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Pompano Pelican
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00090900/00317
 Material Information
Title: Pompano Pelican
Uniform Title: Pompano Pelican
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: Pompano Pelican
Place of Publication: Pompano Beach
Publication Date: 09-14-2012
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Pompano Beach
Coordinates: 26.234722 x -80.125556 ( Place of Publication )
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00090900:00317

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Friday, September 14, 2012 Vol. XX, Issue 37 Wherever you are, read The Pelican @ pompanopelican.com Send news to siren2415@gmail.com Pompano Beach Deer eld Beach Lighthouse Point Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Wilton Manors Oakland Park Hillsboro Beach The Galt Palm Aire The Pelican Pelican 74 days left in 2012 Hurricane season When rip currents show up, Rule 1: Dont PanicCourtesy of Florida Fish and WildlifeNo matter how a rip current is formed, the effect is the same. A large amount of water at the shoreline rushes in a narrow path back to the sea. This path of water can extend as far as 3,000 feet offshore, reach 90 feet in width, and travel up to four feet per second. Rip currents, sometimes incorrectly called undertows, do not pull swimmers under the water, but can pull even experienced swimmer away from shore. Rip currents can happen where 1. There is a break in an offshore sandbar, 2. The longshore current is diverted by a groin, pier, or jetty, or 3. Longshore currents moving in opposite directions meet. See RIP CURRENTS on page 26 Pompano wins green award for making reclaimed water cheaper, easierBy Stephen FellerSTAFF WRITER Pompano Beach The barrier to most people doing something good for the environment often is cost. The city found this out by changing the cost of its water reclamation program for single family homes. Because of this innovation, The Broward League of Cities gave the city a Green Leaf Award for its ICanWater program after more than 400 residents signed up after installation costs were taken out of the equation. The award is part of the Leagues Cities of Excellence Award See RECLAIMED in page 25 LBTS will roll out singlestream recycling before year endBy Judy VikPELICAN STAFFLauderdale-By-The-Sea Commissioners and the public got a preview Tuesday of whats ahe sad as the town prepares to launch a recycling program. The goal is to revitalize interest in recycling and increase participation by residents and visitors. Commissioners approved a plan that calls for several changes in sizes and colors of carts. With the new plan, each household See RECYCLING on page 20 Residents question need for increase in PD budgetFinal hearing will be Sept.20By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFHillsboro Beach Commissioners here went into budget discussions this week looking at a proposed See POLICE on page 16By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach Its been over 50 years since Martin Luther King Boulevard saw a new retail building. But breaking the long drought is the Northwest Community Redevelopment Agency, or NW CRA, with its 4,150 sq. ft. retail development. Adriane Esteban, CRA project manager for the development, said once the $1.5 million building, Of cials tout jobs, redevelopment at MLK retail building nanced by the NW CRA, is completed sometime in the spring of 2013 it will have enough space for up to seven retailers. The development sits on 2.18 acres of land and will include 41 parking spaces when nished. Government is leading the way. Its the beginning of the future, said Carlton Moore, liaison to the NW CRA. I think they did not hit a home run with this project. They hit a grand See BUILDING on page 14 Pompano Beach of cials and developers break ground at the citys new retail center along Martin Luther King Boulevard. The 4,150 sq. ft. buildi ng will have room for up to seven tenants and is slated to be completed sometime in the spring of 2013. Pictured are from left: Cory McFarlane, chief visionary at Pinnacle, the company hired to help build the project; Maggie Anderson, project manager at Pinnacle; City Commissi oner Rex Hardin, Northwest CRA Chairperson Deborah Anthony; City Commissioner Woodrow J. Poitier; Mayor Lamar Fisher, City Commissioner Charlotte Burrie; CRA Co-director Chris Brown and City Commissioner Barry Dockswell. [Photo by Michael dOliveira]

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2 The PelicanFriday, September 14, 2012 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFF Lauderdale-By-The-Sea This towns newly launched Hotel Improvement Program got off to an inauspicious start this week. Commissioners refused to approve staffs rst recommended grant recipient, the High Noon Resort at 4424 El Mar Drive. Owner Paul Novak applied for a $22,550 grant to replace 23 windows and a front door. Town Planner Linda Connors said the application met the requirements of the program. Applicants can receive up to $25,000 in matching funds for expenditures that improve their properties. Commissioners must approve any requests in excess of $15,000. Improvements eligible for funding include replacement of awnings, overhangs, doors and windows if visible from a public street. But two commissioners argued that didnt mean hurricane windows as Novak was proposing. I felt the intention of the Hurricane windows turned down by commissionersprogram was to match funds for appearance improvements, which could include windows, but to upgrade, not to replace existing windows with hurricane windows, Commissioner Stuart Dodd said. He asked that staff take another look at how the requirements are worded. Vice Mayor Scot Sasser agreed with Dodd, noting hed gotten more calls about this issue than about sewer rates or Commercial Boulevard improvements. I thought this was to help struggling hotels, to sharpen up through paint and to beautify. Taxpayers dont think windows are beauti cation. We need to relook at this whole program, in my opinion. Commissioner Mark Brown commended Novak on coming forward with the application. We voted for this program. He did what we invited him to do, and others are putting their applications together, Brown said. Brown said he was surprised to see the application for windows, but noted it meets eligibility standards. If we approve this, we will have to approve other similar requests for windows. If we dont, its unfair to Mr. Novak and others and sends us back to ground one, Brown said. If commissioners want to scrap the whole program, Brown said he would be amenable to that. But he noted that it was the commission that approved the program. Now people dont like the program. If you want to be mad at someone, be mad at me. I voted for it, he said. Dont take it out on Mr. Novak. He only did what we asked him to do. Mr. Novak submitted his application based on what we put in place, said Commissioner Chris Vincent. I dont want to pass this [the program] and then renege after staff approves the application. Going forward, maybe we need to establish what is beauti cation and what is not and then revisit the criteria. We should approve this application. I commend Mr. Novak for coming forward, Vincent said. A motion for approval failed by a 3-2 vote with only Brown and Vincent voting for approval. This is common sense, Vincent said. If we pass this program and then yank it because we disagree with staff, we are not doing our job. The town reneged on their agreement and because of that, I turned out to be the bad guy, Novak said.See STORM WINDOWS on page 19

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The Pelican 3 Friday, September 14, 2012 Air Force rock concertDeer eld Beach Reserve Generation, the six-piece rock band composed of Air Force musicians plays here Friday, Sept. 21, 7 to 9 p.m., at the main beach parking lot, on the beach south of the shing pier. This group plays rock and roll, R&B, jazz and country and is brought here free by the Deer eld Beach Cultural Committee and the city. Blankets or chairs OK. Refreshments will be sold. 954-592-3160.Atarah and Damarys share a laugh with Deer eld Beach Mayor Peggy Noland at the Jim and Jan Moran Boys & Girls Club. Some kids also received back packs. Denny Shub said the store, known for its one-price ts all brand of marketing, also carries shoes for children. Its a shoe-in for these kids New shoes for school Denny, Jessie and Marlene Shub, owners of All Shoes $9.88, a retail outlet on West Hillsboro Boulevard enjoy a moment with children at the Jim and Jan Moran Boys & Girls Club in Deer eld Beach. Children here received a gift of 1,500 pairs of shoes from the store owners. Pictured in the back row are attorney Pat Murphy, store owners Denny, Jessie and Marlene Shub and Mayor Peggy Noland. Murphy, a member of the Deer eld Beach Chamber of Commerce Board of Directors, is counsel for the shoe outlet.

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4 The PelicanFriday, September 14, 2012 By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach Its only 48 pounds but represents something much weightier. On the morning of Sept. 8, members of American Legion Post 142 accepted a piece of steel from the former World Trade Center a piece the Legion plans to include in a new memorial which should be nished by Memorial Day 2013. Legion Commander George Rafajko said the memorial would honor all the civilians, police of cers, re ghters and military personnel who died during the September 11th attacks along with the servicemen and women who have died in Iraq and Afghanistan and those who are still putting their lives on the line in Afghanistan. In order to receive the steel section, the Legion had to agree to certain standards. The steel must be part of a larger memorial, relatively secure and accessible to the public. They want people to be able to come up and touch it, said Rafajko. When completed, the memorial will also include a marble statue of a re ghter and two plaques; one will list the names of those who donated to the project and the other will include a description of the memorials meaning. Forest Lawn Memorial Gardens in Pompano Beach is donating the marble and the Legion is selling brick pavers to raise the funds needed. We have been through four different monument [designs] so far, and I think this is the nal one, said Rafajko. So, with the Legion ready to start building a nal resting place for the steel piece, residents, city and county of cials and Legion members braved the morning heat to witness the groundbreaking for the memorial. Well never forget. It needs to be Legion promises place of honor for a steel section of World Trade Centersaid over and over and over again, said Rick Johnson, Commander of the American Legions 9th District, which oversees Legion 142. Ray Lebowitz, deputy director of the 9-11 Foundation, delivered the piece to the Legion plus another portion of steel to the City of Pompano Beach. He estimates about 40 pieces of the World Trade Center are dispersed throughout Florida. This is a remnant of what we lost that day, said Lebowitz, a former New York City re ghter. Lebowitz left the re department in 1995 and moved to Coconut Creek in 1999. When the towers fell 11 year ago, Lebowitz lost some of the brothers he worked alongside during his 35 years in uniform. One was Lt. Dennis Mojica, of Fire Rescue 1, a company that lost half its numbers when the World Trade Center collapsed. Lebowitz wears a commemorative bracelet with Mojicas name on it around his wrist. And were still losing members from diseases they got on the pile, said Lebowitz. In the aftermath of the attacks many rst responders, who worked at Ground Zero to nd survivors and recover the remains of victims, have contracted respiratory diseases and illnesses and died as a result. To donate to the Legions September 11th memorial, call 954-942-2448. Legion Commander George Rafajko, left, and Ray Lebowitz, deputy director of the 9-11 Foundation, with the piece of the World Trade Center.

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The Pelican 5 Friday, September 14, 2012 By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFWilton Manors Its called The Village at Wilton Manors. But to residents who live near the proposed development it feels like an entire village is being dropped into the middle of their neighborhood. At the citys Development Review Committee, or DRC, on Monday and city commission meeting on Tuesday, residents voiced their opposition to the project in its current form a two story apartment complex with 81 units that, if approved by city of cials, would be located on the four-acre property at the corner of Residents say proposed development too big for siteNortheast 15 Avenue and Northeast 26 Street that is now the home of the Center for Spiritual Living. John Fiore, former mayor and current vice president of the East Neighborhood Association, or ENA, said residents are willing to work with developers to come up with a proposal that ts into the neighborhood. Along with their site plan approval, developers will also have to get the property rezoned. But this plan doesnt cut it, said Fiore, who lives next to the property and thinks the development should be between 60 and 65 units. Michael Miller, a consultant planner hired by the city to help review the plans, agrees. The project See DEVELOPMENT on page 2116th Annual Dunns RunDeer eld Beach The 16th Annual Dunns Run will take place on Sunday, Oct. 7 at 7:30 a.m. The race starts south of the main Deer eld Beach Parking lot located on Ocean Way and Southeast 2 Street and proceeds bene t the Boys & Girls Clubs of Broward County. In addition to the race there will be food and activities including TD the Dolphin, Billy the Marlin, Stanley C. Panther, a re truck, bounce house and more. The cost to register before Oct. 6 is $30. On the day of the race the cost will be $35. For more information about the 16th Annual Dunns Run Event, email Danielle Cox at dcox@bgcbc.com, visit www.dunnsrun.com or call 954-563-2822. Local code revisions is topic at neighborhood meetingPompano Beach Cresthaven Neighborhood Watch meets Sept. 20 at St. Elizabeth Hall, NE 33 Street and 10 Terrace at 7:30 p.m. This months topic is code enforcement. Sonny Martz, code enforcement inspector, will discuss recent changes in the citys code. Also on hand will be Commissioner Charlottte Burrie and BSO Lt. Charlotte Road. The meeting is free and open to the public. Call 954-7867536.

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6 The PelicanFriday, September 14, 2012 Deer eld Beach, Pompano Beach, Lighthouse Point, LauderdaleBy-The-Sea, Wilton Manors and Oakland ParkWilton Manors Oakland Park Hillsboro Beach The Pompano Pelican is published weekly on FridaysStreet Address: 1500-A E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, FL 33060 Telephone: 954-783-8700 Fax: 954-783-0093Letters to the Editor are encouraged and accepted for print if signed, although a writers name will be withheld on request; letters must also include a daytime telephone number. Advertising rates are available upon request. Subscription rate is $31.80 including tax for one years delivery in Greater Pompano Beach; $95.40/per year including tax for others in the United States; call 954-783-8700 for rates abroad. The Pelican is a nonpartisan newspaper and reserves the right to decline advertising. Copyright 2012. Reproduction of this publication in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission of the publisher. The Pelican is a member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, Deer eld Beach Chamber and the LBTS Chamber. The Pelican is a state certi ed woman-owned minority business. The Pelican is delivered to businesses, libraries, schools, of ces, hospitals, news racks and single family homes. All advertising and copy is published at the sole discretion of the publisher. We welcome your critiques and ideas concerning this publication. Anne Siren, publisherExecutive Assistant: Mary Hudson Graphics: Rachel Ramirez Windsheimer Bookkeeper: John White Classi eds: Fran Shelby Contributing Writers: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Judy Wilson, Malcolm McClintock, Judy Vik, Michael dOliveira Account Executives: Paul Shroads, Carolyn Mann, Bill Heaton, Bill Fox Special Of ce Assistant: Cathy Siren ESTABLISHED 1993 Volume XX, Issue 37 Founding Editor and PublisherAnne Hanby Siren The Pelican wants to know what you think. Send your thoughts on local, state and national issues to siren2415@gmail.com Send your letter to the editor siren2415@gmail.com OpinionDysfunctional voter? Visit the Womens League of Voters websiteTallahassee High interest in this years election may well be a mismatch with sweeping changes in election laws that have tightened voter address rules and reduced early voting days. Changing precinct lines and a ballot of unprecedented length worsen the situation, and the League of Women Voters of Florida sees potential problems ahead on Election Day. To make sure that every vote counts, the League is urging voters to take action now to ensure that they are eligible and prepared to vote. A new website, www.BeReadyToVote.org, makes the process easy. The site is a one-stop shop that allows Floridians to check and update their voter status, register to vote, nd their precinct, request an absentee ballot, check on important election dates and deadlines, and be informed about the candidates and issues on the Nov. 6 ballot. Voters can prevent Election Day delays and frustration--what we call electoral dysfunction--by being prepared, says League President Deirdre Macnab. With the high level of enthusiasm and interest were seeing in this years election, sharp reductions in early voting days and a very lengthy ballot, we want to ensure a successful experience for every Florida voter. Even if youre registered, you still should contact your local Supervisor of Elections to check your voter status and update your record if necessary. Local Supervisors of ces throughout Florida are ready to help citizens prepare to vote. Macnab adds, Being confronted by this years pages-long ballot lled with dense legal amendment language and often-misleading titles can also cause problems for unprepared voters and the voters behind them in line. People really need to know the issues and be ready. Also available through www.BeReadyToVote.org is the League of Women Voters of Florida Education Funds 2012 Florida Election & Voter Guide, which contains nonpartisan information on the presidential and statewide candidates, constitutional amendments, and Supreme Court justices that will appear on the November 6 ballot. The League of Women Voters of Florida, a nonpartisan political organization, encourages informed and active participation in government, works to increase understanding of major public policy issues, and in uences public policy through education and advocacy. For more information, please visit the Leagues website at: www.TheFloridaVoter.org. In the Culinary Concepts article that was published in the Aug. 31 issue of The Pelican Dean Mertens name, owner of Culinary Concepts in Pompano Beach was misspelled. The Pelican regrets the error.CorrectionCommentaryWhat is it about facade improvements they dont understand?By Judy WilsonCommissioners in LBTS seem to be dismantling a program that would help do what they have spent untold hours discussing: ramp up the appearance of their aging beachfront town. In turning down a hotel owners request for $25,000 in matching funds to install hurricane strength windows and doors, they have created confusion not only among themselves, but the public as well. It is almost amusing. The Hotel Improvement Program was approved only weeks ago. It is funded with $150,000 and is similar to facade programs currently available to business owners in Deer eld Beach and Pompano Beach. In those cities, community redevelopment agency tax dollars are used to encourage improvements to commercial buildings, and the results have been impressive. In Lauderdale-by-the-Sea, the commission included the installation of windows and doors in the Hotel Improvement Program as one of the allowable sprucing-up measures. It is common knowledge that replacement windows and doors on any structure must withstand hurricane force winds. Thats in the Florida Building Code. It is not an option. So why was this commission surprised to nd public tax dollars going for this purpose? We want to ask, Where have you guys been? The problem with the program may be it gives the commission power to approve or disapprove a project. That should be the job of administrators who understand construction and who are not so easily swayed by public opinion. In this town, a few vocal people can cause the commission to rethink almost anything. It must be frustrating for staff to bring a good program to the public only to have it shot down by an indecisive board. It will be equally discouraging for the business owner who is willing to invest his own money to make improvements. What could be a more important improvement than making a building safer for its occupants? In denying their rst application for improvement funds, commissioners said they had thought the money would go for mere touch-ups. But building owners can pretty much handle the spit and polish improvementspaint, awnings, overhangs themselves. It is the more expensive work doors, windows, roofs that often delay refurbishment. This program was established to help with the costly structural improvements. In most cases, the business owners spend far more than the matching dollars. In other cities those dollars have proven to be the incentive that gets things rolling. In this weeks discussion, the mayor was concerned that the project would not greatly change the appearance of the hotel which is already one of the best kept in town. Perhaps the criteria that applicants must be members of the Superior Small Lodgings Association should be broadened. Owners of more run-down hotels are the ones who really need the nancial assist. And since they would have to come up with a good deal of their own money, the chances are they would take renewed pride in their properties. As for those speakers at Tuesdays commission meeting who fear the program will get out of hand, we remind them the work being done must be visible from the street. Remodeled bathrooms will obviously not be allowed. We dont understand how the commission could be so unaware of the programs purpose. But in a town where elected of cials spend a lot of the time taking one step forward and two steps back, it may not be surprising.

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The Pelican 7 Friday, September 14, 2012 By Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach On Tuesday, commissioners agreed to abandon a public portion of the right-of-way for Riverside Drive to allow for the construction of an easement road. While the property is a small strip of land just east of the Hillsboro Inlet, the move by the commission signals a development of a hotel and marina on the property. Formerly Tails Restaurant, the property is now the focus for a hotel and marina. Drivers entering the city from the bridge at the inlet already see workers tearing down the former restaurant. A spokesperson for Hunter Hospitality, owners of the property, said when the project is completed, those drivers will see a pop as Hotel/marina project takes another step, Alsdorf gets $91.7K grantthey enter the city from the north. Landscaping, lighting and more are planned to make the northern gateway memorable. The company is now in the process of completing permits for the hotel. The marina permits are already in place. On Tuesday, one SCUBA business owner urged the commission to approve the abandonment. We desperately need this hotel. Upscale clients dont end up in Pompano, he said. Commissioner Barry Dockswell said he had seen the plans and complimented the team working on the project. Were nally moving forward with this development, he said. Said Mayor Lamar Fisher, We just want that Hilton built. The hotel spokesperson said that Hilton of cials had visited the property, but nothing is con rmed.County grant will fund ramp at Alsdorf ParkPompano Beach More boaters will have dock space at Asdorf Park on the Intracoastal Waterway. A $91,757 grant from Broward County will fund the construction of a boat ramp, additional parking spaces for vehicles and over-sized trailers, seawall repairs and additional pilings. The grant requires matching funds from the city, but a grant from Florida Inland Navigation District for the same amount will reimburse the city. The only objection to the project came from former city commissioner, Ed Phillips, who said the construction would reduce the shing space for the community. Recent reports of loose railings have closed a section of the Pompano Beach Municipal Pier, but anglers take their chances to get a good casting spot. See related story on page 9. [Photo courtesy of Keith Mizell].

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8 The PelicanFriday, September 14, 2012 Business matters The Pelican takes a look at local business owners. You can tell your story here because business matters. 954-783-8700. By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFThe right pill at the right price is the slogan of this new pharmacy in town, located at 1960 N. Federal Hwy. in Pompano Beach. Manager Cynthia Hershkowitz, sat down with The Pelican to talk about the business. We took over an existing pharmacy in May of this year, cleaned it up until it is now an immaculate pharmacy, well stocked with a large inventory of over-thecounter medical products, and a newly added $1 section lled with a wide variety of kitchen, bath, beauty, household and paper products. In addition, we also stock medical supplies such as bathroom safety items, canes, compression garments and more. She continued, We have a second pharmacy at 799 E. Palmetto Park Road in Boca Raton, both under the general management of Fahim Rahmani. However, Im the designated spokesperson who handles daily marketing, public relations, inventories and management of both stores. Im back and forth throughout the week. The stores arent that far apart. and Im an old hand in this business. With a pleasant smile, she says, Ive been in retail pharmaceutical business for 28 years, mostly in the Boca area. I walked into a pharmacy looking for a job when I was a young girl. I was hired as a cashier and kept working my way up the management ladder until I now handle every aspect of a retail pharmacy. Stocking two stores enables The Right Pill Pharmacies to be very competitive with the large national chains as customers are nding out. Hershkowitz points out, We can offer something that they cant The Right Pill Pharmacy of Pompano offers fast personal service plus competitive prices and thats fast, personalized service. If a customer wants something we do not stock, we will get it within 24 hours. Our suppliers are very accommodating. Asked for other examples of personalized service, she says, Customers seldom have to wait to get a prescription lled here by our pharmacist, Mathew Pendergrast, who is very knowledgeable about medical interactions, over the counter products, vitamins, and nutritional supplements. Hes a great resource and he makes the time to share information with the customer. Customers arent told to come back later. We work with people to make sure they get the medication they need even if they have temporary nancial or insurance dif culties. This new pharmacy considers itself to be a very competitive discount outlet, offering a number of promotions such as free delivery, free antibiotics and $15 off of new transferred prescriptions. The Friends and Family Program rewards existing customers for referrals. The Pompano store has an intern to assist the pharmacist. Hershkowitz adds, Were rapidly building our reputation and already have a growing group of repeating customers. Roberta Kistner is one. She says, Theyre wonderful. I found them by accident and decided to try them. Unlike the big chains that make you stand and wait or come back later, The Right Pill Pharmacy was very accommodating. They gave me immediate service and it was courteous service. They have up to the minute technology and oldfashioned courtesy. I would recommend them. Bonnie Swanson is another loyal patron who says, I think theyre great. Im dealing with an illness that Sign of the times of The Right Pill Pharmacy sign stands sentry to keep pain pill seekers away. A new Florida web site helps pharmacies to identify potential prescription drug abusers. [Photos by Phyllis J. Neuberger] Cynthia Hershkowitz handles public relations, marketing and management of the new The Right Pill Pharmacy at 1960 N. Federal Hwy. in Pompano Beach which promises personal service and discount prices. See The RIGHT PILL on page 24Boca Raton Christian School Open HouseBoca Raton -The public is invited to an evening of music, memories and tributes as we celebrate the 40th Anniversary of Boca Raton Christian School. Friday, October 5, 2012 from 7 to 8:30 p.m. Boca Raton Community Church Sanctuary, 601 NW 4 Ave, Boca Raton. Free admission; no tickets required. For more details visit www. bocachristian.org or call 561-391-2727 x 352 or email licatae@bocachristian.orgPull a few weeds, plant some beans and join the funPompano Beach Join volunteers at the historic Sample-McDougald House on September 15 8 to 11 a.m. to spruce up the grounds and turn the kitchen garden to begin a new planting season. Sample-McDougald House/Centennial Park awardwinning landscape looks great, but in order to keep it that way a little extra TLC is required. Municipal lawnmaintenance does a great job, but there are always a few details that need to be taken care of, Sample-McDougald House needs your help! Just show up on the morning of Sept.15 in work clothes and have a good time making something great even better. Also, volunteers can get involved in the kitchen garden as they begin clearing out the summer crops and begin planting for the fall season -beans, peppers and other local veggies.

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The Pelican 9 Friday, September 14, 2012 Pompano Beach Public works director, Rob McCaughan, reported to the commission that the citys municipal pier was in need of repairs. The existing safety railing at the pier is in an advanced state of disrepair and presents an eminent danger to public safety in its current state, his report read. The city approved a $29,700 contract for engineering services to determine the work that needed to be done. The contract also requires engineering inspections. The total cost for repairs could be as high as $100,000. Keith Mizell, a beach resident, said, Bolts in the concrete have rusted. I saw one loose rail, but after I made an inspection, I found no others. Mizell asked the city to halt the design until members of the community could meet. McCaughan countered that all of the rails were in need of repair. Commissioner Barry Dockswell asked the commission to consider the age of the pier, 45 years old with a life expectancy of 50 years. We need to look at the big picture. We may all be prohibited from using the pier after 2016. Vice Mayor Brummer agreed that the rails should be repaired at the least cost. The pier is in bad shape. The rails should be repaired to live another ve years, he said. City Manager Dennis Beach urged the passage of the contract for engineering services. The pier may have another ve years, but the rails dont, he said. Pier railings deemed dangerous by city9-14 Deer eld Beach Computer Club is now open Fridays from 10 to 11:30 a.m. at Le Club/Activity Center, Room B in Century Village East, Deer eld Beach. $1 entry fee waived for rst time guests. 954-725-9331 or www.db-cc.org. 9-15 Garage sale from 6 a.m. to noon at Northeast 38 Street and Northeast 5 Avenue in Oakland Park. 954630-4500. 9-15 Pony rides from 8 to 11:30 a.m. at Sand & Spurs Equestrian Park, 1600 NE 5 Ave., Pompano Beach. Just north of the Goodyear Blimp Base. Free Admission. Cost is $3 per ride. 954.786.4507. 9-15 Recovery Awareness Night to bene t Vision of Change, an organization that raises money to help fund projects that bene t the children of Los Quinchos, Nicaragua and their efforts to recover from substance abuse and addiction. Event starts at 6 p.m. at Signature Memories Event Center, 299 N. Federal Hwy., Fort Lauderdale. Admission is $20. 954-4010261. 9-15 Family Fun Day is from 4:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Pompano Beach Aquatic Center, 820 NE 18 Ave. A free day of swimming, diving boards, re trucks, snorkeling, games and more. There will also be raf e prizes. 754-2460665. 9-19 Art-By-TheSea group meets at the Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Community Church in Friedt Family Hall, 4433 Bougainvillea Drive. Marcia Hirschy will discuss how artists can market their work. The meeting is free and open to anyone. 954-594-0444. 9-19 ArtHall will be held from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Business Resource Center, 50 NE 1 St., Pompano Beach. ArtHall combines business and art in a series of six receptions. Each month a new exhibit begins with an opening reception on the SightingsA community calendar for Northeast Broward County. Send your event information to mdpelican@yahoo.comSee SIGHTINGS on page 12

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10 The PelicanFriday, September 14, 2012 Making a DifferencePhyllis J. Neuberger wants your suggestions about people who are making a difference. Call 954-7838700. Gretchen 9, from Pompano Beach, donated her hair to Locks for Love this Sunday, Sept. 9. She had been growing her hair for more than two years so that she could make the donation. Gretchen after her haircut, holds her locks which will be sent to the charity in West Palm Beach. Locks are used for cancer patients in need of wigs during and after chemotherapy. Goldi-locks and a great charityBy Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFWhen this string band of ornately costumed, volunteer musicians march up to the stage, the audience often responds with standing applause. This one-of-akind band rolls out its talent, energy and songs in concert, Colorful Broward County Mummers still on the march with music, clapping, tapping and struttingand normally restrained people break into song as they clap hands and tap feet. One song like the Beer Barrel Polka will set the mood, and as one fan said, This is like a tailgate party at a football game. The Broward County Mummers group was founded 35 years ago and currently has 54 men and women members between the ages of 49 and 88. The musicians play Oakland Park Garden ClubOakland Park Elaine Farquharson will present a program on Vegetable Gardening in South Florida at a meeting of the Oakland Park Garden Club on Tuesday, Sept. 18. The meeting will be held at Jaco Pastorius Park Community Center, 1098 NE 40 Court from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. The Garden Club also hosts PARK(ing) Day on Friday, Sept. 21, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the parking lot on the Southeast corner of Oakland Park Boulevard and Northeast 6 Avenue. Parking spaces will be transformed into a park-like setting with a plant sale and raf e for a rain barrel. For more information, call 954630-4511. Briefs banjos, saxophones, clarinets, guitars, accordions, drums, and glockenspiels. They are a dedicated and hardy bunch who drive themselves to weekly rehearsals at the Moose Lodge, 6191 Rock Island Road in Tamarac, and at least 35 concerts during the season. Members arrive from as far as Miami on the south to Delray on the north every Thursday because they want to keep this music alive and they enjoy the camaraderie. Captain Jack Hultman took the top job 13 years ago and is still lled with enthusiasm for the Mummers. A retired divorce lawyer from Long Island, Hultman, now 82, started a Mummers group there 50 years ago. When he settled in Florida, he quickly became active in the Broward County Mummers and soon assumed leadership. He says, My job is many faceted. I keep busy behind the scenes with of ce detail, recruiting musicians, getting bookings and keeping members informed. During performances, Im the one who res up the audience and gets folks on their feet strutting, dancing and singing. We used to be a marching band, but our musicians have aged so we now settle for fast strut to the stage. He goes on to stress, None of us are paid. We charge fees on a sliding scale and the money we earn is basically poured into expenses and costumes which cost about $8,000 each year. This year theyll be decked out in red, white and blue. Hultman describes Mummer music as river boat style, done to a Mummer beat which has its own unique sound. The ve musical directors who rotate responsibility are Scotty Johnson, Mike Moe, Martin Miller, Carl Castle and John Lolli who is 87. Vice President Jan Little serves as lead strutter. I remember seeing and loving the New Jersey Mummers as a child, so its great to now be part of a Mummers group. My husband, George, plays the bass ddle, and being in this together means we share a lot in common, including time. Hultman says, Im having a marvelous retirement. When the Mummers arent taking my time, my pets are. I have Captain Jack Hultman courtesy of Mummers The Mummers sit still for a moment in between rehearsals for their high stepping performances.See MUMMERS on page 12

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The Pelican 11 Friday, September 14, 2012

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12 The PelicanFriday, September 14, 2012 a dog, a cat, two tanks of sh, two outside iguanas and 27 outside ducks. When asked if this isnt a lot to manage, the retired divorce lawyer quips, Its easier than having a wife. The Mummers have pitched in to raise funds for 911 victims, March of Dimes, cancer funds and more. Thanks to you, Mummers, for keeping song, dance and strutting alive. To become a Mummer or to schedule a concert, contact Jack Hultman at 954-9567212. The MummersThe Mummers supposedly made their American debut parading in Philadelphia on January 1, 1901. Then a mix of costumed male musicians from many national backgrounds, they became famous on the Northeast coast. According to Captain Hultman, the group evolved from an old Swedish custom. He explains. King Momus was a ctitious God of Evil long ago in Sweden. On New Years Day, Swedish musicians, dressed in weird costumes, had fun scaring off the evil King Momus. They managed to scare the current population as well, he laughs. The next performance of The Mummers is Oct. 21 at Temple Kodesh in Boynton Beach. Call for a complete schedule.MummersContinued from page 10third Wednesday of the month through October. The event is free. 954-586-1111. 9-20 Campaign fundraiser for Wilton Manors Commissioner Julie Carson at Archidezigns, 2214 N. Dixie Hwy., Wilton Manors, from 6 to 8 p.m. 9-20 Wilton Manors Historical Society meeting at 7 p.m. at city hall commission chambers, 2020 Wilton Drive. 954-566-9019. 9-22 Wilton Manors Kiwanis Club Kids Day from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Wilton Manors Elementary School, 2401 NE 3 Ave. Free food, fun and games for elementary school students. 954-560-7813. 9-23 FAU professor and activist Mike Budd leads a discussion on Rachel Maddows new book, Drift: The Unmooring of American Military Power and the U.S. Love Affair with War. Event is free. Donations are requested. Event is at 1 p.m. at Unitarian Universalist Church of Ft Lauderdale, 3970 NW 21 Ave., Oakland Park. 908-477-7812. 9-25 Card party held by the Benevolent Patriotic Order of Does Drove 142 is scheduled from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Pompano Beach Elks Lodge, 700 NE 10 St. Open to the public. Bring your table of friends or group. Cost is $4 and includes desert, coffee or tea. Call 561479-2002 for reservations.FridaysPompano Proud meets every second Friday of the month at McNab Park, 2250 SightingsContinued from page See SIGHTINGS on page 13

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The Pelican 13 Friday, September 14, 2012 Boat safetyAn ABOUT BOATING SAFELY COURSE Class, Sept. 29 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. takes place at the HQ building, 3939 N. Ocean Blvd., Boca Raton. Those persons who complete the class receive a certi cate and t a Florida Boating ID card, which is required for boaters under 22 years. The course also is valuable for anyone new to Florida boating or needs a classroom safe boating class. In addition, many insurance companies give annual discounts for completing this course. The topics include boating terminology, boat handling, navigation rules, aids to navigation, federal and Florida regulations, safety equipment, and other boating techniques. Classes are taught by Flotilla 36, Boca Raton, in the HQ building in Spanish River Park at 3939 N. Ocean Blvd., just south of Spanish River Blvd. on A1A. Plenty of parking. We have a material cost of $35 per person, The class is completed in one day. For preregistration or information about upcoming classes, call 561-391-3600 and leave a brief message for a call back. E. Atlantic Blvd., from 8:30 to 11 a.m. Every second Sunday the group meets at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach, at 6 p.m. 954-562-3232. The Pompano Beach Rotary Club meets Fridays at 12:15 p.m. at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. 954-786-3274. Art Gallery 21 is open every Friday from 7 to 9 p.m. The gallery, located at the Womans Club of Wilton Manors, 600 NE 21 Court, features various artwork from various artists across the State of Florida. Admission is free. Visit www.canawm.org for more information.SaturdaysPony rides are available at Sand & Spurs Equestrian Park, 1600 NE 5 Ave., Pompano Beach, from 9 to 11:30 a.m. Cost is $3 per ride. 954-786-4507. The Pompano Beach Kiwanis Club Westside meets the rst and third Saturdays of the month at 8:30 a.m. at the E. Pat Larkins Community Center, 520 MLK Blvd., Pompano Beach. 954-7828096. The Deer eld Beach West Kiwanis Club meets the second and fourth Saturdays of the month at 9 a.m. at Westside Park, 445 SW 2 St., Deer eld Beach. 954-54-732-9883. Kayak rentals are available Saturdays and Sundays at Richardson Historic Park, 1937 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Visit www.AtlanticCoastKayak. SightingsContinued from page 12 See SIGHTINGS on page 15

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14 The PelicanFriday, September 14, 2012 slam. At the groundbreaking ceremony on Sept. 7, residents, commissioners and NW CRA board members expressed their excitement that plans for the NW CRA were nally moving forward. This has been a long, long, long time coming, said Dist. 4 Commissioner Woodrow J. Poitier, who represents residents in the NW CRA. People often say When is something going to happen on MLK? Well today is the day, said Deborah Anthony, NW CRA chairperson. So far four businesses have expressed an interest in opening a location there a sit down restaurant, take-out restaurant, beauty shop and professional of ce. Two of the business owners interested in renting space also live in the area. Kimberly Holmes owns a home-based business, Brown Sugar Bakery, and is looking to move into the 731 MLK Boulevard location or one of the storefronts located on Northeast 1 Street in Historic Downtown Pompano. To help her move in and buy some new equipment, Holmes has applied for a loan from the CRAs Microenterprise Fund. Started in 2006, the Microenterprise Fund gives small business owners who either live or base their business in the NW CRA, the opportunity to apply for a low interest loan of up to $25,000. But whether Holmes opens on MLK or Northeast 1 Avenue shes glad to nally see some improvements to the area. Its time to x it up, she said. Benita Brown and her husband, Bernard Noble, already received a Microenterprise Loan and plan on opening the take-out restaurant at 731. I was born and raised here. Anything that we can do to help make it better, thats what were going to do, said Brown. Once open, she said she plans to hire ve local residents as employees and possibly more if she and her husband expand the business. Jobs and economic development were two words repeated a few times during the groundbreaking. Pompano Beach Mayor Lamar Fisher touted the use of Pompano Beach subcontractors in the construction of the new development. Employ our own, said Fisher. Pinnacle, the general contractor the city chose for the project, has hired ve Pompano businesses as subcontractors. Cory McFarlane, chief visionary at Pinnacle, said about two-BuildingContinued from page 1 thirds of the subcontractors hired will be based out of Pompano. We like to keep a lot of dollars in the community, he said. For more information on the 731 development, visit www.PompanoBeachCRA. com or call 954-786-7824.When completed, the MLK development would be the rst new retail space on Martin Luther King Boulevard in over 50 years. [Rendering courtesy of the City of Pompano Beach]

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The Pelican 15 Friday, September 14, 2012 Yep, he likes the car Nine-year-old Angelo, a member of the Jim and Jan Moran Boys & Girls Club in Deer eld Beach, won an art contest sponsored by Doug and Linda Von Allmen that involved decorating a template showing the top, sides and back of a Ferrari. Angelos design, the New York City skyline, won over 500 other entries from ve other Boys & Girls Clubs around Broward County. Angelo won lots of prizes and a chance to meet race car driver Doug Allmen. SightingsContinued from page 13 com or 954-781-0073 for rates. The Wilton Manors Green Market is held every Saturday and Sunday at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. 954-592-0381. The Deer eld Beach West Kiwanis Club meets the second and fourth Saturdays of the month at 9 a.m. at Westside Park, 445 SW 2 St., Deer eld Beach. 954-54-732-9883. Pompano Green Market is held every Saturday from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the corner of Atlantic Boulevard and Cypress Road. Vendors See SIGHTINGS on page 19

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16 The PelicanFriday, September 14, 2012 police department budget that increases next years expenditures by $162,000, a gure some citizens say requires further investigation. Also on the agenda, and added since the budget was prepared in June, is the addition of another sworn of cer at a cost of $88,000. Last month Police Chief Tom Nagy speci cally mentioned that additional staf ng would put the towns marine patrol boat in the water more often. This week he said the additional person will allow him to stabilize the schedule and put the ATV on the beach and the marine patrol boat in the water on more nights and weekends. Currently he operates with 14 sworn of cers and four civilian dispatchers. Only nine of the of cers are trained in the use of the boat and the ATV. In addition, the chief, said he has to do road patrols. I need a fulltime of cer to make sure the road is covered. When I have to work the road, something is wrong. The major [Maj. Jay Szesnat] and I ll in regularly. The additional man would also provide for dispatch calls to come directly to the station. We get a ton of calls from the residents, Nagy said. But resident Al Shore pointed out to commissioners Tuesday that police services are 48 percent of the proposed $4.8 million 2012-13 budget. Non-operating expenses not included in the current year account for $42,000 of the increase. This requires a further look, Shore, a resident of Opal Towers, said. Shore placed the cost of the additional police of cer at $126,000, but Nagy said the gure is closer to $88,000. The $42,000 he is asking for is to replace equipment that cant be repaired, a new police car and to initiate phase one of a three-year update of the radio system. By 2015, the system used now will be obsolete, Nagy said. In addition, his numbers for overtime, workmans compensation, insurance and the pension fund are up. Bruce Warshaw, a resident of Ocean Club, said before the town hires another police of cer, it should pay a consultant to explain the disparity between Hillsboros police budget and that of Highland Beach, a town in Palm Beach County with about the same number of people and miles of A1A to patrol. Highlands police budget is $400,000 less than Hillsboros. Imagine what we could do with $400,000, Warshaw said. Highland Beach has 14 police of cers and some backup personnel. For the second year in a row, it has unfunded an additional sworn of cer position. Former city commissioner Rhea Weiss asked if supervisory personnel could be included in the road patrol schedule and could other cities with marine boats patrol Hillsboro Beach waters? She also asked if the town could save money by outsourcing dispatch. Renes Males noted that Highland Beach contracts some services. She questioned the need for a police boat suggesting there could be more effective ways for residents to protect their property. All three speakers said the police department runs well and keeps the crime rate low and response times short. The rst budget hearing was held last night [Thursday]. As presented by nancial consultant Steve Bloom, the general fund for 2012-13 stands at $4.819 million, with a slight reduction in the current 3.8 mills. Budgeted for the current scal year was $4.869 million. The addition of the police of cer could change the millage, Bloom noted, but that would depend on whether cuts are made somewhere else in the scal plan. Final reading is set for Thursday, Sept. 20, 5 p.m. at town hall.Town endorses inlet and shoreline sand studyHillsboro Beach Commissioners this week committed to spending $51,000 for sand studies of the Boca Raton Inlet and the shoreline between the Boca Raton and Hillsboro inlets. The study will be done in hopes of the Department of Environmental Protection, or DEP, will increase the amount of sand Boca has to dredge annually. That sand drifts downward to help ll the eroded beaches in Deer eld. Consultant Penny Cutt said the DEP may reimburse some of the study costs, perhaps as much as 75 percent. The study is a preliminary step to what Vice Mayor Claire Schubert is trying to achieve: a beach nourishment collaboration between Hillsboro Beach, Deer eld Beach and Boca Raton. The study will determine how much sand can be pumped into the downward drift to replenish the beaches. This [collaboration] is really a dream of mine. There will be a lot of steps to get this done. We have taken the rst one, Schubert said. Cutt said of cials in Boca Raton do not see the need for an additional sand study and are using numbers from a study done in 2002 which has determined the amount of material they are required to dredge and put into the littoral drift annually. Cutt said data gathered in the last 10 years could change that gure. Mayor Dan Dodge said, This may be the long term solution. Instead of a big project every 10 years from a source that no longer exists, we can [nourish] more frequently. This could stabilize our north end. The town completed a $6 million project last year that nourished one and a half miles of the north beach. Sand was taken from a borrow area off of Deer eld Beach. That source is now depleted. A second phase would be a $24,000 study to evaluate the shoreline between the Boca Inlet and the Hillsboro Inlet. The study has not yet been approved. PoliceContinued from page 1

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The Pelican 17 Friday, September 14, 2012 By Malcolm McClintockPELICAN STAFFLauderdale-By-The-Sea Held every second Wednesday of the month at member restaurants, the highly regarded LBTS Chamber of Commerce Business After-Hours was yet again a resounding success. Sea Watchs General Manager Beth Tannar made sure there was a good supply of pork sliders, lobster bisque and conch fritters as over 70 area business leaders mingled enthusiastically. Business cards were exchanged and contacts were made as participants enjoyed happy hour libations and great views of the Atlantic Ocean. The convivial atmosphere ensured that all guests had a fun and productive time. I am always happy to see such a good turnout for our events, says Chamber President Mark Silver who was also eager to talk about the Chambers revamped Visitors Guides. The redesigned guide will sport a great new look, be easier to carry and offer several new opportunities for businesses to promote themselves to visitors as well as area residents. Among the exciting innovations is a more detailed map of the community, developed Sea Watch restaurant hosts LBTS Chamber monthly networking eventEileen Nesdale of the National Save The Sea Turtles Foundation, Emylene Egusquiza of Taylor Tax LLC, and Rachel Sampson of Villa Caprice/A Little Inn By The Sea. Michael Pinto, of Flip-Flops Dockside Eatery, Mindy Correa, of Tours To You, and Ed White of Croton Arms. Alan Forgea of Blue Moon Fish Co., Beth Tannar of Sea Watch restaurant, and Jeff Levine of South Florida Chamber Maps. [Photos by Malcolm McClintock]in a fun, cartoon style that highlights individual businesses. This map will also be direct mailed to homes in neighboring cities. We will be printing 40,000 complete directory booklets and an additional 10,000 direct mailed maps, giving you more ways to reach more consumers than ever before, says Silver. Visit the Chamber website at www.lbts.com for updates and information on upcoming events.

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18 The Pelican Friday, September 14, 2012 Pompano Beach State of the CityPompano Beach The Greater Pompano Beach Chamber hosts the State of the City on Thursday, Sept. 27 at 7:45 a.m. at the Pompano Beach Elks Lodge #1898, 700 NE 10 St. Mayor Lamar Fisher will talk about the past year and what the citys plans for the upcoming year are. The cost to attend is $25, includes breakfast and is open to the public. To RSVP send an email to info@ pompanobeachchamber.com or call 954-941-2940.Musical tribute to the troopsPompano Beach KP Productions will perform Home For The Holidays a musical in honor of veterans and current servicemen and women still serving in the military. The cost is $15 per ticket and the event is on Sunday, Sept. 23 from 2 to 3:30 p.m. at the Herb Skolnick Center, 800 SW 36 Ave.. The costumes and sets will take you back to the 1940s and the Big Band sounds in this tribute to Americas military. For more information, call 954-2748537. Womens Health ExpoDeerfield Beach The Womens Health Expo will be held at the North Broward Medical Center, 201 E. Sample Road, on Tuesday, Oct. 17 from 5 to 8 p.m. There will be food, shopping, activities and giveaways. There will also be vendors providing services geared towards women and womens health issues. For more, call 954-759-7400.Yom Kippur at Temple SholomPompano Beach Yom Kippur services begin on Tuesday, Sept. 25 at 6:55 p.m. at Temple Sholom, 132 SE 11 Ave. Services will also be held on Wednesday, Sept. 26 at 9 a.m., 10:30 a.m., 10:45 a.m., 5 p.m., 5:30 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 954-9426410.

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The Pelican 19 Friday, September 14, 2012 Who is going to do business with this town? Shame on us. Im very disappointed, Vincent said. After the vote, Mayor Rosanne Minnet said she disagreed that the installation of hurricane windows improves the appearance of the property, a program criteria. She said Novaks property is incredible, but what visual impact does this have? She said she doesnt want to see the program pushed aside suggesting commissioners need to discuss it further in another forum. Dodd suggested staff review the criteria to make it clearer to those applying that improvements must visual. Town Manager Connie Hoffmann said staff will work to de ne the criteria but may need more commission guidance. Three residents spoke against Novaks application. You shouldnt be paying for hurricane windows. I agree with painting or awnings or stucco. To spend my tax dollars on hurricane windows is ridiculous, said Bill Vitollo. Vito Chiarello said he wasnt against the hotel program but wondered how well the program was thought out. Most taxpayers thought it was for paint or to get a clean look. Now some want new windows, doors or landscaping. Why stop there? Why not redo bathrooms or add a hot tub? This can get out of hand. If youre using taxpayers money to improve the town, I want to replace my windows and redo my landscaping, too. People of this town should be concerned about where this will go. Edmund Malkoon said the commission should reconsider the criteria so any small property owner can apply. Storm WindowsContinued from page 2wanted. 954-782-3015.MondaysPlay ping-pong from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Cost is $1. All ages can participate. 954-3902130. The Gold Coast Toastmasters Club meets on the second and third Monday of the month from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Dennys, 3151 NW 9 Ave., Fort Lauderdale. 954895-3555 or 954-782-9951.TuesdaysYoga every Tuesday from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Cost is $7 per class. Classes are also held Saturday mornings from 10:15 to 11:45 a.m. 954-607-3520. The Oakland Park Historical Society meets on the second Tuesday of every month at 5:30 p.m. at the at Oakland Park Library, 1298 NE 37 St. For more information, call 954-566-9957. Deer eld Beach Rotary Club meets every Tuesday at 12 p.m. at the Deer Creek Golf Club, 2801 Deer Creek Country Club Blvd., Deer eld Beach. 954-630-9593. Pompano Beach-Lighthouse Rotary Club meets every Tuesday at 7:30 a.m. at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. 954972-7178. The American Legion Auxiliary Unit 142, 171 SW 2 St., Pompano Beach, has Bingo on Tuesdays at 7 p.m. Food is available from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. 954-942-2448. A Yoga class is available for all levels at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors, on Tuesday nights from 6:30 to 8 p.m. and Saturday mornings from 10:30 a.m. until noon. The cost is $7. 305-607-3520. Zonta International meets on the third Tuesday of the month at Duffys Diner, 401 N. Federal Hwy., Deereld Beach, at 11:15 a.m. Zonta International works to advance the status of women. 561-392-2223.WednesdaysThe Deer eld Beach SightingsContinued from page 15 See SIGHTINGS on page 26

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20 The Pelican Friday, September 14, 2012 will receive a black 65-gallon trash cart and a blue 65-gallon recycling cart. The town currently uses the 96-gallon blue carts for trash collection. Residents also can request a 35-gallon blue recycling cart or keep the 96-gallon blue cart for recycling. Multi-family units can keep the larger trash carts. In explaining the changes, Bud Bentley, assistant town manager, said the town is replacing the blue carts with black for trash because blue is commonly viewed as the universal, international indicator of recycling. Also, the blue carts now in use in town for trash have the name of the vendor, Choice, imprinted on the side. That will be replaced with LBTS information. Any household can keep the blue 96-gallon cart for yard waste. It will be re-labeled yard waste only and will be emptied at the same time as the trash cart. Over the next year the number of households using the yard waste cart will be measured to help decide whether the town should start a yard waste collection program. If theres enough interest, the town will ultimately go to green carts for yard waste. The advantage of diverting yard waste from the trash stream is that it reduces disposal costs, according to a report provided commissioners. The recycling program will be funded by a $121,429 grant from the Resource Recovery Board of Broward County, meant to stimulate single-stream recycling. The money covers the cost of carts, an educational program, community outreach and hiring a coordinator. All recyclable materials aluminum, paper, plastic, glass and steel cans will be collected in a single container. Curbside bins will be replaced by the blue, rolling carts. The aim is to distribute the new carts by the end of this calendar year, Town Manager Connie Hoffmann said. The commission already has authorized purchase of the carts. Commissioner Stuart Dodd, who has been pushing for more recycling for years, described the program as exciting. If we can achieve 90 to 95 percent of people recycling, it will make a big difference in our costs, Dodd said. We get a double bene t. We dont pay for whats recycled to go to the trash and we get a credit [for the volume of recycled materials.] The change to a blue cart for recycling will require an educational campaign, Bentley said. Direct mail pieces will be sent to each resident explaining the switch. Information will be published in the towns magazine, Town Topics. And the sides and top of recycling carts will have imprinted information. The lid will have an imbedded label showing types of items that can be recycled. Commissioner Mark Brown suggested an effort be made to engage condos to participate in recycling, such as providing small containers for inside the units. I think there is a willingness to recycle nally, Mayor Roseann Minnet said. RecyclingContinued from page 1Tell The Pelican about your news! mdpelican@yahoo.com or 954-783-8700!

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The Pelican 21 Friday, September 14, 2012 seems very dense and shoehorned in. Maybe [80 units] is too much for that site, said Miller. The developers, Urban Dynamic Communities and Stellar Homes Group, say they need to build a certain number of units in order to make the project successful. The number of units is pretty modest, said Larry Coker, the attorney representing the developers. Coker suggested one way to make the project less dense is to build higher. Originally, plans called for the apartment complex to be 115 units. In his report, Miller lists 37 suggested changes; from the size of parking spaces to inadequate signage to lack of proper landscaping. One of his recommendations involves signi cantly improving the architecture. And the way it looks now leaves residents Randy Comer and his wife, Laura, worried the apartments could hurt property values. We want something conducive to the neighborhood. Something that will t in. This is the nicest area of east Wilton Manors. This [development] could destroy us. It could destroy our entire neighborhood, said Randy Comer. Developers called the project high-end while residents have compared it to a cross between a college dorm and a prison. Luxury is a matter of opinion, said Larry Baum of Stellar Homes Group. The issue here is not so much the architecture . but the way its displayed here, said Coker. Bruce Connolly, ENA board member, thinks developers should have modeled their project after Belle Isle, the mixed-use residential/retail complex on Wilton Drive. Im not against it. It seems like theyre trying to cram as much as they can onto the development, said Connolly. I was hoping for something commercial. Kind of bring air to the neighborhood. But if somethings going to go in there, Id rather see a park. Final approval of the development will have to be given by city commissioners. Before the issue reaches them developers will have to go before the DRC again, then have their plans approved by the Planning and Zoning Board. DevelopmentContinued from page 5By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach Father Bernard J. Pecaro of St. Martins Episcopal Church usually gives blessings to those with two legs. But next month hell bless those with two legs, four legs, eight legs or no legs. Dogs, cats, fish, snakes, rabbits, birds, ferrets, horses, pigs, chickens Father Pecaro will bless them all on Sunday, Oct. 7 at St. Martins, 140 SE 28 Ave. We get everything. I even blessed a spider one time, said Pecaro. Its always just been a great event, said Fred Segal, event coordinator. Ive been to a lot of pet blessings at other churches, but this is the only one where the animals are actually brought inside the church for the blessing. The people are seated in the pews with their pets. It will also be a great opportunity for pet-related business owners, Segal says. Weve got space available for a few vendors anything that will be pet related. Its just a nominal donation to the church for the space. Nonprofits are free, said Segal. In the past, pet related vendors, such as pet adoption organizations, veterinarians and groomers have been on hand. Registration starts at 9:30 a.m., followed by a short procession of the animals down Southeast 28 Avenue, led by Pecaro on horseback, which ends inside the church where the blessings start at 10 a.m. After the blessings, there will be food, a bounce house, petting zoo and a dove release. Its really an outreach to the community. We try to build it as a community event each year, said Pecaro. It seems to be growing every year. To sign up as a vendor, call 954-941-4843 or 954-8490745.Annual blessing of pets, Oct. 7 at St. Martins

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22 The Pelican Friday, September 14, 2012 Classi edsCall 954-545-0013 Mechanic Shop for RentPompano Beach Rent this mechanical shop attached to a busy Texaco Station. Rent is negotiable. 954-941-2600. Ask for George Great opportunity. Call George. 954-941-2600 Call The Pelican at 954-783-8700! HELP WANTEDAFRAID OF DOWNSIZING? Start building a business to supplement your income. Great earnings potential on a part-time basis with Primerica. Call 954729-0192. 9-7 POMPANO BEACH MECHANIC/COUNTER PERSON NEEDED For WellKnown Texaco Fuel Station. References & Experience. Good People Person. Call George 954-941-2600. 9-21 SEEKING EMPLOYMENTHHA I Will Take Excellent Care Of The Elderly / Companion Aid Experienced & Certi ed / Have References. Call 845-709-5275. 9-21 CAREGIVER / COMPANION Caucasian Woman With 25 Yrs Exp. To Assist & Care For Your Loved Ones. Days / Eves / Nights. Ref. Available. 954-482-5494. LPN AT CNA PRICES! Will Drive To Dr. Appointments, Lunch, Shopping, Etc. East Broward Area Only! 954-8957850. 9-21 I AM AN English Speaking Woman W / 9 Years Experience. Easy To Get Along With. Certi ed To Help Aid You Through Activities Throughout The Day. Low Rates. References Available. 561-860-2811. 9-14 NURSES AIDE / SITTER To Care For Your Loved One. Excellent References. Drive. Nights Or Days. Call 770-7091875. 9-14 MALE CNA / HHA / COMPANION. Broward County Area. Former EMT. All Certi cations / Compassionate, References. Call Ron 954-2322832. Very Reasonable! 9-14 SERVICES DANNY BOY ELECTRIC Lic & Insured. Lic. #EC13004811. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. 24/Hr Service. 954-290-1443. Beat Any Written Estimate. Sr, Discount. 9-21 ASI SOUTHERN LAWN MAINTENANCE Provides Full Landscape. Architectural Landscape Design. Tree Trimming & Removal, Full Lawn Maintenance. One Time Clean Out. Andrew 954-6757396. GOT JUNK? TRASH HAULING CONDO CLEANUPS Trees Landscape Yard Fill Pressure Wash Roofs Home Repairs Welding Etc. Dave 954-818-9538. 9-28 MIKE THE GARDNER The All American Yardman Yard And Garden Care Get The Best For Less!! Call 561-5436337 Cell. 9-14 GINGERS HOUSEKEEPING 20 YRS EXP. (Licensed) References Available. Honest & Reliable LOVE To Clean Windows! Refrigerators, Ovens No Problem! FREE Estimates. 954-200-4266. HANDYMAN PAINTING CARPENTRY Pressure Cleaning. Decks! Everything Around The House. No Job Too Small. FREE Estimates! Call 561-350-3781. 9-28 HONEST HANDYMAN HOME & BUILDING Maintenance/Improvements. No Job Too Small. Fast Friendly Service. Reasonable Rates. Local Resident/Homeowner. Call Today For Your FREE Upfront Quote. No Deposit Required. 754-366-1915. BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIESNew GREEN technology. New defroster control saves energy in home refrigerators, commercial chillers. Patented. All optical. Simple mfg. Strategic partners needed..www.NewAvionics.Com. 954-568-1991. MUSICIANS WANTEDADVANCED STUDENT MUSICIANS Being Accepted For 2012 2013 Membership in the American Legion Symphonic Band! Earn Community Service Points While Improving Your Performance Skills! Rehearsals On Wednesday Evenings from 7pm to 9pm at American Legion Post 142, 171 SW 2nd St., Pompano Beach, FL 33060. Band Director Recommendation Encouraged. Email Music Director James McGonigal at info.legionband@ gmail.com for more information. REAL ESTATE WANTEDNEED TO BUY FOR CASH FAST!! Small Duplex Or Triplex With At Least One 3 / 2 Or 2 / 2 E Of Federal Hwy. 954-563-3533. TOWNHOUSESLIGHTHOUSE POINT 2 / 2.5 Waterfront Townhouse. 1677 Sq Ft. Dockage Available! $35 Month. Pet Friendly. Offered At $214,900. Call Colleen Majeski Balistreri Realty 754-235-1208. 9-14 MOBILE HOMESDEERFIELD DOUBLE WIDE 2 / 2 TIDEWATER ESTATES 55+. Background / Credit Check Required. $685 Mo Lot Rent. $5,000 Firm. 954-4260500. 9-21 FURNITUREFORMAL DINING ROOM TABLE w/6 Chairs w/Smoked Glass Top, Credenzas, End Tables, Couch. All Natural Rattan. Lighthouse Pt. 863634-4575 Leave Message. CEMETERY PLOTS2 PREMIUM LOTS Forest Lawn Cemetery For Sale. $1,500 OBO Call 561-603-9383. OR 863-9461646. C.REAL ESTATE WANTEDI BUY HOUSES!! CASH!! AS IS! QUICK CLOSE! ANY AREA ANY CONDITION! NO EQUITY OK. CALL NOW 954-914-2355. 10-19 CONDOS FOR SALEPOMPANO BEACH DIRECT OCEAN VIEW!! Pet Friendly! 2/2 AT THE BREAKERS! $265K. Also For Rent. Call Juliana At Barclays For Details. 1-305-766-4420. POMPANO BEACH DIRECT INTRACOASTAL! Feels Like Youre On A Boat. Pool On Intracoastal. Wrap-A-Round Balcony. Spacious 1 / 1.5 $178K. Also For Rent $1350 Month. 954-588-0562. DEERFIELD BEACH / CENTURY VILLAGE Fabulous Corner By Pool 2 / 2 Unfurnished. Laminate / Tile Floors. BEST In The Village! Do Not Wait! Present Offers! $92K. Jennifer Century Village RE 954-650-5956. 9-14 POMPANO 2 / 1 UPDATED 1st Floor Corner Unit With POND VIEW! FREE 9 Hole Golf Course. $39,900. Kim Loucks RE / MAX In Motion. 954609-9730. DEERFIELD CENTURY VILLAGE! Breathtaking, Stunning 2/2, Remodeled, Furnished 2nd Floor. Near Pool, Clubhouse, Restaurant. Fabulous Location. $150K. Jennifer Century Village RE. 954-650-5956. 9-21 POMPANO BEACH THE CLARIDGE Large Updated 2 / 2 Corner Penthouse Ocean Intracoastal & City Views! Washer / Dryer In Unit. Impact Glass. $498,500. Ruthie Brooks Balistreri Realty. 954-8034174. CONDOS FOR RENTPOMPANO AEGEAN OCEANFRONT Unfurnished Large South Side 2 / 2 + Den Or 3rd Bedroom. Tile Floor. Great Ocean & ICW Views!! W / D In Unit. 24 Hr. Security. Hi Def TV In Rent. Exercise Room, Pool, Hot Tub, Garage Park 2 Cars. $1,700 / Month. Dynasty R.E. 954-295-2356. 9-14 POMPANO BEACH 1 Block To Ocean 1 / 1 Fully Furnished. Flat Screens, DVD, Pool, Laundry, Private Parking, BBQ. Monthly Thru December $850. 954-540-9724.

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The Pelican 23 Friday, September 14, 2012 Classi edsCall 954-545-0013 Call The Pelican at 954-783-8700! FT LAUDERDALE ICW Gated Community. 1 / 1.5 Furnished / Unfurnished. Granite, Wood Floors, Lots Of Amenities. Great Location. No Pets. $950 Month. Call 954588-1644. 9-28 LIGHTHOUSE POINT 2 / 2 ---1st Floor 55+. Pool, Storage, Laundry Facilities. $900 Month / Water Included. Dorothy Bassano Better Homes & Gardens Real Estate. 954-562-4919. 9-14 POMPANO INTRACOASTAL AT ITS BEST. Breathtaking Views! Feels Like Youre On A Boat, Pool Deck On Intracoastal. Spacious 1 / 1.5 $1350 Month. A1A S.E. Corner Unobstructed Views. 2/2 $1,500 Month. 954-588-0562. LEISUREVILLE 55+ 2 / 1 Unfurnished / Furnished $795 / $875 1st & Last. 1st Floor. Free Golf By Pool / Clubhouse. 954-590-8177. 9-14 COCONUT CREEK (Wynmoor) 55+. Clean / Bright 2 / 2 Fully Furnished. Available Immediately. 2nd Floor Lakeview! All Amenities. $950 Month. 954-984-8255. POMPANO 1 / 1.5 UPDATED 1st Floor. Screened Patio. Community Pool. Small Waterfront Complex. $1,200 Month. Dockage Available For Rent. Ruthie Brooks Balistreri Realty. 954-8034174. 9-14 APTS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH 1 BR & 2 BR APTS FOR RENT. Remodeled, Paint, Tile, Etc. Washer / Dryer On Site. Pool. Pet Friendly. George 954-8095030. 9-21 POMPANO BEACH EAST OF FEDERAL HWY! Walk To Everything! 1 & 2 Bedrooms. Call For Information 954-2546325. 9-14 POMPANO MCNAB RD & NE 18 AVENUE 1 & 2 Bedrooms Furnished / Unfurnished. $650 $895 And Up. Pool, Tile Floors. Central A / C. 954-6102327. 9-21 POMPANO BEACH 1/1 $650 NW NE 2/1 $950 2/1,5 Townhouse -Pool $1095 SW 1/1 $750 2/1 $925 2/2 $950 3/2 $1025 ALL FREE WATER. Rent + $70 App Mov-U-In. 954-781-6299. 9-14 LAUDERDALE BY THE SEA 1 / 1 Ground Floor. Central A / C. Parking Out Back Door. Laundry, Courtyard. 200 Steps Beach. $1,100. 954-8685560 Wayne. 9-21 BEST DEAL IN POMPANO BEACH Efficiency With Kitchen, Laundry & Pool. No Pets. Weekly Monthly Season. 500 To Beach. 954294-8483 Or 248-736-1533. 10-5 POMPANO BEACH NE 13 Street. Furnished 1 / 1 All Included! No Pets. October Thru December. 1/2 Block To Beach. $925. Call 954-4100943. 9-21 POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 Bedroom From $500. Easy Movein. 1/2 OFF DEPOSIT. Remodeled. Great Location. 954-783-1088 For More Info. 12-14 COMMERCIAL FOR RENT-SALEPOMPANO COMMERCIAL OFFICE Spaces Available. Ranging From As Low As $500 To $700 Depending On Square Footage. Please Call Darci At 954-7833723. 10-5 DEERFIELD BEACH Retail Of ce Warehouse 700 Sq Ft With Loft. A/C, Bathroom. $575 Per Month. Call For More Info 561-654-1331 Or 561-9985681. 9-21 CORAL SPRINGS 1800 SQ FT. Easy Access To Sawgrass, Ample Parking, Monument Sign. FREE RENT & Buildout. Call 954-328-0413. 9-14

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24 The Pelican Friday, September 14, 2012 WORSHIP DIRECTORY: Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad. Rev. Hyvenson Joseph requires a lot of paper work which the big drug chains are unwilling to be bothered with. They have helped me with all of this and other pharmaceutical needs. They call me when I need re lls and even to see how I am. For people, like me, who appreciate a little personal TLC, I suggest The Right Pill Pharmacy. Hershkowitz says, Its not easy opening a new pharmacy in South Florida because pharmacies have a tarnished reputation due to the number of pill mills that were ourishing here. We are the new kids in town and we want it known that we maintain the highest standards dictated by the governing agencies in this profession. Our state has given us the tools on a web site to identify potential abusers of pharmacies and we use those tools where indicated. We even have a sign out front saying that we dont carry the obvious drugs found in pill mills, nor do we honor pill mill prescriptions. Open Mon. to Fri. from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Sat. 10-3. Call 954-946-7904, Pompano Beach. Boca store hours are 8 a.m. to 10 p.m. every day. Call 561392-1515. The Right PillContinued from page 8 By Rabbi David Hartley MarkTHE JEWISH CENTER AT TEMPLE SHOLOM POMPANO BEACHThis Sunday evening, while the rest of South Florida is strolling on the beach, watching TV, or enjoying a dinner or movie out, the Jewish Community will be going to temple. Sundown begins the High Holy Days, the Days of Awe, the beginning of the Jewish New Year, 5,773 years since the creation of the universe. The rabbis of old who created our Hebrew calendar did not know about dinosaurs or carbon dating. There are many New Years customswearing a new garment, dipping apple slices in honey for a sweet year, eating the special challah, or rich egg-bread, which is in the shape of a crown, or spiral, to remind us either of Gods sovereignty, or the cycle of timebut chief among them is the blowing of the shofar, or rams horn. It is sounded in three different tones, to mimic a person crying over their sins, because that is the central focus of this holy time: repentance, or examining ones deeds, and resolving to do better. We spend hours in temple, asking God to forgive our trespasses against Him; but we must also seek out those whom we have wronged, and humbly ask their forgiveness. There is the old tale of the Chasidic rebbe, Rabbi Levi Yitzchak of Berdichev [1740-1809], who loved to ask the common folk about their thoughts during the High Rosh Hashana, the Jewish New Year: 5773Holy Days. He approached Chaim, a humble tailor, and asked him how he was planning to speak to God that Rosh Hashana. Oy, Rebbe, answered Chaim, I have committed any manner of sins. Once, I deliberately cut a rich mans pants a little bit too short, so that I would have more cloth left over to patch my own childrens ragged garments. And another time, when I had very little money, I was forced to eat food which was not exactly kosher. But look, God he gestured emphatically toward the heavensLook at Your own sins! You create floods, fires, and famines, and cause parents to lose their precious children, and you allow nations to go to war, so that many men dieI ask You, are my sins anything compared to Yours? Chaim, said the rabbi, You let God off too easily. You could have easily forced the Almighty to forgive, not only the sins of the Jewish people, but those of the entire world! As we conclude this past year, there are many areas of suffering, and far more of misunderstanding and hatred, among the various countries. May 5773 prove to be a year in which the great and small nations of the world, like the lion and lamb in the Book of Once, I deliberately cut a rich mans pants a little bit too short, so that I would have more cloth left over to patch my own childrens ragged garments. ChaimSee NEW YEAR on page 26

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The Pelican 25 Friday, September 14, 2012 Program now in its second year. Its a series of three award categories created to recognize work by cities in Broward County, said Sely Cochrane, executive assistant at the Broward League. Each program submitted for an award must be in effect, and is vetted for nancial impact, effectiveness, and how it has the potential to achieve speci c goals set out by the municipality. Its to create awareness of what our cities are doing, Cochrane said. Hopefully, other cities will see this and say, Hey, I want to implement that. In the Green Leaf category, Pompano was up against Miramars urban food plan and the City of Fort Lauderdales Smart Watts program for light bulb awareness, she ReclaimedContinued from page 1said. City Commissioner Barry Dockswell said that elected of cials were very involved in creating the water reclamation program Water reclaimed from sewage and other uses that is un t for drinking has long been used by apartment complexes, golf courses and other commercial properties to irrigate lawns and foliage, Dockswell said. The commission and city staff spent time looking for ways to make it easier for residents to have the pipes installed at their homes in order to sell them the reclaimed water speci cally for irrigation. We listened to what the customers were saying and put together a program that resolved as many issues as we possibly could, said Maria Loucraft, utilities compliance and ef ciency manager for the water department. What we were able to do was create a program where the city took care of all the hassle that previously had been the customers, as well as the upfront cost. Covering half of the programs cost with a $220,000 grant from the countys Integrated Water Resources Plan, the city eliminated the responsibility and cost of installing the reclaimed water pipes from the mains buried beneath streets to spigots at peoples homes, she said. According to Loucraft, the city has a list of plumbers and contractors who are asked to submit bids for each individual job after a resident makes a request to join the program. Every yard is different, she said, but plumbers are called in and the logistics are worked out, and once residents give clearance for the city to work on their property, the city pulls all needed permits and installations take about a day. The Pompano Beach city website includes an application for new businesses to join the list and be contacted for bids, potentially helping to give even more work to local businesses, another bene t of the program. Once the new lines have been installed, residents are charged 85 cents per thousand gallons of water used, a 20-cent hike from the 65 cents per thousand gallons ptiot to installation. Over the long term, the increase will allow the city to absorb those installation costs, she said, pointing out how much less expensive it is to use the reclaimed water as compared to the $2.24 per thousand gallons cost of drinking water. Residents are not subject to the limits placed on the use of potable drinking water. Concerns about drinking water in South Florida have been a focus for the state overall, Dockswell said. In the case of Broward County, this program will help it meet a state requirement to use at least 60 percent of all reclaimed water. So far, the program has about 400 customers in the rst nine months of ICanWater being fully online, and more are calling every day to join. Cochrane said this has put the city ahead of its early estimates of 770 sign-ups during the rst two years. Currently, she said, the city has the capacity to connect about 1,200 homes and that will increase as approximately 10,000 feet of main is buried each year. Dockswell said the city will eventually install pipes beneath the Intracoastal Waterway so that residents on the island can link up, but costs and logistics for that are still in the planning stages. The commissioner said the most important part is that the city is helping to reduce the consumption of potable water and helping to hold off the intrusion of saltwater into the countys freshwater wells the reason the city looked into a reuse program in the rst place. The recognition is very nice, but its for a good proper reason, Dockswell said. Whats most meaningful is that were actually showing great leadership, and in some cases pioneering leadership, in preserving the scarce water resources we have in South Florida.

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26 The Pelican Friday, September 14, 2012 Capt. RJ Boyle is an experienced angler in South Florida. His studio is located in Lighthouse Point. Call 954-420-5001.Signs of a Rip CurrentStand on a high area, such as a sand dune or deck, and scan the water. To spot a rip current, look for the following characteristics: A streak of water that is a different color. The streak may look more murky or darker than the surrounding water. A gap in advancing breakers where the rip current is pushing its way seaward. A line of foam extending offshore. An offshore plume of turbid water past the sandbar. If still unsure, throw a oating object into the water and see if it moves steadily seaward.What to do?Do not panic or try to swim against the current Swim parallel to shore until you feel the current lessen and then swim to shore If you cant break out of the current, oat with it until it dissipates, usually just beyond the breakers. Then swim diagonally to shore. If you do not swim well, know your limits, stay in wading depths, and watch for sudden drop-offs. Always swim in an area protected by certi ed lifeguards.Rip currentsContinued from page 1 lion and lamb in the Book of Isaiah, truly lie down in peace with one another. Amen! Temple Sholom of Pompano Beach is a Progressive Conservative Jewish Congregation offering religious, cultural, and educational activities for all ages and inclinations of Jews and spiritual seekers. We strive to make everyone feel welcome, and we are the friendliest Jewish temple in South Florida. For more information about Temple Sholom, call 954-942-6410. New YearContinued from page 24By Michael dOliveira PELICAN STAFFPompano Beach The wind could bring good dolphin and sword shing this weekend. And its all about the seaweed. We call them weed lanes, said RJ Boyle, of RJ Boyle Studios in Lighthouse Point. According to Boyle, weed lanes attract dolphin and sword sh, which look for squid and other smaller sea creatures to eat. Friday might be dull but Boyle expects Saturday and Sunday to be big shing days. The dolphin hang out under the sea weed, said Boyle. And this weekend the Big wind brings big shing sea weed is being pushed by the wind and current towards South Florida waters. Squid also tend to follow sea weed. Theres a huge squid migration off our coast right now. Al the sh weve been catching have a bunch of squid inside their stomachs, said Boyle. Youll troll the boat along the seaweed lanes, said Boyle, who has already caught a few sword sh. A lot of big sword sh are out there right now. I shed four days this week and I caught eight sword sh. The biggest sh we caught this week was 335 lbs., said Boyle. But he also tasted defeated. We lost one over 500 lbs.SightingsContinued from page 19 Historical Society meets on the third Wednesday of each month from 12 to 1 p.m. at the Old School Museum, 232 NE 2 St., Deer eld Beach. For more information, call 954429-0378. The Pompano Beach Historical Society meets on the third Wednesday of every month at 7 p.m. at the Dick & Miriam Hood Center, 217 NE 4 Ave., Pompano Beach. For more information, call 954292-8040. The Wilton Manors Kiwanis Club meets Wednesdays at 6:30 p.m. at 2749 NE See SIGHTINGS on page 27 Send your news to mdpelican@yahoo.com

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The Pelican 27 Friday, September 14, 2012 14 Ave., Wilton Manors. 954561-9785. The Oakland Park Kiwanis Club meets Wednesdays from 7:30 to 8:30 a.m. at Peter Pan Diner, 1216 E. Oakland Park Blvd., Oakland Park. 954-566-9957. The Pompano Beach Kiwanis Club meets Wednesdays at noon at the Riverside Grille at the Sands Resort, 125 N. Riverside Drive, Pompano Beach. 954-444-4815. The Greater Pompano Beach Senior Citizens Club meets on the second Wednesday of the month at the Emma Lou Olson Community Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach, at 10 a.m. 954-9437787. The Alzheimers Caregivers Support Group meets Wednesdays from 10 a.m. to noon at the NE Focal Point Alzheimers Day Care Center, 301 NW 2 Ave., Deer eld BeachThursdaysThe Wilton Manors Historical Society meets on the third Thursday of the month at Wilton Manors City Hall, 2020 Wilton Drive, at 7 p.m. For more information, call 954-566-9019 or 954-5668219. The Rotary Club of Oakland Park/Wilton Manors meets every Thursday from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. at Tequila Sunrise Mexican Grill, 4711 N. Dixie Hwy., Oakland Park. 954-491-6158. The Deer eld Beach Kiwanis Club meets at noon every Thursday at the Deer eld Beach Hilton, 100 Fairway Dr., Deer eld Beach 954-242-6083. The Pompano Beach Republican Club meets on the fourth Thursday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach. 954-786-7536.Upcoming9-27 Greater Pompano Beach Chamber hosts the State of the City at 7:45 a.m. at the Pompano Beach Elks Lodge #1898, 700 NE 10 St. Mayor Lamar Fisher will talk about the past year and the citys future. Breakfast is $25. To RSVP send an email to info@pompanobeachchamber.com or call 954-941-2940.SightingsContinued from page 26 Send your news to mdpelican@yahoo.com

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28 The Pelican Friday, September 14, 2012 On the road again!Wheels When the Broward Partnership for the Homeless Initiative, or BPHI, posted a call for help, the Broward Sheriffs Of ce responded. Many residents had lost their transportation to their jobs when Broward County of cials cut another bus route. BSO came forth with bicycles that had been con scated from criminals or had been lost and unclaimed. Said Capt. Rick Wierzbicki, They were overjoyed. They had only expected three or four bikes, but we brought seven. The bikes went to those who had jobs. Pictured are Captain Rick Wierzbicki, BPHI CEO Fran Esposito, BPHI clients Edward Kennard, Alexander McLeod and Robert Fisco. [Photo by Cliff Frommer, BSO Crime Lab]Tell The Pelican about your news! mdpelican@yahoo.com or 954-783-8700!Pelican Classi eds work for you! 954-783-8700!

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Friday, September 14, 2012 Vol. XX, Issue 37 Wherever you are, read The Pelican @ pompanopelican.com • Send news to siren2415@gmail.com Pompano Beach • Deer eld Beach • Lighthouse Point • Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Wilton Manors • Oakland Park • Hillsboro Beach • The Galt • Palm Aire The P e l i c a n Pelican 74 days left in 2012 Hurricane season When rip currents show up, Rule 1: Don’t PanicCourtesy of Florida Fish and WildlifeNo matter how a rip current is formed, the effect is the same. A large amount of water at the shoreline rushes in a narrow path back to the sea. This path of water can extend as far as 3,000 feet offshore, reach 90 feet in width, and travel up to four feet per second. Rip currents, sometimes incorrectly called undertows, do not pull swimmers under the water, but can pull even experienced swimmer away from shore. Rip currents can happen where 1. There is a break in an offshore sandbar, 2. The longshore current is diverted by a groin, pier, or jetty, or 3. Longshore currents moving in opposite directions meet. See RIP CURRENTS on page 26 Pompano wins “green” award for making reclaimed water cheaper, easierBy Stephen FellerSTAFF WRITER Pompano Beach The barrier to most people doing something good for the environment often is cost. The city found this out by changing the cost of its water reclamation program for single family homes. Because of this innovation, The Broward League of Cities gave the city a Green Leaf Award for its ICanWater program after more than 400 residents signed up after installation costs were taken out of the equation. The award is part of the League’s Cities of Excellence Award See RECLAIMED in page 25 LBTS will roll out singlestream recycling before year endBy Judy VikPELICAN STAFFLauderdale-By-The-Sea – Commissioners and the public got a preview Tuesday of what’s ahe sad as the town prepares to launch a recycling program. The goal is to revitalize interest in recycling and increase participation by residents and visitors. Commissioners approved a plan that calls for several changes in sizes and colors of carts. With the new plan, each household See RECYCLING on page 20 Residents question need for increase in PD budgetFinal hearing will be Sept.20By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFHillsboro Beach – Commissioners here went into budget discussions this week looking at a proposed See POLICE on page 16By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach – It’s been over 50 years since Martin Luther King Boulevard saw a new retail building. But breaking the long drought is the Northwest Community Redevelopment Agency, or NW CRA, with its 4,150 sq. ft. retail development. Adriane Esteban, CRA project manager for the development, said once the $1.5 million building, Of cials tout jobs, redevelopment at MLK retail building nanced by the NW CRA, is completed sometime in the spring of 2013 it will have enough space for up to seven retailers. The development sits on 2.18 acres of land and will include 41 parking spaces when nished. “Government is leading the way. It’s the beginning of the future,” said Carlton Moore, liaison to the NW CRA. “I think they did not hit a home run with this project. They hit a grand See BUILDING on page 14 Pompano Beach of cials and developers break ground at the city’s new retail center along Martin Luther King Boulevard. The 4,150 sq. ft. buildi ng will have room for up to seven tenants and is slated to be completed sometime in the spring of 2013. Pictured are from left: Co ry McFarlane, chief visionary at Pinnacle, the company hired to help build the project; Maggie Anderson, project manager at Pinnacle; City Commissi oner Rex Hardin, Northwest CRA Chairperson Deborah Anthony; City Commissioner Woodrow J. Poitier; Mayor Lamar Fisher, City Commissioner Charlott e Burrie; CRA Co-director Chris Brown and City Commissioner Barry Dockswell. [Photo by Michael d’Oliveira]

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2 The PelicanFriday, September 14, 2012 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFF Lauderdale-By-The-Sea – This town’s newly launched Hotel Improvement Program got off to an inauspicious start this week. Commissioners refused to approve staff’s rst recommended grant recipient, the High Noon Resort at 4424 El Mar Drive. Owner Paul Novak applied for a $22,550 grant to replace 23 windows and a front door. Town Planner Linda Connors said the application met the requirements of the program. Applicants can receive up to $25,000 in matching funds for expenditures that improve their properties. Commissioners must approve any requests in excess of $15,000. Improvements eligible for funding include replacement of awnings, overhangs, doors and windows if visible from a public street. But two commissioners argued that didn’t mean hurricane windows as Novak was proposing. “I felt the intention of the Hurricane windows turned down by commissionersprogram was to match funds for appearance improvements, which could include windows, but to upgrade, not to replace existing windows with hurricane windows,” Commissioner Stuart Dodd said. He asked that staff take another look at how the requirements are worded. Vice Mayor Scot Sasser agreed with Dodd, noting he’d gotten more calls about this issue than about sewer rates or Commercial Boulevard improvements. “I thought this was to help struggling hotels, to sharpen up through paint and to beautify. Taxpayers don’t think windows are beauti cation. We need to relook at this whole program, in my opinion.” Commissioner Mark Brown commended Novak on coming forward with the application. “We voted for this program. He did what we invited him to do, and others are putting their applications together,” Brown said. Brown said he was surprised to see the application for windows, but noted it meets eligibility standards. “If we approve this, we will have to approve other similar requests for windows. If we don’t, it’s unfair to Mr. Novak and others and sends us back to ground one,” Brown said. If commissioners want to scrap the whole program, Brown said he would be amenable to that. But he noted that it was the commission that approved the program. “Now people don’t like the program. If you want to be mad at someone, be mad at me. I voted for it,” he said. “Don’t take it out on Mr. Novak. He only did what we asked him to do.” “Mr. Novak submitted his application based on what we put in place,” said Commissioner Chris Vincent. “I don’t want to pass this [the program] and then renege after staff approves the application. “Going forward, maybe we need to establish what is beauti cation and what is not and then revisit the criteria. We should approve this application. I commend Mr. Novak for coming forward,” Vincent said. A motion for approval failed by a 3-2 vote with only Brown and Vincent voting for approval. “This is common sense,” Vincent said. “If we pass this program and then yank it because we disagree with staff, we are not doing our job.” “The town reneged on their agreement and because of that, I turned out to be the bad guy,” Novak said.See STORM WINDOWS on page 19

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The Pelican 3 Friday, September 14, 2012 Air Force rock concertDeer eld Beach – “Reserve Generation,” the six-piece rock band composed of Air Force musicians plays here Friday, Sept. 21, 7 to 9 p.m., at the main beach parking lot, on the beach south of the shing pier. This group plays rock and roll, R&B, jazz and country and is brought here free by the Deer eld Beach Cultural Committee and the city. Blankets or chairs OK. Refreshments will be sold. 954-592-3160.Atarah and Damarys share a laugh with Deer eld Beach Mayor Peggy Noland at the Jim and Jan Moran Boys & Girls Club. Some kids also received back packs. Denny Shub said the store, known for its one-price ts all brand of marketing, also carries shoes for children. It’s a shoe-in for these kids New shoes for school Denny, Jessie and Marlene Shub, owners of All Shoes $9.88, a retail outlet on West Hillsboro Boulevard enjoy a moment with children at the Jim and Jan Moran Boys & Girls Club in Deer eld Beach. Children here received a gift of 1,500 pairs of shoes from the store owners. Pictured in the back row are attorney Pat Murphy, store owners Denny, Jessie and Marlene Shub and Mayor Peggy Noland. Murphy, a member of the Deer eld Beach Chamber of Commerce Board of Directors, is counsel for the shoe outlet.

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4 The PelicanFriday, September 14, 2012 By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach – It’s only 48 pounds but represents something much weightier. On the morning of Sept. 8, members of American Legion Post 142 accepted a piece of steel from the former World Trade Center – a piece the Legion plans to include in a new memorial which should be nished by Memorial Day 2013. Legion Commander George Rafajko said the memorial would honor all the civilians, police of cers, re ghters and military personnel who died during the September 11th attacks along with the servicemen and women who have died in Iraq and Afghanistan and those “who are still putting their lives on the line in Afghanistan.” In order to receive the steel section, the Legion had to agree to certain standards. The steel must be part of a larger memorial, relatively secure and accessible to the public. “They want people to be able to come up and touch it,” said Rafajko. When completed, the memorial will also include a marble statue of a re ghter and two plaques; one will list the names of those who donated to the project and the other will include a description of the memorial’s meaning. Forest Lawn Memorial Gardens in Pompano Beach is donating the marble and the Legion is selling brick pavers to raise the funds needed. “We have been through four different monument [designs] so far, and I think this is the nal one,” said Rafajko. So, with the Legion ready to start building a nal resting place for the steel piece, residents, city and county of cials and Legion members braved the morning heat to witness the groundbreaking for the memorial. “We’ll never forget. It needs to be Legion promises place of honor for a steel section of World Trade Centersaid over and over and over again,” said Rick Johnson, Commander of the American Legion’s 9th District, which oversees Legion 142. Ray Lebowitz, deputy director of the 9-11 Foundation, delivered the piece to the Legion plus another portion of steel to the City of Pompano Beach. He estimates about 40 pieces of the World Trade Center are dispersed throughout Florida. “This is a remnant of what we lost that day,” said Lebowitz, a former New York City re ghter. Lebowitz left the re department in 1995 and moved to Coconut Creek in 1999. When the towers fell 11 year ago, Lebowitz lost some of the “brothers” he worked alongside during his 35 years in uniform. One was Lt. Dennis Mojica, of Fire Rescue 1, a company that lost half its numbers when the World Trade Center collapsed. Lebowitz wears a commemorative bracelet with Mojica’s name on it around his wrist. “And we’re still losing members from diseases they got on the pile,” said Lebowitz. In the aftermath of the attacks many rst responders, who worked at Ground Zero to nd survivors and recover the remains of victims, have contracted respiratory diseases and illnesses and died as a result. To donate to the Legion’s September 11th memorial, call 954-942-2448. Legion Commander George Rafajko, left, and Ray Lebowitz, deputy director of the 9-11 Foundation, with the piece of the World Trade Center.

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The Pelican 5 Friday, September 14, 2012 By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFWilton Manors – It’s called “The Village at Wilton Manors.” But to residents who live near the proposed development it feels like an entire village is being dropped into the middle of their neighborhood. At the city’s Development Review Committee, or DRC, on Monday and city commission meeting on Tuesday, residents voiced their opposition to the project in its current form – a two story apartment complex with 81 units that, if approved by city of cials, would be located on the four-acre property at the corner of Residents say proposed development too big for siteNortheast 15 Avenue and Northeast 26 Street that is now the home of the Center for Spiritual Living. John Fiore, former mayor and current vice president of the East Neighborhood Association, or ENA, said residents are willing to work with developers to come up with a proposal that ts into the neighborhood. Along with their site plan approval, developers will also have to get the property rezoned. “But this plan doesn’t cut it,” said Fiore, who lives next to the property and thinks the development should be between 60 and 65 units. Michael Miller, a consultant planner hired by the city to help review the plans, agrees. “The project See DEVELOPMENT on page 2116th Annual Dunn’s RunDeer eld Beach – The 16th Annual Dunn’s Run will take place on Sunday, Oct. 7 at 7:30 a.m. The race starts south of the main Deer eld Beach Parking lot located on Ocean Way and Southeast 2 Street and proceeds bene t the Boys & Girls Clubs of Broward County. In addition to the race there will be food and activities including TD the Dolphin, Billy the Marlin, Stanley C. Panther, a re truck, bounce house and more. The cost to register before Oct. 6 is $30. On the day of the race the cost will be $35. For more information about the 16th Annual Dunn’s Run Event, email Danielle Cox at dcox@bgcbc.com, visit www.dunnsrun.com or call 954-563-2822. Local code revisions is topic at neighborhood meetingPompano Beach Cresthaven Neighborhood Watch meets Sept. 20 at St. Elizabeth Hall, NE 33 Street and 10 Terrace at 7:30 p.m. This month’s topic is code enforcement. Sonny Martz, code enforcement inspector, will discuss recent changes in the city’s code. Also on hand will be Commissioner Charlottte Burrie and BSO Lt. Charlotte Road. The meeting is free and open to the public. Call 954-7867536.

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6 The PelicanFriday, September 14, 2012 Deer eld Beach, Pompano Beach, Lighthouse Point, LauderdaleBy-The-Sea, Wilton Manors and Oakland ParkWilton Manors • Oakland Park • Hillsboro Beach The Pompano Pelican is published weekly on FridaysStreet Address: 1500-A E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, FL 33060 Telephone: 954-783-8700 • Fax: 954-783-0093Letters to the Editor are encouraged and accepted for print if signed, although a writer’s name will be withheld on request; letters must also include a daytime telephone number. Advertising rates are available upon request. Subscription rate is $31.80 including tax for one year’s delivery in Greater Pompano Beach; $95.40/per year including tax for others in the United States; call 954-783-8700 for rates abroad. The Pelican is a nonpartisan newspaper and reserves the right to decline advertising. Copyright 2012. Reproduction of this publication in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission of the publisher. The Pelican is a member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, Deer eld Beach Chamber and the LBTS Chamber. The Pelican is a state certi ed woman-owned minority business. The Pelican is delivered to businesses, libraries, schools, of ces, hospitals, news racks and single family homes. All advertising and copy is published at the sole discretion of the publisher. We welcome your critiques and ideas concerning this publication. Anne Siren, publisherExecutive Assistant: Mary Hudson Graphics: Rachel Ramirez Windsheimer Bookkeeper: John White Classi eds: Fran Shelby Contributing Writers: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Judy Wilson, Malcolm McClintock, Judy Vik, Michael d’Oliveira Account Executives: Paul Shroads, Carolyn Mann, Bill Heaton, Bill Fox Special Of ce Assistant: Cathy Siren ESTABLISHED 1993 • Volume XX, Issue 37 Founding Editor and PublisherAnne Hanby Siren The Pelican wants to know what you think. Send your thoughts on local, state and national issues to siren2415@gmail.com Send your letter to the editor siren2415@gmail.com OpinionDysfunctional voter? Visit the Women’s League of Voters websiteTallahassee High interest in this year’s election may well be a mismatch with sweeping changes in election laws that have tightened voter address rules and reduced early voting days. Changing precinct lines and a ballot of unprecedented length worsen the situation, and the League of Women Voters of Florida sees potential problems ahead on Election Day. To make sure that every vote counts, the League is urging voters to take action now to ensure that they are eligible and prepared to vote. A new website, www.BeReadyToVote.org, makes the process easy. The site is a one-stop shop that allows Floridians to check and update their voter status, register to vote, nd their precinct, request an absentee ballot, check on important election dates and deadlines, and be informed about the candidates and issues on the Nov. 6 ballot. “Voters can prevent Election Day delays and frustration--what we call ‘electoral dysfunction’--by being prepared,” says League President Deirdre Macnab. “With the high level of enthusiasm and interest we’re seeing in this year’s election, sharp reductions in early voting days and a very lengthy ballot, we want to ensure a successful experience for every Florida voter. Even if you’re registered, you still should contact your local Supervisor of Elections to check your voter status and update your record if necessary.” Local Supervisors’ of ces throughout Florida are ready to help citizens prepare to vote. Macnab adds, “Being confronted by this year’s pages-long ballot lled with dense legal amendment language and often-misleading titles can also cause problems for unprepared voters and the voters behind them in line. People really need to know the issues and be ready.” Also available through www.BeReadyToVote.org is the League of Women Voters of Florida Education Fund’s 2012 Florida Election & Voter Guide, which contains nonpartisan information on the presidential and statewide candidates, constitutional amendments, and Supreme Court justices that will appear on the November 6 ballot. The League of Women Voters of Florida, a nonpartisan political organization, encourages informed and active participation in government, works to increase understanding of major public policy issues, and in uences public policy through education and advocacy. For more information, please visit the League’s website at: www.TheFloridaVoter.org. In the Culinary Concepts article that was published in the Aug. 31 issue of The Pelican Dean Merten’s name, owner of Culinary Concepts in Pompano Beach was misspelled. The Pelican regrets the error.CorrectionCommentaryWhat is it about facade improvements they don’t understand?By Judy WilsonCommissioners in LBTS seem to be dismantling a program that would help do what they have spent untold hours discussing: ramp up the appearance of their aging beachfront town. In turning down a hotel owner’s request for $25,000 in matching funds to install hurricane strength windows and doors, they have created confusion not only among themselves, but the public as well. It is almost amusing. The Hotel Improvement Program was approved only weeks ago. It is funded with $150,000 and is similar to facade programs currently available to business owners in Deer eld Beach and Pompano Beach. In those cities, community redevelopment agency tax dollars are used to encourage improvements to commercial buildings, and the results have been impressive. In Lauderdale-by-the-Sea, the commission included the installation of windows and doors in the Hotel Improvement Program as one of the allowable sprucing-up measures. It is common knowledge that replacement windows and doors on any structure must withstand hurricane force winds. That’s in the Florida Building Code. It is not an option. So why was this commission surprised to nd public tax dollars going for this purpose? We want to ask, “Where have you guys been?” The problem with the program may be it gives the commission power to approve or disapprove a project. That should be the job of administrators who understand construction and who are not so easily swayed by public opinion. In this town, a few vocal people can cause the commission to rethink almost anything. It must be frustrating for staff to bring a good program to the public only to have it shot down by an indecisive board. It will be equally discouraging for the business owner who is willing to invest his own money to make improvements. What could be a more important improvement than making a building safer for its occupants? In denying their rst application for improvement funds, commissioners said they had thought the money would go for mere touch-ups. But building owners can pretty much handle the spit and polish improvementspaint, awnings, overhangs themselves. It is the more expensive work –doors, windows, roofs – that often delay refurbishment. This program was established to help with the costly structural improvements. In most cases, the business owners spend far more than the matching dollars. In other cities those dollars have proven to be the incentive that gets things rolling. In this week’s discussion, the mayor was concerned that the project would not greatly change the appearance of the hotel which is already one of the best kept in town. Perhaps the criteria that applicants must be members of the Superior Small Lodgings Association should be broadened. Owners of more run-down hotels are the ones who really need the nancial assist. And since they would have to come up with a good deal of their own money, the chances are they would take renewed pride in their properties. As for those speakers at Tuesday’s commission meeting who fear the program will get out of hand, we remind them the work being done must be visible from the street. Remodeled bathrooms will obviously not be allowed. We don’t understand how the commission could be so unaware of the program’s purpose. But in a town where elected of cials spend a lot of the time taking one step forward and two steps back, it may not be surprising.

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The Pelican 7 Friday, September 14, 2012 By Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach On Tuesday, commissioners agreed to abandon a public portion of the right-of-way for Riverside Drive to allow for the construction of an easement road. While the property is a small strip of land just east of the Hillsboro Inlet, the move by the commission signals a development of a hotel and marina on the property. Formerly Tails Restaurant, the property is now the focus for a hotel and marina. Drivers entering the city from the bridge at the inlet already see workers tearing down the former restaurant. A spokesperson for Hunter Hospitality, owners of the property, said when the project is completed, those drivers will see a “pop” as Hotel/marina project takes another step, Alsdorf gets $91.7K grantthey enter the city from the north. Landscaping, lighting and more are planned to make the northern gateway memorable. The company is now in the process of completing permits for the hotel. The marina permits are already in place. On Tuesday, one SCUBA business owner urged the commission to approve the abandonment. “We desperately need this hotel. Upscale clients don’t end up in Pompano,” he said. Commissioner Barry Dockswell said he had seen the plans and complimented the team working on the project. “We’re nally moving forward with this development,” he said. Said Mayor Lamar Fisher, “We just want that Hilton built.” The hotel spokesperson said that Hilton of cials had visited the property, but nothing is con rmed.County grant will fund ramp at Alsdorf ParkPompano Beach More boaters will have dock space at Asdorf Park on the Intracoastal Waterway. A $91,757 grant from Broward County will fund the construction of a boat ramp, additional parking spaces for vehicles and over-sized trailers, seawall repairs and additional pilings. The grant requires matching funds from the city, but a grant from Florida Inland Navigation District for the same amount will reimburse the city. The only objection to the project came from former city commissioner, Ed Phillips, who said the construction would “reduce the shing space for the community. Recent reports of loose railings have closed a section of the Pompano Beach Municipal Pier, but anglers take their chances to get a good casting spot. See related story on page 9. [Photo courtesy of Keith Mizell].

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8 The PelicanFriday, September 14, 2012 Business matters The Pelican takes a look at local business owners. You can tell your story here because business matters. 954-783-8700. By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFThe right pill at the right price is the slogan of this new pharmacy in town, located at 1960 N. Federal Hwy. in Pompano Beach. Manager Cynthia Hershkowitz, sat down with The Pelican to talk about the business. “We took over an existing pharmacy in May of this year, cleaned it up until it is now an immaculate pharmacy, well stocked with a large inventory of over-thecounter medical products, and a newly added $1 section lled with a wide variety of kitchen, bath, beauty, household and paper products. In addition, we also stock medical supplies such as bathroom safety items, canes, compression garments and more.” She continued, “We have a second pharmacy at 799 E. Palmetto Park Road in Boca Raton, both under the general management of Fahim Rahmani. However, I’m the designated spokesperson who handles daily marketing, public relations, inventories and management of both stores. I’m back and forth throughout the week. The stores aren’t that far apart. and I’m an old hand in this business.” With a pleasant smile, she says, “I’ve been in retail pharmaceutical business for 28 years, mostly in the Boca area. I walked into a pharmacy looking for a job when I was a young girl. I was hired as a cashier and kept working my way up the management ladder until I now handle every aspect of a retail pharmacy.” Stocking two stores enables The Right Pill Pharmacies to be very competitive with the large national chains as customers are nding out. Hershkowitz points out, “We can offer something that they can’t The Right Pill Pharmacy of Pompano offers fast personal service plus competitive prices and that’s fast, personalized service. If a customer wants something we do not stock, we will get it within 24 hours. Our suppliers are very accommodating.” Asked for other examples of personalized service, she says, “Customers seldom have to wait to get a prescription lled here by our pharmacist, Mathew Pendergrast, who is very knowledgeable about medical interactions, over the counter products, vitamins, and nutritional supplements. He’s a great resource and he makes the time to share information with the customer. Customers aren’t told to come back later. We work with people to make sure they get the medication they need even if they have temporary nancial or insurance dif culties.” This new pharmacy considers itself to be a very competitive discount outlet, offering a number of promotions such as free delivery, free antibiotics and $15 off of new transferred prescriptions. The Friends and Family Program rewards existing customers for referrals. The Pompano store has an intern to assist the pharmacist. Hershkowitz adds, “We’re rapidly building our reputation and already have a growing group of repeating customers.” Roberta Kistner is one. She says, “They’re wonderful. I found them by accident and decided to try them. Unlike the big chains that make you stand and wait or come back later, The Right Pill Pharmacy was very accommodating. They gave me immediate service and it was courteous service. They have up to the minute technology and oldfashioned courtesy. I would recommend them.” Bonnie Swanson is another loyal patron who says, “I think they’re great. I’m dealing with an illness that Sign of the times of The Right Pill Pharmacy sign stands sentry to keep pain pill seekers away. A new Florida web site helps pharmacies to identify potential prescription drug abusers. [Photos by Phyllis J. Neuberger] Cynthia Hershkowitz handles public relations, marketing and management of the new The Right Pill Pharmacy at 1960 N. Federal Hwy. in Pompano Beach which promises personal service and discount prices. See The RIGHT PILL on page 24Boca Raton Christian School Open HouseBoca Raton -The public is invited to an evening of music, memories and tributes as we celebrate the 40th Anniversary of Boca Raton Christian School. Friday, October 5, 2012 from 7 to 8:30 p.m. Boca Raton Community Church Sanctuary, 601 NW 4 Ave, Boca Raton. Free admission; no tickets required. For more details visit www. bocachristian.org or call 561-391-2727 x 352 or email licatae@bocachristian.orgPull a few weeds, plant some beans and join the funPompano Beach Join volunteers at the historic Sample-McDougald House on September 15 8 to 11 a.m. to spruce up the grounds and turn the kitchen garden to begin a new planting season. Sample-McDougald House/Centennial Park awardwinning landscape looks great, but in order to keep it that way a little extra TLC is required. Municipal lawnmaintenance does a great job, but there are always a few details that need to be taken care of, Sample-McDougald House needs your help! Just show up on the morning of Sept.15 in work clothes and have a good time making something great even better. Also, volunteers can get involved in the kitchen garden as they begin clearing out the summer crops and begin planting for the fall season -beans, peppers and other local veggies.

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The Pelican 9 Friday, September 14, 2012 Pompano Beach Public works director, Rob McCaughan, reported to the commission that the city’s municipal pier was in need of repairs. “The existing safety railing at the pier is in an advanced state of disrepair and presents an eminent danger to public safety in its current state,” his report read. The city approved a $29,700 contract for engineering services to determine the work that needed to be done. The contract also requires engineering inspections. The total cost for repairs could be as high as $100,000. Keith Mizell, a beach resident, said, “Bolts in the concrete have rusted. I saw one loose rail, but after I made an inspection, I found no others.” Mizell asked the city to halt the design until members of the community could meet. McCaughan countered that all of the rails were in need of repair. Commissioner Barry Dockswell asked the commission to consider the age of the pier, 45 years old with a life expectancy of 50 years. “We need to look at the big picture. We may all be prohibited from using the pier after 2016.” Vice Mayor Brummer agreed that the rails should be repaired at the least cost. “The pier is in bad shape. The rails should be repaired to live another ve years,” he said. City Manager Dennis Beach urged the passage of the contract for engineering services. “The pier may have another ve years, but the rails don’t,” he said. Pier railings deemed dangerous by city9-14 – Deer eld Beach Computer Club is now open Fridays from 10 to 11:30 a.m. at Le Club/Activity Center, Room B in Century Village East, Deer eld Beach. $1 entry fee waived for rst time guests. 954-725-9331 or www.db-cc.org. 9-15 – Garage sale from 6 a.m. to noon at Northeast 38 Street and Northeast 5 Avenue in Oakland Park. 954630-4500. 9-15 – Pony rides from 8 to 11:30 a.m. at Sand & Spurs Equestrian Park, 1600 NE 5 Ave., Pompano Beach. Just north of the Goodyear Blimp Base. Free Admission. Cost is $3 per ride. 954.786.4507. 9-15 – Recovery Awareness Night to bene t Vision of Change, an organization that raises money to help fund projects that bene t the children of Los Quinchos, Nicaragua and their efforts to recover from substance abuse and addiction. Event starts at 6 p.m. at Signature Memories Event Center, 299 N. Federal Hwy., Fort Lauderdale. Admission is $20. 954-4010261. 9-15 – Family Fun Day is from 4:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Pompano Beach Aquatic Center, 820 NE 18 Ave. A free day of swimming, diving boards, re trucks, snorkeling, games and more. There will also be raf e prizes. 754-2460665. 9-19 – Art-By-TheSea group meets at the Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Community Church in Friedt Family Hall, 4433 Bougainvillea Drive. Marcia Hirschy will discuss how artists can market their work. The meeting is free and open to anyone. 954-594-0444. 9-19 – ArtHall will be held from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Business Resource Center, 50 NE 1 St., Pompano Beach. ArtHall combines business and art in a series of six receptions. Each month a new exhibit begins with an opening reception on the SightingsA community calendar for Northeast Broward County. Send your event information to mdpelican@yahoo.comSee SIGHTINGS on page 12

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10 The PelicanFriday, September 14, 2012 Making a DifferencePhyllis J. Neuberger wants your suggestions about people who are making a difference. Call 954-7838700. Gretchen 9, from Pompano Beach, donated her hair to Locks for Love this Sunday, Sept. 9. She had been growing her hair for more than two years so that she could make the donation. Gretchen after her haircut, holds her “locks” which will be sent to the charity in West Palm Beach. Locks are used for cancer patients in need of wigs during and after chemotherapy. Goldi-locks and a great charityBy Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFF When this string band of ornately costumed, volunteer musicians march up to the stage, the audience often responds with standing applause. This one-of-akind band rolls out its talent, energy and songs in concert, Colorful Broward County Mummers still on the march with music, clapping, tapping and strutting and normally restrained people break into song as they clap hands and tap feet. One song like the “Beer Barrel Polka” will set the mood, and as one fan said, “This is like a tailgate party at a football game.” The Broward County Mummers group was founded 35 years ago and currently has 54 men and women members between the ages of 49 and 88. The musicians play Oakland Park Garden ClubOakland Park Elaine Farquharson will present a program on “Vegetable Gardening in South Florida” at a meeting of the Oakland Park Garden Club on Tuesday, Sept. 18. The meeting will be held at Jaco Pastorius Park Community Center, 1098 NE 40 Court from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. The Garden Club also hosts “PARK(ing) Day” on Friday, Sept. 21, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the parking lot on the Southeast corner of Oakland Park Boulevard and Northeast 6 Avenue. Parking spaces will be transformed into a park-like setting with a plant sale and raf e for a rain barrel. For more information, call 954630-4511. Briefs banjos, saxophones, clarinets, guitars, accordions, drums, and glockenspiels. They are a dedicated and hardy bunch who drive themselves to weekly rehearsals at the Moose Lodge, 6191 Rock Island Road in Tamarac, and at least 35 concerts during the season. Members arrive from as far as Miami on the south to Delray on the north every Thursday because they want to keep this music alive and they enjoy the camaraderie. Captain Jack Hultman took the top job 13 years ago and is still lled with enthusiasm for the Mummers. A retired divorce lawyer from Long Island, Hultman, now 82, started a Mummers group there 50 years ago. When he settled in Florida, he quickly became active in the Broward County Mummers and soon assumed leadership. He says, “My job is many faceted. I keep busy behind the scenes with of ce detail, recruiting musicians, getting bookings and keeping members informed. During performances, I’m the one who res up the audience and gets folks on their feet strutting, dancing and singing. “We used to be a marching band, but our musicians have aged so we now settle for fast strut to the stage.” He goes on to stress, “None of us are paid. We charge fees on a sliding scale and the money we earn is basically poured into expenses and costumes which cost about $8,000 each year.” This year they’ll be decked out in red, white and blue. Hultman describes Mummer music as “river boat style, done to a Mummer beat which has its own unique sound.” The ve musical directors who rotate responsibility are Scotty Johnson, Mike Moe, Martin Miller, Carl Castle and John Lolli who is 87. Vice President Jan Little serves as lead strutter. “I remember seeing and loving the New Jersey Mummers as a child, so it’s great to now be part of a Mummers group. My husband, George, plays the bass ddle, and being in this together means we share a lot in common, including time.” Hultman says, “I’m having a marvelous retirement. When the Mummers aren’t taking my time, my pets are. I have Captain Jack Hultman courtesy of Mummers The Mummers sit still for a moment in between rehearsals for their high stepping performances.See MUMMERS on page 12

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The Pelican 11 Friday, September 14, 2012

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12 The PelicanFriday, September 14, 2012 a dog, a cat, two tanks of sh, two outside iguanas and 27 outside ducks.” When asked if this isn’t a lot to manage, the retired divorce lawyer quips, “It’s easier than having a wife.” The Mummers have pitched in to raise funds for 911 victims, March of Dimes, cancer funds and more. Thanks to you, Mummers, for keeping song, dance and strutting alive. To become a Mummer or to schedule a concert, contact Jack Hultman at 954-9567212. The MummersThe Mummers supposedly made their American debut parading in Philadelphia on January 1, 1901. Then a mix of costumed male musicians from many national backgrounds, they became famous on the Northeast coast. According to Captain Hultman, the group evolved from an old Swedish custom. He explains. “King Momus was a ctitious God of Evil long ago in Sweden. On New Year’s Day, Swedish musicians, dressed in weird costumes, had fun scaring off the evil King Momus. “They managed to scare the current population as well,” he laughs. The next performance of The Mummers is Oct. 21 at Temple Kodesh in Boynton Beach. Call for a complete schedule.MummersContinued from page 10third Wednesday of the month through October. The event is free. 954-586-1111. 9-20 – Campaign fundraiser for Wilton Manors Commissioner Julie Carson at Archidezigns, 2214 N. Dixie Hwy., Wilton Manors, from 6 to 8 p.m. 9-20 – Wilton Manors Historical Society meeting at 7 p.m. at city hall commission chambers, 2020 Wilton Drive. 954-566-9019. 9-22 – Wilton Manors Kiwanis Club Kids Day from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Wilton Manors Elementary School, 2401 NE 3 Ave. Free food, fun and games for elementary school students. 954-560-7813. 9-23 – FAU professor and activist Mike Budd leads a discussion on Rachel Maddow’s new book, Drift: The Unmooring of American Military Power and the U.S. Love Affair with War. Event is free. Donations are requested. Event is at 1 p.m. at Unitarian Universalist Church of Ft Lauderdale, 3970 NW 21 Ave., Oakland Park. 908-477-7812. 9-25 – Card party held by the Benevolent Patriotic Order of Does Drove 142 is scheduled from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Pompano Beach Elks Lodge, 700 NE 10 St. Open to the public. Bring your table of friends or group. Cost is $4 and includes desert, coffee or tea. Call 561479-2002 for reservations.FridaysPompano Proud meets every second Friday of the month at McNab Park, 2250 SightingsContinued from page See SIGHTINGS on page 13

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The Pelican 13 Friday, September 14, 2012 Boat safetyAn ABOUT BOATING SAFELY” COURSE Class, Sept. 29 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. takes place at the HQ building, 3939 N. Ocean Blvd., Boca Raton. Those persons who complete the class receive a certi cate and t a Florida Boating ID card, which is required for boaters under 22 years. The course also is valuable for anyone new to Florida boating or needs a classroom “safe boating” class. In addition, many insurance companies give annual discounts for completing this course. The topics include boating terminology, boat handling, navigation rules, aids to navigation, federal and Florida regulations, safety equipment, and other boating techniques. Classes are taught by Flotilla 36, Boca Raton, in the HQ building in Spanish River Park at 3939 N. Ocean Blvd., just south of Spanish River Blvd. on A1A. Plenty of parking. We have a material cost of $35 per person, The class is completed in one day. For preregistration or information about upcoming classes, call 561-391-3600 and leave a brief message for a call back.” E. Atlantic Blvd., from 8:30 to 11 a.m. Every second Sunday the group meets at Galuppi’s, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach, at 6 p.m. 954-562-3232. The Pompano Beach Rotary Club meets Fridays at 12:15 p.m. at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. 954-786-3274. Art Gallery 21 is open every Friday from 7 to 9 p.m. The gallery, located at the Woman’s Club of Wilton Manors, 600 NE 21 Court, features various artwork from various artists across the State of Florida. Admission is free. Visit www.canawm.org for more information.SaturdaysPony rides are available at Sand & Spurs Equestrian Park, 1600 NE 5 Ave., Pompano Beach, from 9 to 11:30 a.m. Cost is $3 per ride. 954-786-4507. The Pompano Beach Kiwanis Club Westside meets the rst and third Saturdays of the month at 8:30 a.m. at the E. Pat Larkins Community Center, 520 MLK Blvd., Pompano Beach. 954-7828096. The Deer eld Beach West Kiwanis Club meets the second and fourth Saturdays of the month at 9 a.m. at Westside Park, 445 SW 2 St., Deer eld Beach. 954-54-732-9883. Kayak rentals are available Saturdays and Sundays at Richardson Historic Park, 1937 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Visit www.AtlanticCoastKayak. SightingsContinued from page 12 See SIGHTINGS on page 15

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14 The PelicanFriday, September 14, 2012 slam.” At the groundbreaking ceremony on Sept. 7, residents, commissioners and NW CRA board members expressed their excitement that plans for the NW CRA were nally moving forward. “This has been a long, long, long time coming,” said Dist. 4 Commissioner Woodrow J. Poitier, who represents residents in the NW CRA. “People often say ‘When is something going to happen on MLK?’ Well today is the day,” said Deborah Anthony, NW CRA chairperson. So far four businesses have expressed an interest in opening a location there – a sit down restaurant, take-out restaurant, beauty shop and professional of ce. Two of the business owners interested in renting space also live in the area. Kimberly Holmes owns a home-based business, Brown Sugar Bakery, and is looking to move into the 731 MLK Boulevard location or one of the storefronts located on Northeast 1 Street in Historic Downtown Pompano. To help her move in and buy some new equipment, Holmes has applied for a loan from the CRA’s Microenterprise Fund. Started in 2006, the Microenterprise Fund gives small business owners who either live or base their business in the NW CRA, the opportunity to apply for a low interest loan of up to $25,000. But whether Holmes opens on MLK or Northeast 1 Avenue she’s glad to nally see some improvements to the area. “It’s time to x it up,” she said. Benita Brown and her husband, Bernard Noble, already received a Microenterprise Loan and plan on opening the take-out restaurant at 731. “I was born and raised here. Anything that we can do to help make it better, that’s what we’re going to do,” said Brown. Once open, she said she plans to hire ve local residents as employees and possibly more if she and her husband expand the business. Jobs and economic development were two words repeated a few times during the groundbreaking. Pompano Beach Mayor Lamar Fisher touted the use of Pompano Beach subcontractors in the construction of the new development. “Employ our own,” said Fisher. Pinnacle, the general contractor the city chose for the project, has hired ve Pompano businesses as subcontractors. Cory McFarlane, chief visionary at Pinnacle, said about two-BuildingContinued from page 1 thirds of the subcontractors hired will be based out of Pompano. “We like to keep a lot of dollars in the community,” he said. For more information on the 731 development, visit www.PompanoBeachCRA. com or call 954-786-7824.When completed, the MLK development would be the rst new retail space on Martin Luther King Boulevard in over 50 years. [Rendering courtesy of the City of Pompano Beach]

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The Pelican 15 Friday, September 14, 2012 Yep, he likes the car Nine-year-old Angelo, a member of the Jim and Jan Moran Boys & Girls Club in Deer eld Beach, won an art contest sponsored by Doug and Linda Von Allmen that involved decorating a template showing the top, sides and back of a Ferrari. Angelo’s design, the New York City skyline, won over 500 other entries from ve other Boys & Girls Clubs around Broward County. Angelo won lots of prizes and a chance to meet race car driver Doug Allmen. SightingsContinued from page 13 com or 954-781-0073 for rates. The Wilton Manors Green Market is held every Saturday and Sunday at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. 954-592-0381. The Deer eld Beach West Kiwanis Club meets the second and fourth Saturdays of the month at 9 a.m. at Westside Park, 445 SW 2 St., Deer eld Beach. 954-54-732-9883. Pompano Green Market is held every Saturday from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the corner of Atlantic Boulevard and Cypress Road. Vendors See SIGHTINGS on page 19

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16 The PelicanFriday, September 14, 2012 police department budget that increases next year’s expenditures by $162,000, a gure some citizens say requires further investigation. Also on the agenda, and added since the budget was prepared in June, is the addition of another sworn of cer at a cost of $88,000. Last month Police Chief Tom Nagy speci cally mentioned that additional staf ng would put the town’s marine patrol boat in the water more often. This week he said the additional person will allow him to stabilize the schedule and put the ATV on the beach and the marine patrol boat in the water on more nights and weekends. Currently he operates with 14 sworn of cers and four civilian dispatchers. Only nine of the of cers are trained in the use of the boat and the ATV. In addition, the chief, said he has to do road patrols. “I need a fulltime of cer to make sure the road is covered. When I have to work the road, something is wrong. The major [Maj. Jay Szesnat] and I ll in regularly. The additional man would also provide for dispatch calls to come directly to the station. “We get a ton of calls from the residents,” Nagy said. But resident Al Shore pointed out to commissioners Tuesday that police services are 48 percent of the proposed $4.8 million 2012-13 budget. Non-operating expenses not included in the current year account for $42,000 of the increase. “This requires a further look, “ Shore, a resident of Opal Towers, said. Shore placed the cost of the additional police of cer at $126,000, but Nagy said the gure is closer to $88,000. The $42,000 he is asking for is to replace equipment that can’t be repaired, a new police car and to initiate phase one of a three-year update of the radio system. By 2015, the system used now will be obsolete, Nagy said. In addition, his numbers for overtime, workman’s compensation, insurance and the pension fund are up. Bruce Warshaw, a resident of Ocean Club, said before the town hires another police of cer, it should pay a consultant to explain the disparity between Hillsboro’s police budget and that of Highland Beach, a town in Palm Beach County with about the same number of people and miles of A1A to patrol. Highland’s police budget is $400,000 less than Hillsboro’s. “Imagine what we could do with $400,000,” Warshaw said. Highland Beach has 14 police of cers and some backup personnel. For the second year in a row, it has unfunded an additional sworn of cer position. Former city commissioner Rhea Weiss asked if supervisory personnel could be included in the road patrol schedule and could other cities with marine boats patrol Hillsboro Beach waters? She also asked if the town could save money by outsourcing dispatch. Renes Males noted that Highland Beach contracts some services.” She questioned the need for a police boat suggesting there could be more effective ways for residents to protect their property. All three speakers said the police department runs well and keeps the crime rate low and response times short. The rst budget hearing was held last night [Thursday]. As presented by nancial consultant Steve Bloom, the general fund for 2012-13 stands at $4.819 million, with a slight reduction in the current 3.8 mills. Budgeted for the current scal year was $4.869 million. The addition of the police of cer could change the millage, Bloom noted, but that would depend on whether cuts are made somewhere else in the scal plan. Final reading is set for Thursday, Sept. 20, 5 p.m. at town hall.Town endorses inlet and shoreline sand studyHillsboro Beach Commissioners this week committed to spending $51,000 for sand studies of the Boca Raton Inlet and the shoreline between the Boca Raton and Hillsboro inlets. The study will be done in hopes of the Department of Environmental Protection, or DEP, will increase the amount of sand Boca has to dredge annually. That sand drifts downward to help ll the eroded beaches in Deer eld. Consultant Penny Cutt said the DEP may reimburse some of the study costs, perhaps as much as 75 percent. The study is a preliminary step to what Vice Mayor Claire Schubert is trying to achieve: a beach nourishment collaboration between Hillsboro Beach, Deer eld Beach and Boca Raton. The study will determine how much sand can be pumped into the downward drift to replenish the beaches. “This [collaboration] is really a dream of mine. There will be a lot of steps to get this done. We have taken the rst one,” Schubert said. Cutt said of cials in Boca Raton do not see the need for an additional sand study and are using numbers from a study done in 2002 which has determined the amount of material they are required to dredge and put into the littoral drift annually. Cutt said data gathered in the last 10 years could change that gure. Mayor Dan Dodge said, “This may be the long term solution. Instead of a big project every 10 years from a source that no longer exists, we can [nourish] more frequently. This could stabilize our north end.” The town completed a $6 million project last year that nourished one and a half miles of the north beach. Sand was taken from a borrow area off of Deer eld Beach. That source is now depleted. A second phase would be a $24,000 study to evaluate the shoreline between the Boca Inlet and the Hillsboro Inlet. The study has not yet been approved. PoliceContinued from page 1

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The Pelican 17 Friday, September 14, 2012 By Malcolm McClintockPELICAN STAFFLauderdale-By-The-Sea – Held every second Wednesday of the month at member restaurants, the highly regarded LBTS Chamber of Commerce “Business After-Hours” was yet again a resounding success. Sea Watch’s General Manager Beth Tannar made sure there was a good supply of pork sliders, lobster bisque and conch fritters as over 70 area business leaders mingled enthusiastically. Business cards were exchanged and contacts were made as participants enjoyed happy hour libations and great views of the Atlantic Ocean. The convivial atmosphere ensured that all guests had a fun and productive time. “I am always happy to see such a good turnout for our events,” says Chamber President Mark Silver who was also eager to talk about the Chamber’s revamped Visitors Guides. “The redesigned guide will sport a great new look, be easier to carry and offer several new opportunities for businesses to promote themselves to visitors as well as area residents.” Among the exciting innovations is a more detailed map of the community, developed Sea Watch restaurant hosts LBTS Chamber monthly networking eventEileen Nesdale of the National Save The Sea Turtles Foundation, Emylene Egusquiza of Taylor Tax LLC, and Rachel Sampson of Villa Caprice/A Little Inn By The Sea. Michael Pinto, of Flip-Flops Dockside Eatery, Mindy Correa, of Tours To You, and Ed White of Croton Arms. Alan Forgea of Blue Moon Fish Co., Beth Tannar of Sea Watch restaurant, and Jeff Levine of South Florida Chamber Maps. [Photos by Malcolm McClintock]in a fun, cartoon style that highlights individual businesses. This map will also be direct mailed to homes in neighboring cities. “We will be printing 40,000 complete directory booklets and an additional 10,000 direct mailed maps, giving you more ways to reach more consumers than ever before,” says Silver. Visit the Chamber website at www.lbts.com for updates and information on upcoming events.

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18 The Pelican Friday, September 14, 2012 Pompano Beach State of the CityPompano Beach – The Greater Pompano Beach Chamber hosts the State of the City on Thursday, Sept. 27 at 7:45 a.m. at the Pompano Beach Elks Lodge #1898, 700 NE 10 St. Mayor Lamar Fisher will talk about the past year and what the city’s plans for the upcoming year are. The cost to attend is $25, includes breakfast and is open to the public. To RSVP send an email to info@ pompanobeachchamber.com or call 954-941-2940.Musical tribute to the troopsPompano Beach – KP Productions will perform Home For The Holidays a musical in honor of veterans and current servicemen and women still serving in the military. The cost is $15 per ticket and the event is on Sunday, Sept. 23 from 2 to 3:30 p.m. at the Herb Skolnick Center, 800 SW 36 Ave.. The costumes and sets will take you back to the 1940’s and the Big Band sounds in this tribute to America’s military. For more information, call 954-2748537. Women’s Health ExpoDeerfield Beach – The Women’s Health Expo will be held at the North Broward Medical Center, 201 E. Sample Road, on Tuesday, Oct. 17 from 5 to 8 p.m. There will be food, shopping, activities and giveaways. There will also be vendors providing services geared towards women and women’s health issues. For more, call 954-759-7400.Yom Kippur at Temple SholomPompano Beach – Yom Kippur services begin on Tuesday, Sept. 25 at 6:55 p.m. at Temple Sholom, 132 SE 11 Ave. Services will also be held on Wednesday, Sept. 26 at 9 a.m., 10:30 a.m., 10:45 a.m., 5 p.m., 5:30 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 954-9426410.

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The Pelican 19 Friday, September 14, 2012 “Who is going to do business with this town? Shame on us. I’m very disappointed,” Vincent said. After the vote, Mayor Rosanne Minnet said she disagreed that the installation of hurricane windows improves the appearance of the property, a program criteria. She said Novak’s property is incredible, “but what visual impact does this have?” She said she doesn’t want to see the program pushed aside suggesting commissioners need to discuss it further in another forum. Dodd suggested staff review the criteria to make it clearer to those applying that improvements must visual. Town Manager Connie Hoffmann said staff will work to de ne the criteria but may need more commission guidance. Three residents spoke against Novak’s application. “You shouldn’t be paying for hurricane windows. I agree with painting or awnings or stucco. To spend my tax dollars on hurricane windows is ridiculous,” said Bill Vitollo. Vito Chiarello said he wasn’t against the hotel program but wondered how well the program was thought out. “Most taxpayers thought it was for paint or to get a clean look. Now some want new windows, doors or landscaping. Why stop there? Why not redo bathrooms or add a hot tub? This can get out of hand. If you’re using taxpayer’s money to improve the town, I want to replace my windows and redo my landscaping, too. People of this town should be concerned about where this will go.” Edmund Malkoon said the commission should reconsider the criteria so any small property owner can apply. Storm WindowsContinued from page 2wanted. 954-782-3015.MondaysPlay ping-pong from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Cost is $1. All ages can participate. 954-3902130. The Gold Coast Toastmasters Club meets on the second and third Monday of the month from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Denny’s, 3151 NW 9 Ave., Fort Lauderdale. 954895-3555 or 954-782-9951.TuesdaysYoga every Tuesday from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Cost is $7 per class. Classes are also held Saturday mornings from 10:15 to 11:45 a.m. 954-607-3520. The Oakland Park Historical Society meets on the second Tuesday of every month at 5:30 p.m. at the at Oakland Park Library, 1298 NE 37 St. For more information, call 954-566-9957. Deer eld Beach Rotary Club meets every Tuesday at 12 p.m. at the Deer Creek Golf Club, 2801 Deer Creek Country Club Blvd., Deer eld Beach. 954-630-9593. Pompano Beach-Lighthouse Rotary Club meets every Tuesday at 7:30 a.m. at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. 954972-7178. The American Legion Auxiliary Unit 142, 171 SW 2 St., Pompano Beach, has Bingo on Tuesdays at 7 p.m. Food is available from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. 954-942-2448. A Yoga class is available for all levels at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors, on Tuesday nights from 6:30 to 8 p.m. and Saturday mornings from 10:30 a.m. until noon. The cost is $7. 305-607-3520. Zonta International meets on the third Tuesday of the month at Duffy’s Diner, 401 N. Federal Hwy., Deer eld Beach, at 11:15 a.m. Zonta International works to advance the status of women. 561-392-2223.WednesdaysThe Deer eld Beach SightingsContinued from page 15 See SIGHTINGS on page 26

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20 The Pelican Friday, September 14, 2012 will receive a black 65-gallon trash cart and a blue 65-gallon recycling cart. The town currently uses the 96-gallon blue carts for trash collection. Residents also can request a 35-gallon blue recycling cart or keep the 96-gallon blue cart for recycling. Multi-family units can keep the larger trash carts. In explaining the changes, Bud Bentley, assistant town manager, said the town is replacing the blue carts with black for trash because blue is commonly viewed as the universal, international indicator of recycling. Also, the blue carts now in use in town for trash have the name of the vendor, Choice, imprinted on the side. That will be replaced with LBTS information. Any household can keep the blue 96-gallon cart for yard waste. It will be re-labeled “yard waste only” and will be emptied at the same time as the trash cart. Over the next year the number of households using the yard waste cart will be measured to help decide whether the town should start a yard waste collection program. If there’s enough interest, the town will ultimately go to green carts for yard waste. The advantage of diverting yard waste from the trash stream is that it reduces disposal costs, according to a report provided commissioners. The recycling program will be funded by a $121,429 grant from the Resource Recovery Board of Broward County, meant to stimulate single-stream recycling. The money covers the cost of carts, an educational program, community outreach and hiring a coordinator. All recyclable materials aluminum, paper, plastic, glass and steel cans will be collected in a single container. Curbside bins will be replaced by the blue, rolling carts. The aim is to distribute the new carts by the end of this calendar year, Town Manager Connie Hoffmann said. The commission already has authorized purchase of the carts. Commissioner Stuart Dodd, who has been pushing for more recycling for years, described the program as “exciting.” “If we can achieve 90 to 95 percent of people recycling, it will make a big difference in our costs,” Dodd said. “We get a double bene t. We don’t pay for what’s recycled to go to the trash and we get a credit [for the volume of recycled materials.”] The change to a blue cart for recycling will require an educational campaign, Bentley said. Direct mail pieces will be sent to each resident explaining the switch. Information will be published in the town’s magazine, “Town Topics.” And the sides and top of recycling carts will have imprinted information. The lid will have an imbedded label showing types of items that can be recycled. Commissioner Mark Brown suggested an effort be made to engage condos to participate in recycling, such as providing small containers for inside the units. “I think there is a willingness to recycle – nally,” Mayor Roseann Minnet said. RecyclingContinued from page 1Tell The Pelican about your news! mdpelican@yahoo.com or 954-783-8700!

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The Pelican 21 Friday, September 14, 2012 seems very dense and shoehorned in. Maybe [80 units] is too much for that site,” said Miller. The developers, Urban Dynamic Communities and Stellar Homes Group, say they need to build a certain number of units in order to make the project successful. “The number of units is pretty modest,” said Larry Coker, the attorney representing the developers. Coker suggested one way to make the project less dense is to build higher. Originally, plans called for the apartment complex to be 115 units. In his report, Miller lists 37 suggested changes; from the size of parking spaces to inadequate signage to lack of proper landscaping. One of his recommendations involves “signi cantly” improving the architecture. And the way it looks now leaves residents Randy Comer and his wife, Laura, worried the apartments could hurt property values. “We want something conducive to the neighborhood. Something that will t in. This is the nicest area of east Wilton Manors. This [development] could destroy us. It could destroy our entire neighborhood,” said Randy Comer. Developers called the project “high-end” while residents have compared it to a cross between a college dorm and a prison. “Luxury is a matter of opinion,” said Larry Baum of Stellar Homes Group. “The issue here is not so much the architecture . but the way it’s displayed here,” said Coker. Bruce Connolly, ENA board member, thinks developers should have modeled their project after Belle Isle, the mixed-use residential/retail complex on Wilton Drive. “I’m not against it. It seems like they’re trying to cram as much as they can onto the development,” said Connolly. “I was hoping for something commercial. Kind of bring air to the neighborhood. But if something’s going to go in there, I’d rather see a park.” Final approval of the development will have to be given by city commissioners. Before the issue reaches them developers will have to go before the DRC again, then have their plans approved by the Planning and Zoning Board. DevelopmentContinued from page 5By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach – Father Bernard J. Pecaro of St. Martin’s Episcopal Church usually gives blessings to those with two legs. But next month he’ll bless those with two legs, four legs, eight legs or no legs. Dogs, cats, fish, snakes, rabbits, birds, ferrets, horses, pigs, chickens – Father Pecaro will bless them all on Sunday, Oct. 7 at St. Martin’s, 140 SE 28 Ave. “We get everything. I even blessed a spider one time,” said Pecaro. “It’s always just been a great event,” said Fred Segal, event coordinator. “I’ve been to a lot of pet blessings at other churches, but this is the only one where the animals are actually brought inside the church for the blessing. The people are seated in the pews with their pets.” It will also be a great opportunity for pet-related business owners, Segal says. “We’ve got space available for a few vendors – anything that will be pet related. It’s just a nominal donation to the church for the space. Nonprofits are free,” said Segal. In the past, pet related vendors, such as pet adoption organizations, veterinarians and groomers have been on hand. Registration starts at 9:30 a.m., followed by a short procession of the animals down Southeast 28 Avenue, led by Pecaro on horseback, which ends inside the church where the blessings start at 10 a.m. After the blessings, there will be food, a bounce house, petting zoo and a dove release. “It’s really an outreach to the community. We try to build it as a community event each year,” said Pecaro. “It seems to be growing every year.” To sign up as a vendor, call 954-941-4843 or 954-8490745.Annual blessing of pets, Oct. 7 at St. Martin’s

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22 The Pelican Friday, September 14, 2012 Classi eds Call 954-545-0013 Mechanic Shop for RentPompano Beach Rent this mechanical shop attached to a busy Texaco Station. Rent is negotiable. 954-941-2600. Ask for George Great opportunity. Call George. 954-941-2600 Call The Pelican at 954-783-8700! HELP WANTEDAFRAID OF DOWNSIZING? Start building a business to supplement your income. Great earnings potential on a part-time basis with Primerica. Call 954729-0192. 9-7 POMPANO BEACH – MECHANIC/COUNTER PERSON NEEDED For WellKnown Texaco Fuel Station. References & Experience. Good People Person. Call George 954-941-2600. 9-21 SEEKING EMPLOYMENTHHA – I Will Take Excellent Care Of The Elderly / Companion Aid – Experienced & Certi ed / Have References. Call 845-709-5275. 9-21 CAREGIVER / COMPANION Caucasian Woman With 25 Yrs Exp. To Assist & Care For Your Loved Ones. Days / Eves / Nights. Ref. Available. 954-482-5494. LPN AT CNA PRICES! Will Drive To Dr. Appointments, Lunch, Shopping, Etc. East Broward Area Only! 954-8957850. 9-21 I AM AN English Speaking Woman W / 9 Years Experience. Easy To Get Along With. Certi ed To Help Aid You Through Activities Throughout The Day. Low Rates. References Available. 561-860-2811. 9-14 NURSES AIDE / SITTER To Care For Your Loved One. Excellent References. Drive. Nights Or Days. Call 770-7091875. 9-14 MALE CNA / HHA / COMPANION. Broward County Area. Former EMT. All Certi cations / Compassionate, References. Call Ron 954-2322832. Very Reasonable! 9-14 SERVICES DANNY BOY ELECTRIC – Lic & Insured. Lic. #EC13004811. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. 24/Hr Service. 954-290-1443. Beat Any Written Estimate. Sr, Discount. 9-21 ASI SOUTHERN LAWN MAINTENANCE Provides Full Landscape. Architectural Landscape Design. Tree Trimming & Removal, Full Lawn Maintenance. One Time Clean Out. Andrew 954-6757396. GOT JUNK? TRASH HAULING – CONDO CLEANUPS – Trees – Landscape – Yard Fill – Pressure Wash – Roofs – Home Repairs – Welding – Etc. Dave 954-818-9538. 9-28 MIKE THE GARDNER “ The All American Yardman” Yard And Garden Care – Get The Best For Less!! Call 561-5436337 Cell. 9-14 GINGERS HOUSEKEEPING – 20 YRS EXP. (Licensed) References Available. Honest & Reliable – LOVE To Clean Windows! Refrigerators, Ovens – No Problem! FREE Estimates. 954-200-4266. HANDYMAN – PAINTING – CARPENTRY – Pressure Cleaning. Decks! Everything Around The House. No Job Too Small. FREE Estimates! Call 561-350-3781. 9-28 HONEST HANDYMAN – HOME & BUILDING Maintenance/Improvements. No Job Too Small. Fast Friendly Service. Reasonable Rates. Local Resident/Homeowner. Call Today For Your FREE Upfront Quote. No Deposit Required. 754-366-1915. BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIESNew GREEN technology. New defroster control saves energy in home refrigerators, commercial chillers. Patented. All optical. Simple mfg. Strategic partners needed..www.NewAvionics.Com. 954-568-1991. MUSICIANS WANTEDADVANCED STUDENT MUSICIANS Being Accepted For 2012 – 2013 Membership in the American Legion Symphonic Band! Earn Community Service Points While Improving Your Performance Skills! Rehearsals On Wednesday Evenings from 7pm to 9pm at American Legion Post 142, 171 SW 2nd St., Pompano Beach, FL 33060. Band Director Recommendation Encouraged. Email Music Director James McGonigal at info.legionband@ gmail.com for more information. REAL ESTATE WANTEDNEED TO BUY FOR CASH FAST!! Small Duplex Or Triplex With At Least One 3 / 2 Or 2 / 2 E Of Federal Hwy. 954-563-3533. TOWNHOUSESLIGHTHOUSE POINT 2 / 2.5 Waterfront Townhouse. 1677 Sq Ft. Dockage Available! $35 Month. Pet Friendly. Offered At $214,900. Call Colleen Majeski Balistreri Realty 754-235-1208. 9-14 MOBILE HOMESDEERFIELD DOUBLE WIDE 2 / 2 – TIDEWATER ESTATES 55+. Background / Credit Check Required. $685 Mo Lot Rent. $5,000 Firm. 954-4260500. 9-21 FURNITUREFORMAL DINING ROOM TABLE w/6 Chairs w/Smoked Glass Top, Credenzas, End Tables, Couch. All Natural Rattan. Lighthouse Pt. 863634-4575 Leave Message. CEMETERY PLOTS2 PREMIUM LOTS – Forest Lawn Cemetery For Sale. $1,500 OBO Call 561-603-9383. OR 863-9461646. C.REAL ESTATE WANTEDI BUY HOUSES!! CASH!! AS IS! QUICK CLOSE! ANY AREA – ANY CONDITION! NO EQUITY OK. CALL NOW 954-914-2355. 10-19 CONDOS FOR SALEPOMPANO BEACH – DIRECT OCEAN VIEW!! Pet Friendly! 2/2 AT THE BREAKERS! $265K. Also For Rent. Call Juliana At Barclay’s For Details. 1-305-766-4420. POMPANO BEACH DIRECT INTRACOASTAL! Feels Like You’re On A Boat. Pool On Intracoastal. Wrap-A-Round Balcony. Spacious 1 / 1.5 $178K. Also For Rent $1350 Month. 954-588-0562. DEERFIELD BEACH / CENTURY VILLAGE – Fabulous Corner – By Pool – 2 / 2 Unfurnished. Laminate / Tile Floors. BEST In The Village! Do Not Wait! Present Offers! $92K. Jennifer – Century Village RE 954-650-5956. 9-14 POMPANO 2 / 1 UPDATED 1st Floor Corner Unit With POND VIEW! FREE 9 – Hole Golf Course. $39,900. Kim Loucks RE / MAX In Motion. 954609-9730. DEERFIELD CENTURY VILLAGE! Breathtaking, Stunning 2/2, Remodeled, Furnished 2nd Floor. Near Pool, Clubhouse, Restaurant. Fabulous Location. $150K. Jennifer – Century Village RE. 954-650-5956. 9-21 POMPANO BEACH “THE CLARIDGE” Large Updated 2 / 2 Corner Penthouse – Ocean – Intracoastal & City Views! Washer / Dryer In Unit. Impact Glass. $498,500. Ruthie Brooks – Balistreri Realty. 954-8034174. CONDOS FOR RENTPOMPANO AEGEAN OCEANFRONT Unfurnished Large South Side 2 / 2 + Den Or 3rd Bedroom. Tile Floor. Great Ocean & ICW Views!! W / D In Unit. 24 Hr. Security. Hi Def TV In Rent. Exercise Room, Pool, Hot Tub, Garage – Park 2 Cars. $1,700 / Month. Dynasty R.E. 954-295-2356. 9-14 POMPANO BEACH 1 Block To Ocean – 1 / 1 Fully Furnished. Flat Screens, DVD, Pool, Laundry, Private Parking, BBQ. Monthly Thru December $850. 954-540-9724.

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The Pelican 23 Friday, September 14, 2012 Classi eds Call 954-545-0013 Call The Pelican at 954-783-8700! FT LAUDERDALE ICW Gated Community. 1 / 1.5 – Furnished / Unfurnished. Granite, Wood Floors, Lots Of Amenities. Great Location. No Pets. $950 Month. Call 954588-1644. 9-28 LIGHTHOUSE POINT 2 / 2 ---1st Floor – 55+. Pool, Storage, Laundry Facilities. $900 Month / Water Included. Dorothy Bassano – Better Homes & Gardens Real Estate. 954-562-4919. 9-14 POMPANO INTRACOASTAL AT IT’S BEST. Breathtaking Views! Feels Like You’re On A Boat, Pool Deck On Intracoastal. Spacious 1 / 1.5 $1350 Month. A1A S.E. Corner – Unobstructed Views. 2/2 $1,500 Month. 954-588-0562. LEISUREVILLE 55+ 2 / 1 Unfurnished / Furnished $795 / $875 1st & Last. 1st Floor. Free Golf – By Pool / Clubhouse. 954-590-8177. 9-14 COCONUT CREEK (Wynmoor) 55+. Clean / Bright 2 / 2 Fully Furnished. Available Immediately. 2nd Floor Lakeview! All Amenities. $950 Month. 954-984-8255. POMPANO 1 / 1.5 UPDATED 1st Floor. Screened Patio. Community Pool. Small Waterfront Complex. $1,200 Month. Dockage Available For Rent. Ruthie Brooks – Balistreri Realty. 954-8034174. 9-14 APTS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH 1 BR & 2 BR APTS FOR RENT. Remodeled, Paint, Tile, Etc. Washer / Dryer On Site. Pool. Pet Friendly. George 954-8095030. 9-21 POMPANO BEACH – EAST OF FEDERAL HWY! Walk To Everything! 1 & 2 Bedrooms. Call For Information 954-2546325. 9-14 POMPANO MCNAB RD & NE 18 AVENUE – 1 & 2 Bedrooms Furnished / Unfurnished. $650 $895 And Up. Pool, Tile Floors. Central A / C. 954-6102327. 9-21 POMPANO BEACH 1/1 $650 – NW – NE 2/1 $950 – 2/1,5 Townhouse -Pool $1095 SW 1/1 $750 – 2/1 $925 – 2/2 $950 – 3/2 $1025 ALL FREE WATER. Rent + $70 App Mov-U-In. 954-781-6299. 9-14 LAUDERDALE BY THE SEA 1 / 1 Ground Floor. Central A / C. Parking Out Back Door. Laundry, Courtyard. 200 Steps Beach. $1,100. 954-8685560 Wayne. 9-21 BEST DEAL IN POMPANO BEACH – Efficiency With Kitchen, Laundry & Pool. No Pets. Weekly – Monthly – Season. 500’ To Beach. 954294-8483 Or 248-736-1533. 10-5 POMPANO BEACH – NE 13 Street. Furnished 1 / 1 All Included! No Pets. October Thru December. 1/2 Block To Beach. $925. Call 954-4100943. 9-21 POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 Bedroom From $500. Easy Movein. 1/2 OFF DEPOSIT. Remodeled. Great Location. 954-783-1088 For More Info. 12-14 COMMERCIAL FOR RENT-SALEPOMPANO COMMERCIAL OFFICE Spaces Available. Ranging From As Low As $500 To $700 Depending On Square Footage. Please Call Darci At 954-7833723. 10-5 DEERFIELD BEACH – Retail Of ce Warehouse – 700 Sq Ft With Loft. A/C, Bathroom. $575 Per Month. Call For More Info 561-654-1331 Or 561-9985681. 9-21 CORAL SPRINGS – 1800 SQ FT. Easy Access To Sawgrass, Ample Parking, Monument Sign. FREE RENT & Buildout. Call 954-328-0413. 9-14

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24 The Pelican Friday, September 14, 2012 WORSHIP DIRECTORY: Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad. Rev. Hyvenson Joseph requires a lot of paper work which the big drug chains are unwilling to be bothered with. They have helped me with all of this and other pharmaceutical needs. They call me when I need re lls and even to see how I am. For people, like me, who appreciate a little personal TLC, I suggest The Right Pill Pharmacy.” Hershkowitz says, “It’s not easy opening a new pharmacy in South Florida because pharmacies have a tarnished reputation due to the number of pill mills that were ourishing here. We are the new kids in town and we want it known that we maintain the highest standards dictated by the governing agencies in this profession. Our state has given us the tools on a web site to identify potential abusers of pharmacies and we use those tools where indicated. We even have a sign out front saying that we don’t carry the obvious drugs found in pill mills, nor do we honor pill mill prescriptions.” Open Mon. to Fri. from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Sat. 10-3. Call 954-946-7904, Pompano Beach. Boca store hours are 8 a.m. to 10 p.m. every day. Call 561392-1515. The Right PillContinued from page 8 By Rabbi David Hartley MarkTHE JEWISH CENTER AT TEMPLE SHOLOM POMPANO BEACHThis Sunday evening, while the rest of South Florida is strolling on the beach, watching TV, or enjoying a dinner or movie out, the Jewish Community will be going to temple. Sundown begins the High Holy Days, the Days of Awe, the beginning of the Jewish New Year, 5,773 years since the creation of the universe. The rabbis of old who created our Hebrew calendar did not know about dinosaurs or carbon dating. There are many New Year’s customs—wearing a new garment, dipping apple slices in honey for a sweet year, eating the special challah, or rich egg-bread, which is in the shape of a crown, or spiral, to remind us either of God’s sovereignty, or the cycle of time—but chief among them is the blowing of the shofar, or ram’s horn. It is sounded in three different tones, to mimic a person crying over their sins, because that is the central focus of this holy time: repentance, or examining one’s deeds, and resolving to do better. We spend hours in temple, asking God to forgive our trespasses against Him; but we must also seek out those whom we have wronged, and humbly ask their forgiveness. There is the old tale of the Chasidic rebbe, Rabbi Levi Yitzchak of Berdichev [1740-1809], who loved to ask the common folk about their thoughts during the High Rosh Hashana, the Jewish New Year: 5773Holy Days. He approached Chaim, a humble tailor, and asked him how he was planning to speak to God that Rosh Hashana. “Oy, Rebbe,” answered Chaim, “I have committed any manner of sins. Once, I deliberately cut a rich man’s pants a little bit too short, so that I would have more cloth left over to patch my own children’s ragged garments. And another time, when I had very little money, I was forced to eat food which was not exactly kosher. But look, God—” he gestured emphatically toward the heavens—“Look at Your own sins! You create floods, fires, and famines, and cause parents to lose their precious children, and you allow nations to go to war, so that many men die—I ask You, are my sins anything compared to Yours?” “Chaim,” said the rabbi, “You let God off too easily. You could have easily forced the Almighty to forgive, not only the sins of the Jewish people, but those of the entire world!” As we conclude this past year, there are many areas of suffering, and far more of misunderstanding and hatred, among the various countries. May 5773 prove to be a year in which the great and small nations of the world, like the lion and lamb in the Book of “Once, I deliberately cut a rich man’s pants a little bit too short, so that I would have more cloth left over to patch my own children’s ragged garments.” ChaimSee NEW YEAR on page 26

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The Pelican 25 Friday, September 14, 2012 Program now in its second year. It’s a series of three award categories created to recognize work by cities in Broward County, said Sely Cochrane, executive assistant at the Broward League. Each program submitted for an award must be in effect, and is vetted for nancial impact, effectiveness, and how it has the potential to achieve speci c goals set out by the municipality. “It’s to create awareness of what our cities are doing,” Cochrane said. “Hopefully, other cities will see this and say, ‘Hey, I want to implement that.” In the Green Leaf category, Pompano was up against Miramar’s urban food plan and the City of Fort Lauderdale’s Smart Watts program for light bulb awareness, she ReclaimedContinued from page 1said. City Commissioner Barry Dockswell said that elected of cials were very involved in creating the water reclamation program Water reclaimed from sewage and other uses that is un t for drinking has long been used by apartment complexes, golf courses and other commercial properties to irrigate lawns and foliage, Dockswell said. The commission and city staff spent time looking for ways to make it easier for residents to have the pipes installed at their homes in order to sell them the reclaimed water speci cally for irrigation. “We listened to what the customers were saying and put together a program that resolved as many issues as we possibly could,” said Maria Loucraft, utilities compliance and ef ciency manager for the water department. “What we were able to do was create a program where the city took care of all the hassle that previously had been the customer’s, as well as the upfront cost.” Covering half of the program’s cost with a $220,000 grant from the county’s Integrated Water Resources Plan, the city eliminated the responsibility and cost of installing the reclaimed water pipes from the mains buried beneath streets to spigots at people’s homes, she said. According to Loucraft, the city has a list of plumbers and contractors who are asked to submit bids for each individual job after a resident makes a request to join the program. Every yard is different, she said, but plumbers are called in and the logistics are worked out, and once residents give clearance for the city to work on their property, the city pulls all needed permits and installations take about a day. The Pompano Beach city website includes an application for new businesses to join the list and be contacted for bids, potentially helping to give even more work to local businesses, another bene t of the program. Once the new lines have been installed, residents are charged 85 cents per thousand gallons of water used, a 20-cent hike from the 65 cents per thousand gallons ptiot to installation. Over the long term, the increase will allow the city to absorb those installation costs, she said, pointing out how much less expensive it is to use the reclaimed water as compared to the $2.24 per thousand gallons cost of drinking water. Residents are not subject to the limits placed on the use of potable drinking water. Concerns about drinking water in South Florida have been a focus for the state overall, Dockswell said. In the case of Broward County, this program will help it meet a state requirement to use at least 60 percent of all reclaimed water. So far, the program has about 400 customers in the rst nine months of ICanWater being fully online, and more are calling every day to join. Cochrane said this has put the city ahead of its early estimates of 770 sign-ups during the rst two years. Currently, she said, the city has the capacity to connect about 1,200 homes and that will increase as approximately 10,000 feet of main is buried each year. Dockswell said the city will eventually install pipes beneath the Intracoastal Waterway so that residents on the island can link up, but costs and logistics for that are still in the planning stages. The commissioner said the most important part is that the city is helping to reduce the consumption of potable water and helping to hold off the intrusion of saltwater into the county’s freshwater wells the reason the city looked into a reuse program in the rst place. “The recognition is very nice, but it’s for a good proper reason,” Dockswell said. “What’s most meaningful is that we’re actually showing great leadership, and in some cases pioneering leadership, in preserving the scarce water resources we have in South Florida.”

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26 The Pelican Friday, September 14, 2012 Capt. RJ Boyle is an experienced angler in South Florida. His studio is located in Lighthouse Point. Call 954-420-5001.Signs of a Rip CurrentStand on a high area, such as a sand dune or deck, and scan the water. To spot a rip current, look for the following characteristics: A streak of water that is a different color. The streak may look more murky or darker than the surrounding water. A gap in advancing breakers where the rip current is pushing its way seaward. A line of foam extending offshore. An offshore plume of turbid water past the sandbar. If still unsure, throw a oating object into the water and see if it moves steadily seaward.What to do?Do not panic or try to swim against the current Swim parallel to shore until you feel the current lessen and then swim to shore If you can’t break out of the current, oat with it until it dissipates, usually just beyond the breakers. Then swim diagonally to shore. If you do not swim well, know your limits, stay in wading depths, and watch for sudden drop-offs. Always swim in an area protected by certi ed lifeguards.Rip currentsContinued from page 1 lion and lamb in the Book of Isaiah, truly lie down in peace with one another. Amen! Temple Sholom of Pompano Beach is a Progressive Conservative Jewish Congregation offering religious, cultural, and educational activities for all ages and inclinations of Jews and spiritual seekers. We strive to make everyone feel welcome, and we are the friendliest Jewish temple in South Florida. For more information about Temple Sholom, call 954-942-6410. New YearContinued from page 24By Michael d’Oliveira PELICAN STAFFPompano Beach – The wind could bring good dolphin and sword shing this weekend. And it’s all about the seaweed. “We call them weed lanes,” said RJ Boyle, of RJ Boyle Studios in Lighthouse Point. According to Boyle, weed lanes attract dolphin and sword sh, which look for squid and other smaller sea creatures to eat. Friday might be dull but Boyle expects Saturday and Sunday to be big shing days. “The dolphin hang out under the sea weed,” said Boyle. And this weekend the Big wind brings big shing sea weed is being pushed by the wind and current towards South Florida waters. Squid also tend to follow sea weed. “There’s a huge squid migration off our coast right now. Al the sh we’ve been catching have a bunch of squid inside their stomachs,” said Boyle. “You’ll troll the boat along the seaweed lanes,” said Boyle, who has already caught a few sword sh. “A lot of big sword sh are out there right now. I shed four days this week and I caught eight sword sh. The biggest sh we caught this week was 335 lbs.,” said Boyle. But he also tasted defeated. “We lost one over 500 lbs.”SightingsContinued from page 19 Historical Society meets on the third Wednesday of each month from 12 to 1 p.m. at the Old School Museum, 232 NE 2 St., Deer eld Beach. For more information, call 954429-0378. The Pompano Beach Historical Society meets on the third Wednesday of every month at 7 p.m. at the Dick & Miriam Hood Center, 217 NE 4 Ave., Pompano Beach. For more information, call 954292-8040. The Wilton Manors Kiwanis Club meets Wednesdays at 6:30 p.m. at 2749 NE See SIGHTINGS on page 27 Send your news to mdpelican@yahoo.com

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The Pelican 27 Friday, September 14, 2012 14 Ave., Wilton Manors. 954561-9785. The Oakland Park Kiwanis Club meets Wednesdays from 7:30 to 8:30 a.m. at Peter Pan Diner, 1216 E. Oakland Park Blvd., Oakland Park. 954-566-9957. The Pompano Beach Kiwanis Club meets Wednesdays at noon at the Riverside Grille at the Sands Resort, 125 N. Riverside Drive, Pompano Beach. 954-444-4815. The Greater Pompano Beach Senior Citizens Club meets on the second Wednesday of the month at the Emma Lou Olson Community Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach, at 10 a.m. 954-9437787. The Alzheimer’s Caregivers Support Group meets Wednesdays from 10 a.m. to noon at the NE Focal Point Alzheimer’s Day Care Center, 301 NW 2 Ave., Deer eld BeachThursdaysThe Wilton Manors Historical Society meets on the third Thursday of the month at Wilton Manors City Hall, 2020 Wilton Drive, at 7 p.m. For more information, call 954-566-9019 or 954-5668219. The Rotary Club of Oakland Park/Wilton Manors meets every Thursday from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. at Tequila Sunrise Mexican Grill, 4711 N. Dixie Hwy., Oakland Park. 954-491-6158. The Deer eld Beach Kiwanis Club meets at noon every Thursday at the Deer eld Beach Hilton, 100 Fairway Dr., Deer eld Beach 954-242-6083. The Pompano Beach Republican Club meets on the fourth Thursday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach. 954-786-7536.Upcoming9-27 – Greater Pompano Beach Chamber hosts the State of the City at 7:45 a.m. at the Pompano Beach Elks Lodge #1898, 700 NE 10 St. Mayor Lamar Fisher will talk about the past year and the city’s future. Breakfast is $25. To RSVP send an email to info@pompanobeachchamber.com or call 954-941-2940.SightingsContinued from page 26 Send your news to mdpelican@yahoo.com

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28 The Pelican Friday, September 14, 2012 On the road again!Wheels When the Broward Partnership for the Homeless Initiative, or BPHI, posted a call for help, the Broward Sheriff’s Of ce responded. Many residents had lost their transportation to their jobs when Broward County of cials cut another bus route. BSO came forth with bicycles that had been con scated from criminals or had been lost and unclaimed. Said Capt. Rick Wierzbicki, “They were overjoyed. They had only expected three or four bikes, but we brought seven.” The bikes went to those who had jobs. Pictured are Captain Rick Wierzbicki, BPHI CEO Fran Esposito, BPHI clients Edward Kennard, Alexander McLeod and Robert Fisco. [Photo by Cliff Frommer, BSO Crime Lab]Tell The Pelican about your news! mdpelican@yahoo.com or 954-783-8700!Pelican Classi eds work for you! 954-783-8700!

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44 The Pelican Friday, September 14, 2012

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The Pelican 45 Friday, September 14, 2012

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46 The Pelican Friday, September 14, 2012

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The Pelican 47 Friday, September 14, 2012

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48 The Pelican Friday, September 14, 2012