Kippur, at 6:55 p.m. and end at 7:46 p.m. On Friday, Sept. 28 candles will be lit at 6:52 p.m. and the service ends at 7:43 p.m. Services will be held again on Sunday, Sept. 30 starting at 6:50 p.m. and at 7:41 p.m. on Monday, Oct. 1. Final services will be held on Tuesday, Oct. 2 at 7:40 p.m. Yom Kippur Day is Wednesday, Sept. 26 starting at 9:30 a.m. For more information, visit www. chabadofnbrowardbeaches. com or call 347-410-1106.Youth Soccer RegistrationOakland Park Registration is currently under way for the city’s 2012-13 Youth Soccer Season. All players must be between the ages of 4 and 16 as of Nov. 12, 2012. Registration fee is $55 for residents and $100 for non-residents. Practices and games are held at the Wimberly Athletic Complex, Stevens Field and Northeast High School. Registration ends on Oct. 12 or when the league is full. To learn more about Youth Soccer, visit: www. oaklandpark .gov or call 954630-4515. Send your news to mdpelican@yahoo.com or 954-783-8700!

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The Pelican 11 Friday, September 21, 2012 By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach – Kimi Farrington has 5,000 fewer reasons to worry about college. On Tuesday, Farrington received a $5,000 college scholarship from Sun Life Financial as part of its Rising Stars program. “This will give me the motivation to continue with my college education,” said Farrington, a senior at Pompano Beach High School with a 4.3 GPA. Farrington said she plans to attend Florida State University and study Constitutional law. “I’m going to be the rst African American female Supreme Pompano Beach High student receives $5,000 for Florida State Court justice,” she said. Farrington received the scholarship because of an essay she wrote about education and her work as an administrative assistant with HANDY, an organization that works to empower vulnerable youth to become productive members of society. Presenting the scholarship was Miami Dolphins offensive lineman Mike Pouncey, who announced that Farrington was one of four students in South Florida to receive the scholarship from Sun Life and that she would also be part of a special pregame ceremony at a Miami Dolphins game on Nov. 10 at Sun Life Stadium. “She just wrote a really good essay. A lot of what she said stuck with the See SCHOLARSHIP on page 12Kimi Farrington receives her giant novelty check from Miami Dolphins player Mike Pouncey. Farrington’s real check, from Sun Life, is a $5,000 college scholarship. [Staff photo]

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12 The PelicanFriday, September 21, 2012 ScholarshipContinued from page judges,” said Kimberly Heald, voluntary bene ts practice leader with Sun Life. Farrington, who lives with her grandmother, has also been the bene ciary of nancial support from HANDY. Mia McFadden, BRACE advisor at Pompano Beach High School, signed up Farrington with HANDY in 2010. “I knew this organization would be what she needed to get to FSU,” said McFadden. “I’m blessed,” said Farrington. “We’re blessed to have her, said Kirk Brown, HANDY’s senior vice president of programs and business development, about Farrington. “She kept a positive attitude no matter what life threw at her.” For Farrington’s grandmother, Jill, it’s just part of who her granddaughter is. “She’s a headstrong girl.” Along with the scholarship, Sun Life awarded $50,000 to HANDY. Bike race to bene t Kids In DistressFort Lauderdale – Bicyclers are invited to prepare and sign-up for the 11th Annual Inlet Challenge Bicycle Ride which takes place Sunday, Dec. 2 from 5 a.m. to 2 p.m. Each rider must raise $150. All proceeds bene t Kids In Distress. For more information, call 954390-7654.

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The Pelican 13 Friday, September 21, 2012

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14 The PelicanFriday, September 21, 2012 the way their garbage hits the streets. Robert McCaughan, public works director, explains that it is all about “curb appeal. Residents were not complying with the original ordinance.” And he blames it on a lack of education from the city. With garbage and bulk pick-up taking place eight times a month, nding one day with a street clear of bulk or trash cans is a rare scene, and city of cials want a cleaner look. The rst suggestion from public works was to limit bulk pick-up from eight times a month to once monthly, a suggestion shot down by city commissioners in July. Now, the changes are minimal and the city is sharing information. Here are some of the basic rules for a healthy and safe relationship with those who haul away the trash: 1. Tree trimmings that cannot be bagged, bundled or tied may be placed in the yard, ve feet from the road, for pick-up. 2. Vegetation that can otherwise be contained or tied, should be. 3. Glass or items that can cause harm must be placed in rigid containers. 4. Supermarket bags are not considered garbage bags. [Says McCaughan, “Some people use Publix bags and placed several of them on the street for pick-up. These bags are often strewn throughout the neighborhood and they violate the code.] 5. Garbage bags are allowed. [While people have been using them for years, this is a new addition to the rules.] 6. Fluorescent lights and computers must be bagged and sealed if being legally discarded. [Mercury can be emitted if these products are broken.] The above rules are speci cally for single-family residences, duplexes and triplexes. “Most people are responsible,” says McCaughan. “Our long-term goal is to get automated carts. [When that happens] if it doesn’t go into the container, it won’t be picked up.” In two years, when the city places bids for garbage pickup, automated carts will be on the table. Meanwhile, residents who do not comply with the rules of garbage pick-up could receive violations and nes. For more information, visit mypompanobeach.com and search “garbage” for a full list of requirements. To recycle electronic items like uorescent lights, computers, television and other items at no cost, take them to 2780 N. Powerline Rd. just north of Copans Road on Fridays and Saturdays from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. GarbageContinued from page 1

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The Pelican 15 Friday, September 21, 2012 difference in the lives of our at-risk youth.” Originally, the Run/Walk started on Northeast 26 Street in LHP and ended at the beach in Deer eld. Several years ago, the route was changed so that the entire event happens here. Both start and nish lines are on Ocean Way. Deer eld Beach Mayor Peggy Noland thinks the change of venue is a good move. “It is much more cost effective and doesn’t disrupt traf c or church-goers,” she said. “It is the smartest move they have made. More money can go to the Boys & Girls Club.” Noland, who has walked the distance in the past, will be out of town for this year’s race. Participants can register online at Dunn’s Run for a pre-run fee of $30, at one of the two parties or at Runners Edge, 3195 N. Federal Hwy, Boca Raton. Packet parties are being held Sept. 29, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Two Georges in the Cove Shopping Center or Oct. 6, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Panera Bread, 3720 W. Hillsboro Blvd., Deer eld Beach. Panera is providing breakfast to participants and Starbucks and Monster Energy Drink will offer liquid refreshments. Other gifts for the most serious fund raisers include dri t running shirts, Honora pearl necklaces, Nike running hoses, the Garmin Forerunner 210 watch which records how far, how fast and how hard the athlete worked, a Tag Heuer watch, Gents Swiss stainless steel watches and a toothwhitening procedure. Dunn’s RunContinued from page 9 9-27 – Wilton Manors Business Association meeting from 12 to 1 p.m. at Shawn & Nick’s Courtyard Caf, 2211 Wilton Drive. Visit www. wiltonmanorscourtyardcafe. com for more information. 9-27 – Greater Pompano Beach Chamber hosts the State of the City at 7:45 a.m. at the Pompano Elks Lodge #1898, 700 NE 10 St. Mayor Lamar Fisher will talk about the past year and what the city’s plans for the SightingsContinued from page 9 See SIGHTINGS page 17

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16 The PelicanFriday, September 21, 2012 at the time of need. Over and over we are told how grateful families are when pre arranged desires have been made known, eliminating this responsibility from the survivors.” Marcia explains that Kalis-McIntee has embalming facilities on the premise, unlike the corporate funeral homes that use centralized systems. “We also have a chapel and enough space to handle several services at one time. We can provide services for all religions and ethnic groups. We and our staff are all very community oriented and fortunately have many referrals from families pleased with our personalized service. Read what a few surviving families have written Surava Virsion writes, “This is the second time I have used your services, and as I was the rst time, I am very satis ed. I chose you the rst time because you were the only one that did not try to sell me something over the phone. Instead you asked me what I was looking for. I will be glad to recommend your services and will use them again.” “Dear Bryan, Thank you for making this dif cult process manageable. We feel that you went above and beyond in the service rendered to my husband. I have adopted you as one of my sons. Sincerely, Evangeline and the Leontsinis Family.” “Dear Bryan, . No words can express my thanks to you. . My husband, Father Constantine, told me, “I hope Bryan is around when I die to take care of me.” Mrs. Evelyn Mitsos.” Of cer Stilwell, president/ commander of Broward County Multi-Agency Honor Guard, writes: “Thank you and the wonderful staff at the KalisMcIntee Funeral Center for your assistance with our Honor Guard training academy. We recently conducted a training course for 115 Police Of cers and Fire ghters from all over Florida on the practices and protocols on “in the line-of-duty death police funeral services.” With the assistance of your facility and the important working tools we needed it was a great success. As always you and your staff were willing to lend a hand to a very delicate subject. On behalf of all of our Broward County and the State of Florida Honor Guard Personnel, we thank you.” Call 954-566-7621 or email kalismcintee@fdn.com Web site is: www. kalismcintee.comKalisContinued form page 8

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The Pelican 17 Friday, September 21, 2012 Under the “White-Miskell ParasailContinued from page 1Bill,” parasailing would be prohibited during certain weather conditions, or within certain proximities of power lines, wharfs or other xed objects. It would also require insurance coverage and inspection of ropes and harnesses and other provisions. “With our dazzling white beaches and crystal clear water, Florida is a natural magnet for adventure-seeking tourists who want a bird’s eye view of the spectacular scenery,” said Sachs in a statement. “But we need to better ensure that they are as safe in the air as they are on the ground, and this legislation is designed to do just that.” To help get the bill passed this time, Pompano has directed Russ Klenet & Associates and Becker & Poliakoff, the city’s lobbying rms, to petition the leadership of the House and Senate; something the city didn’t do before. Current state regulations don’t require equipment inspections nor do parasailing operators need to be licensed or carry insurance. Regulations do require vessels towing parasailers to have Coast Guard-approved oatation devices. There must also be one person observing parasailing activity in addition to the person operating the vessel. Florida also prohibits parasailing companies from taking customers out 30 minutes before sunrise or 30 minutes after sunset. State Rep. Gwyn ClarkeReed said she may sign-on as a co-sponsor in the House when the bill is proposed. She views parasailing in the same way she views carnivals and fairs. “When we allow carnivals and various attractions [to come to town] they have to be inspected prior to the carnival opening up. I put this in the same kind of category,” said Clarke-Reed. “There needs to be some kind of inspection [of parasailing equipment], just more oversight on the whole industry.” City of cials recently passed a resolution urging the state legislature to pass the bill. “It’s such common sense. Why don’t we regulate this industry?” asked Mayor Lamar Fisher. “Those who do it right are behind this [regulation].” Rep. James Frishe, a Republican who sponsored the last parasiling safety bill, said the parasailing industry approached him wanting to improve standards that would help weed out companies that don’t practice good safety standards on their own. Frishe added that right now Tallahassee is adverse to any bills that involve an increase in regulation or oversight. “It’s really a challenge, particularly for Democrats, to get bills brought up,” said Clarke-Reed. SightingsContinued from page 15 upcoming year are. The cost to attend is $25, includes breakfast and is open to the public. To RSVP send an email to info@pompanobeachchamber.com or call 954-941-2940. 9-27 – Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce hosts the Pompano Beach State of the City at 7:45 a.m. at the Pompano Beach Elks Lodge #1898, 700 NE 10 St. Cost is $25, includes breakfast and is open to the public. 954-941-2940. 10-3 – Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce hosts Business With A Twist from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at Two Georges at the Cove, 1754 SW 3 Ct., Deer eld Beach. Cost is $10 for Chamber members who RSVP by Oct. 1 and $15 for non-members. 954~941-2940. 10-4 – Complimentary breakfast for seniors and up to two friends at Galuppi’s, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach, at 9:45 a.m. Dr. Paula Hedglon presents “Bringing Back Life To Seniors, Naturally.” Please RSVP by Oct. 2. 954-2492277.See SIGHTINGS page 19

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18 The Pelican Friday, September 21, 2012 Music Under the StarsPompano Beach – The Weedline Band will be the featured performer for Pompano’s latest Music Under the Stars concert tonight, Sept. 2, at 7 p.m. just south of the Pompano Beach Fishing Pier, 222 N. Pompano Beach Boulevard. Event is free. According to its website, The Weedline is “a rock and roll party band that plays classic rock, modern rock, country, blues, funk and originals that draw from all the above. The sound can be thought of as rock and roll with an acoustic soul.” For more information, visit www. pompanobeachcra.com or call 954-786-5535.ReadingPals to aid struggling readersPompano Beach – Reading is key to success in school, but one third of Florida’s third grade students struggle with this basic skill and cannot read at minimally pro cient levels. To address this problem, ReadingPals, a statewide, threeyear initiative sponsored by United Way, is being launched to engage, encourage and enhance early literacy among prekindergarten through third grade students in lower-performing schools. On Monday, Sept. 24 from 9 to 11 a.m. A ReadingPals training will be held at Pompano Beach Elementary School, 700 NE 13th Ave. Mentors will be trained and tour the school, meet the students and staff and begin reading with students. Two Broward schools will serve as pilot locations for the program. Beginning October 15, students at Pompano Beach Elementary School and Endeavour Primary Learning Center in Lauderhill will be teamed with trained volunteer mentors who will work one-on-one or with small groups with students to read a series of three books. When each book is completed, the students will get to keep it and take the book home. All pre-kindergarten through third grade students at both schools will receive the books, however, the number of students taking part in the ReadingPals program will be determined by the number trained volunteers available. Volunteer mentors will spend one hour a week for a minimum of 25 weeks. For more information on ReadingPals or to sign-up to become a volunteer, contact Lola Jordan at 954-462-4850.Tell The Pelican about your news! mdpelican@yahoo. com or 954-783-8700!

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The Pelican 19 Friday, September 21, 2012 boilers. So they built a lab and a demonstration indoor algae growing machine, or photo bio-reactor. Then they raised funds through family and friends and moved to the Oakland Park site. They needed room to design and build a commercial scale algae cultivation system. From small vials to huge tanks They begin with algae strains purchased from the University of Texas grown in small vials. The product is gradually moved to larger vials until it reaches a certain cell density and is ready for a large tank. Each tank holds 3,000 gallons of water and material. The water is separated from the algae in a centrifuge and the algae is moved to a hydrodynamic separator, like a homogenizer. The shell is cracked and the oil released. Algae is about 40 percent oil Omega 3, the good fat. The oil is blended with rosemary, Vitamin E and olive oil, which acts as a preservative and is used in vitamins and supplements. The water is treated by reverse osmosis and by ultraviolet light and is reused. Only about three percent is lost in this process. When algae is grown outdoors, about 35 percent of the water is lost through evaporation. The company is now starting to produce commercial scale quantities of algae biomass and extracting nutraceutical products, which they hope to sell to cosmetic and pharmaceutical companies. It is a popular ingredient in skin cream and sunscreen. “Consumers are now demanding natural compounds in cosmetics, and the companies are getting away from chemicals,” Moran said. The algae cake or shell has potential as an ingredient in sh food for commercial sh farms, Moran said. Currently, corn and soy products, which pollute the water, are used. The cake could also be used in foods for cows and pigs. Algae to Omega will soon conduct a taste test with sh to see which food is preferred, the corn and soy or algae cake. In the future, Moran said, batteries will be made from algae since it can produce 1,000 more charges than conventional material and is biodegradable. Algae to Omega has nine employees at the Oakland Park site and three at the corporate headquarters at 200 S. Andrews Ave. in downtown Fort Lauderdale. The Oakland Park employees have skills in plumbing, electricity, construction or a biology background. “Algae is the key to all life. Seventy percent of the oxygen we breathe comes from algae,” Moran said. AlgaeContinued from page 4 FridaysPompano Proud meets every second Friday of the month at McNab Park, 2250 E. Atlantic Blvd., from 8:30 to 11 a.m. Every second Sunday the group meets at Galuppi’s, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach, at 6 p.m. 954-562-3232. The Pompano Beach Rotary Club meets Fridays at 12:15 p.m. at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. 954-786-3274. Art Gallery 21 is open every Friday from 7 to 9 p.m. The gallery, located at the Woman’s Club of Wilton Manors, 600 NE 21 Court, features various artwork from various artists across the State of Florida. Admission is free. Visit www.canawm.org for more information.SaturdaysPony rides are available at Sand & Spurs Equestrian Park, 1600 NE 5 Ave., Pompano Beach, from 9 to 11:30 a.m. Cost is $3 per ride. 954-786-4507. The Pompano Beach Kiwanis Club Westside meets the rst and third Saturdays of the month at 8:30 a.m. at the E. Pat Larkins Community Center, 520 MLK Blvd., Pompano Beach. 954-782-8096. The Deer eld Beach West Kiwanis Club meets the second and fourth Saturdays of the month at 9 a.m. at Westside Park, 445 SW 2 St., Deer eld Beach. 954-54-7329883. Kayak rentals are available Saturdays and Sundays at Richardson Historic Park, 1937 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Visit www.AtlanticCoastKayak.com or 954-7810073 for rates. The Wilton Manors Green Market is held every Saturday and Sunday at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. 954-592-0381. The Deer eld Beach West Kiwanis Club meets the second and fourth Saturdays of the month at 9 a.m. at Westside Park, 445 SW 2 St., Deer eld Beach. 954-54-7329883. Pompano Green Market is held every Saturday from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the corner of Atlantic Boulevard and Cypress Road. Vendors wanted. 954-782-3015.MondaysPlay ping-pong from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Cost is $1. 954-3902130. SightingsContinued from page 17 See SIGHTINGS page 21

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20 The Pelican Friday, September 21, 2012 at Sullivan Park and improvements to the neighborhood west of the Cove Shopping Center. The size of the park, at Hillsboro Blvd. and the Intracoastal Waterway, was increased this year by the $2 million purchase of the former Riverview Restaurant site. It will be developed by the Community Redevelopment Agency and is anticipated to cost $4 million, 50 percent of that refundable through a grant from the Florida Inland Navigational District. Improvements to Cove Gardens, at a cost of $1.2 million, will include drainage, sidewalks, paving, landscaping and lighting.Agreement gives city more indoor recreational spaceDeer eld Beach – The city is expanding its recreational facilities through an agreement with the Indoor Sports Complex at Powerline Road and SW 10 St. The parks and recreation department is making available its outdoor athletic facilities in return for the use of the indoor courts and arenas at the complex. Owners of the Sports Complex will have the use of four of the city’s recreational facilities. The parks and recreation department will have access to the basketball/volleyball courts, roller hockey and skate rinks, soccer eld, tness center, and multi-purpose room within the Sports Complex. The agreement calls for the Sports Complex to meet all city rules and regulations. Scheduling will be done by parks and recreation personnel. Available for Sports Complex activities will be the city aquatic center, Westside Park and gymnasium, the middle school athletic complex and the beach sand volley ball courts.Pioneer resident dies; historical society marks 40th year hereDeer eld Beach – Pioneer resident Jackie Stewart died this week. Born here in 1925, Stewart was the daughter of William Gaskin, owner of a general store on W. Hillsboro Blvd. and NW 1 Street. Gaskin was also the police chief for a time, a situation Amie Kay Tanner characterized as “everyone had a lot of jobs in the old days.” Stewart had two daughters and Tanner, president of the Deer eld Beach Historical Society, said visiting with the family this week was a “walk through history.” Tanner takes oral histories of the town’s long time residents and told city commissioners Tuesday that, “If we don’t save yesterday today, it won’t be here tomorrow.” She also took time to remind the public that this year is the 40th anniversary of the local historical society headquartered at the Butler House at SE 4 Avenue and Hillsboro Blvd. “It’s the Ruby Celebration,” Tanner said. “So if you have any rubies you would like to donate, feel free.” Vice Mayor Bill Ganz did not offer up any jewelry, but did say he intends to become a member of the historical society and urged other citizens to follow his lead.New recycling program is underwayDeer eld Beach The big blue recycling carts are being rolled out this week starting at the east end of town. The 65-gallon bins handle all household recyclables and residents will receive points based on the amount they recycle. Points will be redeemable at local stores. A bonus of 75 points will be awarded to those who turn in the handheld yellow and blue bins to the recycling center at 401 SW 4 ST., or they can be placed at the curb. The big blue carts are to be set three to ve feet away for other objectsmailboxes, other bins, etc., so they can be emptied by automated trucks. For more information on the new recycling program, go to the ALL IN link on the city’s website, deer eld-beach.com.Woman’s Club hosting discussion of November ballot amendments Deer eld Beach – The 11 amendments to the state constitution appearing on the November ballot will be explained by a representative of the League of Women Voters Tuesday, Oct. 9, 2 p.m. at a meeting being hosted by the Deer eld Beach Woman’s Club. The League is a nonpartisan organization that aims to educate voters on the issues. The amendments address issues ranging from additional Homestead Exemption bene ts for disabled veterans, their surviving spouses and low-income seniors to public funding of religious institutions to removal of privacy rights in cases of abortion. The League is urging ‘no’ votes on all of the amendments. Persons interested in attending this session should call the Woman’s Club, 910 E. Hillsboro Blvd., 954-421-4700.McKeithan Pavilion being rebuiltDeer eld Beach – The pavilion at Johnnie McKeithan Park, damaged last February by vandals who set re to the structure, is getting a new roof. Commissioners voted this week to spend $110,000 for a metal roof rather than less expensive shingles. The metal will last ve to 10 years longer, City Manager Burgess Hanson said. Also being replaced at the park at 629 N. Deer eld Ave. is an outdoor barbecue grill. Ocean Way closed for pier constructionDeer eld Beach – Ocean Way will be closed next week as the entrance to the shing pier is being constructed. No traf c or parking will be permitted in front of the Wyndham Resort from NE 2 Street to the juncture of NE 21 Avenue from Sept 24 to 28. A guest drop-off area will be provided for the hotel.Commissioners getting meeting breaks Deer eld Beach – Commissioners will meet only once a month for the next four months. Due to con icts presented by holidays, four regularly scheduled meetings have been cancelled. Still on the schedule are commission meetings on Tuesday, Oct. 15, Tuesday, Nov. 6, Tuesday, Dec. 4 and Tuesday, Jan. 15. Special meetings will be called as needed.Deer eldContinued form page1

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The Pelican 21 Friday, September 21, 2012 The Gold Coast Toastmasters Club meets on the second and third Monday of the month from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Denny’s, 3151 NW 9 Ave., Fort Lauderdale. 954895-3555 or 954-782-9951.TuesdaysYoga every Tuesday from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Cost is $7 per class. Classes are also held Saturday mornings from 10:15 to 11:45 a.m. 954-607-3520. The Oakland Park Historical Society meets on the second Tuesday of every month at 5:30 p.m. at the at Oakland Park Library, 1298 NE 37 St. For more information, call 954-566-9957. Deer eld Beach Rotary Club meets every Tuesday at 12 p.m. at the Deer Creek Golf Club, 2801 Deer Creek Country Club Blvd., Deer eld Beach. 954-630-9593. Pompano Beach-Lighthouse Rotary Club meets every Tuesday at 7:30 a.m. at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. 954972-7178. The American Legion Auxiliary Unit 142 171 SW 2 St., Pompano Beach, has Bingo on Tuesdays at 7 p.m. Food is available from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. 954-942-2448. A Yoga class is available for all levels at Hagen Park 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors, on Tuesday nights from 6:30 to 8 p.m. and Saturday mornings from 10:30 a.m. until noon. The cost is $7. 305-607-3520. Zonta International meets on the third Tuesday of the month at Duffy’s Diner, 401 N. Federal Hwy., Deer eld Beach, at 11:15 a.m. Zonta International works to advance the status of women. 561-392-2223.WednesdaysThe Deer eld Beach Historical Society meets on the third Wednesday of each month from 12 to 1 p.m. at the Old School Museum, 232 NE 2 St., Deer eld Beach. For more information, call 954429-0378. The Pompano Beach Historical Society meets on the third Wednesday of every month at 7 p.m. at the Dick & Miriam Hood Center, 217 NE 4 Ave., Pompano Beach. For more information, call 954292-8040. The Wilton Manors Kiwanis Club meets Wednesdays at 6:30 p.m. at 2749 NE 14 Ave., Wilton Manors. 954561-9785. The Oakland Park Kiwanis Club meets Wednesdays from 7:30 to 8:30 a.m. at Peter Pan Diner, 1216 E. Oakland Park Blvd., Oakland Park. 954-566-9957. The Pompano Beach Kiwanis Club meets Wednesdays at noon at the Riverside Grille at the Sands Resort, 125 N. Riverside Drive, Pompano Beach. 954-444-4815. The Greater Pompano Beach Senior Citizens Club meets on the second Wednesday of the month at the Emma Lou Olson Community Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach, at 10 a.m. 954-9437787. The Alzheimer’s CareSightingsContinued from page 19 See SIGHTINGS on page 24

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22 The Pelican Friday, September 21, 2012 Classi eds Call 954-545-0013 Pelican Classi eds work for you! 954-783-8700! HELP WANTED AFRAID OF DOWNSIZING? Start building a business to supplement your income. Great earnings potential on a part-time basis with Primerica. Call 954729-0192. 9-7SEEKING EMPLOYMENTHHA – I Will Take Excellent Care Of The Elderly / Companion Aid – Experienced & Certi ed / Have References. Call 845-709-5275. 9-21 HHA – Seeks Live In Or Out. Will Do Light Housekeeping, Prepare Meals, Doctor’s Visit. Speak English. US Citizen. Experienced. References Available. Willing To Travel. 561-908-1017. 9-21 LPN AT CNA PRICES! Will Drive To Dr. Appointments, Lunch, Shopping, Etc. East Broward Area Only! 954-8957850. 9-21 MALE CNA / HHA / COMPANION. Broward County Area. Former EMT. All Certi cations / Compassionate, References. Call Ron 954-2322832. Very Reasonable! 9-21 SERVICES DANNY BOY ELECTRIC – Lic & Insured. Lic. #EC13004811. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. 24/Hr Service. 954-290-1443. Beat Any Written Estimate. Sr, Discount. 9-21 GOT JUNK? TRASH HAULING – CONDO CLEANUPS – Trees – Landscape – Yard Fill – Pressure Wash – Roofs – Home Repairs – Welding – Etc. Dave 954-818-9538. 9-28 HANDYMAN – PAINTING – CARPENTRY – Pressure Cleaning. Decks! Everything Around The House. No Job Too Small. FREE Estimates! Call 561-350-3781. 9-28 HONEST HANDYMAN – HOME & BUILDING Maintenance/Improvements. No Job Too Small. Fast Friendly Service. Reasonable Rates. Local Resident/Homeowner. Call Today For Your FREE Upfront Quote. No Deposit Required. 754-366-1915. BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIESNew GREEN technology. New defroster control saves energy in home refrigerators, commercial chillers. Patented. All optical. Simple mfg. Strategic partners needed..www.NewAvionics.Com. 954-568-1991. CMUSICIANS WANTEDADVANCED STUDENT MUSICIANS Being Accepted For 2012 – 2013 Membership in the American Legion Symphonic Band! Earn Community Service Points While Improving Your Performance Skills! Rehearsals On Wednesday Evenings from 7pm to 9pm at American Legion Post 142, 171 SW 2nd St., Pompano Beach, FL 33060. Band Director Recommendation Encouraged. Email Music Director James McGonigal at info.legionband@ gmail.com for more information. C OPEN HOUSEPOMPANO 2 / 1 OPEN 9 – 23 – 9AM-2PM. 2551 W Golf Blvd. Unit 101 Leisureville. 1st Floor Lakeview! $39,900. Kim Loucks RE-MAX IN MOTION. 954-609-9730. 9-21 REAL ESTATE SERVICESHOMEOWNERSHIP 45% Cheaper Than Renting! Low Interest Rate! NOW Is The Time To Buy! Yvette Gaussen YES WE CAN REALTY. 954-614-7773 – 954-773-8340. 9-21 REAL ESTATE WANTEDNEED TO BUY FOR CASH FAST!! Small Duplex Or Triplex With At Least One 3 / 2 Or 2 / 2 E Of Federal Hwy. 954-563-3533. 9-21MOBILE HOMESDEERFIELD DOUBLE WIDE 2 / 2 – TIDEWATER ESTATES 55+. Background / Credit Check Required. $685 Mo Lot Rent. $5,000 Firm. 954-4260500. 9-21 CEMETERY PLOTS2 PREMIUM LOTS – Forest Lawn Cemetery For Sale. $1,500 OBO Call 561-603-9383. OR 863-9461646. C. REAL ESTATE WANTEDI BUY HOUSES!! CASH!! AS IS! QUICK CLOSE! ANY AREA – ANY CONDITION! NO EQUITY OK. CALL NOW 954-914-2355. 10-19 CONDOS FOR SALEPOMPANO BEACH DIRECT INTRACOASTAL! Feels Like You’re On A Boat. Pool On Intracoastal. Wrap-A-Round Balcony. Spacious 1 / 1.5 $178K. Also For Rent $1350 Month. 954-588-0562. 10-12 DEERFIELD CENTURY VILLAGE! Breathtaking, Stunning 2/2, Remodeled, Furnished 2nd Floor. Near Pool, Clubhouse, Restaurant. Fabulous Location. $150K. Jennifer – Century Village RE. 954-650-5956. 9-21 POMPANO BEACH Sea Haven. Magni cent Waterfront Resort Type Condos. Covered Parking. 2 Blocks Beach. Heated Pool, Security. 1 / 1.5 & 2 / 2 – Screened Balcony. From $110K. Coldwell Banker 954-629-1324. CONDOS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH 1 Block To Ocean – 1 / 1 Fully Furnished. Flat Screens, DVD, Pool, Laundry, Private Parking, BBQ. Monthly Thru December $850. 954-540-9724. 9-21 FT LAUDERDALE ICW Gated Community. 1 / 1.5 – Furnished / Unfurnished. Granite, Wood Floors, Lots Of Amenities. Great Location. No Pets. $950 Month. Call 954588-1644. 9-28 POMPANO BEACH Sea Haven 1 / 1.5 or 2 / 2. Walk To Beach. Covered Parking. Security. Heated Pool. Exercise Room. BBQ. Resort Type Waterfront Complex. From $900. Call 954-629-1324. POMPANO BEACH 55+ Community. Renovated 2 / 1 Pool! Sunroom – Ground Floor, Beautifully Furnished. On Golf Course. $750 Mo. 1 Year +. Good Credit. 917-5440771. 9-28 LIGHTHOUSE PT 2 / 2 ---1st Floor – 55+. Pool, Storage, Laundry Facilities. $900 Month / Water Included. Dorothy Bassano – Better Homes & Gardens Real Estate. 954-5624919. 9-28 POMPANO INTRACOASTAL AT IT’S BEST. Breathtaking Views! Feels Like You’re On A Boat, Pool Deck On Intracoastal. Spacious 1 / 1.5 $1350 Month. A1A S.E. Corner – Unobstructed Views. 2/2 $1,500 Month. 954-588-0562. LEISUREVILLE 55+ 2 / 1 Unfurnished / Furnished $795 / $875 1st & Last. 1st Floor. Free Golf – By Pool / Clubhouse. 954-590-8177. 9-28 APTS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH 1 BR & 2 BR APTS FOR RENT. Remodeled, Paint, Tile, Etc. Washer / Dryer On Site. Pool. Pet Friendly. George 954-8095030. 9-21 POMPANO MCNAB RD & NE 18 AVENUE – 1 & 2 Bedrooms Furnished / Unfurnished. $650 $895 And Up. Pool, Tile Floors. Central A / C. 954-6102327. 9-21

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The Pelican 23 Friday, September 21, 2012 SightingsSightings is a calendar for Northeast Broward county. Send you event information to mdpelican@ yahoo.comClassi eds Call 954-545-0013 POMPANO BEACH 1/1 $650 – NW – NE 2/1 $950 – 2/1,5 Townhouse -Pool $1095 SW 1/1 $750 – 2/1 $925 – 2/2 $950 – ALL FREE WATER. Rent + $70 App Mov-U-In. 954-7816299. 9-2 ATLANTIC / FEDERAL Efficiency $175 Week. No Security. Cable, Electric, Internet, FREE W / D. Good Job. No Drug Charges. No Evictions. 954-709-0694. 9-21 LAUDERDALE BY THE SEA 1 / 1 Ground Floor. Central A / C. Parking Out Back Door. Laundry, Courtyard. 200 Steps Beach. $1,100. 954-8685560 Wayne. 9-21 BEST DEAL IN POMPANO BEACH – Efficiency With Kitchen, Laundry & Pool. No Pets. Weekly – Monthly – Season. 500’ To Beach. 954294-8483 Or 248-736-1533. 10-5 POMPANO BEACH – NE 13 Street. Furnished 1 / 1 All Included! No Pets. October Thru December. 1/2 Block To Beach. $925. Call 954-4100943. 9-21 POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 Bedroom From $500. Easy Movein. 1/2 OFF DEPOSIT. Remodeled. Great Location. 954-783-1088 For More Info. 12-14 COMMERCIAL FOR RENT-SALEPOMPANO COMMERCIAL OFFICE Spaces Available. Ranging From As Low As $500 To $700 Depending On Square Footage. Please Call Darci At 954-7833723. 10-5 DEERFIELD BEACH – Retail Of ce Warehouse – 700 Sq Ft With Loft. A/C, Bathroom. $575 Per Month. Call For More Info 561-654-1331 Or 561-9985681. 9-21 The Florida Humane Society is requesting donations to pay for the surgery costs of Micky [Above] which ran about $3,000. To donate, visit www. floridahumanesociety. org or call 954-9746152. Help Micky

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24 The Pelican Friday, September 21, 2012 WORSHIP DIRECTORY: Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad. Rev. Hyvenson Joseph Budget balanced with slight decrease in tax rateBy Judy WilsonPELICAN SATFFHillsboro Beach – Commissioners have tentatively approved a $5 million operating budget financed chiefly by a millage rate of 3.49, slightly less than last year. The fiscal plan for 2012-13 includes $2.3 million for police department expenses, $244,000 more than the current year, enough to hire an additional sworn officer, buy a patrol car and begin an upgrade of the communications system. In making final tweaks to the proposed budget, the commission cut $15,000 in overtime expenses from the police budget and another $28,406 in police salaries based on new CPI figures, were able to reduce insurance costs by $8,000 and the price of trash hauling by $8,700. They also reduced their own annual stipend by $11,303, almost half of the current figure. “That’s a very good sign for Hillsboro,” said Steven Bloom, the town’s financial consultant. “Values in a lot of towns are still going down.” Final approval of the budget was set for Thursday evening. givers Support Group meets Wednesdays from 10 a.m. to noon at the NE Focal Point Alzheimer’s Day Care Center, 301 NW 2 Ave., Deer eld BeachThursdaysThe Wilton Manors Historical Society meets on the third Thursday of the month at Wilton Manors City Hall, 2020 Wilton Drive, at 7 p.m. For more information, call 954-566-9019 or 954-5668219. The Rotary Club of Oakland Park/Wilton Manors meets every Thursday from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. at Tequila Sunrise Mexican Grill, 4711 N. Dixie Hwy., Oakland Park. 954-491-6158. The Deer eld Beach Kiwanis Club meets at noon every Thursday at the Deer eld Beach Hilton, 100 Fairway Dr., Deer eld Beach 954-242-6083. The Pompano Beach Republican Club meets on the fourth Thursday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach. 954-786-7536.Upcoming10-5 – Boca Raton – The 40th anniversary celebration of Boca Raton Christian School takes place Friday, Oct. 5 from 7 to 8:30 p.m. at Boca Raton Community Church Sanctuary, 601 NW 4 Ave. Free admission. 561391-2727. 10-7 – 16th Annual Dunn’s Run takes place at 7:30 a.m. at the main Deer eld Beach Parking lot located on Ocean Way and Southeast 2 Street and proceeds bene t the Boys & Girls Clubs of Broward County. Visit www.dunnsrun.com or call 954-563-2822. 10-17 – Women’s Health Expo at the North Broward Medical Center, 201 E. Sample Road, Deer eld Beach from 5 to 8 p.m. There will be food, shopping, activities and giveaways. 954-759-7400. 10-20 – Granny’s Attic Saturday, October 20 at 8:00am Emma Lou Olson Civic Center Are you looking for a bargain? If so, Granny’s Attic is the place to be for great deals. With over 80 vendors selling trinkets and treasures you are sure to nd something you can’t live without! Admission is free and the event is held from 8:00am 2:00pm. For more information contact 954-786-4111. Hope to see you there! 10-22 – Senior Expo from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at South County Civic Center, 16700 Jog Road, Delray Beach. Expo will include 85 vendors showcasing products and services catered to seniors. Free admission and parking. Visit www.retirement-times.com or call 754-246-2874.Volunteer OpportunitiesThe Deer eld Beach Historical Society needs volunteers to help provide tours of our historic sites, organize photos and archives and to help with general maintenance of our properties; light duties such as general housekeeping. The Deer eld Beach Historical Society is a non pro t 501 (C)(3) organization and has four sites listed on the National Register of Historical Places. To volunteer, call 954-429-0378. Send your Sightings to mdpelican@yahoo.com or call 954-7813-8700!SightingsContinued from page 21Tell The Pelican about your news! mdpelican@ yahoo.com or 954783-8700!

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The Pelican 25 Friday, September 21, 2012 By Malcolm McClintockPELICAN STAFFBella Roma Italian Restaurant & Pizzeria40 B SW 15th Street Pompano Beach Tel: 954-784-3696Pompano Beach For three years now, this clean, cozy pizzeria situated at the corner of McNab Rd and S. Cypress has been impressing area residents and businesses with its endearing blend of authentic Italian fare and expeditious service. Owner Mike Buchinski, who has been operating a larger version of Bella Roma in Coconut Creek for the past 12 years, partnered with budding restaurateurs Paul Moschella and longtime associate Jeff Davis to create a second location that could reach customers all the way to A1A. “I have been in this business almost 25 years. I worked in a pizzeria in high school and with some help was eventually able to purchase it,” says the hardworking entrepreneur. “In the meantime, I was mentored by many outstanding chefs who taught me everything I know and helped me develop my own style.” The menu is replete with all the succulent classics. From chicken marsala to veal parmigiana to shrimp Fra Diavolo to baked ziti, Bella Roma offers a bevy of delectable tastes and smells for every palate. “The roasted garlic chicken and broccoli in Asiago cream sauce is definitely one of Pompano Beach’s Bella Roma restaurant delivers mouthwatering pizzas along with classic Italian faremy favorites,” says staff member Jessica Connolly. Other tempting poultry treats include the chicken Francese with white wine lemon butter sauce and the Caprese with fresh mozzarella and oven roasted tomatoes on a bed of delicate fettuccini. “The rigatoni a la vodka is one my favorites,” says Buchinski a native Floridian who spent some time in NY before returning to the warmer climes of the Sunshine State. “Locals know how good our food is. For example, our hand-made paninis and meatball parm subs are huge sellers,” says co-owner Moschella who specializes in the promotion and marketing aspects of the business. “Once you taste our food, you will be hooked!” Seafood lovers can indulge in the eye-catching Zuppa de Pesce which overflows with jumbo shrimp, mussels, calamari and clams sauted with garlic and basil in either a red or white sauce that transports the diner back to the shores of the Mediterranean. “Our vegetarian is the most popular of all,” says Buchinski. “It comes loaded with fresh tomatoes, garlic, spinach, broccoli, eggplant, green peppers, onion, olive oil and pecorino Romano.” Even better, Bella Roma gets most of its vegetables from its immediate neighbor; the well-respected By Their Fruit produce market. “We have great pizza, great food and a great reputation. People even recognize us from the Coconut Creek restaurant,” adds Buchinski who already has plans to expand his eatery to a 40seat restaurant next spring. “We use the highest quality ingredients and everything is made fresh to order.” “My mother Nol has been the biggest positive influence in my life. She has helped me through many tough times, especially after the passing of my brother and father. I really owe everything to her,” says Buchinski who is dedicated to providing the best dining experience possible for his customers. Most large entres are in the $7 to $10 range at lunch [slightly higher in the evenings] and the smaller 14” pizzas start at $13. A host of daily specials are offered [be sure to try the $8 large pies on Tuesdays from 3 to 10 p.m.!] and there is ample free parking. Bella Roma’s huge delivery area stretches from Sample to Oakland Park and Powerline to A1A. Like them on Facebook for additional savings. “We do a lot of catering for office functions, birthday parties and everything in between,” says Buchinski. “We are also very flexible with regard to special requests. If you want lobster tails, then just call ahead of time and we will prepare them for you!” By the way, guests are encouraged to bring their own wine for which there is no corking fee. “We even provide nice wine glasses!” adds Moschella who says that a liquor license is in the offing once the expansion plans come to fruition. For a sweet ending, be sure to try cannoli, cheesecake or the always satisfying chocolate thunder cake. Buon appetito!Owner Mike Buchinski and business partner Paul Moschella show off a few Bella Roma specialties including the highly popular vegetarian pizza. A house specialty – the rigatoni a la vodka with balsamic marinated grilled jumbo shrimp is enhanced by prosciutto, sauted shallots, hand-ground pecorino Romano cheese and pink vodka cream sauce. Another Bella Roma favorite is the chicken Porcini composed of a juicy chicken breast sauted in a Madeira wine cream sauce with portabella mushrooms and mascarpone stuffed homemade raviolis. The chicken Caprese features a plump grilled chicken breast topped with fresh mozzarella and oven roasted tomatoes on a bed of delicate fettuccini drenched in a sundried tomato Asiago cheese cream sauce.

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26 The Pelican Friday, September 21, 2012 Lighthouse Point He’s been called Doc Ray, Dr. Mac, Hey You, and The Diving Dinosaur, but he doesn’t care what he’s called, as long as the right ears listen to his message. And that message is: SAVE THE REEF! “Our reef is as important to our economy as the rain forest is to the rest of the world,” McAllister said in this interview in 2003. “Putting it In the language of politicians, the reef keeps Florida green, meaning green bucks. What draws people to Florida?” he asks. “Is it not beaches, boats and the underwater world of the reef? And then, slipping into the familiar role of professor, he informs. “7,000 years ago Florida had a surface barrier reef similar to Australia’s. Now submerged, ours runs from Miami to Jupiter or further. Our reef is vital to our ecology. It knocks out signi cant power from the waves of a hurricane. It provides sheries and a destination for the diving industry. And personally, it has given me countless hours of exploring pleasure.” McAllister had just celebrated his 80th birthday aboard the Seahorse at the time of this interview. He recalled his party. “12 diving friends and I dove off of the third reef (on Pompano Beach) where we spent about 40 minutes delighting in the beauty of the reef. When we came up, there was a cake and hugs from all the lady divers. Not bad for an old diving dinosaur, huh?” Professor Emeritus of Ocean Engineering at Florida Atlantic University, McAllister spent the ten years after his retirement fighting for his beloved reef, underwater, on the telephone and on the computer, “There have been many frustrations and few accomplishments,” he admitted. One of his admirers said, “The most impressive thing about Dr. Ray is that he personifies the right way to do things. He’s kept us active in conservation of biological and cultural resources. “ McAllister never quit. He was leaving for Amelia Island to present a paper to the Florida Shore and Beach Preservation Association. “My paper is about lessons learned from the Hillsboro Inlet dredging disaster. The method used at Hillsboro was destructive to the live reef and it didn’t need to be like that. A floating tow line could have prevented the entire problem. Boca Raton had a similar disaster in 1988. My goal is to help prevent still another such disaster.” “My efforts to help got me tossed out of the Hillsboro Inlet District. But despite my fate, I have a sense of accomplishment because the state is now looking at using identified gaps for future pipeline and cable routes which will avoid damage to the reef. I have explored from the Palm Beach inlet to Hallandale, identifying the locations of those gaps. The findings went to the Department of Environmental Protection of the State of Florida. The boat owner got a stipend for expenses. For me, it was a chance to save the reef which has given me 40 years of pleasure.” Where did this love affair with the water world begin for this dedicated man with too many credentials to list. This educator, author, columnist, lecturer and defender of the deep says, “I did my first dive into the Long Island Sound. I was 16 wearing a home made helmet and lucky I lived through it. In 1951, while teaching at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, I met my first real divers. “I was hooked. Since then, there have been about 5,000 dives in the Atlantic, Pacific, Gulf of Mexico, South Pacific and most recently in Broward and Palm Beach Counties. On the third dive of my life, I was down almost 165 feet and ran out of air. I was lucky to live and somehow unwilling to quit. Since then, I’ve hunted for buried treasure in the Keys, milked a whale in the Aleutian Islands and almost drowned jumping on the back of a whale in Bermuda. It’s been so exciting.” And if all of this isn’t enough, McAllister remained an active member of the Lighthouse Point Writers’ Group. “I’m working on three books. One is for children entitled The Caveman OG and His Exploits. The second book is a condensation of my published columns about the ocean into book form. The third effort is an autobiography for my grandchildren.” Dr. McAllister is survived by two sons, Keith and Kevin; a daughter Karen Day; granddaughters, Lisa and Maureen McAllister; Cristin Day and Kerry McAllister: grandsons, Matthew and Evan McAllister, Patrick Day and great grandchildren Nicholas and Isabella Memorial ServicesA funeral Mass will be offered on Saturday, Sept. 22 at 9:30 a.m. at St. Paul the Apostle Catholic Church, 2700 NE 36 St., Lighthouse Point. The Mass will be followed with a reception at 11 a.m. at The Pompano Beach Elks Lodge, No. 1898, 700 NE 10 St., Pompano Beach. In Lieu of flowers, Ray would appreciate contributions to Catholic Charities USA or Catholic Relief Services. Arrangements entrusted to Kraeer Funeral Home. McAllisterContinued from page 1

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The Pelican 27 Friday, September 21, 2012 Capt. RJ Boyle is an experienced angler in South Florida. His studio is located in Lighthouse Point. Call 954-420-5001. By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFLighthouse Point RJ Boyle has already caught more than a dozen sword sh, each over 200 lbs., and he says he’s not done yet. “Wednesday alone we caught 12 sh over 200 lbs. The past week has probably Bait migration makes for big catches this weekendthe best big sword sh catches ever recorded here,” said Boyle, who added that this weekend should allow anglers to continue catching big sword sh. He credits the migration of bait for the big shing week so far. “Basically, this is due to a migration of bait that has moved into our waters. Predominantly squid.” “Now these sh will stay here as long as that bait is here, and then they’re going to move on,” said Boyle, who suspects the bait is moving south towards the Gulf of Mexico. But don’t wait too long to get out on the Atlantic Ocean. Once the bait leaves the area so do the predators. “The migration of predatory sh completely depends on the migration of bait,” said Boyle.Boaters wanted for Holiday Boat ParadePompano Beach – Own a boat? Want to show it off? The Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce is looking for boats to be part of its 50th Annual Pompano Beach Holiday Boat Parade. Entry is free and every boat that participates will receive a hand-painted collectible glass ornament designed by local artist Pat Anderson. Big and small boats with few or many decorations will be accepted. The parade will be held Sunday, Dec. 9 starting at 6 p.m. Sponsorship opportunities are also available. To enter, call 954941-2940.Pints for PreservationFort Lauderdale – The Broward Trust for Historic Preservation will hold a fundraiser event on Thursday, Sept. 20 from 6 to 8 p.m. at Maguires Hill 16, 535 N. Andrews Ave. Cost is $35 and includes food and drinks and pays for an annual membership. For more information, call 954-357-5553.

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