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Pompano Pelican
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00090900/00316
 Material Information
Title: Pompano Pelican
Uniform Title: Pompano Pelican
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: Pompano Pelican
Place of Publication: Pompano Beach
Publication Date: 09-07-2012
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Pompano Beach
Coordinates: 26.234722 x -80.125556 ( Place of Publication )
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00090900:00316

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Friday, September 7, 2012 Vol. XX, Issue 36 Wherever you are, read The Pelican @ pompanopelican.com Send news to siren2415@gmail.com Pompano Beach Deer eld Beach Lighthouse Point Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Wilton Manors Oakland Park Hillsboro Beach The Galt Palm Aire The Pelican Pelican 81 days left in 2012 Hurricane season History Issue By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFOakland Park To Chris Rosado, the propane business is just like owning a pizza joint. We deliver straight to your house, just like pizza, said Rosado, who attributes the comparison to his dad. I worked for my dads old propane company since I was a little kid. It was an experience that prepared him to start his own propane business in 2007, Forever Propane Sales & Service at 350 NE 44 St. And like pizza deliveries, cooked Forever Propane powers grills, homes and businesses before and after the stormSee PROPANE on page 18 No need to scream. They got the ice cream So a Salamy, 5, digs into her sweet treat during the free ice cream social held at the iBeria Bank branch in Pompano Beach on Aug. 31. [Photo by Michael dOliveira] Proposed tax hike will cover unanticipated expenses By Stephen FellerSTAFF WRITERPompano Beach Although the economy is slowly improving, the city administrators have proposed a ve percent increase in the property tax rate to meet a budget that outpaced in ation and grew more than city of cials expected. Commissioners will hold the rst of two public hearings on the proposed $219 million 2012-2013 budget on Wednesday, Sept. 12 at 5:30 p.m. in the commission chambers at city hall, See BUDGET on page 9 Commission rm: No place on the eld for those with criminal historiesBy Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach The commissions decision last year to require extensive background checks of city volunteers is keeping some well-meaning citizens off athletic elds and away from programs for children. But earlier this month, despite a request for an appeal process from Commissioner Ben Preston, the rest of the board reiterated its tough stance. We have to err on the side of caution [even though] good people See CRIMINAL HISTORY on page 9 Cameras spot crooks, lead to recoveriesBy Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFLighthouse Point Police expect to recover $500,000 in stolen property by the end of year thanks to the newest members of the department license plate identi cation cameras. See CAMERAS on page 11 Sewer rate adjustment delayed for more dataBy Judy VikPELICAN WRITERLauderdale-By-The-Sea -Town commissioners unanimously agreed Tuesday to go back to the drawing board for more information rather than vote on proposed new sewer rates for the south end of town. Instead they tabled the issue until Oct. 23 and agreed to hire their consultant to do more research on See SEWERS on page 10

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2 The PelicanFriday, September 7, 2012 By Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFFort Lauderdale Helen Herriott Landers sits in a room at Westside School at 301 SW 13 Ave. the home Areas early schools and bad hurricanes remain vivid memories for County Historian Helen Landers of the Broward County Historical Commission, now a part of the countys library system. Helen is the Broward County Historian. She is a member of the generation that experienced Pearl Harbor, World War II, the rst man to walk on the moon and, most recently, the Curiosity Robot landing on Mars. She has served the county as a teacher. She is a strong supporter of womens issues. The spacious room of Westside School is lined with a library of books set on shelves that climb up the History KeeperHelen Landers Helen Landers, County Historian, points out the volumes of history that are stacked on shelves in one of Broward Countys early schools, Westside. Today Westside School is the home of the Broward County Historical Commission.See LANDERS on page 24

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The Pelican 3 Friday, September 7, 2012 Historical Society hosts covered dish supperThe Pompano Beach Historical Society will kick off its 2012-2013 programming season with a covered dish supper on Sept. 15. The event will take place from 4 to 7:30 p.m. at Founders Park, 217 NE 4 Ave., Pompano Beach. In conjunction with the supper, the Historical Society will hold a brief ceremony at 4:30 p.m. marking the reopening of the Societys Kester Cottages, that recently underwent an extensive repair and restoration. The historic structures were constructed in the late 1930s by Pompano businessman and civic leader William Kester as tourist cottages. Facing the beach along Highway A1A, the modest buildings proved to be so popular that a number of them were built in town for local residents. The two Kester Cottages preserved by the Historical Society contain furnishings and artifacts relating to Pompano Beachs history. The cottages will be open for those attending the Sept. 15 event. The covered dish supper is open to Historical Society members, friends and the public. Although there is no admission charge, attendees are asked to bring a prepared food item to share. The Historical Society will provide drinks and tableware. Call 954 292-8040.Email mdpelican@ yahoo.com with your news or announcements!Fishing pier meeting LEED standardsDeer eld Beach The city is well on its way to having a certi ed Silver LEEDS shing pier and according to a project manager it could become golden. Miguel Perez told the commission Tuesday that contractors Stiles Corp. have 49 of the 55 points needed for a silver certi cation and he is con dent more points will be achieved, possibly enough to merit a gold rating. The rebuilt pier restaurant, bait house and other amenities will be the citys rst LEEDS project, designed and built with as many environmental considerations as possible. It is scheduled for completion by the end of this year. Advertise with The Pelican 954-783-8700

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4 The PelicanFriday, September 7, 2012 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFOakland Park This city could soon be home to a beer brewery. Lease negotiations are nearing completion for Funky Buddha Brewery to occupy 17,500 square feet in Oakland Park Station, the former Sears warehouse, at 1201 NE 38 St. Were very excited about it. We hope this will help Oakland Park and the whole street, said broker Patricia Montalbano who was hopeful the lease would be signed by the end of the week. Owner Ryan Sentz said Funky Buddha Brewery will be a production facility with tours, beer tasting and a bar with live music. Sentz will be brewing 100 kinds of beer. He said he was attracted to Oakland Park because of the citys plans to relaunch the SightingsA community calendar for Northeast Broward County. Send your event information to mdpelican@yahoo.comBrewery eyes Oakland Parkarea as a culinary center. Were looking forward to it and are excited. The city has been extremely helpful. I hope it gets done soon [the lease signing] so we can start brewing, he said. Hes targeting the opening for early next year. Sentz said he also will continue to operate Funky Buddha in Boca Raton. Were very much looking forward to Funky Buddha coming into town. It will be an anchor and hopefully draw other breweries and other businesses, said Siegi Constantine, executive director of Oakland Park Main Street. Hopefully, their presence will draw another brewery into the Sikes building on Northeast 12th Avenue. The more the merrier, Constantine added. By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFWilton Manors Mayor Gary Resnicks job of representing the residents of Wilton Manors often takes him out of the city and into Tallahassee. And for his efforts the Florida League of Cities has given Resnick its Home Rule Hero Award. Mayor Resnicks name is synonymous with a Home Rule Hero. He is extremely dedicated and works hard for the citizens of Wilton Manors. He brings that same level of commitment and energy to helping the Florida League of Cities lobbying team and is always ready and willing to contact legislators and help advocate in support of home rule. He has and always will Mayor Resnick named Home Rule Hero by Florida League of Cities be a valuable asset to his city and the State of Florida, said Scott Dudley, the Leagues legislative director. The award recognizes Resnick for his work during the 2012 legislative session See RESNICK on page 5 Resnick

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The Pelican 5 Friday, September 7, 2012 SightingsSightings is a calendar for Northeast Broward county. Send your event information to mdpelican@yahoo.com to advance the Leagues statewide agenda and the home rule powers of Wilton Manors and other cities and towns across Florida. Its nice to get recognized by your peers but you dont do these things for awards, said Resnick, who isnt reimbursed by the city for travel to Tallahassee. Each trip is two-days. Its all out of my own pocket or the League has reimbursed me some. But although he doesnt use city funding to go to Tallahassee, Resnicks main focus in the state capitol is the future of a major portion of city funding. Resnicks is one of four local government representatives appointed to Communications Services Tax Work Group, which is tasked with meeting once a month and studying and reporting on tax issues related to the sale of communications services. As an attorney with Gray Robinson, he specializes in communications and cable law, utilities, and use of rights-of-way, The groups task is to present recommendations to the legislature on the future of the communications services tax by Feb. 1, 2013. Last year Wilton Manors received over $650,000 in revenue from the communications tax; all poured into the general fund. Its the third single largest revenue source that we have, said Resnick. But cities and other local governments are in danger of losing those funds over a billion dollars across Florida. HB 809 would prohibit state and local governments from charging taxes on many digital services offered by telecommunications companies. Used as a funding pledge for the bond the city oated to pay for the new city hall and adjoining parking lot, the loss of the communications services tax would mean tough budget choices for commissioners. We dont get to print money like the federal government. Its either raise taxes or cut services, Resnick said. ResnickContinued from page 4

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6 The PelicanFriday, September 7, 2012 Deer eld Beach, Pompano Beach, Lighthouse Point, LauderdaleBy-The-Sea, Wilton Manors and Oakland ParkWilton Manors Oakland Park Hillsboro Beach The Pompano Pelican is published weekly on FridaysStreet Address: 1500-A E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, FL 33060 Telephone: 954-783-8700 Fax: 954-783-0093Letters to the Editor are encouraged and accepted for print if signed, although a writers name will be withheld on request; letters must also include a daytime telephone number. Advertising rates are available upon request. Subscription rate is $31.80 including tax for one years delivery in Greater Pompano Beach; $95.40/per year including tax for others in the United States; call 954-783-8700 for rates abroad. The Pelican is a nonpartisan newspaper and reserves the right to decline advertising. Copyright 2012. Reproduction of this publication in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission of the publisher. The Pelican is a member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, Deer eld Beach Chamber and the LBTS Chamber. The Pelican is a state certi ed woman-owned minority business. The Pelican is delivered to businesses, libraries, schools, of ces, hospitals, news racks and single family homes. All advertising and copy is published at the sole discretion of the publisher. We welcome your critiques and ideas concerning this publication. Anne Siren, publisherExecutive Assistant: Mary Hudson Graphics: Rachel Ramirez Windsheimer Bookkeeper: John White Classi eds: Fran Shelby Contributing Writers: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Judy Wilson, Malcolm McClintock, Judy Vik, Michael dOliveira Account Executives: Paul Shroads, Carolyn Mann, Bill Heaton, Bill Fox Special Of ce Assistant: Cathy Siren ESTABLISHED 1993 Volume XX, Issue 36 Founding Editor and PublisherAnne Hanby Siren The Pelican wants to know what you think. Send your thoughts on local, state and national issues to siren2415@gmail.com Send your letter to the editor siren2415@gmail.com OpinionNon-partisan League of Women Voters urges voters to nix all 11 state amendments on Nov. 6.As election season kicks into high gear following the political conventions, the League of Women Voters of Florida Education Fund is offering millions of state voters important, non-partisan information about the crucial decisions theyll be making on Election Day. 1. Amendment 1 Health Care Services This amendment would allow Florida to opt out of the Federal Health Care Act. The League opposes this amendment The League of Women Voters of Florida supports the implementation of the Federal Health Care Reform Law in Florida, emphasizing access for all and control of costs. 2. Amendment 2 Veterans Disabled Due to Combat Injury; Homestead Property Tax Discount This amendment expands the homestead exemption to disabled veterans who were not Florida residents when they entered military service. The League opposes this amendment. The League of Women Voters of Florida position is that there should be no increase or extension of homestead exemption. Also, our position states that no tax sources or revenues should be speci ed, limited, exempted, or prohibited in the Constitution. There are ve amendments on the ballot that address reductions in property taxes, including one for businesss tangible property If all ve were to pass [2,4,9, 10, 11], local governments would lose over $1 billion over the next three years. 3. State Government Revenue Limitation This amendment replaces the existing state revenue limitation based on Florida personal income growth with a new state revenue limitation based on in ation and population changes. The League opposes this amendment. The League of Women Voters of Florida believes that the state of Florida has an infrastructure de cit and that state service levels and the quality of life are declining. Because the long-term goals of the state comprehensive plan were designed to reverse decline in levels of service and improve the quality of life, members nd these goals are generally desirable and worth working toward. The LWVF has been speaking out against this amendment for several sessions of the legislature and during the 2008 Tax and Budget Reform Commission where the amendment was defeated. This legislation was passed in Colorado and has affected the states ability to fund health care services as well as education, where they have dropped drastically in national rankings. 4.Property Tax Limitation; Property Value Decline; Reduction for NonHomestead Assessment Increases; Delay of Scheduled Repeal This amendment would reduce the annual growth in assessment limitation on certain non-homestead property from 10 percent to 5 percent. It would prohibit increases in the assessed value of homestead property and certain nonhomestead property when market value of the property decreases. It also gives rst time homesteaders an additional exemption equal to 50 percent of the median just value on the property; this exemption diminishes to zero over a ve year period. The League opposes this amendment for the same reasons stated for opposing Amendment 2. 5. State Courts This amendment adds a requirement that A Supreme Court jusitice appointed by the Governor must also be con rmed by the Senate in order to take of ce. It also authorizes the repeal of a court rule by a simple majority of the legislature instead of the 2/3 majority now required. The amendment also would allow the House of Representatives to review all les of the Judicial Quali cation Commission without regard to whether the request is speci cally related to impeachment considerations. The League opposes this amendment. The League believes that the Governor should be able to appoint judges from a group of nominees selected by a panel or commission composed of members of the Bar and lay members and that judges should be retained in of ce by means of periodic review through an election in which a judge would run unopposed and solely on his/her record. 6. Prohibition on Public Funding of Abortions; Construction of Abortion Rights Federal law prohibits the expenditure of federal funds for most abortions; this amendment would enshrine those prohibitions in the state Constitution. There is another provision in the amendment that would stop the use of the privacy clause in abortion cases; courts would no longer be able to use the clause in defending abortion rights. The League opposes this amendment. We believe that public policy in a pluralistic society must af rm the constitutional right of privacy of the individual to make reproductive choices. 7. Religious Freedom This amendment would repeal a 126-year-old provision in the state Constitution that prohibits taxpayer funding of religious institutions. If passed, the amendment would allow the state to use state monies to fund religious institutions and schools. The League opposes this amendment. The League supports adequate funding of public education with no use of public funding for the expansion or funding of private education through a voucher program. We support a free public school system with high standards for student achievement and with equality of educational opportunity for all that is nanced adequately by the state through an equitable funding formula. 8. Homestead Property Tax Exemption for Surviving Spouse of Military Veteran or First Responder This amendment grants full homestead property tax relief to the surviving spouses of military veterans and rst responders killed in the line of duty. The deceased must have been a permanent resident of Florida as of January 1 of the year they died. The League opposes this amendment for the same reasons stated for opposing Amendment 2. 9. Tangible Personal Property Tax Exemption This amendment affects businesses only and pertains to equipment or furniture used in a business. Under current law, the rst $25,000 of tangible personal property is exempt from taxation; this amendment will raise that exemption to $50,000. Cities and counties will be able to grant additional exemptions. The League opposes this amendment for the same reasons stated for opposing Amendment 2. 10. Additional Homestead Exemption for Low-Income Seniors who Maintain Long-Term Residency on Property; Equal to Assessed Value This amendment grants full homestead property tax relief to low-income seniors who have lived in their home for at least 25 years. The League opposes this amendment for the same reasons stated for opposing Amendment 2. 11. Appointment of Student Body President to Board of Governors of the State University System The State University System is governed by a 17-member Board of Governors. Currently, the president of the Florida Student Association is a member of the board. This amendment would create a new council composed of student body presidents, and the chair of the council would replace the current FSA member on the Board of Governors. The League opposes this amendment. The League believes that the Constitution should be a simple, understandable and integrated statement of basic law, free from obsolete and statutory detail.LeagueContinued

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The Pelican 7 Friday, September 7, 2012 Deer eld Beach Daytime Radness, a watered-down version of Island Water Sports 30year Midnight Madness will be held this year Oct. 19 inside and outside the beachside retail store. Store owner Linsay Cottrell told commissioners Tuesday she expects 6,000 to 8,000 teenagers will come out during the day and asked that a portion of NE 2 St. be closed to traf c. Radness was held for years as a nighttime event until last year when the commission decided it presented too great a risk for its young attendees and refused to close the street. The event included a retail sale, skateboard demonstrations and live music and attracted huge crowds. Two years ago, Madness joined forces with a group of beach businesses to promote dining and drinking in the area and unruly crowds and underage drinking occurred. We got bad partners and we took the brunt of it, Cottrell told the commission. Madness becomes Radness: Its thumbs up for Island Water Sports eventWe have downsized the event. This is our 35th year in Deer eld. Anything you need, well do. The sale will be conducted 6 a.m. to 9 p.m.; entertainment and product demonstrations, 10 a.m. 7 p.m. Surfers for Autism and a Christian charity receive some of the proceeds. In urging the city to proceed with permitting the event, Mayor Peggy Noland called it a Deer eld tradition. City seeks to control donation bins Deer eld Beach An ordinance controlling the location of donation bins is in the works here. Commissioners have discussed allowing the bins only for organizations that are non pro t and may even limit use to the NE Focal Point, a city-sponsored care center, and the Salvation Army which has a store in the city. In addition, the bins will likely be con ned to large commercial properties and require permits and strict maintenance. The ordinance is a response to the donation bins being placed around town by for-pro t entities often without permission from property owners. Attorney says keep 4 a.m. alcohol sales Deer eld Beach Owners of a late-night bar are urging the city to reconsider sunsetting its 4 a.m. hour for the sale of alcohol. Attorney James Brady said the loss of those sales would be bad for business and urged the commission to take a long and hard look over the next 25 days at the provision. Brady said his clients would be willing to compromise on 4 a.m. drinking on Saturday and Sunday only. The current ordinance becomes obsolete on Sept. 30. The commission recently approved new laws allowing alcohol sales on Sunday morning beginning at 8 a.m. Mayor says turtle lights are keeping people in the dark Deer eld Beach Turtle lights, those low intensity beams that protect sea turtle hatchlings, may be good for the turtles, but they are not so good for people, Mayor Peggy Noland said this week. Its dangerous out there. You cant see anyone on the sand, you cant see your car from the sidewalk. The mayor was at the beach one night last week and in her words, The beach was packed. A lost boy prompted the mayor and her daughter Elizabeth to walk on the sand with a ash light until he was found, but Noland said without the light she could see nothing. The nine-year-old was reunited with his mother, but Noland said it was a scary situation. It dont know what we can do, but we have to have lighting over there. Last year, the city, aided by a $450,000 grant from the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, installed turtlefriendly lights along the beachwalk in answer to environmental concerns for the safety of the hatchlings.

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8 The PelicanFriday, September 7, 2012 Making a DifferencePhyllis J. Neuberger wants your suggestions about people who are making a difference. Call 954-7838700. Mike Clark is a two-time U.S.P.C.A. Police Dog National Champion with over 30 years of experience. He has trained hundreds of dogs in all areas such as patrol, narcotics, explosives, arson detection and search and rescue. Clark is recognized as one of the leading K-9 handlers and instructors in the United States. He has won top honors in Regional as well as National Competitions. Through his academies many K-9 handlers have gone on to become leading instructors in other agencies and have won numerous awards of their own. Clarks Patrol Dog Academy was featured in the video K-9 COP. Tomorrow, Sept. 8, pack up the kids and head to the Elks Club for the exciting Save a PetSave a Vet BazaarBy Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFBring the family to the Elks Club at 700 NE 10 St. in Pompano Beach, tomorrow Sept. 8 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. There will be fun for everyone with bargain shopping, food, pony rides, silent auctions and more. Its all about raising needed funds for the all volunteer Veterans Village and K-9 Companion Center. Started in 2009, by a group of professionals in mental health and employment training areas, the group focuses on housing and training in the pet industry. Mike from Save a PetSave a Vet program has taught approximately 25 to 30 vets to train pets for other disabled veterans and civil servants in need of therapy and service dogs. In addition this agency has created a housing counseling division manned by volunteer lawyers and paralegals who help vets with housing issues. Veterans Village is not an actual place. It is the name given to the nine clean, safe and sober housing locations in Deer eld Beach for homeless wounded warriors. By providing job training and home retention assistance programs this 501 (3) non pro t agency attempts to teach men and women marketable skills to help them transfer to independent living. No corporate of cer nor director earns money. It is an all volunteer organization. All trainees receive grant and training bonuses to teach reality based earning policies. Trainers are compensated on persons served in training and successful transition of trainees to independent lifestyles. Veterans Village & K-9 Companion Centers Inc. was one of the rst rescue animalservice dog training programs developed for service men and women. Today, programs inform the population served about new developments in housing retention to help Veterans remain in their homes. On the job training results in marketable skills. A web site has been established to provide unpublicized changes in housing laws to obtain HUD VASH and assistance in legal help to stop home loss. These programs are manned by veterans and others without marketable skills. Director Joe Lopez says, We look for dogs that would otherwise be euthanized. Mike decides if they are trainable. They do not need to be any special breed, but they must be big enough to support a disabled person if they are to be trained as mobility dogs. The Saturday Bazaar at the Elks Club, 700 E. 10 St. in Pompano Beach is the rst fundraiser for this worthy agency. Lopez says, We need to raise funds so that we can continue to train service men and women to train service animals under the strict ADA guidelines. We have two dogs in training now for hyper vigilance work. Many of our homeless vets cannot sleep and are very insecure. Any sound makes them jump, fearing they are being shot at. A trained animal on hand gives them a sense of security. All items sold at the Bazaar have been donated by individuals or businesses. Call 561-807-7177 or email tomr@vvk-9.orgThe small but dedicated directors of this volunteer agency are:Betty Mae SouterFreeman Ph.D.: Chief Executive Of cer Dr. Freeman is a Clinical and Forensic Psychologist. Dr. Freemans dissertation was on Animal Assisted Therapy. Dr. Freeman is considered an expert in competency and forensic psychology by the courts and has developed this animal assisted therapeutic program in hopes of assisting persons with disabilities to become more self suf cient. Mike Clark: Advisor and Senior Dog Trainer Mike Clark is a twotime U.S.P.C.A. Police Dog National Champion with over 30 years of experience. He has trained hundreds of dogs in all areas such as patrol, narcotics, explosives, arson detection and search and rescue. Mike is recognized as one of the leading K-9 handlers and instructors in the United States. He has won top honors in regional as well We look for dogs that would otherwise be euthanized. They do not need to be any special breed, but they must be big enough to support a disabled person if they are to be trained as mobility dogs.See VET PETS on page 18Save a PetSave a Vet participants in the program. Names omitted for privacy reasons. [Photos courtesy of Veterans Village & K-9 Companion Centers, Inc.]

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The Pelican 9 Friday, September 7, 2012 get ensnared, no doubt, Vice Mayor Bill Ganz said. Preston offered several examples of coaching volunteers who have been dropped from city programs because of youthful crimes. One man, who committed felonies and served time as a youth, has completely redeemed himself and now participates in the Prison Ministry and leads the Boys Brigade Program at the Cathedral Church of God. He began coaching in 2005 and when his felonies were uncovered in the newlyrequired level 2 background check, went through a process at the state to prove himself worthy. That resulted in a ruling from the Department of Children and Families that he was t to work with children and the elderly, Preston said, but because of Deer elds policy he is still banned from coaching. This is wrong, Preston said. He needs to be on the eld working with kids. Another case Preston discussed involved a vehicular homicide that occurred 20 years ago. The person driving that car has since led an arrest-free life. We need relief for people who have paid the price, satis ed their obligations, corrected their lives, Preston said. Level 2 background checks research FBI records internationally to discover sexual predator or sex offender convictions as well as felonies involving violence. The same applies to those with records of violent misdemeanors or repeated drug and alcohol convictions. No one in this situation is allowed to coach in youth leagues either sponsored by the city or using city facilities. The background check must be done once a year. When the level 2 rule was approved by the commission in May 2011, organizers of the youth sports programs protested the cost of the inquiries whic were about $50 per person. Last year, the city contributed $2,500 toward those expenses. Parks and Recreation Director Walt Bratton said, in his experience, level 2 checks are generally required by governmental entities. They are recommended by the National Recreation and Park Association. Both Mayor Peggy Noland and Vice Mayor Ganz were adamantly against changing the current policy. Ganz said in earlier days volunteers were accepted on someones word alone, a policy that resulted in persons with serious criminal records from second degree murder to robbery with a deadly weapon being allowed to coach. As to any appeal process, Ganz said, We might make good judgments, but others who follow us may not. I am completely against changing it. Noland said she absolutely had no faith in the Department of Children and Families, adding Our goal is to protect the children. Persisted Preston, Why not some leeway to use people who want to point kids in the right direction? Some mistakes carry long, long after effects, Ganz replied. And I dont want to be judge and jury. The commissions decision to toughen an existing ordinance which required only level 1 checks, using only a state data base, came after a county employee at Quiet Waters Park was accused of molesting a young girl.Criminal historyContinued from page 1 100 W. Atlantic Blvd.. According to Budget Director Brian Donovan, city of cials thought expenses would grow by roughly three percent next year. The difference, he said, can be blamed on the Broward Sheriffs Of ce raising the price of police service by $1.6 million, an increase of about four percent. Pompano of cials had thought it would be within the three percent number. Water and sewer saw slight increases [in cost], Donovan said. But the biggest driver of the budget is public safety its not a cheap service. The budget proposal calls for an increase in the millage rate from 5.2027 mills per $1,000 to 5.4700 mills per $1,000. Residential re service assessments will increase by $11 in order to replace a re station in Cresthaven, Donovan said. The old re station was converted from a civic center when the area was annexed to Pompano Beach more than a decade ago. City Commissioner Barry Dockswell voted against the last two city annual budgets because they included what he considered to be unnecessary increases. Dockswell plans to vote against this one too. Wed be doing a better job for our constituents if we managed to keep services high and not raise the millage rate at the same time, Dockswell said. BudgetContinued from page 1

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10 The PelicanFriday, September 7, 2012 WORSHIP DIRECTORY: Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad. Rev. Hyvenson Joseph commercial customers. Im not comfortable with moving forward with the information weve been given recently and the impact on single-family homes, Mayor Roseann Minnet said. Were a small community. I recommend a review to see how much water is being used by commercial customers so single-family residents dont get hit for all of this. Vice Mayor Scot Sasser agreed. We need more work and more analysis done. I dont feel this is fully baked. Tony Bryan, nance director, explained that the proposed commercial rates were developed using American Water Works Association, or AWWA, tables. We will go back and take a look at different commercial customers and develop tables based on actual use, Bryan said. He said each property or each class of property (such as large hotels) could be looked at, so that more accurate gures are developed. Bryan said two properties could have very different water usage and would be charged the same base facility charge based on meter size. Additional work needs to be done to gather the data to really apportion base charges to commercial customers in accordance with their use, Bryan said. Because the town is as small as it is, it can be done. Commissioner Stuart Dodd asked the towns consultant, Mike Burton, to weigh in. He came up with the proposed rates approved at rst reading in late June. Are we trying to ne tune this too far? Dodd asked. Burton said the AWWA tables usually are used as a default when more accurate data isnt available. When you get more granular data, theres usually more demand assigned to the commercial class than what the meter equivalency table dictates. Burton said the use of the AWWA tables shifted more cost to the residential classes. The analysis will provide a more fair depiction of the demands of commercial customers he said. Dodd said he also favored delaying the vote. Last time when we had a professional review, we ended up with a proposed methodology that increased single-family rates considerably, said Commissioner Mark Brown. We have no assurance that we wont have higher rates for commercial (with the new method.) Were gambling and trying to cover ourselves. Commissioners unanimously agreed to hire Burton & Associates for no more than $5,000 to obtain the additional data. Burton said that will involve looking at the commercial customers average usage in the maximum three months. The number of units assigned to commercial customers will be based on what the demand has been for that customer instead of meter size. SewersContinued from page 1

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The Pelican 11 Friday, September 7, 2012 According to police, the cameras have led to a 220 percent increase in the number of stolen vehicles recovered in 2010 and an increase of 180 percent in the number of stolen vehicles recovered in 2011. The cameras also recently led to the city being awarded the International Motorola Webber Seavey Award for Quality in Law Enforcement, presented by the International Association of Chiefs of Police, or IACP. The IACP selects police departments worldwide and recognizes those that promote excellent standards in law enforcement that contribute to a better quality of life in the communities they serve. Police Chief Ross Licata and Commander Mike Oh will attend the IACP conference in San Diego on Oct. 1 to accept the award. Were only the sixth police agency in the State of Florida to ever receive this award, said Licata. Were understandably quite proud that weve been recognized. The Transient Offender Interdiction Program began in 2010 when the city installed 26 cameras that monitor the license plates of vehicles that come into Lighthouse Point. When a car enters the city its license plate is checked against Florida records; police use the information to look for stolen cars or if the driver is wanted for another crime. Its proven to be quite successful in the clearance of a number of cases that otherwise would not have been solved, said Licata. Were going to be adding 18 additional cameras in other strategic locations before the end of this year. The initial expenditure for the cameras was $260,000 with the new ones expected to cost $140,000. All of it was taken out of the police forfeiture budget, which is funded by the money and property police con scate from convicted criminals. I couldnt think of a better use of the money, said Licata. Licata said the cameras have also led to solving a number of other crimes. One crime involved a property owner who claimed to be in Miami when his building was set on re. Cameras revealed the he lied to police and was driving around the scene at the time of the arson. I probably have another 30 or 40 stories like that, said Licata. Mayor Fred Schorr and Commissioner Glenn Troast see the cameras as another weapon for law enforcement. Its a means to an end. Another tool we can use to protect the residents, said Schorr. I think it goes to show the quality and creativity of our police chief and the law enforcement of cers that work with him. Its one of the more creative solutions that are out there in this day and age, said Troast. Licata credits the commission with pushing the program forward. They had the vision to think outside the box and to overcome some of the fears that are attributed to this kind of technology, he said. But not everyone is a fan of the cameras. The American Civil Liberties Union of Florida is seeking more information on how police track and record the movements of cars and individuals using the cameras. Automatic license plate readers provide the technology that can pose a threat to Americans privacy, secretly monitoring and collecting the movements of every motorist who encounters the system, said Howard Simon, executive director of the ACLU of Florida, in a press release. We want to make sure that there are local ordinances or police protocols that govern how the police will be cataloging and using the information the readers collect since much of it can be sensitive and personal to each of us. Licata defended the use of the cameras. I think we took great precaution to ensure we werent using data for any other reason. Despite the results, of cials said theres no replacement for residents who are aware of whats going on in their neighborhoods. If they see something they need to say something. Nobody knows their neighborhood better than the residents do, said Schorr. The cameras are great . but we still need to be proactive. To reach Lighthouse Point dispatch, call 954-942-8080.CamerasContinued from page 1 Nesting in a tree, this camera is on guard in Lighthouse Point.

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12 The PelicanFriday, September 7, 2012 Business matters The Pelican takes a look at local business owners. You can tell your story here because business matters. 954-783-8700.By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFThe Pelican loves business people with heart and real estate sales associates Terri and Dave Rittenhouse certainly qualify. Terri says, We were mesmerized when we saw a brief feature about oceangoing wheelchairs on the weather channel. A disabled woman got strapped into the vehicle and she was wheeled right into the ocean by her mobile husband. She laughed with joy as the waves splashed over her, and we were so touched. Dave said, We need these vehicles right here on our beach. Lets investigate. When they decided it would be great to offer disabled veterans, children and adults free access to SEA LEGS, they had no idea of what they were getting into. They didnt realize how much of their money and time it would take to launch Broward Sea Legs Charity Drive. However, as they are divers, swimmers, and ex boat owners who love the ocean, they remained motivated to make it happen, despite long hours and costs. Dave did a little research and explains. We found out that SEA LEGS chairs are made in France by Mobi Chair but there is a Florida distributor on the West coast. We agreed that we needed to buy one so that we could demonstrate its value and raise enough money to buy 10 for our own ocean front. Our immediate goal was to provide four chairs to Pompano Beach, four to Deer eld Beach and two for Lauderdale-By-The-Sea. The couple also found out that these beach and water wheelchairs are already available all along the California coast beach areas and in certain areas of Florida as well. We wanted Pompano Beach to be as accommodating to the disabled as other areas in our state and country, Dave said. A SEA LEGS chair retails for $2,300, but the price per chair is reduced with volume purchase. The chairs have three rubber tires, a very sturdy aluminum frame with a safety harness to secure the water bound passenger SEA LEGS ocean-going wheelchairs give landlocked disabled people the chance to splash in the ocean like other folks who must be accompanied by a mobile adult. The Rittenhouses received their chair the end of July and had their preview showing at the recent BSO Night Out at Pompano Beach City Hall. Our rst donation came from a lady who hates the ocean, Dave chuckles. However, when she realized what pleasure a SEA LEGS wheel chair could have given her now deceased disabled mother, she made a contribution. He continues. Mayor Lamar Fisher fell in love with the idea of providing these chairs free to the disabled at our beach and he hopes we will be successful in getting the donated funds we need. Terri aims to have four chairs ready and available free of charge when the remodeled beach area is of cially opened. The husband wife team claim of cials contacted have all been enthusiastic about the possibility of seeing this population nally get to enjoy the ocean instead of just looking at it. Broward SEA LEGS. org Charity Drive, will eventually become a 501c 3 nonpro t association. Unity in the Community is a cosponsor. Marlene Groninger, commander of the Disabled American Veterans Auxiliary, hopes the DAV will also become a co-sponsor. She will bring the idea to a vote as soon as the full membership is on hand to appreciate what SEA LEGS can do for the members. To get the needed funds, the Rittenhouse team is donating the cost of ads to hype their charity drive. They are prepared to do their show and tell presentation to service clubs, and any organization, or group that invites them. They will show up, with their SEA LEGS wheel chair and a video demonstration. They currently have invitations to speak to the Pompano Beach Moose Lodge 2157, the American Legion Sterling McClellan Post 142 and the Pompano Beach Elks Lodge 1898. Were putting in at least 40-hour weeks to get this charity off the ground, plus the ads, the chair itself and other necessary costs., Terri says with a grin. We bit off a much more demanding project than we realized, but were still thrilled to do something that can make a real difference to those who yearn to get into the ocean but havent been able to safely do so. Every dime donated goes into the cost of the chairs. There is no overhead. Were accepting donations, small and large. Terri and Dave Rittenhouse are sales associates with By The Sea Realty, 223 Commercial Blvd. in Lauderdale-By-The-Sea. Dave is also the owner of Lighthouse Car Wash at 1040 E. Sample Road. To donate or to schedule a demonstration call Diane at 954-351-7007 or e-mail: info@Lighthousecarwash. net. Visit the new web site at: Browardsealegs.orgWhen they decided it would be great to offer disabled veterans, children and adults free access to SEA LEGS, they had no idea of what they were getting into. Jerry Groninger, Scott Worobey, Robert Nichols and Jeff Munsell check out Sea Legs, the ocean-going vehicle for persons with physical handicaps. Terri Rittenhouse [right] introduces Deer eld Beach Mayor Peggy Noland and Ron Boehl to Sea Legs, the water-ready wheel chair.

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The Pelican 13 Friday, September 7, 2012 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFLauderdale-By-The-Sea The town has $150,000 in the new scal year for a program that will encourage owners of small hotels to improve their properties. Applicants can receive up to $25,000 in matching funds for expenditures by hotel/motel owners. The improvements must be visible from the street LBTS will help nance exterior upgrades for small lodgingsor the beach. The program is limited to properties that are designated as Superior Small Lodging properties or properties that have applied to and ultimately receive that designation. Applicants must be members of the Superior Small Lodging Association, or SSL, and undergo a property review. Connie Hoffmann, town manager, said that requirement was added because we didnt want the town to be giving money to a hotel that had a reputation for poor customer service and shoddy rooms. We didnt want to support a hotel that wasnt going to bring itself up to a certain standard of operation and service. Eligible for the grants are commercial, licensed transient-lodging properties, excluding vacation rentals, with 50 rooms or less. Grants less than $15,000 can be approved administratively. Those for higher amounts, go to the town commission for approval. Grants are paid on a reimbursement basis, contingent on the applicants successful completion of the project and meeting requirements of the agreement. Bi-monthly reports must be submitted. Funds can be used for replacing signs, painting, landscaping, lighting or removing elements which cover original architectural details and design. Priority will be given to projects with signi cant elements of mid-century modern architecture, sometimes referred to as Miami Modern or MIMO, a form of architecture that is prevalent here. Also eligible are repairs or replacement of the structures roof and replacement of awnings, overhangs, doors and windows if visible from the public right of way. Applicants must get estimates from three licensed contractors. Projects must be completed in six months. Two applications are currently under review. Grants will be awarded on a rst come, rst served basis. Permitting, processing and impact fees will not be eligible for reimbursement. Application forms and guidelines are available on the towns website at www.lbts gov or at the Development Services Department.SightingsSightings is a calendar for Northeast Broward county. Send you event information to mdpelican@yahoo.com 9-8 Shred-A-Thon and prescription drug take back from 9 a.m. to noon at Lowes, 1851 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. Hosted by the Broward Sheriffs Of ce. Limit ve boxes per car. Those who bring prescriptions will receive a $5 Publix gift card. Limit one per family. 954831-8902 or 954-321-4100. 9-8 Fundraiser for Wilton Manors Kiwanis Clubs annual Kids Day event from 6 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Over Easy Caf, 318. E. Oakland Park Blvd., Wilton Manors. Over East will donate the money from any beverages purchased during breakfast or lunch to Kids Day. 954-5607813. 9-9 American Legion Post #142 and Auxiliary Unit, 171 SW 2 St., Pompano Beach, is having a blood drive from 11 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Free hot dogs or hamburgers for donors. 954-942-2448. 9-9 Pancake breakfast hosted by the Benevolent Patriotic Order of DOES See SIGHTINGS page 19

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14 The PelicanFriday, September 7, 2012 While you are enjoying Music Under The Stars on the beach, watching the brilliant fireworks fill the sky with colorbursts on the Fourth of July, or waving to Santa in the Yuletide Parade, have you ever wondered what or who makes it all possible? Up until this year, the answer would have been the citys parks and recreation department, and while its still most of the same people, this year they work under a new name: Pompano Beach Parks, Recreation and Cultural Arts Department This department is responsible for 52 parks including city golf courses, tennis centers, aquatic centers, recreational facilities, beach, fishing pier and passive parks. The department has an annual budget of 11.2 million dollars, a portion of which comes back in fees. This department has 64 full time employees and 80 to 120 part time employees, depending upon the season. Under the direction of City Manager, Dennis Beach, the department is headed up by Mark Beaudreau, Recreation Programs Administrator. Anne Hollady is the administrative assistant. Three Recreation Managers, eight recreation supervisors and two Lieutenant lifeguards complete the top echelon. Established in the 50s, the department had its first spurt of growth under Director Tom Need to stay healthy, play ball, walk the dog, add culture to your life? Pompano Beach Parks, Recreation and Cultural Arts Department has answersBig Bird shows up for Yuletide. Young pianists compete annually at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center. Miller. Much of the Park and Recreation Departments land originally belonged to the FAA., or Federal Aviation Administration. It was transferred to the city in 1948 for public use. Anne Hollady, on deck for 27 years, has seen remarkable growth in the number of parks. She says, When we annexed Cresthaven and the Highlands, we added new parks. The city has purchased land adding George Brummer Park, Hunters Manor Park and Avondale Park. Ive had a number of jobs. One of my favorites is chairing the committee for Yuletide Parade and Celebration. Its a lot of work but it all seems worthwhile when I see the happiness on the faces of people and children. Hollady adds, We offer many programs at different locations. The managers and supervisors are open to suggestions from the people who patronize their centers. While the activities within the city are numerous and varied, every year additions are made. Community Park renovations were completed in early 2012 and the department hosted a Community Park Grand Opening on March 23, 2012. The Pines Golf Course is under construction and will reopen in November 2012 and will have the world-famous Greg Norman signature and become an attraction for major tournaments. Canine Corner, the citys new dog park is filled up daily with owners giving their dogs a leash-free romp in the park. The two aquatic centers draw competitions to the city, and children have opportunities to work on their swimming skills. A junior lifeguard program has earned a stellar reputation nationally. Beaudreau informed us. This year the department processed over 110 public event applications. Applications require numerous checks for safety and security by various city departments. such as public works, police, fire, risk management and more. Most events happen so smoothly, few realize what it takes to make them happen. Pulling an event together is exciting and stressful, but these staffers operate on the saying, There are no problems, just solutions. But even with all of these staff workers, volunteers join in to assist with specific events. This staff relies on volunteer committees for Yuletide, the Annual Piano Competition and the July 4th Celebration. To help offset some of the costs of these big events, staff solicit donations and sponsorships. The donations and sponsorships allow community members and local businesses to partner with the city. The Pompano Beach Amphitheater is one of the entertainment jewels in the city. The outdoor venue has a seating capacity of 3,000 offering a large, yet intimate setting for memorable evenings under the stars. Seven major city events on the annual calendar are Yuletide Celebration, Music Under The Stars Free Concert Series, 4th of July celebration, Children in the Arts Piano Competition and Fundraiser, Nautical Flea Market, Spring Fling and the popular Halloween Fun Fair. The city also co-sponsors various events such as the MLK Parade, March and Celebration, Run Like A Bunny 5 K, Saltwater Shootout, Annual Derby Day Horse Show and Fair, Annual Halloween Horse Show, Annual Pompano Beach Seafood Festival and Pompano Beach Fishing Rodeo. The department hosts various trade shows at the community centers such as the Intergalactic Bead and Jewelry Show, Shell Show, Tropical Postcard Show, Orchid Show, Health Fairs and Depression Glass Show.Fourth of July Beach Bash Nautical Flea Market at Community Park Fun Times at Summer CampPompano Beach Parks, Recreation and Cultural Arts 954-786-4111Summer Camp Olympic Day Activities

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The Pelican 15 Friday, September 7, 2012 Lighthouse tours open to public Sept. 8Hillsboro Beach A tour of the Hillsboro Lighthouse will be offered Saturday, Sept. 8 To participate, meet Hillsboro Lighthouse Preservation Society members at the Sands Harbor Marina, 125 N. Riverside Drive, Pompano Beach, beginning at 8:45 a.m. The rst boat launches at 9 a.m. and the last boat leaves at 2:30 p.m. The tour is free for Hillsboro Lighthouse Preservation Society members and $15 for non-members. Membership is available at the dock. United States Coast Guard regulations require visitors must have at shoes with rubber soles and closed toes in order to make the lighthouse climb. Children must be accompanied by an adult and must be a minimum of four feet tall to climb the tower. No pets are allowed. The Hillsboro Lighthouse Museum and Visitors Center will be open from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. The museum is located at Hillsboro Inlet Park, 2700 N. Ocean Blvd., Pompano Beach. Admission to the lighthouse Museum and Visitors Center is free. The remaining lighthouse tour dates for 2012 are Oct. 13 and Nov. 17. The light beam from the Hillsboro Lighthouse can be seen 28 nautical miles out to sea, making it the most powerful lighthouse beam in the world. For more, visit www. hillsborolighthouse.org or call 954-942-2102. A Pompano Beach toddler slipped unnoticed under the surface of a backyard swimming pool Saturday afternoon as his family members sat nearby. By the time someone noticed 23month-old Johnny Davoer at the bottom of the pool, it was too late to save him. At 5:53 p.m., Broward Sheriffs Of ce, or BSO, deputies and Tamarac Fire Rescue were called to 7904 NW 71 Ave. in Tamarac. The rst-arriving deputy performed cardio-pulmonary resuscitation on the toddler, to no avail. Tamarac Fire Rescue arrived and transported him to Coral Springs Medical Center, where he was pronounced dead a short time later. Family members told BSO detectives that they were visiting the Tamarac home to hang out at the pool. Johnny Davoer was playing in the shallow end as his mother and niece sat in chairs feet away from him. His mother had repeatedly cautioned him not to go in the deep end. When another family member came out of the house and asked where Johnny was, they found him underwater, jumped in and pulled him out. Its unclear how long he was under water. The number one cause of death for children ages 1 to 4 in Broward County is drowning. For information on how to prevent child drownings, visit www.sheriff. org/safety/drowningprevent or call BSO at 954-831-8210. Toddler drowns in pool during family visit SightingsSightings is a calendar for Northeast Broward county. Send you event information to mdpelican@yahoo.com

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16 The PelicanFriday, September 7, 2012 Cut it off for a WishPompano Beach Shear Excitement Salon, 2101 N. Federal Hwy. in the Citi Centre mall, will be hosting a fundraising event Sunday, Oct. 7 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The staff will offer haircuts for the entire family and donate 100 percent of the proceeds to bene t Make-A-Wish Southern Florida. For more information, call 954-782-0077.By Bill Johnson STAFF WRITERPompano Beach Plastic pails turned upside down serve as makeshift drums for students learning music in a program operating on a shoestring. Instruments are begged, borrowed or donated, And there arent many. In early August, the rst purchase was made a new trumpet. The program is the brainchild of Ethel RobinsonBurns who has a long history as a band booster at Blanche Ely High School and believes music helps kids in many ways. She became concerned when some elementary and middle schools in the city dropped music to save money, so she decided to start an Pompano Beach woman creates after-school and summer music program to ll a voidafter-school music program. The idea was simple. Starting it was not. She learned how to incorporate her business as a non-pro t organization before holding the rst class at an open house at the library in Collier City last December. When school got out for the summer, Robinson-Burns launched the summer music camp where students spent Monday through Thursday from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. On a full day, she says, 16 to 20 students attended. She calls the program Motivated United Sound Impacting Communities (M.U.S.I.C.). For the summer, she found a temporary home at the United Pentecostal First Born Church on NW 7th Street. She began raising money with bake sales and garage sales. The little money weve raised, weve put back into the program, RobinsonBurns says. We have to buy books, drumsticks and paper. But the summer camp has held on since June, thanks to volunteers, donated space, and a couple of teachers who teach for a very small stipend. One of them, Jordan Rochester of North Lauderdale, is a graduate of Florida State University, who also played drums in the celebrated Marching 100 at FAMU. He agreed to teach because he wants to keep a tradition going. He has high praise for his former music teacher at Blanche Ely High School, Richard Beckford. I came up under Mr. Beckford, Rochester says. Watching how he taught students from zero is something I wanted to do. Music is good for the You have little league baseball. You have cheerleaders. But you never hear of a little league band.Burns See DRUM LINE on page 21

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The Pelican 17 Friday, September 7, 2012

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18 The Pelican Friday, September 7, 2012 national competitions. Through his academies many K-9 handlers have gone on to become leading instructors in other agencies and have won numerous awards of their own. Michaels Patrol Dog Academy was featured in the video K-9 COP. Roy I. Schwartz: Financial Advisor to The Board Schwartz recently retired from 15 years as a volunteer service member and of cer of the board of trustees of the House of Hope, the premier level 2 addiction recovery rehabilitation treatment center in Broward County, Florida. He has been in the practice of public accounting as a Certied Public Accountant. He has operated numerous sober living programs in South Florida directed at the veteran and mental health population. Joe Lopez: Director Joe Lopez has suffered from multiple disabilities since birth. His mother, an Immigration and Naturalization Of cer was very active in airport operations. Mrs. Lopez often took Joe to work where he had his rst exposure to drug dogs. He became and still is fascinated by them. After his mothers death, Joe became a member of the board carrying on the family tradition of service.Vet PetContinued from page 8 meals can stop after a big storm rolls through town. So its important to be ready to keep the grill going in case the electricity fails and propane is all there is to cook up the contents of a dethawing freezer. Providing for grills of all types, Forever Propane sells propane tanks from the smallest one-pounders to the big containers on the sides of houses and businesses. Instead of throwing those propane bottles away when youre done with them, we provide re llable ones, said Monika Rosado, Chris sister and manager at Forever Propane. And theres no tank too small to be delivered. For bigger 20-pound propane tanks, Forever Propane offers re lls and replacements. For storm preparation, Forever Propane recommends two 20-pound tanks. Its always good to have that spare tank, but it all depends on how much cooking you do, said Monika Rosado. Customers at Forever Propane dont have to leave home for propane supplies. Well come out and disconnect your empty tanks and reconnect your full tank onto your grill, said Chris Rosado. His customers dont even have to be home. They can leave a check at the house or pay by credit card over the phone. And theres no charge for delivery, tank disposal or administrative fees. Were about taking care of the customer, he said. The company even offers grill-cleaning services. Forever Propane sells everything needed to keep the grill res burning before and after a storm from hoses and parts to repair and cleaning services. The whole life of the grill, from sale to xing, repairing and replacing can be handled by Forever Propane. With us, we get you a topoftheline grill at the best price possible price. And were a full service company that can help you maintain it. Anything you need, said Monika Rosado. And everybodys treated like family. With his two other companies, Forever Cutten Landscaping & Lawn Service and Forever Hauling & Bobcat Services, Chris Rosado can also help with clean up yard waste or debris before or after a storm. Were pretty much a onestop shop. I still have loyal customers that only want me to do their landscaping, said Rosado. Forever Propane is also located in Boca Raton and Hollywood. For more information, visit www.foreverpropane.com or call 954-566-3074.Propane safety tipsDont store propane tanks in your car longer than the trip from the store to your home Store propane tanks in a cool, well-ventilated area. Maintain your tank, keeping it free of rust or corrosion. Recertify your tank every 12 years. Propane leaks smell like rotten eggs. If you smell a leak, evacuate the premises and call the re department. Never use a grill inside your home. Close the propane tank cylinder valve when not in use. Do not smoke near a propane tank. PropaneContinued from page 1

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The Pelican 19 Friday, September 7, 2012 SightingsContinued from page 13 Drove 142 at the Elks lodge, 700 NE 10 St., Pompano Beach, from 9 a.m. to noon. Cost is $5 for adults and $2.50 for children. 954-587-1121. 9-10 The Business Resource Center, 50 NE 1 St., Pompano Beach, hosts Its Not Just Business, Its Personal, a business networking open house from 5:30 to 7 p.m. 954-586-1111. 9-10 A Dale Carnegie training program will be held starting at 6 p.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. The free session will be about How to make a great rst impression and networking best practices. 954-390-2130. 9-10 Artist Jennifer Andrews will discuss new public art work at 7 p.m. at Pompano Beach Commission Chambers, 100 W. Atlantic Boulevard. Visit www. Andrewslefevre.com or call 954-357-7236. 9-11 A class on hip pain will be held at Broward Health North Hospital, 201 E Sample Road, Deer eld Beach, from 6 to 7 p.m. 954759-7400. 9-11 Behavioral Health Family Support Group meets from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. at Broward Health Imperial Point Hospital, 6401 N Federal Hwy., Fort Lauderdale. Group is for people with family members dealing with mental illness. 954-739-1888. 9-11 Wilton Manors City Commission meeting at 7 p.m. at city hall, 2020 Wilton Drive. 9-11 Pompano Beach City Commission meeting at 7 p.m. at city hall, 100 W. Atlantic Blvd. 9-11 Lighthouse Point City Commission meeting at 7:30 p.m. at city hall, 2200 N.E. 38 St. 9-11 Lauderdale-ByThe-Sea Town Commission meeting at 7 p.m. at Jarvis Hall, 4501 Ocean Drive. 9-12 Lauderdale-ByThe-Sea Chamber of Commerce business networking event from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at Chart House Restaurant, at 3000 NE 32 Ave., Fort Lauderdale. Reduced drink prices and free nger foods included in the $5 cover charge. 954561-4800. 9-12 The Greater Pompano Chamber Business Expo will be held from 5 to 8 p.m. at Citi Centre, the corner of Copans Road and Federal Highway, on the second oor between Lowes and Sears. Over a hundred local and See SIGHTINGS page 22

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20 The Pelican Friday, September 7, 2012 Pompano Beach A groundbreaking ceremony for the new Marriott, 1208 N. Ocean Blvd., was held last month. The planned hotel will have 219 rooms, 11,000 sq. ft. of meeting space and 6,000 sq. ft. of oceanfront function areas. Additionally, the resort will have a rooftop terrace, multiple pools, ocean views and a private beach. The hotel is slated to open by summer of 2013. Kevin Urgo, principle of Urgo Hotels, estimates the hotel will add over 150 new jobs. Hopefully, we can add something to this community, he said.Pompano of cials, developers break ground on new Marriott [Above] City and county of cials along with developers put their shovels in the sand for the ceremonial groundbreaking. Pictured are: City Commissioner Barry Dockswell, Kevin Urgo, principle Urgo Hotels; Jeff Bruce, project manager Urgo Hotels, Matt Jalazo, director of development Urgo Hotels, Mayor Lamar Fischer, Broward County Commissioner Chip LaMarca, Vice Mayor George Brummer and City Commissioner Rex Hardin. [Left] A rendering of the new hotel. [Photos courtesy of Urgo Hotels] Executives from Marriott and Urgo Hotels, the company building the new hotel, gather next to the hotels renderings.Brick fundraiser for Childrens Art ProjectWilton Manors The Wilton Manors Development Alliance is selling bricks to help raise money for its Childrens Art Project. The goal of the Childrens Art Project is to create a mini plaza within the southern tip of Jaycee Park, located on Wilton Drive across from city hall. Each brick purchased can be inscribed and will be laid in the plaza. The cost is $100 for a 4 x 8 brick and $175 for an 8 x 8 brick. Messages are limited to three lines, 18 characters each line, for the 4 x 8 bricks and six lines, 18 characters each line, for the 8 x 8 bricks. To order a brick, call 954-401-2182.

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The Pelican 21 Friday, September 7, 2012 The Pelican 954-783-8700 brain, and its interesting to see how the students progress. The other instructor, Kito Brent-Harris of Boca Raton, is another product of the Blanche Ely High School music program. A third year sociology student at Florida Atlantic University, he joined the program to teach piano theory and drums. Weve organized in two parts, he says. In the rst part, we teach them to read drum music. In the second, we teach them for a recital. The recital, which ended the summer camp, took place Aug. 7 when each student played a song on the keyboard. Everyone should start on the keyboard before progressing to another instrument, Robinson-Burns says. Among the volunteers who kept the summer program going is Deanna Robinson, a student at the University of Central Florida, who plans to be a doctor. She was there every day doing everything, -making posters and xing lunches.for She helped simply because shes interested in kids. The church pastor, James Robinson, a nephew of Ethel Robinson-Burns, is equally enthusiastic about helping kids learn through music. You never know what can spark their learning, he says. If you can get their con dence up, it helps them believe in themselves. He considers the program to be a valuable outlet for children in the summer. And how about the children? My grandma told me about it, and I love music, says 12-year-old Alexander Williams. Hes interested in drums but doesnt have one, so he practices on the oor at home. Ten-year-old Tequila Youte is interested in drums and piano and has no music program in her school. She explains that shes learning to read drum music, the symbols for singles, doubles, triplets and paradiddles. She summed up the music camp simply as fun. As summer ends, Robinson-Burns will look for two locations for the after-school program during the school year. She realizes that some youngsters cant travel much distance, so she plans to nd two places at opposite ends of the city. Shell also look for more new and used instruments, equipment and volunteers to keep the lessons going. She is determined to do that. Whatever I can do for my babies, I will do, she says. Her ultimate goal is to start a kind of little league band. You have little league baseball. You have cheerleaders. But you never hear of a little league band. To donate an instrument, volunteer, or support the program in some way, you can contact M.U.S.I.C. at 854 856-3496 or through the web site: www.Music4thearts.org. DRUM LINE -Instructors Kito Brent-Harris (2nd from left) and Jordan Rochester (3rd from left) teach drum riffs at M.U.S.I.C. Summer Camp. [Staff photo]Drum lineContinued from page 16

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22 The Pelican Friday, September 7, 2012 Pompano Beach Chamber ExpoPompano Beach The Greater Pompano Chamber of Commerces Business Expo will be held Sept. 12 from 5 to 8 p.m. at Citi Centre, the corner of Copans Road and Federal Highway, on the second oor between Lowes and Sears. Over a hundred local and regional businesses will be showcased during the event. Attendance to the event is open to all local businesses and the public and costs just $10 per person. Buy your ticket in advance and get two tickets for $15. The Expo includes nger foods and refreshments and attendees have a chance to win over 75 door prizes throughout the event by networking with the exhibitors. For more information, visit www.PompanoBeachChamber.com, email lspinelli@ pompanobeachchamber.com or call 954-941-2940.Kids DayWilton Manors Every year the Kiwanis Club of Wilton Manors holds Kids Day, a free day of food, fun and games for elementary school students. This years event will be held at Wilton Manors Elementary School, 2401 NE 3 Ave., on Saturday, Sept. 22 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. For more information, call 954-560-7813. Adult tennis clinicsWilton Manors Adult tennis clinics are offered Monday through Saturday at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Advanced clinic is Monday from 6 to 7 p.m., Beginners and Intermediate is Tuesday from 6 to 7 p.m., Intermediate is Wednesday from 6 to 7 p.m., Round Robin is Thursday from 9 to 11 a.m., Intermediate is Friday from 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. and private lessons are Saturday from 9 a.m. to noon. Junior Tennis Clinics on Tuesday and Thursday from 4:30 to 6 p.m. Lessons and clinics are given by USPTA tennis pro Donna Kocya. Call to make an appointment for private lessons. For more, call 954-554-1050.Send your Sightings and other news to mdpelican@ yahoo.comSightingsContinued from page 19regional businesses will be showcased during the event. Cost is $10 per ticket or two for $15. 954-941-2940. 9-13 Better Business Network Enterprise Group meets at 7:30 a.m. at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. Sponsored by the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce. 954-933-1558 9-13 Wilton Manors will hold its rst budget meeting at 7 p.m. at city hall, 2020 Wilton Drive. Commissioners will vote on the budget, re assessment rates and the millage rate. To view the budget, visit www.wiltonmanors.com or call 954-390-2100. 9-14 Celebrate National Sewing Month with the Pompano Chapter of the American Sewing Guild. Hand sewing techniques will be demonstrated from 10:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at the North Regional/Broward College Library, 1100 Coconut Creek Blvd., Coconut Creek. 954201-2600. 9-15 Pony rides from 8 to 11:30 a.m. at Sand & Spurs Equestrian Park, 1600 NE 5 Ave., Pompano Beach. Just north of the Goodyear Blimp Base. Free Admission. Cost is $3 per ride. 954.786.4507. 9-15 Recovery Awareness Night to bene t Vision of Change, an organization that raises money to help fund projects that bene t the children of Los Quinchos, Nicaragua and their efforts to recover from substance abuse and addiction. Event starts at 6 p.m. at Signature Memories Event Center, 299 N. Federal See SIGHTINGS page 29

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The Pelican 23 Friday, September 7, 2012 Temple Sholom marks Rosh Hashanah Pompano Beach Temple Sholom, 132 SE 11 Ave., Pompano Beach, will be holding its high holiday services and Rosh Hashanah candle lighting starting Sunday, Sept. 16 at 6:30 p.m. The candle lighting ceremony takes place on Sept. 16 at 7:05 p.m. and Monday, Sept. 17 at 7:57 p.m. Services will be held again on Sept. 17 at 9 a.m., 10:30 a.m., 5 p.m. and on Tuesday, Sept. 18 at 9 a.m. For more information, visit www.templesholom orida.org or call 954-942-0731.Send news to mdpelican@yahoo.com Reading the news[Left] Kelsey Ross studies a sculpture at Brookgreen Gardens in South Carolina. Brookgreen Gardens is a sculpture garden and wildlife preserve, south of Murrells Inlet. The 9,100-acre property includes gardens with American sculptures placed in them, the Lowcountry Zoo, and trails through several ecosystems in nature reserves. Brookgreen Gardens was opened in 1932, and is built on four former rice plantations, taking its name from the former Brookgreen Plantation. 9/11 memorialPompano Beach Tomorrow, Sept. 8, at 9 a.m. members of American Legion Post 142 will be having a groundbreaking ceremony at their post, 171 SW 2 St., for a new monument that will honor those who lost their lives on Sept. 11, 2001 and the men and women of the United States military who have died in Iraq and Afghanistan. Retired New York City firefighters will be presenting a section of steel from the World Trade Center which will be part of the memorial. For more, call 954873-6462.

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24 The Pelican Friday, September 7, 2012 Above the period piano, donated to the commission, hangs a portrait of Napolean Bonaparte Broward, 19th governor of Florida who planned the Everglades drainage project in 1906.foot walls and hold the volumes that tell the history of this area. A polished oak oor re ects the sunlight that streams through the western windows, massive windows no longer seen in these times. These windows were the only source of air conditioning in the early 20s when this school was in session. Landers is at home in this classroom. Although she never taught at Westside, her mother, Fern Herriott, once served as director of Westsides summer programs. This school was nished in 1923. At that time, Broward Countys elementary schools were in three areas: Westside, Southside [1922] and Northside [1927]. Dillard Elementary was for black students, Landers says. Westside School closed in 1961. These large airy classrooms are a far cry from the rst school in Fort Lauderdale, a one-room cottage on Andrews Avenue, built in 1899. This rst schoolhouse had 14 students. Teacher Ivy Cromartie always carried a long stick with which to chase away rattlesnakes. The area was called Fort Lauderdale, but in fact it was unincorporated and still part of Dade County. Broward County was not incorporated until Oct. 1, 1914. Landers came to Fort Lauderdale with her parents in 1926, shortly after the famous hurricane of the same year. Like all pioneers who came to Florida in the 20s, Landers has strong memories of those hurricanes that gave little notice before making landfall. When she was ve, the 1928 hurricane hit. Her family was in church when the pastor announced the storm and sent the parishioners home. Before Helen and her family got home, the storm was in full swing. The family pulled into an A&P market, then on Southeast Second Street They were about two blocks from their house on Andrews Avenue. People inside the store wanted us to come in, but my father made my mother and me lie down in a gutter. A tornado passed over us, and then we got back into the Ford coupe and went home. Once there, I remember my father noticed a window ying past us. There goes someones window, he said. I think its ours, her mother said. When things settled down, the family made a post-hurricane tour, traveling as far north as Boca Raton to see the damage that got progressively worse as they continued north. I remember passing farms where the chickens had had their feathers blown off, she said. There would be more storms. The 1933 hurricane twisted their house completely around, but Helen and her family had stopped for lunch on Stirling Road during that storm, a meal that probably saved their lives. When we got home, the house had been hit so hard that carpets and furniture had been carried in the wind across the FEC Railroad tracks, she says. Neighbors took us in while the house was repaired. In 1940, Helen graduated from Fort Lauderdale High School. She headed then to Florida State College for Women in Tallahassee, now Florida State University. In 1933, Helens mother founded Fern Hall, a school for winter visitors. Children who were vacationing with their families brought their books and assignments with them to study at Fern Hall where Mrs. Herriott tutored them. Landers was in eighth grade at Fort Lauderdale High School, but she was pressed into tutoring service when she got home. About the same time, another winter school began that later evolved into Pine Crest Preparatory School. Its founder, Mae McMillan began tutoring the children of winter visitors to Fort Lauderdale. In 1934, she founded her school in rented rooms in the old Elks Club building in downtown Fort Lauderdale. In 1939, she moved her 100 students to an eight-acre site on East Broward Boulevard and added a boarding facility. It was here that Mrs. McMillan established Pine Crest School. Space was limited in the former building, so she acquired acreage across a side street for use as an elementary school. Pine Crest remained on the downtown campus for 26 years. In 1965, it was moved to its present location on Cypress Creek Road just west of Federal Highway.The Flying LWhile at Fort Lauderdale High School, Helen learned the reason students were dubbed The Flying Ls. The school had just opened in the 1920s, says Helen. Everyone was thrilled that the track and eld team had been invited to compete in Gainesville for the state championship. There was this one runner who was very fast. They said, Here comes the Flying L. And it stuck. Helen was in college in 1941 when Pearl Harbor was attacked. In 1942, over Thanksgiving vacation, the college girls were encouraged to entertain members of the military home on leave. I was looking for someone who was tall, said the then lanky 5 7 Helen. And I was skinny. Her group came upon some young men playing pool at the Coast Guard Base in Fort Lauderdale. One of them asked the girls to join them. Said Helen, We cant. We dont even know you. But a Mrs. Neal, who was hosting the event, heard Helens remark and said, Let me introduce you. Thats how Helen met her future husband, RL Landers They were married at Park Temple Methodist Church. After the war, RL and Helen moved to Texas where RL earned bachelors degree in physical education on the GI Bill. Helen completed a masters in history. When they returned to Fort Lauderdale, Helen and RL continued teaching and operating Fern Hall until they sold it in 1971. The new owner renamed the school Florida Oaks Academy. Helen continued teaching as Director of Education at Park Temple Church at 101 SE 3 Avenue. Park Temple merged with First United Methodist, and is now over 100 years old. Helens mark on Broward County is indelible. In 1990, she was appointed Broward County Historian, a position she still holds. She served as president and remains an active member of the American Association of University Women. She vigorously campaigned for the Equal Rights Amendment, a law that never passed, and worked with the historical commission to establish the Womens Hall of Fame. And she is accessible. She is unable to shake her persona as a loving teacher, a quality that makes most people very much at ease in her presence. Meanwhile Helen Landers, 90, continues to keep watch over the massive tomes that contain the progressing history of Broward County. Today, persons who are interested in the history of schools in Broward County are invited to view a gallery of pictures dating back to the rst school in the county. All persons with old family photos and documents are encouraged to donate them to the commission. Volunteers and donations to sustain the work of the commission are needed. Call 954-357-5553. LandersContinued from page 2

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The Pelican 25 Friday, September 7, 2012 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFF Oakland Park City commissioners approved a tentative millage rate and tentative budget on Wednesday but said they are still looking for ways to cut expenses and lower tax bills. Final reading of the $90 million fiscal plan is Sept. 19. The proposed millage is 6.4315, up from the current rate of 6.0138 and will add $657,000 to the operating account. The median tax rate for a singlefamily homeowner would increase $17. The budget for this year relied on the use of $3.7 million from the fund balance or reserves. That reliance on fund balance is no longer sustainable, and you need to address that, City Manager John Stunson said. The new budget withdraws $2.8 million from the fund balance leaving a balance of $9 million. Commissioners disagreed on how much of fund balance should be used. Vice Mayor John Adornato said he was very concerned about going below 25 percent rate. Commissioner Jed Shank supported a staff recommendation of establishing a 20 to 25 percent threshold for reserves. He said that was a prudent approach. I dont want to raise the tax to get money to put in reserves, he said. Shank said he wants something done to mitigate millage that wont impact services. Commissioner Shari McCartney recommended commissioners approve the proposed millage rate for arguments sake. This is tentative. Im confident it wont be the final rate, she said. But she added the commission needs to establish a fiscal policy and to set the reserve rate. Whats our philosophy? I recommend we no longer dip into reserves but learn to live within our means. I recommend that after this fiscal year we no longer dip into fund balance and work to re-fund the fund balance, McCartney said. Commissioner Suzanne Boisvenue said she is concerned about using nearly $3 million in fund balance. Our property values have gone down, and crime has gone up. I want a balanced budget, but I want to make sure were not hurting those who dont have the ability to pay. Then well have more homes in foreclosure. We have bit off too much too fast. We need to slow it down a little. The proposed budget calls for two additions to the Budget still needs tweaking, OP commissioners sayBroward Sheriffs Office at a cost of $300,000. Adornato asked what the city will be getting with those additions. Lt. Al Hubrig, executive officer, said the new positions are a supervisory sergeant and a motor deputy. He said by improving supervision the agency can improve efficiency by making sure all deputies are working at 110 percent. The leading complaint from residents is about traffic down neighborhood streets. With the additional deputy, he said traffic concerns could be addressed more quickly. McCartney said she is still not convinced of the necessity of adding the positions. She said there hasnt been enough time to weigh what restoring five positions this year has done. And its not just salary. Were also adding a pension obligation for eternity, or so it seems. Id like more evidence that the restored officers have been efficient and that two more would make a significant difference. Shank said he would like to see more benchmark data on what is an appropriate number of personnel to have. I dont see it fiscally responsible to add two more at $300,000, but I would like more information, he said. Boisvenue said she supports the additional staff, noting, Health and safety is our first responsibility. She said the city has to be ready for growth, and increased policing will be necessary. Stunson said more data will be provided commissioners to support the additional positions.

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26 The Pelican Friday, September 7, 2012 Classi edsCall 954-545-0013 Mechanic Shop for RentPompano Beach Rent this mechanical shop attached to a busy Texaco Station. Rent is negotiable. 954-941-2600. Ask for George Great opportunity. Call George. 954-941-2600 Call The Pelican at 954-783-8700! HELP WANTEDAFRAID OF DOWNSIZING? Start building a business to supplement your income. Great earnings potential on a part-time basis with Primerica. Call 954729-0192. 9-7 POMPANO BEACH MECHANIC/COUNTER PERSON NEEDED For WellKnown Texaco Fuel Station. References & Experience. Good People Person. Call George 954-941-2600. 9-21 SEEKING EMPLOYMENTHHA I Will Take Excellent Care Of The Elderly / Companion Aid Experienced & Certi ed / Have References. Call 845-709-5275. 9-21 CERTIFIED NURSES AIDE / Home Health Aide. 30 Years Experience. Hospital & Home Care. Caring & Loving. Honest & Reliable. Ref. Upon Request. 954-676-5083 Or 954-6553809. 9-7 CAREGIVER / COMPANION Caucasian Woman With 25 Yrs Exp. To Assist & Care For Your Loved Ones. Days / Eves / Nights. Ref. Available. 954-482-5494. 9-7 LPN AT CNA PRICES! Will Drive To Dr. Appointments, Lunch, Shopping, Etc. East Broward Area Only! 954-8957850. 9-7 PRIVATE TUTOR Online Spanish Tutor / Skype Tailored Lessons w/experience. Good Rates. Save On Gas. 954-5541803. 9-7 MALE CNA / HHA / COMPANION. Broward County Area. Former EMT. All Certi cations / Compassionate, References. Call Ron 954-2322832. Very Reasonable! 9-7 SERVICES DANNY BOY ELECTRIC Lic & Insured. Lic. #EC13004811. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. 24/Hr Service. 954-290-1443. Beat Any Written Estimate. Sr, Discount. 9-21 ASI SOUTHERN LAWN MAINTENANCE Provides Full Landscape. Architectural Landscape Design. Tree Trimming & Removal, Full Lawn Maintenance. One Time Clean Out. Andrew 954-6757396. GOT JUNK? TRASH HAULING CONDO CLEANUPS Trees Landscape Yard Fill Pressure Wash Roofs Home Repairs Welding Etc. Dave 954-818-9538. 9-28 MIKE THE GARDNER The All American Yardman Yard And Garden Care Get The Best For Less!! Call 561-5436337 Cell. 9-14 GINGERS HOUSEKEEPING 20 YRS EXP. (Licensed) References Available. Honest & Reliable LOVE To Clean Windows! Help Organize No Problem! FREE Estimates. 954-200-4266. 9-14 HANDYMAN PAINTING CARPENTRY Pressure Cleaning. Decks! Everything Around The House. No Job Too Small. FREE Estimates! Call 561-350-3781. 9-28 HONEST HANDYMAN HOME & BUILDING Maintenance/Improvements. No Job Too Small. Fast Friendly Service. Reasonable Rates. Local Resident/Homeowner. Call Today For Your FREE Upfront Quote. No Deposit Required. 754-366-1915. 9-7 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIESNew GREEN technology. New defroster control saves energy in home refrigerators, commercial chillers. Patented. All optical. Simple mfg. Strategic partners needed..www.NewAvionics.Com. 954-568-1991. CMUSICIANS WANTEDADVANCED STUDENT MUSICIANS Being Accepted For 2012 2013 Membership in the American Legion Symphonic Band! Earn Community Service Points While Improving Your Performance Skills! Rehearsals On Wednesday Evenings from 7pm to 9pm at American Legion Post 142, 171 SW 2nd St., Pompano Beach, FL 33060. Band Director Recommendation Encouraged. Email Music Director James McGonigal at info.legionband@ gmail.com for more information. C REAL ESTATE WANTEDNEED TO BUY FOR CASH FAST!! Small Duplex Or Triplex With At Least One 3 / 2 Or 2 / 2 E Of Federal Hwy. 954-563-3533. 9-21 MFG HOMESFT LAUD / POMPANO WATERFRONT 2 / 2 On Fishing Canal. Private & Peaceful. $49,900. Call John For Appt. 954-495-0557. DOCKAGELHP PRIVATE DOCK $8 / FT. $225 MONTH MINIMUM. 30 Maximum! Electric Water. NFB NLB. Call 954-9468872. 9-7 FURNITUREFORMAL DINING ROOM TABLE w/6 Chairs w/Smoked Glass Top, Credenzas, End Tables, Couch. All Natural Rattan. 863-634-4575 Leave Message. 9-7CEMETERY PLOTS2 PREMIUM LOTS Forest Lawn Cemetery For Sale. $1,500 OBO Call 561-603-9383. OR 863-9461646. C. REAL ESTATE WANTEDI BUY HOUSES!! CASH!! AS IS! QUICK CLOSE! ANY AREA ANY CONDITION! NO EQUITY OK. CALL NOW 954-914-2355. 10-19 CONDOS FOR SALEPOMPANO BEACH DIRECT OCEAN VIEW!! Pet Friendly! 2/2 AT THE BREAKERS! $265K. Also For Rent. Call Juliana At Barclays For Details. 1-305-766-4420. 8-17 POMPANO BEACH DIRECT INTRACOASTAL! Feels Like Youre On A Boat. Pool On Intracoastal. Wrap-A-Round Balcony. Spacious 1 / 1.5 $178K. Also For Rent $1350 Month. 954-588-0562. DEERFIELD BEACH / CENTURY VILLAGE Fabulous Corner By Pool 2 / 2 Unfurnished. Laminate / Tile Floors. BEST In The Village! Do Not Wait! Present Offers! $92K. Jennifer Century Village RE 954-650-5956. POMPANO 2 / 1 UPDATED 1st Floor Corner Unit With POND VIEW! FREE 9 Hole Golf Course. $39,900. Kim Loucks RE / MAX In Motion. 954609-9730. 9-14 CONDOS FOR RENTPOMPANO AEGEAN OCEANFRONT Unfurnished Large 2 / 2 + Den Or 3rd Bedroom. Tile Floor. Great Ocean & ICW Views!! W / D In Unit. 24 Hr. Security. Hi Def TV In Rent. Exercise Room, Pool, Hot Tub, Garage Park 2 Cars. $1,700 / Month. Dynasty R.E. 954-295-2356. Call The Pelican at 954-783-8700!

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The Pelican 27 Friday, September 7, 2012 Classi edsCall 954-545-0013 For Sale2 metal shelf units, 6 by 18 with four shelves $20 each; six four-drawer le cabinets$10 each; mans Beach Cruiser bike in excellent condition$30; large wooden ne art easel -$30; 3 manual Royal typewriters -$50 each, 5-foot, walnut desk, 4 drawers-$25. Call 954-427-3718.Call The Pelican at 954-783-8700! POMPANO BEACH 1 Block To Ocean 1 / 1 Fully Furnished. Flat Screens, DVD, Pool, Laundry, Private Parking, BBQ. Monthly Thru December $850. 954-540-9724. 9-7 LIGHTHOUSE POINT 2 / 2 1st Floor 55+. Pool, Storage, Laundry Facilities. $900 Month / Water Included. Dorothy Bassano Better Homes & Gardens Real Estate. 954-562-4919. 9-14 POMPANO INTRACOASTAL AT ITS BEST. Breathtaking Views! Feels Like Youre On A Boat, Pool Deck On Intracoastal. Spacious 1 / 1.5 $1350 Month. A1A S.E. Corner Unobstructed Views. 2/2 $1,500 Month. 954-588-0562. LEISUREVILLE 55+ 2 / 1 Unfurnished / Furnished $795 / $875 1st & Last. 1st Floor. Free Golf By Pool / Clubhouse. 954-590-8177. 9-14 APTS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH 1 BR & 2 BR APTS FOR RENT. Remodeled, Paint, Tile, Etc. Washer / Dryer On Site. Pool. Pet Friendly. George 954-8095030. 9-21 POMPANO BEACH 1/1 Apartment. $700 Month Yearly Lease. Pool, Off Federal Hwy. Pet OK! Call Anthony 954-8575207. 9-7 POMPANO BEACH EAST OF FEDERAL HWY! Walk To Everything! 1 & 2 Bedrooms. Call For Information 954-2546325. 9-14 POMPANO MCNAB RD & NE 18 AVENUE 1 & 2 Bedrooms Furnished / Unfurnished. $695 $895 And Up. Pool, Tile Floors. Central A / C. 954-6102327. 9-7 POMPANO BEACH 1/1 $650 NW NE 2/1 $950 2/1,5 Townhouse -Pool $1095 SW 1/1 $750 2/1 $925 2/2 $950 3/2 $1025 ALL FREE WATER. Rent + $70 App Mov-U-In. 954-781-6299. 9-14 POMPANO 2/1 $775 Month Yearly Lease. Pool, Laundry Room, Close To Shopping. Pet OK! 1960 NE 48 Street. Call Anthony 954-857-5207. 9-7 LAUDERDALE BY THE SEA 1 / 1 Ground Floor. Central A / C. Parking Out Back Door. Laundry, Courtyard. 200 Steps Beach. $1,100. 954-8685560 Wayne. 9-21 BEST DEAL IN POMPANO BEACH Efficiency With Kitchen, Laundry & Pool. No Pets. Weekly Monthly Season. 500 To Beach. 954294-84883 Or 248-736-1533. ATLANTIC / FEDERAL Efficiency $175 / Wk. No Security. Cable, Electric, Internet. FREE W /D. Good Job. No Drug Charges No Evictions. 954-709-0694. POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 Bedroom From $500. Easy Movein. 1/2 OFF DEPOSIT. Remodeled. Great Location. 954-783-1088 For More Info. 9-14 COMMERCIAL FOR RENT-SALEPOMPANO COMMERCIAL OFFICE Spaces Available. Ranging From As Low As $500 To $700 Depending On Square Footage. Please Call Darci At 954-7833723. 9-7 DEERFIELD BEACH Retail Of ce Warehouse 700 Sq Ft With Loft. A/C, Bathroom. $575 Per Month. Call For More Info 561-654-1331 Or 561-9985681. 9-21 CORAL SPRINGS 1800 SQ FT. Easy Access To Sawgrass, Ample Parking, Monument Sign. FREE RENT & Buildout. Call 954-328-0413. Call The Pelican at 954-783-8700!

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28 The Pelican Friday, September 7, 2012 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach The one thing, Exchange Club President Robert Friedman would like you know about his organization is that it is dedicated to raising money to improve the lives of kids. Well, maybe there is another thing: They throw amazing parties. Organized here in 1958 with pioneers Stewart Kester and Dan Witt at the helm, The Exchange Club continues to attract movers and shakers the business owners, professionals and politicians. It is an all-guy band. Although in many places Exchange accepts women into membership, the Pompano club remains stag largely because businesswomen here interested in doing good works are the nucleus of the highly successful Soroptimist Club, Exchanges partners. The Exchange Club focus is the prevention of child abuse. To that end they donate about $100,000 annually to local organizations with the same mission and through their scholarship funding and essay contest help students Robert Friedman and Emily Ghijselinck. Charlotte Styers, Chuck Schwaderer and Dr. Bob Parks enjoying the Exchange Club social held Saturday night, despite Tropical Storm Isaac.Pompano Exchange Club has a history of having fun while doing goodBartender Michelle Belger volunteered her Saturday night for the Exchange Club social. Al and Linda Siefert, hosts Betsy and Earl Maucker.See EXCHANGE page 30

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The Pelican 29 Friday, September 7, 2012 RJ BoyleRJ BOYLE STUDIOSWell, we survived another small storm and many of us are itching to get back out on the ocean. There will be plenty of oating objects offshore, which usually provide homes for dolphin and wahoos. Anytime we have a storm, that tracks as Isaac did through the Carribean and around Cuba, we know that whatever debris has broken loose from the islands will make its way to us via the gulfstream current. Keep an eye out as you run offshore in pursuit of dollys. You dont want to run over anything and end your day early. Just before the storm we Tropical storms dont mean end to shing for big catcheswere able to sneak out with some local guys for a day of sword shing. We landed a nice sh weighing around 325 lbs. This was a tough sh that wouldnt give up easily and took us nearly 90 minutes to land. Stay tight. [From Left] John Murray, Mike Eury, Steven Bushouse, Jim Bushouse with their 325-lb. sword sh. [Photo courtesy of RJ Boyle]SightingsContinued from page 22Hwy., Fort Lauderdale. Admission is $20. 954-401-0261. 9-15 Family Fun Day is from 4:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Pompano Beach Aquatic Center, 820 NE 18 Ave. A free day of swimming, diving boards, re trucks, snorkeling, games and more. There will also be raf e prizes. 754-2460665. 9-19 Art-By-The-Sea group meets at the Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Community Church in Friedt Family Hall, 4433 Bougainvillea Drive. Marcia Hirschy will discuss how artists can market their work. The meeting is free and open to anyone. 954-5940444. 9-19 ArtHall will be held from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Business Resource Center, 50 NE 1 St., Pompano Beach. ArtHall combines business and art in a series of six receptions. Each month a new exhibit begins with an opening reception on the third Wednesday of the month through October. The event is free. 954-586-1111. 9-22 Wilton Manors Kiwanis Club Kids Day from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Wilton Manors Elementary School, 2401 NE 3 Ave. Free food, fun and games for elementary school students. 954-560-7813.

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30 The Pelican Friday, September 7, 2012 gain higher education. Some of the charities that have bene tted recently are Childrens Healing Center, Broward Childrens Center, Woodhouse, the Dynamos and the Jack Rabideau Scholarship. To give away all that money, the clubs 65 members have to work very hard at raising it. So they partner with the NFL Alumni Association to sponsor a raf e for two Super Bowl tickets and an allexpense paid trip to the game; they hold bowling tournaments and golf tournaments; and one major dinner/dance a year that brings in a big chunk of change. Last year, Friedman said, the $150 Dinner (the cost of the ticket) held at the Lighthouse Point Yacht and Tennis Club, converted a roomful of normally staid citizens into rock n rollers when the Blues Brothers Tribute Band made a surprise appearance. In fact, the theme of the evening was Chicago in the 20s with elaborate decorations and guest appearances by Al Capone and Humphrey Bogart. Last Years president Scott Alford is from Chicago, Friedman, the 55th president, said. This year I will have to outdo him. I dont know that I can. The evening also includes a draw-down raf e and a live auction of luxury items such ExchangeContinued from page 28as a vacation in an Italian villa or a stay at a ski lodge. In addition to the fundraising events, the club holds a series of socials for its members. One such party was held Saturday at the LHP home of Betsy and Earl Maucker. Because of Tropical Storm Isaac, the venue was changed from the grounds of the Sample McDougald House to the Mauckers, but in true Exchange Club style 80 people showed up anyway to discuss wind and rain and enjoy ne food and drink. In September, the club will host a raft up in Boca Lake for its boating members and in October, an Oktoberfest party in Exchange Park Like many service organization, the Exchange has suffered some loss of membership in the economic downturn. A lot of people who thought belonging to the club would bring them business, dropped out, Friedman said. But they were the wrong kind of members anyway. We are not a networking organization. We dont encourage our members to promote their businesses to us. In fact, if you try, youll get the cold shoulder. When Exchange was formed in Detroit in 1911, a group of business men met to exchange ideas. Its purposes attracted many famous Americans including Calvin Coolidge, Warren G. Harding, Harry Truman and George H.W. Bush. It has evolved into a national organization that raises money for their communities and has a good time doing it. Businessmen with that mindset may want to contact Friedman at 954-783-6694 and inquire about membership in The Exchange Club. It meets Wednesdays for lunch at the LHP Yacht and Tennis Club.Gourmet trucks returnOakland Park Food trucks and vendors are returning to downtown Oakland Park for another Gourmet on Wheels from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 8. The event is at 3148 NE 12 Ave. at the south end of 12 Avenue. 754214-0041 or Debbie Blakely at 954-561-4304.

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The Pelican 31 Friday, September 7, 2012 French speaking dentist opens a new state-of-the-art of ce in Cross Medical/Professional Building Dr. Mandy Mir Esmaili is a new dentist in town. Fluent in French and English, shes offering complimentary consultations and exams to introduce herself to the community. Shes shown here explaining her suggestions to a patient. [Staff photo by Phyllis J. Neuberger] With numerous degrees, accreditations and certi cations, Dr. Mandy Mir Esmaili offers patients a high level of con dence. But education never stops with this young dentist who continues her studies vigorously to be able to offer the latest procedures to her patients.I sold my 12-year dental practice In Boston so my husband and I could live in beautiful, warm South Florida, says Dr. Mandy Mir Esmaili, referred to as Dr. Mandy. She flashes a smile as bright and white as the ones she can create for her patients. Her first move was to get re-licensed by passing the Florida boards. Next, she leased a suite of offices at 2324 NE 53 Street in the Cross Medical and Professional Building, Fort Lauderdale. She says, I can honestly tell my new patients that I am equipped to offer them the best and most efficient care using the newest state-of-the-art equipment. Shortly after she opened, Frank Velez was helping her set up her computer system. He says, I recognized the sophisticated state of the art equipment she was using because Im a nerd on stuff like that. I overheard her speaking to a patient, and I was impressed. Ive avoided dentists for almost two decades, but I decided to try her. I am so happy I did. She had to do extensive teeth cleaning and replace a cap on a front tooth. She is very knowledgeable. Her hands are so skilled that she injected me with Novocain and I didnt even know it. I live in Coral Gables, but Ill make the long ride because shes worth it. Id recommend her to anyone. Her new equipment saves patients time. Time is money, so that means she saves them money as well. As she proudly led The Pelican on a tour of her offices, she paused to talk about each piece of the newest equipment. This digital x-ray machine gives the patient 90 percent less radiation exposure than the conventional machine. In addition, it offers a very crisp image which can be rotated to reveal every angle of the teeth, bones, sinuses and surrounding nerves so that I can detect gum disease, cancer, cracks, infection or any abnormality. The teeth whitening machine, called Lumi-brite, is made by the makers of Lumineers. It has the ability to lighten teeth eight shades in one hour. It also allows Dr. Mandy, to do white fillings in three minutes saving the patient the discomfort of being in the chair for an hour. An intra-oral camera allows patients to see their own dental abnormalities. This dentist can complete root canals in an hour with new rotary instruments. She is equipped to do total implants without referring patients to a specialist. Her family preventative dentistry services for children, teens and adults include the basics such as fillings, bridges, crowns, dentures and extractions. Lee Reyes works near Dr. Mandys office and went to her in an emergency. I have a terrible fear of dentists, she explains, so I was happy to find her so pleasant, gentle and caring. She took care of my immediate problem so well that I dont dread future appointments for gum surgery, extractions, and more. She inspires my confidence. Im grateful I found her. I highly recommend her to my family and friends. Dr. Mandy is also trained with special continuing education in cosmetic dentistry. We offer Invisalign braces which are invisible and effective, allowing children and adults to correct problems without feeling self conscious, says Dr. Mandy. I have treated several women over the age of 85 with Invisalign here at Coral Ridge Smile and they have been thrilled with the improvements. I also place Lumineers which are thin, permanent coverings for discolored or misaligned teeth eliminating shots and drilling. A native of Montreal, Canada, Dr. Mandy is fluent in French and English: a fact very much appreciated by the many French Canadian snowbirds in the area. Her credentials are impressive. She is a graduate of New York University School of Dentistry where she was in the top five percent of her class. She believes in excellence through passion. She goes beyond the annual requirements for continuing education, seeking out every advanced course offered in innovations and aesthetic dentistry. Open now for eight months in South Florida, she says, Im lucky. Ive handled several emergencies and established good relations with many patients. Several have made plans for extensive dental work. Because I am new and just building a practice, I am offering many promotions, including discounts to seniors. To introduce myself to new patients, I am offering a complimentary consultation and examination. Dont hesitate to call us at 954-990-6543. We are here for you. Please visit our website www. coralridgesmile.com and join us on facebook at www.facebook.com/ CoralRidgeSmile.Dr. Mandy took care of my immediate problem so well that I dont dread future appointments for gum surgery, extractions, and more. She inspires my confidence. Im grateful I found her. I highly recommend her to my family and friends. Reyes Coral Ridge Smiles, 2324 NE 53 St., Fort Lauderdale 954-990-6543

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32 The Pelican Friday, September 7, 2012 Maria Ledbetter, owner and licensed groomer, has created a spotless, fresh smelling salon where pets are treated like club members in a Whole Pet fitness center. Its an ideal place for people who are interested in having physically, mentally and socially well-balanced dogs. The system works for Ledbetter, who after five years wants to take time to thank the hundreds of clients who have made this salon so successful. Ledbetter is confident that her success is due to her skills with animals whom she says, I treat like family members and care for them with the same regard. My own dog, Princess, was my inspiration. I pamper her with the best, natural products and do the same for other peoples pets. I take time to acclimate them to the grooming table. Many are frightened from past experiences. I make them comfortable and as stress free as possible. The owner has a very colorful and varied business history. Ledbetter says, Ive owned a 4-star restaurant in Enterprise, Alabama, managed Officers Clubs in Europe and Panama, and had a construction business in Pompano Beach. But before that Ledbetter worked in training and development of rural health workers in Central America. Now that my three children are out of college, I decided to open this salon because I love cats and dogs. I went to school, earned my groomers license and the rest is history. Coleen DeAmico dropped by with Oliver and Lola, who come twice a week for puppy day care and socialization. They have been coming for the past four years, says Ledbetter. This is their second home.Pupe Cutz offers many servicesFull Grooming entails styling, bath, nails ears, sanitary area and feet. Shave Downs are very popular for both cats and dogs because of Floridas heat and humidity. Pets are more comfortable and owners like not having to deal with shedding. Full Bath includes nails, ears, sanitary if needed and the bath. I do offer a special for regular customers which includes a bath every two to three weeks with a good blowout eliminating hair tangling, Ledbetter says. She adds, We do day care for working clients. To many pets, this is a second home because Ive cared for them since they were puppies. I also do very limited over night pet sitting as an accommodation for regulars. We also walk and care for pets whose owners prefer to have them remain at home. And we do pick up and delivery on request. It has been a real learning experience for me that goes far beyond grooming, says Ledbetter. My babies who come here for grooming are always teaching me and our staff a deeper understanding of puppies and cats. We have babies who are therapy dogs who watch their masters and alert them when there could be danger of a seizure or heart attack. We even have a therapy bird, Lea, an African Grey parrot who visits elderly homes and helps mom educate others about animals and their needs. Ledbetter adds that working with her babies actually calms her down. She notes that many people see a drop in blood pressure when they take time to be around dogs. All pets get a new picture after their grooming at Pupe Cutz. Ledbetter adds the pictures to her Facebook page where they can be shared with family and friends. When I take these pictures, Ledbetter says. I always try to capture their individual personalities. PupeCutz has been an amazing part of my life. Dogs, like people all have different personalities, and it seems the sweetest ones always show up here, she adds Pupe Cutz is located at 124 S. Federal Hwy., Unit 2, just east of the corner on the north side of south second street. Theres plenty of parking in the back for clients of this salon. Pupe Cutz pet grooming salon in Pompano Beach provides comfortable, stress free grooming and care It has been a real learning experience for me that goes far beyond grooming. My babies who come here for grooming are always teaching me and our staff a deeper understanding of puppies and cats.Pupe Cutz, 124 S. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach 954-946-7884T-Bone, a Labradoodle poses for his Facebook moment. Maria Ledbetter with Princess and Martini

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Friday, September 7, 2012 Vol. XX, Issue 36 Wherever you are, read The Pelican @ pompanopelican.com • Send news to siren2415@gmail.com Pompano Beach • Deer eld Beach • Lighthouse Point • Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Wilton Manors • Oakland Park • Hillsboro Beach • The Galt • Palm Aire The P e l i c a n Pelican 81 days left in 2012 Hurricane season History Issue By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFOakland Park To Chris Rosado, the propane business is just like owning a pizza joint. “We deliver straight to your house, just like pizza,” said Rosado, who attributes the comparison to his dad. “I worked for my dad’s old propane company since I was a little kid.” It was an experience that prepared him to start his own propane business in 2007, Forever Propane Sales & Service at 350 NE 44 St. And like pizza deliveries, cooked Forever Propane powers grills, homes and businesses before and after the stormSee PROPANE on page 18 No need to scream. They got the ice cream So a Salamy, 5, digs into her sweet treat during the free ice cream social held at the iBeria Bank branch in Pompano Beach on Aug. 31. [Photo by Michael d’Oliveira] Proposed tax hike will cover unanticipated expenses By Stephen FellerSTAFF WRITERPompano Beach Although the economy is slowly improving, the city administrators have proposed a ve percent increase in the property tax rate to meet a budget that outpaced in ation and grew more than city of cials expected. Commissioners will hold the rst of two public hearings on the proposed $219 million 2012-2013 budget on Wednesday, Sept. 12 at 5:30 p.m. in the commission chambers at city hall, See BUDGET on page 9 Commission rm: No place on the eld for those with criminal historiesBy Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach – The commission’s decision last year to require extensive background checks of city volunteers is keeping some well-meaning citizens off athletic elds and away from programs for children. But earlier this month, despite a request for an appeal process from Commissioner Ben Preston, the rest of the board reiterated its tough stance. “We have to err on the side of caution [even though] good people See CRIMINAL HISTORY on page 9 Cameras spot crooks, lead to recoveriesBy Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFLighthouse Point – Police expect to recover $500,000 in stolen property by the end of year thanks to the newest members of the department – license plate identi cation cameras. See CAMERAS on page 11 Sewer rate adjustment delayed for more dataBy Judy VikPELICAN WRITERLauderdale-By-The-Sea -Town commissioners unanimously agreed Tuesday to go back to the drawing board for more information rather than vote on proposed new sewer rates for the south end of town. Instead they tabled the issue until Oct. 23 and agreed to hire their consultant to do more research on See SEWERS on page 10

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2 The PelicanFriday, September 7, 2012 By Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFFort Lauderdale – Helen Herriott Landers sits in a room at Westside School at 301 SW 13 Ave. the home Area’s early schools and bad hurricanes remain vivid memories for County Historian Helen Landers of the Broward County Historical Commission, now a part of the county’s library system. Helen is the Broward County Historian. She is a member of the generation that experienced Pearl Harbor, World War II, the rst man to walk on the moon and, most recently, the Curiosity Robot landing on Mars. She has served the county as a teacher. She is a strong supporter of women’s issues. The spacious room of Westside School is lined with a library of books set on shelves that climb up the History KeeperHelen Landers Helen Landers, County Historian, points out the volumes of history that are stacked on shelves in one of Broward County’s early schools, Westside. Today Westside School is the home of the Broward County Historical Commission.See LANDERS on page 24

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The Pelican 3 Friday, September 7, 2012 Historical Society hosts covered dish supperThe Pompano Beach Historical Society will kick off its 2012-2013 programming season with a covered dish supper on Sept. 15. The event will take place from 4 to 7:30 p.m. at Founders Park, 217 NE 4 Ave., Pompano Beach. In conjunction with the supper, the Historical Society will hold a brief ceremony at 4:30 p.m. marking the reopening of the Society’s Kester Cottages, that recently underwent an extensive repair and restoration. The historic structures were constructed in the late 1930s by Pompano businessman and civic leader William Kester as tourist cottages. Facing the beach along Highway A1A, the modest buildings proved to be so popular that a number of them were built in town for local residents. The two Kester Cottages preserved by the Historical Society contain furnishings and artifacts relating to Pompano Beach’s history. The cottages will be open for those attending the Sept. 15 event. The covered dish supper is open to Historical Society members, friends and the public. Although there is no admission charge, attendees are asked to bring a prepared food item to share. The Historical Society will provide drinks and tableware. Call 954 292-8040.Email mdpelican@ yahoo.com with your news or announcements!Fishing pier meeting LEED standardsDeer eld Beach – The city is well on its way to having a certi ed Silver LEEDS shing pier and according to a project manager it could become golden. Miguel Perez told the commission Tuesday that contractors Stiles Corp. have 49 of the 55 points needed for a silver certi cation and he is con dent more points will be achieved, possibly enough to merit a gold rating. The rebuilt pier restaurant, bait house and other amenities will be the city’s rst LEEDS project, designed and built with as many environmental considerations as possible. It is scheduled for completion by the end of this year. Advertise with The Pelican 954-783-8700

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4 The PelicanFriday, September 7, 2012 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFOakland Park – This city could soon be home to a beer brewery. Lease negotiations are nearing completion for Funky Buddha Brewery to occupy 17,500 square feet in Oakland Park Station, the former Sears warehouse, at 1201 NE 38 St. “We’re very excited about it. We hope this will help Oakland Park and the whole street,” said broker Patricia Montalbano who was hopeful the lease would be signed by the end of the week. Owner Ryan Sentz said Funky Buddha Brewery will be a production facility with tours, beer tasting and a bar with live music. Sentz will be brewing 100 kinds of beer. He said he was attracted to Oakland Park because of the city’s plans to relaunch the SightingsA community calendar for Northeast Broward County. Send your event information to mdpelican@yahoo.comBrewery eyes Oakland Parkarea as a culinary center. “We’re looking forward to it and are excited. The city has been extremely helpful. I hope it gets done soon [the lease signing] so we can start brewing,” he said. He’s targeting the opening for early next year. Sentz said he also will continue to operate Funky Buddha in Boca Raton. “We’re very much looking forward to Funky Buddha coming into town. It will be an anchor and hopefully draw other breweries and other businesses,” said Siegi Constantine, executive director of Oakland Park Main Street. “Hopefully, their presence will draw another brewery into the Sikes building on Northeast 12th Avenue. The more the merrier,” Constantine added. By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFWilton Manors – Mayor Gary Resnick’s job of representing the residents of Wilton Manors often takes him out of the city and into Tallahassee. And for his efforts the Florida League of Cities has given Resnick its Home Rule Hero Award. “Mayor Resnick’s name is synonymous with a Home Rule Hero. He is extremely dedicated and works hard for the citizens of Wilton Manors. He brings that same level of commitment and energy to helping the Florida League of Cities lobbying team and is always ready and willing to contact legislators and help advocate in support of home rule. He has and always will Mayor Resnick named Home Rule Hero by Florida League of Cities be a valuable asset to his city and the State of Florida,” said Scott Dudley, the League’s legislative director. The award recognizes Resnick for his work during the 2012 legislative session See RESNICK on page 5 Resnick

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The Pelican 5 Friday, September 7, 2012 SightingsSightings is a calendar for Northeast Broward county. Send your event information to mdpelican@yahoo.com to advance the League’s statewide agenda and the home rule powers of Wilton Manors and other cities and towns across Florida. “It’s nice to get recognized by your peers but you don’t do these things for awards,” said Resnick, who isn’t reimbursed by the city for travel to Tallahassee. “Each trip is two-days. It’s all out of my own pocket or the League has reimbursed me some.” But although he doesn’t use city funding to go to Tallahassee, Resnick’s main focus in the state capitol is the future of a major portion of city funding. Resnick’s is one of four local government representatives appointed to Communications Services Tax Work Group, which is tasked with meeting once a month and studying and reporting on tax issues related to the sale of communications services. As an attorney with Gray Robinson, he specializes in communications and cable law, utilities, and use of rights-of-way, The group’s task is to present recommendations to the legislature on the future of the communications services tax by Feb. 1, 2013. Last year Wilton Manors received over $650,000 in revenue from the communications tax; all poured into the general fund. “It’s the third single largest revenue source that we have,” said Resnick. But cities and other local governments are in danger of losing those funds – over a billion dollars across Florida. HB 809 would prohibit state and local governments from charging taxes on many digital services offered by telecommunications companies. Used as a funding pledge for the bond the city oated to pay for the new city hall and adjoining parking lot, the loss of the communications services tax would mean tough budget choices for commissioners. “We don’t get to print money like the federal government. It’s either raise taxes or cut services,” Resnick said. ResnickContinued from page 4

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6 The PelicanFriday, September 7, 2012 Deer eld Beach, Pompano Beach, Lighthouse Point, LauderdaleBy-The-Sea, Wilton Manors and Oakland ParkWilton Manors • Oakland Park • Hillsboro Beach The Pompano Pelican is published weekly on FridaysStreet Address: 1500-A E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, FL 33060 Telephone: 954-783-8700 • Fax: 954-783-0093Letters to the Editor are encouraged and accepted for print if signed, although a writer’s name will be withheld on request; letters must also include a daytime telephone number. Advertising rates are available upon request. Subscription rate is $31.80 including tax for one year’s delivery in Greater Pompano Beach; $95.40/per year including tax for others in the United States; call 954-783-8700 for rates abroad. The Pelican is a nonpartisan newspaper and reserves the right to decline advertising. Copyright 2012. Reproduction of this publication in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission of the publisher. The Pelican is a member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, Deer eld Beach Chamber and the LBTS Chamber. The Pelican is a state certi ed woman-owned minority business. The Pelican is delivered to businesses, libraries, schools, of ces, hospitals, news racks and single family homes. All advertising and copy is published at the sole discretion of the publisher. We welcome your critiques and ideas concerning this publication. Anne Siren, publisherExecutive Assistant: Mary Hudson Graphics: Rachel Ramirez Windsheimer Bookkeeper: John White Classi eds: Fran Shelby Contributing Writers: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Judy Wilson, Malcolm McClintock, Judy Vik, Michael d’Oliveira Account Executives: Paul Shroads, Carolyn Mann, Bill Heaton, Bill Fox Special Of ce Assistant: Cathy Siren ESTABLISHED 1993 • Volume XX, Issue 36 Founding Editor and PublisherAnne Hanby Siren The Pelican wants to know what you think. Send your thoughts on local, state and national issues to siren2415@gmail.com Send your letter to the editor siren2415@gmail.com OpinionNon-partisan League of Women Voters urges voters to nix all 11 state amendments on Nov. 6.As election season kicks into high gear following the political conventions, the League of Women Voters of Florida Education Fund is offering millions of state voters important, non-partisan information about the crucial decisions they’ll be making on Election Day. 1. Amendment 1 Health Care Services This amendment would allow Florida to opt out of the Federal Health Care Act. The League opposes this amendment The League of Women Voters of Florida supports the implementation of the Federal Health Care Reform Law in Florida, emphasizing access for all and control of costs. 2. Amendment 2 Veterans Disabled Due to Combat Injury; Homestead Property Tax Discount This amendment expands the homestead exemption to disabled veterans who were not Florida residents when they entered military service. The League opposes this amendment. The League of Women Voters of Florida position is that there should be no increase or extension of homestead exemption. Also, our position states that no tax sources or revenues should be speci ed, limited, exempted, or prohibited in the Constitution. There are ve amendments on the ballot that address reductions in property taxes, including one for business’s tangible property If all ve were to pass [2,4,9, 10, 11], local governments would lose over $1 billion over the next three years. 3. State Government Revenue Limitation This amendment replaces the existing state revenue limitation based on Florida personal income growth with a new state revenue limitation based on in ation and population changes. The League opposes this amendment. The League of Women Voters of Florida believes that the state of Florida has an infrastructure de cit and that state service levels and the quality of life are declining. Because the long-term goals of the state comprehensive plan were designed to reverse decline in levels of service and improve the quality of life, members nd these goals are generally desirable and worth working toward. The LWVF has been speaking out against this amendment for several sessions of the legislature and during the 2008 Tax and Budget Reform Commission where the amendment was defeated. This legislation was passed in Colorado and has affected the state’s ability to fund health care services as well as education, where they have dropped drastically in national rankings. 4.Property Tax Limitation; Property Value Decline; Reduction for NonHomestead Assessment Increases; Delay of Scheduled Repeal This amendment would reduce the annual growth in assessment limitation on certain non-homestead property from 10 percent to 5 percent. It would prohibit increases in the assessed value of homestead property and certain nonhomestead property when market value of the property decreases. It also gives rst time homesteaders an additional exemption equal to 50 percent of the median just value on the property; this exemption diminishes to zero over a ve year period. The League opposes this amendment for the same reasons stated for opposing Amendment 2. 5. State Courts This amendment adds a requirement that A Supreme Court jusitice appointed by the Governor must also be con rmed by the Senate in order to take of ce. It also authorizes the repeal of a court rule by a simple majority of the legislature instead of the 2/3 majority now required. The amendment also would allow the House of Representatives to review all les of the Judicial Quali cation Commission without regard to whether the request is speci cally related to impeachment considerations. The League opposes this amendment. The League believes that the Governor should be able to appoint judges from a group of nominees selected by a panel or commission composed of members of the Bar and lay members and that judges should be retained in of ce by means of periodic review through an election in which a judge would run unopposed and solely on his/her record. 6. Prohibition on Public Funding of Abortions; Construction of Abortion Rights Federal law prohibits the expenditure of federal funds for most abortions; this amendment would enshrine those prohibitions in the state Constitution. There is another provision in the amendment that would stop the use of the privacy clause in abortion cases; courts would no longer be able to use the clause in defending abortion rights. The League opposes this amendment. We believe that public policy in a pluralistic society must af rm the constitutional right of privacy of the individual to make reproductive choices. 7. Religious Freedom This amendment would repeal a 126-year-old provision in the state Constitution that prohibits taxpayer funding of religious institutions. If passed, the amendment would allow the state to use state monies to fund religious institutions and schools. The League opposes this amendment. The League supports adequate funding of public education with no use of public funding for the expansion or funding of private education through a voucher program. We support a free public school system with high standards for student achievement and with equality of educational opportunity for all that is nanced adequately by the state through an equitable funding formula. 8. Homestead Property Tax Exemption for Surviving Spouse of Military Veteran or First Responder This amendment grants full homestead property tax relief to the surviving spouses of military veterans and rst responders killed in the line of duty. The deceased must have been a permanent resident of Florida as of January 1 of the year they died. The League opposes this amendment for the same reasons stated for opposing Amendment 2. 9 Tangible Personal Property Tax Exemption This amendment affects businesses only and pertains to equipment or furniture used in a business. Under current law, the rst $25,000 of tangible personal property is exempt from taxation; this amendment will raise that exemption to $50,000. Cities and counties will be able to grant additional exemptions. The League opposes this amendment for the same reasons stated for opposing Amendment 2. 10 Additional Homestead Exemption for Low-Income Seniors who Maintain Long-Term Residency on Property; Equal to Assessed Value This amendment grants full homestead property tax relief to low-income seniors who have lived in their home for at least 25 years. The League opposes this amendment for the same reasons stated for opposing Amendment 2. 11. Appointment of Student Body President to Board of Governors of the State University System The State University System is governed by a 17-member Board of Governors. Currently, the president of the Florida Student Association is a member of the board. This amendment would create a new council composed of student body presidents, and the chair of the council would replace the current FSA member on the Board of Governors. The League opposes this amendment. The League believes that the Constitution should be a simple, understandable and integrated statement of basic law, free from obsolete and statutory detail.LeagueContinued

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The Pelican 7 Friday, September 7, 2012 Deer eld Beach “Daytime Radness,” a watered-down version of Island Water Sport’s 30year Midnight Madness will be held this year Oct. 19 inside and outside the beachside retail store. Store owner Linsay Cottrell told commissioners Tuesday she expects 6,000 to 8,000 teenagers will come out during the day and asked that a portion of NE 2 St. be closed to traf c. Radness was held for years as a nighttime event until last year when the commission decided it presented too great a risk for its young attendees and refused to close the street. The event included a retail sale, skateboard demonstrations and live music and attracted huge crowds. Two years ago, Madness joined forces with a group of beach businesses to promote dining and drinking in the area and unruly crowds and underage drinking occurred. “We got bad partners and we took the brunt of it,” Cottrell told the commission. Madness becomes Radness: It’s thumbs up for Island Water Sports event“We have downsized the event. This is our 35th year in Deer eld. Anything you need, we’ll do.” The sale will be conducted 6 a.m. to 9 p.m.; entertainment and product demonstrations, 10 a.m. – 7 p.m. Surfers for Autism and a Christian charity receive some of the proceeds. In urging the city to proceed with permitting the event, Mayor Peggy Noland called it “a Deer eld tradition.” City seeks to control donation bins Deer eld Beach An ordinance controlling the location of donation bins is in the works here. Commissioners have discussed allowing the bins only for organizations that are non pro t and may even limit use to the NE Focal Point, a city-sponsored care center, and the Salvation Army which has a store in the city. In addition, the bins will likely be con ned to large commercial properties and require permits and strict maintenance. The ordinance is a response to the donation bins being placed around town by for-pro t entities often without permission from property owners. Attorney says keep 4 a.m. alcohol sales Deer eld Beach – Owners of a late-night bar are urging the city to reconsider sunsetting its 4 a.m. hour for the sale of alcohol. Attorney James Brady said the loss of those sales would be bad for business and urged the commission to “take a long and hard look over the next 25 days” at the provision. Brady said his clients would be willing to compromise on 4 a.m. drinking on Saturday and Sunday only. The current ordinance becomes obsolete on Sept. 30. The commission recently approved new laws allowing alcohol sales on Sunday morning beginning at 8 a.m. Mayor says turtle lights are keeping people in the dark Deer eld Beach – Turtle lights, those low intensity beams that protect sea turtle hatchlings, may be good for the turtles, but they are not so good for people, Mayor Peggy Noland said this week. “It’s dangerous out there. You can’t see anyone on the sand, you can’t see your car from the sidewalk.” The mayor was at the beach one night last week and in her words, “The beach was packed.” A lost boy prompted the mayor and her daughter Elizabeth to walk on the sand with a ash light until he was found, but Noland said without the light she could see nothing. The nine-year-old was reunited with his mother, but Noland said it was a scary situation. “It don’t know what we can do, but we have to have lighting over there.” Last year, the city, aided by a $450,000 grant from the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, installed turtlefriendly lights along the beachwalk in answer to environmental concerns for the safety of the hatchlings.

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8 The PelicanFriday, September 7, 2012 Making a DifferencePhyllis J. Neuberger wants your suggestions about people who are making a difference. Call 954-7838700. Mike Clark is a two-time U.S.P.C.A. Police Dog National Champion with over 30 years of experience. He has trained hundreds of dogs in all areas such as patrol, narcotics, explosives, arson detection and search and rescue. Clark is recognized as one of the leading K-9 handlers and instructors in the United States. He has won top honors in Regional as well as National Competitions. Through his academies many K-9 handlers have gone on to become leading instructors in other agencies and have won numerous awards of their own. Clark’s Patrol Dog Academy was featured in the video K-9 COP. Tomorrow, Sept. 8, pack up the kids and head to the Elks Club for the exciting Save a Pet—Save a Vet BazaarBy Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFBring the family to the Elks Club at 700 NE 10 St. in Pompano Beach, tomorrow Sept. 8 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. There will be fun for everyone with bargain shopping, food, pony rides, silent auctions and more. It’s all about raising needed funds for the all volunteer Veterans Village and K-9 Companion Center. Started in 2009, by a group of professionals in mental health and employment training areas, the group focuses on housing and training in the pet industry. Mike from Save a Pet—Save a Vet program has taught approximately 25 to 30 vets to train pets for other disabled veterans and civil servants in need of therapy and service dogs. In addition this agency has created a housing counseling division manned by volunteer lawyers and paralegals who help vets with housing issues. Veteran’s Village is not an actual place. It is the name given to the nine clean, safe and sober housing locations in Deer eld Beach for homeless wounded warriors. By providing job training and home retention assistance programs this 501 (3) non pro t agency attempts to teach men and women marketable skills to help them transfer to independent living. No corporate of cer nor director earns money. It is an all volunteer organization. All trainees receive grant and training bonuses to teach reality based earning policies. Trainers are compensated on persons served in training and successful transition of trainees to independent lifestyles. Veterans Village & K-9 Companion Centers Inc. was one of the rst rescue animalservice dog training programs developed for service men and women. Today, programs inform the population served about new developments in housing retention to help Veterans remain in their homes. On the job training results in marketable skills. A web site has been established to provide unpublicized changes in housing laws to obtain HUD VASH and assistance in legal help to stop home loss. These programs are manned by veterans and others without marketable skills. Director Joe Lopez says, “We look for dogs that would otherwise be euthanized. Mike decides if they are trainable. They do not need to be any special breed, but they must be big enough to support a disabled person if they are to be trained as mobility dogs.” The Saturday Bazaar at the Elks Club, 700 E. 10 St. in Pompano Beach is the rst fundraiser for this worthy agency. Lopez says, “We need to raise funds so that we can continue to train service men and women to train service animals under the strict ADA guidelines. We have two dogs in training now for hyper vigilance work. Many of our homeless vets cannot sleep and are very insecure. Any sound makes them jump, fearing they are being shot at. A trained animal on hand gives them a sense of security.” All items sold at the Bazaar have been donated by individuals or businesses. Call 561-807-7177 or email tomr@vvk-9.orgThe small but dedicated directors of this volunteer agency are:Betty Mae SouterFreeman Ph.D.: Chief Executive Of cer Dr. Freeman is a Clinical and Forensic Psychologist. Dr. Freeman’s dissertation was on Animal Assisted Therapy. Dr. Freeman is considered an expert in competency and forensic psychology by the courts and has developed this animal assisted therapeutic program in hopes of assisting persons with disabilities to become more self suf cient. Mike Clark: Advisor and Senior Dog Trainer Mike Clark is a twotime U.S.P.C.A. Police Dog National Champion with over 30 years of experience. He has trained hundreds of dogs in all areas such as patrol, narcotics, explosives, arson detection and search and rescue. Mike is recognized as one of the leading K-9 handlers and instructors in the United States. He has won top honors in regional as well “We look for dogs that would otherwise be euthanized. They do not need to be any special breed, but they must be big enough to support a disabled person if they are to be trained as mobility dogs.”See VET PETS on page 18Save a Pet—Save a Vet participants in the program. Names omitted for privacy reasons. [Photos courtesy of Veterans Village & K-9 Companion Centers, Inc.]

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The Pelican 9 Friday, September 7, 2012 get ensnared, no doubt,” Vice Mayor Bill Ganz said. Preston offered several examples of coaching volunteers who have been dropped from city programs because of youthful crimes. One man, who committed felonies and served time as a youth, has completely redeemed himself and now participates in the Prison Ministry and leads the Boys Brigade Program at the Cathedral Church of God. He began coaching in 2005 and when his felonies were uncovered in the newlyrequired level 2 background check, went through a process at the state to prove himself worthy. That resulted in a ruling from the Department of Children and Families that he was t to work with children and the elderly, Preston said, but because of Deer eld’s policy he is still banned from coaching. “This is wrong,” Preston said. “He needs to be on the eld working with kids.” Another case Preston discussed involved a vehicular homicide that occurred 20 years ago. The person driving that car has since led an arrest-free life. “We need relief for people who have paid the price, satis ed their obligations, corrected their lives,” Preston said. Level 2 background checks research FBI records internationally to discover sexual predator or sex offender convictions as well as felonies involving violence. The same applies to those with records of violent misdemeanors or repeated drug and alcohol convictions. No one in this situation is allowed to coach in youth leagues either sponsored by the city or using city facilities. The background check must be done once a year. When the level 2 rule was approved by the commission in May 2011, organizers of the youth sports programs protested the cost of the inquiries whic were about $50 per person. Last year, the city contributed $2,500 toward those expenses. Parks and Recreation Director Walt Bratton said, in his experience, level 2 checks are generally required by governmental entities. They are recommended by the National Recreation and Park Association. Both Mayor Peggy Noland and Vice Mayor Ganz were adamantly against changing the current policy. Ganz said in earlier days volunteers were accepted on someone’s word alone, a policy that resulted in persons with serious criminal records – from second degree murder to robbery with a deadly weapon – being allowed to coach. As to any appeal process, Ganz said, “We might make good judgments, but others who follow us may not. I am completely against changing it.” Noland said she “absolutely had no faith in the Department of Children and Families,” adding “Our goal is to protect the children.” Persisted Preston, “Why not some leeway to use people who want to point kids in the right direction?” “Some mistakes carry long, long after effects,” Ganz replied. “And I don’t want to be judge and jury.” The commission’s decision to toughen an existing ordinance which required only level 1 checks, using only a state data base, came after a county employee at Quiet Waters Park was accused of molesting a young girl.Criminal historyContinued from page 1 100 W. Atlantic Blvd.. According to Budget Director Brian Donovan, city of cials thought expenses would grow by roughly three percent next year. The difference, he said, can be blamed on the Broward Sheriff’s Of ce raising the price of police service by $1.6 million, an increase of about four percent. Pompano of cials had thought it would be within the three percent number. “Water and sewer saw slight increases [in cost],” Donovan said. “But the biggest driver of the budget is public safety it’s not a cheap service.” The budget proposal calls for an increase in the millage rate from 5.2027 mills per $1,000 to 5.4700 mills per $1,000. Residential re service assessments will increase by $11 in order to replace a re station in Cresthaven, Donovan said. The old re station was converted from a civic center when the area was annexed to Pompano Beach more than a decade ago. City Commissioner Barry Dockswell voted against the last two city annual budgets because they included what he considered to be unnecessary increases. Dockswell plans to vote against this one too. “We’d be doing a better job for our constituents if we managed to keep services high and not raise the millage rate at the same time,” Dockswell said. BudgetContinued from page 1

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10 The PelicanFriday, September 7, 2012 WORSHIP DIRECTORY: Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad. Rev. Hyvenson Joseph commercial customers. “I’m not comfortable with moving forward with the information we’ve been given recently and the impact on single-family homes,” Mayor Roseann Minnet said. “We’re a small community. I recommend a review to see how much water is being used by commercial customers so single-family residents don’t get hit for all of this.” Vice Mayor Scot Sasser agreed. “We need more work and more analysis done. I don’t feel this is fully baked.” Tony Bryan, nance director, explained that the proposed commercial rates were developed using American Water Works Association, or AWWA, tables. “We will go back and take a look at different commercial customers and develop tables based on actual use,” Bryan said. He said each property or each class of property (such as large hotels) could be looked at, so that more accurate gures are developed. Bryan said two properties could have very different water usage and would be charged the same base facility charge based on meter size. “Additional work needs to be done to gather the data to really apportion base charges to commercial customers in accordance with their use,” Bryan said. “Because the town is as small as it is, it can be done.” Commissioner Stuart Dodd asked the town’s consultant, Mike Burton, to weigh in. He came up with the proposed rates approved at rst reading in late June. “Are we trying to ne tune this too far?” Dodd asked. Burton said the AWWA tables usually are used as a default when more accurate data isn’t available. “When you get more granular data, there’s usually more demand assigned to the commercial class than what the meter equivalency table dictates.” Burton said the use of the AWWA tables shifted more cost to the residential classes. The analysis will provide a more fair depiction of the demands of commercial customers he said. Dodd said he also favored delaying the vote. “Last time when we had a professional review, we ended up with a proposed methodology that increased single-family rates considerably,” said Commissioner Mark Brown. “We have no assurance that we won’t have higher rates for commercial (with the new method.) We’re gambling and trying to cover ourselves.” Commissioners unanimously agreed to hire Burton & Associates for no more than $5,000 to obtain the additional data. Burton said that will involve looking at the commercial customers average usage in the maximum three months. The number of units assigned to commercial customers will be based on what the demand has been for that customer instead of meter size. SewersContinued from page 1

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The Pelican 11 Friday, September 7, 2012 According to police, the cameras have led to a 220 percent increase in the number of stolen vehicles recovered in 2010 and an increase of 180 percent in the number of stolen vehicles recovered in 2011. The cameras also recently led to the city being awarded the International Motorola Webber Seavey Award for Quality in Law Enforcement, presented by the International Association of Chiefs of Police, or IACP. The IACP selects police departments worldwide and recognizes those that promote excellent standards in law enforcement that contribute to a better quality of life in the communities they serve. Police Chief Ross Licata and Commander Mike Oh will attend the IACP conference in San Diego on Oct. 1 to accept the award. “We’re only the sixth police agency in the State of Florida to ever receive this award,” said Licata. “We’re understandably quite proud that we’ve been recognized.” The Transient Offender Interdiction Program began in 2010 when the city installed 26 cameras that monitor the license plates of vehicles that come into Lighthouse Point. When a car enters the city its license plate is checked against Florida records; police use the information to look for stolen cars or if the driver is wanted for another crime. “It’s proven to be quite successful in the clearance of a number of cases that otherwise would not have been solved,” said Licata. “We’re going to be adding 18 additional cameras in other strategic locations before the end of this year.” The initial expenditure for the cameras was $260,000 with the new ones expected to cost $140,000. All of it was taken out of the police forfeiture budget, which is funded by the money and property police con scate from convicted criminals. “I couldn’t think of a better use of the money,” said Licata. Licata said the cameras have also led to solving a number of other crimes. One crime involved a property owner who claimed to be in Miami when his building was set on re. Cameras revealed the he lied to police and was driving around the scene at the time of the arson. “I probably have another 30 or 40 stories like that,” said Licata. Mayor Fred Schorr and Commissioner Glenn Troast see the cameras as another weapon for law enforcement. “It’s a means to an end. Another tool we can use to protect the residents,” said Schorr. “I think it goes to show the quality and creativity of our police chief and the law enforcement of cers that work with him. It’s one of the more creative solutions that are out there in this day and age,” said Troast. Licata credits the commission with pushing the program forward. “They had the vision to think outside the box and to overcome some of the fears that are attributed to this kind of technology,” he said. But not everyone is a fan of the cameras. The American Civil Liberties Union of Florida is seeking more information on how police track and record the movements of cars and individuals using the cameras. “Automatic license plate readers provide the technology that can pose a threat to American’s privacy, secretly monitoring and collecting the movements of every motorist who encounters the system,” said Howard Simon, executive director of the ACLU of Florida, in a press release. “We want to make sure that there are local ordinances or police protocols that govern how the police will be cataloging and using the information the readers collect since much of it can be sensitive and personal to each of us.” Licata defended the use of the cameras. “I think we took great precaution to ensure we weren’t using data for any other reason.” Despite the results, of cials said there’s no replacement for residents who are aware of what’s going on in their neighborhoods. “If they see something they need to say something. Nobody knows their neighborhood better than the residents do,” said Schorr. “The cameras are great . but we still need to be proactive.” To reach Lighthouse Point dispatch, call 954-942-8080.CamerasContinued from page 1 Nesting in a tree, this camera is on guard in Lighthouse Point.

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12 The PelicanFriday, September 7, 2012 Business matters The Pelican takes a look at local business owners. You can tell your story here because business matters. 954-783-8700.By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFF The Pelican loves business people with heart and real estate sales associates Terri and Dave Rittenhouse certainly qualify. Terri says, “We were mesmerized when we saw a brief feature about oceangoing wheelchairs on the weather channel. A disabled woman got strapped into the vehicle and she was wheeled right into the ocean by her mobile husband. She laughed with joy as the waves splashed over her, and we were so touched.” Dave said, “We need these vehicles right here on our beach. Let’s investigate.” When they decided it would be great to offer disabled veterans, children and adults free access to SEA LEGS, they had no idea of what they were getting into. They didn’t realize how much of their money and time it would take to launch Broward Sea Legs Charity Drive. However, as they are divers, swimmers, and ex boat owners who love the ocean, they remained motivated to make it happen, despite long hours and costs. Dave did a little research and explains. “We found out that SEA LEGS chairs are made in France by Mobi Chair but there is a Florida distributor on the West coast. We agreed that we needed to buy one so that we could demonstrate its value and raise enough money to buy 10 for our own ocean front. Our immediate goal was to provide four chairs to Pompano Beach, four to Deer eld Beach and two for Lauderdale-By-The-Sea. The couple also found out that these beach and water wheelchairs are already available all along the California coast beach areas and in certain areas of Florida as well. “We wanted Pompano Beach to be as accommodating to the disabled as other areas in our state and country,” Dave said. A SEA LEGS chair retails for $2,300, but the price per chair is reduced with volume purchase. The chairs have three rubber tires, a very sturdy aluminum frame with a safety harness to secure the water bound passenger SEA LEGS ocean-going wheelchairs give landlocked disabled people the chance to splash in the ocean like other folks who must be accompanied by a mobile adult. The Rittenhouses received their chair the end of July and had their preview showing at the recent BSO Night Out at Pompano Beach City Hall. “Our rst donation came from a lady who hates the ocean,” Dave chuckles. “However, when she realized what pleasure a SEA LEGS wheel chair could have given her now deceased disabled mother, she made a contribution.” He continues. “Mayor Lamar Fisher fell in love with the idea of providing these chairs free to the disabled at our beach and he hopes we will be successful in getting the donated funds we need.” Terri aims to have four chairs ready and available free of charge when the remodeled beach area is of cially opened. The husband wife team claim of cials contacted have all been enthusiastic about the possibility of seeing this population nally get to enjoy the ocean instead of just looking at it. Broward SEA LEGS. org Charity Drive, will eventually become a 501c 3 nonpro t association. Unity in the Community is a cosponsor. Marlene Groninger, commander of the Disabled American Veterans Auxiliary, hopes the DAV will also become a co-sponsor. She will bring the idea to a vote as soon as the full membership is on hand to appreciate what SEA LEGS can do for the members. To get the needed funds, the Rittenhouse team is donating the cost of ads to hype their charity drive. They are prepared to do their show and tell presentation to service clubs, and any organization, or group that invites them. They will show up, with their SEA LEGS wheel chair and a video demonstration. They currently have invitations to speak to the Pompano Beach Moose Lodge 2157, the American Legion Sterling McClellan Post 142 and the Pompano Beach Elks Lodge 1898. “We’re putting in at least 40-hour weeks to get this charity off the ground, plus the ads, the chair itself and other necessary costs.,” Terri says with a grin. “We bit off a much more demanding project than we realized, but we’re still thrilled to do something that can make a real difference to those who yearn to get into the ocean but haven’t been able to safely do so. Every dime donated goes into the cost of the chairs. There is no overhead. We’re accepting donations, small and large.” Terri and Dave Rittenhouse are sales associates with By The Sea Realty, 223 Commercial Blvd. in Lauderdale-By-The-Sea. Dave is also the owner of Lighthouse Car Wash at 1040 E. Sample Road. To donate or to schedule a demonstration call Diane at 954-351-7007 or e-mail: info@Lighthousecarwash. net Visit the new web site at: Browardsealegs.orgWhen they decided it would be great to offer disabled veterans, children and adults free access to SEA LEGS, they had no idea of what they were getting into. Jerry Groninger, Scott Worobey, Robert Nichols and Jeff Munsell check out Sea Legs, the ocean-going vehicle for persons with physical handicaps. Terri Rittenhouse [right] introduces Deer eld Beach Mayor Peggy Noland and Ron Boehl to Sea Legs, the water-ready wheel chair.

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The Pelican 13 Friday, September 7, 2012 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFLauderdale-By-The-Sea – The town has $150,000 in the new scal year for a program that will encourage owners of small hotels to improve their properties. Applicants can receive up to $25,000 in matching funds for expenditures by hotel/motel owners. The improvements must be visible from the street LBTS will help nance exterior upgrades for small lodgingsor the beach. The program is limited to properties that are designated as Superior Small Lodging properties or properties that have applied to and ultimately receive that designation. Applicants must be members of the Superior Small Lodging Association, or SSL, and undergo a property review. Connie Hoffmann, town manager, said that requirement was added “because we didn’t want the town to be giving money to a hotel that had a reputation for poor customer service and shoddy rooms. We didn’t want to support a hotel that wasn’t going to bring itself up to a certain standard of operation and service.” Eligible for the grants are commercial, licensed transient-lodging properties, excluding vacation rentals, with 50 rooms or less. Grants less than $15,000 can be approved administratively. Those for higher amounts, go to the town commission for approval. Grants are paid on a reimbursement basis, contingent on the applicant’s successful completion of the project and meeting requirements of the agreement. Bi-monthly reports must be submitted. Funds can be used for replacing signs, painting, landscaping, lighting or removing elements which cover original architectural details and design. Priority will be given to projects with signi cant elements of mid-century modern architecture, sometimes referred to as Miami Modern or MIMO, a form of architecture that is prevalent here. Also eligible are repairs or replacement of the structure’s roof and replacement of awnings, overhangs, doors and windows if visible from the public right of way. Applicants must get estimates from three licensed contractors. Projects must be completed in six months. Two applications are currently under review. Grants will be awarded on a rst come, rst served basis. Permitting, processing and impact fees will not be eligible for reimbursement. Application forms and guidelines are available on the town’s website at www.lbts gov or at the Development Services Department.SightingsSightings is a calendar for Northeast Broward county. Send you event information to mdpelican@yahoo.com 9-8 – Shred-A-Thon and prescription drug take back from 9 a.m. to noon at Lowe’s, 1851 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. Hosted by the Broward Sheriff’s Of ce. Limit ve boxes per car. Those who bring prescriptions will receive a $5 Publix gift card. Limit one per family. 954831-8902 or 954-321-4100. 9-8 – Fundraiser for Wilton Manors Kiwanis Club’s annual Kids Day event from 6 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Over Easy Caf, 318. E. Oakland Park Blvd., Wilton Manors. Over East will donate the money from any beverages purchased during breakfast or lunch to Kids Day. 954-5607813. 9-9 – American Legion Post #142 and Auxiliary Unit, 171 SW 2 St., Pompano Beach, is having a blood drive from 11 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Free hot dogs or hamburgers for donors. 954-942-2448. 9-9 – Pancake breakfast hosted by the Benevolent Patriotic Order of DOES See SIGHTINGS page 19

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14 The PelicanFriday, September 7, 2012 While you are enjoying Music Under The Stars on the beach, watching the brilliant fireworks fill the sky with colorbursts on the Fourth of July, or waving to Santa in the Yuletide Parade, have you ever wondered what or who makes it all possible? Up until this year, the answer would have been the city’s parks and recreation department, and while it’s still most of the same people, this year they work under a new name: Pompano Beach Parks, Recreation and Cultural Arts Department This department is responsible for 52 parks including city golf courses, tennis centers, aquatic centers, recreational facilities, beach, fishing pier and passive parks. The department has an annual budget of 11.2 million dollars, a portion of which comes back in fees. This department has 64 full time employees and 80 to 120 part time employees, depending upon the season. Under the direction of City Manager, Dennis Beach, the department is headed up by Mark Beaudreau, Recreation Programs Administrator. Anne Hollady is the administrative assistant. Three Recreation Managers, eight recreation supervisors and two Lieutenant lifeguards complete the top echelon. Established in the 50s, the department had its first spurt of growth under Director Tom Need to stay healthy, play ball, walk the dog, add culture to your life? Pompano Beach Parks, Recreation and Cultural Arts Department has answersBig Bird shows up for Yuletide. Young pianists compete annually at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center. Miller. Much of the Park and Recreation Department’s land originally belonged to the FAA., or Federal Aviation Administration. It was transferred to the city in 1948 for public use. Anne Hollady, on deck for 27 years, has seen remarkable growth in the number of parks. She says, “When we annexed Cresthaven and the Highlands, we added new parks. The city has purchased land adding George Brummer Park, Hunter’s Manor Park and Avondale Park. I’ve had a number of jobs. One of my favorites is chairing the committee for Yuletide Parade and Celebration. It’s a lot of work but it all seems worthwhile when I see the happiness on the faces of people and children.” Hollady adds, “We offer many programs at different locations. The managers and supervisors are open to suggestions from the people who patronize their centers.” While the activities within the city are numerous and varied, every year additions are made. Community Park renovations were completed in early 2012 and the department hosted a Community Park Grand Opening on March 23, 2012. The Pines Golf Course is under construction and will reopen in November 2012 and will have the world-famous Greg Norman signature and become an attraction for major tournaments. Canine Corner, the city’s new dog park is filled up daily with owners giving their dogs a leash-free romp in the park. The two aquatic centers draw competitions to the city, and children have opportunities to work on their swimming skills. A junior lifeguard program has earned a stellar reputation nationally. Beaudreau informed us. “This year the department processed over 110 public event applications. Applications require numerous checks for safety and security by various city departments. such as public works, police, fire, risk management and more. Most events happen so smoothly, few realize what it takes to make them happen. Pulling an event together is exciting and stressful, but these staffers operate on the saying, ‘There are no problems, just solutions.’ But even with all of these staff workers, volunteers join in to assist with specific events. This staff relies on volunteer committees for Yuletide, the Annual Piano Competition and the July 4th Celebration. To help offset some of the costs of these big events, staff solicit donations and sponsorships. The donations and sponsorships allow community members and local businesses to partner with the city. The Pompano Beach Amphitheater is one of the entertainment jewels in the city. The outdoor venue has a seating capacity of 3,000 offering a large, yet intimate setting for memorable evenings under the stars. Seven major city events on the annual calendar are Yuletide Celebration, Music Under The Stars Free Concert Series, 4th of July celebration, Children in the Arts Piano Competition and Fundraiser, Nautical Flea Market, Spring Fling and the popular Halloween Fun Fair. The city also co-sponsors various events such as the MLK Parade, March and Celebration, Run Like A Bunny 5 K, Saltwater Shootout, Annual Derby Day Horse Show and Fair, Annual Halloween Horse Show, Annual Pompano Beach Seafood Festival and Pompano Beach Fishing Rodeo. The department hosts various trade shows at the community centers such as the Intergalactic Bead and Jewelry Show, Shell Show, Tropical Postcard Show, Orchid Show, Health Fairs and Depression Glass Show.Fourth of July Beach Bash Nautical Flea Market at Community Park Fun Times at Summer CampPompano Beach Parks, Recreation and Cultural Arts • 954-786-4111Summer Camp Olympic Day Activities

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The Pelican 15 Friday, September 7, 2012 Lighthouse tours open to public Sept. 8Hillsboro Beach – A tour of the Hillsboro Lighthouse will be offered Saturday, Sept. 8 To participate, meet Hillsboro Lighthouse Preservation Society members at the Sands Harbor Marina, 125 N. Riverside Drive, Pompano Beach, beginning at 8:45 a.m. The rst boat launches at 9 a.m. and the last boat leaves at 2:30 p.m. The tour is free for Hillsboro Lighthouse Preservation Society members and $15 for non-members. Membership is available at the dock. United States Coast Guard regulations require visitors must have at shoes with rubber soles and closed toes in order to make the lighthouse climb. Children must be accompanied by an adult and must be a minimum of four feet tall to climb the tower. No pets are allowed. The Hillsboro Lighthouse Museum and Visitor’s Center will be open from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. The museum is located at Hillsboro Inlet Park, 2700 N. Ocean Blvd., Pompano Beach. Admission to the lighthouse Museum and Visitor’s Center is free. The remaining lighthouse tour dates for 2012 are Oct. 13 and Nov. 17. The light beam from the Hillsboro Lighthouse can be seen 28 nautical miles out to sea, making it the most powerful lighthouse beam in the world. For more, visit www. hillsborolighthouse.org or call 954-942-2102. A Pompano Beach toddler slipped unnoticed under the surface of a backyard swimming pool Saturday afternoon as his family members sat nearby. By the time someone noticed 23month-old Johnny Davoer at the bottom of the pool, it was too late to save him. At 5:53 p.m., Broward Sheriff’s Of ce, or BSO, deputies and Tamarac Fire Rescue were called to 7904 NW 71 Ave. in Tamarac. The rst-arriving deputy performed cardio-pulmonary resuscitation on the toddler, to no avail. Tamarac Fire Rescue arrived and transported him to Coral Springs Medical Center, where he was pronounced dead a short time later. Family members told BSO detectives that they were visiting the Tamarac home to hang out at the pool. Johnny Davoer was playing in the shallow end as his mother and niece sat in chairs feet away from him. His mother had repeatedly cautioned him not to go in the deep end. When another family member came out of the house and asked where Johnny was, they found him underwater, jumped in and pulled him out. It’s unclear how long he was under water. The number one cause of death for children ages 1 to 4 in Broward County is drowning. For information on how to prevent child drownings, visit www.sheriff. org/safety/drowningprevent or call BSO at 954-831-8210. Toddler drowns in pool during family visit SightingsSightings is a calendar for Northeast Broward county. Send you event information to mdpelican@yahoo.com

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16 The PelicanFriday, September 7, 2012 Cut it off for a WishPompano Beach – Shear Excitement Salon, 2101 N. Federal Hwy. in the Citi Centre mall, will be hosting a fundraising event Sunday, Oct. 7 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The staff will offer haircuts for the entire family and donate 100 percent of the proceeds to bene t Make-A-Wish Southern Florida. For more information, call 954-782-0077.By Bill Johnson STAFF WRITERPompano Beach – Plastic pails turned upside down serve as makeshift drums for students learning music in a program operating on a shoestring. Instruments are begged, borrowed or donated, And there aren’t many. In early August, the rst purchase was made a new trumpet. The program is the brainchild of Ethel RobinsonBurns who has a long history as a band booster at Blanche Ely High School and believes music helps kids in many ways. She became concerned when some elementary and middle schools in the city dropped music to save money, so she decided to start an Pompano Beach woman creates after-school and summer music program to ll a voidafter-school music program. The idea was simple. Starting it was not. She learned how to incorporate her business as a non-pro t organization before holding the rst class at an open house at the library in Collier City last December. When school got out for the summer, Robinson-Burns launched the “summer music camp” where students spent Monday through Thursday from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. On a full day, she says, 16 to 20 students attended. She calls the program Motivated United Sound Impacting Communities (M.U.S.I.C.). For the summer, she found a temporary home at the United Pentecostal First Born Church on NW 7th Street. She began raising money with bake sales and garage sales. “The little money we’ve raised, we’ve put back into the program,” RobinsonBurns says. “We have to buy books, drumsticks and paper.” But the summer camp has held on since June, thanks to volunteers, donated space, and a couple of teachers who teach for a very small stipend. One of them, Jordan Rochester of North Lauderdale, is a graduate of Florida State University, who also played drums in the celebrated Marching 100 at FAMU. He agreed to teach because he wants to keep a tradition going. He has high praise for his former music teacher at Blanche Ely High School, Richard Beckford. “I came up under Mr. Beckford,” Rochester says. “Watching how he taught students from zero is something I wanted to do. Music is good for the “You have little league baseball. You have cheerleaders. But you never hear of a little league band.”Burns See DRUM LINE on page 21

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The Pelican 17 Friday, September 7, 2012

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18 The Pelican Friday, September 7, 2012 national competitions. Through his academies many K-9 handlers have gone on to become leading instructors in other agencies and have won numerous awards of their own. Michael’s Patrol Dog Academy was featured in the video K-9 COP. Roy I. Schwartz: Financial Advisor to The Board Schwartz recently retired from 15 years as a volunteer service member and of cer of the board of trustees of the House of Hope, the premier level 2 addiction recovery rehabilitation treatment center in Broward County, Florida. He has been in the practice of public accounting as a Certi ed Public Accountant. He has operated numerous sober living programs in South Florida directed at the veteran and mental health population. Joe Lopez: Director Joe Lopez has suffered from multiple disabilities since birth. His mother, an Immigration and Naturalization Of cer was very active in airport operations. Mrs. Lopez often took Joe to work where he had his rst exposure to drug dogs. He became and still is fascinated by them. After his mother’s death, Joe became a member of the board carrying on the family tradition of service.Vet PetContinued from page 8 meals can stop after a big storm rolls through town. So it’s important to be ready to keep the grill going in case the electricity fails and propane is all there is to cook up the contents of a dethawing freezer. Providing for grills of all types, Forever Propane sells propane tanks from the smallest one-pounders to the big containers on the sides of houses and businesses. “Instead of throwing those propane bottles away when you’re done with them, we provide re llable ones,” said Monika Rosado, Chris’ sister and manager at Forever Propane. And there’s no tank too small to be delivered. For bigger 20-pound propane tanks, Forever Propane offers re lls and replacements. For storm preparation, Forever Propane recommends two 20-pound tanks. “It’s always good to have that spare tank, but it all depends on how much cooking you do,” said Monika Rosado. Customers at Forever Propane don’t have to leave home for propane supplies. “We’ll come out and disconnect your empty tanks and reconnect your full tank onto your grill,” said Chris Rosado. His customers don’t even have to be home. They can leave a check at the house or pay by credit card over the phone. And there’s no charge for delivery, tank disposal or administrative fees. “We’re about taking care of the customer,” he said. The company even offers grill-cleaning services. Forever Propane sells everything needed to keep the grill res burning before and after a storm – from hoses and parts to repair and cleaning services. The whole life of the grill, from sale to xing, repairing and replacing can be handled by Forever Propane. “With us, we get you a topoftheline grill at the best price possible price. And we’re a full service company that can help you maintain it. Anything you need,” said Monika Rosado. “And everybody’s treated like family.” With his two other companies, Forever Cutten Landscaping & Lawn Service and Forever Hauling & Bobcat Services, Chris Rosado can also help with clean up yard waste or debris before or after a storm. “We’re pretty much a onestop shop. I still have loyal customers that only want me to do their landscaping,” said Rosado. Forever Propane is also located in Boca Raton and Hollywood. For more information, visit www.foreverpropane.com or call 954-566-3074.Propane safety tipsDon’t store propane tanks in your car longer than the trip from the store to your home Store propane tanks in a cool, well-ventilated area. Maintain your tank, keeping it free of rust or corrosion. Recertify your tank every 12 years. Propane leaks smell like rotten eggs. If you smell a leak, evacuate the premises and call the re department. Never use a grill inside your home. Close the propane tank cylinder valve when not in use. Do not smoke near a propane tank. PropaneContinued from page 1

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The Pelican 19 Friday, September 7, 2012 SightingsContinued from page 13 Drove 142 at the Elks lodge, 700 NE 10 St., Pompano Beach, from 9 a.m. to noon. Cost is $5 for adults and $2.50 for children. 954-587-1121. 9-10 – The Business Resource Center 50 NE 1 St., Pompano Beach, hosts It’s Not Just Business, It’s Personal, a business networking open house from 5:30 to 7 p.m. 954-586-1111. 9-10 – A Dale Carnegie training program will be held starting at 6 p.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. The free session will be about “How to make a great rst impression and networking best practices.” 954-390-2130. 9-10 – Artist Jennifer Andrews will discuss new public art work at 7 p.m. at Pompano Beach Commission Chambers, 100 W. Atlantic Boulevard. Visit www. Andrewslefevre.com or call 954-357-7236. 9-11 – A class on hip pain will be held at Broward Health North Hospital, 201 E Sample Road, Deer eld Beach, from 6 to 7 p.m. 954759-7400. 9-11 – Behavioral Health Family Support Group meets from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. at Broward Health Imperial Point Hospital, 6401 N Federal Hwy., Fort Lauderdale. Group is for people with family members dealing with mental illness. 954-739-1888. 9-11 – Wilton Manors City Commission meeting at 7 p.m. at city hall, 2020 Wilton Drive. 9-11 – Pompano Beach City Commission meeting at 7 p.m. at city hall, 100 W. Atlantic Blvd. 9-11 – Lighthouse Point City Commission meeting at 7:30 p.m. at city hall, 2200 N.E. 38 St. 9-11 – Lauderdale-ByThe-Sea Town Commission meeting at 7 p.m. at Jarvis Hall, 4501 Ocean Drive. 9-12 – Lauderdale-ByThe-Sea Chamber of Commerce business networking event from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at Chart House Restaurant, at 3000 NE 32 Ave., Fort Lauderdale. Reduced drink prices and free nger foods included in the $5 cover charge. 954561-4800. 9-12 – The Greater Pompano Chamber Business Expo will be held from 5 to 8 p.m. at Citi Centre, the corner of Copans Road and Federal Highway, on the second oor between Lowe’s and Sears. Over a hundred local and See SIGHTINGS page 22

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20 The Pelican Friday, September 7, 2012 Pompano Beach – A groundbreaking ceremony for the new Marriott, 1208 N. Ocean Blvd., was held last month. The planned hotel will have 219 rooms, 11,000 sq. ft. of meeting space and 6,000 sq. ft. of oceanfront function areas. Additionally, the resort will have a rooftop terrace, multiple pools, ocean views and a private beach. The hotel is slated to open by summer of 2013. Kevin Urgo, principle of Urgo Hotels, estimates the hotel will add over 150 new jobs. “Hopefully, we can add something to this community,” he said.Pompano of cials, developers break ground on new Marriott [Above] City and county of cials along with developers put their shovels in the sand for the ceremonial groundbreaking. Pictured are: City Commissioner Barry Dockswell, Kevin Urgo, principle Urgo Hotels; Jeff Bruce, project manager Urgo Hotels, Matt Jalazo, director of development Urgo Hotels, Mayor Lamar Fischer, Broward County Commissioner Chip LaMarca, Vice Mayor George Brummer and City Commissioner Rex Hardin. [Left] A rendering of the new hotel. [Photos courtesy of Urgo Hotels] Executives from Marriott and Urgo Hotels, the company building the new hotel, gather next to the hotel’s renderings.Brick fundraiser for Children’s Art ProjectWilton Manors – The Wilton Manors Development Alliance is selling bricks to help raise money for its Children’s Art Project. The goal of the Children’s Art Project is to create a mini plaza within the southern tip of Jaycee Park, located on Wilton Drive across from city hall. Each brick purchased can be inscribed and will be laid in the plaza. The cost is $100 for a 4 x 8 brick and $175 for an 8 x 8 brick. Messages are limited to three lines, 18 characters each line, for the 4 x 8 bricks and six lines, 18 characters each line, for the 8 x 8 bricks. To order a brick, call 954-401-2182.

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The Pelican 21 Friday, September 7, 2012 The Pelican 954-783-8700 brain, and it’s interesting to see how the students progress.” The other instructor, Kito Brent-Harris of Boca Raton, is another product of the Blanche Ely High School music program. A third year sociology student at Florida Atlantic University, he joined the program to teach piano theory and drums. “We’ve organized in two parts,” he says. “In the rst part, we teach them to read drum music. In the second, we teach them for a recital.” The recital, which ended the summer camp, took place Aug. 7 when each student played a song on the keyboard. “Everyone should start on the keyboard before progressing to another instrument,” Robinson-Burns says. Among the volunteers who kept the summer program going is Deanna Robinson, a student at the University of Central Florida, who plans to be a doctor. She was there every day “doing everything,” -making posters and xing lunches.for She helped simply because she’s interested in kids. The church pastor, James Robinson, a nephew of Ethel Robinson-Burns, is equally enthusiastic about helping kids learn through music. “You never know what can spark their learning,” he says. “If you can get their con dence up, it helps them believe in themselves.” He considers the program to be a valuable outlet for children in the summer. And how about the children? “My grandma told me about it, and I love music,” says 12-year-old Alexander Williams. He’s interested in drums but doesn’t have one, so he practices on the oor at home. Ten-year-old Tequila Youte is interested in drums and piano and has no music program in her school. She explains that she’s learning to read drum music, the symbols for “singles, doubles, triplets and paradiddles.” She summed up the music camp simply as “fun.” As summer ends, Robinson-Burns will look for two locations for the after-school program during the school year. She realizes that some youngsters can’t travel much distance, so she plans to nd two places at opposite ends of the city. She’ll also look for more new and used instruments, equipment and volunteers to keep the lessons going. She is determined to do that. “Whatever I can do for my babies, I will do,” she says. Her ultimate goal is to start a kind of little league band. “You have little league baseball. You have cheerleaders. But you never hear of a little league band.” To donate an instrument, volunteer, or support the program in some way, you can contact M.U.S.I.C. at 854 856-3496 or through the web site: www.Music4thearts.org. DRUM LINE -Instructors Kito Brent-Harris (2nd from left) and Jordan Rochester (3rd from left) teach drum riffs at M.U.S.I.C. Su mmer Camp. [Staff photo]Drum lineContinued from page 16

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22 The Pelican Friday, September 7, 2012 Pompano Beach Chamber ExpoPompano Beach The Greater Pompano Chamber of Commerce’s Business Expo will be held Sept. 12 from 5 to 8 p.m. at Citi Centre, the corner of Copans Road and Federal Highway, on the second oor between Lowe’s and Sears. Over a hundred local and regional businesses will be showcased during the event. Attendance to the event is open to all local businesses and the public and costs just $10 per person. Buy your ticket in advance and get two tickets for $15. The Expo includes nger foods and refreshments and attendees have a chance to win over 75 door prizes throughout the event by networking with the exhibitors. For more information, visit www.PompanoBeachChamber.com, email lspinelli@ pompanobeachchamber.com or call 954-941-2940.Kids DayWilton Manors Every year the Kiwanis Club of Wilton Manors holds Kids Day, a free day of food, fun and games for elementary school students. This year’s event will be held at Wilton Manors Elementary School, 2401 NE 3 Ave., on Saturday, Sept. 22 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. For more information, call 954-560-7813. Adult tennis clinicsWilton Manors Adult tennis clinics are offered Monday through Saturday at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Advanced clinic is Monday from 6 to 7 p.m., Beginners and Intermediate is Tuesday from 6 to 7 p.m., Intermediate is Wednesday from 6 to 7 p.m., Round Robin is Thursday from 9 to 11 a.m., Intermediate is Friday from 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. and private lessons are Saturday from 9 a.m. to noon. Junior Tennis Clinics on Tuesday and Thursday from 4:30 to 6 p.m. Lessons and clinics are given by USPTA tennis pro Donna Kocya. Call to make an appointment for private lessons. For more, call 954-554-1050.Send your Sightings and other news to mdpelican@ yahoo.comSightingsContinued from page 19regional businesses will be showcased during the event. Cost is $10 per ticket or two for $15. 954-941-2940. 9-13 – Better Business Network – Enterprise Group meets at 7:30 a.m. at Galuppi’s, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. Sponsored by the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce. 954-933-1558 9-13 – Wilton Manors will hold its rst budget meeting at 7 p.m. at city hall, 2020 Wilton Drive. Commissioners will vote on the budget, re assessment rates and the millage rate. To view the budget, visit www.wiltonmanors.com or call 954-390-2100. 9-14 – Celebrate National Sewing Month with the Pompano Chapter of the American Sewing Guild. Hand sewing techniques will be demonstrated from 10:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at the North Regional/Broward College Library, 1100 Coconut Creek Blvd., Coconut Creek. 954201-2600. 9-15 – Pony rides from 8 to 11:30 a.m. at Sand & Spurs Equestrian Park, 1600 NE 5 Ave., Pompano Beach. Just north of the Goodyear Blimp Base. Free Admission. Cost is $3 per ride. 954.786.4507. 9-15 – Recovery Awareness Night to bene t Vision of Change, an organization that raises money to help fund projects that bene t the children of Los Quinchos, Nicaragua and their efforts to recover from substance abuse and addiction. Event starts at 6 p.m. at Signature Memories Event Center, 299 N. Federal See SIGHTINGS page 29

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The Pelican 23 Friday, September 7, 2012 Temple Sholom marks Rosh Hashanah Pompano Beach – Temple Sholom, 132 SE 11 Ave., Pompano Beach, will be holding its high holiday services and Rosh Hashanah candle lighting starting Sunday, Sept. 16 at 6:30 p.m. The candle lighting ceremony takes place on Sept. 16 at 7:05 p.m. and Monday, Sept. 17 at 7:57 p.m. Services will be held again on Sept. 17 at 9 a.m., 10:30 a.m., 5 p.m. and on Tuesday, Sept. 18 at 9 a.m. For more information, visit www.templesholom orida.org or call 954-942-0731.Send news to mdpelican@yahoo.com Reading the news[Left] Kelsey Ross studies a sculpture at Brookgreen Gardens in South Carolina. Brookgreen Gardens is a sculpture garden and wildlife preserve, south of Murrells Inlet. The 9,100-acre property includes gardens with American sculptures placed in them, the Lowcountry Zoo, and trails through several ecosystems in nature reserves. Brookgreen Gardens was opened in 1932, and is built on four former rice plantations, taking its name from the former Brookgreen Plantation. 9/11 memorialPompano Beach – Tomorrow, Sept. 8, at 9 a.m. members of American Legion Post 142 will be having a groundbreaking ceremony at their post, 171 SW 2 St., for a new monument that will honor those who lost their lives on Sept. 11, 2001 and the men and women of the United States military who have died in Iraq and Afghanistan. Retired New York City firefighters will be presenting a section of steel from the World Trade Center which will be part of the memorial. For more, call 954873-6462.

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24 The Pelican Friday, September 7, 2012 Above the period piano, donated to the commission, hangs a portrait of Napolean Bonaparte Broward, 19th governor of Florida who planned the Everglades drainage project in 1906.foot walls and hold the volumes that tell the history of this area. A polished oak oor re ects the sunlight that streams through the western windows, massive windows no longer seen in these times. These windows were the only source of air conditioning in the early 20s when this school was in session. Landers is at home in this classroom. Although she never taught at Westside, her mother, Fern Herriott, once served as director of Westside’s summer programs. “This school was nished in 1923. At that time, Broward County’s elementary schools were in three areas: Westside, Southside [1922] and Northside [1927]. Dillard Elementary was for black students,” Landers says. Westside School closed in 1961. These large airy classrooms are a far cry from the rst school in Fort Lauderdale, a one-room cottage on Andrews Avenue, built in 1899. This rst schoolhouse had 14 students. Teacher Ivy Cromartie always carried a long stick with which to chase away rattlesnakes. The area was called Fort Lauderdale, but in fact it was unincorporated and still part of Dade County. Broward County was not incorporated until Oct. 1, 1914. Landers came to Fort Lauderdale with her parents in 1926, shortly after the famous hurricane of the same year. Like all pioneers who came to Florida in the 20s, Landers has strong memories of those hurricanes that gave little notice before making landfall. When she was ve, the 1928 hurricane hit. Her family was in church when the pastor announced the storm and sent the parishioners home. Before Helen and her family got home, the storm was in full swing. The family pulled into an A&P market, then on Southeast Second Street They were about two blocks from their house on Andrews Avenue. “People inside the store wanted us to come in, but my father made my mother and me lie down in a gutter. A tornado passed over us, and then we got back into the Ford coupe and went home. “Once there, I remember my father noticed a window ying past us. ‘There goes someone’s window,’” he said. “I think it’s ours,” her mother said. When things settled down, the family made a post-hurricane tour, traveling as far north as Boca Raton to see the damage that got progressively worse as they continued north. “I remember passing farms where the chickens had had their feathers blown off,” she said. There would be more storms. The 1933 hurricane twisted their house completely around, but Helen and her family had stopped for lunch on Stirling Road during that storm, a meal that probably saved their lives. “When we got home, the house had been hit so hard that carpets and furniture had been carried in the wind across the FEC Railroad tracks,” she says. “Neighbors took us in while the house was repaired.” In 1940, Helen graduated from Fort Lauderdale High School. She headed then to Florida State College for Women in Tallahassee, now Florida State University. In 1933, Helen’s mother founded Fern Hall, a school for winter visitors. Children who were vacationing with their families brought their books and assignments with them to study at Fern Hall where Mrs. Herriott tutored them. Landers was in eighth grade at Fort Lauderdale High School, but she was pressed into tutoring service when she got home. About the same time, another winter school began that later evolved into Pine Crest Preparatory School. Its founder, Mae McMillan began tutoring the children of winter visitors to Fort Lauderdale. In 1934, she founded her school in rented rooms in the old Elks Club building in downtown Fort Lauderdale. In 1939, she moved her 100 students to an eight-acre site on East Broward Boulevard and added a boarding facility. It was here that Mrs. McMillan established Pine Crest School. Space was limited in the former building, so she acquired acreage across a side street for use as an elementary school. Pine Crest remained on the downtown campus for 26 years. In 1965, it was moved to its present location on Cypress Creek Road just west of Federal Highway.The Flying LWhile at Fort Lauderdale High School, Helen learned the reason students were dubbed The Flying L’s. “The school had just opened in the 1920s,” says Helen. “Everyone was thrilled that the track and eld team had been invited to compete in Gainesville for the state championship. There was this one runner who was very fast. They said, ‘Here comes the Flying L.’ And it stuck.” Helen was in college in 1941 when Pearl Harbor was attacked. In 1942, over Thanksgiving vacation, the college girls were encouraged to entertain members of the military home on leave. “I was looking for someone who was tall,” said the then lanky 5’ 7” Helen. “And I was skinny.” Her group came upon some young men playing pool at the Coast Guard Base in Fort Lauderdale. One of them asked the girls to join them. Said Helen, “We can’t. We don’t even know you.” But a Mrs. Neal, who was hosting the event, heard Helen’s remark and said, “Let me introduce you.” That’s how Helen met her future husband, RL Landers They were married at Park Temple Methodist Church. After the war, RL and Helen moved to Texas where RL earned bachelor’s degree in physical education on the GI Bill. Helen completed a masters in history. When they returned to Fort Lauderdale, Helen and RL continued teaching and operating Fern Hall until they sold it in 1971. The new owner renamed the school Florida Oaks Academy. Helen continued teaching as Director of Education at Park Temple Church at 101 SE 3 Avenue. Park Temple merged with First United Methodist, and is now over 100 years old. Helen’s mark on Broward County is indelible. In 1990, she was appointed Broward County Historian, a position she still holds. She served as president and remains an active member of the American Association of University Women. She vigorously campaigned for the Equal Rights Amendment, a law that never passed, and worked with the historical commission to establish the Women’s Hall of Fame. And she is accessible. She is unable to shake her persona as a loving teacher, a quality that makes most people very much at ease in her presence. Meanwhile Helen Landers, 90, continues to keep watch over the massive tomes that contain the progressing history of Broward County. Today, persons who are interested in the history of schools in Broward County are invited to view a gallery of pictures dating back to the rst school in the county. All persons with old family photos and documents are encouraged to donate them to the commission. Volunteers and donations to sustain the work of the commission are needed. Call 954-357-5553. LandersContinued from page 2

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The Pelican 25 Friday, September 7, 2012 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFF Oakland Park – City commissioners approved a tentative millage rate and tentative budget on Wednesday but said they are still looking for ways to cut expenses and lower tax bills. Final reading of the $90 million fiscal plan is Sept. 19. The proposed millage is 6.4315, up from the current rate of 6.0138 and will add $657,000 to the operating account. The median tax rate for a singlefamily homeowner would increase $17. The budget for this year relied on the use of $3.7 million from the fund balance or reserves. “That reliance on fund balance is no longer sustainable, and you need to address that,” City Manager John Stunson said. The new budget withdraws $2.8 million from the fund balance leaving a balance of $9 million. Commissioners disagreed on how much of fund balance should be used. Vice Mayor John Adornato said he was very concerned about going below 25 percent rate. Commissioner Jed Shank supported a staff recommendation of establishing a 20 to 25 percent threshold for reserves. He said that was a prudent approach. “I don’t want to raise the tax to get money to put in reserves,” he said. Shank said he wants something done to mitigate millage that won’t impact services. Commissioner Shari McCartney recommended commissioners approve the proposed millage rate for argument’s sake. “This is tentative. I’m confident it won’t be the final rate,” she said. But she added the commission needs to establish a fiscal policy and to set the reserve rate. “What’s our philosophy? I recommend we no longer dip into reserves but learn to live within our means. I recommend that after this fiscal year we no longer dip into fund balance and work to re-fund the fund balance,” McCartney said. Commissioner Suzanne Boisvenue said she is concerned about using nearly $3 million in fund balance. “Our property values have gone down, and crime has gone up. I want a balanced budget, but I want to make sure we’re not hurting those who don’t have the ability to pay. Then we’ll have more homes in foreclosure. We have bit off too much too fast. We need to slow it down a little.” The proposed budget calls for two additions to the Budget still needs tweaking, OP commissioners sayBroward Sheriff’s Office at a cost of $300,000. Adornato asked what the city will be getting with those additions. Lt. Al Hubrig, executive officer, said the new positions are a supervisory sergeant and a motor deputy. He said by improving supervision the agency can improve efficiency by making sure all deputies are working at 110 percent. The leading complaint from residents is about traffic down neighborhood streets. With the additional deputy, he said traffic concerns could be addressed more quickly. McCartney said she is still not convinced of the necessity of adding the positions. She said there hasn’t been enough time to weigh what restoring five positions this year has done. “And it’s not just salary. We’re also adding a pension obligation for eternity, or so it seems. I’d like more evidence that the restored officers have been efficient and that two more would make a significant difference.” Shank said he would like to see more benchmark data on what is an appropriate number of personnel to have. “I don’t see it fiscally responsible to add two more at $300,000, but I would like more information,” he said. Boisvenue said she supports the additional staff, noting, “Health and safety is our first responsibility.” She said the city has to be ready for growth, and increased policing will be necessary. Stunson said more data will be provided commissioners to support the additional positions.

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26 The Pelican Friday, September 7, 2012 Classi eds Call 954-545-0013 Mechanic Shop for RentPompano Beach Rent this mechanical shop attached to a busy Texaco Station. Rent is negotiable. 954-941-2600. Ask for George Great opportunity. Call George. 954-941-2600 Call The Pelican at 954-783-8700! HELP WANTEDAFRAID OF DOWNSIZING? Start building a business to supplement your income. Great earnings potential on a part-time basis with Primerica. Call 954729-0192. 9-7 POMPANO BEACH – MECHANIC/COUNTER PERSON NEEDED For WellKnown Texaco Fuel Station. References & Experience. Good People Person. Call George 954-941-2600. 9-21 SEEKING EMPLOYMENTHHA – I Will Take Excellent Care Of The Elderly / Companion Aid – Experienced & Certi ed / Have References. Call 845-709-5275. 9-21 CERTIFIED NURSES AIDE / Home Health Aide. 30 Years Experience. Hospital & Home Care. Caring & Loving. Honest & Reliable. Ref. Upon Request. 954-676-5083 Or 954-6553809. 9-7 CAREGIVER / COMPANION Caucasian Woman With 25 Yrs Exp. To Assist & Care For Your Loved Ones. Days / Eves / Nights. Ref. Available. 954-482-5494. 9-7 LPN AT CNA PRICES! Will Drive To Dr. Appointments, Lunch, Shopping, Etc. East Broward Area Only! 954-8957850. 9-7 PRIVATE TUTOR – Online Spanish Tutor / Skype Tailored Lessons w/experience. Good Rates. Save On Gas. 954-5541803. 9-7 MALE CNA / HHA / COMPANION. Broward County Area. Former EMT. All Certi cations / Compassionate, References. Call Ron 954-2322832. Very Reasonable! 9-7 SERVICES DANNY BOY ELECTRIC – Lic & Insured. Lic. #EC13004811. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. 24/Hr Service. 954-290-1443. Beat Any Written Estimate. Sr, Discount. 9-21 ASI SOUTHERN LAWN MAINTENANCE Provides Full Landscape. Architectural Landscape Design. Tree Trimming & Removal, Full Lawn Maintenance. One Time Clean Out. Andrew 954-6757396. GOT JUNK? TRASH HAULING – CONDO CLEANUPS – Trees – Landscape – Yard Fill – Pressure Wash – Roofs – Home Repairs – Welding – Etc. Dave 954-818-9538. 9-28 MIKE THE GARDNER “ The All American Yardman” Yard And Garden Care – Get The Best For Less!! Call 561-5436337 Cell. 9-14 GINGERS HOUSEKEEPING – 20 YRS EXP. (Licensed) References Available. Honest & Reliable – LOVE To Clean Windows! Help Organize – No Problem! FREE Estimates. 954-200-4266. 9-14 HANDYMAN – PAINTING – CARPENTRY – Pressure Cleaning. Decks! Everything Around The House. No Job Too Small. FREE Estimates! Call 561-350-3781. 9-28 HONEST HANDYMAN – HOME & BUILDING Maintenance/Improvements. No Job Too Small. Fast Friendly Service. Reasonable Rates. Local Resident/Homeowner. Call Today For Your FREE Upfront Quote. No Deposit Required. 754-366-1915. 9-7 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIESNew GREEN technology. New defroster control saves energy in home refrigerators, commercial chillers. Patented. All optical. Simple mfg. Strategic partners needed..www.NewAvionics.Com. 954-568-1991. CMUSICIANS WANTEDADVANCED STUDENT MUSICIANS Being Accepted For 2012 – 2013 Membership in the American Legion Symphonic Band! Earn Community Service Points While Improving Your Performance Skills! Rehearsals On Wednesday Evenings from 7pm to 9pm at American Legion Post 142, 171 SW 2nd St., Pompano Beach, FL 33060. Band Director Recommendation Encouraged. Email Music Director James McGonigal at info.legionband@ gmail.com for more information. C REAL ESTATE WANTEDNEED TO BUY FOR CASH FAST!! Small Duplex Or Triplex With At Least One 3 / 2 Or 2 / 2 E Of Federal Hwy. 954-563-3533. 9-21 MFG HOMESFT LAUD / POMPANO WATERFRONT 2 / 2 On Fishing Canal. Private & Peaceful. $49,900. Call John For Appt. 954-495-0557. DOCKAGELHP PRIVATE DOCK $8 / FT. $225 MONTH MINIMUM. 30’ Maximum! Electric – Water. NFB – NLB. Call 954-9468872. 9-7 FURNITUREFORMAL DINING ROOM TABLE w/6 Chairs w/Smoked Glass Top, Credenzas, End Tables, Couch. All Natural Rattan. 863-634-4575 Leave Message. 9-7CEMETERY PLOTS2 PREMIUM LOTS – Forest Lawn Cemetery For Sale. $1,500 OBO Call 561-603-9383. OR 863-9461646. C. REAL ESTATE WANTEDI BUY HOUSES!! CASH!! AS IS! QUICK CLOSE! ANY AREA – ANY CONDITION! NO EQUITY OK. CALL NOW 954-914-2355. 10-19 CONDOS FOR SALEPOMPANO BEACH – DIRECT OCEAN VIEW!! Pet Friendly! 2/2 AT THE BREAKERS! $265K. Also For Rent. Call Juliana At Barclay’s For Details. 1-305-766-4420. 8-17 POMPANO BEACH DIRECT INTRACOASTAL! Feels Like You’re On A Boat. Pool On Intracoastal. Wrap-A-Round Balcony. Spacious 1 / 1.5 $178K. Also For Rent $1350 Month. 954-588-0562. DEERFIELD BEACH / CENTURY VILLAGE – Fabulous Corner – By Pool – 2 / 2 Unfurnished. Laminate / Tile Floors. BEST In The Village! Do Not Wait! Present Offers! $92K. Jennifer – Century Village RE 954-650-5956. POMPANO 2 / 1 UPDATED 1st Floor Corner Unit With POND VIEW! FREE 9 – Hole Golf Course. $39,900. Kim Loucks RE / MAX In Motion. 954609-9730. 9-14 CONDOS FOR RENTPOMPANO AEGEAN OCEANFRONT Unfurnished Large 2 / 2 + Den Or 3rd Bedroom. Tile Floor. Great Ocean & ICW Views!! W / D In Unit. 24 Hr. Security. Hi Def TV In Rent. Exercise Room, Pool, Hot Tub, Garage – Park 2 Cars. $1,700 / Month. Dynasty R.E. 954-295-2356. Call The Pelican at 954-783-8700!

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The Pelican 27 Friday, September 7, 2012 Classi eds Call 954-545-0013 For Sale2 metal shelf units, 6’ by 18” with four shelves $20 each; six four-drawer le cabinets$10 each; man’s Beach Cruiser bike in excellent condition$30; large wooden ne art easel -$30; 3 manual Royal typewriters -$50 each, 5-foot, walnut desk, 4 drawers-$25. Call 954-427-3718.Call The Pelican at 954-783-8700! POMPANO BEACH 1 Block To Ocean – 1 / 1 Fully Furnished. Flat Screens, DVD, Pool, Laundry, Private Parking, BBQ. Monthly Thru December $850. 954-540-9724. 9-7 LIGHTHOUSE POINT 2 / 2 1st Floor – 55+. Pool, Storage, Laundry Facilities. $900 Month / Water Included. Dorothy Bassano – Better Homes & Gardens Real Estate. 954-562-4919. 9-14 POMPANO INTRACOASTAL AT IT’S BEST. Breathtaking Views! Feels Like You’re On A Boat, Pool Deck On Intracoastal. Spacious 1 / 1.5 $1350 Month. A1A S.E. Corner – Unobstructed Views. 2/2 $1,500 Month. 954-588-0562. LEISUREVILLE 55+ 2 / 1 Unfurnished / Furnished $795 / $875 1st & Last. 1st Floor. Free Golf – By Pool / Clubhouse. 954-590-8177. 9-14 APTS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH 1 BR & 2 BR APTS FOR RENT. Remodeled, Paint, Tile, Etc. Washer / Dryer On Site. Pool. Pet Friendly. George 954-8095030. 9-21 POMPANO BEACH 1/1 Apartment. $700 Month Yearly Lease. Pool, Off Federal Hwy. Pet OK! Call Anthony 954-8575207. 9-7 POMPANO BEACH – EAST OF FEDERAL HWY! Walk To Everything! 1 & 2 Bedrooms. Call For Information 954-2546325. 9-14 POMPANO MCNAB RD & NE 18 AVENUE – 1 & 2 Bedrooms Furnished / Unfurnished. $695 $895 And Up. Pool, Tile Floors. Central A / C. 954-6102327. 9-7 POMPANO BEACH 1/1 $650 – NW – NE 2/1 $950 – 2/1,5 Townhouse -Pool $1095 SW 1/1 $750 – 2/1 $925 – 2/2 $950 – 3/2 $1025 ALL FREE WATER. Rent + $70 App Mov-U-In. 954-781-6299. 9-14 POMPANO 2/1 $775 Month Yearly Lease. Pool, Laundry Room, Close To Shopping. Pet OK! 1960 NE 48 Street. Call Anthony 954-857-5207. 9-7 LAUDERDALE BY THE SEA 1 / 1 Ground Floor. Central A / C. Parking Out Back Door. Laundry, Courtyard. 200 Steps Beach. $1,100. 954-8685560 Wayne. 9-21 BEST DEAL IN POMPANO BEACH – Efficiency With Kitchen, Laundry & Pool. No Pets. Weekly – Monthly – Season. 500’ To Beach. 954294-84883 Or 248-736-1533. ATLANTIC / FEDERAL Efficiency $175 / Wk. No Security. Cable, Electric, Internet. FREE W /D. Good Job. No Drug Charges – No Evictions. 954-709-0694. POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 Bedroom From $500. Easy Movein. 1/2 OFF DEPOSIT. Remodeled. Great Location. 954-783-1088 For More Info. 9-14 COMMERCIAL FOR RENT-SALEPOMPANO COMMERCIAL OFFICE Spaces Available. Ranging From As Low As $500 To $700 Depending On Square Footage. Please Call Darci At 954-7833723. 9-7 DEERFIELD BEACH – Retail Of ce Warehouse – 700 Sq Ft With Loft. A/C, Bathroom. $575 Per Month. Call For More Info 561-654-1331 Or 561-9985681. 9-21 CORAL SPRINGS – 1800 SQ FT. Easy Access To Sawgrass, Ample Parking, Monument Sign. FREE RENT & Buildout. Call 954-328-0413. Call The Pelican at 954-783-8700!

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28 The Pelican Friday, September 7, 2012 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach – The one thing, Exchange Club President Robert Friedman would like you know about his organization is that it is dedicated to raising money to improve the lives of kids. Well, maybe there is another thing: They throw amazing parties. Organized here in 1958 with pioneers Stewart Kester and Dan Witt at the helm, The Exchange Club continues to attract movers and shakers – the business owners, professionals and politicians. It is an all-guy band. Although in many places Exchange accepts women into membership, the Pompano club remains stag largely because businesswomen here interested in doing good works are the nucleus of the highly successful Soroptimist Club, Exchange’s partners. The Exchange Club focus is the prevention of child abuse. To that end they donate about $100,000 annually to local organizations with the same mission and through their scholarship funding and essay contest help students Robert Friedman and Emily Ghijselinck. Charlotte Styers, Chuck Schwaderer and Dr. Bob Parks enjoying the Exchange Club social held Saturday night, despite Tropical Storm Isaac.Pompano Exchange Club has a history of having fun while doing goodBartender Michelle Belger volunteered her Saturday night for the Exchange Club social. Al and Linda Siefert, hosts Betsy and Earl Maucker.See EXCHANGE page 30

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The Pelican 29 Friday, September 7, 2012 RJ BoyleRJ BOYLE STUDIOSWell, we survived another small storm and many of us are itching to get back out on the ocean. There will be plenty of oating objects offshore, which usually provide homes for dolphin and wahoos. Anytime we have a storm, that tracks as Isaac did through the Carribean and around Cuba, we know that whatever debris has broken loose from the islands will make its way to us via the gulfstream current. Keep an eye out as you run offshore in pursuit of dollys. You don’t want to run over anything and end your day early. Just before the storm we Tropical storms don’t mean end to shing for big catcheswere able to sneak out with some local guys for a day of sword shing. We landed a nice sh weighing around 325 lbs. This was a tough sh that wouldn’t give up easily and took us nearly 90 minutes to land. Stay tight. [From Left] John Murray, Mike Eury, Steven Bushouse, Jim Bushouse with their 325-lb. sword sh. [Photo courtesy of RJ Boyle]SightingsContinued from page 22Hwy., Fort Lauderdale. Admission is $20. 954-401-0261. 9-15 – Family Fun Day is from 4:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Pompano Beach Aquatic Center, 820 NE 18 Ave. A free day of swimming, diving boards, re trucks, snorkeling, games and more. There will also be raf e prizes. 754-2460665. 9-19 – Art-By-The-Sea group meets at the Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Community Church in Friedt Family Hall, 4433 Bougainvillea Drive. Marcia Hirschy will discuss how artists can market their work. The meeting is free and open to anyone. 954-5940444. 9-19 – ArtHall will be held from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Business Resource Center, 50 NE 1 St., Pompano Beach. ArtHall combines business and art in a series of six receptions. Each month a new exhibit begins with an opening reception on the third Wednesday of the month through October. The event is free. 954-586-1111. 9-22 – Wilton Manors Kiwanis Club Kids Day from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Wilton Manors Elementary School, 2401 NE 3 Ave. Free food, fun and games for elementary school students. 954-560-7813.

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30 The Pelican Friday, September 7, 2012 gain higher education. Some of the charities that have bene tted recently are Children’s Healing Center, Broward Children’s Center, Woodhouse, the Dynamos and the Jack Rabideau Scholarship. To give away all that money, the club’s 65 members have to work very hard at raising it. So they partner with the NFL Alumni Association to sponsor a raf e for two Super Bowl tickets and an allexpense paid trip to the game; they hold bowling tournaments and golf tournaments; and one major dinner/dance a year that brings in a big chunk of change. Last year, Friedman said, the $150 Dinner (the cost of the ticket) held at the Lighthouse Point Yacht and Tennis Club, converted a roomful of normally staid citizens into rock ‘n rollers when the Blues Brothers Tribute Band made a surprise appearance. In fact, the theme of the evening was Chicago in the 20s with elaborate decorations and “guest appearances” by Al Capone and Humphrey Bogart. “Last Year’s president Scott Alford is from Chicago,” Friedman, the 55th president, said. “This year I will have to outdo him. I don’t know that I can.” The evening also includes a draw-down raf e and a live auction of luxury items such ExchangeContinued from page 28as a vacation in an Italian villa or a stay at a ski lodge. In addition to the fundraising events, the club holds a series of socials for its members. One such party was held Saturday at the LHP home of Betsy and Earl Maucker. Because of Tropical Storm Isaac, the venue was changed from the grounds of the Sample –McDougald House to the Mauckers, but in true Exchange Club style 80 people showed up anyway to discuss wind and rain and enjoy ne food and drink. In September, the club will host a “raft up” in Boca Lake for its boating members and in October, an Oktoberfest party in Exchange Park Like many service organization, the Exchange has suffered some loss of membership in the economic downturn. “A lot of people who thought belonging to the club would bring them business, dropped out,” Friedman said. “But they were the wrong kind of members anyway. We are not a networking organization. We don’t encourage our members to promote their businesses to us. In fact, if you try, you’ll get the cold shoulder.” When Exchange was formed in Detroit in 1911, a group of business men met to “exchange ideas.” Its purposes attracted many famous Americans including Calvin Coolidge, Warren G. Harding, Harry Truman and George H.W. Bush. It has evolved into a national organization that raises money for their communities and has a good time doing it. Businessmen with that mindset may want to contact Friedman at 954-783-6694 and inquire about membership in The Exchange Club. It meets Wednesdays for lunch at the LHP Yacht and Tennis Club.Gourmet trucks returnOakland Park – Food trucks and vendors are returning to downtown Oakland Park for another “Gourmet on Wheels” from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 8. The event is at 3148 NE 12 Ave. at the south end of 12 Avenue. 754214-0041 or Debbie Blakely at 954-561-4304.

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The Pelican 31 Friday, September 7, 2012 French speaking dentist opens a new state-of-the-art of ce in Cross Medical/Professional Building Dr. Mandy Mir Esmaili is a new dentist in town. Fluent in French and English, she’s offering complimentary consultations and exams to introduce herself to the community. She’s shown here explaining her suggestions to a patient. [Staff photo by Phyllis J. Neuberger] With numerous degrees, accreditations and certi cations, Dr. Mandy Mir Esmaili offers patients a high level of con dence. But education never stops with this young dentist who continues her studies vigorously to be able to offer the latest procedures to her patients.“I sold my 12-year dental practice In Boston so my husband and I could live in beautiful, warm South Florida,” says Dr. Mandy Mir Esmaili, referred to as Dr. Mandy. She flashes a smile as bright and white as the ones she can create for her patients. Her first move was to get re-licensed by passing the Florida boards. Next, she leased a suite of offices at 2324 NE 53 Street in the Cross Medical and Professional Building, Fort Lauderdale. She says, “I can honestly tell my new patients that I am equipped to offer them the best and most efficient care using the newest state-of-the-art equipment.” Shortly after she opened, Frank Velez was helping her set up her computer system. He says, “I recognized the sophisticated state of the art equipment she was using because I’m a nerd on stuff like that. I overheard her speaking to a patient, and I was impressed. I’ve avoided dentists for almost two decades, but I decided to try her. I am so happy I did. She had to do extensive teeth cleaning and replace a cap on a front tooth. She is very knowledgeable. Her hands are so skilled that she injected me with Novocain and I didn’t even know it. I live in Coral Gables, but I’ll make the long ride because she’s worth it. I’d recommend her to anyone. Her new equipment saves patients time. Time is money, so that means she saves them money as well.” As she proudly led The Pelican on a tour of her offices, she paused to talk about each piece of the newest equipment. “This digital x-ray machine gives the patient 90 percent less radiation exposure than the conventional machine. In addition, it offers a very crisp image which can be rotated to reveal every angle of the teeth, bones, sinuses and surrounding nerves so that I can detect gum disease, cancer, cracks, infection or any abnormality.” The teeth whitening machine, called Lumi-brite, is made by the makers of Lumineers. It has the ability to lighten teeth eight shades in one hour. It also allows Dr. Mandy, to do white fillings in three minutes saving the patient the discomfort of being in the chair for an hour.” An intra-oral camera allows patients to see their own dental abnormalities. This dentist can complete root canals in an hour with new rotary instruments. She is equipped to do total implants without referring patients to a specialist. Her family preventative dentistry services for children, teens and adults include the basics such as fillings, bridges, crowns, dentures and extractions. Lee Reyes works near Dr. Mandy’s office and went to her in an emergency. “I have a terrible fear of dentists,” she explains, “so I was happy to find her so pleasant, gentle and caring. She took care of my immediate problem so well that I don’t dread future appointments for gum surgery, extractions, and more. She inspires my confidence. I’m grateful I found her. I highly recommend her to my family and friends.” Dr. Mandy is also trained with special continuing education in cosmetic dentistry. “We offer Invisalign braces which are invisible and effective, allowing children and adults to correct problems without feeling self conscious, says Dr. Mandy. “I have treated several women over the age of 85 with Invisalign here at Coral Ridge Smile and they have been thrilled with the improvements. “I also place Lumineers which are thin, permanent coverings for discolored or misaligned teeth eliminating shots and drilling.” A native of Montreal, Canada, Dr. Mandy is fluent in French and English: a fact very much appreciated by the many French Canadian snowbirds in the area. Her credentials are impressive. She is a graduate of New York University School of Dentistry where she was in the top five percent of her class. She believes in excellence through passion. She goes beyond the annual requirements for continuing education, seeking out every advanced course offered in innovations and aesthetic dentistry. Open now for eight months in South Florida, she says, “I’m lucky. I’ve handled several emergencies and established good relations with many patients. Several have made plans for extensive dental work. Because I am new and just building a practice, I am offering many promotions, including discounts to seniors. To introduce myself to new patients, I am offering a complimentary consultation and examination. Don’t hesitate to call us at 954-990-6543. We are here for you. Please visit our website www. coralridgesmile.com and join us on facebook at www.facebook.com/ CoralRidgeSmile.”“Dr. Mandy took care of my immediate problem so well that I don’t dread future appointments for gum surgery, extractions, and more. She inspires my confidence. I’m grateful I found her. I highly recommend her to my family and friends.” Reyes Coral Ridge Smiles, 2324 NE 53 St., Fort Lauderdale • 954-990-6543

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32 The Pelican Friday, September 7, 2012 Maria Ledbetter, owner and licensed groomer, has created a spotless, fresh smelling salon where pets are treated like club members in a “Whole Pet” fitness center. It’s an ideal place for people who are interested in having physically, mentally and socially well-balanced dogs. The system works for Ledbetter, who after five years wants to take time to thank the hundreds of clients who have made this salon so successful. Ledbetter is confident that her success is due to her skills with animals whom she says, “I treat like family members and care for them with the same regard. My own dog, Princess, was my inspiration. I pamper her with the best, natural products and do the same for other people’s pets. I take time to acclimate them to the grooming table. Many are frightened from past experiences. I make them comfortable and as stress free as possible.” The owner has a very colorful and varied business history. Ledbetter says, “I’ve owned a 4-star restaurant in Enterprise, Alabama, managed Officers’ Clubs in Europe and Panama, and had a construction business in Pompano Beach. But before that Ledbetter worked in training and development of rural health workers in Central America. “Now that my three children are out of college, I decided to open this salon because I love cats and dogs. I went to school, earned my groomer’s license and the rest is history.” Coleen De’Amico dropped by with Oliver and Lola, who come twice a week for puppy day care and socialization. “They have been coming for the past four years,” says Ledbetter. “This is their second home.”Pup’e Cutz offers many servicesFull Grooming entails styling, bath, nails ears, sanitary area and feet. Shave Downs are very popular for both cats and dogs because of Florida’s heat and humidity. Pets are more comfortable and owners like not having to deal with shedding. Full Bath includes nails, ears, sanitary if needed and the bath. “I do offer a special for regular customers which includes a bath every two to three weeks with a good blowout eliminating hair tangling,” Ledbetter says. She adds, “We do day care for working clients. To many pets, this is a second home because I’ve cared for them since they were puppies. I also do very limited over night pet sitting as an accommodation for regulars. We also walk and care for pets whose owners prefer to have them remain at home. And we do pick up and delivery on request.” “It has been a real learning experience for me that goes far beyond grooming,” says Ledbetter. “My babies who come here for grooming are always teaching me and our staff a deeper understanding of puppies and cats. We have babies who are therapy dogs who watch their masters and alert them when there could be danger of a seizure or heart attack. We even have a therapy bird, Lea, an African Grey parrot who visits elderly homes and helps mom educate others about animals and their needs.” Ledbetter adds that working with her babies actually calms her down. She notes that many people see a drop in blood pressure when they take time to be around dogs. All pets get a new picture after their grooming at Pup’e Cutz. Ledbetter adds the pictures to her Facebook page where they can be shared with family and friends. “When I take these pictures,” Ledbetter says. “I always try to capture their individual personalities. “Pup’eCutz has been an amazing part of my life. Dogs, like people all have different personalities, and it seems the sweetest ones always show up here,” she adds Pup’e Cutz is located at 124 S. Federal Hwy., Unit 2, just east of the corner on the north side of south second street. There’s plenty of parking in the back for clients of this salon. Pup’e Cutz pet grooming salon in Pompano Beach provides comfortable, stress free grooming and care “It has been a real learning experience for me that goes far beyond grooming. My babies who come here for grooming are always teaching me and our staff a deeper understanding of puppies and cats.”Pup’e Cutz, 124 S. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach • 954-946-7884T-Bone, a Labradoodle poses for his Facebook moment. Maria Ledbetter with Princess and Martini

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