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Pompano Pelican
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00090900/00315
 Material Information
Title: Pompano Pelican
Uniform Title: Pompano Pelican
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: Pompano Pelican
Place of Publication: Pompano Beach
Publication Date: 08-31-2012
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Pompano Beach
Coordinates: 26.234722 x -80.125556 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00090900:00315

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Friday, August 31, 2012 Vol. XX, Issue 35 Wherever you are, read The Pelican @ pompanopelican.com Send news to siren2415@gmail.com Pompano Beach Deer eld Beach Lighthouse Point Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Wilton Manors Oakland Park Hillsboro Beach The Galt Palm Aire The Pelican Pelican Visit us online at www.pompanopelican.com The The Pelican Pelican 88 days left in 2012 Hurricane season By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFThe storm has passed. Theres no power in the kitchen nor the rest of the house. So, will it be soup or steaks?At Culinary Concepts, grilling is serious business especially in the aftermath of a stormFor many South Floridians, the aftermath of a storm brings reduced dining options. But it doesnt have to be that way. With the proper amount of preparation eating well doesnt require electricity. From woodred pizza to baked bread to steak, anything you can do in an oven you can do in these, said Dean Marten, owner of Culinary Concepts, as he pointed to a Big See STORM FOOD on page 15 SampleMcDougald House tours on Labor DayPompano Beach The historic 1916 Sample-McDougald House will be open to the general public for tours on Labor Day, September 3rd, from 12 to 5 p.m.. The $5 admission charge includes a guided tour of the house and refreshments. The Sample-McDougald House is located at 450 NE 10 Street in Pompano Beach, and has recently completed a $2.5 million restoration and landscaping effort. The house, the only structure in Pompano Beach listed in the National Register of Historic Places, was originally located on North Dixie Highway, just south of Sample Road. In order to preserve it, the house was moved to its present location in 2001. The 4,500 square foot, Georgian Revival house is noted for its wraparound porch, spacious rooms and intricate architectural detail work. Surrounding the house are four acres of landscaped grounds, designated by the City of Pompano Beach as Centennial Park in honor of the municipalitys 100th anniversary in 2008. In additional to public tours, the house and grounds can be rented for private events such as weddings, dinners and corporate functions. For more information call 954 691-5686.By Judy VikSTAFF WRITERTropical Storm Isaac spared North Broward cities major damage as it blew through this area Sunday and Isaacs winds and rain were inconvenient, but caused little damage, but gusting winds brought high iersheaded toward Louisiana. Rain squalls continued intermittently on Monday. The City of Pompano Beach was very well prepared for the storm, according to Sandra King, city communications director. The citys emergency manager worked all weekend, and public works and utilities employees were on hand. Seven lift stations lost power during See ISAAC on page 16 Sailing surfers took full advantage of the winds on the beaches at Pompano Beach while beach combers braved the surf last weekend. History Issue II

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2 The PelicanFriday, August 31, 2012 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach is a city of hundreds of churches today, but it was the early churches that held communities together as pioneers began to carve out this city which began with 250 residents and has grown to over 100,000 today. Pompano Beach First Baptist Church of Pompano Beach was born in a Methodist church building. An organizational meeting, held May 4, 1915, seven years after Pompano was First Baptists history is signi cant for growth and community outreach Early buildings of First Baptist Churchincorporated as a city, in a community building owned by local Methodists. Here the edgling Baptist congregation met for seven years until parishioners completed their own sanctuary. The Rev. S.P. Mahoney preached two Sunday afternoons a month for a monthly salary of $10. Early in 1921, church members voted unanimously to build their own church at a cost of at least $5,000. Dr. J.P. Lee became pastor in 1922, and in February the church purchased four lots on Northeast 1 Street for $900. Services were rst held in the newly completed church building in July. Early in 1923 the church began construction of a parsonage beside the sanctuary and had it ready for occupancy in less than ve months. By the time both buildings were formally dedicated in March 1924, all the debts had been paid in full with $200 left in the building fund. Although the church building and parsonage suffered heavy damage in a 1928 hurricane, most of the loss was covered by insurance. In 1936 the church began construction of a Sunday School building, which was completed in 1937.See Baptists on page 18

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The Pelican 3 Friday, August 31, 2012 By Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFMerrill Pridemore will not eat chicken. Just the mention of this common fowl makes him shake his head and grimace. His wife, Julia, steps into the conversation and con rms the vow made by her husband of more than 64 years. Thats true, she says. He hates chicken. Merrill will look you in the eye and simulate holding Memories of growing up in Pompano reveal the antics and life of a young boy who is now the family patriarch Merrill Pridemore talks about early Pompano in the same room he was born in 84 years ago. a chicken by its legs. You know how we had to dip them in hot water so we could pull off the feathers? Thats right, Julia says. Stinky. Merril nods his head. So I promised myself that if I ever had enough money to buy my own food, I would never eat chicken again. Merrill has been true to his word. Eighty-four years ago See PRIDEMORE on page 30

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4 The PelicanFriday, August 31, 2012 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFHillsboro Beach Its not surprising that the woman who took it upon herself to write this small towns history came from a part of the country seeped in her own familys origins. Carmen McGarrys was born in Champlain, NY, and her ancestors trace their lineage to Samuel De Champlain the founder of Quebec City. Their family name, Racine, is common there. Her sisters home in Plattsburgh, NY faces a War of 1812 battleground. That region was also a site of the French Indian War. So when she came to Hillsboro Beach in 1991, it The need to unravel fact from ction motivated this history keeper was new territory that needed exploring. The rst thing she cleared up was the towns incorporation date. Thought to be 1941, she went to the county courthouse and found the documents incorporating the town in 1939. From there she took to reading all the handwritten minutes of town commission meetings, every one of them, she says. And she began hearing stories about the town founders that she found hard to believe. To get the facts she went to the archives of newspapers Opal Scrieber, whose husband built the Opal Towers Condominium and named it after her. Photo taken at towns 60th anniversary celebration. Historian Carmen McGarry with the towns rst police marshal Amo Angelletti.and historical societies, searched of cial records, read university publications and funeral home death notices and conducted personal interviews with heirs of the rst settlers. What surprised her is that many of the stories See MCGARRY on page 29 History KeeperMayor Carmen McGarry

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The Pelican 5 Friday, August 31, 2012 By Bill JohnsonPELICAN WRITERLauderdale-By-The-Sea For the rst time, Assumption Catholic Church in LBTS will celebrate a Special Liturgy for Our Lady of Charity, patroness of Cuba, 400 years Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Assumption Catholic Church to hold Spanish mass to celebrate the patroness of Cubaafter her statue was found in Cuban waters. It will be held on Sunday, Sept. 9, at 12:15 p.m. The church is at 2001 South Ocean Blvd. This follows a wellattended July celebration of the patroness of Columbia. The idea is outreach to the sizeable population of people of Hispanic origin in Broward County, says the Very Reverend Michael Greer, the church pastor. This is to celebrate in terms of spirituality and devotion, as well as community building. Fernando Alvarez, an active member of the church for 12 years, has played a key role in organizing the mass. He explains that the United States national anthem will be played for a procession to post the ag near the alter. Cubas national anthem will then be played as its ag is posted. A statute of the Lady of Charity will be in place and six ladies representing the six provinces of Cuba will bring oral offerings to Our Lady. The priest will then conduct a standard mass including hymns. After the mass a reception will be held in the parish hall where Cuban coffee and pastries will be served. As reported in a church publication, the patroness of Cuba dates back to the 1600s when two native Indians and a slave boy in a canoe discovered a statue oating in the ocean. According to sworn testimony of witnesses, it was a statue of the Virgin Mary holding a child and a gold cross. The statue was fastened to a board with the inscription, I am the Virgin of Charity. Although it was found in the water, witnesses reported it was not wet. Over the years, church of cials accepted and authenticated the account, and in 1916 Benedict XV declared Our Lady of Charity as the patroness of Cuba. Pope Paul VI later raised her sanctuary to the category of Basilica in 1997. While this is the rst service at Assumption Catholic Church dedicated to the patroness of Cuba, masses in Spanish are not new to Pastor Greer. He previously served his church in Kendall. There was a diverse Latin population there, and his church conducted a number of similar masses. Fernando Alvarez (L) and Pastor Michael Greer

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6 The PelicanFriday, August 31, 2012 SightingsA community calendar for Northeast Broward County. Send your event information to mdpelican@yahoo.com 9-4 Deer eld Beach City Commission meeting at 6:55 p.m. at city hall, 150 NE 2 Ave. 9-8 Deer eld Beach city shred from 9 a.m. to noon at the Recycling Drop-Off Center, 401 SW 4 St. Cost is $10 for up to ve boxes or bags and $20 for up to 10 boxes or bags. Checks only. 954-480-4379. 9-8 Shred-A-Thon and prescription drug take back from 9 a.m. to noon at Lowes, 1851 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. Hosted by the Broward Sheriffs Of ce. Limit ve boxes per car. Those who bring prescriptions will receive a $5 Publix gift card. Limit one per family. 954831-8902. 9-8 Fundraiser for Wilton Manors Kiwanis Clubs annual Kids Day event from 6 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Over Easy Caf, 318. E. Oakland Park Blvd., Wilton Manors. Over East will donate the money from any beverages purchased during breakfast or lunch to Kids Day. 954-5607813. 9-9 Pancake breakfast hosted by the Benevolent Patriotic Order of DOES Drove 142 at the Elks lodge, 700 NE 10 St., Pompano Beach, from 9 a.m. to noon. Cost is $5 for adults and $2.50 for children. 954-587-1121. 9-10 Artist Jennifer Andrews will discuss new See SIGHTINGS on page 10

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The Pelican 7 Friday, August 31, 2012 By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFRoz Karneol came to Pompano Beach in 1944 when it was still a farm community. Her story is part of the Jewish history in Pompano Beach and how these rst settlers related to and affected the city. Karneal says, As a member of Temple Sholom since its inception, I feel that interfaith living in a Christian community has been a wonderful experience. Like all of the Jewish community, I have participated in many city wide efforts over the years which have enriched my life and hopefully the lives of many Pompano residents. I met my husband, Herman, in Boston during WWII and eventually came to Pompano to meet his family. I never left. We married in Temple Emanuel in Fort Lauderdale, and my life here began. It was totally different from the world I came from in Boston. Our family patriarch, Abe Hirshman, came to Pompano in 1928 and opened the BonTon Department Store. His brother, Moe, followed in 1934 and opened the Pompano Pharmacy which still exists under different ownership. The Hirshman family now numbered eight which included Abe and Lena Hirshman, Moe and Goldie Hirshman, Florence and Eddie David and my husband, Herman Karneol, and me. The other Jewish family in Pompano included Dave and Gussie Goldberg and Harry and Fay Goldberg. The twelve of us began the Pompano Jewish Circle which was the foundation for our Jewish community. We met in each others homes and talked about having our own temple one day. Perhaps because our Christian friends all had churches, we were eager to identify ourselves as a Jewish community. Its Pompano Beachs Jewish Center at Temple Sholom began with Jewish Circle of 12 pioneers back in the 40sSee TEMPLE on page 44

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8 The PelicanFriday, August 31, 2012 WORSHIP DIRECTORY: Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad. Rev. Hyvenson Joseph By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFOakland Park The public will be heard on the proposed $90.5 million budget Wednesday, Sept. 5 at 6:30 p.m. The scal plan calls for a $1.5 million increase in revenue and a tax increase of about $17 for the median household, a re assessment increase to $196 for residential units and withdrawal of $2.88 million from fund balance. City Manager John Stunson said if the commission makes no move to increase taxes or make cuts, the city will be out of reserves in two more years. During a budget workshop Wednesday, Commissioner Shari McCartney suggested commissioners focus on the big picture and include a plan for re-funding the fund balance, our savings account. The precipitous drop in fund balance is frightening, she said. We need a plan to rell it to pre-crash level. With this budget, the balance will be at $9 million. McCartney suggested looking at staff additions in the Broward Sheriffs Of ce, purchase of a re truck and the citys lobbying contract as possible ways to drop the increase in the millage rate signi cantly. We need to make sure our taxes are reasonable and we get the services we need, she said. Vice Mayor John Adornato said it is crucial the city maintain a high level of safety. He noted that residential burglaries are up, adding that is not unique to Oakland Park. He shared McCartneys concerns about tapping into reserves. He said he thought more ways to save in the budget could be found. Last year we had a proposal to increase some recreational fees. Maybe we can take a look at that for further parity. Mayor Anne Sallee said, I absolutely believe we need the two additional BSO of cers. We have issues with crime and have employees who are overworked. We have traf c problems in the city and want to maintain safe conditions. [The proposed budget calls for an additional sergeant and motorman.] She said that the new re truck will be paid for over seven years. Sallee agreed the fund balance must be brought up. But we shouldnt do it at the expense of public safety. Commissioner Jed Shank noted the proposed budget calls for no layoffs, merit pay increases, an aggressive downtown marketing plan and minimal reduction to services. I dont support any further reduction in reserves, Shank said. If we can put off increasing taxes for another year, we need to do that. He suggested not adding the two deputies to BSO, for a savings of $300,000 and not purchasing the new re truck until talks are held about the Facing tax hikes, public will review OP budget this weekpossibility of consolidating the re department with another agency. Commissioner Suzanne Boisvenue, disagreeing with Shank said the two new deputies are needed and so See TAX on page 9

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The Pelican 9 Friday, August 31, 2012 is the new re truck. Public safety is our number one priority. We have a truck that is almost no use at all. She suggested paring down the $404 million proposed for the Community Redevelopment Agency and marketing the downtown. Were spending almost $300,000 more than weve ever spent before. Adornato noted that its the state that required the city to add to its pension fund at a cost of $1.4 million, which is why so much of fund balance is being used. He said he supports the revenues for Main Street, adding, Were getting an incredible response. Addressing the re truck purchase, Stunson said the best reserve vehicle is a 12year-old truck. If that is out of service, the department relies on a 25-year-old backup, and sometimes it breaks down. Fire Chief Don Widing said he has borrowed a truck from Broward County in the past, but said he cant rely on another agency for a truck. He said the older vehicle should have been gone four years ago. TaxContinued frm pafe 8 Edna Horne Johnson (lower left) celebrated her 101st birthday last weekend in Boca Raton with many members of her large clan and friends. A native of Deer eld Beach, Edna was the fourth of six children born to Joel and Ardena Horne. When she was 32 she married Myrle Johnson and had two daughters, Joyce Avanti(standing left) and Judy Denault. Pictured with them is Joel Horne, 96, Ednas brother. She now lives in Georgia close to her daughters and is still sharp of mind. In a song her family composed, Edna is described as warm and precious, her favorite things: her Baptist religion, Lawrence Welk, clearance racks at Macys and hot fudge sundaes. Ednas parents came to Deer eld Beach around 1903. Her mother, Ardena, lived to be 103. Happy birthday Edna Horne The Pelican 954-783-8700

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10 The PelicanFriday, August 31, 2012 Fingerprints at Pac N Send, LHPLivescan digital ngerprinting is now available at Pac N Send, 3640-83 N. Federal Hwy., Lighthouse Point. Penni Morris explains that the ngerprinting is done at her stores location and electronically sent to Florida Department of Law Enforcement. Morris added that she can also process Level I and Level II applicant background checks and a series of other background checks. Call 954-946-7760.County Call CenterBroward The Broward County Call Center provides a single point of contact for the services and programs offered by the more than 50 agencies comprising Broward County government. The center offers callers a fast, simple and convenient way to reach trained, professional information specialists. Questions ranging from Where can I get a passport? to Who is my commissioner? can be answered. Calls to the center can be made in English, Spanish or Creole. The center is open Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Under emergency conditions its open 24/7. Call 954-831-4000 or 3-1-1 or 954-831-3940 for the hearing impaired. Business Resource Center eventsPompano Beach On Friday, Sept. 7 from 4 to 6 p.m. the Business Resource Center, 50 NE 1 St., hosts Ask The Expert, a free oneon-one consultation with a technology professional. Topics include hardware con guration, PC repair, software installation, iPods, iTunes, virus and smart phone assistance. On Monday, Sept. 10 from 5:30 to 7 p.m. the Business Resource Center hosts Its Not Just Business, Its Personal, a business networking open house. Meet local business owners, build an external team, discover common connections and win prizes. For more information on either event, call 954-5861111.SightingsContinued from page 6public art work at 7 p.m. at Pompano Beach Commission Chambers, 100 W. Atlantic Boulevard. Visit www. Andrewslefevre.com or call 954-357-7236. 9-11 A class on hip pain will be held at Broward Health North Hospital, 201 E Sample Road, Deer eld Beach, from 6 to 7 p.m. 954759-7400. 9-11 Behavioral Health Family Support Group meets from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. at Broward Health Imperial Point Hospital, 6401 N Federal Hwy., Fort Lauderdale. Group is for people with family members dealing with mental illness. 954-739-1888. 9-11 Wilton Manors City Commission meeting at 7 p.m. at city hall, 2020 Wilton Drive. 9-11 Pompano Beach City Commission meeting at 7 p.m. at city hall, 100 W. Atlantic Blvd. 9-11 Lighthouse Point City Commission meeting at 7:30 p.m. at city hall, 2200 N.E. 38 St. 9-11 Lauderdale-ByThe-Sea Town Commission meeting at 7 p.m. at Jarvis Hall, 4501 Ocean Drive. 9-12 The Greater Pompano Chamber Business Expo will be held from 5 to 8 p.m. at Citi Centre, the corner of Copans Road and Federal Highway, on the second oor between Lowes and Sears. Over a hundred local and regional businesses will be showcased during the event. Cost is $10 per ticket or two for $15. 954-941-2940. 9-13 Better Business Network Enterprise Group meets at 7:30 a.m. at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. Sponsored by the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce. 954-933-1558 9-13 Wilton Manors will hold its rst of cial budget meeting at 7 p.m. at city hall, 2020 Wilton Drive. Commissioners will vote on the budget, re assessment rates and the millage rate. To view the budget, visit www. wiltonmanors.com or call 954-390-2100. 9-14 Celebrate National Sewing Month with the Pompano Chapter of the American Sewing Guild. See SIGHTINGS on page 17

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The Pelican 11 Friday, August 31, 2012

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12 The PelicanFriday, August 31, 2012 Deerfield Beach The story of Manufacturer Direct Eyewear begins with the owner, John Lombardi, an importer and exporter of eyeglasses and optical goods for 35 years. Ten years ago, Lombardi purchased his property on the edge of a redevelopment zone because he needed more space for his wholesale business. Taking advantage of the citys faade program, he improved his property and with his business neighbors created a retail-friendly commercial strip on Hillsboro Boulevard. just west of Dixie Highway. The result has been a highly successful location and business which continues to expand and improve with changing technologies. Weve had much success here, Lombardi said. With his background in importing, Lombardi aptly named his store Manufacturer Direct Eyewear with the idea of offering his products directly to the public. It caught on. Soon after, customers were requesting a variety of well-known designer eyewear. In the spacious, brightly decorated showroom, customers can choose from hundreds of styles of eyeglasses, sunglasses and sport glasses with the assistance of a highly-trained staff. The store features designer names: Tom Ford, Tiffany, Bulgari, Guess, Ray Ban, Maui Jim, Costa Del Mar, Oakley, Coach and most recently, for younger customers, the Olsen Twins line of frames, Elizabeth and James. Using the very latest in computer manufacturing equipment, a client can be examined by a board certified optometrist, fitted with a frame, have lenses cut, and ready for assembly in a day. This new technology keeps his business innovative and exciting, Lombardi said. Lombardi is passionate about good vision, especially for young people. He offers them a back-to-school special: three pairs of glasses with polycarbonate lenses for $99 and a $50 eye exam. Students come in our shop who cant see across the room, he says. They often dont realize that everybody doesnt see like they do because they have nothing to compare their vision to. An eye exam not only checks the health of their eyes it gives a reference point as to what correct vision is. Manufacturer Direct Eyewear, 142 W. Hillsboro Blvd., Deerfield Beach 954-570-9293 www.lensframes.comId like this to be a store that is also a health institute. John Lombardi.The latest styles, changes in technology and a caring staff all contribute to the success of Manufacturer Direct EyewearThis lack of good vision accounts for many students failing in school and eventually dropping out, he said. He also urges young people to wear sunglasses saying, So much eye damage is done before the age of 18 years. Id like our customers to consider this store a health facility as well as the place they buy their eyeglasses To this end, the Optometrists at Manufacturer Direct Eyewear have forged a working relationship with the Rand Eye Institute and refer clients with serious eye conditions there. The optometrists often take walk in patients with emergencies, usually caused by workers not using protective eyewear while using saws, working with metal etc. doctors also diagnose and treat many eye conditions such as glaucoma. Our doctors fit all types of contact lenses including multi focal. Along with a board-certified optometrists, Steve Hammer, a licensed optician, is on site. Steve and other trained staff help customers/patients select the best progressive and other types of lenses to fit their lifestyles. Lombardi donates a good deal of time to his Deerfield Beach community, active in the Chamber of Commerce, other organizations and volunteering each summer to take in students from the Neighborhood Initiative Program which gives teenagers a glimpse of the working world. He is also expanding his online business, Extreme Eyewear, which provides specialty glasses for divers, pilots, competitive shooters, and cyclists all over the world. One of those lines, American Optical is one of the few eyeglasses still stamped with the letters, USA. This business, which may seem ordinary on the surface, is always evolving Lombardi said. It is a new and exciting time to be in business. For the latest in optical information, visit the Manufacturer Direct Eyewear Facebook page which contains news on eye health as well as the latest styles in eyewear. The family of employees at Manufacturer Direct Eyewear, many of whom are multi-lingual, focus their attention on the clients needs. Said Lombardi, We meet friendly, wonderful people from all over the world and develop bonds with many of our customers who have also become our friends. A worthy achievement for this business celebrating a decade in Deerfield Beach. Risa Lombardi models fashion sunglasses

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The Pelican 13 Friday, August 31, 2012 Deerfield Beach Welcoming thirsty patrons since 1975, the old Tipperary Pub is practically a landmark in the Deerfield Beach community. We took over from Big Ron in April of 2003, says current owner Dick Maggiore as he reminisces about the persistence it required to finally procure this well-established tavern and eatery from its previous proprietor. Along with the help of business partner Danny OConnor, Maggiore has continued the tradition of offering typical Irish pub fare in a friendly neighborhood bar setting. The New York native has been in the food industry since 1976 when he opened his first deli in the Rockaway district of Queens. Now, Maggiore focuses his energies on his two core businesses: Tricky Dicks in West Boca and the Tipperary Pub. I absolutely love it here in Deerfield. I used to live in Fort Lauderdale but moved up here because it is so much more enjoyable, says the dedicated restaurateur. The menu is quite straightforward with all-day breakfast and a good selection of appetizers, grilled specialties Tipperary Pub, The Cove Shopping Center, 1540 3 Ct., Deer eld Beach -954-421-9769Deer elds Tipperary Pub serves up Irish fare with neighborly airTipperary Pub owner Dick Maggiore shows off a couple of the house breakfast and lunch specialties. and sandwiches. Our Irish Farmhouse breakfast features bangers, sausage and blood pudding all imported from Cork in Ireland, says Maggiore. For those who have visited the Emerald Isle, this meal will definitely bring back memories. In addition, a nice portion of zesty home fries accompanies most traditional breakfast dishes. Omelettes, pancakes, smoked salmon and madefrom-scratch biscuits and gravy are some of the other good options. Some days people are waiting in line outside the door when we open. The locals really enjoy our food, says smiling bartender Michelle. For the lunch and dinner menu, The Tipperary Pub offers up all the classics one could expect to find in a good sports bar. Grilled fish Caesar salad, chicken wings, mozzarella sticks, smoked fish dip and hearty clam chowder are just a few of the starters to whet ones appetite. Weve got just about everything from scratch, say Tipperarys Chef Frankie as he brings out a sizeable halfrack of ribs smothered in a tangy house BBQ sauce. He is joined by Chef June in the kitchen. Other favorites from the grill include the OBacon Burger with cheese, the 10 ounce New York Strip steak, the grilled tuna steak and the filet of sole. Our baby-back ribs, meatballs and chowder are all excellent, says Maggiore. There is also a good choice of subs and sandwiches such as Philly cheese steak, chicken breast, dolphin, stacked Irish ham and even liverwurst. But the Tipperary is also very much a pub. With pool tables, dart boards, table shuffleboard, umpteen flat screen TVs with sports packages and a well-stocked bar, there is plenty of entertainment for patrons. We have dart teams, a pool league and even a softball team. We also have a pig roast on the fourth Sunday of each month during high season, says Maggiore. Happy hour is from 4 to 8 p.m. daily. Ladies night is on Monday from 8 p.m. to midnight. There is free wi-fi and discount coupons can also be printed directly from the pubs website at www.tipperarypub. net. The average dish costs about $6 and breakfast starts at $2.99. Daily lunch specials are posted on boards. Take-out is popular and free parking is plentiful. We have an emergency generator to make sure we never close during hurricanes. People travel from far away to come see us at those times, chuckles Maggiore. We also have a stimulus special featuring a 16 oz Pabst Blue Ribbon for $2, adds the wily entrepreneur. Reminiscent of Cheers, the little Boston bar so famously depicted on television, the Tipperary is the kind of pub where everyone remembers your name. Everybody knows everybody. This is a very friendly place, says Maggiore.

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14 The PelicanFriday, August 31, 2012 Dr. Kellie Mosley-Mendez takes great pains to make her patients feel at home. From their rst view of the outer of ce, decorated like a high end living room, to the extra time and attention they are given, the client comes rst in this dermatology practice. I dont see 60 patients a day, said Dr. MosleyMendez. This is almost a concierge practice. My staff is very well trained. We all spend lots of time explaining treatments and outcomes to the patients. There is no rushing them in and out. Once a client comes in here, he or she usually comes back. Interested in dermatology her whole life, Dr. MosleyMendez obtained her degree in Osteopathic Medicine from Nova Southeastern University in 1998 and completed her residency at Broward General Hospital in 2002. After working in the area for awhile she established her rst of ce in Miami Lakes. A little over a year ago, she moved to Lighthouse Point with her husband Kevin, a radiologist at Florida Medical Center, and her son Kevin, Jr., 9, a national diving champion. Its a move she is glad they made. In April 2011, she opened DKM Skin Care at 4801 N. Federal Highway in Fort Lauderdale. I was basically starting over, but I like the clientele up here and being near Holy Cross Hospital gives me lots of referrals. We wanted to live on the water because we have a boat, and Lighthouse Point is a good place for a family, MosleyMendez said. The dermatologist took her practice another step and became a certi ed pharmacist so she can dispense prescription drugs for skin problems. She also sells her own skin care line to treat conditions such as psoriasis, acne, rosacea and melasma. Along with moisturizers and cleansers, the best seller in the line is an anti-aging lotion containing essential ingredients that rejuvenate the skin. These are medical grade products only available at a doctors of ce, she said. What that means is the products contain a higher percentage of active ingredients than what can be sold over the counter at Dr. Mosley-Mendez offers cosmetic solutions and countless ways to solve skin problems, sun damagedepartment stores. And the prices are comparable, in some cases cheaper, since most DKM products sell in the $20 to $40 range. This practice treats all skin diseases and conditions and offers cosmetology procedures such as vein treatments, skin resurfacing, Botox injections and Juvederm applications. The newest lasers remove surgical lines, scars, redness and dark spots on the skin. Within the last month, she has added a MOHS laboratory for her skin cancer patients and will schedule procedures with a MOHS surgeon right in her of ce. A MOHS surgeon is trained to read tissue slides in the on-site lab and can proceed immediately to do more surgery as required during the procedure. Like others in her eld, Dr. Mosley-Mendez is seeing a rise in skin cancer patients. She attributes that to people continuing to go into the sun despite the warnings and the popularity of tanning salons. She recommends annual skin exams. One of her long term patients, Kim Van Sant, brings her whole family to DKM. She recalled how concerned DKM Skin Care 4801 N. Federal Highway, Fort Lauderdale. 954-202-7881 Dr. Mosley-Mendez was when treating one of Van Sants sons. She was so apologetic that the numbing shot would be a bit painful, Van Sant remembers. She herself has had numerous procedures including vein removal and skin peels for sun damage. I dont think she has ever recommended anything that I would not recommend to someone else, Van Sant said. This dermatology of ce also offers a Slim Down program which is doctor monitored for effective weight loss. Although Dr. MosleyMendez enjoys interior decorating, her real passion outside the of ce is her sons diving career. A member of the Pine Crest swim team, Kevin Jr., also dives with USA Diving and last year was national champion in his age division. This year, he is ranked third in the nation diving in the age 9 to 11 division. Free time and vacations are spent at dive meets, Mosley-Mendez said. This summer, Kevin is training with an Olympic coach. The staff at DKM Skin Care creates a happy, caring atmosphere. From left Phillip Banks, Aida Bonilla, Dr. MosleyMendez and Saili Ordaz.Dr. Kellie Mosley-Mendez in her of ces at 4801 N. Federal Hwy., Fort Lauderdale.

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The Pelican 15 Friday, August 31, 2012 Green Egg which is a combination oven, smoker and grill powered by charcoal. It takes 10 minutes to get it up to temperature, said Marten. For grillers looking for a step below a Big Green Egg, Culinary Concepts has smaller grills perfect for condo balconies or for those just looking to cook up the essentials after the power goes out. For those looking for a step above, theres the 56-inch Alfresco grill. With a rotating rotisserie, infrared cooker, smoker and refrigeration unit, the Alfresco, which uses propane, can cook up a meal after an out of the ordinary weather event or an everyday barbeque. Marten has the 42-inch version at home. After Wilma hit in 2005, he was an important person to know in his neighborhood. All the neighbors brought food over to our house as their freezers were thawing. Thats the bene t of owning a grill store. Youre always prepared. Not too experienced on what cooks well and easy on a grill, besides hot dogs and hamburgers? Marten says, Leg of lamb and ribs cook easily. But almost anything is grill worthy. As the things in your freezer thaw you just start grilling them, said Marten. Culinary Concepts staff can even help pick out the right kind of wood to use to get the desired smoked taste in your meat from sweet to earthy. But without proper preparation nothings getting smoked or grilled. And just like gassing up the car and making sure there is enough charcoal or propane to last the aftermath of a storm, Marten recommends everyone make sure their grill is in a usable condition before a storm hits. To prepare for a storm or the perfect barbecue, Culinary Concepts sells sh baskets, meat thermometers, hibachi grills, mosquito misters, pizza cutters, cast iron skillets, cook books, spatulas, drink tumblers that keep ice cubes frozen for up to ve hours and even olive stuffers for the person who has everything, said Marten. Culinary Concepts also offers some alternatives to traditional grilling. Instead of drenching your charcoal in lighter uid, Weber Cubes can be used to get charcoal going. Its a lot cleaner and youre not introducing the lighter uid chemicals into your charcoal or your food, said Marten. And rain or shine, every Saturday Marten and his staff like to re up one of the grills at the store and show their customers just what they can do. Plus, when you have to work Saturdays you may as well eat, he said. For more, visit www. gratecook.com or call 954781-5163. Family Fun DayPompano Beach Splashes and Smiles Swim School will celebrate its 4th Annual Family Fun Day on Saturday, Sept. 15 from 4:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Pompano Beach Aquatic Center, 820 NE 18 Ave. Join Splashes and Smiles for a day of swimming, diving boards, fire trucks, snorkeling, games and more. There will also be raffle prizes. The event is free and all proceeds benefit the The Kids Cancer Foundation of South Florida. For more information, to donate items to the raffle, sponsor the event or volunteer, email SplashesandSmiles@gmail.com or call 754-246-0665. Storm foodContinued from page 1 Dean Marten, owner of Culinary Concepts in Pompano Beach, stands next to the 56-inch Alfresco grill. With a rotating rotisserie, infrared cooker, smoker and refrigeration unit, the Alfresco, which uses propane, can cook up any meal after an out of the ordinary weather event or an everyday barbeque. [Staff photo]

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16 The PelicanFriday, August 31, 2012 the storm, but generators were at the sites to keep them running. According to King, among the other stormrelated incidents, an electrical panel at Fire Station 103 in Cresthaven shorted out. A tree at the citys dog park fell on a fence causing minor damage, and winds felled several new trees on the jogging path. Public works employees picked up about 200 cubic yards of vegetative debris. Some areas, including portions of Cresthaven, lost power. Residents of Deer eld Beach fared better with no power outages reported. According to Environmental Services Director Charlie DaBrusco there was some tree damage but the only major cleanup effort was on the beach where the winds pushed sand over Ocean Avenue from the shing pier to SE 4 Street. Crews worked all day Tuesday clearing the roadway. The street further south to the city limits remained clear, protected by sand dunes and sea grasses. Thats why we plant the dunes, DaBrusco pointed out. With no serious threat from the storm, fun loving citizens came to the beach to get a glimpse of the surf and then retreated to beach restaurants. While they offered no hurricane specials, a manager at Big Daddys said,Sunday is always a busy night, but this Sunday was much busier than we anticipated. In Oakland Park, city rain gauges showed six inches fell between Friday and Monday, as predicted. City facilities were shuttered when tropical storm warnings were issued. We had no ooding issues, no injuries, no major downed trees or wires and no power outages, said David Rafter, public information of cer. Oakland Park re ghters responded to a small re in a house in the 300 block of NW 38 Street at 1:30 p.m. Sunday. The re was caused by a short in electrical wiring in a wall and was not storm-related, Rafter said. No one was displaced or injured. The citys Emergency Operations Center was open at a re station and staffed all weekend. In Lauderdale-By-TheSea, power outages were reported near Terra Mar Isle on Sunday and in a few spots south of Commercial Boulevard Monday. A few traf c lights were out due to power outages. Effects were nothing signi cant, Lt. Angelo Cedeno said, noting that winds were stronger on Monday than on Sunday. The town experienced minimal ooding, according to Steve dOliveira, spokesperson. Some newly planted trees and branches were down. There was no property damage and no ooding damage. Crews were out Saturday cleaning drains and pumping water. In Lighthouse Point, a spokesperson at the Public Works Department said there was no storm-related report from that city. The wind and rain did caused cancellation of many events. The Pompano Exchange Club, planning a social outside at the SampleMcDougald House, moved the party to a private home in Lighthouse Point. And even when the storm had passed on Tuesday, of cials participating in the ribboncutting ceremony of the C. Scott Ellington Technology Business Incubator, delayed that ceremony until later in September. Ellington was a resident of Deer eld Beach. Storm Dogs Mixed terriors, big Jaxson and little Oliver were recently seen walking around Terra Mar Island in hurricane styled-rain gear. Their master, Kyle Campbell quipped Rain or shine, dogs need to be walked. [Photo by Barbara McCormick]Wilton Manors The City of Wilton Manors has hired a contractor to pick up Tropical Storm Isaac related tree debris on Monday, Sept. 3,. Tree debris should be at the curb no later than 7 a.m. Three trucks will haul debris through the central, east and western parts of the city. This pickup is for tree debris only. Storm debris pick IsaacContinued from page 1

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The Pelican 17 Friday, August 31, 2012 Boat ramp closed but boaters will get a breakDeerfield Beach Due to the complete closure of the boat launch ramp at Pioneer Park from Tuesday, Sept. 4 through Friday, Dec. 7, patrons may turn in their 2012 parking until Dec. 7 and receive a pro-rated discount of $25 toward their 2013 sticker. Current sticker documentation must be shown to receive the credit slip. No refunds will be issued. Boat trailer parking stickers brought in past that the Dec. 7 deadline will not qualify for this discount. For additional information please contact 954-426-6898 or visit Parks and Recreation, 401 SW 4th Street, Deerfield Beach. SightingsContinued from page 10 See SIGHTINGS on page 20Hand sewing techniques will be demonstrated from 10:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at the North Regional/Broward College Library, 1100 Coconut Creek Blvd., Coconut Creek. 954-201-2600. 9-15 Pony rides from 8 to 11:30 a.m. at Sand & Spurs Equestrian Park, 1600 NE 5 Ave., Pompano Beach. Just north of the Goodyear Blimp Base. Free Admission. Cost is $3 per ride. 954.786.4507. 9-15 Recovery Awareness Night to bene t Vision of Change, an organization that raises money to help fund projects that bene t the children of Los Quinchos, Nicaragua and their efforts to recover from substance abuse and addiction. Event starts at

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18 The Pelican Friday, August 31, 2012 BaptistsContinued from page 2Church membership and Sunday School attendance declined slightly in First Baptists third decade. However, with the sweeping national prosperity that followed the end of World War II, the church began a steady growth that continued for years. Rev. Charles W. Smith became pastor in March 1945. Under his leadership the church built a second Sunday School building and began construction of its present auditorium. In late 1949, church membership was 525. In 1950, First Baptist promoted development of an Oakland Park mission that later became an independent church. The new auditorium was dedicated in January 1955, and by the fall of that year, membership topped 1,000. First Baptist members continued building missions in North Pompano and Margate. The Rev. Mack R. Douglas became pastor in December 1962. He had a vision for the churchs development and expansion that far exceeded anything the congregation had dreamed of: a half-million dollar recreation and education building that would Today, First Baptist Church of Pompano remains a pillar in the community as well as a landmark.add needed Sunday school space and provide a place for supervised programs in basketball, volleyball, tennis, handball, skating and bowling. The new two-story building also included music facilities, senior-adult activity areas, church of ces and a large fellowship hall with fully equipped kitchen. Ground-breaking took place in November 1963. The new activities building provided a great boost for the already thriving youth ministry. In October 1965, the church instituted a new Sunday school department for single adults, reaching out to a long-neglected segment of the congregation. And the recreation and education facility have been an integral part of First Baptists growth ever since. The gym is used most everyday for some purpose. I cant tell you names of athletes but theres been a lot of church growth from athletic programs, said Jerry Bowman, a deacon at First Baptist who joined the church in 1960 after marrying his wife, Newana Cheshire, one of the pioneer members. Douglas resigned in February 1969, and Dr. Robert L. Smith became the 12th pastor in September of that year. A Tell Pompano crusade in March 1971 resulted in a Pompano Pentecost with more than 80 conversions and about the same number of spiritual rededications. Another important ministry began in June 1979. The Day Camp, an all-day program for children during summer vacation, was launched and now also provides after-school programs during the school year. In December 1979 a Christmas tradition was born with the presentation of the rst Singing Christmas Tree under the direction of Rev. Al Fennell, music minister. In May 1980 First Baptist celebrated its 65th anniversary by breaking ground for the nal portion of the expansion that had been almost 10 years in planning. The adult building would stand along the front of the recreation building and extend east along 1st St. until it connected with the sanctuary building. The Lena Lyons Warren addition was dedicated in February 1982. The church reluctantly accepted Dr. Smiths resignation in October 1984. During his 15-year pastorate he baptized 1,365 people, and the church accepted 2,128 members by transfer. The Spanish and Haitian missions, new adult education building and growth in single-adult and senioradult ministries bore witness to his wise leadership and the support and hard work of his wife Ethelyn, according to a church history. I think the community has changed around Pompano and our church has changed ethnically, said Pastor Don Worden. We have a more diverse church and it re ects the community around us. Worden, who oversees church administration and missions, said the church has also expanded its missions to Haiti, Honduras and the Dominican Republic. The number of Haitian Baptist churches in the Dominican Republic has increased as a result. Because of conditions in Haiti many Haitians immigrated to the Dominican See BAPTISTSn page 19

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The Pelican 19 Friday, August 31, 2012 Republic. Our goal is to have 120 Haitian Baptist churches in the Dominican Republic by 2014. Right now were up to 70, said Worden. In September 1985, the BaptistsContinued from page 18church called a Texan, Dr. Thomas B. Harris III. as pastor. He died of cancer in July 1987. The Rev. Kenneth Hall Smith Jr. began his pastorate at First Baptist on Easter Sunday, March 26, 1989. He dened his task as that of equipping each church member to minister in the marketplace. The church observed its 75th anniversary in May 1990 with a weekend of celebrating and reminiscing. Pastor Smith resigned in April 1991 to establish a fulltime evangelistic and teaching ministry. The church called Dr. Robert Dominy as pastor in January 1992, and he and his wife Janet began their ministry here on March 1. In March 1993 former member Dr. Al Mohler was named president of Southern Baptist Seminary in Louisville, Ky. Dr. Mohler grew up in First Baptist and was licensed and ordained in the church. The church opened the Lords Gift House in May 1993 in a small building on a corner of the church campus. It is open every Saturday morning, staffed by volunteers, to dispense donated food and clothing as well as the gospel to needy people in areas around the church. Pastor Dominy resigned in March 1999. Rev. David Rice, former interim youth minister, became pastor in September. In April 2000, the church voted to establish a new building fund to prepare for future growth requirements. The campaign raised over $1.6 million over four and a half years. In November 2003 Dr. Rice left to return to Westside Baptist Church in Gainesville, his college church. On May 1, 2005, as the church celebrated its 90th anniversary, Dr. Ron Harvey took the helm as new senior pastor. He continues to lead the church today as it continues its mission of reaching and nurturing all people for Christ. Charter members of First Baptist Church were Mr. and Mrs. Ed Cook, Mrs. Rachel Hardin, Mrs. Kitty Hardy, Mr. and Mrs. A.J. McCaughy, Mr. and Mrs. W.A. Petsch, Mr. Cleve Rucker, Mr. and Mrs. R.B. Rucker, Mr. W.C. Rucker, Mrs. L. Smith, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph P. Smoak, Mr. and Mrs. L.R. Smoak, Mrs. E.J. Walker, Mrs. John Warren and Mr. and Mrs. George D. Wyse. Information for this article came from The Harvest Plentiful, a booklet published by First Baptist Church on its 90th anniversary.

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20 The Pelican Friday, August 31, 2012 City to give update on hurricane prepPompano Beach Kimberly Spill, emergency manager for the City of Pompano Beach, will be the guest speaker at the Pompano Beach Highlands Civic Improvement Association meeting on Tuesday, Sept. 4 at 7 p.m. The meeting will be held at Highlands Park, 1650 NE. 50 Ct. Spill will give updates on measures the city has taken to prepare for natural disasters and other types of emergencies. The public is invited to attend. For more information, visit www.pbhighlands.org or call 954-9336393. 6 p.m. at Signature Memories Event Center, 299 N. Federal Hwy., Fort Lauderdale. Admission is $20. 954-401-0261. 9-19 Art-By-The-Sea group meets at the Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Community Church in Friedt Family Hall, 4433 Bougainvillea Drive. Marcia Hirschy will discuss how artists can market their work. The meeting is free and open to anyone. 954-5940444. 9-19 ArtHall will be held from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Business Resource Center, 50 NE 1 St., Pompano Beach. ArtHall combines business and art in a series of six receptions. Each month a new exhibit begins with an opening reception on the third Wednesday of the month through October. The event is free. 954-586-1111. 9-22 Wilton Manors Kiwanis Club Kids Day from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Wilton Manors Elementary School, 2401 NE 3 Ave. Free food, activities and games. 954-560-7813.FridaysPompano Proud meets every second Friday of the month at McNab Park, 2250 E. Atlantic Blvd., from 8:30 to 11 a.m. Every second Sunday the group meets at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach, at 6 p.m. 954-562-3232. The Pompano Beach Rotary Club meets Fridays at 12:15 p.m. at Galuppis, 1103 SightingsContinued from page 17 See SIGHTINGS on page 21

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The Pelican 21 Friday, August 31, 2012 The Pelican 954-783-8700N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. 954-786-3274. Art Gallery 21 is open every Friday from 7 to 9 p.m. The gallery, located at the Womans Club of Wilton Manors, 600 NE 21 Court, features various artwork from various artists across the State of Florida. Admission is free. Visit www.canawm.org for more information.SaturdaysPony rides are available at Sand & Spurs Equestrian Park, 1600 NE 5 Ave., Pompano Beach, from 9 to 11:30 a.m. Cost is $3 per ride. 954786-4507. The Pompano Beach Kiwanis Club Westside meets the rst and third Saturdays of the month at 8:30 a.m. at the E. Pat Larkins Community Center, 520 MLK Blvd., Pompano Beach. 954-782-8096. The Deer eld Beach West Kiwanis Club meets the second and fourth Saturdays of the month at 9 a.m. at Westside Park, 445 SW 2 St., Deer eld Beach. 954-54-7329883. Kayak rentals are available Saturdays and Sundays at Richardson Historic Park, 1937 Wilton Drive, Wilton SightingsContinued from page 20 See SIGHTINGS on page 24

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22 The Pelican Friday, August 31, 2012 DOUBLE TR SENT AS SP

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The Pelican 23 Friday, August 31, 2012 RUCK PREAD

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24 The Pelican Friday, August 31, 2012 Get rid of debris from IsaacBroward Residents can drop off vegetative debris and other refuse from Tropical Storm Isaac at Broward Countys Residential DropOff Center. The center, 2780 N. Powerline Rd., Pompano Beach, is be open to all Broward County residents except for Hallandale Beach, Parkland, Pembroke Pines and Pompano Beach on Saturdays from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Other drop-off sites are located at 5490 Reese Road, Davie and 5601 W. Hallandale Beach Blvd., West Park. To drop off debris you must have a valid drivers license showing your current address. For more information, call 954-765-4999.Deer eld to get new recycling carts soonDeerfield Beach Starting in September, Deerfield Beach residents will receive their new recycling carts. The carts are part of the citys All-In Recycling initiative to increase the amount of recycling by instituting a rewards program that will start in October. The rewards program gives recyclers points that can be used towards discounts and gift certificates to local restaurants, shops and entertainment spots. Recyclers can claim rewards valued up to $25 per month or more. For more information about Deerfield Beachs All-In Recycling program, call the Recycling Division at 954480-4454.Generator ready storesBroward A list of generator ready businesses by city is available online. The directory includes all the gas stations, grocery stores and home improvement stores that have generators in case of a loss of power. Visit www. broward.org/Hurricane/Stores to see the list. Manors. Visit www.AtlanticCoastKayak.com or 954-7810073 for rates. The Wilton Manors Green Market is held every Saturday and Sunday at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. 954-592-0381. The Deer eld Beach West Kiwanis Club meets the second and fourth Saturdays of the month at 9 a.m. at Westside Park, 445 SW 2 St., Deer eld Beach. 954-54-7329883. Pompano Green Market is held every Saturday from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the corner of Atlantic Boulevard and Cypress Road. Vendors wanted. 954-782-3015.MondaysPlay ping-pong from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Cost is $1. All ages can participate. 954-3902130. The Gold Coast Toastmasters Club meets on the second and third Monday of the month from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Dennys, 3151 NW 9 Ave., Fort Lauderdale. 954895-3555 or 954-782-9951.TuesdaysThe Oakland Park Historical Society meets on the second Tuesday of every month at 5:30 p.m. at the at Oakland Park Library, 1298 NE 37 St. For more information, call 954-566-9957. SightingsContinued from page 21 See SIGHTINGS on page 25Tell The Pelican about your news! mdpelican@ yahoo.com or 954783-8700!

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The Pelican 25 Friday, August 31, 2012 Palm Aire/ Cypress Bend Democratic Club meetingPompano Beach The Palm Aire/Cypress Bend Democratic Club will hold a meeting on Tuesday Sept. 4 at 7 p.m. at the Herb Skolnick Center, 800 SW 36 Ave. Matthew Stewart, field organizer for the Obama Campaign, will be a guest speaker and talk about campaign matters. A representative from the League of Women Voters will also be a speaker and discuss the voter ID laws that have been passed in some states. Refreshments will be served. Call 954-975-3772 or 786877-1644. Ice cream socialPompano Beach Pompano Beach -Iberia Bank, 990 N. Federal Hwy., will be hosting an ice cream social today from 1 to 4 p.m. For more information, call 954-6011100. Deer eld Beach Rotary Club meets every Tuesday at 12 p.m. at the Deer Creek Golf Club, 2801 Deer Creek Country Club Blvd., Deer eld Beach. 954-630-9593. Pompano Beach-Lighthouse Rotary Club meets every Tuesday at 7:30 a.m. at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. 954972-7178. The American Legion Auxiliary Unit 142, 171 SW 2 St., Pompano Beach, has Bingo on Tuesdays at 7 p.m. Food is available from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. 954-942-2448. A Yoga class is available for all levels at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors, on Tuesday nights from 6:30 to 8 p.m. and Saturday mornings from 10:30 a.m. until noon. The cost is $7. 305-607-3520. Zonta International meets on the third Tuesday of the month at Duffys Diner, 401 N. Federal Hwy., Deereld Beach, at 11:15 a.m. Zonta International works to advance the status of women. 561-392-2223.WednesdaysThe Deer eld Beach Historical Society meets on the third Wednesday of each month from 12 to 1 p.m. at the Old School Museum, 232 NE 2 St., Deer eld Beach. For more information, call 954429-0378. The Pompano Beach Historical Society meets on the third Wednesday of every month at 7 p.m. at the Dick & Miriam Hood Center, 217 NE 4 Ave., Pompano Beach. For more information, call 954292-8040. The Wilton Manors Kiwanis Club meets Wednesdays at 6:30 p.m. at 2749 NE 14 Ave., Wilton Manors. 954561-9785. The Oakland Park Kiwanis Club meets Wednesdays from 7:30 to 8:30 a.m. at Peter Pan Diner, 1216 E. Oakland Park Blvd., Oakland Park. 954-566-9957. The Pompano Beach Kiwanis Club meets Wednesdays at noon at the Riverside SightingsContinued from page 24 See SIGHTINGS on page 28

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26 The Pelican Friday, August 31, 2012 Broward College, North Campus, 1000 Coconut Creek Blvd., Coconut Creek, Fla., 33066 954-201-2270Broward College helps build a better community one mind at a time Floridas public state colleges uniquely support the viability, vitality and robust growth of the Sunshine State. And as one of Floridas Great 28, Broward College is committed to fulfilling this mission. In 1957, Florida embarked on a program to create a network of two-year colleges where Floridians could complete their undergraduate education or pursue two-year technical programs leading to the workforce. The state mandated that each of the colleges would be affordable and located within 30 miles of 95 percent of the states population. When the state released its plan, Broward County was not among the highest-priority communities selected for the first wave of construction: Broward was rated Two-A. By 1959, Broward County was placed at the top of the priority list and work on the Junior College of Broward County was quickly underway. Founding President Dr. Joe B. Rushing was hired from Howard Payne College, in Brownwood, Texas, on March 17, 1960, and 17 days after accepting the position, he was in Broward County, assembling his faculty and staff. Just over four months later, on Sept. 6, the Junior College of Broward County opened its doors to its first class 701 students. Classes were held at the former Naval Air Station Junior High on the western edge of what is now the Fort LauderdaleHollywood International Airport. A faculty of 28 and staff of 19 welcomed students on opening day. Since that day, Broward College has worked diligently to provide a highquality educational experience for every student. Broward Colleges graduates go on to serve our community, state and nation, and ensure the safety and vitality of our communities. Central Campus, which was the colleges first permanent campus, opened in 1963. North Campus opened its doors on Feb. 24, 1972, and since that time has remained North Browards focal point for higher education. In addition to providing classes for students preparing to go on and continue their study at four-year universities and colleges, North Campus is the location of choice for students in associate in science degree and certificate programs such as massage therapy, diagnostic medical sonography, radiation therapy, nuclear medical technology and others. Among the associates degree programs offered at the North Campus is a completely redesigned Engineering Technology degree, which includes Manufacturing Skill Standards Council (MSSC) classes that will prepare you for the nationally recognized MSSC certification. North Campus is also home to two popular community resources, the Toski-Battersby Golf Improvement Center, which opened Oct. 10, 1989, and the Junior Achievement World Huizenga Center, which opened on Sept. 21, 2009. All these programs are currently being offered right in your backyard at Broward Colleges North Campus. North Campus also offers selected bachelors degree programs, which were approved on Feb. 19, 2008, by the Florida Board of Education. As with several of Floridas state colleges, the offering of bachelors degrees is part of a Floridawide push to meet specific workforce needs throughout the state. On May 28, 2008, Gov. Charlie Crist signed legislation changing the name of Broward Community College to Broward College and the Colleges first class of bachelors degree program students began attending classes in January 2009 and graduated in December 2010. Early in 2011, the Washington D.C.based Aspen Institute ranked Broward College in the top 10 percent of community colleges nationally. The ranking made the college eligible to compete for funds from the institutes $1 million Prize for Community College Excellence, to be awarded at the end of the year. The prize represents a partnership among the Aspen Institute, the Joyce and Lumina Foundations, and the charitable foundations of Bank of America and JP Morgan Chase. As Broward College forges into its second half-century of service to Broward County, it does so as one of the nations largest institutions of its type, with a visionary, dynamic board of trustees, president, administration, faculty and staff working together, and a reputation for the pursuit of excellence and service to the diverse communities it serves. From the 701 students, 28 professors and the small staff who opened the college in 1960, Broward now serves more than 66,000 students annually and employs a faculty and staff of more than 2,000. (Right) North Campus Student Affairs Building(Below):North Campus engineering students prepare for high-wage, highdemand careers in advanced manufacturing electronics and electrical, mechanical and industrial engineering From the 701 students, 28 professors and the small staff who opened the college in 1960, Broward now serves more than 66,000 students annually and employs a faculty and staff of more than 2,000.

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The Pelican 27 Friday, August 31, 2012 Mary Stefl has seen a lot of the world. From her early days in England and the rest of Europe to her travels across the Atlantic to Canada and finally to settling down with her husband, Roger, 19 years ago in South Florida, she has seen a lot. But would anyone imagine Mary settled? Not those who know her. Her energy and intelligence continue to drive her to new heights. Thats what happened in February 2009, when a group of young persons at First American Title Underwriters who had worked together for years decided to break out on their own and forge the birth of Bailey Woodruff Title Company in Deerfield Beach. Mary calls that event her Once upon a time . story. We knew we were good at what we did, says Mary. We were very good, and we wanted to be the best that the community would ever see. And this entrepreneur was right on target. Offering her colleagues the same salaries they had at the time, she chose those whom she believed could put together a title company that would raise the bar for service and efficiency. Mary has never looked back. She explains why choosing Names for photo, from left to right: Sarah Parker, Stephanie Sylvester, Jay Yeskel, Amy Wahl, Lorna Tritt, Millie Linhares. Mary Ste centre, with Miles the dog.Bailey Woodruff Title Company, Inc., 665 SE 10 St., Deer eld Beach 954-571-7919a good title company is critical. We are the ones that take care of the closing o there are no problems, Mary says. Good old fashioned service, care and consideration for the client are what this new company stands for. We believe in talking with people, listening to what their customers have to say and even holding hands, when necessary. We make sure all of closing documents are in place and on time. And she gives credit for meeting those goals to her staff. Short Sales are all the rage, and buyers and sellers have a wonderful negotiator in Millie Linhares, who has successfully closed many a hopeless transaction. Century Village was, is and always will be an enormously influential force in the neighborhood, and Jay Yeskel and Loma Tritt are the undisputed King and Queen of The Village closings, Mary says. A little international flavor is brought with Sarah J. Parker from Australia Founding Bailey Woodruff Title Company, a once upon a time storyand Mary from Europe. Amy Wahl and Stephanie Sylvester are part of the All-American contingent, Mary adds. Bailey Woodruff may be a fledgling company, but Mary is very proud of being named one of the top five closing offices in Broward County, according to Data Trace. And in spite of the housing market, Mary encourages everyone to hang onto the American dream of home ownership. Yes, ladies and gentlemen, it is still possible to get a mortgage, buy a home or refinance an existing homestead, she says. Bailey Woodruff with their outstanding staff, modest pricing and unbeatable enthusiasm are the people you needwhat ever your situation might be, she says. They all look forward to greeting you at their premises on SE l0* Street, in Deerfield Beach, just next to the (recently re-opened) Dunkin Donuts, a block west of Federal Highway, and invite you to turn to www.baileywoodruff.com to find their individual profiles..

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28 The Pelican Friday, August 31, 2012 Grille at the Sands Resort, 125 N. Riverside Drive, Pompano Beach. 954-444-4815. The Greater Pompano Beach Senior Citizens Club meets on the second Wednesday of the month at the Emma Lou Olson Community Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach, at 10 a.m. 954-9437787. The Alzheimers Caregivers Support Group meets Wednesdays from 10 a.m. to noon at the NE Focal Point Alzheimers Day Care Center, 301 NW 2 Ave., Deer eld BeachThursdaysThe Wilton Manors Historical Society meets on the third Thursday of the month at Wilton Manors City Hall, 2020 Wilton Drive, at 7 p.m. For more information, call 954-566-9019 or 954-5668219. The Rotary Club of Oakland Park/Wilton Manors meets every Thursday from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. at Tequila Sunrise Mexican Grill, 4711 N. Dixie Hwy., Oakland Park. 954-491-6158. The Deer eld Beach Kiwanis Club meets at noon every Thursday at the Deer eld Beach Hilton, 100 Fairway Dr., Deer eld Beach 954-242-6083.SightingsContinued from page 25

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The Pelican 29 Friday, August 31, 2012 true and that inspired her to write the rst of cial history of the town in 1997, The Magni cent Mile. It took four years to put all the bits and pieces she had collected together. It was so dif cult. I didnt put any hearsay into the book, McGarry said. Prior to publishing the towns history, her interest in its past earned her an appointment as town historian and she assembled a historical committee: Amo Angeletti, the rst town marshal, Connie Caloggero, Mary Celantano, Ann Grainger, Dean Lindstrom and Sandy Satullo. Hillsboro Beach was settled by wealthy families. They purchased building lots platted from ocean to Intracoastal Waterway. McGarry says they were adventurous people and sharp investors and the 3.2 miles of oceanfront property presented them a real estate opportunity. The man most signi cant to establishing Hillsboro Beach as a town was Ernest Wooler, the rst mayor. Wooler was an English-born engineer, one of the designers of the original Rolls-Royce. Later he worked at Packard building aircraft engines used during WWII. He purchased his Hillsboro Mile building lot in 1935, built a home and himself held the administrative positions necessary to creating a town. His long history here did not end until 1968. Herbert Malcolm brought a different kind of experience to Hillsboro Beach. He was headmaster at Lake Placid where students came in the winter, but the school struggled nancially and in 1925 with the help of investors, he opened the Hillsboro Club which is here today on the Hillsboro Inlet. Although the town was very primitive delivering water to the club and its guests was one of the dif culties people ocked to the resort and it became an exclusive retreat long before the town was incorporated. Famous for his political background, Edward Stettinius, U.S. secretary of state 1944-45 and rst U.S. representative to the United Nations, had a winter home here visited by Franklin Roosevelt, Winston Churchill and Gen. George Patton among others. His presence in town gave rise to other persons of in uence, namely Bink Glisson who became caretaker of Stettinius home and later C. Oliver Wellington who purchased that home and went on to develop the City of Wellington in Palm Beach County. Glisson was a nephew of Cap. Ted Knight of the legendary Caps Place restaurant and was a founding commissioner of the Hillsboro Inlet Improvement District. Another pioneer of interest was Russ French, out of Detroit, whose family owned a mortgage and bond Company. He moved into one of the rst houses on the Mile, was mayor in 1952-55 and literally put down roots here becoming a bean farmer and founder of the First National Bank of Pompano Beach. When Alex D. Henderson moved here in 1946 he intended to retire. Instead he founded Hillsboro Country Day School in 1953 with money he earned from his stock options at the Avon Company. Later he established the Henderson Clinic in Fort Lauderdale. Real estate developer Floyd Grainger moved to town in 1958 and built Deer elds rst beach highrise, Tiara East. He served as mayor in 1965, was the rst vice president of the Deer eld Beach Chamber of Commerce and established non-pro t housing for the elderly in Delray Beach. Charles Stradella was an automotive industry pioneer on the board of General Motors Corp. when he retired in 1962 here. He was also CEO of General Motors Acceptance Corp. Stradella served several years on the commission and helped pass two municipal bond issues, one for beach nourishment, the other for the water plant. President of Breyers Ice Cream, Clyde Shaffer, moved to town in 1965, became its zoning expert and served on the commission and as vice mayor. Then there was John Erickson, a Chicago businessman who became Floridas oldest mayor after serving 12 years on the commission here. He also edited the town code adopted in 1976. Those are a few of the people whose lives make interesting reading in Magni cent Mile. McGarry herself has remained an important link to the history of Hillsboro Beach. In, 1999, she headed up the committee that celebrated the towns 60th anniversary, the bicentennial year having been ignored by town of cials. She singlehandedly arranged to have the Barefoot Mailman statue removed from its original home the Barefoot Mailman Hotel and Restaurant to town hall. With a $500,000 grant from Broward County (which also built the police station) she found sculptor Frank Varga who cast it in bronze. The original was moved to the grounds of the Hillsboro Lighthouse on the inlet where mailman James Hamilton apparently drowned in the late 1880s (Another good story in McGarrys book). Last year, that statue was found to be decomposing and McGarry commissioned Varga to restore it. McGarrys talents are not con ned to writing history. She is a stained glass window artist and designer of jewelry and member of ASID. She attended college in Albany, NY and graduate school at the University of Chicago where she lived many years and raised her family. After moving south, she became a fulltime community volunteer. Among her interests locally, The Florida Lighthouse Association, The Womens History Coalition, The Area Agency on Aging, The Womens Political Caucus, The former Womens League of Hillsboro Beach and Rotary International. In the last paragraphs of her book, McGarry sums up the real value of being an historian. Only by knowing well a towns shortcomings and strengths can citizens succor it in hard times and sustain it during good times. To that end, Magni cent Mile was written. McGarryContinued from page 4

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30 The Pelican Friday, August 31, 2012 At Jacks Bar, this cash register was busy as soon as prohibition was lifted. PridemoreContinued from page 3 Merrill entered this world in the very same house he lives in today. His home on 2nd Street in Pompano Beach was built by Dave Hardin. Dr. George McClellan was on hand to deliver Merrill. It was 1928. Before Merrill reached the age of one, he experienced his rst hurricane. His father and his grandfather had been out checking for damage. They got stuck in a building. When the winds stopped, Merrills father, Jack found his son in the arms of his grandmother huddled in a corner of the house. The roof was gone. The lay of the land was different in 1928. The house on 2nd Street was in the middle of the woods. It was about four blocks from the city limits of Pompano. East of 13th Avenue all the way to the beach was unincorporated. Only a few houses had been built. Atlantic Boulevard was a narrow paved road, big enough for two cars to pass. Merrill and his friends went shing in the Intracoastal Waterway. They watched movies at the Pompano Theater on the corner of 1st Street and 4th Avenue. There wasnt a lot to do here, he said. We had to use our imaginations for fun. The story of Merrill and Julia Pridemore is a portrait of one of the many strong families that braved mosquitoes, snakes, gators and hurricanes that occurred, unannounced, over the years. Pompano had not yet annexed the beach area beyond 13th Ave. The big business was farming winter crops like beans and peppers that provided jobs and great wealth for these early entrepreneurs. The Bean & Pepper Jamborees celebrated that harvest with barbecues, games and mule races. Merrill Pridemores grandfather, Nat Shriver, had a 40acre farm located on Sample Road and Federal Highway, across from the present location of the shopping center referred to as Shoppers Haven. There were farms throughout the land that became Lighthouse Point. Shriver rented the farmland from Flagler Railroad Company. Gene Pridemore, Merrills son, remembers his father telling the stories of the Flagler Company urging him to buy the land. But Shriver did not want to deal with taxes. Neither Merrills father nor he was inclined to pursue farming. Merrills father, who anticipated the approaching end of prohibition, opened a store on Hammonville Road, where 3.2 beer was served and sold. Beer with an alcohol content of 3.2 percent could be sold in stores, restaurants, and taverns since it was believed that it was not intoxicating. When Congress repealed prohibition, Jack Pridemore bought the rst liquor license in Pompano Beach and the second license in Broward County. Merrill, when he reached the age of 21, tended bar, worked as a clerk and moved into buying the whiskey and banking the proceeds. During WWII, soldiers in uniform were treated to Jack Daniels. The bar fared very well, says Merrill. And Dad began buying real estate. Jack Pridemore got his real estate license and began buying and selling, an easy task as Pompano was beginning to grow. In 1980, Jacks Bar closed. Today, Merrill and Julia live in the same house on 2nd Street where streets, sidewalks and stop signs have popped up over the years. This once solitary house where chickens and other farm animals roamed has since become urban. Merrill looks back on those early times in Pompano with a rm smile. He recalls his early friendships that included John and Gwen McCormick, Tommy Williams, Bill Sanders, Frank Carson, Charlie Frier, Harry Platts and others. Merrill remembers that John McCormick couldnt join the afternoon action of baseball, shing or digging for artifacts at Indian Mound on Lettuce Lake until he milked his family cow, Blue. Blue was usually staked out on 4th Street. Wed meet up with John and wait until he nished the milking before wed go out to play, Merrill said. Teens adventures in those days seem pretty mild, but The Pelican asked Merrill if maybe there was something he might have done that was bad. Recoiling just a bit, then laughing, he admitted his big crime. One Halloween night, we went to the high school and carried the bike racks up to the second oor, he admitted. [This interviewer held back her shock.] Merrill Pridemores recollection of early Pompano may appear to be calm and reserved, but this family represents the multitude of good and hard-working people who made it through the early years, held their families together, knew their neighbors and knit a close community. There are times when Merrill visits the Pompano Cemetery and reads the names of his many family members who have passed on. And he thinks about them and what they did to build his close family. Merrill and Julia have ve children, Gene, Karen, Denise, Donna and Paul. Today, once a week, Julia cooks for a houseful of children, grandchildren and great grandchildren. They gather at a large table that takes up most of the room. Merrill and Julia admit that theyre never sure whos going to be there, but the table always lls up. Pompano was a good place to grow up, Merrill says.Pompano Beach State of the City address by mayorPompano Beach The Greater Pompano Beach Chamber hosts the State of the City on Thursday, Sept. 27 at 7:45 a.m. at the Pompano Beach Elks Lodge #1898, 700 NE 10 St. Mayor Lamar Fisher will talk about the past year and what the citys plans for the upcoming year are. The cost to attend is $25, includes breakfast and is open to the public. To RSVP send an email to info@pompanobeachchamber.com or call 954-9412940.Kids Day fundraiserWilton Manors Every year the Kiwanis Club of Wilton Manors holds Kids Day, a free day of food, fun and games for elementary school students. This years event will be held at Wilton Manors Elementary School, 2401 NE 3 Ave., on Saturday, Sept. 22 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. To help raise money for the event, there will be a fundraiser at the Over Easy Caf, 318 E. Oakland Park Blvd., Wilton Manors. On that day, the money spent on coffee, orange juice, milk or other beverages will be donated by Over Easy to the Wilton Manors Kiwanis Club. So have a good meal and help some deserving kids at the same time. For more information, call 954-560-7813.

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The Pelican 31 Friday, August 31, 2012 What began with the birth of a boy born in the 1960s in the tiny Italian town of Ascoli Piceno continues with the man and the owner of a thriving restaurant in the heart of Pompano Beach. We lived a very rural, farmland existence, says restaurateur Giuliano Vallorani We had no money and no running water. We grew our own crops and raised pigs, chickens and rabbits. But fate would conspire to dramatically alter Valloranis existence when his aunt married an American from New York. The nuptials set off a chain of events that eventually allowed the extended family to move to Bensonhurst, New York and, shortly thereafter, Hollywood, Florida. My mother has been living in the same house in Hollywood since 1972, adds Vallorani with genuine astonishment. I graduated from McArthur High School in 1980. The following year I opened Alberts Pizza on County Line Road in Hallandale. I was only 19 years old at the time, says the impressively fearless entrepreneur. After 3 years of operation I sold Alberts and bought an existing pizzeria in Margate. This was the original Zuccarellis that I still own and run today, adds Vallorani who only recently inaugurated his new establishment in Pompano. After running Zuccarellis for nearly 30 years in Margate, I suddenly decided I wanted to open another restaurant. My wifes mother lives in Lighthouse Point and told me about a beautiful stand alone building near the Pompano golf course that was up for sale. And that is how Zuccarelli East was born! recalls the affable paesan. I go back to my hometown in Italy almost every year. It is amazing to see the progress that has occurred there, says Vallorani who remains close to his roots. Indeed, it is this strong connection with his ancestry that has produced a menu that is unpretentiously authentic, satisfyingly abundant and reassuringly economical. Serving just about every Italian specialty imaginable, this welcoming trattoria comes loaded with a great Zuccarelli East, 1340 N. Federal Highway, Pompano Beach 954-941-1261An immigrants tale: a life-altering journey from the Italian countryside to the sunny shores of Pompano Beach[Above] Zuccarellis staff can cook up anything Italian, from salads to spaghetti and meatballs to spinach pizzas. wine list and tons of culinary expertise. The result is affordable, high-quality fare in a relaxed ambiance. The voluminous menu is replete with a seemingly endless array of mouthwatering favorites. Soups include the classic minestrone as well as the hearty pasta e fagiole. Salads such as grilled chicken, Caesar or calamari are also good starters. On the appetizer front, stuffed mushrooms, mussels marinara, clams oreganata and broccoli Parmigiana are just a few of the tempting choices available. A host of hot and cold sandwiches also make an appearance. Sausage & peppers, eggplant, chicken, veal or meatball Parmigiana will warm the soul while cappicola, salami, ham and provolone make for a tasty Italian hoagie. Delectable paninis such as the fried chicken cutlet, the gourmet veggie, the saltimbocca with prosciutto or the caprese with tomatoes and basil are reliable take-out options. But the true stars of the Zuccarelli menu can be found in the pasta, chicken, seafood and veal entre selections. Linguini with clams, chicken & spinach lasagna, manicotti, baked ziti, eggplant rollatini and stuffed shells complete the authentic Italian pasta tableau. Our penne a la vodka is also outstanding, adds Vallorani with a knowing smile. Veal and chicken can be enjoyed in a variety of traditional preparations. Lemony butter Francese sauce, Marsala wine & mushrooms, Scarpariella with sausage, classic Cacciatore and Piccata with white wine and capers are some of the most popular recipes. Of note is the Chicken Ascoliana with fresh spinach covered in light marinara and cheese. Served with ziti in a homemade tomato sauce, this gargantuan dish of plump chicken breasts will satisfy the hungry as well as the picky. This is now our favorite Italian place in Pompano. The food is outstanding, say local residents Ted and Gay Crownover. The seafood options are equally plentiful and flavorful. Our Zuppa de Pesce is fantastic, says Vallorani as he brings a colossal plate of al dente linguini covered with steaming hot jumbo shrimp, mussels, clams, octopus and calamari in a rich marinara sauce. Other maritime options include the broiled filet of sole, the shrimp Fra Diavolo or scampi, the stuffed flounder and the zuppa de clams. We really have a full menu. Everything is very authentic, says the experienced restaurateur. Of course, we also make great New York style thin crust pizzas, adds Vallorani as pie specialist Pat Dimeglio prepares a large meat lovers pizza for delivery. Located directly across the street from Pompanos municipal golf course, Zuccarelli offers daily specials and lunch combos, plenty of free parking and an extensive catering service. The remarkably large entres are priced between $10 and $15 while pizzas start at $9. Wine glasses are $5 and most wine bottles $16. Be sure to try one of the many tantalizing desserts such as raspberry chiffon, cannoli, cheesecake or tiramisu. Buon appetito! This single portion of Chicken Ascoliana over ows with 4 plump breasts smothered in fresh spinach, melted cheese and zesty marinara sauce. It also features a hearty serving of perfectly cooked ziti pasta. A Zuccarelli signature dish, the Zuppa De Pesce, features a wealth of shrimp, mussels, clams, octopus and calamari in a zesty marinara sauce over al dente linguini.

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32 The Pelican Friday, August 31, 2012 Originally opened in 1982, Checkers Old-Munchen has become a reliable source of authentic German fare in Pompano Beach. Brainchild of Detlaf Neuman, former head Chef of a 5-star Munich hotel, the restaurant has stayed in the family over the past three decades. Today, nephew Mat Moore is at the helm of this thriving bastion of Teutonic temptations. In March, Checkers OldMunchen was the victim of a re and was temporarily closed. But the restaurant is set to reopen in the middle of September. Until then Checkers menu can be enjoyed at Diner By The Sea, 215 E. Commercial Blvd., Lauderdale-By-The-Sea. German food is so much more than just sausage, says Moore as he pours a gigantic boot of Kostritzer beer. This dark, medium bodied lager is a popular choice among the more than 30 varieties of beer available. The Kostritzer is my favorite. Its Germanys answer to Guinness, adds Moore. For wine lovers, the Peter Brum Riesling features the quintessentially aromatic and fruity overtones one expects from this crisp white varietal of the Rhine region. Beverages in hand, many patrons kick start a meal with a hearty bowl of Checkers Old-Munchens famous onion & apple soup. Bursting with avor, this Bavarian version of French onion soup features sauted onions and apples slowly simmered in the house beef and lager broth topped with provolone cheese. Other classic starters include the Liverwurst & Muenster cheese platter, Bratwurst and Knackwurst on a bed of sauerkraut and several healthy salad options. Of note is the Kartoffelpuffer home made potato pancakes served with applesauce and sour cream. A quick scan of the menu reveals that vegetarianism is not exactly a German invention. Veal, pork, beef, chicken and sausage dominate the landscape. The plethora of meat options includes mouthwatering veal or pork Wienerschnitzels. These house specialties showcase lightly breaded cutlets sauted in lemon butter and topped with rich homemade gravy. Pompano Beachs Checkers Old-Munchen delivers tasty German cuisine in a friendly European atmosphereOriginally created in neighboring Vienna, this preparation method has become a regional staple of southeastern Germany. Served with red cabbage and potato dumpling or spaetzel (German egg noodles similar to gnocchi), these plates feel like a home cooked meal in Deutschland. Another crowd pleaser is the eye-popping Schweinhaxen. This plate features a specially seasoned 2 lb. boiled pork shank slow roasted for 6 hours. The result is a wonderfully moist and juicy fall-off-thebone meat all topped with homemade gravy. We use the broth of the pork shanks to make our gravy. It is absolutely delicious, says Moore. The chicken menu includes sauted breasts Hunter style with mushrooms in a wine gravy, Blackforest ham with white wine cream or the Paprika version in sweet cream sauce with red bell peppers. One of my favorites is the pork Stroganoff. But if you want to get a taste of several specialties, I would recommend our famous Bavarian Platter, says Moore. This sampler dish over ows with Bratwurst, Knackwurst, Wienerschnitzel and either schweinebraten or sauerbraten. The former consists of tender oven roasted pork loin while the latter is an acquired taste involving vinegar marinated beef topped with sweet and sour gravy. The food is outstanding and the prices are very reasonable, say regular local customers Bob Stoetzer and Pat McQueen. A good way to conclude a culinary voyage to Germany is with a warm homemade apple strudel. Served with Alemannic alacrity by the friendly waitresses, this ice cream topped behemoth is a great dessert to share. With wall to wall beer steins as dcor, the ambiance at Checkers Old-Munchen is warm and resoundingly European. Take advantage of various coupons available for half-priced entres with beverage purchase. The Think German Its Friday club (TGIF) allows off libations, appetizers and desserts with the purchase of an entre. All entres are priced between $14 and $17, wine bottles are around $25 and beer starts at $4. There is free parking in the back and all major credit cards are accepted. The early bird special is from 5 pm to 6:30 p.m. and all day Sunday. Be sure to inquire about upcoming Oktoberfest specials on Facebook and especially the highly anticipated $10 entre weekends. Prost!A stein and German fare are the signature menu items at Checkers Old-Muchen Checker )ld-Munchens menu is now being served at Diner-By-The-Sea, 215 Commercial Blvd., Lauderdale-By-The-Sea 954-785-7565

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The Pelican 33 Friday, August 31, 2012 Established in 1985 by restaurateur Tom Douglas and his brother-in-law Dario Dziamalek, the inimitable Chez Porkys has been delivering Pompano Beachs most highly rated Louisiana inspired specialties for the better part of the last 3 decades. I am originally from upstate NY where I owned and operated a restaurant for 3 years, says Douglas who, after selling his business, moved to the Big Apple to run his own nightclub. It was the late 70s and we sure had a lot of fun! But, eventually, the allure of warmer weather brought Douglas down to South Florida. I had some restaurant ideas and, in 1984, I drove by this area and saw this vacant space for sale. At the time, the Cypress Plaza neighborhood was the hub of activity in Pompano Beach. We werent sure in which direction to go with the menu. In fact, it took about 6 months to figure out what kind of cuisine we would offer, says the ber-friendly Vietnam War veteran. It ended up being a hodge-podge of various cuisines but with a definite New Orleans twist. Indeed, the biggest selling items at Chez Porkys are the famous chicken wings. Available in a cornucopia of tantalizing flavors, these plump and meaty favorites have won a slew of awards over the years. The various sauces include Louisiana style, lemongarlic, barbeque, Asian, spicy curry, salt & vinegar, Jamaican jerk, Buffalo and the cult classic raspberry. I invented the raspberry sauce in 1987 long before it became fashionable, says the highly creative Douglas who took full advantage of his Italian background and South Asian combat experience to develop exciting flavor profiles that were truly cutting-edge at the time. People would gladly wait in line 1 hour just to get into the restaurant. They would drink beer and socialize in the parking lot! Other novel dishes include the mouthwatering Caribbean coconut soup with ginger and curry, the bacon wrapped shrimp-on-a-stick, the chicken Zingara with sun-dried tomatoes and artichokes, the chargrilled steak Teriyaki and the ever popular Louisiana sauted Cajun shrimp a perennial top choice of food critics. We still do great business today but things have changed, says Douglas with a hint of nostalgia as he looks at the many pictures of erstwhile celebrities adorning the walls of his quaint eatery. I remember when Kareem Abdul-Jabbar came in, he had to bend down quite low just to get through the front door, says a smiling Suzie Schuitt, a veteran waitress and hostess that has been welcoming customers for the past 23 years. We sure have had many wellknown sports figures and other stars in here over the years. We also fed the secret service after Hurricane Wilma. We were the only place in town open 2 days later! adds Douglas who is as proud of his top-notch customer service as he is of his extensive menu. By the way, everything we cook is made fresh to order. Our customers truly appreciate the care we put into our food, says the friendly Chef who has earned myriad accolades for another Chez Porkys specialty the prize winning baby back ribs. Smothered in a tangy homemade barbeque sauce, the fall-off-the-bone ribs titillate the senses while satisfying the most primal of carnivorous urges. Whether you dine in, order out or use our catering services, just about everything is an original recipe or a new twist on an old classic. We also have a great beer and wine selection, says the detailoriented Douglas. From steaks to poultry, seafood to pastas, Chez Porkys offers the bold, eclectic flavors that locals have wholeheartedly embraced for generations. The name is actually derived from the famous 80s movie Porkys, says Douglas with a hearty laugh. For a voyeuristic peek into Pompano Beachs gastronomic locker room, this historic restaurant is definitely the ideal spot to get an eyeful of sexy South Florida cuisine. Barbecue landmark since 1985 continues to delight patrons with its unique American cuisine, ribs and so much more![Top] Smothered in decadently tangy barbecue sauce, the melt-in-your-mouth baby back ribs are a Chez Porky specialty. [Left] Long-time associate Suzie Schuitt, proprietor Tom Douglas and waitress Candice McMillan show off a few of Chez Porkys classic dishes. [Right] A top choice of food critics, the highly addictive Louisiana shrimp are sauteed in butter, beer and Cajun spices..Chez Porkys, 105 SW 6 St., Pompano Beach 954-946-5590

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34 The Pelican Friday, August 31, 2012 Eye Site Vision, 2490 N. Federal Hwy., Lighthouse Point, 954-943-3779Homegrown optometrist builds a growing practice serving all segments of the community Lets see, would be a perfect slogan for Eye Site Vision in Lighthouse Point. With Dr. Gary Goberville on site for complete eye exams and a specialized staff to assist patients with the myriad frames from Coach to Christian Dior, this locallyowned clinic is an easy stop for sight and style. Dr. Goberville, who grew up in Lighthouse Point, played football and baseball at Cardinal Gibbons, is a board-certified optometric physician. He attended Tulane University in New Orleans and the University of Florida. He received his Doctor of Optometry degree from at the New England School of Optometry in Boston. Dr. Goberville says that he returned to Lighthouse Point because its just a great city. And besides his practice, he and his wife are raising two children here. Dr. Goberville also is a pediatric optometry specialist. He has taught pediatric optometry at Nova Southeastern University, and he is trained in sport vision improvement using computer programs and exercises. Now in practice for more than 13 years, Dr. Goberville has built two additional clinics, one in Coral Springs and another in Boca Raton, in addition to the Lighthouse Point location. With school now in session, Dr. Goberville suggests that eye check-ups are in order whether a parent suspects a problem or not. He adds that school screenings are not complete eye exams. Some children have reading problems that simply require glasses, says Dr. Goberville. A lot of people pass off those problems as dyslexia when its not the case. He adds there are tests that can determine if there is a dyslexia problem of if there is just a need for glasses. I like to start eye exams at six months, he says. At that age we can see retinoblastoma, a tumor that develops in early childhood. The tumor can be removed and [the procedure] can eliminate blindness and possible death of the child. Eye Site Vision offers Some children have reading problems that simply require glasses. Dr. Gary Goberville. patient care for all ages. Common problems that especially impact South Floridians include cataracts, dry eyes and glaucoma. Dr. Goberville explains that too much exposure to ultraviolent rays may encourage early cataracts and macular degeneration. To lower the odds of these eye diseases, Dr. Goberville suggests glasses with polarized lens and large frames protect the eyes and the skin around the eyes. Dry eyes, itching and redness could be the result of allergies, he says. There are two ways to approach a solution. First have a complete eye exam and evaluate for allergies then treat the problem with specialized eye drops. Often, there are second and third steps to maintain healthy eyes, but they all begin with a complete eye exam. With the latest technology including the Humphrey Automated Visual Field, a procedure that tests the pathway from the patients eye across through the brain and to the occipital lobe, places are visible that formerly could not be seen. The ultrasound pachymetry also helps the doctor find a more accurate eye-pressure measurement in prescribing treatment for glaucoma. The staff at Eye Site Center includes Ryan Himmel, optician, and Heather Atchison, optometric technologist. Eye Site Vision centers carry and fit a wide variety of contact lenses such as progressive, bifocal, rigid gas permeable and colored. All brand names are available and can be ordered on line and delivered to your door.

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The Pelican 35 Friday, August 31, 2012 Jacks Old Fashioned Hamburger house, 591 S. Cypress Rd., Pompano Beach -942-2844Jacks Old Fashioned Hamburger House serves an American institution: the hamburger. And it started serving them over a uniquely American holiday: the Fourth of July. Says Jeff Gluth, We are 40 years and counting. Our success has been the result of our burger and its superior quality. We grind lean brisket of beef and steak rounds fresh daily on the premises. Gluths precision in forming this famous burger is also attributed to every burger being hand patted, no preformed patties found here. Personal pride in the hamburgers served up here is part of this companys entire team. We have some employees who have been with us for 20 years, said Gluth. Gluth was originally a business partner with Jack Berry, the founder of Jacks Hamburgers. That relation lasted 31 years and ended with Jacks death a few years ago. Jacks original philosophy in teaching young people a strong work ethic has also remained a tradition. We take great pride in helping develop young people. Many early employees who started out in high school have gone on to great jobs and great lives. Our employees are very special to us. They are our family, he said. Burgers may have changed over the years, but at Jacks the lines keep growing and the jukebox keeps on playing. Tradition remains strong. Gourmet burgers? We were one of the first to do this. And we do not need a fancy bun or condiments. We impress our customers with a juicy burger that has a distinct flavor and melts in your mouth with each bite, Gluth says. We have a special grinding processor that is operated on the premises, Gluth says. For non-burger lovers, Jacks also offers sliced fresh sandwiches made fresh daily our own roast beef. While customers dont need condiments to enjoy a burger at Jacks, the burger joints specially-made mustard dill relish and sweet red pepper relish add an additional zing to the flavor. Carolyn Littlefield is the manager of Jacks Old Fashion Hamburger in Fort Lauderdale. She echoes the high standards set by Jack and carried on today. We care about the product and the people working for us. We are proud to be part of Pompano Beach and Fort Lauderdale for 40 years, said Gluth. Jacks Old Fashioned Hamburger House is located at 4201 N. Federal Hwy., in Fort Lauderdale and 591 S. Cypress Road in Pompano Beach. Call 954-565-9960 to reach the Fort Lauderdale restaurant and 954-942-2844 for Pompano or visit www. jacksoldfashionhamburgers. com. Gourmet burgers? We were one of the first to do this. And we do not need a fancy bun or condiments. We impress our customers with a juicy burger that has a distinct flavor and melts in your mouth with each bite, Jeff GluthJacks Hamburgers celebrates its 40-year anniversary: Where were you in 1970?Jack Berry founded Jacks Old Fashion Hamburger House in 1972. The Pompano Beach restaurant opened one year later.

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36 The Pelican Friday, August 31, 2012 Classi edsCall 954-545-0013 Mechanic Shop for RentPompano Beach Rent this mechanical shop attached to a busy Texaco Station. Rent is negotiable. 954-941-2600. Ask for George Great opportunity. Call George. 954-941-2600 In Pompano BeachPompano Library, 1213 E. Atlantic Blvd. Auto Tech, 429 N. Dixie Hwy. Sample Road Auto Spa, 2501 W. Sample Road NuTurf, 2801 N. Dixie Hwy. Chit Chat Lounge, 651 N. Federal Hwy. Sunnys Produce, 677 N. Federal Hwy. Golden Corral, 2100 W. Atlantic Blvd. Brandys Shoes, 1290 N. Federal Hwy. HELP WANTEDAFRAID OF DOWNSIZING? Start building a business to supplement your income. Great earnings potential on a part-time basis with Primerica. Call 954729-0192. 9-7 POMPANO BEACH MECHANIC/ COUNTER PERSON NEEDED For Well-Known Texaco Fuel Station. References & Experience. Good People Person. Call George 954-941-2600. SEEKING EMPLOYMENTGROCERY SHOPPING & DELIVERY From Publix To Individuals & Businesses. Serving Broward Since 2005. 954-200-0074. www.weshopanddeliver.com. 8-31 HHA I Will Take Excellent Care Of The Elderly / Companion Aid Experienced & Certi ed / Have References. Call 845-709-5275. 9-21 EUROPEAN LADY Is Looking For A Position As A CAREGIVER / COMPANION. Reliable. High Quality Care. 11 Yrs. Exp. Own Transportation. Fluent In English & Polish. References. 954-480-7786. CAREGIVER / COMPANION Caucasian Woman With 25 Yrs Exp. To Assist & Care For Your Loved Ones. Days / Eves / Nights. Ref. Available. 954-482-5494. 8-31 HONEST MALE With References Seeking Position As A CAREGIVER! Call Chris 954-290-7344. 8-31 LPN AT CNA PRICES! Will Drive To Dr. Appointments, Lunch, Shopping, Etc. East Broward Area Only! 954895-7850. 9-7 MALE CNA / HHA / COMPANION. Broward County Area. Former EMT. All Certi cations / Compassionate, References. Call Ron 954-232-2832. Very Reasonable! 8-31 SERVICES DANNY BOY ELECTRIC Lic & Insured. Lic. #EC13004811. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. 24/Hr Service. 954-290-1443. Beat Any Written Estimate. Sr, Discount. 9-21 ASI SOUTHERN LAWN MAINTENANCE Provides Full Landscape. Architectural Landscape Design. Tree Trimming & Removal, Full Lawn Maintenance. One Time Clean Out. Andrew 954-675-7396. GOT JUNK? TRASH HAULING CONDO CLEANUPS Trees Landscape Yard Fill Pressure Wash Roofs Home Repairs Welding Etc. Dave 954-818-9538. 8-31 MIKE THE GARDNER The All American Yardman Yard And Garden Care Get The Best For Less!! Call 561-543-6337 Cell. 9-14 HONEST HANDYMAN HOME & BUILDING Maintenance/ Improvements. No Job Too Small. Fast Friendly Service. Reasonable Rates. Local Resident/Homeowner. Call Today For Your FREE Upfront Quote. No Deposit Required. 754366-1915. BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIESNew GREEN technology. New defroster control saves energy in home refrigerators, commercial chillers. Patented. All optical. Simple mfg. Strategic partners needed.. www.NewAvionics.Com. 954-568-1991. MUSICIANS WANTEDADVANCED STUDENT MUSICIANS Being Accepted For 2012 2013 Membership in the American Legion Symphonic Band! Earn Community Service Points While Improving Your Performance Skills! Rehearsals On Wednesday Evenings from 7pm to 9pm at American Legion Post 142, 171 SW 2nd St., Pompano Beach, FL 33060. Band Director Recommendation Encouraged. Email Music Director James McGonigal at info.legionband@gmail.com for more information. C REAL ESTATE SERVICESSELLING OR BUYING Choose Someone You Can Trust 18 Years Experience. English, French, Spanish, Greek. Yvette Gaussen. YES WE CAN REALTY. 954-614-7773 Or 954-773-8340. REAL ESTATE WANTEDNEED TO BUY FOR CASH FAST!! Small Duplex Or Triplex With At Least One 3 / 2 Or 2 / 2 E Of Federal Hwy. 954-563-3533. MFG HOMESFT LAUD / POMPANO WATERFRONT 2 / 2 On Fishing Canal. Private & Peaceful. $49,900. Call John For Appt. 954-495-0557. ROOMS FOR RENTE. DEERFIELD BEACH E Of A1A 1st Floor Furnished. Large Fridg., Kitchen, Micro, Laundry, Own Bath, TV, A / C. $170 Week. 954-725-9680. 8-31 CEMETERY PLOTS2 PREMIUM LOTS Forest Lawn Cemetery For Sale. $1,500 OBO Call 561603-9383. OR 863-946-1646. C.REAL ESTATE WANTEDI BUY HOUSES!! CASH!! AS IS! QUICK CLOSE! ANY AREA ANY CONDITION! NO EQUITY OK. CALL NOW 954-914-2355. 10-19 CONDOS FOR SALEPOMPANO BEACH DIRECT OCEAN VIEW!! Pet Friendly! 2/2 AT THE BREAKERS! $265K. Also For Rent. Call Juliana At Barclays For Details. 1-305-766-4420. 8-17 POMPANO BEACH DIRECT INTRACOASTAL! Feels Like Youre On A Boat. Pool On Intracoastal. Wrap-A-Round Balcony. Spacious 1 / 1.5 $178K. Also For Rent $1350 Month. 954-588-0562. POMPANO BEACH THE CLARIDGE Large Updated 2 / 2 Corner Penthouse Ocean Intracoastal & City Views! Washer / Dryer In Unit. Impact Glass. $498,500. Ruthie Brooks Balistreri Realty. 954803-4174. 8-31 CONDOS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH OCEANFRONT Furnished 1 Bedroom. Resort Atmosphere. Indoor Parking Security. $1,100 Month Yearly Lease. 954-562-7530. 8-31 POMPANO BEACH 55+ Community. Renovated 2/1 Pool!! With Sunroom Ground Floor / On Golf Course. Beautifully Furn. 1 Year +. Good Credit. $700 Month. 954-531-7708. LIGHTHOUSE POINT 2 / 2 1st Floor 55+. Pool, Storage, Laundry Facilities. $900 Month / Water Included. Dorothy Bassano Better Homes & Gardens Real Estate. 954-562-4919. 8-31 POMPANO INTRACOASTAL AT ITS BEST. Breathtaking Views! Feels Like Youre On A Boat, Pool Deck On Intracoastal. Spacious 1 / 1.5 $1350 Month. A1A S.E. Corner Unobstructed Views. 2/2 $1,500 Month. 954-588-0562. 9-14 Call The Pelican at 954-783-8700!

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The Pelican 37 Friday, August 31, 2012 Classi edsCall 954-545-0013 APTS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH 1 BR & 2 BR APTS FOR RENT. Remodeled, Paint, Tile, Etc. Washer / Dryer On Site. Pool. Pet Friendly. George 954809-5030. POMPANO BEACH 1/1 Apartment. $700 Month Yearly Lease. Pool, Off Federal Hwy. Pet OK! Call Anthony 954857-5207. POMPANO BEACH EAST OF FEDERAL HWY! Walk To Everything! 1 & 2 Bedrooms. Call For Information 954-2546325. 9-14 POMPANO BEACH Spacious 2 / 2 $850 Month & 1 / 1 $700 Month. Pool, Coin Laundry, Tile Floors. Near Beach. Call 954-907-2258. 8-31 POMPANO MCNAB RD & NE 18 AVENUE 1 & 2 Bedrooms Furnished / Unfurnished. $695 $895 And Up. Pool, Tile Floors. Central A / C. 954-6102327. 9-7 POMPANO BEACH 1/1 $650 2/1 $750 NW NE 2/1 $950 2/1,5 Townhouse $1095 SW 1/1 $750 2/1 $925 2/2 $950 3/2 $1025 ALL FREE WATER. Rent + $70 App Mov-U-In. 954-781-6299. 8-31 POMPANO 2/1 $775 Month Yearly Lease. Pool, Laundry Room, Close To Shopping. Pet OK! 1960 NE 48 Street. Call Anthony 954-857-5207. 9-7 DOWNTOWN LAUD BY THE SEA Clean Apartments. Near Beach, Shopping, Restaurants. On Site Courtyard, Parking, Laundry. Wayne 954-868-5560. 8-24 POMPANO ATLANTIC / INTRACOASTAL AREA South Of Publix. Ef ciency Furnished Private Entrance. Utilities Included. Non-Smoker. Long Term. $700 Month. 954415-8838. 8-31 LAUDERDALE BY THE SEA 1 / 1 Ground Floor. Central A / C. Parking Out Back Door. Laundry, Courtyard. 200 Steps Beach. $1,100. 954-8685560 Wayne. 9-21 BEST DEAL IN POMPANO BEACH Efficiency With Kitchen, Laundry & Pool. No Pets. Weekly Monthly Season. 500 To Beach. 954294-84883 Or 248-736-1533. 9-21 POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 Bedroom From $500. Easy Movein. 1/2 OFF DEPOSIT. Remodeled. Great Location. 954-783-1088 For More Info. 9-14 COMMERCIAL FOR RENT-SALEPOMPANO COMMERCIAL OFFICE Spaces Available. Ranging From As Low As $500 To $700 Depending On Square Footage. Please Call Darci At 954-7833723. 9-7 DEERFIELD BEACH Retail Of ce Warehouse 700 Sq Ft With Loft. A/C, Bathroom. $575 Per Month. Call For More Info 561-654-1331 Or 561-9985681. 9-21 CORAL SPRINGS 1800 SQ FT. Easy Access To Sawgrass, Ample Parking, Monument Sign. FREE RENT & Buildout. Call 954-328-0413. 9-14

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38 The Pelican Friday, August 31, 2012 James Robert Dunn started his career in 1967 as a sales representative for IBM. During a sales call to a jewelry company in Malden, Massachusetts, Jim picked up a magazine about the jewelry business and became intrigued. When his schedule allowed, Jim took correspondence courses in gemology, and went to New York to learn about diamonds and colored stones. I bought a little microscope and I was playing scientist at home, he says. While at IBM, Jim met his future wife Ann Marie Pelliccia, who was working as an executive secretary. Ann Marie, like Jim, was also driven by an entrepreneurial spirit. She was ten years old when her family immigrated to this country from Italy. It didnt take long for Ann Marie to master the English language and become the interpreter for her fathers cabinet making business. From the age of 11, she went to work every day after school with her father until she graduated high school and soon after, she joined the team at IBM. It was IBM that helped us forge our philosophy about customer service and business ethics says Ann Marie. The couple married in 1969 and together, they decided to take a chance and start a jewelry business. With their savings of $10,000, the couple purchased a small house in Hanover, Mass. and converted it into their first jewelry store, The House of Gems. During the first year, their store was burglarized and every piece of jewelry was taken including customers repairs. To make matters worse, the Dunns were in between insurance policies. The couple went from door todoor informing and reassuring each client that their prized possessions would be replaced. Ann Marie and Jim paid for the stolen jewelry out of their own pockets to preserve their reputation for integrity and trust. The Dunns misfortune turned out to be a blessing in disguise. Word spread when the couple made good on their promise and business began to grow by leaps and bounds. The House of Gems soon outgrew its tiny location. Jim and Ann Marie relocated the store to a nearby mall in South Weymouth, Mass. and changed the name to J.R. Dunn Jewelers, placing an emphasis on the importance of the family-owned and operated business. In 1978, the couple relocated to South Florida and opened a small jewelry boutique, which served a select clientele by appointment only. This is when the Dunns were fortunate enough to have Robert Pelliccia, Ann Maries brother, come on board at the age of 18 and eventually start creating one-of-a-kind custom creations and now over 30 years later he continues to create his award winning designs for J.R. Dunns discerning clients. Today the Lighthouse Point store is an 8,000 square foot design studio and showroom. Jim, Ann J.R. Dunn Jewelers 4210 N. Federal Highway, Lighthouse Point 954-782-5000Living the American Dream ; its a family affair at J.R. DunnsSean, Ann Marie and Jim DunnMarie and their son Sean run the business together. Sean earned his Bachelor of Science in Business Management from the University of Florida as well as his gemological degree from GIA. Jim credits Sean with much of the technological advancement achieved at the store, including the creation of the companys e-commerce website, JRDunn.com, nearly eight years ago. Fortunately, the faith Jim and Ann Marie placed in Sean paid off and JRDunn.com now serves clients in over 20 countries. My father always told me I could be whatever I wanted, says Sean. He has given me so much latitude to try new things and the confidence to take steps forward. One of the most entrepreneurial things about my father is that he has no fear of taking risks. Hes not afraid to try new things. If it doesnt work, its not going to devastate him. Tomorrow hell wake up with another great idea and go for it. In addition to being a close knit family that supports one another, the Dunns have forged many great relationships with their employees, clients and in the community. If youre in business and the people in the community are supporting you, then you should go back and support the community, says Jim. The Dunns credit these relationships for having allowed J.R. Dunn Jewelers to persevere and thrive even in tough times. While a lot has changed since Jim and Ann Marie started the business in 1969, their values havent. On any given day you are likely to find multiple family members on the premise at J.R. Dunn Jewelers. Even Ann Maries mother, Fernanda, at the age of 86 might be the one who greets you at the door. Every guest entering the store today is treated with the same standards of excellence and friendly service established many years ago in that tiny house in Massachusetts. It is truly a family affair. I cant believe it has already been 33 years since we opened our jewelry showroom in South Florida. This would not have been possible without the tremendous support of our local communityJim Dunn

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The Pelican 39 Friday, August 31, 2012 Nelsons Diner at 438 S. Cypress Rd. is the breakfast and lunch destination for many of the movers and shakers in Pompano Beach. Opened in June of 2009, the restaurants success traces back to its owner, Greg Nelson. His love of cooking and his knowledge of running a commercial kitchen is legend with those who know him. For me it all began at Capris, a 200 seat Italian Restaurant in Greenwood, South Carolina, Nelson says. I was hired as a bus boy when I was 12 years old. I was paid $1.08 per hour. I had 10 hours on my first check, which after deductions, was $8. That and a free cheeseburger made me a happy employee, he smiles still remembering that check. I progressed from bus boy to dishwasher to slicer and dicer and at 15, I began to cook and loved it. At 17 he traded his kitchen experience for a spot on the diamond with the Greenville Braves baseball team. On a Florida trip, my back gave out. I left the team and stayed in Florida to become kitchen manager for a Bobby Rubinos, and later did the same for Tommy Norris so I was well equipped to run my own restaurant. However, he got side tracked for 20 years while he worked for Lou Bachrodt Chevrolet Dealership as desk/fleet/ commercial manager. When I left Lou, we both had tears in our eyes, Nelson admits. I was ready to do something else and he understood that. Lou comes to lunch here at least once a week and we remain best of friends. In all those years working for Lou, I still cooked at home, at church or any party that came my way. And now Im cooking in my own restaurant and loving it. When youre a small business owner you do it all, he says with an easy smile. I buy the food, cook the food, plan the menu, handle the personnel, do customer relations, advertising, and I often mop the floor. The hours are tough but if you like what youre doing, even that doesnt matter. Nelson comes in at 4 a.m. to begin food preparation and although the restaurant closes at 3 p.m. his day often lasts until 6 p.m. He says, Im lucky that my wife, Elyse and I live just a few blocks away. Elyse is my bookkeeper, accountant, my everything. Our two children, Hailey, 17 and Grant, 14, drop by to eat and sometimes they will even lend a hand. Business is good. Nelsons has become the place to meet and eat. At any given time from 6 a.m. to 3 p.m. one might see the mayor, Frank Furman and his gang, city hall employees, BSO, fire rescue and the folks from nearby John Knox Village and neighborhood businesses. Customers are often greeted by name and if theyre regulars a cup of coffee, their way, is at the table before they sit down. Nelson says he never thought hed need a staff of 11, but finds that they all keep busy. The menu is extensive, but its the $5.99 daily specials that are the best sellers. Monday is pot roast, Tuesday is meat loaf and open-face roast beef; Wednesday is sloppy Joes; Thursday is turkey, mashed potatoes and gravy, Friday is tilapia or shrimp. The soup and half sandwich combo is another big seller. Nelson faxes daily menus to his take-out customers and says that meals to go make up about one third of his daily business. Steve Tidwell, owner of Body Spot says, Im here every day to pick up lunch or dinner for my employees. Another regular is Marge Muth, director of community outreach for Dignity/Kraeer Funerals who says, Im a regular here because the place is so friendly. They greet me by name. The food is great and the price is right. Its a great spot to meet a friend. When were filled to capacity, I bring out coffee or juice to those who are waiting. Many come in, look around for someone they know and join them, Nelson laughs. Were like cheers. Our customers get to know each other and sit together when were crowded and often when were not crowded. Besides food and fellowship, Nelsons Diner offers a little nostalgia with Elvis, baseball and 50s memorabilia decorating the walls while 50s and 60s records play quietly in the background. Soon patrons will see Gregs newly restored 1957 Chevy parked outside. Nelsons is open 7 days from 6 a.m. until 3 p.m.; Call 954-785-3646The success of Nelsons Diner starts with the history of Greg Nelsons lifetime love of cookingNelsons Diner, 438 S. Cypress Road, Pompano Beach 954-785-3646Nelsons has become the place to meet and eat. At any given time from 6 a.m. to 3 p.m. one might see the mayor, Frank Furman and his gang, city hall employees, BSO, fire rescue and the folks from nearby John Knox Village and neighborhood businesses. The great chef, Greg Nelson, keeps his oors shined and his patrons well fed.[Top] Greg serves up his famous North Carolina pulled-pork sandwich with fries and slaw. [Right] A younger Greg shows off his ambe at The Kapok Restaurant.

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40 The Pelican Friday, August 31, 2012

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The Pelican 41 Friday, August 31, 2012 The dental experience you have as a child shapes your dental experience forever, says Dr. Jared Young, whose practice in Lighthouse Point has been a longtime favorite for parents and children. Dr. Young follows in the footsteps of Dr. Jerry Klein, who pioneered childrens dentistry in this area more than 40 years ago. He joined the practice over a year ago, and has since remodeled the office to create a whole new bright beachy feel. Children leave the office with balloons, stickers, or rings. Making the dentist visit fun is what this specialty is all about, he says. With TVs mounted on the ceiling, children here are watching their favorite shows while resting in the dental chair. While his solo practice is only one-year old, Dr. Youngs credentials are impressive. Dr. Young received his dental training in Florida, at Nova Southeastern University where he was a recipient of the Pierre Fauchard Academy Scholarship. Originally from Michigan, Dr. Young then returned to Childrens Bright New Look for Childrens DentistryBright Young Smiles, 1930 NE 34 Ct., Lighthouse Point, FL 954-781-1855 Hospital of Michigan to serve as Chief Resident and receive 2 years of specialty training in Pediatric Dentistry. This specialty training involved education in general anesthesia, emergency medicine, cardiology, pediatric medicine, cleft lip/ palate, conscious sedation, orthodontics, oral surgery, growth and development, and operating room dentistry. Graduating with Highest Honors from Michigan State University with a bachelors degree in psychology, Dr. Young loves interacting with children and parents. The Lighthouse Point area is home for Dr. Young and his wife Catherine Young, D.M.D. He is currently the Broward Dental Associations Chair for Give Kids a Smile, an annual charity event that provides free dental care to needy South Florida children. Dr. Young is an active member of the American Dental Association, American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry, Florida Dental Association, and the Broward County Dental Association. But what impresses these young patients so much that they want to go back has more to do with his kid-friendly office and patient-centered practice. We see patients as early as one-year-old for preventative measures, he says. And its more for the parents than for the patient. This also creates a dental home for the patient, so they have a familiar place to go in case of dental emergencies. We educate the parents about cleaning the teeth, good diet habits, and oral habits like finger-sucking and pacifiers. Dr. Young says pacifier use or finger habits are common up to 18 months, and after that they run the risk of changing the shape of the jaw and the position of the teeth. We have a lot of methods to help break the habits, but we do need the parent and childs help for a successful outcome. Juices are a big risk factor in getting cavities in children. Even natural fruit juices are very high in sugar. Think of it as candy, the nutrition facts are the same. Children who drink juice from a sippy cup are at the greatest risk. And parents get more advice to help their children develop healthy habits for a lifetime. Pediatric dentistry is relatively new. The specialty started in the 1950s. And if a person goes by the word of Dr. Young, its the best area of dentistry. Children are a whole lot more fun to work with. They keep you laughing all day, he says. These young patients also get a kick out of the beachy murals that flank the entire office. The waiting room is packed with toys and puzzles patients enjoy next to a wall mural depicting a sandy beach with palm trees. Dr. Young sees patients from infants through high school, and office procedures include checkups, cleanings, fillings, crowns, extractions, whitening and orthodontics. Dr. Jareds position on x-rays is simple: Only if necessary. We have digital xray technology as well, which minimizes exposure. There are a lot of times in primary (baby) teeth procedures where we can skip the local anesthesia injection as well, which makes for a more positive experience. Sedation dentistry is also available for patients who require it. Dr. Young adds, Patients who require anesthesia remain under the eye of an M.D. anesthesiologist and his nurse during the [procedure], and that makes for very safe conditions. I have several patients with autism who require anesthesia. Parents get a welcome from Bright Young Smiles as they are always invited to be with their child during all procedures, or they can enjoy a cup of coffee under one of the palm trees, TV remote in hand. Bright Young Smiles is open five days a week. Patients also have Dr. Youngs cell phone in case of emergenciesDr. Jared Youngs beach mural gives his dental of ce a sense of fun, and all this fun builds healthy smiles at Bright Young Smiles in Lighthouse Point. Children are a whole lot more fun to work with. They keep you laughing all day, Dr. Jared Young[Above, top to bottom] Mason, Cameron, Nathan and James with Dr. Young.

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42 The Pelican Friday, August 31, 2012 Deer eld Beach Executive Director Phil Barrett is very proud of The Forum at Deer Creek, an elegant retirement community that offers a lush country club setting to seniors who want to enjoy life free of the demands of maintaining a home. Barrett says, We offer a choice of very spacious apartments plus all the amenities that ease daily burdens and allow residents free time for fun, hobbies, stimulating lectures and shows. Our residents experience ne, restaurant-style dining, weekly housekeeping and linen service, transportation and endless activities and events. Like all good executives, he called in a few members of his management team to talk about speci cs. Blair Fritz, Regional Marketing Manager who happened to be visiting said The Forum is owned by Five Star Senior Living, a company with over 250 senior living communities across the United States. Fritz said, Our assisted living residents bene t from a unique concept which is our six levels of care. Residents pay only for the care they need. For example, if the only need is to administer medication that is the only additional service charged. At the other extreme, for the very frail residents, we provide all the care they need. The Forum is 23 years old and currently has 207 residents in independent living. There are 50 residents in assisted living and 60 in either short term rehab or receiving skilled nursing care. Carol Bonk is the Dining Room Manager. A friendly, The Forum at Deer Creek, 3001 Deer Creek Country Club Blvd., 33442 954-698-6269Finding a lifestyle to t comfort and exciting activities is all part of the Forum at Deer CreekBeautiful grounds, fountains and artistic architecture make The Forum at Deer Creek an elegant retirement choice.lively lady, she quipped, The only complaint I get from residents is being guilty of causing their weight gain. I tell them, No problem. Work it off in the tness room and exercise class with Barbara McCormick, our activities director. Bonk said that breakfast and a choice of lunch or dinner are included in the residents monthly bills. Every menu has either a beef, chicken or sh entre, a least two starches, plus vegetables, soups, salads and of course, desserts. We also offer an Always Available Menu for residents who dont want the daily offerings that includes herb baked chicken and sh, fresh omelets, kosher hot dogs, hamburgers and nova platter as the alternate entrees, Bonk said. Sid and Ellen Gold moved into The Forum 15 months ago and are very happy with this choice according to Ellen who said, The food is very good. I love desserts so I check the daily dinner menu from the bottom up! Everyone is very friendly. Im a bingo and a black jack player and Sids a golfer who goes to the golf club next door to play. We enjoy the cocktail hours, the live entertainment and all of the activities. McCormick, Recreation Director, distributes a monthly activities calendar packed with a variety of things to do. After exercise class, held every day, there is a long list of activities including Adult Story Telling with Caren Neile,Classical Music and Opera Appreciation with Gene Solomon, a discussion group led by Liz Reynolds called Whats Your View?, book reviews with Ronelle Delmont, painting classes a writers workshop, current event lectures with Eli Kavon nature club and much more! There is an outdoor swimming pool, the adjacent Deer Creek Golf Club, and bridge, canasta and mahjong games going on daily. Religious services and observances are offered for all denominations. Tisha Hahn, director of sales and marketing said, The Forum is an elegant and warm retirement community offering independent living, assisted living, skilled nursing and rehabilitation care. Our residents enjoy all the comforts of home in a resort style setting. Beautiful apartments, thoughtful amenities and a dedicated staff a community you will be proud to call home. Because we are a rental community our residents do not pay a large, up front entrance fee and they feel secure knowing we offer all levels of care to meet their needs now and in the future. Residents have a choice of several lovely and spacious oor plans to choose from. The oor plans range from studio, one and two bedroom options. Resident Dottie Barnett says, I have a lovely twobedroom apartment because I want my brother and grandchildren to be able to visit me. I like it here very much because the people are friendly and theres so much to do. I attend the lectures, the shows and I play canasta and mahjong. The food is good. Management is very accommodating with transportation provided to shops, doctors or wherever you need to go. Hahn added, Our residents come from communities in Delray Beach, Boca Raton, Boynton Beach and of course, Deer eld Beach. Many move in because their friends have recommended The Forum. They feel comfortable and are proud to have family and friends visit and spend time at their community. Our residents family and friends are always welcome, whether it is to stay for a meal, enjoy the pool and beautiful courtyard or join them on holidays and special occasions. Located in Deer eld Beach, The Forum is accessible to both Broward and Palm Beach counties, the Interstate and Florida Turnpike, beaches, shopping, churches and synagogues. To visit The Forum, exit I-95 at Hillsboro Blvd., go west to Deer Creek Country Club Blvd and follow the road past the country club to The Forum entrance on the right hand side.

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The Pelican 43 Friday, August 31, 2012 Larry Gene Kosa has been a customer at Over Easy Caf since before it even opened in 1995. Back then, when Cathy Cerniglia was getting her restaurant ready to serve up its first batch of eggs over easy, Kosa came in and sat down, but he didnt get to order just yet. When the kitchen was finally up and running, Kosa was one of the first customers to pull up a stool. Ever since then hes been coming back for the food and the friendly atmosphere. When you tell her the way you want it, she makes it the way you want it, said Kosa. Everythings good here and this is really a mom and pop atmosphere. Cathy sold Over Easy in 2002. But in 2005 she bought it back and started serving up her own unique brand of mom and pop atmosphere once again. Nobody else ever owned it this long, she said. Its happy, and its beautiful and this is my home. This is my neighborhood. Theres always something new. Things are always changing, said Cathy, who added that each new cook she adds brings something new to the menu. At Over Easy, there are 20 varieties of omelettes such as the classic Western with ham, green peppers and onions. There is even a bacon cheeseburger omelette and a more continental Greek one with tomatoes and Feta cheese. One of the more exotic items added to the menu recently is the black bean chipotle burger. They taste like black beans and salsa. Its one of our most popular items, said Cathy, who added that she will be adding healthier items to her menu. A trend that she said the whole shopping center is adopting. Recently, a jazzercise studio and wrestling/fitness center have opened their doors next to Over Easy. The shopping center has really grown here. I heard the owner is even trying to get a juice bar. But for those who like to indulge, Cathys getting ready for her seasonal pies. Cherry, apple, blueberry, pecan, coconut custard, banana cream will be available at Thanksgiving to enjoy in the restaurant or to take home for the holiday. And no Thanksgiving would be complete without For two decades, Wilton Manors Over Easy Cafe has offered fresh menus, community service and a friendly welcome a pumpkin pie. To make her own version of Thanksgiving Americana, Cathy gets about as fresh as a cook can buying her pumpkins from the Wilton Manors Kiwanis Clubs annual pumpkin patch. We sell a couple hundred pies for Thanksgiving, said Cathy, who also adds a Thanksgiving Day meal to her menu, complete with roast turkey, stuffing and cranberry. Cathys love of serving up a good meal extends beyond her regular patrons. She is the most generous contributor to the Wilton Manors Kiwanis Clubs backpack food program, which sends children at Wilton Manors home with back packs filled with food. Over Easy is a drop-off place for her patrons and for others with whom she does business to make this program a success. Cathy and other club members fill backpacks with cans of fruits and vegetables, macaroni and cheese boxes, cans of tuna and other nonperishable items. One woman recently brought in 2,400 packs of shampoo. We call her Big Hair Tina, said Cathy. Our kids are going to have the cleanest heads in the The Over Easy Cafe, 318 E. Oakland Park Blvd., Wilton Manors 954-561-1177[Above] Owner Cathy Cerniglia, top left, Deena gastel, Michael Cerniglia, Larry Gene Kosa and Tina Greager, bottom left. [Right] Customers Michael Ellsworth, left, and Paul Forino. [Bottom] Just some of the many supplies that have been collected for the Kiwanis Clubs backpack for food program through Over Easy.school. All I do is mention the backpack program to my customers and the donations come. The customers are awesome. For more on the Over Easy Caf, visit www.theovereasy. com, on Facebook or call 954561-1177 Plenty of children in South Florida show up at school hungry, but those young students with a food back pack not only get to eat breakfast, theres plenty of food for dinner too. Donations are always accepted at Over Easy..

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44 The Pelican Friday, August 31, 2012 hard to describe the depth of our feelings and our need to do this. Pompano State Farmers Market was the largest wintertime wholesale produce market in the country at that time. There were Jewish brokers and buyers who came for the season and lived in Miami Beach and cities south of Pompano. Roz was a bookkeeper at the market for over 20 years. She recalls, We spread the word of our existence here and our numbers grew. We outgrew our living rooms and began to meet at the Pompano Chamber of Commerce, and we advertised in the local paper. Our lucky break came when Dr. Tobin and his wife, Lee, from Triple Creek, Colorado, dropped into our midst. They had read about Cresthaven houses for sale with a $200 down payment. Instead of vacationing in Miami Beach which they usually did, they came, looked and stayed. Doc retired here and became the President and motivator for Temple Sholom. I can still hear him say, Its time to stop looking for donors. We must raise the money ourselves, buy some land and build our own temple. He red all of us up and we began to fund raise in a big way. Every Jewish person in the community was involved and excited. We bought the land where our temple now stands. There were so many who gave generously and tirelessly, I hope Im not forgetting anyone. She ticked off names: Harry and Fay Goldberg, Gert and Berrnie Millman, Irene and Martin Reidich, Abe and Bess Cor, Bebe and Eddie Kodish, Dr. Harvey and Myra Saff, Isabel and Stanley Rubel, and Sidney and Lorraine Harris. We can never thank them enough for their support. When it was time to begin building, we had help from Richard Koff, a building contractor who built many homes in Lyons Park, including ours. He worked closely with Lou Wolfe, the architect who designed Temple Sholom. Completed in July of 1960, the congregation soon had 300 members. It felt great to help turn our vision of a temple into a reality. I have been a member ever since the doors of Temple Sholom opened, and Im so glad it is here serving the Jewish community so well.Early memories of Pompano BeachRoz Karneols memories encompass much more than the Jewish community. In addition to a rewarding career in the produce market, she and Herman raised two daughters, Risa McClave and Rafaela Twist and one granddaughter, Hannah McClave, all of whom are living in Pompano Beach. She and Herman, now deceased, were active in Pompano Beach. Roz served as Past President of the Temple Sisterhood, the American Legion Auxiliary, Lions Club Auxiliary and Beta Sigma Phi, a service sorority. For 25 years, she was a volunteer facilitator for the Pompano Branch of the Elizabeth Faulk Center for Group Counseling. She is still an active member of the Pompano Beach Historical Society and still teaches knitting at the Temple once a week. She says, Im a big believer in interfaith living. Had I not come to Pompano Beach, I would never have met the wonderful mix of people I have lived happily with for most of my life. It has been a wonderful experience. I have learned about many religions and I hope have shared information about mine. My current knitting class is open to all faiths. Im pleased to be involved in the Temple social activities open to the community regardless of religion and membership. Irene Reidich came to Pompano Beach with her parents in 1934 and attended Pompano Elementary, Middle and High School. She says, My father, Moe Hirshman, owned Pompano Pharmacy. Years later, my husband and I owned the Army Surplus Store in Old Pompano. We worked hard and always tried to be good citizens. My father was the rst president of Temple Sholom. We were proud to have our own house of worship just like our neighbors did. As Jews, we were always involved in our community. I was the rst and only female president of Temple Sholom from 1977 to 1979. Our Temple has always opened its doors to all who want to come. We have study groups and social events, all open to every faith. Myra Saff, another longtime resident said, The Jewish Center at Temple Sholom has always welcomed the non-Jewish population with open arms. Currently, we have study groups, cooking, MahJong and knitting classes open to the community. Her husband, Dr. Harvey Saff, retired podiatrist, is a past president and current treasurer of the Jewish Center at Temple Sholom. He says, I had an of ce for 50 years on Atlantic Boulevard. We came here in 1957 and have been involved in the Temple and in city and civic organizations ever since. The Jewish Center at Temple Sholom has always welcomed newcomers and people of all faiths to all of our services, study groups and classes. Right now we have an ongoing and somewhat unique program, conducted by Debby Lombard, for special needs children. Its completely non denominational. In fact I dont think there are any Jewish children in the program. The children are very involved and put on a show for us every now and then. Once a month we have a Saturday morning service for these special needs children and their families. Our Jewish Center at Temple Sholom and our members have always felt part of Pompano Beach and have hopefully contributed to its progress. The Jewish Center at Temple Sholom has always welcomed newcomers and people of all faiths to all of our services, study groups and classes. Right now we have an ongoing and somewhat unique program, conducted by Debby Lombard, for special needs children. Its completely non denominational. In fact I dont think there are any Jewish children in the program. The children are very involved and put on a show for us every non and then. Once a month we do a Saturday morning service for these special needs children and their families. Our Jewish Center at Temple Sholom and our members have always felt part of Pompano Beach and have hopefully contributed to its progress. TempleContinued from page 7

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Friday, August 31, 2012 Vol. XX, Issue 35 Wherever you are, read The Pelican @ pompanopelican.com • Send news to siren2415@gmail.com Pompano Beach • Deer eld Beach • Lighthouse Point • Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Wilton Manors • Oakland Park • Hillsboro Beach • The Galt • Palm Aire The P e l i c a n Pelican Visit us online at www.pompanopelican.com T h e The P e l i c a n Pelican 88 days left in 2012 Hurricane season By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFThe storm has passed. There’s no power in the kitchen nor the rest of the house. So, will it be soup or steaks?At Culinary Concepts, grilling is serious business especially in the aftermath of a stormFor many South Floridians, the aftermath of a storm brings reduced dining options. But it doesn’t have to be that way. With the proper amount of preparation eating well doesn’t require electricity. From wood red pizza to baked bread to steak, “anything you can do in an oven you can do in these,” said Dean Marten, owner of Culinary Concepts, as he pointed to a Big See STORM FOOD on page 15 SampleMcDougald House tours on Labor DayPompano Beach The historic 1916 Sample-McDougald House will be open to the general public for tours on Labor Day, September 3rd, from 12 to 5 p.m.. The $5 admission charge includes a guided tour of the house and refreshments. The Sample-McDougald House is located at 450 NE 10 Street in Pompano Beach, and has recently completed a $2.5 million restoration and landscaping effort. The house, the only structure in Pompano Beach listed in the National Register of Historic Places, was originally located on North Dixie Highway, just south of Sample Road. In order to preserve it, the house was moved to its present location in 2001. The 4,500 square foot, Georgian Revival house is noted for its wraparound porch, spacious rooms and intricate architectural detail work. Surrounding the house are four acres of landscaped grounds, designated by the City of Pompano Beach as Centennial Park in honor of the municipality’s 100th anniversary in 2008. In additional to public tours, the house and grounds can be rented for private events such as weddings, dinners and corporate functions. For more information call 954 691-5686.By Judy VikSTAFF WRITERTropical Storm Isaac spared North Broward cities major damage as it blew through this area Sunday and Isaac’s winds and rain were inconvenient, but caused little damage, but gusting winds brought high iersheaded toward Louisiana. Rain squalls continued intermittently on Monday. The City of Pompano Beach was very well prepared for the storm, according to Sandra King, city communications director. The city’s emergency manager worked all weekend, and public works and utilities employees were on hand. Seven lift stations lost power during See ISAAC on page 16 Sailing surfers took full advantage of the winds on the beaches at Pompano Beach while beach combers braved the surf last weeke nd. History Issue II

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2 The PelicanFriday, August 31, 2012 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach is a city of hundreds of churches today, but it was the early churches that held communities together as pioneers began to carve out this city which began with 250 residents and has grown to over 100,000 today. Pompano Beach First Baptist Church of Pompano Beach was born in a Methodist church building. An organizational meeting, held May 4, 1915, seven years after Pompano was First Baptist’s history is signi cant for growth and community outreach Early buildings of First Baptist Churchincorporated as a city, in a community building owned by local Methodists. Here the edgling Baptist congregation met for seven years until parishioners completed their own sanctuary. The Rev. S.P. Mahoney preached two Sunday afternoons a month for a monthly salary of $10. Early in 1921, church members voted unanimously to build their own church at a cost of at least $5,000. Dr. J.P. Lee became pastor in 1922, and in February the church purchased four lots on Northeast 1 Street for $900. Services were rst held in the newly completed church building in July. Early in 1923 the church began construction of a parsonage beside the sanctuary and had it ready for occupancy in less than ve months. By the time both buildings were formally dedicated in March 1924, all the debts had been paid in full with $200 left in the building fund. Although the church building and parsonage suffered heavy damage in a 1928 hurricane, most of the loss was covered by insurance. In 1936 the church began construction of a Sunday School building, which was completed in 1937.See Baptists on page 18

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The Pelican 3 Friday, August 31, 2012 By Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFMerrill Pridemore will not eat chicken. Just the mention of this common fowl makes him shake his head and grimace. His wife, Julia, steps into the conversation and con rms the vow made by her husband of more than 64 years. “That’s true,” she says. “He hates chicken.” Merrill will look you in the eye and simulate holding Memories of growing up in Pompano reveal the antics and life of a young boy who is now the family patriarch Merrill Pridemore talks about early Pompano in the same room he was born in 84 years ago. a chicken by its legs. “You know how we had to dip them in hot water so we could pull off the feathers?” “That’s right,” Julia says. “Stinky.” Merril nods his head. “So I promised myself that if I ever had enough money to buy my own food, I would never eat chicken again.” Merrill has been true to his word. Eighty-four years ago See PRIDEMORE on page 30

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4 The PelicanFriday, August 31, 2012 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFHillsboro Beach – It’s not surprising that the woman who took it upon herself to write this small town’s history came from a part of the country seeped in her own family’s origins. Carmen McGarry’s was born in Champlain, NY, and her ancestors trace their lineage to Samuel De Champlain the founder of Quebec City. Their family name, Racine, is common there. Her sister’s home in Plattsburgh, NY faces a War of 1812 battleground. That region was also a site of the French Indian War. So when she came to Hillsboro Beach in 1991, it The need to unravel fact from ction motivated this history keeper was new territory that needed exploring. The rst thing she cleared up was the town’s incorporation date. Thought to be 1941, she went to the county courthouse and found the documents incorporating the town in 1939. From there she took to reading all the handwritten minutes of town commission meetings, “every one of them”, she says. And she began hearing stories about the town founders that she found hard to believe. To get the facts she went to the archives of newspapers Opal Scrieber, whose husband built the Opal Towers Condominium and named it after her. Photo taken at town’s 60th anniversary celebration. Historian Carmen McGarry with the town’s rst police marshal Amo Angelletti.and historical societies, searched of cial records, read university publications and funeral home death notices and conducted personal interviews with heirs of the rst settlers. What surprised her is that many of the stories See MCGARRY on page 29 History KeeperMayor Carmen McGarry

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The Pelican 5 Friday, August 31, 2012 By Bill JohnsonPELICAN WRITERLauderdale-By-The-Sea – For the rst time, Assumption Catholic Church in LBTS will celebrate a Special Liturgy for Our Lady of Charity, patroness of Cuba, 400 years Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Assumption Catholic Church to hold Spanish mass to celebrate the patroness of Cubaafter her statue was found in Cuban waters. It will be held on Sunday, Sept. 9, at 12:15 p.m. The church is at 2001 South Ocean Blvd. This follows a wellattended July celebration of the patroness of Columbia. “The idea is outreach to the sizeable population of people of Hispanic origin in Broward County,” says the Very Reverend Michael Greer, the church pastor. “This is to celebrate in terms of spirituality and devotion, as well as community building.” Fernando Alvarez, an active member of the church for 12 years, has played a key role in organizing the mass. He explains that the United States national anthem will be played for a procession to post the ag near the alter. Cuba’s national anthem will then be played as its ag is posted. A statute of the Lady of Charity will be in place and six ladies representing the six provinces of Cuba will bring oral offerings to Our Lady. The priest will then conduct “a standard mass” including hymns. After the mass a reception will be held in the parish hall where Cuban coffee and pastries will be served. As reported in a church publication, the patroness of Cuba dates back to the 1600s when two native Indians and a slave boy in a canoe discovered a statue oating in the ocean. According to sworn testimony of witnesses, it was a statue of the Virgin Mary holding a child and a gold cross. The statue was fastened to a board with the inscription, “I am the Virgin of Charity.” Although it was found in the water, witnesses reported it was not wet. Over the years, church of cials accepted and authenticated the account, and in 1916 Benedict XV declared Our Lady of Charity as the patroness of Cuba. Pope Paul VI later raised her sanctuary to the category of Basilica in 1997. While this is the rst service at Assumption Catholic Church dedicated to the patroness of Cuba, masses in Spanish are not new to Pastor Greer. He previously served his church in Kendall. There was a diverse Latin population there, and his church conducted a number of similar masses. Fernando Alvarez (L) and Pastor Michael Greer

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6 The PelicanFriday, August 31, 2012 SightingsA community calendar for Northeast Broward County. Send your event information to mdpelican@yahoo.com 9-4 – Deer eld Beach City Commission meeting at 6:55 p.m. at city hall, 150 NE 2 Ave. 9-8 – Deer eld Beach city shred from 9 a.m. to noon at the Recycling Drop-Off Center, 401 SW 4 St. Cost is $10 for up to ve boxes or bags and $20 for up to 10 boxes or bags. Checks only. 954-480-4379. 9-8 – Shred-A-Thon and prescription drug take back from 9 a.m. to noon at Lowe’s, 1851 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. Hosted by the Broward Sheriff’s Of ce. Limit ve boxes per car. Those who bring prescriptions will receive a $5 Publix gift card. Limit one per family. 954831-8902. 9-8 – Fundraiser for Wilton Manors Kiwanis Club’s annual Kids Day event from 6 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Over Easy Caf, 318. E. Oakland Park Blvd., Wilton Manors. Over East will donate the money from any beverages purchased during breakfast or lunch to Kids Day. 954-5607813. 9-9 – Pancake breakfast hosted by the Benevolent Patriotic Order of DOES Drove 142 at the Elks lodge, 700 NE 10 St., Pompano Beach, from 9 a.m. to noon. Cost is $5 for adults and $2.50 for children. 954-587-1121. 9-10 – Artist Jennifer Andrews will discuss new See SIGHTINGS on page 10

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The Pelican 7 Friday, August 31, 2012 By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFRoz Karneol came to Pompano Beach in 1944 when it was still a farm community. Her story is part of the Jewish history in Pompano Beach and how these rst settlers related to and affected the city. Karneal says, “As a member of Temple Sholom since its inception, I feel that interfaith living in a Christian community has been a wonderful experience. Like all of the Jewish community, I have participated in many city wide efforts over the years which have enriched my life and hopefully the lives of many Pompano residents.” “I met my husband, Herman, in Boston during WWII and eventually came to Pompano to meet his family. I never left. We married in Temple Emanuel in Fort Lauderdale, and my life here began. It was totally different from the world I came from in Boston.” “Our family patriarch, Abe Hirshman, came to Pompano in 1928 and opened the BonTon Department Store. His brother, Moe, followed in 1934 and opened the Pompano Pharmacy which still exists under different ownership. The Hirshman family now numbered eight which included Abe and Lena Hirshman, Moe and Goldie Hirshman, Florence and Eddie David and my husband, Herman Karneol, and me.” “The other Jewish family in Pompano included Dave and Gussie Goldberg and Harry and Fay Goldberg. The twelve of us began the Pompano Jewish Circle which was the foundation for our Jewish community. We met in each other’s homes and talked about having our own temple one day. Perhaps because our Christian friends all had churches, we were eager to identify ourselves as a Jewish community. It’s Pompano Beach’s Jewish Center at Temple Sholom began with Jewish Circle of 12 pioneers back in the 40sSee TEMPLE on page 44

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8 The PelicanFriday, August 31, 2012 WORSHIP DIRECTORY: Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad. Rev. Hyvenson Joseph By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFOakland Park – The public will be heard on the proposed $90.5 million budget Wednesday, Sept. 5 at 6:30 p.m. The scal plan calls for a $1.5 million increase in revenue and a tax increase of about $17 for the median household, a re assessment increase to $196 for residential units and withdrawal of $2.88 million from fund balance. City Manager John Stunson said if the commission makes no move to increase taxes or make cuts, the city will be out of reserves in two more years. During a budget workshop Wednesday, Commissioner Shari McCartney suggested commissioners focus on the big picture and include a plan for re-funding the fund balance, “our savings account.” “The precipitous drop in fund balance is frightening,” she said. “We need a plan to re ll it to pre-crash level.” With this budget, the balance will be at $9 million. McCartney suggested looking at staff additions in the Broward Sheriff’s Of ce, purchase of a re truck and the city’s lobbying contract as possible ways to drop the increase in the millage rate signi cantly. “We need to make sure our taxes are reasonable and we get the services we need,” she said. Vice Mayor John Adornato said it is crucial the city maintain a high level of safety. He noted that residential burglaries are up, adding that is not unique to Oakland Park. He shared McCartney’s concerns about tapping into reserves. He said he thought more ways to save in the budget could be found. “Last year we had a proposal to increase some recreational fees. Maybe we can take a look at that for further parity.” Mayor Anne Sallee said, “I absolutely believe we need the two additional BSO of cers. We have issues with crime and have employees who are overworked. We have traf c problems in the city and want to maintain safe conditions. [The proposed budget calls for an additional sergeant and motorman.] She said that the new re truck will be paid for over seven years. Sallee agreed the fund balance must be brought up. “But we shouldn’t do it at the expense of public safety.” Commissioner Jed Shank noted the proposed budget calls for no layoffs, merit pay increases, an aggressive downtown marketing plan and minimal reduction to services. “I don’t support any further reduction in reserves,” Shank said. “If we can put off increasing taxes for another year, we need to do that.” He suggested not adding the two deputies to BSO, for a savings of $300,000 and not purchasing the new re truck until talks are held about the Facing tax hikes, public will review OP budget this weekpossibility of consolidating the re department with another agency. Commissioner Suzanne Boisvenue, disagreeing with Shank said the two new deputies are needed and so See TAX on page 9

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The Pelican 9 Friday, August 31, 2012 is the new re truck. “Public safety is our number one priority. We have a truck that is almost no use at all.” She suggested paring down the $404 million proposed for the Community Redevelopment Agency and marketing the downtown. “We’re spending almost $300,000 more than we’ve ever spent before.” Adornato noted that it’s the state that required the city to add to its pension fund at a cost of $1.4 million, which is why so much of fund balance is being used. He said he supports the revenues for Main Street, adding, “We’re getting an incredible response.” Addressing the re truck purchase, Stunson said the best reserve vehicle is a 12year-old truck. If that is out of service, the department relies on a 25-year-old backup, and sometimes it breaks down. Fire Chief Don Widing said he has borrowed a truck from Broward County in the past, but said he can’t rely on another agency for a truck. He said the older vehicle should have been gone four years ago. TaxContinued frm pafe 8 Edna Horne Johnson (lower left) celebrated her 101st birthday last weekend in Boca Raton with many members of her large clan and friends. A native of Deer eld Beach, Edna was the fourth of six children born to Joel and Ardena Horne. When she was 32 she married Myrle Johnson and had two daughters, Joyce Avanti(standing left) and Judy Denault. Pictured with them is Joel Horne, 96, Edna’s brother. She now lives in Georgia close to her daughters and is still sharp of mind. In a song her family composed, Edna is described as “warm and precious,” her favorite things: her Baptist religion, Lawrence Welk, clearance racks at Macy’s and hot fudge sundaes. Edna’s parents came to Deer eld Beach around 1903. Her mother, Ardena, lived to be 103. Happy birthday Edna Horne The Pelican 954-783-8700

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10 The PelicanFriday, August 31, 2012 Fingerprints at Pac N’ Send, LHPLivescan digital ngerprinting is now available at Pac N’ Send, 3640-83 N. Federal Hwy., Lighthouse Point. Penni Morris explains that the ngerprinting is done at her store’s location and electronically sent to Florida Department of Law Enforcement. Morris added that she can also process Level I and Level II applicant background checks and a series of other background checks. Call 954-946-7760.County Call CenterBroward – The Broward County Call Center provides a single point of contact for the services and programs offered by the more than 50 agencies comprising Broward County government. The center offers callers a fast, simple and convenient way to reach trained, professional information specialists. Questions ranging from ‘Where can I get a passport?’ to ‘Who is my commissioner?’ can be answered. Calls to the center can be made in English, Spanish or Creole. The center is open Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Under emergency conditions it’s open 24/7. Call 954-831-4000 or 3-1-1 or 954-831-3940 for the hearing impaired. Business Resource Center eventsPompano Beach – On Friday, Sept. 7 from 4 to 6 p.m. the Business Resource Center, 50 NE 1 St., hosts Ask The Expert, a free oneon-one consultation with a technology professional. Topics include hardware con guration, PC repair, software installation, iPods, iTunes, virus and smart phone assistance. On Monday, Sept. 10 from 5:30 to 7 p.m. the Business Resource Center hosts It’s Not Just Business, It’s Personal, a business networking open house. Meet local business owners, build an external team, discover common connections and win prizes. For more information on either event, call 954-5861111.SightingsContinued from page 6public art work at 7 p.m. at Pompano Beach Commission Chambers, 100 W. Atlantic Boulevard. Visit www. Andrewslefevre.com or call 954-357-7236. 9-11 – A class on hip pain will be held at Broward Health North Hospital, 201 E Sample Road, Deer eld Beach, from 6 to 7 p.m. 954759-7400. 9-11 – Behavioral Health Family Support Group meets from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. at Broward Health Imperial Point Hospital, 6401 N Federal Hwy., Fort Lauderdale. Group is for people with family members dealing with mental illness. 954-739-1888. 9-11 – Wilton Manors City Commission meeting at 7 p.m. at city hall, 2020 Wilton Drive. 9-11 – Pompano Beach City Commission meeting at 7 p.m. at city hall, 100 W. Atlantic Blvd. 9-11 – Lighthouse Point City Commission meeting at 7:30 p.m. at city hall, 2200 N.E. 38 St. 9-11 – Lauderdale-ByThe-Sea Town Commission meeting at 7 p.m. at Jarvis Hall, 4501 Ocean Drive. 9-12 – The Greater Pompano Chamber Business Expo will be held from 5 to 8 p.m. at Citi Centre, the corner of Copans Road and Federal Highway, on the second oor between Lowe’s and Sears. Over a hundred local and regional businesses will be showcased during the event. Cost is $10 per ticket or two for $15. 954-941-2940. 9-13 – Better Business Network – Enterprise Group meets at 7:30 a.m. at Galuppi’s, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. Sponsored by the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce. 954-933-1558 9-13 – Wilton Manors will hold its rst of cial budget meeting at 7 p.m. at city hall, 2020 Wilton Drive. Commissioners will vote on the budget, re assessment rates and the millage rate. To view the budget, visit www. wiltonmanors.com or call 954-390-2100. 9-14 – Celebrate National Sewing Month with the Pompano Chapter of the American Sewing Guild. See SIGHTINGS on page 17

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The Pelican 11 Friday, August 31, 2012

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12 The PelicanFriday, August 31, 2012 Deerfield Beach The story of Manufacturer Direct Eyewear begins with the owner, John Lombardi, an importer and exporter of eyeglasses and optical goods for 35 years. Ten years ago, Lombardi purchased his property on the edge of a redevelopment zone because he needed more space for his wholesale business. Taking advantage of the city’s faade program, he improved his property and with his business neighbors created a retail-friendly commercial strip on Hillsboro Boulevard. just west of Dixie Highway. The result has been a highly successful location and business which continues to expand and improve with changing technologies. “We’ve had much success here,” Lombardi said. With his background in importing, Lombardi aptly named his store Manufacturer Direct Eyewear with the idea of offering his products directly to the public. It caught on. Soon after, customers were requesting a variety of well-known designer eyewear. In the spacious, brightly decorated showroom, customers can choose from hundreds of styles of eyeglasses, sunglasses and sport glasses with the assistance of a highly-trained staff. The store features designer names: Tom Ford, Tiffany, Bulgari, Guess, Ray Ban, Maui Jim, Costa Del Mar, Oakley, Coach and most recently, for younger customers, the Olsen Twin’s line of frames, Elizabeth and James. Using the very latest in computer manufacturing equipment, a client can be examined by a board certified optometrist, fitted with a frame, have lenses cut, and ready for assembly in a day. This new technology keeps his business innovative and exciting, Lombardi said. Lombardi is passionate about good vision, especially for young people. He offers them a back-to-school special: three pairs of glasses with polycarbonate lenses for $99 and a $50 eye exam. “Students come in our shop who can’t see across the room,” he says. “They often don’t realize that everybody doesn’t see like they do because they have nothing to compare their vision to.” An eye exam not only checks the health of their eyes it gives a reference point as to what correct vision is. Manufacturer Direct Eyewear, 142 W. Hillsboro Blvd., Deerfield Beach – 954-570-9293 • www.lensframes.comI’d like this to be a store that is also a health institute. John Lombardi.The latest styles, changes in technology and a caring staff all contribute to the success of Manufacturer Direct EyewearThis lack of good vision accounts for many students failing in school and eventually dropping out, he said. He also urges young people to wear sunglasses saying, “So much eye damage is done before the age of 18 years. I’d like our customers to consider this store a health facility as well as the place they buy their eyeglasses” To this end, the Optometrists at Manufacturer Direct Eyewear have forged a working relationship with the Rand Eye Institute and refer clients with serious eye conditions there. The optometrists often take walk in patients with emergencies, usually caused by workers not using protective eyewear while using saws, working with metal etc. doctors also diagnose and treat many eye conditions such as glaucoma. Our doctors fit all types of contact lenses including multi focal. Along with a board-certified optometrists, Steve Hammer, a licensed optician, is on site. Steve and other trained staff help customers/patients select the best progressive and other types of lenses to fit their lifestyles. Lombardi donates a good deal of time to his Deerfield Beach community, active in the Chamber of Commerce, other organizations and volunteering each summer to take in students from the Neighborhood Initiative Program which gives teenagers a glimpse of the working world. He is also expanding his online business, Extreme Eyewear, which provides specialty glasses for divers, pilots, competitive shooters, and cyclists all over the world. One of those lines, American Optical is one of the few eyeglasses still stamped with the letters, USA. This business, which may seem ordinary on the surface, is always evolving Lombardi said. “It is a new and exciting time to be in business.” For the latest in optical information, visit the Manufacturer Direct Eyewear Facebook page which contains news on eye health as well as the latest styles in eyewear. The family of employees at Manufacturer Direct Eyewear, many of whom are multi-lingual, focus their attention on the client’s needs. Said Lombardi, “We meet friendly, wonderful people from all over the world and develop bonds with many of our customers who have also become our friends.” A worthy achievement for this business celebrating a decade in Deerfield Beach. Risa Lombardi models fashion sunglasses

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The Pelican 13 Friday, August 31, 2012 Deerfield Beach Welcoming thirsty patrons since 1975, the old Tipperary Pub is practically a landmark in the Deerfield Beach community. “We took over from Big Ron in April of 2003,” says current owner Dick Maggiore as he reminisces about the persistence it required to finally procure this well-established tavern and eatery from its previous proprietor. Along with the help of business partner Danny O’Connor, Maggiore has continued the tradition of offering typical Irish pub fare in a friendly neighborhood bar setting. The New York native has been in the food industry since 1976 when he opened his first deli in the Rockaway district of Queens. Now, Maggiore focuses his energies on his two core businesses: Tricky Dick’s in West Boca and the Tipperary Pub. “I absolutely love it here in Deerfield. I used to live in Fort Lauderdale but moved up here because it is so much more enjoyable,” says the dedicated restaurateur. The menu is quite straightforward with all-day breakfast and a good selection of appetizers, grilled specialties Tipperary Pub, The Cove Shopping Center, 1540 3 Ct., Deer eld Beach -954-421-9769Deer eld’s Tipperary Pub serves up Irish fare with neighborly airTipperary Pub owner Dick Maggiore shows off a couple of the house breakfast and lunch specialties. and sandwiches. “Our Irish Farmhouse breakfast features bangers, sausage and blood pudding all imported from Cork in Ireland,” says Maggiore. For those who have visited the Emerald Isle, this meal will definitely bring back memories. In addition, a nice portion of zesty home fries accompanies most traditional breakfast dishes. Omelettes, pancakes, smoked salmon and madefrom-scratch biscuits and gravy are some of the other good options. “Some days people are waiting in line outside the door when we open. The locals really enjoy our food,” says smiling bartender Michelle. For the lunch and dinner menu, The Tipperary Pub offers up all the classics one could expect to find in a good sports bar. Grilled fish Caesar salad, chicken wings, mozzarella sticks, smoked fish dip and hearty clam chowder are just a few of the starters to whet one’s appetite. “We’ve got just about everything from scratch,” say Tipperary’s Chef Frankie as he brings out a sizeable halfrack of ribs smothered in a tangy house BBQ sauce. He is joined by Chef June in the kitchen. Other favorites from the grill include the O’Bacon Burger with cheese, the 10 ounce New York Strip steak, the grilled tuna steak and the filet of sole. “Our baby-back ribs, meatballs and chowder are all excellent,” says Maggiore. There is also a good choice of subs and sandwiches such as Philly cheese steak, chicken breast, dolphin, stacked Irish ham and even liverwurst. But the Tipperary is also very much a pub. With pool tables, dart boards, table shuffleboard, umpteen flat screen TVs with sports packages and a well-stocked bar, there is plenty of entertainment for patrons. “We have dart teams, a pool league and even a softball team. We also have a pig roast on the fourth Sunday of each month during high season,” says Maggiore. Happy hour is from 4 to 8 p.m. daily. Ladies night is on Monday from 8 p.m. to midnight. There is free wi-fi and discount coupons can also be printed directly from the pub’s website at www.tipperarypub. net. The average dish costs about $6 and breakfast starts at $2.99. Daily lunch specials are posted on boards. Take-out is popular and free parking is plentiful. “We have an emergency generator to make sure we never close during hurricanes. People travel from far away to come see us at those times,” chuckles Maggiore. “We also have a stimulus special featuring a 16 oz Pabst Blue Ribbon for $2,” adds the wily entrepreneur. Reminiscent of Cheers, the little Boston bar so famously depicted on television, the Tipperary is the kind of pub where everyone remembers your name. “Everybody knows everybody. This is a very friendly place,” says Maggiore.

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14 The PelicanFriday, August 31, 2012 Dr. Kellie Mosley-Mendez takes great pains to make her patients feel at home. From their rst view of the outer of ce, decorated like a high end living room, to the extra time and attention they are given, the client comes rst in this dermatology practice. “I don’t see 60 patients a day, “ said Dr. MosleyMendez. “This is almost a concierge practice. My staff is very well trained. We all spend lots of time explaining treatments and outcomes to the patients. There is no rushing them in and out. Once a client comes in here, he or she usually comes back.” Interested in dermatology her whole life, Dr. MosleyMendez obtained her degree in Osteopathic Medicine from Nova Southeastern University in 1998 and completed her residency at Broward General Hospital in 2002. After working in the area for awhile she established her rst of ce in Miami Lakes. A little over a year ago, she moved to Lighthouse Point with her husband Kevin, a radiologist at Florida Medical Center, and her son Kevin, Jr., 9, a national diving champion. It’s a move she is glad they made. In April 2011, she opened DKM Skin Care at 4801 N. Federal Highway in Fort Lauderdale. “I was basically starting over, but I like the clientele up here and being near Holy Cross Hospital gives me lots of referrals. We wanted to live on the water because we have a boat, and Lighthouse Point is a good place for a family,” MosleyMendez said. The dermatologist took her practice another step and became a certi ed pharmacist so she can dispense prescription drugs for skin problems. She also sells her own skin care line to treat conditions such as psoriasis, acne, rosacea and melasma. Along with moisturizers and cleansers, the best seller in the line is an anti-aging lotion containing essential ingredients that rejuvenate the skin. “These are medical grade products only available at a doctor’s of ce,” she said. What that means is the products contain a higher percentage of active ingredients than what can be sold over the counter at Dr. Mosley-Mendez offers cosmetic solutions and countless ways to solve skin problems, sun damagedepartment stores. And the prices are comparable, in some cases cheaper, since most DKM products sell in the $20 to $40 range. This practice treats all skin diseases and conditions and offers cosmetology procedures such as vein treatments, skin resurfacing, Botox injections and Juvederm applications. The newest lasers remove surgical lines, scars, redness and dark spots on the skin. Within the last month, she has added a MOHS laboratory for her skin cancer patients and will schedule procedures with a MOHS surgeon right in her of ce. A MOHS surgeon is trained to read tissue slides in the on-site lab and can proceed immediately to do more surgery as required during the procedure. Like others in her eld, Dr. Mosley-Mendez is seeing a rise in skin cancer patients. She attributes that to people continuing to go into the sun despite the warnings and the popularity of tanning salons. She recommends annual skin exams. One of her long term patients, Kim Van Sant, brings her whole family to DKM. She recalled how concerned DKM Skin Care 4801 N. Federal Highway, Fort Lauderdale. 954-202-7881 Dr. Mosley-Mendez was when treating one of Van Sant’s sons. “She was so apologetic that the numbing shot would be a bit painful,” Van Sant remembers. She herself has had numerous procedures including vein removal and skin peels for sun damage. “I don’t think she has ever recommended anything that I would not recommend to someone else,” Van Sant said. This dermatology of ce also offers a Slim Down program which is doctor monitored for effective weight loss. Although Dr. MosleyMendez enjoys interior decorating, her real passion outside the of ce is her son’s diving career. A member of the Pine Crest swim team, Kevin Jr., also dives with USA Diving and last year was national champion in his age division. This year, he is ranked third in the nation diving in the age 9 to 11 division. Free time and vacations are spent at dive meets, Mosley-Mendez said. This summer, Kevin is training with an Olympic coach. The staff at DKM Skin Care creates a happy, caring atmosphere. From left Phillip Banks, Aida Bonilla, Dr. MosleyMendez and Saili Ordaz.Dr. Kellie Mosley-Mendez in her of ces at 4801 N. Federal Hwy., Fort Lauderdale.

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The Pelican 15 Friday, August 31, 2012 Green Egg which is a combination oven, smoker and grill powered by charcoal. “It takes 10 minutes to get it up to temperature,” said Marten. For grillers looking for a step below a Big Green Egg, Culinary Concepts has smaller grills perfect for condo balconies or for those just looking to cook up the essentials after the power goes out. For those looking for a step above, there’s the 56-inch Alfresco grill. With a rotating rotisserie, infrared cooker, smoker and refrigeration unit, the Alfresco, which uses propane, can cook up a meal after an out of the ordinary weather event or an everyday barbeque. Marten has the 42-inch version at home. After Wilma hit in 2005, he was an important person to know in his neighborhood. “All the neighbors brought food over to our house as their freezers were thawing. That’s the bene t of owning a grill store. You’re always prepared.” Not too experienced on what cooks well and easy on a grill, besides hot dogs and hamburgers? Marten says, “Leg of lamb and ribs cook easily.” But almost anything is grill worthy. “As the things in your freezer thaw you just start grilling them,” said Marten. Culinary Concepts’ staff can even help pick out the right kind of wood to use to get the desired smoked taste in your meat – from sweet to earthy. But without proper preparation nothing’s getting smoked or grilled. And just like gassing up the car and making sure there is enough charcoal or propane to last the aftermath of a storm, Marten recommends everyone make sure their grill is in a usable condition before a storm hits. To prepare for a storm or the perfect barbecue, Culinary Concepts sells sh baskets, meat thermometers, hibachi grills, mosquito misters, pizza cutters, cast iron skillets, cook books, spatulas, drink tumblers that keep ice cubes frozen for up to ve hours and even olive stuffers “for the person who has everything,” said Marten. Culinary Concepts also offers some alternatives to traditional grilling. Instead of drenching your charcoal in lighter uid, Weber Cubes can be used to get charcoal going. “It’s a lot cleaner and you’re not introducing the lighter uid chemicals into your charcoal or your food,” said Marten. And rain or shine, every Saturday Marten and his staff like to re up one of the grills at the store and show their customers just what they can do. “Plus, when you have to work Saturdays you may as well eat,” he said. For more, visit www. gratecook.com or call 954781-5163. Family Fun DayPompano Beach – Splashes and Smiles Swim School will celebrate its 4th Annual Family Fun Day on Saturday, Sept. 15 from 4:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Pompano Beach Aquatic Center, 820 NE 18 Ave. Join Splashes and Smiles for a day of swimming, diving boards, fire trucks, snorkeling, games and more. There will also be raffle prizes. The event is free and all proceeds benefit the The Kid’s Cancer Foundation of South Florida. For more information, to donate items to the raffle, sponsor the event or volunteer, email SplashesandSmiles@gmail.com or call 754-246-0665. Storm foodContinued from page 1 Dean Marten, owner of Culinary Concepts in Pompano Beach, stands next to the 56-inch Alfresco grill. With a rotating rotisserie, infrared cooker, smoker and refrigeration unit, the Alfresco, which uses propane, can cook up any meal after an out of the ordinary weather event or an everyday barbeque. [Staff photo]

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16 The PelicanFriday, August 31, 2012 the storm, but generators were at the sites to keep them running. According to King, among the other stormrelated incidents, an electrical panel at Fire Station 103 in Cresthaven shorted out. A tree at the city’s dog park fell on a fence causing minor damage, and winds felled several new trees on the jogging path. Public works employees picked up about 200 cubic yards of vegetative debris. Some areas, including portions of Cresthaven, lost power. Residents of Deer eld Beach fared better with no power outages reported. According to Environmental Services Director Charlie DaBrusco there was some tree damage but the only major cleanup effort was on the beach where the winds pushed sand over Ocean Avenue from the shing pier to SE 4 Street. Crews worked all day Tuesday clearing the roadway. The street further south to the city limits remained clear, protected by sand dunes and sea grasses. “That’s why we plant the dunes,” DaBrusco pointed out. With no serious threat from the storm, fun loving citizens came to the beach to get a glimpse of the surf and then retreated to beach restaurants. While they offered no ‘hurricane specials,’ a manager at Big Daddy’s said,”Sunday is always a busy night, but this Sunday was much busier than we anticipated.” In Oakland Park, city rain gauges showed six inches fell between Friday and Monday, as predicted. City facilities were shuttered when tropical storm warnings were issued. “We had no ooding issues, no injuries, no major downed trees or wires and no power outages,” said David Rafter, public information of cer. Oakland Park re ghters responded to a small re in a house in the 300 block of NW 38 Street at 1:30 p.m. Sunday. The re was caused by a short in electrical wiring in a wall and was not storm-related, Rafter said. No one was displaced or injured. The city’s Emergency Operations Center was open at a re station and staffed all weekend. In Lauderdale-By-TheSea, power outages were reported near Terra Mar Isle on Sunday and in a few spots south of Commercial Boulevard Monday. A few traf c lights were out due to power outages. Effects were “nothing signi cant,” Lt. Angelo Cedeno said, noting that winds were stronger on Monday than on Sunday. The town experienced minimal ooding, according to Steve d’Oliveira, spokesperson. Some newly planted trees and branches were down. There was no property damage and no ooding damage. Crews were out Saturday cleaning drains and pumping water. In Lighthouse Point, a spokesperson at the Public Works Department said there was no storm-related report from that city. The wind and rain did caused cancellation of many events. The Pompano Exchange Club, planning a social outside at the SampleMcDougald House, moved the party to a private home in Lighthouse Point. And even when the storm had passed on Tuesday, of cials participating in the ribboncutting ceremony of the C. Scott Ellington Technology Business Incubator, delayed that ceremony until later in September. Ellington was a resident of Deer eld Beach. Storm Dogs Mixed terriors, big Jaxson and little Oliver were recently seen walking around Terra Mar Island in hurricane styled-rain gear. Their master, Kyle Campbell quipped “Rain or shine, dogs need to be walked.” [Photo by Barbara McCormick]Wilton Manors The City of Wilton Manors has hired a contractor to pick up Tropical Storm Isaac related tree debris on Monday, Sept. 3,. Tree debris should be at the curb no later than 7 a.m. Three trucks will haul debris through the central, east and western parts of the city. This pickup is for tree debris only. Storm debris pick IsaacContinued from page 1

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The Pelican 17 Friday, August 31, 2012 Boat ramp closed but boaters will get a breakDeerfield Beach Due to the complete closure of the boat launch ramp at Pioneer Park from Tuesday, Sept. 4 through Friday, Dec. 7, patrons may turn in their 2012 parking until Dec. 7 and receive a pro-rated discount of $25 toward their 2013 sticker. Current sticker documentation must be shown to receive the credit slip. No refunds will be issued. Boat trailer parking stickers brought in past that the Dec. 7 deadline will not qualify for this discount. For additional information please contact 954-426-6898 or visit Parks and Recreation, 401 SW 4th Street, Deerfield Beach. SightingsContinued from page 10 See SIGHTINGS on page 20Hand sewing techniques will be demonstrated from 10:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at the North Regional/Broward College Library, 1100 Coconut Creek Blvd., Coconut Creek. 954-201-2600. 9-15 – Pony rides from 8 to 11:30 a.m. at Sand & Spurs Equestrian Park, 1600 NE 5 Ave., Pompano Beach. Just north of the Goodyear Blimp Base. Free Admission. Cost is $3 per ride. 954.786.4507. 9-15 – Recovery Awareness Nigh t to bene t Vision of Change, an organization that raises money to help fund projects that bene t the children of Los Quinchos, Nicaragua and their efforts to recover from substance abuse and addiction. Event starts at

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18 The Pelican Friday, August 31, 2012 BaptistsContinued from page 2Church membership and Sunday School attendance declined slightly in First Baptist’s third decade. However, with the sweeping national prosperity that followed the end of World War II, the church began a steady growth that continued for years. Rev. Charles W. Smith became pastor in March 1945. Under his leadership the church built a second Sunday School building and began construction of its present auditorium. In late 1949, church membership was 525. In 1950, First Baptist promoted development of an Oakland Park mission that later became an independent church. The new auditorium was dedicated in January 1955, and by the fall of that year, membership topped 1,000. First Baptist members continued building missions in North Pompano and Margate. The Rev. Mack R. Douglas became pastor in December 1962. He had a vision for the church’s development and expansion that far exceeded anything the congregation had dreamed of: a half-million dollar recreation and education building that would Today, First Baptist Church of Pompano remains a pillar in the community as well as a landmark.add needed Sunday school space and provide a place for supervised programs in basketball, volleyball, tennis, handball, skating and bowling. The new two-story building also included music facilities, senior-adult activity areas, church of ces and a large fellowship hall with fully equipped kitchen. Ground-breaking took place in November 1963. The new activities building provided a great boost for the already thriving youth ministry. In October 1965, the church instituted a new Sunday school department for single adults, reaching out to a long-neglected segment of the congregation. And the recreation and education facility have been an integral part of First Baptist’s growth ever since. “The gym is used most everyday for some purpose. I can’t tell you names of athletes but there’s been a lot of church growth from athletic programs,” said Jerry Bowman, a deacon at First Baptist who joined the church in 1960 after marrying his wife, Newana Cheshire, one of the pioneer members. Douglas resigned in February 1969, and Dr. Robert L. Smith became the 12th pastor in September of that year. A “Tell Pompano” crusade in March 1971 resulted in a “Pompano Pentecost” with more than 80 conversions and about the same number of spiritual rededications. Another important ministry began in June 1979. The Day Camp, an all-day program for children during summer vacation, was launched and now also provides after-school programs during the school year. In December 1979 a Christmas tradition was born with the presentation of the rst “Singing Christmas Tree” under the direction of Rev. Al Fennell, music minister. In May 1980 First Baptist celebrated its 65th anniversary by breaking ground for the nal portion of the expansion that had been almost 10 years in planning. The “adult building” would stand along the front of the recreation building and extend east along 1st St. until it connected with the sanctuary building. The Lena Lyons Warren addition was dedicated in February 1982. The church reluctantly accepted Dr. Smith’s resignation in October 1984. During his 15-year pastorate he baptized 1,365 people, and the church accepted 2,128 members by transfer. The Spanish and Haitian missions, new adult education building and growth in single-adult and senioradult ministries bore witness to his wise leadership and the support and hard work of his wife Ethelyn, according to a church history. “I think the community has changed around Pompano and our church has changed ethnically,” said Pastor Don Worden. “We have a more diverse church and it re ects the community around us.” Worden, who oversees church administration and missions, said the church has also expanded its missions to Haiti, Honduras and the Dominican Republic. The number of Haitian Baptist churches in the Dominican Republic has increased as a result. Because of conditions in Haiti many Haitians immigrated to the Dominican See BAPTISTSn page 19

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The Pelican 19 Friday, August 31, 2012 Republic. “Our goal is to have 120 Haitian Baptist churches in the Dominican Republic by 2014. Right now we’re up to 70,” said Worden. In September 1985, the BaptistsContinued from page 18church called a Texan, Dr. Thomas B. Harris III. as pastor. He died of cancer in July 1987. The Rev. Kenneth Hall Smith Jr. began his pastorate at First Baptist on Easter Sunday, March 26, 1989. He de ned his task as that of equipping each church member to minister in the marketplace. The church observed its 75th anniversary in May 1990 with a weekend of celebrating and reminiscing. Pastor Smith resigned in April 1991 to establish a fulltime evangelistic and teaching ministry. The church called Dr. Robert Dominy as pastor in January 1992, and he and his wife Janet began their ministry here on March 1. In March 1993 former member Dr. Al Mohler was named president of Southern Baptist Seminary in Louisville, Ky. Dr. Mohler grew up in First Baptist and was licensed and ordained in the church. The church opened the Lord’s Gift House in May 1993 in a small building on a corner of the church campus. It is open every Saturday morning, staffed by volunteers, to dispense donated food and clothing as well as the gospel to needy people in areas around the church. Pastor Dominy resigned in March 1999. Rev. David Rice, former interim youth minister, became pastor in September. In April 2000, the church voted to establish a new building fund to prepare for future growth requirements. The campaign raised over $1.6 million over four and a half years. In November 2003 Dr. Rice left to return to Westside Baptist Church in Gainesville, his college church. On May 1, 2005, as the church celebrated its 90th anniversary, Dr. Ron Harvey took the helm as new senior pastor. He continues to lead the church today as it continues its mission of “reaching and nurturing all people for Christ.” Charter members of First Baptist Church were Mr. and Mrs. Ed Cook, Mrs. Rachel Hardin, Mrs. Kitty Hardy, Mr. and Mrs. A.J. McCaughy, Mr. and Mrs. W.A. Petsch, Mr. Cleve Rucker, Mr. and Mrs. R.B. Rucker, Mr. W.C. Rucker, Mrs. L. Smith, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph P. Smoak, Mr. and Mrs. L.R. Smoak, Mrs. E.J. Walker, Mrs. John Warren and Mr. and Mrs. George D. Wyse. Information for this article came from “The Harvest Plentiful,” a booklet published by First Baptist Church on its 90th anniversary.

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20 The Pelican Friday, August 31, 2012 City to give update on hurricane prepPompano Beach – Kimberly Spill, emergency manager for the City of Pompano Beach, will be the guest speaker at the Pompano Beach Highlands Civic Improvement Association meeting on Tuesday, Sept. 4 at 7 p.m. The meeting will be held at Highlands Park, 1650 NE. 50 Ct. Spill will give updates on measures the city has taken to prepare for natural disasters and other types of emergencies. The public is invited to attend. For more information, visit www.pbhighlands.org or call 954-9336393. 6 p.m. at Signature Memories Event Center, 299 N. Federal Hwy., Fort Lauderdale. Admission is $20. 954-401-0261. 9-19 – Art-By-The-Sea group meets at the Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Community Church in Friedt Family Hall, 4433 Bougainvillea Drive. Marcia Hirschy will discuss how artists can market their work. The meeting is free and open to anyone. 954-5940444. 9-19 – ArtHall will be held from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Business Resource Center, 50 NE 1 St., Pompano Beach. ArtHall combines business and art in a series of six receptions. Each month a new exhibit begins with an opening reception on the third Wednesday of the month through October. The event is free. 954-586-1111. 9-22 – Wilton Manors Kiwanis Club Kids Day from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Wilton Manors Elementary School, 2401 NE 3 Ave. Free food, activities and games. 954-560-7813.FridaysPompano Proud meets every second Friday of the month at McNab Park, 2250 E. Atlantic Blvd., from 8:30 to 11 a.m. Every second Sunday the group meets at Galuppi’s, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach, at 6 p.m. 954-562-3232. The Pompano Beach Rotary Club meets Fridays at 12:15 p.m. at Galuppis, 1103 SightingsContinued from page 17 See SIGHTINGS on page 21

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The Pelican 21 Friday, August 31, 2012 The Pelican 954-783-8700N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. 954-786-3274. Art Gallery 21 is open every Friday from 7 to 9 p.m. The gallery, located at the Woman’s Club of Wilton Manors, 600 NE 21 Court, features various artwork from various artists across the State of Florida. Admission is free. Visit www.canawm.org for more information.SaturdaysPony rides are available at Sand & Spurs Equestrian Park, 1600 NE 5 Ave., Pompano Beach, from 9 to 11:30 a.m. Cost is $3 per ride. 954786-4507. The Pompano Beach Kiwanis Club Westside meets the rst and third Saturdays of the month at 8:30 a.m. at the E. Pat Larkins Community Center, 520 MLK Blvd., Pompano Beach. 954-782-8096. The Deer eld Beach West Kiwanis Club meets the second and fourth Saturdays of the month at 9 a.m. at Westside Park, 445 SW 2 St., Deer eld Beach. 954-54-7329883. Kayak rentals are available Saturdays and Sundays at Richardson Historic Park, 1937 Wilton Drive, Wilton SightingsContinued from page 20 See SIGHTINGS on page 24

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22 The Pelican Friday, August 31, 2012 DOUBLE TR SENT AS SP

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The Pelican 23 Friday, August 31, 2012 RUCK PREAD

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24 The Pelican Friday, August 31, 2012 Get rid of debris from IsaacBroward – Residents can drop off vegetative debris and other refuse from Tropical Storm Isaac at Broward County’s Residential DropOff Center. The center, 2780 N. Powerline Rd., Pompano Beach, is be open to all Broward County residents – except for Hallandale Beach, Parkland, Pembroke Pines and Pompano Beach – on Saturdays from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Other drop-off sites are located at 5490 Reese Road, Davie and 5601 W. Hallandale Beach Blvd., West Park. To drop off debris you must have a valid drivers license showing your current address. For more information, call 954-765-4999.Deer eld to get new recycling carts soonDeerfield Beach – Starting in September, Deerfield Beach residents will receive their new recycling carts. The carts are part of the city’s All-In Recycling initiative to increase the amount of recycling by instituting a rewards program that will start in October. The rewards program gives recyclers points that can be used towards discounts and gift certificates to local restaurants, shops and entertainment spots. Recyclers can claim rewards valued up to $25 per month or more. For more information about Deerfield Beach’s All-In Recycling program, call the Recycling Division at 954480-4454.Generator ready storesBroward – A list of generator ready businesses by city is available online. The directory includes all the gas stations, grocery stores and home improvement stores that have generators in case of a loss of power. Visit www. broward.org/Hurricane/Stores to see the list. Manors. Visit www.AtlanticCoastKayak.com or 954-7810073 for rates. The Wilton Manors Green Market is held every Saturday and Sunday at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. 954-592-0381. The Deer eld Beach West Kiwanis Club meets the second and fourth Saturdays of the month at 9 a.m. at Westside Park, 445 SW 2 St., Deer eld Beach. 954-54-7329883. Pompano Green Market is held every Saturday from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the corner of Atlantic Boulevard and Cypress Road. Vendors wanted. 954-782-3015.MondaysPlay ping-pong from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Cost is $1. All ages can participate. 954-3902130. The Gold Coast Toastmasters Club meets on the second and third Monday of the month from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Denny’s, 3151 NW 9 Ave., Fort Lauderdale. 954895-3555 or 954-782-9951.TuesdaysThe Oakland Park Historical Society meets on the second Tuesday of every month at 5:30 p.m. at the at Oakland Park Library, 1298 NE 37 St. For more information, call 954-566-9957. SightingsContinued from page 21 See SIGHTINGS on page 25Tell The Pelican about your news! mdpelican@ yahoo.com or 954783-8700!

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The Pelican 25 Friday, August 31, 2012 Palm Aire/ Cypress Bend Democratic Club meetingPompano Beach – The Palm Aire/Cypress Bend Democratic Club will hold a meeting on Tuesday Sept. 4 at 7 p.m. at the Herb Skolnick Center, 800 SW 36 Ave. Matthew Stewart, field organizer for the Obama Campaign, will be a guest speaker and talk about campaign matters. A representative from the League of Women Voters will also be a speaker and discuss the voter ID laws that have been passed in some states. Refreshments will be served. Call 954-975-3772 or 786877-1644. Ice cream socialPompano Beach – Pompano Beach -Iberia Bank, 990 N. Federal Hwy., will be hosting an ice cream social today from 1 to 4 p.m. For more information, call 954-6011100. Deer eld Beach Rotary Club meets every Tuesday at 12 p.m. at the Deer Creek Golf Club, 2801 Deer Creek Country Club Blvd., Deer eld Beach. 954-630-9593. Pompano Beach-Lighthouse Rotary Club meets every Tuesday at 7:30 a.m. at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. 954972-7178. The American Legion Auxiliary Unit 142 171 SW 2 St., Pompano Beach, has Bingo on Tuesdays at 7 p.m. Food is available from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. 954-942-2448. A Yoga class is available for all levels at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors, on Tuesday nights from 6:30 to 8 p.m. and Saturday mornings from 10:30 a.m. until noon. The cost is $7. 305-607-3520. Zonta International meets on the third Tuesday of the month at Duffy’s Diner, 401 N. Federal Hwy., Deer eld Beach, at 11:15 a.m. Zonta International works to advance the status of women. 561-392-2223.WednesdaysThe Deer eld Beach Historical Society meets on the third Wednesday of each month from 12 to 1 p.m. at the Old School Museum, 232 NE 2 St., Deer eld Beach. For more information, call 954429-0378. The Pompano Beach Historical Society meets on the third Wednesday of every month at 7 p.m. at the Dick & Miriam Hood Center, 217 NE 4 Ave., Pompano Beach. For more information, call 954292-8040. The Wilton Manors Kiwanis Club meets Wednesdays at 6:30 p.m. at 2749 NE 14 Ave., Wilton Manors. 954561-9785. The Oakland Park Kiwanis Club meets Wednesdays from 7:30 to 8:30 a.m. at Peter Pan Diner, 1216 E. Oakland Park Blvd., Oakland Park. 954-566-9957. The Pompano Beach Kiwanis Club meets Wednesdays at noon at the Riverside SightingsContinued from page 24 See SIGHTINGS on page 28

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26 The Pelican Friday, August 31, 2012 “ Broward College, North Campus, 1000 Coconut Creek Blvd., Coconut Creek, Fla., 33066 954-201-2270Broward College helps build a better community one mind at a time Florida’s public state colleges uniquely support the viability, vitality and robust growth of the Sunshine State. And as one of Florida’s “Great 28,” Broward College is committed to fulfilling this mission. In 1957, Florida embarked on a program to create a network of two-year colleges where Floridians could complete their undergraduate education or pursue two-year technical programs leading to the workforce. The state mandated that each of the colleges would be affordable and located within 30 miles of 95 percent of the state’s population. When the state released its plan, Broward County was not among the highest-priority communities selected for the first wave of construction: Broward was rated Two-A. By 1959, Broward County was placed at the top of the priority list and work on the Junior College of Broward County was quickly underway. Founding President Dr. Joe B. Rushing was hired from Howard Payne College, in Brownwood, Texas, on March 17, 1960, and 17 days after accepting the position, he was in Broward County, assembling his faculty and staff. Just over four months later, on Sept. 6, the Junior College of Broward County opened its doors to its first class – 701 students. Classes were held at the former Naval Air Station Junior High on the western edge of what is now the Fort LauderdaleHollywood International Airport. A faculty of 28 and staff of 19 welcomed students on opening day. Since that day, Broward College has worked diligently to provide a highquality educational experience for every student. Broward College’s graduates go on to serve our community, state and nation, and ensure the safety and vitality of our communities. Central Campus, which was the college’s first permanent campus, opened in 1963. North Campus opened its doors on Feb. 24, 1972, and since that time has remained North Broward’s focal point for higher education. In addition to providing classes for students preparing to go on and continue their study at four-year universities and colleges, North Campus is the location of choice for students in associate in science degree and certificate programs such as massage therapy, diagnostic medical sonography, radiation therapy, nuclear medical technology and others. Among the associate’s degree programs offered at the North Campus is a completely redesigned Engineering Technology degree, which includes Manufacturing Skill Standards Council (MSSC) classes that will prepare you for the nationally recognized MSSC certification. North Campus is also home to two popular community resources, the Toski-Battersby Golf Improvement Center, which opened Oct. 10, 1989, and the Junior Achievement World Huizenga Center, which opened on Sept. 21, 2009. All these programs are currently being offered right in your backyard at Broward College’s North Campus. North Campus also offers selected bachelor’s degree programs, which were approved on Feb. 19, 2008, by the Florida Board of Education. As with several of Florida’s state colleges, the offering of bachelor’s degrees is part of a Floridawide push to meet specific workforce needs throughout the state. On May 28, 2008, Gov. Charlie Crist signed legislation changing the name of Broward Community College to Broward College and the College’s first class of bachelor’s degree program students began attending classes in January 2009 and graduated in December 2010. Early in 2011, the Washington D.C.based Aspen Institute ranked Broward College in the top 10 percent of community colleges nationally. The ranking made the college eligible to compete for funds from the institute’s $1 million Prize for Community College Excellence, to be awarded at the end of the year. The prize represents a partnership among the Aspen Institute, the Joyce and Lumina Foundations, and the charitable foundations of Bank of America and JP Morgan Chase. As Broward College forges into its second half-century of service to Broward County, it does so as one of the nation’s largest institutions of its type, with a visionary, dynamic board of trustees, president, administration, faculty and staff working together, and a reputation for the pursuit of excellence and service to the diverse communities it serves. From the 701 students, 28 professors and the small staff who opened the college in 1960, Broward now serves more than 66,000 students annually and employs a faculty and staff of more than 2,000. (Right) North Campus Student Affairs Building(Below):North Campus engineering students prepare for high-wage, highdemand careers in advanced manufacturing electronics and electrical, mechanical and industrial engineering From the 701 students, 28 professors and the small staff who opened the college in 1960, Broward now serves more than 66,000 students annually and employs a faculty and staff of more than 2,000.

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The Pelican 27 Friday, August 31, 2012 Mary Stefl has seen a lot of the world. From her early days in England and the rest of Europe to her travels across the Atlantic to Canada and finally to settling down with her husband, Roger, 19 years ago in South Florida, she has seen a lot. But would anyone imagine Mary settled? Not those who know her. Her energy and intelligence continue to drive her to new heights. That’s what happened in February 2009, when a group of young persons at First American Title Underwriters who had worked together for years decided to break out on their own and forge the birth of Bailey Woodruff Title Company in Deerfield Beach. Mary calls that event her “Once upon a time . “ story. “We knew we were good at what we did,” says Mary. “We were very good, and we wanted to be the best that the community would ever see.” And this entrepreneur was right on target. Offering her colleagues the same salaries they had at the time, she chose those whom she believed could put together a title company that would raise the bar for service and efficiency. Mary has never looked back. She explains why choosing Names for photo, from left to right: Sarah Parker, Stephanie Sylvester, Jay Yeskel, Amy Wahl, Lorna Tritt, Millie Linhares. Ma ry Ste centre, with Miles the dog.Bailey Woodruff Title Company, Inc., 665 SE 10 St., Deer eld Beach 954-571-7919a good title company is critical. “We are the ones that take care of the closing o there are no problems,” Mary says. “Good old fashioned service, care and consideration for the client are what this new company stands for. We believe in talking with people, listening to what their customers have to say and even holding hands, when necessary. We make sure all of closing documents are in place and on time.” And she gives credit for meeting those goals to her staff. “Short Sales are all the rage, and buyers and sellers have a wonderful negotiator in Millie Linhares, who has successfully closed many a ‘hopeless’ transaction. Century Village was, is and always will be an enormously influential force in the neighborhood, and Jay Yeskel and Loma Tritt are the undisputed King and Queen of “The Village” closings,” Mary says. “A little international flavor is brought with Sarah J. Parker from Australia Founding Bailey Woodruff Title Company, “ a once upon a time ” storyand Mary from Europe. Amy Wahl and Stephanie Sylvester are part of the All-American contingent,” Mary adds. Bailey Woodruff may be a fledgling company, but Mary is very proud of being named one of the “top five closing offices in Broward County,” according to Data Trace. And in spite of the housing market, Mary encourages everyone to hang onto the American dream of home ownership. “Yes, ladies and gentlemen, it is still possible to get a mortgage, buy a home or refinance an existing homestead,” she says. “Bailey Woodruff with their outstanding staff, modest pricing and unbeatable enthusiasm are the people you needwhat ever your situation might be,” she says. They all look forward to greeting you at their premises on SE l0* Street, in Deerfield Beach, just next to the (recently re-opened) Dunkin Donuts, a block west of Federal Highway, and invite you to turn to www.baileywoodruff.com to find their individual profiles..

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28 The Pelican Friday, August 31, 2012 Grille at the Sands Resort, 125 N. Riverside Drive, Pompano Beach. 954-444-4815. The Greater Pompano Beach Senior Citizens Club meets on the second Wednesday of the month at the Emma Lou Olson Community Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach, at 10 a.m. 954-9437787. The Alzheimer’s Caregivers Support Group meets Wednesdays from 10 a.m. to noon at the NE Focal Point Alzheimer’s Day Care Center, 301 NW 2 Ave., Deer eld BeachThursdaysThe Wilton Manors Historical Society meets on the third Thursday of the month at Wilton Manors City Hall, 2020 Wilton Drive, at 7 p.m. For more information, call 954-566-9019 or 954-5668219. The Rotary Club of Oakland Park/Wilton Manors meets every Thursday from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. at Tequila Sunrise Mexican Grill, 4711 N. Dixie Hwy., Oakland Park. 954-491-6158. The Deer eld Beach Kiwanis Club meets at noon every Thursday at the Deer eld Beach Hilton, 100 Fairway Dr., Deer eld Beach 954-242-6083.SightingsContinued from page 25

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The Pelican 29 Friday, August 31, 2012 true and that inspired her to write the rst of cial history of the town in 1997, “The Magni cent Mile.” It took four years to put all the bits and pieces she had collected together. “It was so dif cult. I didn’t put any hearsay into the book,” McGarry said. Prior to publishing the town’s history, her interest in its past earned her an appointment as town historian and she assembled a historical committee: Amo Angeletti, the rst town marshal, Connie Caloggero, Mary Celantano, Ann Grainger, Dean Lindstrom and Sandy Satullo. Hillsboro Beach was settled by wealthy families. They purchased building lots platted from ocean to Intracoastal Waterway. McGarry says they were adventurous people and sharp investors and the 3.2 miles of oceanfront property presented them a real estate opportunity. The man most signi cant to establishing Hillsboro Beach as a town was Ernest Wooler, the rst mayor. Wooler was an English-born engineer, one of the designers of the original Rolls-Royce. Later he worked at Packard building aircraft engines used during WWII. He purchased his Hillsboro Mile building lot in 1935, built a home and himself held the administrative positions necessary to creating a town. His long history here did not end until 1968. Herbert Malcolm brought a different kind of experience to Hillsboro Beach. He was headmaster at Lake Placid where students came in the winter, but the school struggled nancially and in 1925 with the help of investors, he opened the Hillsboro Club which is here today on the Hillsboro Inlet. Although the town was very primitive delivering water to the club and its guests was one of the dif culties people ocked to the resort and it became an exclusive retreat long before the town was incorporated. Famous for his political background, Edward Stettinius, U.S. secretary of state 1944-45 and rst U.S. representative to the United Nations, had a winter home here visited by Franklin Roosevelt, Winston Churchill and Gen. George Patton among others. His presence in town gave rise to other persons of in uence, namely “Bink” Glisson who became caretaker of Stettinius’ home and later C. Oliver Wellington who purchased that home and went on to develop the City of Wellington in Palm Beach County. Glisson was a nephew of Cap. Ted Knight of the legendary Cap’s Place restaurant and was a founding commissioner of the Hillsboro Inlet Improvement District. Another pioneer of interest was Russ French, out of Detroit, whose family owned a mortgage and bond Company. He moved into one of the rst houses on the Mile, was mayor in 1952-55 and literally put down roots here becoming a bean farmer and founder of the First National Bank of Pompano Beach. When Alex D. Henderson moved here in 1946 he intended to retire. Instead he founded Hillsboro Country Day School in 1953 with money he earned from his stock options at the Avon Company. Later he established the Henderson Clinic in Fort Lauderdale. Real estate developer Floyd Grainger moved to town in 1958 and built Deer eld’s rst beach highrise, Tiara East. He served as mayor in 1965, was the rst vice president of the Deer eld Beach Chamber of Commerce and established non-pro t housing for the elderly in Delray Beach. Charles Stradella was an automotive industry pioneer on the board of General Motors Corp. when he retired in 1962 here. He was also CEO of General Motors Acceptance Corp. Stradella served several years on the commission and helped pass two municipal bond issues, one for beach nourishment, the other for the water plant. President of Breyer’s Ice Cream, Clyde Shaffer, moved to town in 1965, became its zoning expert and served on the commission and as vice mayor. Then there was John Erickson, a Chicago businessman who became Florida’s oldest mayor after serving 12 years on the commission here. He also edited the town code adopted in 1976. Those are a few of the people whose lives make interesting reading in “Magni cent Mile.” McGarry herself has remained an important link to the history of Hillsboro Beach. In, 1999, she headed up the committee that celebrated the town’s 60th anniversary, the bicentennial year having been ignored by town of cials. She singlehandedly arranged to have the Barefoot Mailman statue removed from its original home – the Barefoot Mailman Hotel and Restaurant – to town hall. With a $500,000 grant from Broward County (which also built the police station) she found sculptor Frank Varga who cast it in bronze. The original was moved to the grounds of the Hillsboro Lighthouse on the inlet where mailman James Hamilton apparently drowned in the late 1880s (Another good story in McGarry’s book). Last year, that statue was found to be decomposing and McGarry commissioned Varga to restore it. McGarry’s talents are not con ned to writing history. She is a stained glass window artist and designer of jewelry and member of ASID. She attended college in Albany, NY and graduate school at the University of Chicago where she lived many years and raised her family. After moving south, she became a fulltime community volunteer. Among her interests locally, The Florida Lighthouse Association, The Women’s History Coalition, The Area Agency on Aging, The Women’s Political Caucus, The former Women’s League of Hillsboro Beach and Rotary International. In the last paragraphs of her book, McGarry sums up the real value of being an historian. “Only by knowing well a town’s shortcomings and strengths can citizens succor it in hard times and sustain it during good times. To that end, “Magni cent Mile” was written.” McGarryContinued from page 4

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30 The Pelican Friday, August 31, 2012 At Jack’s Bar, this cash register was busy as soon as prohibition was lifted. PridemoreContinued from page 3 Merrill entered this world in the very same house he lives in today. His home on 2nd Street in Pompano Beach was built by Dave Hardin. Dr. George McClellan was on hand to deliver Merrill. It was 1928. Before Merrill reached the age of one, he experienced his rst hurricane. His father and his grandfather had been out checking for damage. They got stuck in a building. When the winds stopped, Merrill’s father, Jack found his son in the arms of his grandmother huddled in a corner of the house. The roof was gone. The lay of the land was different in 1928. The house on 2nd Street was in the middle of the woods. It was about four blocks from the city limits of Pompano. East of 13th Avenue all the way to the beach was unincorporated. Only a few houses had been built. Atlantic Boulevard was a narrow paved road, big enough for two cars to pass. Merrill and his friends went shing in the Intracoastal Waterway. They watched movies at the Pompano Theater on the corner of 1st Street and 4th Avenue. “There wasn’t a lot to do here,” he said. “We had to use our imaginations for fun.” The story of Merrill and Julia Pridemore is a portrait of one of the many strong families that braved mosquitoes, snakes, gators and hurricanes that occurred, unannounced, over the years. Pompano had not yet annexed the beach area beyond 13th Ave. The big business was farming winter crops like beans and peppers that provided jobs and great wealth for these early entrepreneurs. The Bean & Pepper Jamborees celebrated that harvest with barbecues, games and mule races. Merrill Pridemore’s grandfather, Nat Shriver, had a 40acre farm located on Sample Road and Federal Highway, across from the present location of the shopping center referred to as Shoppers Haven. There were farms throughout the land that became Lighthouse Point. Shriver rented the farmland from Flagler Railroad Company. Gene Pridemore, Merrill’s son, remembers his father telling the stories of the Flagler Company urging him to buy the land. But Shriver did not want to deal with taxes. Neither Merrill’s father nor he was inclined to pursue farming. Merrill’s father, who anticipated the approaching end of prohibition, opened a store on Hammonville Road, where 3.2 beer was served and sold. Beer with an alcohol content of 3.2 percent could be sold in stores, restaurants, and taverns since it was believed that it was not intoxicating. When Congress repealed prohibition, Jack Pridemore bought the rst liquor license in Pompano Beach and the second license in Broward County. Merrill, when he reached the age of 21, tended bar, worked as a clerk and moved into buying the whiskey and banking the proceeds. During WWII, soldiers in uniform were treated to Jack Daniels. “The bar fared very well,” says Merrill. “And Dad began buying real estate.” Jack Pridemore got his real estate license and began buying and selling, an easy task as Pompano was beginning to grow. In 1980, Jack’s Bar closed. Today, Merrill and Julia live in the same house on 2nd Street where streets, sidewalks and stop signs have popped up over the years. This once solitary house where chickens and other farm animals roamed has since become urban. Merrill looks back on those early times in Pompano with a rm smile. He recalls his early friendships that included John and Gwen McCormick, Tommy Williams, Bill Sanders, Frank Carson, Charlie Frier, Harry Platts and others. Merrill remembers that John McCormick couldn’t join the afternoon action of baseball, shing or digging for artifacts at Indian Mound on Lettuce Lake until he milked his family cow, Blue. “Blue was usually staked out on 4th Street. We’d meet up with John and wait until he nished the milking before we’d go out to play,” Merrill said. Teens’ adventures in those days seem pretty mild, but “ The Pelican ” asked Merrill if maybe there was something he might have done that was “bad.” Recoiling just a bit, then laughing, he admitted his big crime. “One Halloween night, we went to the high school and carried the bike racks up to the second oor,” he admitted. [This interviewer held back her shock.] Merrill Pridemore’s recollection of early Pompano may appear to be calm and reserved, but this family represents the multitude of good and hard-working people who made it through the early years, held their families together, knew their neighbors and knit a close community. There are times when Merrill visits the Pompano Cemetery and reads the names of his many family members who have passed on. And he thinks about them and what they did to build his close family. Merrill and Julia have ve children, Gene, Karen, Denise, Donna and Paul. Today, once a week, Julia cooks for a houseful of children, grandchildren and great grandchildren. They gather at a large table that takes up most of the room. Merrill and Julia admit that they’re never sure who’s going to be there, but the table always lls up. “Pompano was a good place to grow up,” Merrill says.Pompano Beach State of the City address by mayorPompano Beach – The Greater Pompano Beach Chamber hosts the State of the City on Thursday, Sept. 27 at 7:45 a.m. at the Pompano Beach Elks Lodge #1898, 700 NE 10 St. Mayor Lamar Fisher will talk about the past year and what the city’s plans for the upcoming year are. The cost to attend is $25, includes breakfast and is open to the public. To RSVP send an email to info@pompanobeachchamber.com or call 954-9412940.Kids Day fundraiserWilton Manors – Every year the Kiwanis Club of Wilton Manors holds Kids Day, a free day of food, fun and games for elementary school students. This year’s event will be held at Wilton Manors Elementary School, 2401 NE 3 Ave., on Saturday, Sept. 22 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. To help raise money for the event, there will be a fundraiser at the Over Easy Caf, 318 E. Oakland Park Blvd., Wilton Manors. On that day, the money spent on coffee, orange juice, milk or other beverages will be donated by Over Easy to the Wilton Manors Kiwanis Club. So have a good meal and help some deserving kids at the same time. For more information, call 954-560-7813.

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The Pelican 31 Friday, August 31, 2012 What began with the birth of a boy born in the 1960’s in the tiny Italian town of Ascoli Piceno continues with the man and the owner of a thriving restaurant in the heart of Pompano Beach. “We lived a very rural, farmland existence,” says restaurateur Giuliano Vallorani “We had no money and no running water. We grew our own crops and raised pigs, chickens and rabbits.” But fate would conspire to dramatically alter Vallorani’s existence when his aunt married an American from New York. The nuptials set off a chain of events that eventually allowed the extended family to move to Bensonhurst, New York and, shortly thereafter, Hollywood, Florida. “My mother has been living in the same house in Hollywood since 1972,” adds Vallorani with genuine astonishment. “I graduated from McArthur High School in 1980. The following year I opened Albert’s Pizza on County Line Road in Hallandale. I was only 19 years old at the time,” says the impressively fearless entrepreneur. “After 3 years of operation I sold Albert’s and bought an existing pizzeria in Margate. This was the original Zuccarelli’s that I still own and run today,” adds Vallorani who only recently inaugurated his new establishment in Pompano. “After running Zuccarelli’s for nearly 30 years in Margate, I suddenly decided I wanted to open another restaurant. My wife’s mother lives in Lighthouse Point and told me about a beautiful stand alone building near the Pompano golf course that was up for sale. And that is how Zuccarelli East was born!” recalls the affable paesan. “I go back to my hometown in Italy almost every year. It is amazing to see the progress that has occurred there,” says Vallorani who remains close to his roots. Indeed, it is this strong connection with his ancestry that has produced a menu that is unpretentiously authentic, satisfyingly abundant and reassuringly economical. Serving just about every Italian specialty imaginable, this welcoming trattoria comes loaded with a great Zuccarelli East, 1340 N. Federal Highway, Pompano Beach 954-941-1261An immigrant’s tale: a life-altering journey from the Italian countryside to the sunny shores of Pompano Beach[Above] Zuccarelli’s staff can cook up anything Italian, from salads to spaghetti and meatballs to spinach pizzas. wine list and tons of culinary expertise. The result is affordable, high-quality fare in a relaxed ambiance. The voluminous menu is replete with a seemingly endless array of mouthwatering favorites. Soups include the classic minestrone as well as the hearty pasta e fagiole. Salads such as grilled chicken, Caesar or calamari are also good starters. On the appetizer front, stuffed mushrooms, mussels marinara, clams oreganata and broccoli Parmigiana are just a few of the tempting choices available. A host of hot and cold sandwiches also make an appearance. Sausage & peppers, eggplant, chicken, veal or meatball Parmigiana will warm the soul while cappicola, salami, ham and provolone make for a tasty Italian hoagie. Delectable paninis such as the fried chicken cutlet, the gourmet veggie, the saltimbocca with prosciutto or the caprese with tomatoes and basil are reliable take-out options. But the true stars of the Zuccarelli menu can be found in the pasta, chicken, seafood and veal entre selections. Linguini with clams, chicken & spinach lasagna, manicotti, baked ziti, eggplant rollatini and stuffed shells complete the authentic Italian pasta tableau. “Our penne a la vodka is also outstanding,” adds Vallorani with a knowing smile. Veal and chicken can be enjoyed in a variety of traditional preparations. Lemony butter Francese sauce, Marsala wine & mushrooms, Scarpariella with sausage, classic Cacciatore and Piccata with white wine and capers are some of the most popular recipes. Of note is the Chicken Ascoliana with fresh spinach covered in light marinara and cheese. Served with ziti in a homemade tomato sauce, this gargantuan dish of plump chicken breasts will satisfy the hungry as well as the picky. “This is now our favorite Italian place in Pompano. The food is outstanding,” say local residents Ted and Gay Crownover. The seafood options are equally plentiful and flavorful. “Our Zuppa de Pesce is fantastic,” says Vallorani as he brings a colossal plate of al dente linguini covered with steaming hot jumbo shrimp, mussels, clams, octopus and calamari in a rich marinara sauce. Other maritime options include the broiled filet of sole, the shrimp Fra Diavolo or scampi, the stuffed flounder and the zuppa de clams. “We really have a full menu. Everything is very authentic,” says the experienced restaurateur. “Of course, we also make great New York style thin crust pizzas,” adds Vallorani as pie specialist Pat Dimeglio prepares a large meat lovers pizza for delivery. Located directly across the street from Pompano’s municipal golf course, Zuccarelli offers daily specials and lunch combos, plenty of free parking and an extensive catering service. The remarkably large entres are priced between $10 and $15 while pizzas start at $9. Wine glasses are $5 and most wine bottles $16. Be sure to try one of the many tantalizing desserts such as raspberry chiffon, cannoli, cheesecake or tiramisu. Buon appetito! This single portion of Chicken Ascoliana over ows with 4 plump breasts smothered in fresh spinach, melted cheese and zesty marinara sauce. It also features a hearty serving of perfectly cooked ziti pasta. A Zuccarelli signature dish, the Zuppa De Pesce, features a wealth of shrimp, mussels, clams, octopus and calamari in a zesty marinara sauce over al dente linguini.

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32 The Pelican Friday, August 31, 2012 Originally opened in 1982, Checkers Old-Munchen has become a reliable source of authentic German fare in Pompano Beach. Brainchild of Detlaf Neuman, former head Chef of a 5-star Munich hotel, the restaurant has stayed in the family over the past three decades. Today, nephew Mat Moore is at the helm of this thriving bastion of Teutonic temptations. In March, Checkers OldMunchen was the victim of a re and was temporarily closed. But the restaurant is set to reopen in the middle of September. Until then Checkers’ menu can be enjoyed at Diner By The Sea, 215 E. Commercial Blvd., Lauderdale-By-The-Sea. “German food is so much more than just sausage,” says Moore as he pours a gigantic boot of Kostritzer beer. This dark, medium bodied lager is a popular choice among the more than 30 varieties of beer available. “The Kostritzer is my favorite. It’s Germany’s answer to Guinness,” adds Moore. For wine lovers, the Peter Brum Riesling features the quintessentially aromatic and fruity overtones one expects from this crisp white varietal of the Rhine region. Beverages in hand, many patrons kick start a meal with a hearty bowl of Checkers Old-Munchen’s famous onion & apple soup. Bursting with avor, this Bavarian version of French onion soup features sauted onions and apples slowly simmered in the house beef and lager broth topped with provolone cheese. Other classic starters include the Liverwurst & Muenster cheese platter, Bratwurst and Knackwurst on a bed of sauerkraut and several healthy salad options. Of note is the Kartoffelpuffer – home made potato pancakes served with applesauce and sour cream. A quick scan of the menu reveals that vegetarianism is not exactly a German invention. Veal, pork, beef, chicken and sausage dominate the landscape. The plethora of meat options includes mouthwatering veal or pork Wienerschnitzels. These house specialties showcase lightly breaded cutlets sauted in lemon butter and topped with rich homemade gravy. Pompano Beach’s Checkers Old-Munchen delivers tasty German cuisine in a friendly European atmosphereOriginally created in neighboring Vienna, this preparation method has become a regional staple of southeastern Germany. Served with red cabbage and potato dumpling or spaetzel (German egg noodles similar to gnocchi), these plates feel like a home cooked meal in Deutschland. Another crowd pleaser is the eye-popping Schweinhaxen. This plate features a specially seasoned 2 lb. boiled pork shank slow roasted for 6 hours. The result is a wonderfully moist and juicy fall-off-thebone meat all topped with homemade gravy. “We use the broth of the pork shanks to make our gravy. It is absolutely delicious,” says Moore. The chicken menu includes sauted breasts Hunter style with mushrooms in a wine gravy, Blackforest ham with white wine cream or the Paprika version in sweet cream sauce with red bell peppers. “One of my favorites is the pork Stroganoff. But if you want to get a taste of several specialties, I would recommend our famous Bavarian Platter,” says Moore. This sampler dish over ows with Bratwurst, Knackwurst, Wienerschnitzel and either schweinebraten or sauerbraten. The former consists of tender oven roasted pork loin while the latter is an acquired taste involving vinegar marinated beef topped with sweet and sour gravy. “The food is outstanding and the prices are very reasonable,” say regular local customers Bob Stoetzer and Pat McQueen. A good way to conclude a culinary voyage to Germany is with a warm homemade apple strudel. Served with Alemannic alacrity by the friendly waitresses, this ice cream topped behemoth is a great dessert to share. With wall to wall beer steins as dcor, the ambiance at Checkers Old-Munchen is warm and resoundingly European. Take advantage of various coupons available for half-priced entres with beverage purchase. The “Think German It’s Friday” club (TGIF) allows off libations, appetizers and desserts with the purchase of an entre. All entres are priced between $14 and $17, wine bottles are around $25 and beer starts at $4. There is free parking in the back and all major credit cards are accepted. The early bird special is from 5 pm to 6:30 p.m. and all day Sunday. Be sure to inquire about upcoming Oktoberfest specials on Facebook and especially the highly anticipated $10 entre weekends. Prost!A stein and German fare are the signature menu items at Checkers Old-Muchen Checker )ld-Munchen’s menu is now being served at Diner-By-The-Sea, 215 Commercial Blvd., Lauderdale-By-The-Sea • 954-785-7565

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The Pelican 33 Friday, August 31, 2012 Established in 1985 by restaurateur Tom Douglas and his brother-in-law Dario Dziamalek, the inimitable Chez Porky’s has been delivering Pompano Beach’s most highly rated Louisiana inspired specialties for the better part of the last 3 decades. “I am originally from upstate NY where I owned and operated a restaurant for 3 years,” says Douglas who, after selling his business, moved to the Big Apple to run his own nightclub. “It was the late 70’s and we sure had a lot of fun!” But, eventually, the allure of warmer weather brought Douglas down to South Florida. “I had some restaurant ideas and, in 1984, I drove by this area and saw this vacant space for sale. At the time, the Cypress Plaza neighborhood was the hub of activity in Pompano Beach.” “We weren’t sure in which direction to go with the menu. In fact, it took about 6 months to figure out what kind of cuisine we would offer,” says the ber-friendly Vietnam War veteran. “It ended up being a hodge-podge of various cuisines but with a definite New Orleans twist.” Indeed, the biggest selling items at Chez Porky’s are the famous chicken wings. Available in a cornucopia of tantalizing flavors, these plump and meaty favorites have won a slew of awards over the years. The various sauces include Louisiana style, lemongarlic, barbeque, Asian, spicy curry, salt & vinegar, Jamaican jerk, Buffalo and the cult classic… raspberry. “I invented the raspberry sauce in 1987 long before it became fashionable,” says the highly creative Douglas who took full advantage of his Italian background and South Asian combat experience to develop exciting flavor profiles that were truly cutting-edge at the time. “People would gladly wait in line 1 hour just to get into the restaurant. They would drink beer and socialize in the parking lot!” Other novel dishes include the mouthwatering Caribbean coconut soup with ginger and curry, the bacon wrapped shrimp-on-a-stick, the chicken Zingara with sun-dried tomatoes and artichokes, the chargrilled steak Teriyaki and the ever popular Louisiana sauted Cajun shrimp – a perennial top choice of food critics. “We still do great business today but things have changed,” says Douglas with a hint of nostalgia as he looks at the many pictures of erstwhile celebrities adorning the walls of his quaint eatery. “I remember when Kareem Abdul-Jabbar came in, he had to bend down quite low just to get through the front door,” says a smiling Suzie Schuitt, a veteran waitress and hostess that has been welcoming customers for the past 23 years. “We sure have had many wellknown sports figures and other stars in here over the years.” “We also fed the secret service after Hurricane Wilma. We were the only place in town open 2 days later!” adds Douglas who is as proud of his top-notch customer service as he is of his extensive menu. “By the way, everything we cook is made fresh to order. Our customers truly appreciate the care we put into our food,” says the friendly Chef who has earned myriad accolades for another Chez Porky’s specialty the prize winning baby back ribs. Smothered in a tangy homemade barbeque sauce, the fall-off-the-bone ribs titillate the senses while satisfying the most primal of carnivorous urges. “Whether you dine in, order out or use our catering services, just about everything is an original recipe or a new twist on an old classic. We also have a great beer and wine selection,” says the detailoriented Douglas. From steaks to poultry, seafood to pastas, Chez Porky’s offers the bold, eclectic flavors that locals have wholeheartedly embraced for generations. “The name is actually derived from the famous 80’s movie Porky’s,” says Douglas with a hearty laugh. For a voyeuristic peek into Pompano Beach’s gastronomic locker room, this historic restaurant is definitely the ideal spot to get an eyeful of sexy South Florida cuisine. Barbecue landmark since 1985 continues to delight patrons with its unique American cuisine, ribs and so much more![Top] Smothered in decadently tangy barbecue sauce, the melt-in-your-mouth baby back ribs are a Chez Porky specialty. [Left] Long-time associate Suzie Schuitt, proprietor Tom Douglas and waitress Candice McMillan show off a few of Chez Porky’s classic dishes. [Right] A top choice of food critics, the highly addictive Louisiana shrimp are sauteed in butter, beer and Cajun spices..Chez Porky’s, 105 SW 6 St., Pompano Beach • 954-946-5590

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34 The Pelican Friday, August 31, 2012 Eye Site Vision, 2490 N. Federal Hwy., Lighthouse Point, 954-943-3779Homegrown optometrist builds a growing practice serving all segments of the community “Let’s see,” would be a perfect slogan for Eye Site Vision in Lighthouse Point. With Dr. Gary Goberville on site for complete eye exams and a specialized staff to assist patients with the myriad frames from Coach to Christian Dior, this locallyowned clinic is an easy stop for sight and style. Dr. Goberville, who grew up in Lighthouse Point, played football and baseball at Cardinal Gibbons, is a board-certified optometric physician. He attended Tulane University in New Orleans and the University of Florida. He received his Doctor of Optometry degree from at the New England School of Optometry in Boston. Dr. Goberville says that he returned to Lighthouse Point because it’s just a “great city.” And besides his practice, he and his wife are raising two children here. Dr. Goberville also is a pediatric optometry specialist. He has taught pediatric optometry at Nova Southeastern University, and he is trained in sport vision improvement using computer programs and exercises. Now in practice for more than 13 years, Dr. Goberville has built two additional clinics, one in Coral Springs and another in Boca Raton, in addition to the Lighthouse Point location. With school now in session, Dr. Goberville suggests that eye check-ups are in order whether a parent suspects a problem or not. He adds that school screenings are not complete eye exams. “Some children have reading problems that simply require glasses,” says Dr. Goberville. “A lot of people pass off those problems as dyslexia when it’s not the case.” He adds there are tests that can determine if there is a dyslexia problem of if there is just a need for glasses. “I like to start eye exams at six months,” he says. “At that age we can see retinoblastoma, a tumor that develops in early childhood. The tumor can be removed and [the procedure] can eliminate blindness and possible death of the child.” Eye Site Vision offers “Some children have reading problems that simply require glasses.” Dr. Gary Goberville. patient care for all ages. Common problems that especially impact South Floridians include cataracts, dry eyes and glaucoma. Dr. Goberville explains that too much exposure to ultraviolent rays may encourage early cataracts and macular degeneration. To lower the odds of these eye diseases, Dr. Goberville suggests glasses with polarized lens and large frames protect the eyes and the skin around the eyes. “Dry eyes, itching and redness could be the result of allergies,” he says. “There are two ways to approach a solution. First have a complete eye exam and evaluate for allergies then treat the problem with specialized eye drops.” Often, there are second and third steps to maintain healthy eyes, but they all begin with a complete eye exam. With the latest technology including the Humphrey Automated Visual Field, a procedure that tests the pathway from the patient’s eye across through the brain and to the occipital lobe, places are visible that formerly could not be seen. The ultrasound pachymetry also helps the doctor find a more accurate eye-pressure measurement in prescribing treatment for glaucoma. The staff at Eye Site Center includes Ryan Himmel, optician, and Heather Atchison, optometric technologist. Eye Site Vision centers carry and fit a wide variety of contact lenses such as progressive, bifocal, rigid gas permeable and colored. All brand names are available and can be ordered on line and delivered to your door.

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The Pelican 35 Friday, August 31, 2012 Jack’s Old Fashioned Hamburger house, 591 S. Cypress Rd., Pompano Beach •954-942-2844Jack’s Old Fashioned Hamburger House serves an American institution: the hamburger. And it started serving them over a uniquely American holiday: the Fourth of July. Says Jeff Gluth, “We are 40 years and counting. Our success has been the result of our burger and its superior quality. We grind lean brisket of beef and steak rounds fresh daily on the premises.” Gluth’s precision in forming this famous burger is also attributed to every burger being hand patted, no preformed patties found here. Personal pride in the hamburgers served up here is part of this company’s entire team. “We have some employees who have been with us for 20 years,” said Gluth. Gluth was originally a business partner with Jack Berry, the founder of Jack’s Hamburgers. That relation lasted 31 years and ended with Jack’s death a few years ago. Jack’s original philosophy in teaching young people a strong work ethic has also remained a tradition. “We take great pride in helping develop young people. Many early employees who started out in high school have gone on to great jobs and great lives. Our employees are very special to us. They are our family, “ he said. Burgers may have changed over the years, but at Jack’s the lines keep growing and the jukebox keeps on playing. Tradition remains strong. “Gourmet burgers? We were one of the first to do this. And we do not need a fancy bun or condiments. We impress our customers with a juicy burger that has a distinct flavor and melts in your mouth with each bite,” Gluth says. “We have a special grinding processor that is operated on the premises,” Gluth says. For non-burger lovers, Jack’s also offers “sliced fresh” sandwiches made fresh daily “our own roast beef.” While customers don’t need condiments to enjoy a burger at Jack’s, the burger joint’s specially-made mustard dill relish and sweet red pepper relish add an additional zing to the flavor. Carolyn Littlefield is the manager of Jack’s Old Fashion Hamburger in Fort Lauderdale. She echoes the high standards set by Jack and carried on today. “We care about the product and the people working for us. We are proud to be part of Pompano Beach and Fort Lauderdale for 40 years,” said Gluth. Jack’s Old Fashioned Hamburger House is located at 4201 N. Federal Hwy., in Fort Lauderdale and 591 S. Cypress Road in Pompano Beach. Call 954-565-9960 to reach the Fort Lauderdale restaurant and 954-942-2844 for Pompano or visit www. jacksoldfashionhamburgers. com. “Gourmet burgers? We were one of the first to do this. And we do not need a fancy bun or condiments. We impress our customers with a juicy burger that has a distinct flavor and melts in your mouth with each bite,” Jeff GluthJack’s Hamburgers celebrates its 40-year anniversary: Where were you in 1970?Jack Berry founded Jack’s Old Fashion Hamburger House in 1972. The Pompano Beach restaurant opened one year later.

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36 The Pelican Friday, August 31, 2012 Classi eds Call 954-545-0013 Mechanic Shop for RentPompano Beach Rent this mechanical shop attached to a busy Texaco Station. Rent is negotiable. 954-941-2600. Ask for George Great opportunity. Call George. 954-941-2600 In Pompano BeachPompano Library, 1213 E. Atlantic Blvd. Auto Tech, 429 N. Dixie Hwy. Sample Road Auto Spa, 2501 W. Sample Road NuTurf, 2801 N. Dixie Hwy. Chit Chat Lounge, 651 N. Federal Hwy. Sunny’s Produce, 677 N. Federal Hwy. Golden Corral, 2100 W. Atlantic Blvd. Brandy’s Shoes, 1290 N. Federal Hwy. HELP WANTEDAFRAID OF DOWNSIZING? Start building a business to supplement your income. Great earnings potential on a part-time basis with Primerica. Call 954729-0192. 9-7 POMPANO BEACH – MECHANIC/ COUNTER PERSON NEEDED For Well-Known Texaco Fuel Station. References & Experience. Good People Person. Call George 954-941-2600. SEEKING EMPLOYMENTGROCERY SHOPPING & DELIVERY From Publix To Individuals & Businesses. Serving Broward Since 2005. 954-200-0074. www.weshopanddeliver.com 8-31 HHA – I Will Take Excellent Care Of The Elderly / Companion Aid – Experienced & Certi ed / Have References. Call 845-709-5275. 9-21 EUROPEAN LADY Is Looking For A Position As A CAREGIVER / COMPANION. Reliable. High Quality Care. 11 Yrs. Exp. Own Transportation. Fluent In English & Polish. References. 954-480-7786. CAREGIVER / COMPANION Caucasian Woman With 25 Yrs Exp. To Assist & Care For Your Loved Ones. Days / Eves / Nights. Ref. Available. 954-482-5494. 8-31 HONEST MALE With References Seeking Position As A CAREGIVER! Call Chris 954-290-7344. 8-31 LPN AT CNA PRICES! Will Drive To Dr. Appointments, Lunch, Shopping, Etc. East Broward Area Only! 954895-7850. 9-7 MALE CNA / HHA / COMPANION. Broward County Area. Former EMT. All Certi cations / Compassionate, References. Call Ron 954-232-2832. Very Reasonable! 8-31 SERVICES DANNY BOY ELECTRIC – Lic & Insured. Lic. #EC13004811. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. 24/Hr Service. 954-290-1443. Beat Any Written Estimate. Sr, Discount. 9-21 ASI SOUTHERN LAWN MAINTENANCE Provides Full Landscape. Architectural Landscape Design. Tree Trimming & Removal, Full Lawn Maintenance. One Time Clean Out. Andrew 954-675-7396. GOT JUNK? TRASH HAULING – CONDO CLEANUPS – Trees – Landscape – Yard Fill – Pressure Wash – Roofs – Home Repairs – Welding – Etc. Dave 954-818-9538. 8-31 MIKE THE GARDNER “ The All American Yardman” Yard And Garden Care – Get The Best For Less!! Call 561-543-6337 Cell. 9-14 HONEST HANDYMAN – HOME & BUILDING Maintenance/ Improvements. No Job Too Small. Fast Friendly Service. Reasonable Rates. Local Resident/Homeowner. Call Today For Your FREE Upfront Quote. No Deposit Required. 754366-1915. BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIESNew GREEN technology. New defroster control saves energy in home refrigerators, commercial chillers. Patented. All optical. Simple mfg. Strategic partners needed.. www.NewAvionics.Com. 954-568-1991. MUSICIANS WANTEDADVANCED STUDENT MUSICIANS Being Accepted For 2012 – 2013 Membership in the American Legion Symphonic Band! Earn Community Service Points While Improving Your Performance Skills! Rehearsals On Wednesday Evenings from 7pm to 9pm at American Legion Post 142, 171 SW 2nd St., Pompano Beach, FL 33060. Band Director Recommendation Encouraged. Email Music Director James McGonigal at info.legionband@gmail.com for more information. C REAL ESTATE SERVICESSELLING OR BUYING Choose Someone You Can Trust 18 Years Experience. English, French, Spanish, Greek. Yvette Gaussen. YES WE CAN REALTY. 954-614-7773 Or 954-773-8340. REAL ESTATE WANTEDNEED TO BUY FOR CASH FAST!! Small Duplex Or Triplex With At Least One 3 / 2 Or 2 / 2 E Of Federal Hwy. 954-563-3533. MFG HOMESFT LAUD / POMPANO WATERFRONT 2 / 2 On Fishing Canal. Private & Peaceful. $49,900. Call John For Appt. 954-495-0557. ROOMS FOR RENTE. DEERFIELD BEACH – E Of A1A – 1st Floor Furnished. Large Fridg., Kitchen, Micro, Laundry, Own Bath, TV, A / C. $170 Week. 954-725-9680. 8-31 CEMETERY PLOTS2 PREMIUM LOTS – Forest Lawn Cemetery For Sale. $1,500 OBO Call 561603-9383. OR 863-946-1646. C.REAL ESTATE WANTEDI BUY HOUSES!! CASH!! AS IS! QUICK CLOSE! ANY AREA – ANY CONDITION! NO EQUITY OK. CALL NOW 954-914-2355. 10-19 CONDOS FOR SALEPOMPANO BEACH – DIRECT OCEAN VIEW!! Pet Friendly! 2/2 AT THE BREAKERS! $265K. Also For Rent. Call Juliana At Barclay’s For Details. 1-305-766-4420. 8-17 POMPANO BEACH DIRECT INTRACOASTAL! Feels Like You’re On A Boat. Pool On Intracoastal. Wrap-A-Round Balcony. Spacious 1 / 1.5 $178K. Also For Rent $1350 Month. 954-588-0562. POMPANO BEACH “THE CLARIDGE” Large Updated 2 / 2 Corner Penthouse – Ocean – Intracoastal & City Views! Washer / Dryer In Unit. Impact Glass. $498,500. Ruthie Brooks – Balistreri Realty. 954803-4174. 8-31 CONDOS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH OCEANFRONT Furnished 1 Bedroom. Resort Atmosphere. Indoor Parking – Security. $1,100 Month Yearly Lease. 954-562-7530. 8-31 POMPANO BEACH 55+ Community. Renovated 2/1 – Pool!! With Sunroom – Ground Floor / On Golf Course. Beautifully Furn. 1 Year +. Good Credit. $700 Month. 954-531-7708. LIGHTHOUSE POINT 2 / 2 1st Floor – 55+. Pool, Storage, Laundry Facilities. $900 Month / Water Included. Dorothy Bassano – Better Homes & Gardens Real Estate. 954-562-4919. 8-31 POMPANO INTRACOASTAL AT IT’S BEST. Breathtaking Views! Feels Like You’re On A Boat, Pool Deck On Intracoastal. Spacious 1 / 1.5 $1350 Month. A1A S.E. Corner – Unobstructed Views. 2/2 $1,500 Month. 954-588-0562. 9-14 Call The Pelican at 954-783-8700!

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The Pelican 37 Friday, August 31, 2012 Classi eds Call 954-545-0013 APTS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH 1 BR & 2 BR APTS FOR RENT. Remodeled, Paint, Tile, Etc. Washer / Dryer On Site. Pool. Pet Friendly. George 954809-5030. POMPANO BEACH 1/1 Apartment. $700 Month Yearly Lease. Pool, Off Federal Hwy. Pet OK! Call Anthony 954857-5207. POMPANO BEACH – EAST OF FEDERAL HWY! Walk To Everything! 1 & 2 Bedrooms. Call For Information 954-2546325. 9-14 POMPANO BEACH Spacious 2 / 2 $850 Month & 1 / 1 $700 Month. Pool, Coin Laundry, Tile Floors. Near Beach. Call 954-907-2258. 8-31 POMPANO MCNAB RD & NE 18 AVENUE – 1 & 2 Bedrooms Furnished / Unfurnished. $695 $895 And Up. Pool, Tile Floors. Central A / C. 954-6102327. 9-7 POMPANO BEACH 1/1 $650 – 2/1 $750 NW – NE 2/1 $950 – 2/1,5 Townhouse $1095 SW 1/1 $750 – 2/1 $925 – 2/2 $950 – 3/2 $1025 ALL FREE WATER. Rent + $70 App Mov-U-In. 954-781-6299. 8-31 POMPANO 2/1 $775 Month Yearly Lease. Pool, Laundry Room, Close To Shopping. Pet OK! 1960 NE 48 Street. Call Anthony 954-857-5207. 9-7 DOWNTOWN LAUD BY THE SEA – Clean Apartments. Near Beach, Shopping, Restaurants. On Site Courtyard, Parking, Laundry. Wayne 954-868-5560. 8-24 POMPANO ATLANTIC / INTRACOASTAL AREA – South Of Publix. Ef ciency Furnished – Private Entrance. Utilities Included. Non-Smoker. Long Term. $700 Month. 954415-8838. 8-31 LAUDERDALE BY THE SEA 1 / 1 Ground Floor. Central A / C. Parking Out Back Door. Laundry, Courtyard. 200 Steps Beach. $1,100. 954-8685560 Wayne. 9-21 BEST DEAL IN POMPANO BEACH – Efficiency With Kitchen, Laundry & Pool. No Pets. Weekly – Monthly – Season. 500’ To Beach. 954294-84883 Or 248-736-1533. 9-21 POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 Bedroom From $500. Easy Movein. 1/2 OFF DEPOSIT. Remodeled. Great Location. 954-783-1088 For More Info. 9-14 COMMERCIAL FOR RENT-SALEPOMPANO COMMERCIAL OFFICE Spaces Available. Ranging From As Low As $500 To $700 Depending On Square Footage. Please Call Darci At 954-7833723. 9-7 DEERFIELD BEACH – Retail Of ce Warehouse – 700 Sq Ft With Loft. A/C, Bathroom. $575 Per Month. Call For More Info 561-654-1331 Or 561-9985681. 9-21 CORAL SPRINGS – 1800 SQ FT. Easy Access To Sawgrass, Ample Parking, Monument Sign. FREE RENT & Buildout. Call 954-328-0413. 9-14

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38 The Pelican Friday, August 31, 2012 James Robert Dunn started his career in 1967 as a sales representative for IBM. During a sales call to a jewelry company in Malden, Massachusetts, Jim picked up a magazine about the jewelry business and became intrigued. When his schedule allowed, Jim took correspondence courses in gemology, and went to New York to learn about diamonds and colored stones. “I bought a little microscope and I was playing scientist at home,” he says. While at IBM, Jim met his future wife Ann Marie Pelliccia, who was working as an executive secretary. Ann Marie, like Jim, was also driven by an entrepreneurial spirit. She was ten years old when her family immigrated to this country from Italy. It didn’t take long for Ann Marie to master the English language and become the interpreter for her father’s cabinet making business. From the age of 11, she went to work every day after school with her father until she graduated high school and soon after, she joined the team at IBM. “It was IBM that helped us forge our philosophy about customer service and business ethics” says Ann Marie. The couple married in 1969 and together, they decided to take a chance and start a jewelry business. With their savings of $10,000, the couple purchased a small house in Hanover, Mass. and converted it into their first jewelry store, The House of Gems. During the first year, their store was burglarized and every piece of jewelry was taken including customers’ repairs. To make matters worse, the Dunns were in between insurance policies. The couple went from door –todoor informing and reassuring each client that their prized possessions would be replaced. Ann Marie and Jim paid for the stolen jewelry out of their own pockets to preserve their reputation for integrity and trust. The Dunns’ misfortune turned out to be a blessing in disguise. Word spread when the couple made good on their promise and business began to grow by leaps and bounds. The House of Gems soon outgrew its tiny location. Jim and Ann Marie relocated the store to a nearby mall in South Weymouth, Mass. and changed the name to J.R. Dunn Jewelers, placing an emphasis on the importance of the family-owned and operated business. In 1978, the couple relocated to South Florida and opened a small jewelry boutique, which served a select clientele by appointment only. This is when the Dunns were fortunate enough to have Robert Pelliccia, Ann Marie’s brother, come on board at the age of 18 and eventually start creating one-of-a-kind custom creations and now over 30 years later he continues to create his award winning designs for J.R. Dunn’s discerning clients. Today the Lighthouse Point store is an 8,000 square foot design studio and showroom. Jim, Ann J.R. Dunn Jewelers 4210 N. Federal Highway, Lighthouse Point 954-782-5000Living the American Dream ; it’s a family affair at J.R. Dunn’sSean, Ann Marie and Jim DunnMarie and their son Sean run the business together. Sean earned his Bachelor of Science in Business Management from the University of Florida as well as his gemological degree from GIA. Jim credits Sean with much of the technological advancement achieved at the store, including the creation of the company’s e-commerce website, JRDunn.com, nearly eight years ago. Fortunately, the faith Jim and Ann Marie placed in Sean paid off and JRDunn.com now serves clients in over 20 countries. “My father always told me I could be whatever I wanted,” says Sean. He has given me so much latitude to try new things and the confidence to take steps forward. One of the most entrepreneurial things about my father is that he has no fear of taking risks. He’s not afraid to try new things. If it doesn’t work, it’s not going to devastate him. Tomorrow he’ll wake up with another great idea and go for it.” In addition to being a close knit family that supports one another, the Dunns have forged many great relationships with their employees, clients and in the community. “If you’re in business and the people in the community are supporting you, then you should go back and support the community,” says Jim. The Dunns credit these relationships for having allowed J.R. Dunn Jewelers to persevere and thrive even in tough times. While a lot has changed since Jim and Ann Marie started the business in 1969, their values haven’t. On any given day you are likely to find multiple family members on the premise at J.R. Dunn Jewelers. Even Ann Marie’s mother, Fernanda, at the age of 86 might be the one who greets you at the door. Every guest entering the store today is treated with the same standards of excellence and friendly service established many years ago in that tiny house in Massachusetts. It is truly a family affair…. “I can’t believe it has already been 33 years since we opened our jewelry showroom in South Florida. This would not have been possible without the tremendous support of our local community”Jim Dunn

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The Pelican 39 Friday, August 31, 2012 Nelson’s Diner at 438 S. Cypress Rd. is the breakfast and lunch destination for many of the movers and shakers in Pompano Beach. Opened in June of 2009, the restaurant’s success traces back to its owner, Greg Nelson. His love of cooking and his knowledge of running a commercial kitchen is legend with those who know him. “For me it all began at Capri’s, a 200 seat Italian Restaurant in Greenwood, South Carolina,” Nelson says. “I was hired as a bus boy when I was 12 years old. I was paid $1.08 per hour. I had 10 hours on my first check, which after deductions, was $8. That and a free cheeseburger made me a happy employee,” he smiles still remembering that check. “I progressed from bus boy to dishwasher to slicer and dicer and at 15, I began to cook and loved it.” At 17 he traded his kitchen experience for a spot on the diamond with the Greenville Braves baseball team. “On a Florida trip, my back gave out. I left the team and stayed in Florida to become kitchen manager for a Bobby Rubino’s, and later did the same for Tommy Norris so I was well equipped to run my own restaurant. However, he got side tracked for 20 years while he worked for Lou Bachrodt Chevrolet Dealership as desk/fleet/ commercial manager. “When I left Lou, we both had tears in our eyes,” Nelson admits. “I was ready to do something else and he understood that. Lou comes to lunch here at least once a week and we remain best of friends.” “In all those years working for Lou, I still cooked at home, at church or any party that came my way. And now I’m cooking in my own restaurant and loving it. When you’re a small business owner you do it all,” he says with an easy smile. “I buy the food, cook the food, plan the menu, handle the personnel, do customer relations, advertising, and I often mop the floor. The hours are tough but if you like what you’re doing, even that doesn’t matter.” Nelson comes in at 4 a.m. to begin food preparation and although the restaurant closes at 3 p.m. his day often lasts until 6 p.m. He says, “I’m lucky that my wife, Elyse and I live just a few blocks away. Elyse is my bookkeeper, accountant, my everything. Our two children, Hailey, 17 and Grant, 14, drop by to eat and sometimes they will even lend a hand.” Business is good. Nelson’s has become the place to meet and eat. At any given time from 6 a.m. to 3 p.m. one might see the mayor, Frank Furman and his gang, city hall employees, BSO, fire rescue and the folks from nearby John Knox Village and neighborhood businesses. Customers are often greeted by name and if they’re regulars a cup of coffee, their way, is at the table before they sit down. Nelson says he never thought he’d need a staff of 11, but finds that they all keep busy. The menu is extensive, but it’s the $5.99 daily specials that are the best sellers. Monday is pot roast, Tuesday is meat loaf and open-face roast beef; Wednesday is sloppy Joes; Thursday is turkey, mashed potatoes and gravy, Friday is tilapia or shrimp. The soup and half sandwich combo is another big seller. Nelson faxes daily menus to his take-out customers and says that meals to go make up about one third of his daily business. Steve Tidwell, owner of Body Spot says, “I’m here every day to pick up lunch or dinner for my employees.” Another regular is Marge Muth, director of community outreach for Dignity/Kraeer Funerals who says, “I’m a regular here because the place is so friendly. They greet me by name. The food is great and the price is right. It’s a great spot to meet a friend.” “When we’re filled to capacity, I bring out coffee or juice to those who are waiting. Many come in, look around for someone they know and join them,” Nelson laughs. “We’re like cheers. Our customers get to know each other and sit together when we’re crowded and often when we’re not crowded.” Besides food and fellowship, Nelson’s Diner offers a little nostalgia with Elvis, baseball and 50s memorabilia decorating the walls while 50s and 60s records play quietly in the background. Soon patrons will see Greg’s newly restored 1957 Chevy parked outside. Nelson’s is open 7 days from 6 a.m. until 3 p.m.; Call 954-785-3646The success of Nelson’s Diner starts with the history of Greg Nelson’s lifetime love of cookingNelson’s Diner, 438 S. Cypress Road, Pompano Beach 954-785-3646Nelson’s has become the place to meet and eat. At any given time from 6 a.m. to 3 p.m. one might see the mayor, Frank Furman and his gang, city hall employees, BSO, fire rescue and the folks from nearby John Knox Village and neighborhood businesses. The great chef, Greg Nelson, keeps his oors shined and his patrons well fed.[Top] Greg serves up his famous North Carolina pulled-pork sandwich with fries and slaw. [Right] A younger Greg shows off his ambe at The Kapok Restaurant.

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The Pelican 41 Friday, August 31, 2012 “The dental experience you have as a child shapes your dental experience forever,” says Dr. Jared Young, whose practice in Lighthouse Point has been a longtime favorite for parents and children. Dr. Young follows in the footsteps of Dr. Jerry Klein, who pioneered children’s dentistry in this area more than 40 years ago. He joined the practice over a year ago, and has since remodeled the office to create a whole new bright “beachy” feel. “Children leave the office with balloons, stickers, or rings. Making the dentist visit fun is what this specialty is all about,” he says. With TVs mounted on the ceiling, children here are watching their favorite shows while resting in the dental chair. While his solo practice is only one-year old, Dr. Young’s credentials are impressive. Dr. Young received his dental training in Florida, at Nova Southeastern University where he was a recipient of the Pierre Fauchard Academy Scholarship. Originally from Michigan, Dr. Young then returned to Children’s Bright New Look for Children’s DentistryBright Young Smiles, 1930 NE 34 Ct., Lighthouse Point, FL 954-781-1855 Hospital of Michigan to serve as Chief Resident and receive 2 years of specialty training in Pediatric Dentistry. This specialty training involved education in general anesthesia, emergency medicine, cardiology, pediatric medicine, cleft lip/ palate, conscious sedation, orthodontics, oral surgery, growth and development, and operating room dentistry. Graduating with Highest Honors from Michigan State University with a bachelor’s degree in psychology, Dr. Young loves interacting with children and parents. The Lighthouse Point area is home for Dr. Young and his wife Catherine Young, D.M.D. He is currently the Broward Dental Association’s Chair for Give Kids a Smile, an annual charity event that provides free dental care to needy South Florida children. Dr. Young is an active member of the American Dental Association, American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry, Florida Dental Association, and the Broward County Dental Association. But what impresses these young patients so much that they want to go back has more to do with his kid-friendly office and patient-centered practice. “We see patients as early as one-year-old for preventative measures,” he says. “And it’s more for the parents than for the patient. This also creates a “dental home” for the patient, so they have a familiar place to go in case of dental emergencies. We educate the parents about cleaning the teeth, good diet habits, and oral habits like finger-sucking and pacifiers.” Dr. Young says pacifier use or finger habits are common up to 18 months, and after that they run the risk of changing the shape of the jaw and the position of the teeth. “We have a lot of methods to help break the habits, but we do need the parent and child’s help for a successful outcome.” “Juices are a big risk factor in getting cavities in children. Even natural fruit juices are very high in sugar. Think of it as candy, the nutrition facts are the same. Children who drink juice from a “sippy cup” are at the greatest risk.” And parents get more advice to help their children develop healthy habits for a lifetime. Pediatric dentistry is relatively new. The specialty started in the 1950s. And if a person goes by the word of Dr. Young, it’s the best area of dentistry. “Children are a whole lot more fun to work with. They keep you laughing all day,” he says. These young patients also get a kick out of the “beachy” murals that flank the entire office. The waiting room is packed with toys and puzzles patients enjoy next to a wall mural depicting a sandy beach with palm trees. Dr. Young sees patients from infants through high school, and office procedures include checkups, cleanings, fillings, crowns, extractions, whitening and orthodontics. Dr. Jared’s position on x-rays is simple: “Only if necessary. We have digital xray technology as well, which minimizes exposure.” “There are a lot of times in primary (baby) teeth procedures where we can skip the local anesthesia injection as well, which makes for a more positive experience. Sedation dentistry is also available for patients who require it.” Dr. Young adds, “Patients who require anesthesia remain under the eye of an M.D. anesthesiologist and his nurse during the [procedure], and that makes for very safe conditions. I have several patients with autism who require anesthesia.” Parents get a welcome from Bright Young Smiles as they are always invited to be with their child during all procedures, or they can enjoy a cup of coffee under one of the palm trees, TV remote in hand. Bright Young Smiles is open five days a week. Patients also have Dr. Young’s cell phone in case of emergenciesDr. Jared Young’s beach mural gives his dental of ce a sense of fun, and all this fun builds healthy smiles at Bright Young Smiles in Lighthouse Point. “Children are a whole lot more fun to work with. They keep you laughing all day,” Dr. Jared Young[Above, top to bottom] Mason, Cameron, Nathan and James with Dr. Young.

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42 The Pelican Friday, August 31, 2012 Deer eld Beach – Executive Director Phil Barrett is very proud of The Forum at Deer Creek, an elegant retirement community that offers a lush country club setting to seniors who want to enjoy life free of the demands of maintaining a home. Barrett says,” We offer a choice of very spacious apartments plus all the amenities that ease daily burdens and allow residents free time for fun, hobbies, stimulating lectures and shows. Our residents experience ne, restaurant-style dining, weekly housekeeping and linen service, transportation and endless activities and events.” Like all good executives, he called in a few members of his management team to talk about speci cs. Blair Fritz, Regional Marketing Manager who happened to be visiting said The Forum is owned by Five Star Senior Living, a company with over 250 senior living communities across the United States. Fritz said, “Our assisted living residents bene t from a unique concept which is our six levels of care. Residents pay only for the care they need. For example, if the only need is to administer medication that is the only additional service charged. At the other extreme, for the very frail residents, we provide all the care they need.” The Forum is 23 years old and currently has 207 residents in independent living. There are 50 residents in assisted living and 60 in either short term rehab or receiving skilled nursing care. Carol Bonk is the Dining Room Manager. A friendly, The Forum at Deer Creek, 3001 Deer Creek Country Club Blvd., 33442 954-698-6269Finding a lifestyle to t comfort and exciting activities is all part of the Forum at Deer CreekBeautiful grounds, fountains and artistic architecture make The Forum at Deer Creek an elegant retirement choice.lively lady, she quipped, “The only complaint I get from residents is being guilty of causing their weight gain. I tell them, ‘No problem. Work it off in the tness room and exercise class with Barbara McCormick, our activities director.’” Bonk said that breakfast and a choice of lunch or dinner are included in the residents’ monthly bills. Every menu has either a beef, chicken or sh entre, a least two starches, plus vegetables, soups, salads and of course, desserts. “We also offer an ‘Always Available Menu’ for residents who don’t want the daily offerings that includes herb baked chicken and sh, fresh omelets, kosher hot dogs, hamburgers and nova platter as the alternate entrees,” Bonk said. Sid and Ellen Gold moved into The Forum 15 months ago and are very happy with this choice according to Ellen who said, “The food is very good. I love desserts so I check the daily dinner menu from the bottom up! “Everyone is very friendly. I’m a bingo and a black jack player and Sid’s a golfer who goes to the golf club next door to play. “We enjoy the cocktail hours, the live entertainment and all of the activities.” McCormick, Recreation Director, distributes a monthly activities calendar packed with a variety of things to do. After exercise class, held every day, there is a long list of activities including “Adult Story Telling” with Caren Neile,”Classical Music and Opera Appreciation” with Gene Solomon, a discussion group led by Liz Reynolds called “What’s Your View?,” book reviews with Ronelle Delmont, painting classes a writer’s workshop, current event lectures with Eli Kavon nature club and much more! There is an outdoor swimming pool, the adjacent Deer Creek Golf Club, and bridge, canasta and mahjong games going on daily. Religious services and observances are offered for all denominations. Tisha Hahn, director of sales and marketing said, “The Forum is an elegant and warm retirement community offering independent living, assisted living, skilled nursing and rehabilitation care. “Our residents enjoy all the comforts of home in a resort style setting. Beautiful apartments, thoughtful amenities and a dedicated staff – a community you will be proud to call home. “Because we are a rental community our residents do not pay a large, up front entrance fee and they feel secure knowing we offer all levels of care to meet their needs now and in the future.” Residents have a choice of several lovely and spacious oor plans to choose from. The oor plans range from studio, one and two bedroom options. Resident Dottie Barnett says, “I have a lovely twobedroom apartment because I want my brother and grandchildren to be able to visit me. I like it here very much because the people are friendly and there’s so much to do. I attend the lectures, the shows and I play canasta and mahjong. The food is good. Management is very accommodating with transportation provided to shops, doctors or wherever you need to go.” Hahn added, “Our residents come from communities in Delray Beach, Boca Raton, Boynton Beach and of course, Deer eld Beach. Many move in because their friends have recommended The Forum. They feel comfortable and are proud to have family and friends visit and spend time at their community. Our resident’s family and friends are always welcome, whether it is to stay for a meal, enjoy the pool and beautiful courtyard or join them on holidays and special occasions.” Located in Deer eld Beach, The Forum is accessible to both Broward and Palm Beach counties, the Interstate and Florida Turnpike, beaches, shopping, churches and synagogues. To visit The Forum, exit I-95 at Hillsboro Blvd., go west to Deer Creek Country Club Blvd and follow the road past the country club to The Forum entrance on the right hand side.

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The Pelican 43 Friday, August 31, 2012 Larry Gene Kosa has been a customer at Over Easy Caf since before it even opened in 1995. Back then, when Cathy Cerniglia was getting her restaurant ready to serve up its first batch of eggs over easy, Kosa came in and sat down, but he didn’t get to order just yet. When the kitchen was finally up and running, Kosa was one of the first customers to pull up a stool. Ever since then he’s been coming back for the food and the friendly atmosphere. “When you tell her the way you want it, she makes it the way you want it,” said Kosa. “Everything’s good here and this is really a mom and pop atmosphere.” Cathy sold Over Easy in 2002. But in 2005 she bought it back and started serving up her own unique brand of “mom and pop atmosphere” once again. “Nobody else ever owned it this long,” she said. “It’s happy, and it’s beautiful and this is my home. This is my neighborhood.” “There’s always something new. Things are always changing,” said Cathy, who added that each new cook she adds brings something new to the menu. At Over Easy, there are 20 varieties of omelettes such as the classic Western with ham, green peppers and onions. There is even a bacon cheeseburger omelette and a more continental Greek one with tomatoes and Feta cheese. One of the more exotic items added to the menu recently is the black bean chipotle burger. “They taste like black beans and salsa. It’s one of our most popular items,” said Cathy, who added that she will be adding healthier items to her menu. A trend that she said the whole shopping center is adopting. Recently, a jazzercise studio and wrestling/fitness center have opened their doors next to Over Easy. “The shopping center has really grown here. I heard the owner is even trying to get a juice bar.” But for those who like to indulge, Cathy’s getting ready for her seasonal pies. Cherry, apple, blueberry, pecan, coconut custard, banana cream will be available at Thanksgiving to enjoy in the restaurant or to take home for the holiday. And no Thanksgiving would be complete without For two decades, Wilton Manor’s Over Easy Cafe has offered fresh menus, community service and a friendly welcome a pumpkin pie. To make her own version of Thanksgiving Americana, Cathy gets about as fresh as a cook can – buying her pumpkins from the Wilton Manors Kiwanis Club’s annual pumpkin patch. “We sell a couple hundred pies for Thanksgiving,” said Cathy, who also adds a Thanksgiving Day meal to her menu, complete with roast turkey, stuffing and cranberry. Cathy’s love of serving up a good meal extends beyond her regular patrons. She is the most generous contributor to the Wilton Manors Kiwanis Club’s backpack food program, which sends children at Wilton Manors home with back packs filled with food. Over Easy is a drop-off place for her patrons and for others with whom she does business to make this program a success. Cathy and other club members fill backpacks with cans of fruits and vegetables, macaroni and cheese boxes, cans of tuna and other nonperishable items. One woman recently brought in 2,400 packs of shampoo. “We call her ‘Big Hair Tina,’” said Cathy. “Our kids are going to have the cleanest heads in the The Over Easy Cafe, 318 E. Oakland Park Blvd., Wilton Manors • 954-561-1177[Above] Owner Cathy Cerniglia, top left, Deena gastel, Michael Cerniglia, Larry Gene Kosa and Tina Greager, bottom left. [Right] Customers Michael Ellsworth, left, and Paul Forino. [Bottom] Just some of the many supplies that have been collected for the Kiwanis Club’s backpack for food program through Over Easy.school. All I do is mention the backpack program to my customers and the donations come. The customers are awesome.” For more on the Over Easy Caf, visit www.theovereasy. com, on Facebook or call 954561-1177 Plenty of children in South Florida show up at school hungry, but those young students with a food back pack not only get to eat breakfast, there’s plenty of food for dinner too. Donations are always accepted at Over Easy..

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44 The Pelican Friday, August 31, 2012 hard to describe the depth of our feelings and our need to do this.” Pompano State Farmer’s Market was the largest wintertime wholesale produce market in the country at that time. There were Jewish brokers and buyers who came for the season and lived in Miami Beach and cities south of Pompano. Roz was a bookkeeper at the market for over 20 years. She recalls, “We spread the word of our existence here and our numbers grew. We outgrew our living rooms and began to meet at the Pompano Chamber of Commerce, and we advertised in the local paper. “Our lucky break came when Dr. Tobin and his wife, Lee, from Triple Creek, Colorado, dropped into our midst. They had read about Cresthaven houses for sale with a $200 down payment. Instead of vacationing in Miami Beach which they usually did, they came, looked and stayed. Doc retired here and became the President and motivator for Temple Sholom. I can still hear him say, “It’s time to stop looking for donors. We must raise the money ourselves, buy some land and build our own temple.” He red all of us up and we began to fund raise in a big way. Every Jewish person in the community was involved and excited. We bought the land where our temple now stands.” “There were so many who gave generously and tirelessly, I hope I’m not forgetting anyone.” She ticked off names: Harry and Fay Goldberg, Gert and Berrnie Millman, Irene and Martin Reidich, Abe and Bess Cor, Bebe and Eddie Kodish, Dr. Harvey and Myra Saff, Isabel and Stanley Rubel, and Sidney and Lorraine Harris. “We can never thank them enough for their support. When it was time to begin building, we had help from Richard Koff, a building contractor who built many homes in Lyons Park, including ours. He worked closely with Lou Wolfe, the architect who designed Temple Sholom. Completed in July of 1960, the congregation soon had 300 members. It felt great to help turn our vision of a temple into a reality. I have been a member ever since the doors of Temple Sholom opened, and I’m so glad it is here serving the Jewish community so well.Early memories of Pompano BeachRoz Karneol’s memories encompass much more than the Jewish community. In addition to a rewarding career in the produce market, she and Herman raised two daughters, Risa McClave and Rafaela Twist and one granddaughter, Hannah McClave, all of whom are living in Pompano Beach. She and Herman, now deceased, were active in Pompano Beach. Roz served as Past President of the Temple Sisterhood, the American Legion Auxiliary, Lions Club Auxiliary and Beta Sigma Phi, a service sorority. For 25 years, she was a volunteer facilitator for the Pompano Branch of the Elizabeth Faulk Center for Group Counseling. She is still an active member of the Pompano Beach Historical Society and still teaches knitting at the Temple once a week. She says, “I’m a big believer in interfaith living. Had I not come to Pompano Beach, I would never have met the wonderful mix of people I have lived happily with for most of my life. It has been a wonderful experience. I have learned about many religions and I hope have shared information about mine. My current knitting class is open to all faiths. I’m pleased to be involved in the Temple social activities open to the community regardless of religion and membership.” Irene Reidich came to Pompano Beach with her parents in 1934 and attended Pompano Elementary, Middle and High School. She says, “My father, Moe Hirshman, owned Pompano Pharmacy. Years later, my husband and I owned the Army Surplus Store in Old Pompano. We worked hard and always tried to be good citizens. My father was the rst president of Temple Sholom. We were proud to have our own house of worship just like our neighbors did. As Jews, we were always involved in our community. I was the rst and only female president of Temple Sholom from 1977 to 1979. Our Temple has always opened its doors to all who want to come. We have study groups and social events, all open to every faith.” Myra Saff, another longtime resident said, “The Jewish Center at Temple Sholom has always welcomed the non-Jewish population with open arms. Currently, we have study groups, cooking, MahJong and knitting classes open to the community. Her husband, Dr. Harvey Saff, retired podiatrist, is a past president and current treasurer of the Jewish Center at Temple Sholom. He says, “I had an of ce for 50 years on Atlantic Boulevard. We came here in 1957 and have been involved in the Temple and in city and civic organizations ever since.” The Jewish Center at Temple Sholom has always welcomed newcomers and people of all faiths to all of our services, study groups and classes. Right now we have an ongoing and somewhat unique program, conducted by Debby Lombard, for special needs children. It’s completely non denominational. In fact I don’t think there are any Jewish children in the program. The children are very involved and put on a show for us every now and then. Once a month we have a Saturday morning service for these special needs children and their families.” “Our Jewish Center at Temple Sholom and our members have always felt part of Pompano Beach and have hopefully contributed to its progress.” The Jewish Center at Temple Sholom has always welcomed newcomers and people of all faiths to all of our services, study groups and classes. Right now we have an ongoing and somewhat unique program, conducted by Debby Lombard, for special needs children. It’s completely non denominational. In fact I don’t think there are any Jewish children in the program. The children are very involved and put on a show for us every non and then. Once a month we do a Saturday morning service for these special needs children and their families.” “Our Jewish Center at Temple Sholom and our members have always felt part of Pompano Beach and have hopefully contributed to its progress.” TempleContinued from page 7

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