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Pompano Pelican
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00090900/00314
 Material Information
Title: Pompano Pelican
Uniform Title: Pompano Pelican
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: Pompano Pelican
Place of Publication: Pompano Beach
Publication Date: 08-24-2012
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Pompano Beach
Coordinates: 26.234722 x -80.125556 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00090900:00314

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Friday, August 24, 2012 Vol. XX, Issue 34 Wherever you are, read The Pelican @ pompanopelican.com Send news to siren2415@gmail.com Pompano Beach Deer eld Beach Lighthouse Point Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Wilton Manors Oakland Park Hillsboro Beach The Galt Palm Aire The Pelican Pelican Visit us online at www.pompanopelican.com The The Pelican Pelican 95 days left in 2012 Hurricane season They keep history, make it and offer itThe 2012 history issues of The Pelican focus on the people whose dreams became realities for the rest of us. While cities are being remade, we watch buildings plowed under and replaced with todays architecture. The speed by which all of this takes place has sent the keepers of history busy trying to capture the looks and the tales of what will soon become dust. The makers of history belong to numerous men and women who bet their fortunes on dreams, like Jan McArt, who brought theater to thousands of Florida residents when Miami Beach was about the only spot to catch a live show. And those who capture, maintain and research history do it so that others will know how we arrived at this point in our own history. Thank you to the advertisers and the history keepers who made this issue possible.By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFPompano BeachHe has put a lot of words together about the history of South Florida; about what drove us to settle on these sandy shores and about what happened after we rst arrived here. For Dan Hobby, 65, history is more than a list of chronological dates. It is Pompano Beach historian Dan Hobby in front of a wall of historical photographs. Historian Dan Hobby digs to uncover the big pictureabout the big picture: the reasons that events happen and the consequences of those happenings. I try to show how an event affects the future or why things happen the way they did. You have to look at the whole picture to develop the narrative, Hobby said. History is more than a recitation of isolated events. Its guring out why things are they way they are. There is even a trap to compiling pictorial histories Hobby said. They tend to be scrapbooks of the past, nostalgic, but not history. For Hobby, each of the books he has written has had its own format, its own challenges. When he relies on personal accounts to esh out the facts, he is often faced with dramatically See HOBBY on page 18 History Keeper Dan Hobby By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFSouth Florida could soon get a visit from Tropical Storm Isaac. And just like residents, the private and Residents prepare for Isaac; business owners, cities are already in gear for the rst threat to this areapublic sectors are getting ready for the storms possible landfall. Were always getting ready for a hurricane. We pretty much stay ready this time of year, said Pompano Beach Fire Rescue Chief Harry Small. Right now were keeping an eye on things. Usually in May and June we get ourselves up to speed to get ready to go on a moments notice.See ISAAC on page 21 Music under the starsPompano Beach -Due to the threat of Tropical Storm Isaac, Music Under the Stars, a free concert on the beach, has been rescheduled from tonight, Aug. 24 to Friday, Sept. 7. Call 954786-1111.

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2 The PelicanFriday, August 24, 2012 By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFWilton Manors The 80s in Wilton Manors was a decade marked by civic association battles, smuggled immigrants, an election doover, charter confusion and accusations of cronyism. Thats why author and historian Benjamin Little loves the period so much so much so that he wrote a book about it all. Littles book, Wilton Manors, from Farming Community to Urban Village spans the citys history History Keeper Benjamin LittleLittle honored for recent book on Wilton Manors turbulent years from when it was known as Colohatchee, an area sparsely populated by Native Americans in the late 1800s, until today. Originally from New Hampshire, Little moved to Wilton Manors in 1998 and comes from a family of historians. Like so many before him from northern locales, he nally got fed up with New England winters and traded snowy banks for sandy beaches. My father had just died so there was nothing compelling me to stay, he said. But coming from a much older part of the country, one where many buildings were erected before Broward County even existed, history in South Florida takes on a much fresher signi cance for Little. Being from New England, if its older than the Civil War; its new. For his work, Little was given the Stuart B. McIver Historians Award by the Broward County Historical Commission and named Historian of the Year. The whole thing was a real effort by the board. His book is where I jumped off, said Little about McIver, who wrote various books that included historical information about Wilton Manors, Fort Lauderdale and other parts of South Florida. For Little, the fun in studying Wilton Manors past comes from poring through documents and minutes of meetings trying to make sense of it all. The 80s were very interesting. That was the one that was the most fun, not being here to experience it. That time was the most contentious, said Little, who also serves as secretary of the See LITTLE on page 15 A resident of Wilton Manors since 1998, Benjamin Little, originally from New Hampshire, isnt used to history being so recent. Being from New England, if its older than the Civil War its new, he said.

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The Pelican 3 Friday, August 24, 2012 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach This citys of cial historian, designated in 2005 by the city commission, is Bud Garner, a lifelong resident who relishes remembering his past. Garner has written Tales of Old Pompano, and in 2005, short stories of his life and times from his own experiences and using accounts from older pioneers. His titles are intriguing: The Day the Gator got These folkloric tales describe Pompano Beach through the eyes of boyhoodJimmy McNab, The Night the Gypsies Came to Pompano Beach, The Murder of Junior Harper, The Ashley Gang, Alligators and Moonshine Stills. One story tells of a tragedy: the death in 1964 of three of the citys well respected residents, Stanley Parrish, 27, Warren Parrish, 29 and their uncle T.J. Nobles. The three were killed when their private aircraft crashed into Lake Okeechobee. Garner was in the search plane that spotted the body of Nobles in the water and retrieved it. No other bodies or the plane were ever recovered. It was a traumatic experience, he remembers. And the story that always gains attention is titled the Ashley Gang. The Ashleys were Floridas claim to outlaw fame. From 1911 to 1924 they plundered banks, businesses, trains and post of ces. One day in 1924, they came to Pompano Beach in a taxicab after a heist in West Palm Beach. The cab was stolen. They had left the driver tied to a tree in Deer eld Beach. Two of the gang members hit the Pompano Beach Bank at NE 1 St. and NE 1 Ave., See TALES on page 17Bud GarnerHistory Keeper and made off with $5,000 in cash, brazenly waving their loot wrapped in a bed sheet, We got it all. Not long after that, John Swamp Bandit Ashley and three other members of his gang were killed at the Sabastian Inlet Bud Garner

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4 The PelicanFriday, August 24, 2012 SightingsSightings is a calendar for Northeast Broward county. Send you event information to mdpelican@yahoo.com 8-26 Wilton Manors Get Out The Vote Bar Crawl starts at 2 p.m. at Sidelines Sports Bar, 2031 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. The Pub Crawl is intended to register voters for the upcoming election. Sidelines Sports Bar, Bills Filling Station, The Manor, Rosies Bar and Grill, New Moon, Mattys on the Drive, Georgies Alibi and Boom are included in the event. 8-28 & 9-11 Behavioral Health Family Support Group meets from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. at Broward Health Imperial Point Hospital, 6401 N Federal Hwy., Fort Lauderdale. Group is for people with family members dealing with mental illness. 954-739-1888. 8-30 Secret Woods Nature Center, 2701 W. State Rd. 84, Dania Beach, concludes its Summer Home Landscape Series 2012. Event is from 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. For ages 12 and up. 954-3578884. 8-31 LauderdaleBy-The-Sea Chamber of Commerce hosts its next Power Breakfast from 7:30 to 8:45 a.m. at Blue Moon Fish Co., 4405 W. Tradewinds Ave. The guest speaker will be SER Media Group CEO Sasha Ezquerra who will talk about using social media to market businesses. Cost is $20. 954267-9888. 9-1 Tickets for Night At The Ballpark are on sale at Wilton Manors City Hall, 2020 Wilton Drive, for $35 each. Cost includes bus ride to and from Marlins Stadium which departs from Wilton Manors Elementary School, 2401 NE 3 Ave., at 5 p.m. Sponsored by Wilton Manors CAAB. 954-390-2100. 9-5 NatureScape workshop from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Fern Forest Nature Center, 201 S. Lyons Road, Coconut Creek. Workshop will focus on ways to create and maintain a NatureScape See SIGHTINGS on page 6

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The Pelican 5 Friday, August 24, 2012 By Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFJan McArt, the iconic First Lady of Floridas Musical Theater walked into the Green Room at Lynn University this week looking like she was ready to play the female lead in whatever she wanted. And no director would have denied her. But beyond her talent on stage, she is known as the true pioneer who brought serious theater to South Florida nearly 30 years ago. The aspirations and ambitions of this woman, the daughter of talented parents in Cleveland, Indiana, began early. I always loved the theater, she says. I built small theaters in our family garage. I was a puppeteer, and I was always singing. McArts mother, Jean, who sang in the local church choir, warned her daughter to stay away from a singing career. Youll get too many colds, she said. So from that day on, I never had a cold, McArt Theater Keeper Jan McArtAfter 28 years of Broadway shows, Jan McArt puts her magic to work at Lynn University Jan McArt as Mame with composer Jerry Herman Above Can Can opens in Palm Beach [Right] Jan stars in Best Little Whorehouse in Texas at Royal Palm Theater, Boca Raton. said. Her heart led her straight to Broadway. Her big break came when Richard Rodgers invited her to audition for Oklahoma! When she arrived, she asked Rodgers if he would accompany her on the piano. He agreed. Do you know If I Loved You? she asked. I think so, Rodgers replied. I wrote it. She landed the part as understudy for Laurey. Six weeks into the show, the lead became ill, and McArt Jan McArt remains First Lady of Theater in South Florida.See MCART on page 10

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6 The PelicanFriday, August 24, 2012 Parks & Leisure Services Department. Call 954-6304500 for more information. See SIGHTINGS on page 12SightingsContinued from page 5yard. Pre-registration is required by calling 954-5191470. 9-8 Deer eld Beach city shred from 9 a.m. to noon at the Recycling Drop-Off Center, 401 SW 4 St. Cost is $10 for up to ve boxes or bags and $20 for up to 10 boxes or bags. Checks only. 954-480-4379. 9-8 Shred-A-Thon and prescription drug take back from 9 a.m. to noon at Lowes, 1851 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. Hosted by the Broward Sheriffs Of ce. Limit ve boxes per car. Those who bring prescriptions will receive a $5 Publix gift card. Limit one per family. 954831-8902. 9-11 A class on hip pain will be held at Broward Health North Hospital, 201 E Sample Road, Deer eld Beach, from 6 to 7 p.m. 954759-7400. 9-12 The Greater Pompano Chamber Business Expo will be held from 5 to 8 p.m. at Citi Centre, the corner of Copans Road and Federal

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The Pelican 7 Friday, August 24, 2012

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8 The PelicanFriday, August 24, 2012 Deer eld Beach, Pompano Beach, Lighthouse Point, LauderdaleBy-The-Sea, Wilton Manors and Oakland ParkWilton Manors Oakland Park Hillsboro Beach The Pompano Pelican is published weekly on FridaysStreet Address: 1500-A E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, FL 33060 Telephone: 954-783-8700 Fax: 954-783-0093Letters to the Editor are encouraged and accepted for print if signed, although a writers name will be withheld on request; letters must also include a daytime telephone number. Advertising rates are available upon request. Subscription rate is $31.80 including tax for one years delivery in Greater Pompano Beach; $95.40/per year including tax for others in the United States; call 954-783-8700 for rates abroad. The Pelican is a nonpartisan newspaper and reserves the right to decline advertising. Copyright 2012. Reproduction of this publication in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission of the publisher. The Pelican is a member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, Deer eld Beach Chamber and the LBTS Chamber. The Pelican is a state certi ed woman-owned minority business. The Pelican is delivered to businesses, libraries, schools, of ces, hospitals, news racks and single family homes. All advertising and copy is published at the sole discretion of the publisher. We welcome your critiques and ideas concerning this publication. Anne Siren, publisherExecutive Assistant: Mary Hudson Graphics: Rachel Ramirez Windsheimer Bookkeeper: John White Classi eds: Fran Shelby Contributing Writers: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Judy Wilson, Malcolm McClintock, Judy Vik, Michael dOliveira Account Executives: Paul Shroads, Carolyn Mann, Bill Heaton, Bill Fox Special Of ce Assistant: Cathy Siren ESTABLISHED 1993 Volume XX, Issue 34 Founding Editor and PublisherAnne Hanby Siren The Pelican wants to know what you think. Send your thoughts on local, state and national issues to siren2415@gmail.com Send your letter to the editor siren2415@gmail.com OpinionBudget workshopOakland Park A budget workshop is set for 6 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 29, in commission chambers at City Hall, 3650 NE 12 Ave. Commissioners will review and discuss the scal year 2013 budget. Big movieOakland Park The movie Big Miracle will be shown at sunset in Royal Palm Park, 1701 NW 38 St. The free movie is presented by the Oakland Park Docents needed for historic toursDeer eld Beach Angela Alipaz chose to put in her volunteer time at the citys historic Butler House because she has always been interested in the historic. Its knowledge she said of her docent training. Said Amie Kay Tanner, in charge of training docents, I am so glad she picked us. But we need more like her. Tanner is hoping another dozen people interested in Deer elds past will volunteer as docents for the Butler House, the Kester Cottage and the Old Schoolhouse. She needs a commitment of only three or four hours a week so that a tour schedule of the historic sites can be set. The training is minimal. Information sheets are provided. The Butler House, circa 1923, and the Old Schoolhouse are on the National Register of Historic Places. Its really an easy job, Tanner said. After the rst few times, you know the stories of these places. Interested persons should call the Deer eld Beach Historical Society, 954429-0378. History counts for all of usBy Anne SirenPUBLISHEROne thing I love about The Pelican historical issues comes from the stories themselves. In all of these South Florida cities, the pioneers who reaped the harvests that led to the vegetables grown down here being shipped north, created a strong connection between the North and South. They sent a message that there was work to be done in Florida. Henry Flagler heard the call and come down to build a railroad. That work was plagued with death, sickness, mosquitoes and other tropical inhabitants. Farmers dealt with alligators stopping up their irrigation pipes, rattler snakes sleeping under the green bean stalks. And that is the learning curve we can all accept from them. Keep going on: go on through grief, through jobless times, through illness and through disaster. Those early pioneers made plenty of mistakes that the rest of us are paying for like the huge efforts to dry up the Everglades. We moved beyond the hard times of segregation: the times when white children had full school terms, and black children were pulled out of school to work the elds. We, down here, are part of a microcosm of history, making bad judgments, moving forward, learning and growing. There are still plenty of us who remember the times when tossing wrappers, soda bottles and left-over food out of cars on the sides of highways. Thanks to Lady Bird Johnson, we were re-educated about that. We recall these tales because some of the Keepers of History. Their work is tedious and in many cases unfunded. In this issue, Jan McArt reminds us that theater is also having a dif cult time with money. And unless we begin to fund these important roles history and theater make in our lives, they could disappear. Dan Hobbys book, Pompano Beach: A History of Pioneers and Progress and Lighthouse Point, The First Fifty Years should be on everyones coffee table. Local physicians, dentists and all who maintain waiting rooms would do well to offer those waiting a chance to know more about where they live and work. Benjamin Littles history of Wilton Manors, Wilton Manors, from Farming Community to Urban Village and Bud Garners Tales of Old Pompano, make good reading for us and those who follow. Heres a nice dinner-time tale: The Day the Alligator got Jimmy McNab. But to get these books into your hands, you will have to contact your local or county historical society. By spreading the history around, you become a history keeper. The best way to nd out about these books and others that de ne your hometown is to join your local historicalsociety. Here they are. Happy reading. The Deer eld Beach Historical Society meets on the third Wednesday of each month from 12 to 1 p.m. at the Old School Museum, 232 NE 2 St., Deer eld Beach. For more information, call 954-429-0378. The Pompano Beach Historical Societ y meets on the third Wednesday of every month at 7 p.m. at the Dick & Miriam Hood Center, 217 NE 4 Ave., Pompano Beach. For more information, call 954-292-8040. The Wilton Manors Historical Society meets on the third Thursday of the month at Wilton Manors City Hall, 2020 Wilton Drive, at 7 p.m. For more information, call 954-566-9019 or 954-566-8219. The Oakland Park Historical Society meets on the second Tuesday of every month at 5:30 p.m. at the at Oakland Park Library, 1298 NE 37 St. For more information, call 954-566-9957. Manny is a two-year-old Fox Terrier. He was given to the Florida Humane Society in Pompano because his previous family was moving and couldnt take him with them. He would make a great family dog. He knows several commands. He needs a good, long walk once a day, play time and mental stimulation to keep him happy and would do best with no small children. Manny and all his friends can be seen and adopted at the Florida Humane Society, open 12 to 4 p.m. Thursday through Sunday. Visit www. oridahumanesociety.org or call 954-974-6152.Adopt Manny today!

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The Pelican 9 Friday, August 24, 2012 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach Amie Kay Tanners frustration is that the citys pioneers are reluctant to talk about the past. A self-appointed collector of local history, Tanner is more than willing to listen. Ive done eight or 10 videos, but I still have a long list of people I want to interview. I want to make us [The DB Historical Society] Plaques outside the Butler House commemorate the lives of historian Emily Dietrich and farmer J.D. Butler. Both were honored as Great Floridians in 2000 along with mayor and judge G.E. Butler, midwife and migrant worker advocate Branhilda Knowles, builder and city commissioner Odas Tanner, farmer and commissioner JB Wiles. Deer eld Beachs keepers of the past: Memories still sharp for history lovers Tanner and CollierHistory Keeper Amie Kay Tannera repository. I beg, beg, beg people to come forward so that all their information is not lost. Her frustration is compounded by the fact that the oral histories that were taken over the years are on cassette tapes which are deteriorating. I need a transcriber, she said. Some of the tapes go back to the years when the late Emily Dietrich was the citys of cial historian. Dietrich died in 1996 but left her mark when she and Margaret Briggs and Briggs daughter-in-law, Barbara, doggedly gathered the volumes of information needed to put four local structures on the National Register of Historic Places. Margaret Briggs had to travel to Miami to get the original building plans for the Butler House, now the home of the Historical Society. Dietrich and Briggs spent several years assembling enough credentials for the Butler House, Old Schoolhouse, Kester Cottage and Deer eld Beach Elementary School to be nationally recognized. Among the oral histories that do exist are those given See Tanner on page 10

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10 The PelicanFriday, August 24, 2012 completed the run. It was curtains up from then on. McArt has had an exciting and wide-ranging career from opera, Broadway and the concert stage to award-winning television performances and highly acclaimed supper club appearances, both nationally and abroad. She was a leading soprano with the San Francisco Opera Company and the NBC Opera Company and has starred in world premieres in New York. Having made her symphony debut with Arthur Fiedler and the Boston Pops, the Columbia concert artist became a favorite guest performer with symphonies across the country. She has co-starred with Liberace and Jack Jones; played wellknown cabaret nightspots such as the St. Regis and Pierre Hotels in New York, the Coconut Grove in Los Angeles, and the Colony and Society in London. She also has performed concert engagements in Saudi Arabia, Tokyo, Hong Kong and Bangkok. What brought her to Florida? Like everyone else, I came here to visit my mother, she answers. In South Florida, McArt put her business acumen to work, and the results were cabaret theaters in Miami Beach, Fort Lauderdale and Key West. Then came dinner theater at the Royal Palm Plaza in 1977. We were the rst 52week equity theater, McArt says. I brought in actors from New York, and I always tried to use Florida actors. Royal Palm Theater opened with The Merry Widow and continued with many Broadway hits such as Fiddler on the Roof and South Paci c. In 1993, a forgotten cigarette ignited the theater and cancelled shows for four months. The theater nally closed in 2001 with Some Like It Hot. Along with the dinner theater, McArt gave space to a childrens stage, Little Palm Theater, a launching pad for young actors, many of whom are having theatrical success throughout the country. Since 2001, McArt has been concertizing, released her CD, Pray for Peace and appeared in Florida Follies starring Florence Henderson and Carol Lawrence. In 2004, McArt was appointed Director of Theatre Arts program development at Lynn University. She is the founder and producer of the Libby Dodsons Live at Lynn series. It troubles McArt to see small theaters closing because they lack donors. The arts are always the rst to suffer, she says. Arts activities need the support of the community. I just want places for young artists to be. She says she has felt like a voice in the wilderness in convincing the public to support local arts groups. McArt has little praise for schools that are dropping arts programs. If you have no theater to feed the soul, what have you? she asks. Art is the ice cream and cake of life. Everything else is orthodontic bills and more, she says.McArtContinued from page 5 John Raitt and Jan McArt after performance in Pajama Game.by Ray Collier, JB Wiles, Jack Butler, Lorene Broxton, David Eller, Edna Horne Johnson, Myrle Johnson and Cleo White. Ive been trying all my life to get information on Mayo Howard, Tanner said. Howard was a long time member of Deer elds police force and is the rst Black person to be buried at the citys Memorial Cemetery on NE 6 Ave. Tanner has lived in Deer eld Beach all her life. Her father Odas built many buildings here including the Deer eld Beach Womans Club and she herself is a repository for local history. She even knows, who among the old families, was related to whom. Another resident with a sharp memory of the past is Ray Collier, also a native, who at the age of 30 became the citys postmaster. The pay was $7,400 a year. Stamps were three cents. Now 78, Collier has recorded his thoughts which include memories of the mail being hung on a pole alongside the FEC Railroad Tracks to be snatched by a conductor as the train rolled past. As a boy, he rode his horse to the beach across the old wooden swing bridge over the Intracoastal Waterway. He attended a two-room elementary school and lived in a Kester Cottage on Hillsboro Blvd., and 5th Ave. He remembers that everything east of SE 6 Avenue and Hillsboro Blvd., was woods and that, at the beach, another block of homes extended eastward from the current shoreline. In the hurricane of 1947, we lost ve homes there, he said. He recalls when the center of town was Dixie Highway and Hillsboro Blvd., and that he worked for a year at Doc Wrights drug store after graduating from Pompano Beach High School, Class of History Keeper Ray CollierTannerContinued from page 9. Collier is largely responsible for the formation of the Butler Scholarship, a behest left by Alice Butler in 1976. From childhood, Collier had a close friendship with Alice and her husband J.D. and would visit them at the Butler House once a week to hear stories about old Deer eld. That friendship lasted until Alice died and Collier was named to manage her estate. Childless after the loss of three babies, Alice and her husband J.D., loved children and contributed to their causes. Alice endowed the swimming pool and the rst football stadium at Deer eld Beach High School and provided scholarship money for any graduate that could get into college. In the 13 years following her death, what was a modest grant ballooned into $7 million when the Butler farmland was nally sold. While Tanner and Collier have long memories of Deer eld Beach, a historian equally responsible for keeping memories alive is Carolyn Morris who became executive director of the DB Historical Society in 2007 and who struggles now with the societys nancial issues. Since the city dropped the society from its budget last year, Morris works on a volunteer basis trying to maintain the Butler House for posterity. Tanner notes that without a paid executive director, there are few opportunities for grants. Despite that, the Butler House is open by appointment for tours and several school classes are already on the schedule. One elementary school, Norcrest, sends its fourth graders each year to learn about life when the city was a farming community. Unlike some surrounding communities, Deer eld Beach does not have a thoroughly researched, written history. A pictorial history with some information was published around 2005. Putting the archives in order and sorting the volumes of information already at the Butler House is a herculean task but Tanner is rm in her belief that she and Morris, with a little help from friends of history, will one day accomplish it.

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The Pelican 11 Friday, August 24, 2012

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12 The PelicanFriday, August 24, 2012 WORSHIP DIRECTORY: Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad. Rev. Hyvenson Joseph See SIGHTINGS on page 16SightingsContinued from page 6Highway, on the second oor between Lowes and Sears. Over a hundred local and regional businesses will be showcased during the event. Cost is $10 per ticket or two for $15. 954-941-2940. 9-13 Better Business Network Enterprise Group meets at 7:30 a.m. at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. Sponsored by the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce. 954-933-1558 9-13 Wilton Manors will hold its rst of cial budget meeting at 7 p.m. at city hall, 2020 Wilton Drive. Commissioners will vote on the budget, re assessment rates and the millage rate. To view the budget, visit www. wiltonmanors.com or call 954-390-2100. 9-14 Celebrate National Sewing Month with the Pompano Chapter of the American Sewing Guild. Hand sewing techniques will be demonstrated from 10:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at the North Regional/Broward College Library, 1100 Coconut Creek Blvd., Coconut Creek. 954201-2600. 9-15 Recovery Awareness Night to bene t Vision of Change, an organization that raises money to help fund projects that bene t the children of Los Quinchos, Nicaragua and their efforts to recover from substance abuse and addiction. Event starts at 6 p.m. at Signature Memories Event Center, 299 N. Federal Hwy., Fort Lauderdale. Admission is $20. 954-4010261.FridaysPompano Proud meets every second Friday of the month at McNab Park, 2250 E. Atlantic Blvd., from 8:30 to 11 a.m. Every second Sunday the group meets at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach, at 6 p.m. 954-562-3232. The Pompano Beach Rotary Club meets Fridays at 12:15 p.m. at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. 954-786-3274. Art Gallery 21 is open every Friday from 7 to 9 p.m. The gallery, located at the Womans Club of Wilton Manors, 600 NE 21 Court, features various artwork from various artists across the State of Florida. Admission is free. Visit www.canawm.org for more information.SaturdaysPony rides are available at Sand & Spurs Equestrian Park, 1600 NE 5 Ave., Pompano Beach, from 9 to 11:30 a.m. Cost is $3 per ride. 954-786-4507. The Pompano Beach Kiwanis Club Westside meets the rst and third Saturdays of the month at 8:30 a.m. at the E. Pat Larkins Community Center, 520 MLK Blvd., Pompano Beach. 954782-8096. The Deer eld Beach West Kiwanis Club meets the second and fourth Saturdays of the month at 9 a.m. at Westside Park, 445 SW 2 St., Deer eld Beach. 954-54-732-9883. Kayak rentals are available Saturdays and Sundays at Richardson Historic Park, 1937 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Visit www.AtlanticCoastKayak. com or 954-781-0073 for rates. The Wilton Manors Green Market is held every Saturday and Sunday at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. 954-592-0381. The Deer eld Beach est Kiwanis Club meets the second and fourth Saturdays

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The Pelican 13 Friday, August 24, 2012 Frank H. Furman Insurance, 1314 E. Atlantic Boulevard, Pompano Beach 954-943-5050For 50 years, Frank H. Furman Insurance company has served and contributed to Pompano Beach, the city Frank Furman lovesFrank H. Furman, Inc. will be celebrating its 50th year in the insurance business Sept. 1. Frank and his firm are very excited that they have served the community for 50 years. As a successful businessman in the eld of insurance, Frank has invested time and nancial assistance to organizations that bene t the overall community. The success of Frank H. Furman Insurance only added to his belief that giving back was a gift. He explains that in 1962, a close friend allowed him and his wife, Martha Jane, to open an independent agency. We opened our agency on Atlantic Boulevard rent free for one year. Our friend allowed us to make our dream a reality, says Frank. In return, Frank has served as a major sponsor for community events that also began as ideas, including The Tiger Trail Festival, Pompano Beach Fireworks on July 4th, Yuletide Parade, Seafood Festival, Fishing Rodeo, Holiday Boat Parade, Children in the Arts Piano Competition and numerous others that have grown to be part of the tapestry of Pompano Beach. Those contributions were the result of a young insurance salesman who believed in his product, stood behind it and worked hard at it every day. Frank and Martha Jane have been residents of Pompano Beach for 56 years where they raised their children, became active in their church and are proud that they are part of 60 families [employees in the business] where helping them prosper has been a great reward. They have faced obstacles, the biggest one being the unstable insurance market for homeowners after Hurricane Andrew in 1992 and Citizens Insurance. We have a great staff, says Frank. We specialize in insuring homes, businesses, automobiles, boats, health and life insurance products. We also get pleasure out of helping clients when they have a claim. That is what we are about. Frank was named to the board of John Knox Village at a time when the resident community had just come out of bankruptcy. He led the Village as chairman of the board from that time to his retirement last year with a business plan that worked and enabled JKV to grow and flourish. Resident population grew to 1,000 and needed expansion continues today. The Village honored Frank for his contributions with the addition of the Frank H. Furman, Jr. Plaza upon his retirement from the JKV board. Frank has been a trustee of Florida Southern College in Lakeland for 33 years. And he has dedicated 45 years as a member of the Florida Annual Conference of the United Methodist Church. With so much history, so much philanthropy and so much civic commitment, Frank still has time for a laugh. Tacked on the yellowing pages of his scrapbook is a song entitled There is No One With Endurance Like the Man who Sells Insurance, written in 1935 by Frank Crumit and friends. How true for Frank Furman. [Top] Frank and Martha Jane pose in front of their new building on Atlantic Boulevard. [Center] Happy with his own desk and his own business, Frank Furman begins a long career in Pompano Beach. [Lower] Frank and Martha Jane Furman announce the opening of their insurance agency. [ Town News, Tuesday Sept. 4, 1962] 50 Years!

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14 The PelicanFriday, August 24, 2012 Jaline Boccuzzi, D.M.D., began her dental career after graduating from the dental hygiene program at Tallahassee Community College. With a merit scholarship under her belt, she moved on to Boston where she attended Tufts University School of Medicine and earned her DMD. After a full day, Dr. Boccuzzi talked to The Pelican about her work, her research and her new dog Ultra, who had just arrived for a visit. Dental procedures have changed dramatically over the past 15 years, and keeping up with the latest education and workshops has been a large part of this young dentists life. Dentistry now offers a wide variety of relatively painless procedures that not only improve looks, smiles, and comfort; but often have a positive impact on the overall health of the patient. But, says Dr. Boccuzzi, its the overall health of the economy that makes some of these procedures out of reach for many patients. That issue prompted Dr. Boccuzzi to find ways that are more cost-effective. Two new items are hot on the market, and they can save a patient thousands of dollars, she says. The first is a new composite material that is closest to wear as enamel. This material bonds to the tooth at a molecular level. It comes in many shades and can be molded easily to fit the new smile. And its a same-day procedure. This material is one that can eliminate the look of black triangles at the gum level. Sometimes it just looks like a person has Discoveries in dentistry offer better procedures and better health for fewer dollars, says this young dentistpepper caught in the teeth, says Dr. Boccuzzi. This removes that appearance and is less costly than porcelain veneers. A second new item has been replacing the number of implants needed to correct and replace lost teeth. Referred to as AllOn-Four, Dr. Boccuzzi explains that instead of a full mouth of implants, a new procedure using only four implants, placed at specific angles is enough to build a complete permanent bridge on the top or bottom. Dental improvements are coming at lightning speeds. Forty years ago, the best a dentist could do for a patient losing teeth was to create false teeth that were removable. When implants arrived on the scene, they replaced the removable false teeth. As that procedure became more sophisticated, implants were used to secure bridges, but the procedures required six to eight implants. Using only four is a savings of thousands of dollars, Dr. Boccuzzi says. And this is what we need to offer our patients ... less expensive alternatives to a better and healthier smile. On-going education and workshops keep most dentists on the edge of the latest developments. This is one dentist who stays very busy with education. Another research project that has fascinated Dr. Boccuzzi is her project of close encounters with viral and bacterial matter in the mouth. Its another forward-looking research that some scientists are theorizing could predict related problems throughout the body. Using her willing candidate and assistant, Sandy Mercier, Dr. Boccuzzi takes a sample of saliva to test for various bacteria. She says there are about 450 bacteria and a handful of viruses in anyones mouth. In Merciers case, the discovery of the bacterium Eikenella corroden, which could be a contributor to heart disease, would serve as an early alert to remove the bacte-This is what we need to offer our patients. Less expensive alternatives to a better and healthier smile. Dr. Jaline BoccuzziJaline Boccuzzi, DMD, 2122 NE 2 St., Pompano Beach 954-941-4310 www.jbdentistry.com info@jbdentistry.com David Dunn All-On-Four Upper and lowerHappy Patients Ally Battistini VanDyck- Composite/ Bonding Smile Jonathan Wroth Black triangles removed (Composite/ Bonding)ria and check the heart. Dr. Boccuzzis interest in research and clinical studies, such as the one with Mercier, has impressed her staff and patients, all of whom feel more secure with her continuing education; which, in the end, benefits their own health futures. The office also offers numerous cosmetic procedures from ZOOM and Deep Bleach KOR, Botox, Juvederm and Radiesse. Dr. Boccuzzi offers a full-service dental office along with her staff members Sandy Bryant, R.D.H.; Sandy Mercier, Treatment Coordinator/ Patient Liasion and Cristina Casas, C.D.A Call the office with your questions or to meet Dr. Boccuzzi. 954-941-4310.

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The Pelican 15 Friday, August 24, 2012 Historical Society. Im not subtle. I entitled this chapter Revolution. The revolutionary decade kicked-off with a smuggling operation. Like something out of a Miami Vice episode, in May of 1980 a cigarette boat docked at a house on the South Fork of the Middle River with its cargo of illegal immigrants from Columbia. Police soon surrounded the house and arrested three smugglers and over a dozen immigrants. The Colombians had been smuggled from Bimini for $600 to $800 each, wrote Little. The political turbulence began when Sam Stephens, a full-time city employee, was appointed to the council much to the dismay of Mayor Arthur Welling who claimed it violated the citys civil service rules. A ruling by the state attorney general was ignored by former city attorney William Miller and Stevens was later elected by the council as president of the city council. The Revolution came when Diane Cline and William Turner, running together on a ticket of changing the citys trajectory at the time, won election to the city council, paving the way for a charter showdown between those who wanted to keep the mayors veto power over the rest of the council or give the mayor one vote among four others. The latter charter proposal won out, creating the current city commission style government, but not without some confusion. Youre not supposed to put two diametrically opposed proposals on the ballot because you cant have two forms of government, wrote Jane Carroll, former county supervisor of elections, about the 1984 charter questions. The winning proposal passed 68 to 32 percent. The losing got 45 to 55 percent of the vote. At least some voters must have been confused by the wording, wrote Little. Unhappy with some of the changes being driven by Cline and Turner and some of the members of the civic association board and wanting to counter its in uence, the Old Guard formed the Concerned Citizens of Wilton Manors. In a failed attempt, the Old Guard unsuccessfully tried to pack the Civic Association board. The two groups even fought tooth and nail over who would get the 4th of July beer concession. And temperance was avoided, joked Little. Wilton Manors, from Farming Community to Urban Village is available for purchase at Amazon.com and the Wilton Manors Library, 500 NE 26 St. LittleContinued form page 2

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16 The PelicanFriday, August 24, 2012 SightingsContinued from page 6 of the month at 9 a.m. at Westside Park, 445 SW 2 St., Deer eld Beach. 954-54-7329883. Pompano Green Market is held every Saturday from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the corner of Atlantic Boulevard and Cypress Road. Vendors wanted. 954-782-3015.MondaysPlay ping-pong from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Cost is $1. All ages can participate. 954-3902130. The Gold Coast Toastmasters Club meets on the second and third Monday of the month from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Dennys, 3151 NW 9 Ave., Fort Lauderdale. 954895-3555 or 954-782-9951.TuesdaysDeer eld Beach Rotary Club meets every Tuesday at 12 p.m. at the Deer Creek Golf Club, 2801 Deer Creek Country Club Blvd., Deer eld Beach. 954-630-9593. Pompano BeachLighthouse Rotary Club meets every Tuesday at 7:30 a.m. at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. 954-972-7178. The American Legion Auxiliary Unit 142, 171 SW 2 St., Pompano Beach, has Bingo on Tuesdays at 7 p.m. Food is available from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. 954-942-2448. A Yoga class is available for all levels at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors, on Tuesday nights from 6:30 to 8 p.m. and Saturday mornings from 10:30 a.m. until noon. The cost is $7. 305-607-3520. Zonta International meets on the third Tuesday of the month at Duffys Diner, 401 N. Federal Hwy., Deer eld Beach, at 11:15 a.m. Zonta International works to advance the status of women. 561-392-2223.See SIGHTINGS on page 22

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The Pelican 17 Friday, August 24, 2012 as they tried to drive out of the state. That confrontation with law enforcement ended their ignoble careers. This rst-hand account was told to Garner by JR Merritt, sheriff of St. Lucie County at the time. Thirty six stories of Garners, these and others, are posted on the Website, Stories of Old Pompano. They provide the reader with a very personal glimpse of Pompano Beach as a farming communi-TalesContinued from page 3ty. Garners memory for dates and places is phenomenal. Readers will recognize many of the names in his stories because today local roads are named for those pioneer families. Garner, 85 began writing his tales so that his grandchildren could see what it was like to live in Pompano Beach when he was a boy. You could rattle around the city all night and no one bothered you, he recalls. It was all good, clean fun. I get a sick, empty feeling in my stomach when I think of what the kids are missing today. He came to Pompano Beach in 1927 when he was nine months old and has lived here ever since except for the three years he was in the Navy. His account of those years is in the archives at the Naval Air Station in Jacksonville. As much as he is recognized for being Pompanos most proli c teller of tales, Garner credits a number of others for keeping track of local history, among them Don Downie who writes of his growing up and has contributed a story to Stories of Old Pompano and the late Eldes Walton, who had reams of information but never put any of it in writing, much to Garners dismay. Another person who needs to be remembered, he said, is Myrtle Vinson, who along with Walton, kept the records and maintained the graves at the city cemetery for years before the city took over that task. Garner is still writing his memories. He has one in the works now that will soon be ready to read to his nine greatgrandchildren. Fifteen of his kith and kin have birthdays in August, Garner said, and last week a huge party was held at his home. It could, one day, be fodder for another Tale, this one possibly told by one of his own grandchildren. Tell The Pelican about your news! 954-783-8700!

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18 The Pelican Friday, August 24, 2012 HobbyContinued from page 1opposing versions. That happens when he is writing the histories of newer cities where the founders can be interviewed. When it comes to documents and photographs, it is a judgment call as which ones carry history forward what is important and what is not. Hobby has written about many of the cities around us. That includes his newest, a book on Coconut Creek. Pompano Beach: A History of Pioneers and Progress, published in 2010 is the citys only full length narrative history. He edited Pompanos Centennial Journal, wrote Lighthouse Point, The First Fifty Years, Fort Lauderdale, Broward County: A Contemporary Portrait, Preserving Historic Properties in Fort Lauderdale and a number of articles. In recognition of his expertise, he sits on the advisory board of the Broward Trust for Historic Preservation, the Florida Review Board for the National Register of Historic Places, University of Florida History Advisory Board, the Broward County Planning Council, the Florida Association of Museums, the Florida Historical Society. He is the Pompano Chambers Shining Star for 2009 and has served on many boards in his hometown of Coconut Creek. Currently, he has two jobs: executive director of the Pompano Beach Historical Society and the SampleMcDougald House. He was executive director of the Fort Lauderdale Historical Society for 20 years, 1980-2000, and before that, after obtaining degrees from the University of Florida and University of South Florida, taught at Broward College and Lake City Community College. Despite the dif culties in raising dollars to support historic organizations, Hobby says he prefers it to teaching which can become repetitive. Preserving history is not. Faced with the restoration of the Sample-McDougald House, Hobby coordinated the $2.5 million effort which, set back by Hurricane Wilma and the economic downturn, has nally come to fruition. The stately old home will soon be open to public for tours and special events. Recently, the Pompano Beach Exchange Club, huge supporters of the house, was invited to hold a social there. Although he has written thousands of words about this area, Hobby knows that future historians may change our history. How we view the world, in uences our view of history and the people who were there, he said. Someone alive in 1920 would have a different view of an important event than someone who researches it in 2012. Part of an historians job is interpreting the date and guring out what it means. So while he attempts to make what he writes, valid in the future he is under no illusion that others will not write something more complete. Hobby is on a continual search for more historical material. He urges amateur archivists to search their old papers and photographs. People dont realize what they have, Hobby said. One photo of youngsters at play in a vacant eld, yielded an image of the construction of Cypress Plaza in the background, he said. And now that almost anything can be scanned, information can be preserved and returned to its owner. In Hobbys mind, Pompano Beach began its turn from rural to urban the year students at Pompano Beach High School decided to be the Golden Tornadoes instead of the Beanpickers. That was in 1956 and by then there were new people in town who didnt appreciate the citys farming heritage. Margate was incorporated in 1955 and Coral Springs in 1962. Pompanos farmers held vast acreage in both places, but few saw the incorporation of those cities as the harbinger of things to come. The other spur to development was the hurricane of 1947 that ooded farms and the towns. The ood control projects safeguarded the farmland and made residential development possible. Those times and the boom years that followed may be the subject of Hobbys next book. The history of all of North Broward is in those bean elds, he said.

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The Pelican 19 Friday, August 24, 2012 RJ BoyleRJ BOYLE STUDIOSThe rst big storm of the year is quickly approaching and as it nears we should see good shing until the storm arrives and then just after it passes through. The lower barometric pressure tends to re up the bite, so get out there while you can. The past days have seen hit or miss, but should get a lot better for the weekend. Daytime Hurricanes make for some great shingswords have been somewhat good with a few smaller sh hitting the deck and a nice one, 350 lbs., being taken this past Sunday. The inshore action is hot with mangrove snapper and yellowtails chomping. King sh are ring off, so remember your wire leaders. As always, be safe and use caution as this storm gets closer. If you have any questions, hit me up at the shop 954-420-5001. Get tight, suckas! Fish without a license on Sept. 1Florida On Sept. 1, recreational anglers can sh without a license in Floridas lakes, ponds, rivers and streams. Floridas licensefree shing days are an excellent opportunity to share the fun, excitement and togetherness of a shing trip with the entire family. This also is a great time for experienced anglers to introduce friends to the sport, even if they dont have a shing license, said Nick Wiley, executive director of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. Although a license is not required, all other bag limit, season and size restrictions apply. Visit www.myfwc.com for more information.Family Fun DayPompano Beach Splashes and Smiles Swim School will celebrate its 4th Annual Family Fun Day on Saturday, Sept. 15 from 4:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Pompano Beach Aquatic Center, 820 NE 18 Ave. Join Splashes and Smiles for a day of swimming, diving boards, re trucks, snorkeling, games and more. There will also be raf e prizes. The event is free and all proceeds bene t the The Kids Cancer Foundation of South Florida. For more information, to donate items to the raf e, sponsor the event or volunteer, email SplashesandSmiles@gmail.com or call 754-246-0665. Tell The Pelican about your news or special events! mdpelican@

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20 The Pelican Friday, August 24, 2012 Business ExpoPompano Beach The Greater Pompano Chamber Business Expo will be held Sept. 12 from 5 to 8 p.m. at Citi Centre, the corner of Copans Road and Federal Highway, on the second oor between Lowes and Sears. Over a hundred local and regional businesses will be showcased during the event and costs just $10 per person. Buy a ticket in advance and get two tickets for $15. The Expo includes nger foods and attendees have a chance to win door prizes throughout the event. For more information, visit www.PompanoBeachChamber.com, email Lisa Spinelli at the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce at lspinelli@ pompanobeachchamber.com or call 954-941-2940. Night at the Ballpark Wilton Manors The Community Affairs Advisory Board is selling tickets for Night At The Ballpark, Sept. 1 at Marlins Stadium. Tickets are $35 each and include a bus ride to and from Marlins Stadium which departs from Wilton Manors Elementary School, 2401 NE 3 Ave., at 5 p.m. Game time is at 7:10 p.m. Tickets are on sale at Wilton Manors City Hall, 2020 Wilton Drive. For more, call 954-390-2100.Broward County Call CenterBroward The Broward County Call Center provides a single point of contact for the services and programs offered by Broward County government. Calls can be made in English, Spanish or Creole. The call center is open Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Under emergency conditions its open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Call 954-831-4000 or Tell The Pelican about your news! mdpelican@yahoo.com or 954-7838700!

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The Pelican 21 Friday, August 24, 2012 Small said with the approach of Isaac, Fire Rescue has started massing supplies and has stepped up coordinating with its personnel to keep them informed and ready in case South Florida gets its rst major storm since Wilma in 2005. We start talking to each other a lot, said Small. One of the things about hurricanes is that it gives you a little time to prepare. Repairs on re trucks are also sped up in case theyre needed later. Having trucks in the garage [after a storm] aint cool, said Small. And along with talking to their own employees, cities are also already coordinating with other agencies, including the National Weather Service and Broward County Emergency Management. Right now were at the point of having daily briefings, said Kimberly Spill, emergency manager for Pompano. Theyll be ramped-up IsaacContinued from page 1as the storm gets closer. If it does hit, each department has its own disaster response plan and city employees prepare their own families so they can be prepared to work for the city before and after, depending on their role, said Spill. A lot of how cities prepare and respond to emergencies is time-tested, but with the advent of new technology a lot is also new. The internet and social media have given cities new tools to inform residents about emergency-related issues. Code Red, a telephone communication system, can alert residents about evacuation orders or other emergency-related information and the Vulnerable Population Registry is a website where anyone who is at risk can sign up and of cials will check on them after an emergency in case they need help. Visit www.mypompanobeach.com for more information. I think weve learned a lot from Hurricane Wilma. However, Wilma was only a category one to two, said Spill. Weve developed a whole new operating procedure but theres always room for improvement. When a storm threatens, cities implement procedures to protect and serve their residents. But they also perform tasks similar to what each of those residents does to prepare themselves for the storm. David Archacki, Wilton Manors director of public services, said before a storm staff secures park benches, garbage cans and other city property that might blow away with a strong wind. Construction crews must secure their sites. The citys emergency generators are lled to capacity. And if Isaac is the rst major storm to hit South Florida in seven years, the citys Emergency Operations Center, in the new city hall, will see its rst test. Were more prepared now then weve ever been, said Archacki. Frank Tropepe, who owns Ace Hardware stores in Pompano, Lauderdale-ByThe-Sea, Deer eld Beach and Margate, said his locations are ready to handle any surge in shopping by those getting ready for the storm. Waiting in the wings are over 1,000 lanterns, 150 generators and other supplies. Ive got a warehouse. We keep a pretty good stock of that stuff, said Tropepe. And I just beefed-up my hurricane stuff. But just in case he runs out of something, Tropepe said he can still bring in items as needed. Aces strong point is their distribution. We can get on the phone and we can get product very quickly. Publix is also stocking up in case Isaac visits. Right now its just extra pallets of water. But if the storm hits, Kimberly Reynolds, Publixs media relations manager for South East Florida, said Publixs eet of trucks is ready to deliver anything and everything its customers need; including batteries, pet food and prescription medicine. The supermarkets locations are also equipped with generators. Visit www.broward.org/ Hurricane/Stores for a list of generator ready businesses in Broward.Art Gallery 21 openWilton Manors Art Gallery 21 is open for the public from 7 to 9 p.m. every Friday. The gallery, located at the Womans Club of Wilton Manors, 600 NE 21 Court, features various artwork from various artists across the State of Florida. Admission is free. Gallery 21 is sponsored by the City of Wilton Manors and the Central Area Neighborhood Association. Visit www. canawm.org for more.

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22 The Pelican Friday, August 24, 2012 SightingsContinued from page 16WednesdaysThe Wilton Manors Kiwanis Club meets Wednesdays at 6:30 p.m. at 2749 NE 14 Ave., Wilton Manors. 954561-9785. The Oakland Park Kiwanis Club meets Wednesdays from 7:30 to 8:30 a.m. at Peter Pan Diner, 1216 E. Oakland Park Blvd., Oakland Park. 954-566-9957. The Pompano Beach Kiwanis Club meets Wednesdays at noon at the Riverside Grille at the Sands Resort, 125 N. Riverside Drive, Pompano Beach. 954-444-4815. The Greater Pompano Beach Senior Citizens Club meets on the second Wednesday of the month at the Emma Lou Olson Community Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach, at 10 a.m. 954-9437787. The Alzheimers Caregivers Support Group meets Wednesdays from 10 a.m. to noon at the NE Focal Point Alzheimers Day Care Center, 301 NW 2 Ave., Deer eld BeachThursdaysThe Rotary Club of Oakland Park/Wilton Manors meets every Thursday from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. at Tequila Sunrise Mexican Grill, 4711 N. Dixie Hwy., Oakland Park. 954-491-6158. The Deer eld Beach Kiwanis Club meets at noon every Thursday at the Deer eld Beach Hilton, 100 Fairway Dr., Deer eld Beach 954-242-6083. The Pompano Beach Republican Club meets on the fourth Thursday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach. 954-786-7536.Upcoming9-19 Art-By-The-Sea group meets at the Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Community Church in Friedt Family Hall, 4433 Bougainvillea Drive. Marcia Hirschy will discuss how artists can market their work. The meeting is free and open to anyone. 954-5940444. 9-23 FAU professor and activist Mike Budd leads a discussion on Rachel Maddows new book, Drift: The Unmooring of American Military Power and the U.S. Love Affair with War. Event is free. Donations are requested. Event is at 1 p.m. at Unitarian Universalist Church of Ft Lauderdale, 3970 NW 21 Ave., Oakland Park. 908477-7812. 9-25 Card party held by the Benevolent Patriotic Order of Does Drove 142 is scheduled from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Pompano Beach Elks Lodge, 700 NE 10 St. Open to the public. Bring your table of friends or group. Cost is $4 and includes desert, coffee or tea. Call 561-4792002 for reservations. Tell The Pelican about your news or special events! mdpelican@yahoo.com

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The Pelican 23 Friday, August 24, 2012 Pompano Beach As he nears his second anniversary in Pompano Beach, Dr. Eugenio Menendez says his practice is taking root, growing and spreading its branches into the community. Dr. Menendez offers primary care and diagnostic services at Pompano Beach Internal Medicine, 1600 E. Atlantic Blvd. He soon will be expanding into more space adjacent to the waiting room and plans to add an additional physician or nurse practitioner. He also plans to increase his community involvement and help to the community in need. Last year, as he marked his first anniversary in Pompano Beach, Menendez hosted a health fair, inviting a local chiropractor, dermatologist and podiatrist to join him, along with other vendors. He plans to do that again this fall for his second anniversary. The health fair included blood pressure and diabetes screening. The event drew a number of people with no access to health care, many of whom returned to see Dr. Menendez. For his first anniversary, Dr. Menendez partnered with Broward Childrens Center in staging an art show with a portion of the sales going to the center. Paintings by a local artist, Robert Stephen Simon, are in all the exam rooms. Dr. Menendezs slogan is st Century medicine practiced the old-fashioned way. He believes in listening to his patients. And he has the latest technology, including ultrasounds, echocardiograms, nerve conductor tests and spirometry for pulmonary disorders. He is trained to prevent and diagnose simple and complex medical conditions. Dr. Menendez says patients obtain a lot of information about medicine on the Internet. But in many cases, he has to clarify the misconceptions the Internet gives them. Just because its on Google or Dr. Oz said so doesnt mean theyre always getting the facts, he said. Dr. Menendez is in his eighth year of practice. He is board certified by the American Board of Internal Medicine and a Fellow of the American College of Physicians. He completed his bachelors degree in biology with honors from Florida International Pompano Beach Internal Medicine, 1600 E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach 954-942-2247University and his medical degree from the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine in 2001. He is affiliated with Holy Cross Medical Center, Imperial Point Medical Center, John Knox Village Health Center and Broward Childrens Center. Travel medicine is one of his fields of expertise. When patients are planning an African safari or a cruise down the Amazon, they should prepare by having the appropriate vaccines and obtaining medicines, so they can go with peace of mind and protect themselves from disease, he says. He also offers a medically supervised weight loss program. He has written a book, The Peoples Diet, a guide to obesity, nutrition and health. The book includes a guide to shopping for the right foods and information on what to order when dining out. The office honors Medicare and most insurance plans. Dr. Eugenio Menendez at Pompano Beach Internal Medicine expands practice to meet needs of community For uninsured patients, Dr. Menendez is associated with a discounted medical plan. Patients can see a network of specialists for a small monthly fee. He sees a number of uninsured patients. As an added service, he employs a staff person to assist patients who need additional benefits to obtain information on Access Florida, a program of the Florida Department of Children and Families. Patients are assisted in enrolling for Medicaid and food stamps. Family members assist Dr. Menendez in his practice. His father, Eugenio Menendez Sr. is vice president/general manager, handing business development and finance. My first job as a 14-yearold was working for my father at a Burger King in Houston. He was my first boss, Dr. Menendez said. And now hes my boss, his father said. Dr. Menendez is a member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce. Dr. Menendez is pleased to have both his office and home in Pompano Beach. Having everything close helps him to have a decent quality of life with his wife and daughter. And if Im relaxed and take care of my stress, I can take better care of my patients, he says. For relaxation he enjoys riding his bike and aquatic sports, such as kayaking and paddle boarding. Left to Right Medical Assistants Sonaly de Almeida, Vicky Perez, Leeann LLuberes with Gene Menendez and Dr. Eugenio Menendez Dr. Menendezs slogan is st Century medicine practiced the oldfashioned way. He believes in listening to his patients.

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24 The Pelican Friday, August 24, 2012 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeerfield Beach Embassy Suites Resort & Spa has a long history as the citys first luxury hotel. It was established on the beach in 1986, the second high-rise hotel and the first to offer upscale amenities. As it turns out, guests seem inclined to make their own history here, returning to be married, celebrate a birthday, or hold family reunions. Our guests get married here, come back for the baby shower and return for their anniversaries, said Dawn Lopes, director of sales and marketing. We have become a place for families to celebrate special occasions, to build their own memories. Its almost like being a part of the family. A full-service hotel, Embassy Suites continues to win the prestigious JD Power and Associates Award for guest satisfaction among upscale chains and proudly displays AAAs Four Diamond Status. In fact, in the beginning, it reinvented the upscale hotel experience by offering allsuite lodging in 244 spacious two-room, two bathroom accommodations. Rooms include wet bar, refrigerator, microwave and coffee maker. The complimentary cooked-to-order breakfast and evening managers reception are welcome amenities. The spectacular ocean view sets the guest experience, Lopes said. Right away the tropical atmosphere brightens the spirit and sets the mood. You Embassy Suites Resort & Spa, 950 S. Ocean Drive, Deer eld Beach 954-426-0478It is the Embassy Suites tradition to always exceed our guests expectations. Melissa Lane, GM, Embassy Suites Resort & Spa.Guests at Embassy Suite come here to build their own memories in South Florida are glad to be here. The amenities at Embassy Suites continue to improve. In 2007, the entire hotel including BTs Restaurant was remodeled and Spa950 was added. This September, after Labor Day, the pool deck is receiving a facelift. BTs has become a popular spot for locals as well as hotel guests with dining inside and out on the beautiful patio with a menu that offers continental cuisine and daily specials. Spa950, the full service spa offers monthly specials, a wide range of facials, massages and body treatments. The salon offers, hair, makeup, manicure/pedicure and waxing services. During the week the hotel is a destination for business travelers attracted by the 10,000-square feet of meeting space and the package deals that are offered. There are also packages for weekend getaways that include rejuvenating spa treatments. The Embassy Suites is managed by Hilton Hotels, one of the countrys largest hotel chains. Our company continues to provide upscale services while keeping up with technology and changing with the times Lopes said. Our frequent traveler program is considered the best in the Industry. Our Hilton Honor members get some wonderful privileges and those critical air miles. With a ballroom that seats up to 300 guests, the Embassy Suites is a popular choice for local charity events, weddings as well as for business meetings. The unique, enclosed patio is a lush, tropical retreat for receptions and special occasions. General Manager Melissa Lane has been here since 2010 and has had time to settle into the community and meet many of her guests. We have a unique product and exceptional service with very loyal customers who hold us to a higher standard. It is the Embassy suites tradition to always exceed our guests expectations. We enjoy making a difference in the lives of our team members, our guests and our communities, Lane said.Views from Embassy Suites in Deer eld Beach create memories that only the combination of an ocean, superb service and luxurious sourroundings can offer. Even the outdoor experience with ocean breezes is a setting of luxury..

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The Pelican 25 Friday, August 24, 2012 Lighthouse Point In her heyday, during which she opened a chain of cosmetic studios, Merle Norman was considered the epitome of old Hollywood glamour. The ambitious young Merle Norman began sharing skin care secrets in Santa Monica, CA in the early 1920s when she converted a formula for diaper rash into a face cream. In 1931, she opened her first studio. Her sales technique was based on the concept that if women would try her products, they would buy them. She also invented before and after makeovers, a sales tool that remains in high demand. Norman enlisted her nephew, J.B.Nethercutt, to help her develop and manufacture her products and for other women, decades before working was the norm, an opportunity to achieve business success by owning their own Merle Norman locations. Norman died in 1972 and Nethercutt in 2004, but the company is still familyrun. Jason Smith, owner of the Lighthouse Point Merle Norman Studio, says, Merle Norman continues its heritage of helping women everywhere look their absolute best. Smith purchased the local franchise nine months ago believing in the companys concepts and proud of the fact that all its products are made in America. We want to keep it clean and simple and geared to our market which here in Lighthouse Point is a very loyal one. They like to support local businesses. The spa offers all the usual services, manicures, pedicures, facials, massages, waxing in a serene, friendly atmosphere. Smith is very much dedicated to making his customers feel at home. We offer a comfortable, local spa, Smith said. We know our customers by name and have a history of their purchases. Cosmetics and skin care products are always shipped free anywhere in the USA. Because Smith keeps purchases on record, customers can re-order from anywhere and many do from their summer homes in the north. Even those who live locally take advantage of the free shipping rather than come to the salon, he said. A Merle Norman tradition he encourages is for his clients to play with the make-up and not feel obligated to buy. Since the first studio opened in 1931, this company has marked many milestones. In 1936, it opened its first studio abroad in Bangkok. 1944 marked the first milliondollar year. The New York headquarters were opened in 1948. In the 50s, the first national advertising campaign was launched. The company began franchising in 1964 and won numerous awards from Entrepreneur Magazine Today, there are 200 Merle Norman locations around the country, but only two others in South Florida; one in Boynton Beach, the other in Miami Beach.Merle Norman Day Spa, Shoppes of Beacon Light, 1809 NE 24 Street, Lighthouse Point, 954-946-8200The elegant Merle Norman photographed in the 1930s. Merle Norman continues its heritage of helping women look their absolute best. Jason Smith.A ne line of cosmetics and personal service are Merle Norman signatures in Lighthouse Point Jason Smith, owner of the Lighthouse Point Merle Norman Studio, says, Merle Norman continues its heritage of helping women everywhere look their absolute best.

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26 The Pelican Friday, August 24, 2012

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The Pelican 27 Friday, August 24, 2012 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach Mayor Lamar Fisher follows in his familys footsteps not only professionally, but in his love of public service. Mayor here since 2007, Fishers great grandfather Clint Lyons signed the paperwork that made Pompano Beach a city in 1908. His grandfather, Louis Fisher Sr., was mayor in 1943 and his father, Louis, received an honorary doctorate for his humanitarian service to this city. Lamar Fishers forebearers, at one time, were the largest bean and pepper growers in the country, farming on land that is now the City of Coral Springs. When that generation died, the heirs Fisher Auction Company, 351 S. Cypr ess Road, Suite 210, Pompano Beach 954-942-0917 Mayor Lamar Fisher, in front of the banner marking Pompano Beachs centennial year.I never thought I would be in politics. It is an honor to serve a city that my family has been a part of since its inception. Lamar Fisher, Mayor of Pompano BeachFisher Auction has roots in the community that go back to the founding fathers of Pompano Beachhad to sell the land to pay the taxes and one of Broward Countys most famous land auctions occurred with Johnny Carson as the emcee. Fishers grandfather, Louis Sr., handled the sale giving him a taste of something other than traditional real estate. Says the mayor, People lined up behind a rope and when Johnny shouted, Go! they ran to the lot they wanted to buy. By no means was it a modern-day auction, but it set the roots for what the business became. In 1972, Louis Jr. founded Fisher Auction Company where Fisher has worked for 32 years, making the family firm one of the most successful of its kind in the United States. Fisher was elected to the Pompano Beach City Commission in 2002 after serving as district governor of Kiwanis International. His travels for Kiwanis were one of the best experiences of my life, and one that gave him a glimpse into politics. Now serving as mayor for the City of Pompano Beach since 2007, Fisher says, I never thought I would be in politics. It is an honor to serve a city that my family has been a part of since its inception. Especially gratifying is the opportunity to help people, Fisher said. I will do everything I can to solve someones problem. Everything else is secondary. I always advise people You are the commissions eyes and ears. We have to hear from you. Since politics takes much of the mayors time, Fisher Auction Company operates with a well trained staff that has been with the firm for years. Most of the companys auctions are real estate based: commercial, industrial and hospitality properties, multifamily and luxury residences. Owners of these properties often choose to sell at auction rather than normal real estate channels, Fisher said, and often with better success. Recently, he sold two oceanfront homes for $6 million apiece in 60 days. Most of the worlds valuables are sold at auction, he noted. One exception to the usual real estate sales was the highprofile sale of the law office collectibles and furniture of financier Scott Rothstein, the Fort Lauderdale lawyer now serving a federal prison term for fraud. And Fisher has also auctioned such items as President John F. Kennedys briefcase and John F. Kennedy Jr.s airplane. Moving into this new age of buying and selling, Fisher Auction Company in 2006 set an Internet sales record when it liquidated 2,100 properties in Sarasota via the Internet. Estimated value at $43 million, the sale brought in $65 million, the largest gross for a single event conducted on the Internet. In order to keep up with the changing environment in communication, Fisher has recruited people who are savvy in social media to his company. I grew up in the business and have a passion for it, he says. When I get up on stage, I am still excited and I have butterflies. But he sees that as a good thing, evidence that he hasnt gone stale. You dont know from day to day what youre going to be selling. I love the challenge. I love visiting the client, signing the contract and selling at auction, he said. This native-born son and his wife Suzan have two children, a daughter, Trisha, in law school at Nova Southeastern University and a son, Paul, soon graduating from Westminster Academy. Lamar Fishers forebearers, at one time, were the largest bean and pepper growers in the country, farming on land that is now the City of Coral Springs. When that generation died, the heirs had to sell the land to pay the taxes and one of Broward Countys most famous land auctions occurred with Johnny Carson as emcee.

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28 The Pelican Friday, August 24, 2012 Long before JM Family Enterprises was recognized as a leader in the automotive business, Jim Moran had already made a significant impact in the industry and in the South Florida community. With a career spanning more than six decades, Jim Moran was truly an automotive pioneer. Before his passing in 2007, he was recognized with the 1996 Horatio Alger Association of Distinguished Americans Award and received the single greatest honor in the international motor vehicle industry in 2005 when he was inducted into the Automotive Hall of Fame. Jim Morans automotive career started with humble beginnings in 1939. After saving every penny he could, he put together $360 to purchase a Sinclair gas station that soon became the largest volume outlet in Chicago. After serving in World War II, he returned to Chicago and sold his first car a 1936 Ford Coupe he reconditioned himself off the apron of the Sinclair station for $275. A whole new world opened up for him that day. Thanks to hard work and his desire to succeed, he established himself as Chicagos Jim Moran the Courtesy Man, becoming the No. 1 Hudson dealer in the country and later the No. 1 Ford dealer in the world. He was also the first auto dealer in the United States to advertise on television and the only one ever to appear on the cover of TIME magazine. Jim Moran started JM Family with just 11 associates in offices on the fourth floor of a bank building in Pompano Beach. Today, the privately held company led by President and CEO Colin Brown continues to be a leader in the automotive industry guided by the philosophies of its founder. JM Family moved to its current headquarters in Deerfield Beach in 1981, and now has approximately 3,800 associates throughout the United States, Canada and South America. It is currently ranked No. 27 on Forbes list of Americas Largest Private Companies and No. 17 on FORTUNE magazines Best Companies to Work For. In tribute to Jim Morans inspiring legacy, each year JM Family recognizes his birthday on Aug. 8 as Founders Day. Since his passing in 2007, this celebration has provided associates with an opportunity to remember the Boss, and share fond memories of him and the important lessons he left behind. As part of Founders Day, all business locations enjoy a special lunch menu of Jim Morans favorite meals, including his dessert-ofchoice, chocolate cake. Associates are also encouraged to visit The Jim Moran Foundation on its Deerfield Beach campus or its website, www. jimmoranfoundation.org to explore photos and stories of his life and career .Giving back was a cornerstone of Jim Morans personal and business philosophy, and he wanted to provide for a continuation of his generosity to the community beyond his lifetime. In 2000, he began The Jim Moran Foundation with the mission to improve the quality of life for the youth and families in Florida through the support of innovative programs and opportunities that meet the ever-changing needs of the community. In addition to the companywide celebration to honor his memory, The Foundation established its tradition of Founders Day grants in 2009. This year, in honor of what would have been Jim Morans 94th birthday, The Foundation awarded $94,000 each to both the Broward County and Northeast Florida chapters of Big Brothers Big Sisters for their Bigs in Schools programs. JM Family also keeps Jim Morans remarkable legacy of giving back alive by sharing time, talents and resources in the community to cultivate something significant and lasting. The culture he instilled is evident in how its associates conduct business and by their actions in the community. The company doesnt just say they are a family, they live it. Guided by the Philosophies of its Founder Jim Moran, JM Family Enterprises Continues to be a Leader in the Automotive IndustryJM Family Enterprises, 100 Jim Moran Blvd, Deer eld Beach 954-429-2000 JM Family Enterprises corporate headquarters, located in Deer eld Beach

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The Pelican 29 Friday, August 24, 2012 FastBoats Marine Group believes in a decentralized management. Our departments function as individually-owned small businesses. Managers are entrepreneurial in character and know that their success depends on anticipating customers needs and delivering highquality products and services. Stepping into the world of yachting is as close as FastBoats Marine Group, 1490 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. Here in the showroom is an overwhelming array of luxury vessels where racers, cruisers and anglers will think they are at the end of the rainbow. And for Randy Sweers, who owns this business with his wife, Kim, FastBoats is a rainbow that continues to expand. Randys MBA from the University of Toronto, led him to a banking position in South Florida, but he was, as the clich goes, a fish out of water. Boating and racing were his adored hobbies, so it wasnt surprising when he resigned to seek employment in the marine industry. With his educational background, Randy fielded lots of offers, but he didnt jump for the first job. He remembers a smokedfilled room for sales executives at one place and said, I didnt spend six years in college for that. As he drove back from that offer, his eye caught a sight that changed his life. I saw a new marina with Cigarettes and Scarabs, he said. I pulled in and went to the front desk to ask about a job. Thats when I met Richie Powers, owner of Champion Marine at that time. Now it was clear that those college years and his experience on the water were about to join forces for Randy. In Canada, I had already gained experience importing boats and setting up dealerships. I was hired on the spot. After three years in sales, Randy moved on in 1994, when he opened Florida Powerboat Brokerage in Fort Lauderdale, now known as Fast Boats Marine Group. Randy was ahead of the curve in the mid-90s with the Internet. While others were lagging behind about this new technology, Randys keyboards were smoking. We used the Internet to send pictures of boats to clients, he said. Meanwhile, his competition was stuck on snail mail and in showrooms. By 2009, Randy had two warehouses and a 24,000 square-foot showroom on Copans Road and North Dixie Highway in Pompano Beach. And he was not alone. He and Kim had married in 2002, and Kims business skills made this family, which now includes their son, Chase, a powerhouse partnership. Says Kim, But its Chase that keeps us grounded. She refers to the routine of school, sports and lots of family time. We just have to work smart, she adds. I am responsible for the daily operations of FastBoats Marine Group (Pompano and Aventura locations) including financial management, operational policies and procedures, marketing, human resources, and IT. In addition, I assist Randy in the management of the Parts, Service and Sales departments. Randy and Kim made it through the 2008 economic nightmare, and shortly after formed a strategic partnership with Aqua Marine Partners, the parent company of Hidden Harbour marina storage in Pompano Beach as well as six other marinas in the Southeastern United States. The fit was perfect. Randy was finally on the water; he could offer his clients excellent dry and wet storage, and he had an exclusive agreement for service work at Hidden Harbour. By now his team of technicians, headed up by his first marine boss, Richie Powers, had grown to seven. They currently have 19 employees they prefer to call team members. Aqua Marine Partners runs the day-to-day operations at the marina, and the clients take advantage of FastBoats for their service needs. FastBoats has recently opened a new location at Hi-Lift Marina in Aventura where they have expanded their service and parts department and can now offer clients a second location for wet and dry storage. Community The Sweers have committed to give back to the community that has contributed to their success. They strongly believe that the chains of poverty can be broken through educational and support services for underprivileged families. They sit on various community boards and support organizations such as the Jason Taylor Foundation, Take Stock in Children, Youth Automotive Training Center, and Jack and Jill Childrens Center. They have aligned their personal mission of educating the underprivileged with these charities in hopes of making a difference in South Florida. Kim and Randys belief is that youre never complete until you change the life of one less fortunate. They encourage others to donate their time to make a difference and leave their lasting legacy.Husband-wife power team takes on luxury yachts, shing and power boats with a team of expert technicians that keep them all shipshape Kim and Randy Sweers, surrounded by luxury vessels, both new and used, in their showroom in Pompano Beach, can offer boaters in all categories the right boat for the right reason. Fast Boats Marine 1490 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. 954-581-8355 fastboats.com

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30 The Pelican Friday, August 24, 2012 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFWhen Ari Shahar came to South Florida in 1987 he recognized the need for a company that addressed tile problems and issues. An engineer by training, Ari experimented and developed a process to repair and rebond loose and hollow tiles permanently. The business was an immediate success. Homeowners, builders, Realtors, insurance companies and prospective buyers found Aris process an excellent remedy for loose and buckling tile. As the business developed, Ari and his wife, Daphna, expanded to include all services related to tile, marble and stone. They are also able to repair and rebuild showers, replacing the wallboard and using the same tile which saves the homeowner thousands in costly redos. From day one, Daphna put every customer into a database and today has 40,000 names and addresses. She also believes that no job is too small and says, Sometimes things just need perking up. Those perk ups are what the technicians at Universal Tile Restoration do so well, from repairing tiles, to regrouting, to finding out-ofstock replacement tiles under a stove or washing machine. When tiles buckle due to flooding, extreme heat, or because they were never bonded properly, the efficient way to repair them is by injecting the bonding agent and resetting the tile. This is a permanent repair. The holes are then patched with the same color grout. If the grout is dirty, the technicians clean all the tiles, stain the grout back to its original color and seal the surface. Of course, grout color can now be changed to one of the new designer shades giving the floor a whole new style. The mainstay of our business is the repair issues people have that they cannot get anyone to address. They are then faced with replacing the floor, Daphna said. Someone putting their home on the market today can call Universal Tile Restoration and very quickly have floors that are repaired and restored and showers that are cleaned and re-grouted, turning a poor selling prospect into Universal Tile Restoration, Inc. 1239 E. Newport Center Circle Ste. 114, Deerfield Beach 954-427-7725Innovative tile restoration process was the beginning of a successful family-owned businessLauren, Ari and Daphna at their of ces in Newport Center. The Shahars shitsu, Abu, poses with two highly effective products for cleaning and restoring tile and marble. Abu regularly tends the front door at his owners customer-friendly of ce. We find solutions and we are very creative using existing materials. I like to think we are problem-solvers. Daphna Shahara winning one, she said. We find solutions and are very creative using existing materials. I like to think we are problem-solvers. Universal Tile Restoration serves customers from Key West to Stuart and works with all types of tile and stone. If no job is too small, then no job is too big. Among their corporate clients are the JM Lexus showroom and Office Depots headquarters. A large part of Universal Tile Restoration includes polishing marble, honing, sealing and cleaning all makes of stones, limestone, travertine and saturnia. Our customers continue to call on us to solve their problems. We build relationships, and our business is based on loyalty as well as professionalism, Daphna said. Our office is open Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and we welcome customers in who want to talk about their tile problems. The Shahars live in Boca Raton where they raised their two daughters. One of them, Lauren Levy, an MBA, handles the business side of Universal Tile Restoration along with raising the Shahars two little grandsons. Ari, Daphna and Loren relocated to the Newport Center six years ago. They are licensed and bonded contractors and every one of their 12 employees is full time. Were a rather big company for a small familyrun operation, Daphna said. Mexican tile is a specialty at Universal Tile.

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The Pelican 31 Friday, August 24, 2012 Lighthouse Point Is there any brisket left? The guy coming through the door at Red Fox Diner is worried that he might be too late for Thursdays delicious lunch special. But, living up to its reputation as a truly guest oriented eatery, the kitchen had thought to save a portion or two for those regulars who might be running late. Patty and Lou Petrone, Lighthouse Point residents, have owned Red Fox Diner for six years, but the Red Fox has made its den in Lighthouse Points Venetian Isles Plaza for almost 45 years. Photos of the original can be seen decorating the walls along with other scenes of local interest. There have been some name changes along the way, but the current one came from Lien and Bob Lehners when they took the place more than 20 years ago. Lien had been a student at the Le Cordon Bleu in Paris and while other students wore blue scarves, she wore a red one. She was dubbed the Red Fox and the rest is history. Bob designed the logo, perching a chef toque atop the smiling fox. The Petrones take pride in having made Red Fox an inviting and community oriented dining spot. Open from 6 a.m. until 3 p.m. Monday through Sunday ( only breakfast on Sunday) many of their guests eat both breakfast and lunch there or opt to have food delivered to their homes or offices [delivery Monday Friday 7:30 am -2 pm]. The floor staff, headed by manager Diane Evers, formerly head bartender at Lighthouse Point Yacht Club, has first time guests quickly feeling at home. Making the most of a small kitchen, the staff turns out an amazing variety of foods. The aforementioned brisket is only one of the daily lunch specials. Twenty eight sandwiches are on the menu and thats not counting salads, quesadillas, plated dishes like fresh roasted turkey or country fried steak, or the burger and hot dog section. Starting early in the morning the kitchen staff puts out an array of Red Fox Diner Venetian Isles Plaza, 3640 N. Federal Hwy., Lighthouse Point 954-783-7714We can be depended upon to participate in almost any fundraising event that will help our town. Patty PetroneFortyve years of being the meet and greet place in Lighthouse Point comes from great food, service and the Petrones omelettes, French toast creations, mouth-watering Belgian waffles and breakfast wraps. Hungry patrons come in for freshmade egg, tuna and chicken salads as well as fresh soups. Patty mentions that many a cold has been nursed to health by Red Fox chicken soup; and regular client Roxanne Rowen who has lunch at the diner at least three times a week, gives Sergey five stars for all his soups. Her favorite is his hot red beet borscht. He doesnt make it too often, but when he does I always order it she says with a smile, and I take some home for later. Theres not much seasonal change at the Red Fox. Always open seven days a week, the diner closes an hour earlier in summer at 2 p.m. but stays busy throughout the day. For patrons with pets, there are tables outside where pooches get water bowls and doggie treats. Patty and Lou do more than serve up tasty dishes. We are so happy to sponsor local sport teams and we can be depended upon to participate in almost any fundraising event to help our town, says Patty. They have been part of The Taste of Lighthouse Point for five years, donated food for American Cancer Society Relay for Life and recently filled five boatloads of food baskets for a fishing excursion put on for Wounded Warriors. The food, the attachment to their city and the welcoming atmosphere has made Red Fox Diner a gathering place for so many folks in the area. Thursday breakfast usually attracts local politicians. At other times a client might run into his or her physician or attorney, or a next door neighbor. Theres a family table feel to the place, a table where theres [Above] Thursdays lunch special, brisket and rice, keeps this day busy at Red Fox in Lighthouse Point. [Below] Wraps are prepared fresh and delicious. Patty and Lou Petrone have been feeding the commuity with food, love and contributions for years.always room for another seat.

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32 The Pelican Friday, August 24, 2012 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFEvery childs back-toschool supply checklist should include a visit to a chiropractor. The visits should start much earlier, in infancy, to help a child express more life, according to Dr. Paula Hedglon of Hedglon Chiropractic Center in Pompano Beach. Just as parents schedule regular visits to the dentist, visits to the chiropractor should be booked before youngsters return to school. The visits are important to make sure the spine is clear so the body can function at 100 percent, she says. Kids need these visits more than ever with so much stress on families today, Dr. Hedglon said. We live in a fast-paced world with more stress chemically, mentally and physically. Teens face a lot of emotional stress. The brain sends impulses through the spinal cord and then to the organs. When one or more of the bones of the spine move out of position, they create pressure on, or irritate spinal nerves. Chiropractors call Dr. Paulas touch begins the healing at Hedglon Chiropractic Centerthis a vertebral subluxation. Subluxation occurs in three ways: Physically, chemically and emotionally/ mentally, Dr. Hedglon says. It could happen in sports or when a child falls off a bike. The child may not feel it right away, but the effects could show up later. The body has the ability to heal itself with no interference, Dr. Hedglon says. Chiropractors correct vertebral subluxations by delivering a safe, effective and specific force known as a chiropractic adjustment. A chiropractor can detect subluxations you may not yet feel. She sees patients ranging from infants to 102, including a number of families who come together and have had their children adjusted since birth. And she says she sees miracles every day. Theyre not mine. Theyre miracles of the bodys ability to heal itself. She recalled checking an infant after a difficult delivery. The baby had no feeling on the side of his face. Dr. Hedglon used her pinkies to apply light pressure, and after five days the baby could open his eye and improvement could be seen on the whole side of his face. When babies are colicky, have frequent ear infections or disruptions to sleeping patterns, it could be due to a subluxation, which can alter or prevent the normal flow of impulses from the brain to the rest of the body. Many things can be eliminated if you seek chiropractic care before medicating, Dr. Hedglon said. Chiropractic adjustments dont cure anything. They allow the body to function 100 percent, she said. The body heals itself. Or, as a sign over her reception desk reads, I move the bone; God does the healing. She cautions that its not a quick fix. Sometimes it takes time for a long-term condition. And sometimes we see miracles overnight. With children, after chiropractic care, everything is more in tune. They can think clearly. She has seen children stop wetting the bed after care and adults get off drugs. Children with autism have been helped with focusing. One boy who didnt talk or walk started walking after Chiropractic adjustments dont cure anything. They allow the body to function 100 percent. The body heals itself. Dr. Hedglonadjustment. Dr. Hedglon has seen children with ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder) helped through chiropractic care. I noticed they function better at school and even their grades improved. Dr. Hedglon is observing her 24th anniversary in practice. She has been at her office at 1313 E. Sample Road in Pompano Beach since 1993. Previously, she taught at St. Elizabeth of Hungary Catholic School. She has a bachelors degree in education from Florida State University and a Doctor of Chiropractic degree from Life Chiropractic College, Marietta, Ga. Dr. Hedglon is married to Michael, who owns Hedgehog Studios, an advertising agency in Pompano Beach. They have one daughter, Catherine, a student at the University of Miami Law School. Chiropractic is not what I do. It is my life, she says. My mission is to reach people so they can understand the potential of their body. With adjustments, the body can heal faster and disease can be prevented. Photos of many of her patients line the office walls. Dr. Hedglon clearly loves what she does. I love coming here every day. Its my mission in life, she says. She and her office staff start each day with prayer and meditation and thank God for the gift of life. Hedglon Chiropractic Center, 1313 E. Sample Road, Pompano Beach 954-946-1799 The Purinton family enjoys a visit with Dr. Paula. [Photo courtesy of Hedglon Chiropractic Center]

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The Pelican 33 Friday, August 24, 2012 Sentimental over ice cream, the new & improved Dairy Queen has become a neighborhood landmark, again!Pompano Beach Dairy Queen owner Sal Biviano is in the business of creating a smile and a memory. Customers regularly approach him with stories of my Dairy Queen in wherever their hometowns may have been. Everyone has a story, Sal said. Dairy Queens are the image of small town America. His own memory is of walking with his family for ice cream when the DQ was located in the Beacon Light Shopping Center. Biviano was 12 then. A few years later, in 1976, his dad Onofrio purchased the store and operated it until five years ago when Sal, 51, took over. Trained as a CPA and with years of corporate experience at JM Family, Sal was ready to re-enter the family business. In the summer of 2008, the familiar red-roofed Diary Queen in the Shoppes at Beacon Light was shuttered and Sal moved up Federal Highway to a former Texaco station at NE 29 Street. The move was beneficial in lots of ways. The store is more visible from the highway, it is easier to drive in and out, there is room for a drive thru which has created a phenomenal amount of new business, and there is a covered patio where customers can relax with a sweet treat, a chili dog or a BBQ sandwich. Located on the west side of the highway, it is within walking distance for many families. The patio area which seats about 30 is the one thing Sal was adamant about when he changed locations. It has become a popular place for birthday parties. People bring balloons, a few decorations, order a cake, and voila, instant celebration. I could have had more parking or I could have had a bigger store, but I was definite about the patio. I love to see people having fun. It allows them to sit and have some good family time. Thats very important to me, Sal said. He operates the 1,200square foot store with a staff of about 20 young people giving kids the same opportunity he had at his dads DQ. Im very connected with the kids, Sal said. Sometimes I am their only father figure. He takes this interest in kids out into the community where he is assistant scoutmaster I donate a lot of product as it is important to me to support the charities in the community. Sal Bivianofor Troop 119 and cubmaster to the Pack. Formerly, he coached little league baseball. He is also an active supporter of local organizations and offers up hundreds of DQ coupons for fundraisers. I donate a lot of product, as its important to me to support the charities in the community, Sal said. Business at the Dairy Queen begins to boom right after school when cars pull up with kids eager for a snack. The later it gets, the busier it is, Sal said. The menu at Sals is traditional: nine different sundaes, 27 flavors of blizzards, 11 shakes and malts, soft cones, cakes, waffle bowls, banana splits, Oreo brownie earthquakes, peanut buster parfaits, moolatte coffee and the newest creation, frozen hot chocolate. This fall, Dairy Queen is adding another familiar name to its menu, Orange Julius, and will roll out an assortment of fruit smoothies. Its a great new product line with a dozen new flavors. It will add a lot to our drink options, Sal said. Sals dad died the same month the new store opened but he is still remembered. This has my father written all over it, Sal said, noting his clean, bright establishment. Owned by corporate giant Berkshire Hathaway, Dairy Queen has been part of the American landscape for 67 years. On this particular landscape, it is probably the oldest family-run, retail business in the neighborhood, a place Sal Biviano hopes will leave his young customers with their own pleasant memories.Dairy Queen, 2901 N. Federal Highway, Pompano Beach 954-943-8390 Sal Biviano [far right] and some of his staff, Andy Jules, Teri Chiarello, Troy Fralick and Beth Smith.

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34 The Pelican Friday, August 24, 2012 Pompano Beach In this economic climate, consumers are focused on where theyre spending money. Businesses that survive deliver a great product for a fair price, said Jay Ghanem, owner of Auto Tech and Body at 429 N. Dixie Highway. He focuses on doing just that while also emphasizing customer and community service. Ghanem finds ways to keep overhead low so he can run his business more efficiently and maintain fair prices. For example, he negotiates bulk prices on tires, ordering 500-800 at a time in order to keep costs down and remain competitive. Another cost saver: He flies instructors here for training sessions rather than paying for technicians to travel to other cities. He hosts technicians from other repair shops at the Auto Tech in-house community center. As a result, his employees are trained at a low cost and receive ongoing training in all the latest technology. Their recent lessons have included learning to troubleshoot electrical problems on electric cars so they know what to expect. This firm was ahead of its time in the alternative energy field. Ghanem recently unveiled an electric car that was built over a four-year period in the shop. While it isnt feasible to build more cars here, they can provide components for electric cars. Ghanem predicts that in a decade many people will be driving electric cars. They will want something built in this country instead of their fuel money going to other countries. The Society of Automotive Engineers recognized Auto Tech and Body for building the car. And this company has been named one of the top 10 family-owned auto businesses in the U.S. The company offers fuel conversion, converting dieselfueled vehicles to run on waste vegetable oil. The number of requests spike when fuel prices go up, Ghanem said. The vegetable oil is 85 percent cleaner than fossil fuel, he says. Auto Tech and Body has 16 employees. They offer auto repair, maintenance for tires, brakes, air-conditioners and suspension. They provide complete collision repairs and repairs for all insurance companies from the U.S. and Auto Tech and Body, 429 N. Dixie Highway, Pompano Beach 954-946-9730Creativity and expertise have lifted Auto Tech and Body over the top for customer service, excellent pricing and a commitment to its communityCanada. The firm also has an inventory of pre-owned cars of all makes and models. Ghanem founded Auto Tech and Body in 1997 with three employees. After obtaining a degree in engineering from Florida Atlantic University, he worked for a national dealership training technicians and service advisers. Then he started his own business. Its so important to have a mechanic you trust, he says. Its important to have a relationship with a repair shop. Before doing business with a new repair shop, he suggests interviewing the personnel to get an idea of their knowledge, expertise and honesty. Ghanem said his employees get decent salaries that are not commission based. He says he has the most incredible, committed staff. As a result, they have many repeat customers. Ghanem lives in Lighthouse Point with his wife Mei and their two young children. They are one of the biggest driving forces for me to do my best at work and in my community, he says. Mei is a bookkeeper at Auto Tech, a great support and an amazing mom, Jay said. His sister Chadia Meroueh is company vice president. Theirs is like a magical relationship, he said. Each one has accountabilities, and each one does his or her part. Chadia trains staff to deliver exceptional customer service. You dont have to be a 5Star hotel to deliver 5-Star customer service, Ghanem says. Jay and Chadia devote much of their time to community organizations. Serving others is where we get our rewards, he says. Until recently he was president of the Rotary Club in Pompano Beach. He is now assistant governor for North Broward Rotary clubs. He is also vice chair of the Northwest Advisory Board for the Pompano Beach Community Redevelopment Agency, an advisory board member for the Broward College Automotive Program, Atlantic Technical Center and the Pompano Beach Economic Development Council and a board member of Dynamos, a club for physically and mentally challenged adults. Chadia is vice president of the Kiwanis Club and a board member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce. Both are members of the Boys and Girls Club board of directors. Many of the groups they are active in hold meetings at the company community center. The firm also holds car wash fundraisers for many different charities. Bulk buying keeps prices lower for customers and hosting seminars keeps mechanics on the cutting edge. Jay Ghanem Auto Tech and Body, 429 N. Dixie Highway, Pompano Beach

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The Pelican 35 Friday, August 24, 2012 Frank Tropepe knows exactly why customers choose an Ace Hardware store over the big box chains. We are more like a mom and pop convenience store. We cater to the area. We listen to the needs of our customers and do the research to find them the products they need. And there are always clerks on the floor to help them find what they need, he said. Tropepe is the owner of four Ace Hardware stores, the first one purchased in Margate on Margate Boulevard 17 years ago. The next one was Beach Hardware on the corner of Commercial Boulevard and A1A. Then came the store on Sample Road a few blocks west of U.S. 1. Last year he opened the Deerfield Beach store on South U.S. 1. With the exception of the Deerfield store, all the locations have been in business for more than 60 years, an achievement in the retail business. Deerfield Beach has gotten great reviews from the community. We have good visibility in a free-standing building and there is a good market there, Tropepe said. This summer the Ace store on Sample Road was totally remodeled and is now offering its longtime customers a fresh look. Ace Hardware has 5,500 stores around the country. It is a $5 billion company headquartered in Oak Brook, Ill., that started 90 years ago when three retailers in Brooklyn decided they could buy goods cheaper if they went in together. Belonging to a cooperative, Tropepe says, is different from being a franchise owner. While the franchise dictates exactly how the operation is to be run, a co-op provides the owners with guidelines but each operator has the freedom to make buying decisions. Each owner also has a share of the co-op and a percentage of the earnings. Customer service is what keeps people coming back to his stores, Tropepe says. If we dont have it in stock, well order it. Or well do the research and find it. With 30 years in the business, Tropepe knows how important it is to have knowledgeable help on the floor. Many of his retired At Ace Hardware customer service and products geared to the neighborhood contribute to its long historyAce Hardware, Margate, Lauderdale-By-The-Sea, Pompano Beach, Deer eld Beach 954-942-3961[Right] The Craftsman brand is now in all four of the Ace stores owned by Tropepe. [Center] Frank Tropepe holds his grandson Michael, 18 months, amid a display of Weber grills. [Below] Stihl landscape power tools can be repaired on site at Ace Hardware stores.employees have backgrounds in industry or are familiar with the trades plumbing, electrical, building. Whats it worth to the customer to have an experienced person to talk to? he asked. While products are changing all the time, the newest major effect on the hardware business is the green movement. It is affecting everything from light bulbs to faucets to paint. But knowing the ins and outs of each new product requires constant training Tropepe said. Ace carries many national brands as well as its own labels and competes pricewise with the big box We are more like a mom and pop convenience store. We cater to the area. We listen to the needs of our customers and do the research to find them the products they need. And there are always clerks on the floor to help them find what they need. Frank Tropepe stores because of its national buying power. A new service at the Deerfield Beach store is propane exchange getting a full tank in exchange for an empty one. In all the stores, car remotes can be reprogrammed, keys and key fobs made and locks rekeyed; knives and scissors can be sharpened and screens repaired. A favorite of Ace customers is the nuts and bolts aisle which contains a huge variety of fasteners including hard-to-find chrome and stainless steel. On the fun side is a large display of bird feeders and accessories. The Weber grills are ever popular and the Craftsman tools are notable for quality and design. With the stores huge range of products, one marketing device has proven very successful: Aces Helpful Hardware Club that gives rebates and rewards. A customers purchases are kept on record and a discount coupon sent that matches the purchases. Even nicer, a birthday is worth a $5 rebate card. It is definitely effective, Tropepe said. Signing up for Ace rewards is free, he added. Tropepe is a native of the area. He lives in Lauderdaleby-the-Sea with his wife. They have three children and four grandchildren.

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36 The Pelican Friday, August 24, 2012 Classi edsCall 954-545-0013 Mechanic Shop for RentPompano Beach Rent this mechanical shop attached to a busy Texaco Station. Rent is negotiable. 954-941-2600. Ask for George Great opportunity. Call George. 954-941-2600 HELP WANTEDAFRAID OF DOWNSIZING? Start building a business to supplement your income. Great earnings potential on a part-time basis with Primerica. Call 954729-0192. 9-7 OCA RATON SALON Wanted Hair Stylist Manicurist Pedicurist Facialist Massage. Salary Commission Or Rent! 1 MONTH FREE! 954-415-4937. 8-24 POMPANO BEACH MECHANIC/COUNTER PERSON NEEDED For WellKnown Texaco Fuel Station. References & Experience. Good People Person. Call George 954-941-2600. 8-24 SEEKING EMPLOYMENTGROCERY SHOPPING & DELIVERY From Publix To Individuals & Businesses. Serving Broward Since 2005. 954-200-0074. www. weshopanddeliver .com. 8-31 EUROPEAN LADY Is Looking For A Position As A CAREGIVER / COMPANION. Reliable. High Quality Care. 11 Yrs. Exp. Own Transportation. Fluent In English & Polish. References. 954-480-7786. 8-31 CAREGIVER / COMPANION Caucasian Woman With 25 Yrs Exp. To Assist & Care For Your Loved Ones. Days / Eves / Nights. Ref. Available. 954-482-5494. 8-24 HONEST MALE With References Seeking Position As A CAREGIVER! Call Chris 954-290-7344. 8-31 MALE CNA / HHA / COMPANION. Broward County Area. Former EMT. All Certi cations / Compassionate, References. Call Ron 954-2322832. Very Reasonable! 8-24 SERVICES DANNY BOY ELECTRIC Lic & Insured. Lic. #EC13004811. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. 24/Hr Service. 954-290-1443. Beat Any Written Estimate. Sr, Discount. 8-24 ASI SOUTHERN LAWN MAINTENANCE Provides Full Landscape. Architectural Landscape Design. Tree Trimming & Removal, Full Lawn Maintenance. One Time Clean Out. Andrew 954-6757396. 9-14 GOT JUNK? TRASH HAULING CONDO CLEANUPS Trees Landscape Yard Fill Pressure Wash Roofs Home Repairs Welding Etc. Dave 954-818-9538. 8-31 MIKE THE GARDNER The All American Yardman Yard And Garden Care Get The Best For Less!! Call 561-5436337 Cell. 9-14 HONEST HANDYMAN HOME & BUILDING Maintenance/Improvements. No Job Too Small. Fast Friendly Service. Reasonable Rates. Local Resident/Homeowner. Call Today For Your FREE Upfront Quote. No Deposit Required. 754-366-1915. 824 PRIVATE INSTRUCTIONSPIANO LESSONS. ADULTS & CHILDREN. YOUR HOME. 954-938-3194. 8-24 ROMANCEATTRACTIVE SLIM Brunette 45 Seeks Established Man 45 62 For Long Term Relationship. Leave Message. 954-278-1186. 8-24 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIESNew GREEN technology. New defroster control saves energy in home refrigerators, commercial chillers. Patented. All optical. Simple mfg. Strategic partners needed..www.NewAvionics.Com. 954-568-1991. C MUSICIANS WANTEDADVANCED STUDENT MUSICIANS Being Accepted For 2012 2013 Membership in the American Legion Symphonic Band! Earn Community Service Points While Improving Your Performance Skills! Rehearsals On Wednesday Evenings from 7pm to 9pm at American Legion Post 142, 171 SW 2nd St., Pompano Beach, FL 33060. Band Director Recommendation Encouraged. Email Music Director James McGonigal at info.legionband@ gmail.com for more information. C REAL ESTATE SERVICESSELLING OR BUYING Choose Someone You Can Trust 18 Years Experience. English, French, Spanish, Greek. Yvette Gaussen. YES WE CAN REALTY. 954-6147773 Or 954-773-8340. 8-31 MFG HOMESFT LAUD / POMPANO WATERFRONT 2 / 2 On Fishing Canal. Private & Peaceful. $49,900. Call John For Appt. 954-495-0557. 9-7ROOMS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH ROOM FURNISHED W/ADJOINING 1/2 Bath (Access To Full Bath / Laundry) In Private Home. Private Entrance. Walking Distance To Mall. $160 / Wk. 954-782-7322. 8-24 E. DEERFIELD BEACH E Of A1A 1st Floor Furnished. Large Fridg., Kitchen, Micro, Laundry, Own Bath, TV, A / C. $170 Week. 954-725-9680. 8-24 CEMETERY PLOTS2 PREMIUM LOTS SIDE BY SIDE. Forest Lawn Cemetery For Sale. $1,500 OBO Call 561-6039383. C. REAL ESTATE WANTEDI BUY HOUSES!! CASH!! AS IS! QUICK CLOSE! ANY AREA ANY CONDITION! NO EQUITY OK. CALL NOW 954-914-2355. 10-19 CONDOS FOR SALEPOMPANO BEACH DIRECT OCEAN VIEW!! Pet Friendly! 2/2 AT THE BREAKERS! $265K. Also For Rent. Call Juliana At Barclays For Details. 1-305-766-4420. 8-17 POMPANO BEACH DIRECT INTRACOASTAL! Feels Like Youre On A Boat. Pool On Intracoastal. Wrap-A-Round Balcony. Spacious 1 / 1.5 $178K. Also For Rent $1350 Month. 954-588-0562.

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The Pelican 37 Friday, August 24, 2012 Classi edsCall 954-545-0013 In Pompano BeachPompano Library, 1213 E. Atlantic Blvd. Auto Tech, 429 N. Dixie Hwy. Sample Road Auto Spa, 2501 W. Sample Road NuTurf, 2801 N. Dixie Hwy. Chit Chat Lounge, 651 N. Federal Hwy. Sunnys Produce, 677 N. Federal Hwy. Golden Corral, 2100 W. Atlantic Blvd. Brandys Shoes, 1290 N. Federal Hwy. POMPANO BEACH THE CLARIDGE Large Updated 2 / 2 Corner Penthouse Ocean Intracoastal & City Views! Washer / Dryer In Unit. Impact Glass. $498,500. Ruthie Brooks Balistreri Realty. 954-8034174. 8-24 CONDOS FOR RENTFT LAUDERDALE ICW Gated Community. 1/1.5, Furnished / Unfurnished. Granite, Wood Floors, Lots Of Amenities. Great Location. No Pets. $950 Month. Call 954588-1644. 9-14 POMPANO BEACH 55+ Community. Renovated 2/1 Pool!! With Sunroom Ground Floor / On Golf Course. Beautifully Furn. 1 Year +. Good Credit. $700 Month. 954-531-7708. 8-31 LIGHTHOUSE POINT 2 / 2 1st Floor 55+. Pool, Storage, Laundry Facilities. $900 Month / Water Included. Dorothy Bassano Better Homes & Gardens Real Estate. 954-562-4919. 8-31 POMPANO INTRACOASTAL AT ITS BEST. Breathtaking Views! Feels Like Youre On A Boat, Pool Deck On Intracoastal. Spacious 1 / 1.5 $1350 Month. A1A S.E. Corner Unobstructed Views. 2/2 $1,500 Month. 954-588-0562. 9-14 APTS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH 1 BR & 2 BR APTS FOR RENT. Remodeled, Paint, Tile, Etc. Washer / Dryer On Site. Pool. Pet Friendly. George 954-8095030. 8-24 POMPANO BEACH 1/1 Apartment. $700 Month Yearly Lease. Pool, Off Federal Hwy. Pet OK! Call Anthony 954-8575207. 9-7 POMPANO BEACH 1/1 $650 2/1 $750 NW NE 2/1 $950 2/1,5 Townhouse $1095 SW 1/1 $750 2/1 $925 2/2 $950 3/2 $1025 ALL FREE WATER. Rent + $70 App MovU-In. 954-781-6299. 8-31 POMPANO 2/1 $775 Month Yearly Lease. Pool, Laundry Room, Close To Shopping. Pet OK! 1960 NE 48 Street. Call Anthony 954-857-5207. 9-7 DOWNTOWN LAUD BY THE SEA Clean Apartments. Near Beach, Shopping, Restaurants. On Site Courtyard, Parking, Laundry. Wayne 954-868-5560. 8-24 POMPANO ATLANTIC / INTRACOASTAL AREA South Of Publix. Ef ciency Furnished Private Entrance. Utilities Included. Non-Smoker. Long Term. $700 Month. 954415-8838. 8-24 POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 Bedroom From $500. Easy Movein. 1/2 OFF DEPOSIT. Remodeled. Great Location. 954-783-1088 For More Info. 9-14 COMMERCIAL FOR RENT-SALEPOMPANO COMMERCIAL OFFICE Spaces Available. Ranging From As Low As $500 To $700 Depending On Square Footage. Please Call Darci At 954-7833723. 9-7 DEERFIELD BEACH Retail Of ce Warehouse 700 Sq Ft With Loft. A/C, Bathroom. $575 Per Month. Call For More Info 561-654-1331 Or 561-9985681. 8-24 CORAL SPRINGS 1800 SQ FT. Easy Access To Sawgrass, Ample Parking, Monument Sign. FREE RENT & Buildout. Call 954-328-0413. 9-14Call The Pelican at 954-783-8700! Pelican Classi eds mean business 954-783-8700!

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38 The Pelican Friday, August 24, 2012 Lighthouse PointPhil Smith has had a history in South Florida for over 35 years. A resident of Coral Ridge, Smith began his auto sales empire with a Toyota dealership in Homestead. Today he has 18 dealerships in three states which constitute the 55th largest automotive group in the U.S. Four of those dealerships handle the Kia brand which is considered the fastestgrowing motor company in the U.S. Kia was the fastest foreign manufacturer to sell three million units in the U.S. market, said Wes Lasher, general manager of Lighthouse Point Phil Smith Kia. That means the Korean auto manufacturer outsold Toyota, Honda and Nissan. The brand is on fire, Lasher said. Lighthouse Point is the headquarters for all of Phil Smiths dealerships. Phil Smith Kia opened here in 2002 and has since established an unmatched reputation for customer service. For six consecutive quarters it has won Kias Customer Service Satisfaction Award and is recognized by Kia as the only dealership in the country to do so. We treat people the way we would want to be treated, Lasher said. Buying a car is supposed to be a great experience, a reward. So we try to live by the Golden Rule here. Lasher himself has been in the automotive business for 25 years, 20 of them in South Florida. His experience, along with that of his staff, account for the fact that 30 to 40 percent of their business comes from referrals. We take care of you before, during and after the sale, Lasher said. The other reason Kia sales are soaring is, in Lashers words, that the smart money is finding the brand. Topping the reasons people buy a Kia may be the outstanding warranty that is offered: 10 years and 100,000 miles on the drive train. Then there is value along with design and styling. Kia can offer customers a car costing $13,000 or one costing $36,000. The popular Optima hybrid, selling for less than $30,000, comes with duel sun roof, a navigation system, heated and air-conditioned and memory seats, and then again that warranty, the best in the industry. Lasher has another policy that attracts customers. He will trade for anything, he said. And why are owners of luxury cars turning them in for Kias? People are buying smarter, he said. They want more value for the money spent. He has taken in Boxsters, Mercedes convertibles, the Lexus hybrid, Jaguars, a BMW 750. He also believes Kia is creating an image which appeals to the cliquish buyer. Its like they now belong to a clique, a clan, Lasher said. Kia began in the 50s as a manufacturer of steel tubes. Later it went into making bicycles and in the 60s came out with a threewheeled truck. In the 70s, it manufactured its first sedan, the Brisa, and in the 80s reached one million in sales. In the 90s, the company expanded into the U.S. and European markets. One manufacturing plant and two design facilities are located in the U.S. This month, Phil Smith Kia may be enjoying one of its best sales events ever. August, when the current models go on sale to make way for the new ones, is traditionally the best month in the business, Lasher said.Colorful Kia showroom is perfect setting for cutout of NBA star Lake Grif n. Kia is a major sponsor of the NBA.The smart-money is buying Kias. Wes Lasher, GM Phil Smith Kia.Phil Smith Kia 4230 N. Federal Hwy. Lighthouse Point 954-435-7200Kia auto dealership has a history of customer satisfaction Phil Smith Kia in Lighthouse Point is headquarters for all of the Phil Smith auto dealerships. Phil Smith Kia is a consistent winner of the Customer Service Satisfaction Award. [Below] One of the value offers that brings customers to Phil Smith Kia.

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The Pelican 39 Friday, August 24, 2012 Lighthouse Point To write a story about a 22year-old entrepreneur for a history edition might seem a bit ludicrous. But in the case of Marlin Greene, owner of The Hydrant, an elegant pet boutique, it can be justified. Greene, has been in his line of work since he was 14 years old, first working in a local pet boutique and then gaining corporate retail experience at Pet Supermarket. Eighteen months ago he opened his own specialty store stocking it with just about anything a dog or cat owner might require for their pet. In appearance, the shop is higher end. Comfy white couches and huge white orchids set the tone. White shelves and drawers contain the merchandise. But along with all the glitter, there are items for cats and dogs that are priced competitively with the supermarket stores. Best sellers are the colorful collars vividly displayed in a wall unit. Next in popularity are the novelty toys, some of which closely resemble the real things that puppies like to chew on. Greene said his third biggest sellers are the bigdog beds of which he has The Hydrant, 2022 E. Sample Road, Lighthouse Point 954-941-3330I know my customers one-onone. I try to have a selection that re ects every pet owners taste. Marlin GreeneYoung retailer understands his industry: Dogs and cats are treated like people in the new urban societyMarlin Greene with two of his favorite friends at his pet supply store, The Hydrant. The store carries a large and colorful inventory of dog collars. Large-dog beds come in a variety of custom fabrics to match a homes dcor.a huge inventory and then offers 350 fabric swatches for custom orders. For small dogs, carriers that look like very good purses, car seats and strollers are big sellers. Greene said that the strollers are extremely practical for shopping or sightseeing or festivalgoing. In this waterfront, seafaring community, life vests to protect poochie at the beach, around the pool or on the boat, are popular items. For small dogs there are, of course, clothing. T-shirts start at $14. To accessorize, there are bejeweled leashes for about the same price. The Hydrant carries a line of organic food that contains free-range chicken, no fillers, no byproducts and no gluten. Many dogs have food allergies, Greene said. And cats, often picky eaters, love the Health Extension brand of food he stocks. Another good seller is an organic chew made of elk or deer antler that cleans a dogs teeth, stimulates gums and provides bone marrow in the diet. And for the pet celebrating a birthday, cakes can be special-ordered that contain only healthy products. The pet industry is a $52 billion business, Greene said. Dogs are treated like people. His shop is unique to the area. There is none other that is solely a dog/cat boutique, although some groomers and vets carry a few items and food lines. Greene attends four industry shows a year to keep his inventory fresh. He likes owning a shop as opposed to managing a large store. In all, he carries 150 to 200 product lines, changing out his shelves to match the seasons. I know my customers one-on-one and their pets are always welcome, Geene said. I try to have a selection that reflects every Jeweled collars, leashes, organic food for pets at The Hydrant pet owners taste. A pet that is always on the premises is Sabrina, a calico Persian cat, who is very good at customer relations, Greene said. Now, he is hoping to work with the Florida Humane Society to conduct pet adoptions in the store, giving those who take in a rescue dog or cat discounts on essential pet supplies.

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40 The Pelican Friday, August 24, 2012 Fort Lauderdale Robert Borowski came to South Florida right after Hurricane Andrew and stayed for 20 years building a reputation along the way for being one of the most reliable and knowledgeable roofing contractors in the area. He did this by becoming skilled at applying all roofing materials metal, tile and shingle and by hiring craftsmen with the oldschool skills of coppersmithing. I have a lot of employees from Europe where this trade is a family tradition, Borowski said, adding We are one of the few companies capable of installing all roofing products. He started Allied Roofing in Pompano Beach and moved to a larger Fort Lauderdale location 10 years ago. He is one of the few roofers who produce his own sheet metal panels which gives him much-needed product control. His work is visible all over north Broward including at The First Presbyterian Church of Pompano Beach, JBs restaurant on the beach in Deerfield, the Hillsboro Club on the Hillsboro Mile. The Club with its steeply pitched roof and the constant offshore winds was one of his most challenging jobs, Borowski said. In addition, he had to work around the summer guests. And when JBs expanded 10 years ago, the Allied crew redid the roof with material guaranteed to withstand the effects of salt and sand for 25 years. In fact, warranties on workmanship and materials are something all customers should insist on Borowski said. Believing that his customers should be fully informed, Borowski presents them with 20 questions that give them an opportunity to compare contracts. We try to show our customers all their options. An educated consumer is a more satisfied one. The Allied website, alliedroofing.cc also contains information important to potential customers. Those who want to know what the replacement of a roof entails, should watch movies of Allieds latest jobs on youtube channel.Allied Roo ng & Sheet Metal, Inc. 2801 NW 55 Ct., Bay 5W, Fort Lauderdale 954-485-5922. When the economy took a downturn in 2008, Borowski shifted his business from new construction to custom and residential roofing. We were lucky enough to turn the right way, he says now. Taking his belief in self-sufficiency to great heights, Borowski has installed backup generators in his 7,000 squarefoot building, has a plan for his employees to follow preand -post -hurricane events, and has equipped his fleet with global positioning systems. Because of its strong financial position, suppliers are willing to sell materials directly to Allied Roofing and the company is never short of product. We are prepared for bad times. We can get up and running quickly, he said. Allied also installs solar panels, hot water panels and rainwater harvest systems. Borowski came to this country from Poland 29 years ago, immigrating during what he said were difficult times. He credits his success to being an owner-operated business and to being a detail guy. He also believes that good people are key for success. We have a massive amount of longtime employees, and I was able to keep them even in the downturn. The majority of his business probably 80 percentcomes from referrals. We have good people, good service and give good work. There is nothing magical about it, Borowski said. He also offers warranties with every job. The customer should insist on manufacturers warranties to protect his investment, he said. A resident of The Cove in Deerfield Beach, Borowski is a strong supporter of community events and belongs to chambers in several cities. In Pompano Beach, he contributes to the Yuletide Parade; in Deerfield Beach, he sponsors the Founders Days fireworks. He also does charitable work at his church and through his professional associations. Allied Roofing is also located in Miami and Borowski is thinking about expanding his operation to West Palm Beach. Things are slowly turning around, he said. I want to be ready for the good times.We try to show our customers all their options. Robert Borowski Attention to detail in an atmosphere of trust has made Allied Roo ng a success story The crew at Allied Roo ng

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42 The Pelican Friday, August 24, 2012

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The Pelican 43 Friday, August 24, 2012 Pompano Beach Keeping Dave Giannone away from fixing boats is not a bet anyone wants to take. Heres why. Dave has been repairing boats for over 30 years. He has gone from traveling to home docks with tool boxes offering dockside repairs to owning Giannone Marine, 800 S. Federal Hwy. Pompano Beach, a company with water access employing over 30 people. Dave sold the business to Aqua Toy Store in 2002, took an eight-year hiatus, returned and took over boat repairs as well as brokering sales of used boats. Now he is back in the same space with his new company since 2010, Complete Marine. Dave is using up every inch of space with sales, dockage, repairs and storage. Sales are really good now for used boats, he says. The industry is more solid today. People are recognizing a good deal in this economy. Ive got an acre of boats. They are good boats for good prices.ServiceThe slogan here is From Bottoms to Repower, We Do It All. And Dave says he and his crew . . abide by that. Complete Marine offers a 25-ton travel lift and a 10ton forklift for dry-docking, painting and cleaning. Complete Marine also offers a wide variety of bottom and anti-fouling paint. They can haul motor and sail boats, and many captains just motor their way to Complete Marine for the work they need. We can handle anything from a 2HP engine to a 1,000HP diesel, he says. Complete marine also offers fiberglass repairs and prepurchase marine inspections. And Dave says service is important to maintain a safe vessel. Boats should be seen for yearly service, and its critical to have a trained eye look at a boat. We can repair problems that could otherwise be catastrophic.Hurricane AdviceWhen the storms churn in the Atlantic, boaters have a little more to think about when preparing for strong winds and high water. Dave offers dry storage only for hurricane protection, but the best advice he has for these unpredictable storms is to make sure your insurance is paid. New York to Pompano BeachDave came here from upstate New York where his boating centered on the fresh waters of the mountain lakes. The auto industry was booming then, and Dave left high school in 1979 to study marine mechanics. His first job here was at Hammerhead Marine where he worked as a technician. He saw the boating industry booming and his profession unfolding in the late 80s. Today, Dave tries to find time to take his 42-Hatteras to Bimini, a boat that gets him there in 2 hours and 45 minutes and back 15 minutes quicker with a little help from the Gulf Stream. Dave Giannones story is one of the boating history of Pompano Beach, a city of oceanfront and inland canals where thousands of vessels find berth. And this guy is right here to keep those vessels in good shape.Whether power or sail, Complete Marine in Pompano Beach offers reliable service since 1985Complete Marine, 800 S. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach 954-786-9013 www.completeboat.comBoats should be seen for yearly service, and its critical to have a trained eye to look at a boat. We can repair problems that could otherwise be catastrophic. The staff at Complete Marine can help boat owners forge a life-long relationship with their vessels. From purchase to maintenance to docking to selling, Complete Marines staff can take care of everything a boat owner needs to enjoy their baby for years to come. We handle big and small boats. If its a boat and they need something we can handle it, said owner David Giannone.

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44 The Pelican Friday, August 24, 2012Pompano Beach dermatologists share life and work togetherTheirs is not only a partnership in business but a partnership in life, as well. They are the Doctors Hecker Melanie and David a married couple who operate Hecker Dermatology Group in Pompano Beach. Not all couples would choose to spend so much time together, but the Heckers enjoy it and say its an advantage in their medical practice. Theres no challenge in working together, says Melanie. Im working with someone I trust. David says they want the practice to succeed, so were on the same page. These doctors love what they do. The beauty of dermatology is that we do everything, explains Melanie. We see men, women and children, and the situation in each examination room is different. The doctors may remove a skin cancer from one patient and perform a cosmetic procedure on the next. The variety makes for an interesting day, Melanie says. Besides taking much satisfaction in helping people, the Hecker doctors like the size and personal nature of their practice, which is at 3500 NE 5th Avenue, just off Sample Road near Dixie Highway, in Pompano Beach. They call it a mom and pop or boutique operation. The doctors entered careers in dermatology from different directions. As a teenager growing up in Hollywood, Florida, David was impressed by his dermatologist, who became a role model and mentor. He decided then to pursue such a medical career himself. During his medical residency at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City, David trained with an internationally recognized expert on psoriasis, and he developed a special interest in that disease. He did research and published professional papers on the subject. He is excited about a big revolution in the treatment of psoriasis a new class of medication called biologics. Psoriasis is a chronic disease, he explains. There is no cure. Patients must stay on the drug forever, but their skin is clear. Weve never gotten someone clear before, he says. This is exciting because I can help people in a way that I never could before. Melanies path to health care is probably not surprising, considering that her father and three brothers are medical doctors. But she did not take a direct route to her medical practice. After earning an MBA in nance, she began a career on Wall Street. While she enjoyed Wall Street, it wasnt as satisfying as shed like, so she headed for medical school and a career based on helping people directly. Her education led her to research dermatology at Weill Cornell Medical Center in New York City at the same time David was studying there. They met while making rounds at the hospital. The rest, as they say, is history a meeting that led to marriage, three children, a medical practice together in Pompano Beach, and a home in Lighthouse Point. They began their medical careers in 1999 with David rst practicing in Boca Raton. He still sees patients part-time in Boynton Beach. But it was always their hope to practice together, and he joined Melanie in Pompano Beach a couple of years ago. Despite their busy medical practice and the demands of parenting three children, the Doctors Hecker make time for community service. They have participated in numerous free cancer screening events sponsored by various community groups, distributing information, providing advice and screening hundreds of people for signs of cancer. They are quick to stress the importance of these screening events. Routine body checks can prevent you from having cancer down the road, Melanie says. Its important because one person in the U.S. dies every hour from melanoma -one of the fastest growing cancers in the U.S. She explains that 80 percent of the damage to your skin is done before you are 18 years old, so its important to educate children. Thats why we like to see families, she adds. The realities and economics of practicing medicine today result in many dermatologists joining larger group practices. But the Heckers plan to stay right where they are to continue their mom and pop approach to serving patients for just as long as they can.Together Husband and wife physicians in Pompano Beach, Drs. Melanie and David Hecker. Pompano Beach Hecker Dermatology Group, focuses on diseases of the skin and cosmetic procedures.Hecker Dermatology Group, 3500 NE 5th Avenue, Pompano Beach 954-783-2323



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Friday, August 24, 2012 Vol. XX, Issue 34 Wherever you are, read The Pelican @ pompanopelican.com • Send news to siren2415@gmail.com Pompano Beach • Deer eld Beach • Lighthouse Point • Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Wilton Manors • Oakland Park • Hillsboro Beach • The Galt • Palm Aire The P e l i c a n Pelican Visit us online at www.pompanopelican.com T h e The P e l i c a n Pelican 95 days left in 2012 Hurricane season They keep history, make it and offer itThe 2012 history issues of The Pelican focus on the people whose dreams became realities for the rest of us. While cities are being remade, we watch buildings plowed under and replaced with today’s architecture. The speed by which all of this takes place has sent the keepers of history busy trying to capture the looks and the tales of what will soon become dust. The makers of history belong to numerous men and women who bet their fortunes on dreams, like Jan McArt, who brought theater to thousands of Florida residents when Miami Beach was about the only spot to catch a live show. And those who capture, maintain and research history do it so that others will know how we arrived at this point in our own history. Thank you to the advertisers and the history keepers who made this issue possible.By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach He has put a lot of words together about the history of South Florida; about what drove us to settle on these sandy shores and about what happened after we rst arrived here. For Dan Hobby, 65, history is more than a list of chronological dates. It is Pompano Beach historian Dan Hobby in front of a wall of historical photographs. Historian Dan Hobby digs to uncover the big pictureabout the big picture: the reasons that events happen and the consequences of those happenings. “I try to show how an event affects the future or why things happen the way they did. You have to look at the whole picture to develop the narrative,” Hobby said. “History is more than a recitation of isolated events. It’s guring out why things are they way they are.” There is even a trap to compiling pictorial histories Hobby said. “They tend to be scrapbooks of the past, nostalgic, but not history.” For Hobby, each of the books he has written has had its own format, its own challenges. When he relies on personal accounts to esh out the facts, he is often faced with dramatically See HOBBY on page 18 History Keeper Dan Hobby By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFSouth Florida could soon get a visit from Tropical Storm Isaac. And just like residents, the private and Residents prepare for Isaac; business owners, cities are already in gear for the rst threat to this areapublic sectors are getting ready for the storm’s possible landfall. “We’re always getting ready for a hurricane. We pretty much stay ready this time of year,” said Pompano Beach Fire Rescue Chief Harry Small. “Right now we’re keeping an eye on things. Usually in May and June we get ourselves up to speed to get ready to go on a moments notice.”See ISAAC on page 21 Music under the starsPompano Beach -Due to the threat of Tropical Storm Isaac, Music Under the Stars, a free concert on the beach, has been rescheduled from tonight, Aug. 24 to Friday, Sept. 7. Call 954786-1111.

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2 The PelicanFriday, August 24, 2012 By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFWilton Manors –The 80s in Wilton Manors was a decade marked by civic association battles, smuggled immigrants, an election doover, charter confusion and accusations of cronyism. That’s why author and historian Benjamin Little loves the period so much – so much so that he wrote a book about it all. Little’s book, Wilton Manors, from Farming Community to Urban Village spans the city’s history History Keeper Benjamin LittleLittle honored for recent book on Wilton Manors’ turbulent years from when it was known as “Colohatchee,” an area sparsely populated by Native Americans in the late 1800s, until today. Originally from New Hampshire, Little moved to Wilton Manors in 1998 and comes from a family of historians. Like so many before him from northern locales, he nally got fed up with New England winters and traded snowy banks for sandy beaches. “My father had just died so there was nothing compelling me to stay,” he said. But coming from a much older part of the country, one where many buildings were erected before Broward County even existed, history in South Florida takes on a much fresher signi cance for Little. “Being from New England, if it’s older than the Civil War; it’s new.” For his work, Little was given the Stuart B. McIver Historian’s Award by the Broward County Historical Commission and named “Historian of the Year.” “The whole thing was a real effort by the board. His book is where I jumped off,” said Little about McIver, who wrote various books that included historical information about Wilton Manors, Fort Lauderdale and other parts of South Florida. For Little, the fun in studying Wilton Manors’ past comes from poring through documents and minutes of meetings “trying to make sense of it all.” “The 80s were very interesting. That was the one that was the most fun, not being here to experience it. That time was the most contentious,” said Little, who also serves as secretary of the See LITTLE on page 15 A resident of Wilton Manors since 1998, Benjamin Little, originally from New Hampshire, isn’t used to history being so recent. “Being from New England, if it’s older than the Civil War it’s new,” he said.

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The Pelican 3 Friday, August 24, 2012 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach This city’s of cial historian, designated in 2005 by the city commission, is Bud Garner, a lifelong resident who relishes remembering his past. Garner has written Tales of Old Pompano, and in 2005, short stories of his life and times from his own experiences and using accounts from older pioneers. His titles are intriguing: “The Day the Gator got These folkloric tales describe Pompano Beach through the eyes of boyhoodJimmy McNab,” The Night the Gypsies Came to Pompano Beach,” “The Murder of Junior Harper,” “The Ashley Gang,” “Alligators and Moonshine Stills.” One story tells of a tragedy: the death in 1964 of three of the city’s well respected residents, Stanley Parrish, 27, Warren Parrish, 29 and their uncle T.J. Nobles. The three were killed when their private aircraft crashed into Lake Okeechobee. Garner was in the search plane that spotted the body of Nobles in the water and retrieved it. No other bodies or the plane were ever recovered. “It was a traumatic experience,” he remembers. And the story that always gains attention is titled “the Ashley Gang.” The Ashleys were Florida’s claim to outlaw fame. From 1911 to 1924 they plundered banks, businesses, trains and post of ces. One day in 1924, they came to Pompano Beach in a taxicab after a heist in West Palm Beach. The cab was stolen. They had left the driver tied to a tree in Deer eld Beach. Two of the gang members hit the Pompano Beach Bank at NE 1 St. and NE 1 Ave., See TALES on page 17Bud GarnerHistory Keeper and made off with $5,000 in cash, brazenly waving their loot wrapped in a bed sheet, “We got it all.” Not long after that, John “Swamp Bandit” Ashley and three other members of his gang were killed at the Sabastian Inlet Bud Garner

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4 The PelicanFriday, August 24, 2012 SightingsSightings is a calendar for Northeast Broward county. Send you event information to mdpelican@yahoo.com 8-26 – Wilton Manors Get Out The Vote Bar Crawl starts at 2 p.m. at Sidelines Sports Bar, 2031 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. The Pub Crawl is intended to register voters for the upcoming election. Sidelines Sports Bar, Bill’s Filling Station, The Manor, Rosie’s Bar and Grill, New Moon, Matty’s on the Drive, Georgie’s Alibi and Boom are included in the event. 8-28 & 9-11 – Behavioral Health Family Support Group meets from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. at Broward Health Imperial Point Hospital, 6401 N Federal Hwy., Fort Lauderdale. Group is for people with family members dealing with mental illness. 954-739-1888. 8-30 – Secret Woods Nature Center 2701 W. State Rd. 84, Dania Beach, concludes its Summer Home Landscape Series 2012. Event is from 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. For ages 12 and up. 954-3578884. 8-31 – LauderdaleBy-The-Sea Chamber of Commerc e hosts its next Power Breakfast from 7:30 to 8:45 a.m. at Blue Moon Fish Co., 4405 W. Tradewinds Ave. The guest speaker will be SER Media Group CEO Sasha Ezquerra who will talk about using social media to market businesses. Cost is $20. 954267-9888. 9-1 – Tickets for Night At The Ballpark are on sale at Wilton Manors City Hall, 2020 Wilton Drive, for $35 each. Cost includes bus ride to and from Marlins Stadium which departs from Wilton Manors Elementary School, 2401 NE 3 Ave., at 5 p.m. Sponsored by Wilton Manors CAAB. 954-390-2100. 9-5 – NatureScape worksho p from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Fern Forest Nature Center, 201 S. Lyons Road, Coconut Creek. Workshop will focus on ways to create and maintain a NatureScape See SIGHTINGS on page 6

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The Pelican 5 Friday, August 24, 2012 By Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFJan McArt, the iconic “First Lady of Florida’s Musical Theater” walked into the Green Room at Lynn University this week looking like she was ready to play the female lead in whatever she wanted. And no director would have denied her. But beyond her talent on stage, she is known as the true pioneer who brought serious theater to South Florida nearly 30 years ago. The aspirations and ambitions of this woman, the daughter of talented parents in Cleveland, Indiana, began early. “I always loved the theater,” she says. “I built small theaters in our family garage. I was a puppeteer, and I was always singing.” McArt’s mother, Jean, who sang in the local church choir, warned her daughter to stay away from a singing career. “You’ll get too many colds,” she said. “So from that day on, I never had a cold,” McArt Theater Keeper Jan McArtAfter 28 years of Broadway shows, Jan McArt puts her magic to work at Lynn University Jan McArt as Mame with composer Jerry Herman Above Can Can opens in Palm Beach [Right] Jan stars in Best Little Whorehouse in Texas at Royal Palm Theater, Boca Raton. said. Her heart led her straight to Broadway. Her big break came when Richard Rodgers invited her to audition for Oklahoma! When she arrived, she asked Rodgers if he would accompany her on the piano. He agreed. “Do you know “If I Loved You?” she asked. “I think so,” Rodgers replied. “I wrote it.” She landed the part as understudy for Laurey. Six weeks into the show, the lead became ill, and McArt Jan McArt remains First Lady of Theater in South Florida.See MCART on page 10

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6 The PelicanFriday, August 24, 2012 Parks & Leisure Services Department. Call 954-6304500 for more information. See SIGHTINGS on page 12SightingsContinued from page 5yard. Pre-registration is required by calling 954-5191470. 9-8 – Deer eld Beach city shred from 9 a.m. to noon at the Recycling Drop-Off Center, 401 SW 4 St. Cost is $10 for up to ve boxes or bags and $20 for up to 10 boxes or bags. Checks only. 954-480-4379. 9-8 – Shred-A-Thon and prescription drug take back from 9 a.m. to noon at Lowe’s, 1851 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. Hosted by the Broward Sheriff’s Of ce. Limit ve boxes per car. Those who bring prescriptions will receive a $5 Publix gift card. Limit one per family. 954831-8902. 9-11 – A class on hip pain will be held at Broward Health North Hospital, 201 E Sample Road, Deer eld Beach, from 6 to 7 p.m. 954759-7400. 9-12 – The Greater Pompano Chamber Business Expo will be held from 5 to 8 p.m. at Citi Centre, the corner of Copans Road and Federal

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The Pelican 7 Friday, August 24, 2012

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8 The PelicanFriday, August 24, 2012 Deer eld Beach, Pompano Beach, Lighthouse Point, LauderdaleBy-The-Sea, Wilton Manors and Oakland ParkWilton Manors • Oakland Park • Hillsboro Beach The Pompano Pelican is published weekly on FridaysStreet Address: 1500-A E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, FL 33060 Telephone: 954-783-8700 • Fax: 954-783-0093Letters to the Editor are encouraged and accepted for print if signed, although a writer’s name will be withheld on request; letters must also include a daytime telephone number. Advertising rates are available upon request. Subscription rate is $31.80 including tax for one year’s delivery in Greater Pompano Beach; $95.40/per year including tax for others in the United States; call 954-783-8700 for rates abroad. The Pelican is a nonpartisan newspaper and reserves the right to decline advertising. Copyright 2012. Reproduction of this publication in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission of the publisher. The Pelican is a member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, Deer eld Beach Chamber and the LBTS Chamber. The Pelican is a state certi ed woman-owned minority business. The Pelican is delivered to businesses, libraries, schools, of ces, hospitals, news racks and single family homes. All advertising and copy is published at the sole discretion of the publisher. We welcome your critiques and ideas concerning this publication. Anne Siren, publisherExecutive Assistant: Mary Hudson Graphics: Rachel Ramirez Windsheimer Bookkeeper: John White Classi eds: Fran Shelby Contributing Writers: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Judy Wilson, Malcolm McClintock, Judy Vik, Michael d’Oliveira Account Executives: Paul Shroads, Carolyn Mann, Bill Heaton, Bill Fox Special Of ce Assistant: Cathy Siren ESTABLISHED 1993 • Volume XX, Issue 34 Founding Editor and PublisherAnne Hanby Siren The Pelican wants to know what you think. Send your thoughts on local, state and national issues to siren2415@gmail.com Send your letter to the editor siren2415@gmail.com OpinionBudget workshopOakland Park – A budget workshop is set for 6 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 29, in commission chambers at City Hall, 3650 NE 12 Ave. Commissioners will review and discuss the scal year 2013 budget. Big movieOakland Park – The movie “Big Miracle” will be shown at sunset in Royal Palm Park, 1701 NW 38 St. The free movie is presented by the Oakland Park Docents needed for historic toursDeer eld Beach – Angela Alipaz chose to put in her volunteer time at the city’s historic Butler House because she has always been interested in the historic. “It’s knowledge” she said of her docent training. Said Amie Kay Tanner, in charge of training docents, “I am so glad she picked us. But we need more like her.” Tanner is hoping another dozen people interested in Deer eld’s past will volunteer as docents for the Butler House, the Kester Cottage and the Old Schoolhouse. She needs a commitment of only three or four hours a week so that a tour schedule of the historic sites can be set. The training is minimal. Information sheets are provided. The Butler House, circa 1923, and the Old Schoolhouse are on the National Register of Historic Places. “It’s really an easy job,” Tanner said. “After the rst few times, you know the stories of these places.” Interested persons should call the Deer eld Beach Historical Society, 954429-0378. History counts for all of usBy Anne SirenPUBLISHEROne thing I love about The Pelican historical issues comes from the stories themselves. In all of these South Florida cities, the pioneers who reaped the harvests that led to the vegetables grown down here being shipped north, created a strong connection between the North and South. They sent a message that there was work to be done in Florida. Henry Flagler heard the call and come down to build a railroad. That work was plagued with death, sickness, mosquitoes and other tropical inhabitants. Farmers dealt with alligators stopping up their irrigation pipes, rattler snakes sleeping under the green bean stalks. And that is the learning curve we can all accept from them. Keep going on: go on through grief, through jobless times, through illness and through disaster. Those early pioneers made plenty of mistakes that the rest of us are paying for like the huge efforts to dry up the Everglades. We moved beyond the hard times of segregation: the times when white children had full school terms, and black children were pulled out of school to work the elds. We, down here, are part of a microcosm of history, making bad judgments, moving forward, learning and growing. There are still plenty of us who remember the times when tossing wrappers, soda bottles and left-over food out of cars on the sides of highways. Thanks to Lady Bird Johnson, we were re-educated about that. We recall these tales because some of the Keepers of History. Their work is tedious and in many cases unfunded. In this issue, Jan McArt reminds us that theater is also having a dif cult time with money. And unless we begin to fund these important roles history and theater make in our lives, they could disappear. Dan Hobby’s book, Pompano Beach: A History of Pioneers and Progress and Lighthouse Point, The First Fifty Years should be on everyone’s coffee table. Local physicians, dentists and all who maintain waiting rooms would do well to offer those waiting a chance to know more about where they live and work. Benjamin Little’s history of Wilton Manors, Wilton Manors, from Farming Community to Urban Village and Bud Garner’s Tales of Old Pompano make good reading for us and those who follow. Here’s a nice dinner-time tale: “The Day the Alligator got Jimmy McNab.” But to get these books into your hands, you will have to contact your local or county historical society. By spreading the history around, you become a history keeper. The best way to nd out about these books and others that de ne your hometown is to join your local historicalsociety. Here they are. Happy reading. The Deer eld Beach Historical Society meets on the third Wednesday of each month from 12 to 1 p.m. at the Old School Museum, 232 NE 2 St., Deer eld Beach. For more information, call 954-429-0378. The Pompano Beach Historical Societ y meets on the third Wednesday of every month at 7 p.m. at the Dick & Miriam Hood Center, 217 NE 4 Ave., Pompano Beach. For more information, call 954-292-8040. The Wilton Manors Historical Society meets on the third Thursday of the month at Wilton Manors City Hall, 2020 Wilton Drive, at 7 p.m. For more information, call 954-566-9019 or 954-566-8219. The Oakland Park Historical Society meets on the second Tuesday of every month at 5:30 p.m. at the at Oakland Park Library, 1298 NE 37 St. For more information, call 954-566-9957. Manny is a two-year-old Fox Terrier. He was given to the Florida Humane Society in Pompano because his previous family was moving and couldn’t take him with them. He would make a great family dog. He knows several commands. He needs a good, long walk once a day, play time and mental stimulation to keep him happy and would do best with no small children. Manny and all his friends can be seen and adopted at the Florida Humane Society, open 12 to 4 p.m. Thursday through Sunday. Visit www. oridahumanesociety.org or call 954-974-6152.Adopt Manny today!

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The Pelican 9 Friday, August 24, 2012 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach – Amie Kay Tanner’s frustration is that the city’s pioneers are reluctant to talk about the past. A self-appointed collector of local history, Tanner is more than willing to listen. “I’ve done eight or 10 videos, but I still have a long list of people I want to interview. I want to make us [The DB Historical Society] Plaques outside the Butler House commemorate the lives of historian Emily Dietrich and farmer J.D. Butler. Both were honored as Great Floridians in 2000 along with mayor and judge G.E. Butler, midwife and migrant worker advocate Branhilda Knowles, builder and city commissioner Odas Tanner, farmer and commissioner JB Wiles. Deer eld Beach’s keepers of the past: Memories still sharp for history lovers Tanner and CollierHistory Keeper Amie Kay Tannera repository. I beg, beg, beg people to come forward so that all their information is not lost.” Her frustration is compounded by the fact that the oral histories that were taken over the years are on cassette tapes which are deteriorating. “I need a transcriber,” she said. Some of the tapes go back to the years when the late Emily Dietrich was the city’s of cial historian. Dietrich died in 1996 but left her mark when she and Margaret Briggs and Briggs’ daughter-in-law, Barbara, doggedly gathered the volumes of information needed to put four local structures on the National Register of Historic Places. Margaret Briggs had to travel to Miami to get the original building plans for the Butler House, now the home of the Historical Society. Dietrich and Briggs spent several years assembling enough credentials for the Butler House, Old Schoolhouse, Kester Cottage and Deer eld Beach Elementary School to be nationally recognized. Among the oral histories that do exist are those given See Tanner on page 10

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10 The PelicanFriday, August 24, 2012 completed the run. It was curtains up from then on. McArt has had an exciting and wide-ranging career from opera, Broadway and the concert stage to award-winning television performances and highly acclaimed supper club appearances, both nationally and abroad. She was a leading soprano with the San Francisco Opera Company and the NBC Opera Company and has starred in world premieres in New York. Having made her symphony debut with Arthur Fiedler and the Boston Pops, the Columbia concert artist became a favorite guest performer with symphonies across the country. She has co-starred with Liberace and Jack Jones; played wellknown cabaret nightspots such as the St. Regis and Pierre Hotels in New York, the Coconut Grove in Los Angeles, and the Colony and Society in London. She also has performed concert engagements in Saudi Arabia, Tokyo, Hong Kong and Bangkok. What brought her to Florida? “Like everyone else, I came here to visit my mother,” she answers. In South Florida, McArt put her business acumen to work, and the results were cabaret theaters in Miami Beach, Fort Lauderdale and Key West. “Then came dinner theater at the Royal Palm Plaza in 1977. We were the rst 52week equity theater,” McArt says. “I brought in actors from New York, and I always tried to use Florida actors. Royal Palm Theater opened with “The Merry Widow” and continued with many Broadway hits such as “Fiddler on the Roof “ and “South Paci c.” In 1993, a forgotten cigarette ignited the theater and cancelled shows for four months. The theater nally closed in 2001 with “Some Like It Hot.” Along with the dinner theater, McArt gave space to a children’s stage, Little Palm Theater, a launching pad for young actors, many of whom are having theatrical success throughout the country. Since 2001, McArt has been concertizing, released her CD, Pray for Peace and appeared in “Florida Follies” starring Florence Henderson and Carol Lawrence. In 2004, McArt was appointed Director of Theatre Arts program development at Lynn University. She is the founder and producer of the Libby Dodson’s Live at Lynn series. It troubles McArt to see small theaters closing because they lack donors. “The arts are always the rst to suffer,” she says. “Arts activities need the support of the community. I just want places for young artists to be.” She says she has felt like a “voice in the wilderness” in convincing the public to support local arts groups. McArt has little praise for schools that are dropping arts programs. “If you have no theater to feed the soul, what have you?” she asks. “Art is the ice cream and cake of life. Everything else is orthodontic bills and more,” she says.McArtContinued from page 5 John Raitt and Jan McArt after performance in Pajama Game.by Ray Collier, JB Wiles, Jack Butler, Lorene Broxton, David Eller, Edna Horne Johnson, Myrle Johnson and Cleo White. “I’ve been trying all my life to get information on Mayo Howard,” Tanner said. Howard was a long time member of Deer eld’s police force and is the rst Black person to be buried at the city’s Memorial Cemetery on NE 6 Ave. Tanner has lived in Deer eld Beach all her life. Her father Odas built many buildings here including the Deer eld Beach Woman’s Club and she herself is a “repository” for local history. She even knows, who among the old families, was related to whom. Another resident with a sharp memory of the past is Ray Collier, also a native, who at the age of 30 became the city’s postmaster. The pay was $7,400 a year. Stamps were three cents. Now 78, Collier has recorded his thoughts which include memories of the mail being hung on a pole alongside the FEC Railroad Tracks to be snatched by a conductor as the train rolled past. As a boy, he rode his horse to the beach across the old wooden swing bridge over the Intracoastal Waterway. He attended a two-room elementary school and lived in a Kester Cottage on Hillsboro Blvd., and 5th Ave. He remembers that everything east of SE 6 Avenue and Hillsboro Blvd., was woods and that, at the beach, another block of homes extended eastward from the current shoreline. “In the hurricane of 1947, we lost ve homes there,” he said. He recalls when the center of town was Dixie Highway and Hillsboro Blvd., and that he worked for a year at Doc Wright’s drug store after graduating from Pompano Beach High School, Class of History Keeper Ray CollierTannerContinued from page 9‘52. Collier is largely responsible for the formation of the Butler Scholarship, a behest left by Alice Butler in 1976. From childhood, Collier had a close friendship with Alice and her husband J.D. and would visit them at the Butler House once a week to hear stories about old Deer eld. That friendship lasted until Alice died and Collier was named to manage her estate. Childless after the loss of three babies, Alice and her husband J.D., loved children and contributed to their causes. Alice endowed the swimming pool and the rst football stadium at Deer eld Beach High School and provided scholarship money for any graduate that could get into college. In the 13 years following her death, what was a modest grant ballooned into $7 million when the Butler farmland was nally sold. While Tanner and Collier have long memories of Deer eld Beach, a historian equally responsible for keeping memories alive is Carolyn Morris who became executive director of the DB Historical Society in 2007 and who struggles now with the society’s nancial issues. Since the city dropped the society from its budget last year, Morris works on a volunteer basis trying to maintain the Butler House for posterity. Tanner notes that without a paid executive director, there are few opportunities for grants. Despite that, the Butler House is open by appointment for tours and several school classes are already on the schedule. One elementary school, Norcrest, sends its fourth graders each year to learn about life when the city was a farming community. Unlike some surrounding communities, Deer eld Beach does not have a thoroughly researched, written history. A pictorial history with some information was published around 2005. Putting the archives in order and sorting the volumes of information already at the Butler House is a herculean task but Tanner is rm in her belief that she and Morris, with a little help from friends of history, will one day accomplish it.

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The Pelican 11 Friday, August 24, 2012

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12 The PelicanFriday, August 24, 2012 WORSHIP DIRECTORY: Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad. Rev. Hyvenson Joseph See SIGHTINGS on page 16SightingsContinued from page 6Highway, on the second oor between Lowe’s and Sears. Over a hundred local and regional businesses will be showcased during the event. Cost is $10 per ticket or two for $15. 954-941-2940. 9-13 – Better Business Network – Enterprise Group meets at 7:30 a.m. at Galuppi’s, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. Sponsored by the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce. 954-933-1558 9-13 – Wilton Manors will hold its rst of cial budget meeting at 7 p.m. at city hall, 2020 Wilton Drive. Commissioners will vote on the budget, re assessment rates and the millage rate. To view the budget, visit www. wiltonmanors.com or call 954-390-2100. 9-14 – Celebrate National Sewing Month with the Pompano Chapter of the American Sewing Guild. Hand sewing techniques will be demonstrated from 10:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at the North Regional/Broward College Library, 1100 Coconut Creek Blvd., Coconut Creek. 954201-2600. 9-15 – Recovery Awareness Night to bene t Vision of Change, an organization that raises money to help fund projects that bene t the children of Los Quinchos, Nicaragua and their efforts to recover from substance abuse and addiction. Event starts at 6 p.m. at Signature Memories Event Center, 299 N. Federal Hwy., Fort Lauderdale. Admission is $20. 954-4010261.FridaysPompano Proud meets every second Friday of the month at McNab Park, 2250 E. Atlantic Blvd., from 8:30 to 11 a.m. Every second Sunday the group meets at Galuppi’s, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach, at 6 p.m. 954-562-3232. The Pompano Beach Rotary Club meets Fridays at 12:15 p.m. at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. 954-786-3274. Art Gallery 21 is open every Friday from 7 to 9 p.m. The gallery, located at the Woman’s Club of Wilton Manors, 600 NE 21 Court, features various artwork from various artists across the State of Florida. Admission is free. Visit www.canawm.org for more information.SaturdaysPony rides are available at Sand & Spurs Equestrian Park, 1600 NE 5 Ave., Pompano Beach, from 9 to 11:30 a.m. Cost is $3 per ride. 954-786-4507. The Pompano Beach Kiwanis Club Westside meets the rst and third Saturdays of the month at 8:30 a.m. at the E. Pat Larkins Community Center, 520 MLK Blvd., Pompano Beach. 954782-8096. The Deer eld Beach West Kiwanis Club meets the second and fourth Saturdays of the month at 9 a.m. at Westside Park, 445 SW 2 St., Deer eld Beach. 954-54-732-9883. Kayak rentals are available Saturdays and Sundays at Richardson Historic Park, 1937 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Visit www.AtlanticCoastKayak. com or 954-781-0073 for rates. The Wilton Manors Green Market is held every Saturday and Sunday at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. 954-592-0381. The Deer eld Beach est Kiwanis Club meets the second and fourth Saturdays

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The Pelican 13 Friday, August 24, 2012 Frank H. Furman Insurance, 1314 E. Atlantic Boulevard, Pompano Beach 954-943-5050For 50 years, Frank H. Furman Insurance company has served and contributed to Pompano Beach, the city Frank Furman lovesFrank H. Furman, Inc. will be celebrating its 50th year in the insurance business Sept. 1. Frank and his firm are very excited that they have served the community for 50 years. As a successful businessman in the eld of insurance, Frank has invested time and nancial assistance to organizations that bene t the overall community. The success of Frank H. Furman Insurance only added to his belief that giving back was a gift. He explains that in 1962, a close friend allowed him and his wife, Martha Jane, to open an independent agency. “We opened our agency on Atlantic Boulevard rent free for one year. Our friend allowed us to make our dream a reality,” says Frank. In return, Frank has served as a major sponsor for community events that also began as ideas, including The Tiger Trail Festival, Pompano Beach Fireworks on July 4th, Yuletide Parade, Seafood Festival, Fishing Rodeo, Holiday Boat Parade, Children in the Arts Piano Competition and numerous others that have grown to be part of the tapestry of Pompano Beach. Those contributions were the result of a young insurance salesman who believed in his product, stood behind it and worked hard at it every day. Frank and Martha Jane have been residents of Pompano Beach for 56 years where they raised their children, became active in their church and are proud that they are “part of 60 families [employees in the business] where helping them prosper has been a great reward.” They have faced obstacles, the biggest one being the “unstable insurance market for homeowners after Hurricane Andrew in 1992 and Citizens Insurance. “We have a great staff,” says Frank. “We specialize in insuring homes, businesses, automobiles, boats, health and life insurance products. We also get pleasure out of helping clients when they have a claim. That is what we are about.” Frank was named to the board of John Knox Village at a time when the resident community had just come out of bankruptcy. He led the Village as chairman of the board from that time to his retirement last year with a business plan that worked and enabled JKV to grow and flourish. Resident population grew to 1,000 and needed expansion continues today. The Village honored Frank for his contributions with the addition of the Frank H. Furman, Jr. Plaza upon his retirement from the JKV board. Frank has been a trustee of Florida Southern College in Lakeland for 33 years. And he has dedicated 45 years as a member of the Florida Annual Conference of the United Methodist Church. With so much history, so much philanthropy and so much civic commitment, Frank still has time for a laugh. Tacked on the yellowing pages of his scrapbook is a song entitled “There is No One With Endurance Like the Man who Sells Insurance,” written in 1935 by Frank Crumit and friends. How true for Frank Furman. [Top] Frank and Martha Jane pose in front of their new building on Atlantic Boulevard. [Center] Happy with his own desk and his own business, Frank Furman begins a long career in Pompano Beach. [Lower] Frank and Martha Jane Furman announce the opening of their insurance agency. [ Town News Tuesday Sept. 4, 1962] 50 Years!

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14 The PelicanFriday, August 24, 2012 “ Jaline Boccuzzi, D.M.D., began her dental career after graduating from the dental hygiene program at Tallahassee Community College. With a merit scholarship under her belt, she moved on to Boston where she attended Tufts University School of Medicine and earned her DMD. After a full day, Dr. Boccuzzi talked to The Pelican about her work, her research and her new dog Ultra, who had just arrived for a visit. Dental procedures have changed dramatically over the past 15 years, and keeping up with the latest education and workshops has been a large part of this young dentist’s life. Dentistry now offers a wide variety of relatively painless procedures that not only improve looks, smiles, and comfort; but often have a positive impact on the overall health of the patient. But, says Dr. Boccuzzi, it’s the overall health of the economy that makes some of these procedures out of reach for many patients. That issue prompted Dr. Boccuzzi to find ways that are more cost-effective. “Two new items are hot on the market, and they can save a patient thousands of dollars,” she says. The first is a new composite material that is closest to wear as enamel. This material bonds to the tooth at a molecular level. It comes in many shades and can be molded easily to fit the new smile. And it’s a same-day procedure. This material is one that can eliminate the look of ‘black triangles’ at the gum level. “Sometimes it just looks like a person has Discoveries in dentistry offer better procedures and better health for fewer dollars, says this young dentistpepper caught in the teeth,” says Dr. Boccuzzi. “This removes that appearance and is less costly than porcelain veneers.” A second new item has been replacing the number of implants needed to correct and replace lost teeth. Referred to as “AllOn-Four,” Dr. Boccuzzi explains that instead of a full mouth of implants, a new procedure using only four implants, placed at specific angles is enough to build a complete permanent bridge on the top or bottom. Dental improvements are coming at lightning speeds. Forty years ago, the best a dentist could do for a patient losing teeth was to create false teeth that were removable. When implants arrived on the scene, they replaced the removable false teeth. As that procedure became more sophisticated, implants were used to secure bridges, but the procedures required six to eight implants. “Using only four is a savings of thousands of dollars,” Dr. Boccuzzi says. “And this is what we need to offer our patients ... less expensive alternatives to a better and healthier smile.” On-going education and workshops keep most dentists on the edge of the latest developments. This is one dentist who stays very busy with education. Another research project that has fascinated Dr. Boccuzzi is her project of close encounters with viral and bacterial matter in the mouth. It’s another forward-looking research that some scientists are theorizing could predict related problems throughout the body. Using her willing candidate and assistant, Sandy Mercier, Dr. Boccuzzi takes a sample of saliva to test for various bacteria. She says there are about 450 bacteria and a handful of viruses in anyone’s mouth. In Mercier’s case, the discovery of the bacterium Eikenella corroden, which could be a contributor to heart disease, would serve as an early alert to remove the bacte-This is what we need to offer our patients. Less expensive alternatives to a better and healthier smile. Dr. Jaline BoccuzziJaline Boccuzzi, DMD, 2122 NE 2 St., Pompano Beach • 954-941-4310 • www.jbdentistry.com • info@jbdentistry.com David Dunn ‘All-On-Four’ Upper and lowerHappy Patients Ally Battistini VanDyck‘Composite/ Bonding Smile’ Jonathan Wroth Black triangles removed (Composite/ Bonding)ria and check the heart. Dr. Boccuzzi’s interest in research and clinical studies, such as the one with Mercier, has impressed her staff and patients, all of whom feel more secure with her continuing education; which, in the end, benefits their own health futures. The office also offers numerous cosmetic procedures from ZOOM and Deep Bleach KOR, Botox, Juvederm and Radiesse. Dr. Boccuzzi offers a full-service dental office along with her staff members Sandy Bryant, R.D.H.; Sandy Mercier, Treatment Coordinator/ Patient Liasion and Cristina Casas, C.D.A Call the office with your questions or to meet Dr. Boccuzzi. 954-941-4310.

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The Pelican 15 Friday, August 24, 2012 Historical Society. “I’m not subtle. I entitled this chapter ‘Revolution.’” The revolutionary decade kicked-off with a smuggling operation. Like something out of a Miami Vice episode, in May of 1980 a cigarette boat docked at a house on the South Fork of the Middle River with its cargo of illegal immigrants from Columbia. Police soon surrounded the house and arrested three smugglers and over a dozen immigrants. “The Colombians had been smuggled from Bimini for $600 to $800 each,” wrote Little. The political turbulence began when Sam Stephens, a full-time city employee, was appointed to the council much to the dismay of Mayor Arthur Welling who claimed it violated the city’s civil service rules. A ruling by the state attorney general was ignored by former city attorney William Miller and Stevens was later elected by the council as president of the city council. The “Revolution” came when Diane Cline and William Turner, running together on a ticket of changing the city’s trajectory at the time, won election to the city council, paving the way for a charter showdown between those who wanted to keep the mayor’s veto power over the rest of the council or give the mayor one vote among four others. The latter charter proposal won out, creating the current city commission style government, but not without some confusion. “You’re not supposed to put two diametrically opposed proposals on the ballot because you can’t have two forms of government,” wrote Jane Carroll, former county supervisor of elections, about the 1984 charter questions. The winning proposal passed 68 to 32 percent. The losing got 45 to 55 percent of the vote. “At least some voters must have been confused by the wording,” wrote Little. Unhappy with some of the changes being driven by Cline and Turner and some of the members of the civic association board and wanting to counter its in uence, the “Old Guard” formed the Concerned Citizens of Wilton Manors. In a failed attempt, the “Old Guard” unsuccessfully tried to pack the Civic Association board. The two groups even fought “tooth and nail” over who would get the 4th of July beer concession. “And temperance was avoided,” joked Little. “Wilton Manors, from Farming Community to Urban Village” is available for purchase at Amazon.com and the Wilton Manors Library, 500 NE 26 St. LittleContinued form page 2

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16 The PelicanFriday, August 24, 2012 SightingsContinued from page 6 of the month at 9 a.m. at Westside Park, 445 SW 2 St., Deer eld Beach. 954-54-7329883. Pompano Green Market is held every Saturday from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the corner of Atlantic Boulevard and Cypress Road. Vendors wanted. 954-782-3015.MondaysPlay ping-pong from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Cost is $1. All ages can participate. 954-3902130. The Gold Coast Toastmasters Club meets on the second and third Monday of the month from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Denny’s, 3151 NW 9 Ave., Fort Lauderdale. 954895-3555 or 954-782-9951.TuesdaysDeer eld Beach Rotary Club meets every Tuesday at 12 p.m. at the Deer Creek Golf Club, 2801 Deer Creek Country Club Blvd., Deer eld Beach. 954-630-9593. Pompano BeachLighthouse Rotary Club meets every Tuesday at 7:30 a.m. at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. 954-972-7178. The American Legion Auxiliary Unit 142, 171 SW 2 St., Pompano Beach, has Bingo on Tuesdays at 7 p.m. Food is available from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. 954-942-2448. A Yoga class is available for all levels at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors, on Tuesday nights from 6:30 to 8 p.m. and Saturday mornings from 10:30 a.m. until noon. The cost is $7. 305-607-3520. Zonta International meets on the third Tuesday of the month at Duffy’s Diner, 401 N. Federal Hwy., Deer eld Beach, at 11:15 a.m. Zonta International works to advance the status of women. 561-392-2223.See SIGHTINGS on page 22

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The Pelican 17 Friday, August 24, 2012 as they tried to drive out of the state. That confrontation with law enforcement ended their ignoble careers. This rst-hand account was told to Garner by JR Merritt, sheriff of St. Lucie County at the time. Thirty six stories of Garner’s, these and others, are posted on the Website, “Stories of Old Pompano.” They provide the reader with a very personal glimpse of Pompano Beach as a farming communi-TalesContinued from page 3ty. Garner’s memory for dates and places is phenomenal. Readers will recognize many of the names in his stories because today local roads are named for those pioneer families. Garner, 85 began writing his tales so that his grandchildren could see what it was like to live in Pompano Beach when he was a boy. “You could rattle around the city all night and no one bothered you,” he recalls. “It was all good, clean fun. I get a sick, empty feeling in my stomach when I think of what the kids are missing today.” He came to Pompano Beach in 1927 when he was nine months old and has lived here ever since except for the three years he was in the Navy. His account of those years is in the archives at the Naval Air Station in Jacksonville. As much as he is recognized for being Pompano’s most proli c teller of tales, Garner credits a number of others for keeping track of local history, among them Don Downie who writes of his growing up and has contributed a story to “Stories of Old Pompano” and the late Eldes Walton, who had reams of information but never put any of it in writing, much to Garner’s dismay. Another person who needs to be remembered, he said, is Myrtle Vinson, who along with Walton, kept the records and maintained the graves at the city cemetery for years before the city took over that task. Garner is still writing his memories. He has one in the works now that will soon be ready to read to his nine greatgrandchildren. Fifteen of his kith and kin have birthdays in August, Garner said, and last week a huge party was held at his home. It could, one day, be fodder for another “Tale,” this one possibly told by one of his own grandchildren. Tell The Pelican about your news! 954-783-8700!

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18 The Pelican Friday, August 24, 2012 HobbyContinued from page 1opposing versions. That happens when he is writing the histories of newer cities where the founders can be interviewed. When it comes to documents and photographs, it is a judgment call as which ones carry history forward – what is important and what is not. Hobby has written about many of the cities around us. That includes his newest, a book on Coconut Creek. Pompano Beach: A History of Pioneers and Progress, published in 2010 is the city’s only full length narrative history. He edited Pompano’s Centennial Journal wrote Lighthouse Point, The First Fifty Years, Fort Lauderdale Broward County: A Contemporary Portrait Preserving Historic Properties in Fort Lauderdale and a number of articles. In recognition of his expertise, he sits on the advisory board of the Broward Trust for Historic Preservation, the Florida Review Board for the National Register of Historic Places, University of Florida History Advisory Board, the Broward County Planning Council, the Florida Association of Museums, the Florida Historical Society. He is the Pompano Chamber’s Shining Star for 2009 and has served on many boards in his hometown of Coconut Creek. Currently, he has two jobs: executive director of the Pompano Beach Historical Society and the SampleMcDougald House. He was executive director of the Fort Lauderdale Historical Society for 20 years, 1980-2000, and before that, after obtaining degrees from the University of Florida and University of South Florida, taught at Broward College and Lake City Community College. Despite the dif culties in raising dollars to support historic organizations, Hobby says he prefers it to teaching which can become repetitive. Preserving history is not. Faced with the restoration of the Sample-McDougald House, Hobby coordinated the $2.5 million effort which, set back by Hurricane Wilma and the economic downturn, has nally come to fruition. The stately old home will soon be open to public for tours and special events. Recently, the Pompano Beach Exchange Club, huge supporters of the house, was invited to hold a social there. Although he has written thousands of words about this area, Hobby knows that future historians may change our history. “How we view the world, in uences our view of history and the people who were there,” he said. “Someone alive in 1920 would have a different view of an important event than someone who researches it in 2012. Part of an historian’s job is interpreting the date and guring out what it means.” So while he attempts to make what he writes, “valid in the future” he is under no illusion that others will not write something more complete. Hobby is on a continual search for more historical material. He urges amateur archivists to search their old papers and photographs. “People don’t realize what they have,” Hobby said. One photo of youngsters at play in a vacant eld, yielded an image of the construction of Cypress Plaza in the background, he said. And now that almost anything can be scanned, information can be preserved and returned to its owner. In Hobby’s mind, Pompano Beach began its turn from rural to urban the year students at Pompano Beach High School decided to be the Golden Tornadoes instead of the Beanpickers. That was in 1956 and by then there were new people in town who didn’t appreciate the city’s farming heritage. Margate was incorporated in 1955 and Coral Springs in 1962. Pompano’s farmers held vast acreage in both places, but few saw the incorporation of those cities as the harbinger of things to come. The other spur to development was the hurricane of 1947 that ooded farms and the towns. The ood control projects safeguarded the farmland and made residential development possible. Those times and the boom years that followed may be the subject of Hobby’s next book. “The history of all of North Broward is in those bean elds,” he said.

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The Pelican 19 Friday, August 24, 2012 RJ BoyleRJ BOYLE STUDIOSThe rst big storm of the year is quickly approaching and as it nears we should see good shing until the storm arrives and then just after it passes through. The lower barometric pressure tends to re up the bite, so get out there while you can. The past days have seen hit or miss, but should get a lot better for the weekend. Daytime Hurricanes make for some great shingswords have been somewhat good with a few smaller sh hitting the deck and a nice one, 350 lbs., being taken this past Sunday. The inshore action is hot with mangrove snapper and yellowtails chomping. King sh are ring off, so remember your wire leaders. As always, be safe and use caution as this storm gets closer. If you have any questions, hit me up at the shop 954-420-5001. Get tight, suckas! Fish without a license on Sept. 1Florida – On Sept. 1, recreational anglers can sh without a license in Florida’s lakes, ponds, rivers and streams. “Florida’s licensefree shing days are an excellent opportunity to share the fun, excitement and togetherness of a shing trip with the entire family. This also is a great time for experienced anglers to introduce friends to the sport, even if they don’t have a shing license,” said Nick Wiley, executive director of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. Although a license is not required, all other bag limit, season and size restrictions apply. Visit www.myfwc.com for more information.Family Fun DayPompano Beach – Splashes and Smiles Swim School will celebrate its 4th Annual Family Fun Day on Saturday, Sept. 15 from 4:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Pompano Beach Aquatic Center, 820 NE 18 Ave. Join Splashes and Smiles for a day of swimming, diving boards, re trucks, snorkeling, games and more. There will also be raf e prizes. The event is free and all proceeds bene t the The Kid’s Cancer Foundation of South Florida. For more information, to donate items to the raf e, sponsor the event or volunteer, email SplashesandSmiles@gmail.com or call 754-246-0665. Tell The Pelican about your news or special events! mdpelican@

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20 The Pelican Friday, August 24, 2012 Business ExpoPompano Beach – The Greater Pompano Chamber Business Expo will be held Sept. 12 from 5 to 8 p.m. at Citi Centre, the corner of Copans Road and Federal Highway, on the second oor between Lowe’s and Sears. Over a hundred local and regional businesses will be showcased during the event and costs just $10 per person. Buy a ticket in advance and get two tickets for $15. The Expo includes nger foods and attendees have a chance to win door prizes throughout the event. For more information, visit www.PompanoBeachChamber.com, email Lisa Spinelli at the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce at lspinelli@ pompanobeachchamber.com or call 954-941-2940. Night at the Ballpark Wilton Manors – The Community Affairs Advisory Board is selling tickets for Night At The Ballpark, Sept. 1 at Marlins Stadium. Tickets are $35 each and include a bus ride to and from Marlins Stadium which departs from Wilton Manors Elementary School, 2401 NE 3 Ave., at 5 p.m. Game time is at 7:10 p.m. Tickets are on sale at Wilton Manors City Hall, 2020 Wilton Drive. For more, call 954-390-2100.Broward County Call CenterBroward – The Broward County Call Center provides a single point of contact for the services and programs offered by Broward County government. Calls can be made in English, Spanish or Creole. The call center is open Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Under emergency conditions it’s open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Call 954-831-4000 or Tell The Pelican about your news! mdpelican@yahoo.com or 954-7838700!

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The Pelican 21 Friday, August 24, 2012 Small said with the approach of Isaac, Fire Rescue has started massing supplies and has stepped up coordinating with its personnel to keep them informed and ready in case South Florida gets its rst major storm since Wilma in 2005. “We start talking to each other a lot,” said Small. “One of the things about hurricanes is that it gives you a little time to prepare.” Repairs on re trucks are also sped up in case they’re needed later. “Having trucks in the garage [after a storm] ain’t cool,” said Small. And along with talking to their own employees, cities are also already coordinating with other agencies, including the National Weather Service and Broward County Emergency Management. “Right now we’re at the point of having daily briefings,” said Kimberly Spill, emergency manager for Pompano. “They’ll be ramped-up IsaacContinued from page 1as the storm gets closer.” If it does hit, each department has its own disaster response plan and city employees prepare their own families “so they can be prepared to work for the city before and after, depending on their role,” said Spill. A lot of how cities prepare and respond to emergencies is time-tested, but with the advent of new technology a lot is also new. The internet and social media have given cities new tools to inform residents about emergency-related issues. Code Red, a telephone communication system, can alert residents about evacuation orders or other emergency-related information and the Vulnerable Population Registry is a website where anyone who is at risk can sign up and of cials will check on them after an emergency in case they need help. Visit www.mypompanobeach.com for more information. “I think we’ve learned a lot from Hurricane Wilma. However, Wilma was only a category one to two,” said Spill. “We’ve developed a whole new operating procedure but there’s always room for improvement.” When a storm threatens, cities implement procedures to protect and serve their residents. But they also perform tasks similar to what each of those residents does to prepare themselves for the storm. David Archacki, Wilton Manors’ director of public services, said before a storm staff secures park benches, garbage cans and other city property that might blow away with a strong wind. Construction crews must secure their sites. The city’s emergency generators are lled to capacity. And if Isaac is the rst major storm to hit South Florida in seven years, the city’s Emergency Operations Center, in the new city hall, will see its rst test. “We’re more prepared now then we’ve ever been,” said Archacki. Frank Tropepe, who owns Ace Hardware stores in Pompano, Lauderdale-ByThe-Sea, Deer eld Beach and Margate, said his locations are ready to handle any surge in shopping by those getting ready for the storm. Waiting in the wings are over 1,000 lanterns, 150 generators and other supplies. “I’ve got a warehouse. We keep a pretty good stock of that stuff,” said Tropepe. “And I just beefed-up my hurricane stuff.” But just in case he runs out of something, Tropepe said he can still bring in items as needed. “Ace’s strong point is their distribution. We can get on the phone and we can get product very quickly.” Publix is also stocking up in case Isaac visits. Right now it’s just extra pallets of water. But if the storm hits, Kimberly Reynolds, Publix’s media relations manager for South East Florida, said Publix’s eet of trucks is ready to deliver anything and everything its customers need; including batteries, pet food and prescription medicine. The supermarket’s locations are also equipped with generators. Visit www.broward.org/ Hurricane/Stores for a list of generator ready businesses in Broward.Art Gallery 21 openWilton Manors – Art Gallery 21 is open for the public from 7 to 9 p.m. every Friday. The gallery, located at the Woman’s Club of Wilton Manors, 600 NE 21 Court, features various artwork from various artists across the State of Florida. Admission is free. Gallery 21 is sponsored by the City of Wilton Manors and the Central Area Neighborhood Association. Visit www. canawm.org for more.

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22 The Pelican Friday, August 24, 2012 SightingsContinued from page 16WednesdaysThe Wilton Manors Kiwanis Club meets Wednesdays at 6:30 p.m. at 2749 NE 14 Ave., Wilton Manors. 954561-9785. The Oakland Park Kiwanis Club meets Wednesdays from 7:30 to 8:30 a.m. at Peter Pan Diner, 1216 E. Oakland Park Blvd., Oakland Park. 954-566-9957. The Pompano Beach Kiwanis Club meets Wednesdays at noon at the Riverside Grille at the Sands Resort, 125 N. Riverside Drive, Pompano Beach. 954-444-4815. The Greater Pompano Beach Senior Citizens Club meets on the second Wednesday of the month at the Emma Lou Olson Community Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach, at 10 a.m. 954-9437787. The Alzheimer’s Caregivers Support Group meets Wednesdays from 10 a.m. to noon at the NE Focal Point Alzheimer’s Day Care Center, 301 NW 2 Ave., Deer eld BeachThursdaysThe Rotary Club of Oakland Park/Wilton Manors meets every Thursday from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. at Tequila Sunrise Mexican Grill, 4711 N. Dixie Hwy., Oakland Park. 954-491-6158. The Deer eld Beach Kiwanis Club meets at noon every Thursday at the Deer eld Beach Hilton, 100 Fairway Dr., Deer eld Beach 954-242-6083. The Pompano Beach Republican Club meets on the fourth Thursday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach. 954-786-7536.Upcoming9-19 – Art-By-The-Sea group meets at the Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Community Church in Friedt Family Hall, 4433 Bougainvillea Drive. Marcia Hirschy will discuss how artists can market their work. The meeting is free and open to anyone. 954-5940444. 9-23 – FAU professor and activist Mike Budd leads a discussion on Rachel Maddow’s new book, Drift: The Unmooring of American Military Power and the U.S. Love Affair with War. Event is free. Donations are requested. Event is at 1 p.m. at Unitarian Universalist Church of Ft Lauderdale, 3970 NW 21 Ave., Oakland Park. 908477-7812. 9-25 – Card party held by the Benevolent Patriotic Order of Does Drove 142 is scheduled from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Pompano Beach Elks Lodge, 700 NE 10 St. Open to the public. Bring your table of friends or group. Cost is $4 and includes desert, coffee or tea. Call 561-4792002 for reservations. Tell The Pelican about your news or special events! mdpelican@yahoo.com

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The Pelican 23 Friday, August 24, 2012 “ Pompano Beach – As he nears his second anniversary in Pompano Beach, Dr. Eugenio Menendez says his practice is taking root, growing and spreading its branches into the community. Dr. Menendez offers primary care and diagnostic services at Pompano Beach Internal Medicine, 1600 E. Atlantic Blvd. He soon will be expanding into more space adjacent to the waiting room and plans to add an additional physician or nurse practitioner. He also plans to increase his community involvement and help to the community in need. Last year, as he marked his first anniversary in Pompano Beach, Menendez hosted a health fair, inviting a local chiropractor, dermatologist and podiatrist to join him, along with other vendors. He plans to do that again this fall for his second anniversary. The health fair included blood pressure and diabetes screening. The event drew a number of people with no access to health care, many of whom returned to see Dr. Menendez. For his first anniversary, Dr. Menendez partnered with Broward Children’s Center in staging an art show with a portion of the sales going to the center. Paintings by a local artist, Robert Stephen Simon, are in all the exam rooms. Dr. Menendez’s slogan is “21st Century medicine practiced the old-fashioned way.” He believes in listening to his patients. And he has the latest technology, including ultrasounds, echocardiograms, nerve conductor tests and spirometry for pulmonary disorders. He is trained to prevent and diagnose simple and complex medical conditions. Dr. Menendez says patients obtain a lot of information about medicine on the Internet. But in many cases, he has to clarify the misconceptions the Internet gives them. “Just because it’s on Google or Dr. Oz said so doesn’t mean they’re always getting the facts,” he said. Dr. Menendez is in his eighth year of practice. He is board certified by the American Board of Internal Medicine and a Fellow of the American College of Physicians. He completed his bachelor’s degree in biology with honors from Florida International Pompano Beach Internal Medicine, 1600 E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach • 954-942-2247University and his medical degree from the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine in 2001. He is affiliated with Holy Cross Medical Center, Imperial Point Medical Center, John Knox Village Health Center and Broward Children’s Center. Travel medicine is one of his fields of expertise. “When patients are planning an African safari or a cruise down the Amazon, they should prepare by having the appropriate vaccines and obtaining medicines, so they can go with peace of mind and protect themselves from disease,” he says. He also offers a medically supervised weight loss program. He has written a book, The People’s Diet, a guide to obesity, nutrition and health. The book includes a guide to shopping for the right foods and information on what to order when dining out. The office honors Medicare and most insurance plans. Dr. Eugenio Menendez at Pompano Beach Internal Medicine expands practice to meet needs of community For uninsured patients, Dr. Menendez is associated with a discounted medical plan. Patients can see a network of specialists for a small monthly fee. He sees a number of uninsured patients. As an added service, he employs a staff person to assist patients who need additional benefits to obtain information on Access Florida, a program of the Florida Department of Children and Families. Patients are assisted in enrolling for Medicaid and food stamps. Family members assist Dr. Menendez in his practice. His father, Eugenio Menendez Sr. is vice president/general manager, handing business development and finance. “My first job as a 14-yearold was working for my father at a Burger King in Houston. He was my first boss,” Dr. Menendez said. “And now he’s my boss,” his father said. Dr. Menendez is a member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce. Dr. Menendez is pleased to have both his office and home in Pompano Beach. Having everything close helps him to have a decent quality of life with his wife and daughter. “And if I’m relaxed and take care of my stress, I can take better care of my patients,” he says. For relaxation he enjoys riding his bike and aquatic sports, such as kayaking and paddle boarding. Left to Right Medical Assistants Sonaly de Almeida, Vicky Perez, Leeann LLuberes with Gene Menendez and Dr. Eugenio Menendez Dr. Menendez’s slogan is “21st Century medicine practiced the oldfashioned way.” He believes in listening to his patients.

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24 The Pelican Friday, August 24, 2012 “ By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeerfield Beach – Embassy Suites Resort & Spa has a long history as the city’s first luxury hotel. It was established on the beach in 1986, the second high-rise hotel and the first to offer upscale amenities. As it turns out, guests seem inclined to make their own history here, returning to be married, celebrate a birthday, or hold family reunions. “Our guests get married here, come back for the baby shower and return for their anniversaries,” said Dawn Lopes, director of sales and marketing. “We have become a place for families to celebrate special occasions, to build their own memories. It’s almost like being a part of the family.” A full-service hotel, Embassy Suites continues to win the prestigious JD Power and Associates Award for guest satisfaction among upscale chains and proudly displays AAA’s Four Diamond Status. In fact, in the beginning, it reinvented the upscale hotel experience by offering allsuite lodging in 244 spacious two-room, two bathroom accommodations. Rooms include wet bar, refrigerator, microwave and coffee maker. The complimentary cooked-to-order breakfast and evening manager’s reception are welcome amenities. “The spectacular ocean view sets the guest experience,” Lopes said. “Right away the tropical atmosphere brightens the spirit and sets the mood. You Embassy Suites Resort & Spa, 950 S. Ocean Drive, Deer eld Beach 954-426-0478It is the Embassy Suites tradition to always exceed our guests’ expectations.” – Melissa Lane, GM, Embassy Suites Resort & Spa.Guests at Embassy Suite come here to build their own memories in South Florida are glad to be here.” The amenities at Embassy Suites continue to improve. In 2007, the entire hotel including BT’s Restaurant was remodeled and Spa950 was added. This September, after Labor Day, the pool deck is receiving a facelift. BT’s has become a popular spot for locals as well as hotel guests with dining inside and out on the beautiful patio with a menu that offers continental cuisine and daily specials. Spa950, the full service spa offers monthly specials, a wide range of facials, massages and body treatments. The salon offers, hair, makeup, manicure/pedicure and waxing services. During the week the hotel is a destination for business travelers attracted by the 10,000-square feet of meeting space and the package deals that are offered. There are also packages for weekend getaways that include rejuvenating spa treatments. The Embassy Suites is managed by Hilton Hotels, one of the country’s largest hotel chains. “Our company continues to provide upscale services while keeping up with technology and changing with the times” Lopes said. “Our frequent traveler program is considered the best in the Industry. Our Hilton Honor members get some wonderful privileges and those critical air miles.” With a ballroom that seats up to 300 guests, the Embassy Suites is a popular choice for local charity events, weddings as well as for business meetings. The unique, enclosed patio is a lush, tropical retreat for receptions and special occasions. General Manager Melissa Lane has been here since 2010 and has had time to settle into the community and meet many of her guests. “We have a unique product and exceptional service with very loyal customers who hold us to a higher standard. “It is the Embassy suites tradition to always exceed our guest’s expectations. We enjoy making a difference in the lives of our team members, our guests and our communities,” Lane said.Views from Embassy Suites in Deer eld Beach create memories that only the combination of an ocean, superb service and luxurious sourroundings can offer. Even the outdoor experience with ocean breezes is a setting of luxury..

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The Pelican 25 Friday, August 24, 2012 “ Lighthouse Point –In her heyday, during which she opened a chain of cosmetic studios, Merle Norman was considered the epitome of old Hollywood glamour. The ambitious young Merle Norman began sharing skin care secrets in Santa Monica, CA in the early 1920s when she converted a formula for diaper rash into a face cream. In 1931, she opened her first studio. Her sales technique was based on the concept that if women would try her products, they would buy them. She also invented “before and after” makeovers, a sales tool that remains in high demand. Norman enlisted her nephew, J.B.Nethercutt, to help her develop and manufacture her products and for other women, decades before working was the norm, an opportunity to achieve business success by owning their own Merle Norman locations. Norman died in 1972 and Nethercutt in 2004, but the company is still familyrun. Jason Smith, owner of the Lighthouse Point Merle Norman Studio, says, “Merle Norman continues its heritage of helping women everywhere look their absolute best.” Smith purchased the local franchise nine months ago believing in the company’s concepts and proud of the fact that all its products are made in America. “We want to keep it clean and simple and geared to our market which here in Lighthouse Point is a very loyal one. They like to support local businesses.” The spa offers all the usual services, manicures, pedicures, facials, massages, waxing in a serene, friendly atmosphere. Smith is very much dedicated to making his customers feel at home. “We offer a comfortable, local spa,” Smith said. “We know our customers by name and have a history of their purchases.” Cosmetics and skin care products are always shipped free anywhere in the USA. Because Smith keeps purchases on record, customers can re-order from anywhere and many do from their summer homes in the north. Even those who live locally take advantage of the free shipping rather than come to the salon, he said. A Merle Norman tradition he encourages is for his clients to “play with the make-up and not feel obligated to buy.” Since the first studio opened in 1931, this company has marked many milestones. In 1936, it opened its first studio abroad in Bangkok. 1944 marked the first milliondollar year. The New York headquarters were opened in 1948. In the 50s, the first national advertising campaign was launched. The company began franchising in 1964 and won numerous awards from Entrepreneur Magazine Today, there are 200 Merle Norman locations around the country, but only two others in South Florida; one in Boynton Beach, the other in Miami Beach.Merle Norman Day Spa, Shoppes of Beacon Light, 1809 NE 24 Street, Lighthouse Point, 954-946-8200The elegant Merle Norman photographed in the 1930s. Merle Norman continues its heritage of helping women look their absolute best. Jason Smith.A ne line of cosmetics and personal service are Merle Norman signatures in Lighthouse Point Jason Smith, owner of the Lighthouse Point Merle Norman Studio, says, “Merle Norman continues its heritage of helping women everywhere look their absolute best.”

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26 The Pelican Friday, August 24, 2012

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The Pelican 27 Friday, August 24, 2012 “ By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach – Mayor Lamar Fisher follows in his family’s footsteps not only professionally, but in his love of public service. Mayor here since 2007, Fisher’s great grandfather Clint Lyons signed the paperwork that made Pompano Beach a city in 1908. His grandfather, Louis Fisher Sr., was mayor in 1943 and his father, Louis, received an honorary doctorate for his humanitarian service to this city. Lamar Fisher’s forebearers, at one time, were the largest bean and pepper growers in the country, farming on land that is now the City of Coral Springs. When that generation died, the heirs Fisher Auction Company, 351 S. Cypr ess Road, Suite 210, Pompano Beach • 954-942-0917 Mayor Lamar Fisher, in front of the banner marking Pompano Beach’s centennial year.I never thought I would be in politics. It is an honor to serve a city that my family has been a part of since its inception. Lamar Fisher, Mayor of Pompano BeachFisher Auction has roots in the community that go back to the founding fathers of Pompano Beachhad to sell the land to pay the taxes and one of Broward County’s most famous land auctions occurred –with Johnny Carson as the emcee. Fisher’s grandfather, Louis Sr., handled the sale giving him a taste of something other than traditional real estate. Says the mayor, “People lined up behind a rope and when Johnny shouted, “Go!” they ran to the lot they wanted to buy. By no means was it a modern-day auction, but it set the roots for what the business became.” In 1972, Louis Jr. founded Fisher Auction Company where Fisher has worked for 32 years, making the family firm one of the most successful of its kind in the United States. Fisher was elected to the Pompano Beach City Commission in 2002 after serving as district governor of Kiwanis International. His travels for Kiwanis were “one of the best experiences of my life,” and one that gave him a glimpse into politics. Now serving as mayor for the City of Pompano Beach since 2007, Fisher says, “I never thought I would be in politics. It is an honor to serve a city that my family has been a part of since its inception.” Especially gratifying is the opportunity to help people, Fisher said. “I will do everything I can to solve someone’s problem. Everything else is secondary. I always advise people ‘You are the commission’s eyes and ears. We have to hear from you.’” Since politics takes much of the mayor’s time, Fisher Auction Company operates with a well trained staff that has been with the firm for years. Most of the company’s auctions are real estate based: commercial, industrial and hospitality properties, multifamily and luxury residences. Owners of these properties often choose to sell at auction rather than normal real estate channels, Fisher said, and often with better success. Recently, he sold two oceanfront homes for $6 million apiece in 60 days. “Most of the world’s valuables are sold at auction,” he noted. One exception to the usual real estate sales was the highprofile sale of the law office collectibles and furniture of financier Scott Rothstein, the Fort Lauderdale lawyer now serving a federal prison term for fraud. And Fisher has also auctioned such items as President John F. Kennedy’s briefcase and John F. Kennedy Jr.’s airplane. Moving into this new age of buying and selling, Fisher Auction Company in 2006 set an Internet sales record when it liquidated 2,100 properties in Sarasota via the Internet. Estimated value at $43 million, the sale brought in $65 million, the largest gross for a single event conducted on the Internet. In order to keep up with the changing environment in communication, Fisher has recruited people who are savvy in social media to his company. “I grew up in the business and have a passion for it,” he says. “When I get up on stage, I am still excited and I have butterflies.” But he sees that as a good thing, evidence that he hasn’t gone stale. “You don’t know from day to day what you’re going to be selling. I love the challenge. I love visiting the client, signing the contract and selling at auction,” he said. This native-born son and his wife Suzan have two children, a daughter, Trisha, in law school at Nova Southeastern University and a son, Paul, soon graduating from Westminster Academy. Lamar Fisher’s forebearers, at one time, were the largest bean and pepper growers in the country, farming on land that is now the City of Coral Springs. When that generation died, the heirs had to sell the land to pay the taxes and one of Broward County’s most famous land auctions occurred –with Johnny Carson as emcee.

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28 The Pelican Friday, August 24, 2012 Long before JM Family Enterprises was recognized as a leader in the automotive business, Jim Moran had already made a significant impact in the industry and in the South Florida community. With a career spanning more than six decades, Jim Moran was truly an automotive pioneer. Before his passing in 2007, he was recognized with the 1996 Horatio Alger Association of Distinguished Americans Award and received the single greatest honor in the international motor vehicle industry in 2005 when he was inducted into the Automotive Hall of Fame. Jim Moran’s automotive career started with humble beginnings in 1939. After saving every penny he could, he put together $360 to purchase a Sinclair gas station that soon became the largest volume outlet in Chicago. After serving in World War II, he returned to Chicago and sold his first car – a 1936 Ford Coupe he reconditioned himself – off the apron of the Sinclair station for $275. A whole new world opened up for him that day. Thanks to hard work and his desire to succeed, he established himself as Chicago’s “Jim Moran the Courtesy Man,” becoming the No. 1 Hudson dealer in the country and later the No. 1 Ford dealer in the world. He was also the first auto dealer in the United States to advertise on television and the only one ever to appear on the cover of TIME magazine. Jim Moran started JM Family with just 11 associates in offices on the fourth floor of a bank building in Pompano Beach. Today, the privately held company led by President and CEO Colin Brown continues to be a leader in the automotive industry guided by the philosophies of its founder. JM Family moved to its current headquarters in Deerfield Beach in 1981, and now has approximately 3,800 associates throughout the United States, Canada and South America. It is currently ranked No. 27 on Forbes’ list of America’s Largest Private Companies and No. 17 on FORTUNE magazine’s “100 Best Companies to Work For.” In tribute to Jim Moran’s inspiring legacy, each year JM Family recognizes his birthday on Aug. 8 as Founder’s Day. Since his passing in 2007, this celebration has provided associates with an opportunity to remember “the Boss,” and share fond memories of him and the important lessons he left behind. As part of Founder’s Day, all business locations enjoy a special lunch menu of Jim Moran’s favorite meals, including his dessert-ofchoice, chocolate cake. Associates are also encouraged to visit The Jim Moran Foundation on its Deerfield Beach campus or its website, www. jimmoranfoundation.org to explore photos and stories of his life and career.Giving back was a cornerstone of Jim Moran’s personal and business philosophy, and he wanted to provide for a continuation of his generosity to the community beyond his lifetime. In 2000, he began The Jim Moran Foundation with the mission to improve the quality of life for the youth and families in Florida through the support of innovative programs and opportunities that meet the ever-changing needs of the community. In addition to the companywide celebration to honor his memory, The Foundation established its tradition of Founder’s Day grants in 2009. This year, in honor of what would have been Jim Moran’s 94th birthday, The Foundation awarded $94,000 each to both the Broward County and Northeast Florida chapters of Big Brothers Big Sisters for their Bigs in Schools programs. JM Family also keeps Jim Moran’s remarkable legacy of giving back alive by sharing time, talents and resources in the community to cultivate something significant and lasting. The culture he instilled is evident in how its associates conduct business and by their actions in the community. The company doesn’t just say they are a family, they live it. Guided by the Philosophies of its Founder Jim Moran, JM Family Enterprises Continues to be a Leader in the Automotive IndustryJM Family Enterprises, 100 Jim Moran Blvd, Deer eld Beach • 954-429-2000 JM Family Enterprises’ corporate headquarters, located in Deer eld Beach

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The Pelican 29 Friday, August 24, 2012 “ FastBoats Marine Group believes in a decentralized management. Our departments function as individually-owned small businesses. Managers are entrepreneurial in character and know that their success depends on anticipating customers’ needs and delivering highquality products and services. Stepping into the world of yachting is as close as FastBoats Marine Group, 1490 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. Here in the showroom is an overwhelming array of luxury vessels where racers, cruisers and anglers will think they are at the end of the rainbow. And for Randy Sweers, who owns this business with his wife, Kim, FastBoats is a rainbow that continues to expand. Randy’s MBA from the University of Toronto, led him to a banking position in South Florida, but he was, as the clich goes, “a fish out of water.” Boating and racing were his adored hobbies, so it wasn’t surprising when he resigned to seek employment in the marine industry. With his educational background, Randy fielded lots of offers, but he didn’t jump for the first job. He remembers a smokedfilled room for sales executives at one place and said, “I didn’t spend six years in college for that.” As he drove back from that offer, his eye caught a sight that changed his life. “I saw a new marina with Cigarettes and Scarabs,” he said. “I pulled in and went to the front desk to ask about a job. That’s when I met Richie Powers, owner of Champion Marine at that time.” Now it was clear that those college years and his experience on the water were about to join forces for Randy. “In Canada, I had already gained experience importing boats and setting up dealerships. I was hired on the spot.” After three years in sales, Randy moved on in 1994, when he opened Florida Powerboat Brokerage in Fort Lauderdale, now known as Fast Boats Marine Group. Randy was ahead of the curve in the mid-90s with the Internet. While others were lagging behind about this new technology, Randy’s keyboards were smoking.’ “We used the Internet to send pictures of boats to clients,” he said. Meanwhile, his competition was stuck on snail mail and in showrooms. By 2009, Randy had two warehouses and a 24,000 square-foot showroom on Copans Road and North Dixie Highway in Pompano Beach. And he was not alone. He and Kim had married in 2002, and Kim’s business skills made this family, which now includes their son, Chase, a powerhouse partnership. Says Kim, “But it’s Chase that keeps us grounded.” She refers to the routine of school, sports and lots of family time. “We just have to work smart,” she adds. “I am responsible for the daily operations of FastBoats Marine Group (Pompano and Aventura locations) including financial management, operational policies and procedures, marketing, human resources, and IT. In addition, I assist Randy in the management of the Parts, Service and Sales departments. Randy and Kim made it through the 2008 economic nightmare, and shortly after formed a strategic partnership with Aqua Marine Partners, the parent company of Hidden Harbour marina storage in Pompano Beach as well as six other marinas in the Southeastern United States. The fit was perfect. Randy was finally on the water; he could offer his clients excellent dry and wet storage, and he had an exclusive agreement for service work at Hidden Harbour. By now his team of technicians, headed up by his first marine boss, Richie Powers, had grown to seven. They currently have 19 employees they prefer to call “team members.” Aqua Marine Partners runs the day-to-day operations at the marina, and the clients take advantage of FastBoats for their service needs. FastBoats has recently opened a new location at Hi-Lift Marina in Aventura where they have expanded their service and parts department and can now offer clients a second location for wet and dry storage. Community The Sweers have committed to give back to the community that has contributed to their success. They strongly believe that the chains of poverty can be broken through educational and support services for underprivileged families. They sit on various community boards and support organizations such as the Jason Taylor Foundation, Take Stock in Children, Youth Automotive Training Center, and Jack and Jill Children’s Center. They have aligned their personal mission of educating the underprivileged with these charities in hopes of making a difference in South Florida. Kim and Randy’s belief is that you’re never complete until you change the life of one less fortunate. They encourage others to donate their time to make a difference and leave their lasting legacy.Husband-wife power team takes on luxury yachts, shing and power boats with a team of expert technicians that keep them all shipshape Kim and Randy Sweers, surrounded by luxury vessels, both new and used, in their showroom in Pompano Beach, can offer boaters in all categories the right boat for the right reason. Fast Boats Marine • 1490 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. 954-581-8355 • fastboats.com

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30 The Pelican Friday, August 24, 2012 “ By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFWhen Ari Shahar came to South Florida in 1987 he recognized the need for a company that addressed tile problems and issues. An engineer by training, Ari experimented and developed a process to repair and rebond loose and hollow tiles permanently. The business was an immediate success. Homeowners, builders, Realtors, insurance companies and prospective buyers found Ari’s process an excellent remedy for loose and buckling tile. As the business developed, Ari and his wife, Daphna, expanded to include all services related to tile, marble and stone. They are also able to repair and rebuild showers, replacing the wallboard and using the same tile which saves the homeowner thousands in costly redos. From day one, Daphna put every customer into a database and today has 40,000 names and addresses. She also believes that no job is too small and says, “Sometimes things just need perking up.” Those perk ups are what the technicians at Universal Tile Restoration do so well, from repairing tiles, to regrouting, to finding out-ofstock replacement tiles under a stove or washing machine. When tiles buckle due to flooding, extreme heat, or because they were never bonded properly, the efficient way to repair them is by injecting the bonding agent and resetting the tile. This is a permanent repair. The holes are then patched with the same color grout. If the grout is dirty, the technicians clean all the tiles, stain the grout back to its original color and seal the surface. Of course, grout color can now be changed to one of the new designer shades giving the floor a whole new style. “The mainstay of our business is the repair issues people have that they cannot get anyone to address. They are then faced with replacing the floor,” Daphna said. “Someone putting their home on the market today can call Universal Tile Restoration and very quickly have floors that are repaired and restored and showers that are cleaned and re-grouted, turning a poor selling prospect into Universal Tile Restoration, Inc. 1239 E. Newport Center Circle Ste. 114, Deerfield Beach 954-427-7725Innovative tile restoration process was the beginning of a successful family-owned businessLauren, Ari and Daphna at their of ces in Newport Center. The Shahar’s shitsu, Abu, poses with two highly effective products for cleaning and restoring tile and marble. Abu regularly tends the front door at his owner’s customer-friendly of ce. We find solutions and we are very creative using existing materials. I like to think we are problem-solvers.” Daphna Shahara winning one,” she said. “We find solutions and are very creative using existing materials. I like to think we are problem-solvers.” Universal Tile Restoration serves customers from Key West to Stuart and works with all types of tile and stone. If no job is too small, then no job is too big. Among their corporate clients are the JM Lexus showroom and Office Depot’s headquarters. A large part of Universal Tile Restoration includes polishing marble, honing, sealing and cleaning all makes of stones, limestone, travertine and saturnia. “Our customers continue to call on us to solve their problems. We build relationships, and our business is based on loyalty as well as professionalism,” Daphna said. “Our office is open Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and we welcome customers in who want to talk about their tile problems.” The Shahars live in Boca Raton where they raised their two daughters. One of them, Lauren Levy, an MBA, handles the business side of Universal Tile Restoration along with raising the Shahar’s two little grandsons. Ari, Daphna and Loren relocated to the Newport Center six years ago. They are licensed and bonded contractors and every one of their 12 employees is full time. “We’re a rather big company for a small familyrun operation,” Daphna said. Mexican tile is a specialty at Universal Tile.

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The Pelican 31 Friday, August 24, 2012 “ Lighthouse Point “Is there any brisket left?” The guy coming through the door at Red Fox Diner is worried that he might be too late for Thursdays’ delicious lunch special. But, living up to its reputation as a truly guest oriented eatery, the kitchen had thought to save a portion or two for those regulars who might be running late. Patty and Lou Petrone, Lighthouse Point residents, have owned Red Fox Diner for six years, but the Red Fox has made its den in Lighthouse Point’s Venetian Isles Plaza for almost 45 years. Photos of the original can be seen decorating the walls along with other scenes of local interest. There have been some name changes along the way, but the current one came from Lien and Bob Lehners when they took the place more than 20 years ago. Lien had been a student at the Le Cordon Bleu in Paris and while other students wore blue scarves, she wore a red one. She was dubbed the Red Fox and the rest is history. Bob designed the logo, perching a chef toque atop the smiling fox. The Petrones take pride in having made Red Fox an inviting and community oriented dining spot. Open from 6 a.m. until 3 p.m. Monday through Sunday ( only breakfast on Sunday) many of their guests eat both breakfast and lunch there or opt to have food delivered to their homes or offices [delivery Monday –Friday 7:30 am -2 pm]. The floor staff, headed by manager Diane Evers, formerly head bartender at Lighthouse Point Yacht Club, has first time guests quickly feeling at home. Making the most of a small kitchen, the staff turns out an amazing variety of foods. The aforementioned brisket is only one of the daily lunch specials. Twenty eight sandwiches are on the menu and that’s not counting salads, quesadillas, plated dishes like fresh roasted turkey or country fried steak, or the burger and hot dog section. Starting early in the morning the kitchen staff puts out an array of Red Fox Diner Venetian Isles Plaza, 3640 N. Federal Hwy., Lighthouse Point 954-783-7714We can be depended upon to participate in almost any fundraising event that will help our town. Patty PetroneForty ve years of being the meet and greet place in Lighthouse Point comes from great food, service and the Petrones omelettes, French toast creations, mouth-watering Belgian waffles and breakfast wraps. Hungry patrons come in for freshmade egg, tuna and chicken salads as well as fresh soups. Patty mentions that many a cold has been nursed to health by Red Fox chicken soup; and regular client Roxanne Rowen who has lunch at the diner at least three times a week, gives Sergey five stars for all his soups. Her favorite is his hot red beet borscht. “He doesn’t make it too often, but when he does I always order it” she says with a smile, “and I take some home for later.” There’s not much seasonal change at the Red Fox. Always open seven days a week, the diner closes an hour earlier in summer at 2 p.m. but stays busy throughout the day. For patrons with pets, there are tables outside where pooches get water bowls and doggie treats. Patty and Lou do more than serve up tasty dishes. “We are so happy to sponsor local sport teams and we can be depended upon to participate in almost any fundraising event to help our town,” says Patty. They have been part of “The Taste of Lighthouse Point” for five years, donated food for American Cancer Society Relay for Life and recently filled five boatloads of food baskets for a fishing excursion put on for “Wounded Warriors.” The food, the attachment to their city and the welcoming atmosphere has made Red Fox Diner a gathering place for so many folks in the area. Thursday breakfast usually attracts local politicians. At other times a client might run into his or her physician or attorney, or a next door neighbor. There’s a family table feel to the place, a table where there’s [Above] Thursday’s lunch special, brisket and rice, keeps this day busy at Red Fox in Lighthouse Point. [Below] Wraps are prepared fresh and delicious. Patty and Lou Petrone have been feeding the commuity with food, love and contributions for years.always room for another seat.

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32 The Pelican Friday, August 24, 2012 “ By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFEvery child’s back-toschool supply checklist should include a visit to a chiropractor. The visits should start much earlier, in infancy, to help a child express more life, according to Dr. Paula Hedglon of Hedglon Chiropractic Center in Pompano Beach. Just as parents schedule regular visits to the dentist, visits to the chiropractor should be booked before youngsters return to school. The visits are important to make sure the spine is clear so the body can function at 100 percent, she says. “Kids need these visits more than ever with so much stress on families today,” Dr. Hedglon said. “We live in a fast-paced world with more stress chemically, mentally and physically. Teens face a lot of emotional stress.” The brain sends impulses through the spinal cord and then to the organs. When one or more of the bones of the spine move out of position, they create pressure on, or irritate spinal nerves. Chiropractors call Dr. Paula’s touch begins the healing at Hedglon Chiropractic Centerthis a vertebral subluxation. Subluxation occurs in three ways: Physically, chemically and emotionally/ mentally, Dr. Hedglon says. It could happen in sports or when a child falls off a bike. The child may not feel it right away, but the effects could show up later. The body has the ability to heal itself with no interference, Dr. Hedglon says. Chiropractors correct vertebral subluxations by delivering a safe, effective and specific force known as a chiropractic adjustment. A chiropractor can detect subluxations you may not yet feel. She sees patients ranging from infants to 102, including a number of families who come together and have had their children adjusted since birth. And she says she sees miracles every day. “They’re not mine. They’re miracles of the body’s ability to heal itself.” She recalled checking an infant after a difficult delivery. The baby had no feeling on the side of his face. Dr. Hedglon used her pinkies to apply light pressure, and after five days the baby could open his eye and improvement could be seen on the whole side of his face. When babies are colicky, have frequent ear infections or disruptions to sleeping patterns, it could be due to a subluxation, which can alter or prevent the normal flow of impulses from the brain to the rest of the body. “Many things can be eliminated if you seek chiropractic care before medicating,” Dr. Hedglon said. “Chiropractic adjustments don’t cure anything. They allow the body to function 100 percent,” she said. “The body heals itself.” Or, as a sign over her reception desk reads, “I move the bone; God does the healing.” She cautions that it’s not a quick fix. “Sometimes it takes time for a long-term condition. And sometimes we see miracles overnight.” With children, after chiropractic care, everything is more in tune. They can think clearly. She has seen children stop wetting the bed after care and adults get off drugs. Children with autism have been helped with focusing. One boy who didn’t talk or walk started walking after Chiropractic adjustments don’t cure anything. They allow the body to function 100 percent. The body heals itself. Dr. Hedglonadjustment. Dr. Hedglon has seen children with ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder) helped through chiropractic care. “I noticed they function better at school and even their grades improved. Dr. Hedglon is observing her 24th anniversary in practice. She has been at her office at 1313 E. Sample Road in Pompano Beach since 1993. Previously, she taught at St. Elizabeth of Hungary Catholic School. She has a bachelor’s degree in education from Florida State University and a Doctor of Chiropractic degree from Life Chiropractic College, Marietta, Ga. Dr. Hedglon is married to Michael, who owns Hedgehog Studios, an advertising agency in Pompano Beach. They have one daughter, Catherine, a student at the University of Miami Law School. “Chiropractic is not what I do. It is my life,” she says. “My mission is to reach people so they can understand the potential of their body. With adjustments, the body can heal faster and disease can be prevented.” Photos of many of her patients line the office walls. Dr. Hedglon clearly loves what she does. “I love coming here every day. It’s my mission in life,” she says. She and her office staff start each day with prayer and meditation and thank God for the gift of life. Hedglon Chiropractic Center, 1313 E. Sample Road, Pompano Beach 954-946-1799 The Purinton family enjoys a visit with Dr. Paula. [Photo courtesy of Hedglon Chiropractic Center]

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The Pelican 33 Friday, August 24, 2012 Sentimental over ice cream, the new & improved Dairy Queen has become a neighborhood landmark, again! “ Pompano Beach Dairy Queen owner Sal Biviano is in the business of creating a smile and a memory. Customers regularly approach him with stories of “my Dairy Queen” in wherever their hometowns may have been. “Everyone has a story,” Sal said. “Dairy Queens are the image of small town America.” His own memory is of walking with his family for ice cream when the DQ was located in the Beacon Light Shopping Center. Biviano was 12 then. A few years later, in 1976, his dad Onofrio purchased the store and operated it until five years ago when Sal, 51, took over. Trained as a CPA and with years of corporate experience at JM Family, Sal was ready to re-enter the family business. In the summer of 2008, the familiar red-roofed Diary Queen in the Shoppes at Beacon Light was shuttered and Sal moved up Federal Highway to a former Texaco station at NE 29 Street. The move was beneficial in lots of ways. The store is more visible from the highway, it is easier to drive in and out, there is room for a drive thru which has created a “phenomenal” amount of new business, and there is a covered patio where customers can relax with a sweet treat, a chili dog or a BBQ sandwich. Located on the west side of the highway, it is within walking distance for many families. The patio area which seats about 30 is the one thing Sal was adamant about when he changed locations. It has become a popular place for birthday parties. People bring balloons, a few decorations, order a cake, and voila, instant celebration. “I could have had more parking or I could have had a bigger store, but I was definite about the patio. I love to see people having fun. It allows them to sit and have some good family time. That’s very important to me,” Sal said. He operates the 1,200square foot store with a staff of about 20 young people giving kids the same opportunity he had at his dad’s DQ. “I’m very connected with the kids,” Sal said. “Sometimes I am their only father figure.” He takes this interest in kids out into the community where he is assistant scoutmaster I donate a lot of product as it is important to me to support the charities in the community. – Sal Bivianofor Troop 119 and cubmaster to the Pack. Formerly, he coached little league baseball. He is also an active supporter of local organizations and offers up hundreds of DQ coupons for fundraisers. “I donate a lot of product, as it’s important to me to support the charities in the community,” Sal said. Business at the Dairy Queen begins to boom right after school when cars pull up with kids eager for a snack. The later it gets, the busier it is, Sal said. The menu at Sal’s is traditional: nine different sundaes, 27 flavors of blizzards, 11 shakes and malts, soft cones, cakes, waffle bowls, banana splits, Oreo brownie earthquakes, peanut buster parfaits, moolatte coffee and the newest creation, frozen hot chocolate. This fall, Dairy Queen is adding another familiar name to its menu, Orange Julius, and will roll out an assortment of fruit smoothies. “It’s a great new product line with a dozen new flavors. It will add a lot to our drink options,” Sal said. Sal’s dad died the same month the new store opened but he is still remembered. “This has my father written all over it,” Sal said, noting his clean, bright establishment. Owned by corporate giant Berkshire Hathaway, Dairy Queen has been part of the American landscape for 67 years. On this particular landscape, it is probably the oldest family-run, retail business in the neighborhood, a place Sal Biviano hopes will leave his young customers with their own pleasant memories.Dairy Queen, 2901 N. Federal Highway, Pompano Beach • 954-943-8390 Sal Biviano [far right] and some of his staff, Andy Jules, Teri Chiarello, Troy Fralick and Beth Smith.

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34 The Pelican Friday, August 24, 2012 “ Pompano Beach – In this economic climate, consumers are focused on where they’re spending money. “Businesses that survive deliver a great product for a fair price,” said Jay Ghanem, owner of Auto Tech and Body at 429 N. Dixie Highway. He focuses on doing just that while also emphasizing customer and community service. Ghanem finds ways to keep overhead low so he can run his business more efficiently and maintain fair prices. For example, he negotiates bulk prices on tires, ordering 500-800 at a time in order to keep costs down and remain competitive. Another cost saver: He flies instructors here for training sessions rather than paying for technicians to travel to other cities. He hosts technicians from other repair shops at the Auto Tech in-house community center. As a result, his employees are trained at a low cost and receive ongoing training in all the latest technology. Their recent lessons have included learning to troubleshoot electrical problems on electric cars so they know what to expect. This firm was ahead of its time in the alternative energy field. Ghanem recently unveiled an electric car that was built over a four-year period in the shop. While it isn’t feasible to build more cars here, they can provide components for electric cars. Ghanem predicts that in a decade many people will be driving electric cars. They will want something built in this country instead of their fuel money going to other countries. The Society of Automotive Engineers recognized Auto Tech and Body for building the car. And this company has been named one of the top 10 family-owned auto businesses in the U.S. The company offers fuel conversion, converting dieselfueled vehicles to run on waste vegetable oil. “The number of requests spike when fuel prices go up,” Ghanem said. The vegetable oil is 85 percent cleaner than fossil fuel, he says. Auto Tech and Body has 16 employees. They offer auto repair, maintenance for tires, brakes, air-conditioners and suspension. They provide complete collision repairs and repairs for all insurance companies from the U.S. and Auto Tech and Body, 429 N. Dixie Highway, Pompano Beach • 954-946-9730Creativity and expertise have lifted Auto Tech and Body over the top for customer service, excellent pricing and a commitment to its communityCanada. The firm also has an inventory of pre-owned cars of all makes and models. Ghanem founded Auto Tech and Body in 1997 with three employees. After obtaining a degree in engineering from Florida Atlantic University, he worked for a national dealership training technicians and service advisers. Then he started his own business. “It’s so important to have a mechanic you trust,” he says. “It’s important to have a relationship with a repair shop.” Before doing business with a new repair shop, he suggests interviewing the personnel to get an idea of their knowledge, expertise and honesty. Ghanem said his employees get decent salaries that are not commission based. He says he has “the most incredible, committed staff.” As a result, they have many repeat customers. Ghanem lives in Lighthouse Point with his wife Mei and their two young children. “They are one of the biggest driving forces for me to do my best at work and in my community,” he says. Mei is a bookkeeper at Auto Tech, “a great support and an amazing mom,” Jay said. His sister Chadia Meroueh is company vice president. Theirs is “like a magical relationship,” he said. Each one has accountabilities, and each one does his or her part. Chadia trains staff to deliver exceptional customer service. “You don’t have to be a 5Star hotel to deliver 5-Star customer service,” Ghanem says. Jay and Chadia devote much of their time to community organizations. “Serving others is where we get our rewards,” he says. Until recently he was president of the Rotary Club in Pompano Beach. He is now assistant governor for North Broward Rotary clubs. He is also vice chair of the Northwest Advisory Board for the Pompano Beach Community Redevelopment Agency, an advisory board member for the Broward College Automotive Program, Atlantic Technical Center and the Pompano Beach Economic Development Council and a board member of Dynamos, a club for physically and mentally challenged adults. Chadia is vice president of the Kiwanis Club and a board member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce. Both are members of the Boys and Girls Club board of directors. Many of the groups they are active in hold meetings at the company community center. The firm also holds car wash fundraisers for many different charities. Bulk buying keeps prices lower for customers and hosting seminars keeps mechanics on the ‘cutting edge.’ Jay Ghanem Auto Tech and Body, 429 N. Dixie Highway, Pompano Beach

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The Pelican 35 Friday, August 24, 2012 “ Frank Tropepe knows exactly why customers choose an Ace Hardware store over the big box chains. “We are more like a mom and pop convenience store. We cater to the area. We listen to the needs of our customers and do the research to find them the products they need. And there are always clerks on the floor to help them find what they need,” he said. Tropepe is the owner of four Ace Hardware stores, the first one purchased in Margate on Margate Boulevard 17 years ago. The next one was Beach Hardware on the corner of Commercial Boulevard and A1A. Then came the store on Sample Road a few blocks west of U.S. 1. Last year he opened the Deerfield Beach store on South U.S. 1. With the exception of the Deerfield store, all the locations have been in business for more than 60 years, an achievement in the retail business. “Deerfield Beach has gotten great reviews from the community. We have good visibility in a free-standing building and there is a good market there,” Tropepe said. This summer the Ace store on Sample Road was totally remodeled and is now offering its longtime customers a fresh look. Ace Hardware has 5,500 stores around the country. It is a $5 billion company headquartered in Oak Brook, Ill., that started 90 years ago when three retailers in Brooklyn decided they could buy goods cheaper if they went in together. Belonging to a cooperative, Tropepe says, is different from being a franchise owner. While the franchise dictates exactly how the operation is to be run, a co-op provides the owners with guidelines but each operator has the freedom to make buying decisions. Each owner also has a share of the co-op and a percentage of the earnings. Customer service is what keeps people coming back to his stores, Tropepe says. “If we don’t have it in stock, we’ll order it. Or we’ll do the research and find it.” With 30 years in the business, Tropepe knows how important it is to have knowledgeable help on the floor. Many of his retired At Ace Hardware customer service and products geared to the neighborhood contribute to its long historyAce Hardware, Margate, Lauderdale-By-The-Sea, Pompano Beach, Deer eld Beach • 954-942-3961[Right] The Craftsman brand is now in all four of the Ace stores owned by Tropepe. [Center] Frank Tropepe holds his grandson Michael, 18 months, amid a display of Weber grills. [Below] Stihl landscape power tools can be repaired on site at Ace Hardware stores.employees have backgrounds in industry or are familiar with the trades – plumbing, electrical, building. “What’s it worth to the customer to have an experienced person to talk to?” he asked. While products are changing all the time, the newest major effect on the hardware business is the “green” movement. It is affecting everything from light bulbs to faucets to paint. But knowing the ins and outs of each new product requires constant training Tropepe said. Ace carries many national brands as well as its own labels and competes pricewise with the big box We are more like a mom and pop convenience store. We cater to the area. We listen to the needs of our customers and do the research to find them the products they need. And there are always clerks on the floor to help them find what they need. Frank Tropepe stores because of its national buying power. A new service at the Deerfield Beach store is propane exchange – getting a full tank in exchange for an empty one. In all the stores, car remotes can be reprogrammed, keys and key fobs made and locks rekeyed; knives and scissors can be sharpened and screens repaired. A favorite of Ace customers is the nuts and bolts aisle which contains a huge variety of fasteners including hard-to-find chrome and stainless steel. On the fun side is a large display of bird feeders and accessories. The Weber grills are ever popular and the Craftsman tools are notable for quality and design. With the store’s huge range of products, one marketing device has proven very successful: Ace’s Helpful Hardware Club that gives rebates and rewards. A customer’s purchases are kept on record and a discount coupon sent that matches the purchases. Even nicer, a birthday is worth a $5 rebate card. “It is definitely effective,” Tropepe said. Signing up for Ace rewards is free, he added. Tropepe is a native of the area. He lives in Lauderdaleby-the-Sea with his wife. They have three children and four grandchildren.

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36 The Pelican Friday, August 24, 2012 Classi eds Call 954-545-0013 Mechanic Shop for RentPompano Beach Rent this mechanical shop attached to a busy Texaco Station. Rent is negotiable. 954-941-2600. Ask for George Great opportunity. Call George. 954-941-2600 HELP WANTEDAFRAID OF DOWNSIZING? Start building a business to supplement your income. Great earnings potential on a part-time basis with Primerica. Call 954729-0192. 9-7 OCA RATON SALON – Wanted Hair Stylist – Manicurist – Pedicurist – Facialist – Massage. Salary – Commission Or Rent! 1 MONTH FREE! 954-415-4937. 8-24 POMPANO BEACH – MECHANIC/COUNTER PERSON NEEDED For WellKnown Texaco Fuel Station. References & Experience. Good People Person. Call George 954-941-2600. 8-24 SEEKING EMPLOYMENTGROCERY SHOPPING & DELIVERY From Publix To Individuals & Businesses. Serving Broward Since 2005. 954-200-0074. www. weshopanddeliver.com 8-31 EUROPEAN LADY Is Looking For A Position As A CAREGIVER / COMPANION. Reliable. High Quality Care. 11 Yrs. Exp. Own Transportation. Fluent In English & Polish. References. 954-480-7786. 8-31 CAREGIVER / COMPANION Caucasian Woman With 25 Yrs Exp. To Assist & Care For Your Loved Ones. Days / Eves / Nights. Ref. Available. 954-482-5494. 8-24 HONEST MALE With References Seeking Position As A CAREGIVER! Call Chris 954-290-7344. 8-31 MALE CNA / HHA / COMPANION. Broward County Area. Former EMT. All Certi cations / Compassionate, References. Call Ron 954-2322832. Very Reasonable! 8-24 SERVICES DANNY BOY ELECTRIC – Lic & Insured. Lic. #EC13004811. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. 24/Hr Service. 954-290-1443. Beat Any Written Estimate. Sr, Discount. 8-24 ASI SOUTHERN LAWN MAINTENANCE Provides Full Landscape. Architectural Landscape Design. Tree Trimming & Removal, Full Lawn Maintenance. One Time Clean Out. Andrew 954-6757396. 9-14 GOT JUNK? TRASH HAULING – CONDO CLEANUPS – Trees – Landscape – Yard Fill – Pressure Wash – Roofs – Home Repairs – Welding – Etc. Dave 954-818-9538. 8-31 MIKE THE GARDNER “ The All American Yardman” Yard And Garden Care – Get The Best For Less!! Call 561-5436337 Cell. 9-14 HONEST HANDYMAN – HOME & BUILDING Maintenance/Improvements. No Job Too Small. Fast Friendly Service. Reasonable Rates. Local Resident/Homeowner. Call Today For Your FREE Upfront Quote. No Deposit Required. 754-366-1915. 824 PRIVATE INSTRUCTIONSPIANO LESSONS. ADULTS & CHILDREN. YOUR HOME. 954-938-3194. 8-24 ROMANCEATTRACTIVE SLIM Brunette 45 Seeks Established Man 45 – 62 For Long Term Relationship. Leave Message. 954-278-1186. 8-24 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIESNew GREEN technology. New defroster control saves energy in home refrigerators, commercial chillers. Patented. All optical. Simple mfg. Strategic partners needed..www.NewAvionics.Com. 954-568-1991. C MUSICIANS WANTEDADVANCED STUDENT MUSICIANS Being Accepted For 2012 – 2013 Membership in the American Legion Symphonic Band! Earn Community Service Points While Improving Your Performance Skills! Rehearsals On Wednesday Evenings from 7pm to 9pm at American Legion Post 142, 171 SW 2nd St., Pompano Beach, FL 33060. Band Director Recommendation Encouraged. Email Music Director James McGonigal at info.legionband@ gmail.com for more information. C REAL ESTATE SERVICESSELLING OR BUYING Choose Someone You Can Trust 18 Years Experience. English, French, Spanish, Greek. Yvette Gaussen. YES WE CAN REALTY. 954-6147773 Or 954-773-8340. 8-31 MFG HOMESFT LAUD / POMPANO WATERFRONT 2 / 2 On Fishing Canal. Private & Peaceful. $49,900. Call John For Appt. 954-495-0557. 9-7ROOMS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH ROOM FURNISHED W/ADJOINING 1/2 Bath (Access To Full Bath / Laundry) In Private Home. Private Entrance. Walking Distance To Mall. $160 / Wk. 954-782-7322. 8-24 E. DEERFIELD BEACH – E Of A1A – 1st Floor Furnished. Large Fridg., Kitchen, Micro, Laundry, Own Bath, TV, A / C. $170 Week. 954-725-9680. 8-24 CEMETERY PLOTS2 PREMIUM LOTS – SIDE BY SIDE. Forest Lawn Cemetery For Sale. $1,500 OBO Call 561-6039383. C. REAL ESTATE WANTEDI BUY HOUSES!! CASH!! AS IS! QUICK CLOSE! ANY AREA – ANY CONDITION! NO EQUITY OK. CALL NOW 954-914-2355. 10-19 CONDOS FOR SALEPOMPANO BEACH – DIRECT OCEAN VIEW!! Pet Friendly! 2/2 AT THE BREAKERS! $265K. Also For Rent. Call Juliana At Barclay’s For Details. 1-305-766-4420. 8-17 POMPANO BEACH DIRECT INTRACOASTAL! Feels Like You’re On A Boat. Pool On Intracoastal. Wrap-A-Round Balcony. Spacious 1 / 1.5 $178K. Also For Rent $1350 Month. 954-588-0562.

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The Pelican 37 Friday, August 24, 2012 Classi eds Call 954-545-0013 In Pompano BeachPompano Library, 1213 E. Atlantic Blvd. Auto Tech, 429 N. Dixie Hwy. Sample Road Auto Spa, 2501 W. Sample Road NuTurf, 2801 N. Dixie Hwy. Chit Chat Lounge, 651 N. Federal Hwy. Sunny’s Produce, 677 N. Federal Hwy. Golden Corral, 2100 W. Atlantic Blvd. Brandy’s Shoes, 1290 N. Federal Hwy. POMPANO BEACH “THE CLARIDGE” Large Updated 2 / 2 Corner Penthouse – Ocean – Intracoastal & City Views! Washer / Dryer In Unit. Impact Glass. $498,500. Ruthie Brooks – Balistreri Realty. 954-8034174. 8-24 CONDOS FOR RENTFT LAUDERDALE ICW Gated Community. 1/1.5, Furnished / Unfurnished. Granite, Wood Floors, Lots Of Amenities. Great Location. No Pets. $950 Month. Call 954588-1644. 9-14 POMPANO BEACH 55+ Community. Renovated 2/1 – Pool!! With Sunroom – Ground Floor / On Golf Course. Beautifully Furn. 1 Year +. Good Credit. $700 Month. 954-531-7708. 8-31 LIGHTHOUSE POINT 2 / 2 1st Floor – 55+. Pool, Storage, Laundry Facilities. $900 Month / Water Included. Dorothy Bassano – Better Homes & Gardens Real Estate. 954-562-4919. 8-31 POMPANO INTRACOASTAL AT IT’S BEST. Breathtaking Views! Feels Like You’re On A Boat, Pool Deck On Intracoastal. Spacious 1 / 1.5 $1350 Month. A1A S.E. Corner – Unobstructed Views. 2/2 $1,500 Month. 954-588-0562. 9-14 APTS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH 1 BR & 2 BR APTS FOR RENT. Remodeled, Paint, Tile, Etc. Washer / Dryer On Site. Pool. Pet Friendly. George 954-8095030. 8-24 POMPANO BEACH 1/1 Apartment. $700 Month Yearly Lease. Pool, Off Federal Hwy. Pet OK! Call Anthony 954-8575207. 9-7 POMPANO BEACH 1/1 $650 – 2/1 $750 NW – NE 2/1 $950 – 2/1,5 Townhouse $1095 SW 1/1 $750 – 2/1 $925 – 2/2 $950 – 3/2 $1025 ALL FREE WATER. Rent + $70 App MovU-In. 954-781-6299. 8-31 POMPANO 2/1 $775 Month Yearly Lease. Pool, Laundry Room, Close To Shopping. Pet OK! 1960 NE 48 Street. Call Anthony 954-857-5207. 9-7 DOWNTOWN LAUD BY THE SEA – Clean Apartments. Near Beach, Shopping, Restaurants. On Site Courtyard, Parking, Laundry. Wayne 954-868-5560. 8-24 POMPANO ATLANTIC / INTRACOASTAL AREA – South Of Publix. Ef ciency Furnished – Private Entrance. Utilities Included. Non-Smoker. Long Term. $700 Month. 954415-8838. 8-24 POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 Bedroom From $500. Easy Movein. 1/2 OFF DEPOSIT. Remodeled. Great Location. 954-783-1088 For More Info. 9-14 COMMERCIAL FOR RENT-SALEPOMPANO COMMERCIAL OFFICE Spaces Available. Ranging From As Low As $500 To $700 Depending On Square Footage. Please Call Darci At 954-7833723. 9-7 DEERFIELD BEACH – Retail Of ce Warehouse – 700 Sq Ft With Loft. A/C, Bathroom. $575 Per Month. Call For More Info 561-654-1331 Or 561-9985681. 8-24 CORAL SPRINGS – 1800 SQ FT. Easy Access To Sawgrass, Ample Parking, Monument Sign. FREE RENT & Buildout. Call 954-328-0413. 9-14Call The Pelican at 954-783-8700! Pelican Classi eds mean business 954-783-8700!

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38 The Pelican Friday, August 24, 2012 “ Lighthouse Point Phil Smith has had a history in South Florida for over 35 years. A resident of Coral Ridge, Smith began his auto sales empire with a Toyota dealership in Homestead. Today he has 18 dealerships in three states which constitute the 55th largest automotive group in the U.S. Four of those dealerships handle the Kia brand which is considered the fastestgrowing motor company in the U.S. “Kia was the fastest foreign manufacturer to sell three million units in the U.S. market,” said Wes Lasher, general manager of Lighthouse Point Phil Smith Kia. That means the Korean auto manufacturer outsold Toyota, Honda and Nissan. “The brand is on fire,” Lasher said. Lighthouse Point is the headquarters for all of Phil Smith’s dealerships. Phil Smith Kia opened here in 2002 and has since established an unmatched reputation for customer service. For six consecutive quarters it has won Kia’s Customer Service Satisfaction Award and is recognized by Kia as the only dealership in the country to do so. “We treat people the way we would want to be treated,” Lasher said. “Buying a car is supposed to be a great experience, a reward. So we try to live by the Golden Rule here.” Lasher himself has been in the automotive business for 25 years, 20 of them in South Florida. His experience, along with that of his staff, account for the fact that 30 to 40 percent of their business comes from referrals. “We take care of you before, during and after the sale,” Lasher said. The other reason Kia sales are soaring is, in Lasher’s words, that the “smart money” is finding the brand. Topping the reasons people buy a Kia may be the outstanding warranty that is offered: 10 years and 100,000 miles on the drive train. Then there is value along with design and styling. Kia can offer customers a car costing $13,000 or one costing $36,000. The popular Optima hybrid, selling for less than $30,000, comes with duel sun roof, a navigation system, heated and air-conditioned and memory seats, and then again that warranty, the best in the industry. Lasher has another policy that attracts customers. He will trade for anything, he said. And why are owners of luxury cars turning them in for Kias? “People are buying smarter,” he said. “They want more value for the money spent.” He has taken in Boxsters, Mercedes convertibles, the Lexus hybrid, Jaguars, a BMW 750. He also believes Kia is creating an image which appeals to the cliquish buyer. “It’s like they now belong to a clique, a clan,” Lasher said. Kia began in the 50s as a manufacturer of steel tubes. Later it went into making bicycles and in the 60s came out with a threewheeled truck. In the 70s, it manufactured its first sedan, the Brisa, and in the 80s reached one million in sales. In the 90s, the company expanded into the U.S. and European markets. One manufacturing plant and two design facilities are located in the U.S. This month, Phil Smith Kia may be enjoying one of its best sales events ever. August, when the current models go on sale to make way for the new ones, is traditionally the best month in the business, Lasher said.Colorful Kia showroom is perfect setting for cutout of NBA star Lake Grif n. Kia is a major sponsor of the NBA.The smart-money is buying Kias.” Wes Lasher, GM Phil Smith Kia.Phil Smith Kia 4230 N. Federal Hwy. Lighthouse Point • 954-435-7200Kia auto dealership has a history of customer satisfaction Phil Smith Kia in Lighthouse Point is headquarters for all of the Phil Smith auto dealerships. Phil Smith Kia is a consistent winner of the Customer Service Satisfaction Award. [Below] One of the value offers that brings customers to Phil Smith Kia.

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The Pelican 39 Friday, August 24, 2012 “ Lighthouse Poin t – To write a story about a 22year-old entrepreneur for a “history edition” might seem a bit ludicrous. But in the case of Marlin Greene, owner of The Hydrant, an elegant pet boutique, it can be justified. Greene, has been in his line of work since he was 14 years old, first working in a local pet boutique and then gaining corporate retail experience at Pet Supermarket. Eighteen months ago he opened his own specialty store stocking it with just about anything a dog or cat owner might require for their pet. In appearance, the shop is higher end. Comfy white couches and huge white orchids set the tone. White shelves and drawers contain the merchandise. But along with all the glitter, there are items for cats and dogs that are priced competitively with the supermarket stores. Best sellers are the colorful collars vividly displayed in a wall unit. Next in popularity are the novelty toys, some of which closely resemble the real things that puppies like to chew on. Greene said his third biggest sellers are the bigdog beds of which he has The Hydrant, 2022 E. Sample Road, Lighthouse Point • 954-941-3330I know my customers one-onone. I try to have a selection that re ects every pet owner’s taste. Marlin GreeneYoung retailer understands his industry: Dogs and cats are treated like people in the new urban societyMarlin Greene with two of his favorite ‘friends’ at his pet supply store, The Hydrant. The store carries a large and colorful i nventory of dog collars. Large-dog beds come in a variety of custom fabrics to match a home’s dcor.a huge inventory and then offers 350 fabric swatches for custom orders. For small dogs, carriers that look like very good purses, car seats and strollers are big sellers. Greene said that the strollers are extremely practical for shopping or sightseeing or festival–going. In this waterfront, seafaring community, life vests to protect poochie at the beach, around the pool or on the boat, are popular items. For small dogs there are, of course, clothing. T-shirts start at $14. To accessorize, there are bejeweled leashes for about the same price. The Hydrant carries a line of organic food that contains free-range chicken, no fillers, no byproducts and no gluten. Many dogs have food allergies, Greene said. And cats, often picky eaters, love the Health Extension brand of food he stocks. Another good seller is an organic chew made of elk or deer antler that cleans a dog’s teeth, stimulates gums and provides bone marrow in the diet. And for the pet celebrating a birthday, cakes can be special-ordered that contain only healthy products. “The pet industry is a $52 billion business,” Greene said. “Dogs are treated like people.” His shop is unique to the area. There is none other that is solely a dog/cat boutique, although some groomers and vets carry a few items and food lines. Greene attends four industry shows a year to keep his inventory fresh. He likes owning a shop as opposed to managing a large store. In all, he carries 150 to 200 product lines, changing out his shelves to match the seasons. “I know my customers one-on-one and their pets are always welcome,” Geene said. “I try to have a selection that reflects every Jeweled collars, leashes, organic food for pets at The Hydrant pet owner’s taste.” A pet that is always on the premises is Sabrina, a calico Persian cat, who is very good at customer relations, Greene said. Now, he is hoping to work with the Florida Humane Society to conduct pet adoptions in the store, giving those who take in a rescue dog or cat discounts on essential pet supplies.

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40 The Pelican Friday, August 24, 2012 “ Fort Lauderdale – Robert Borowski came to South Florida right after Hurricane Andrew and stayed for 20 years building a reputation along the way for being one of the most reliable and knowledgeable roofing contractors in the area. He did this by becoming skilled at applying all roofing materials – metal, tile and shingle – and by hiring craftsmen with the oldschool skills of coppersmithing. “I have a lot of employees from Europe where this trade is a family tradition,” Borowski said, adding “We are one of the few companies capable of installing all roofing products.” He started Allied Roofing in Pompano Beach and moved to a larger Fort Lauderdale location 10 years ago. He is one of the few roofers who produce his own sheet metal panels which gives him much-needed product control. His work is visible all over north Broward including at The First Presbyterian Church of Pompano Beach, JB’s restaurant on the beach in Deerfield, the Hillsboro Club on the Hillsboro Mile. The Club with its steeply pitched roof and the constant offshore winds was one of his most challenging jobs, Borowski said. In addition, he had to work around the summer guests. And when JB’s expanded 10 years ago, the Allied crew redid the roof with material guaranteed to withstand the effects of salt and sand for 25 years. In fact, warranties on workmanship and materials are something all customers should insist on Borowski said. Believing that his customers should be fully informed, Borowski presents them with 20 questions that give them an opportunity to compare contracts. “We try to show our customers all their options. An educated consumer is a more satisfied one.” The Allied website, alliedroofing.cc also contains information important to potential customers. Those who want to know what the replacement of a roof entails, should watch movies of Allied’s latest jobs on youtube channel.Allied Roo ng & Sheet Metal, Inc. 2801 NW 55 Ct., Bay 5W, Fort Lauderdale • 954-485-5922. When the economy took a downturn in 2008, Borowski shifted his business from new construction to custom and residential roofing. “We were lucky enough to turn the right way,” he says now. Taking his belief in self-sufficiency to great heights, Borowski has installed backup generators in his 7,000 squarefoot building, has a plan for his employees to follow preand -post -hurricane events, and has equipped his fleet with global positioning systems. Because of its strong financial position, suppliers are willing to sell materials directly to Allied Roofing and the company is never short of product. “We are prepared for bad times. We can get up and running quickly,” he said. Allied also installs solar panels, hot water panels and rainwater harvest systems. Borowski came to this country from Poland 29 years ago, immigrating during what he said were “difficult times.” He credits his success to being an owner-operated business and to being a “detail guy.” He also believes that “good people are key for success. We have a massive amount of longtime employees, and I was able to keep them even in the downturn.” The majority of his business – probably 80 percentcomes from referrals. “We have good people, good service and give good work. There is nothing magical about it,” Borowski said. He also offers warranties with every job. “The customer should insist on manufacturer’s warranties to protect his investment,” he said. A resident of The Cove in Deerfield Beach, Borowski is a strong supporter of community events and belongs to chambers in several cities. In Pompano Beach, he contributes to the Yuletide Parade; in Deerfield Beach, he sponsors the Founders’ Days’ fireworks. He also does charitable work at his church and through his professional associations. Allied Roofing is also located in Miami and Borowski is thinking about expanding his operation to West Palm Beach. “Things are slowly turning around,” he said. “I want to be ready for the good times.”We try to show our customers all their options. Robert Borowski Attention to detail in an atmosphere of trust has made Allied Roo ng a success story The crew at Allied Roo ng

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42 The Pelican Friday, August 24, 2012

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The Pelican 43 Friday, August 24, 2012 “ Pompano Beach Keeping Dave Giannone away from fixing boats is not a bet anyone wants to take. Here’s why. Dave has been repairing boats for over 30 years. He has gone from traveling to home docks with tool boxes offering dockside repairs to owning Giannone Marine, 800 S. Federal Hwy. Pompano Beach, a company with water access employing over 30 people. Dave sold the business to Aqua Toy Store in 2002, took an eight-year hiatus, returned and took over boat repairs as well as brokering sales of used boats. Now he is back in the same space with his new company since 2010, Complete Marine. Dave is using up every inch of space with sales, dockage, repairs and storage. “Sales are really good now for used boats,” he says. “The industry is more solid today. People are recognizing a good deal in this economy. I’ve got an acre of boats. They are good boats for good prices.”ServiceThe slogan here is “From Bottoms to Repower, We Do It All.” And Dave says he and his crew “. . abide by that.” Complete Marine offers a 25-ton travel lift and a 10ton forklift for dry-docking, painting and cleaning. Complete Marine also offers a wide variety of bottom and anti-fouling paint. They can haul motor and sail boats, and many captains just motor their way to Complete Marine for the work they need. “We can handle anything from a 2HP engine to a 1,000HP diesel,” he says. Complete marine also offers fiberglass repairs and prepurchase marine inspections. And Dave says service is “important” to maintain a safe vessel. “Boats should be seen for yearly service, and it’s critical to have a trained eye look at a boat. We can repair problems that could otherwise be catastrophic.”Hurricane AdviceWhen the storms churn in the Atlantic, boaters have a little more to think about when preparing for strong winds and high water. Dave offers dry storage only for hurricane protection, but the best advice he has for these unpredictable storms is to “make sure your insurance is paid.” New York to Pompano BeachDave came here from upstate New York where his boating centered on the fresh waters of the mountain lakes. The auto industry was booming then, and Dave left high school in 1979 to study marine mechanics. His first job here was at Hammerhead Marine where he worked as a technician. He saw the boating industry booming and his profession unfolding in the late 80s. Today, Dave tries to find time to take his 42-Hatteras to Bimini, a boat that gets him there in 2 hours and 45 minutes and back 15 minutes quicker with a little help from the Gulf Stream. Dave Giannone’s story is one of the boating history of Pompano Beach, a city of oceanfront and inland canals where thousands of vessels find berth. And this guy is right here to keep those vessels in good shape.Whether power or sail, Complete Marine in Pompano Beach offers reliable service since 1985Complete Marine, 800 S. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach • 954-786-9013 www.completeboat.comBoats should be seen for yearly service, and it’s critical to have a trained eye to look at a boat. We can repair problems that could otherwise be catastrophic. The staff at Complete Marine can help boat owners forge a life-long relationship with their vessels. From purchase to maintenance to docking to selling, Complete Marine’s staff can take care of everything a boat owner needs to enjoy their baby for years to come. “We handle big and small boats. If it’s a boat and they need something we can handle it,” said owner David Giannone.

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44 The Pelican Friday, August 24, 2012Pompano Beach dermatologists share life and work togetherTheirs is not only a partnership in business but a partnership in life, as well. They are the Doctors Hecker – Melanie and David – a married couple who operate Hecker Dermatology Group in Pompano Beach. Not all couples would choose to spend so much time together, but the Heckers enjoy it and say it’s an advantage in their medical practice. “There’s no challenge in working together,” says Melanie. “I’m working with someone I trust.” David says they want the practice to succeed, “so we’re on the same page.” These doctors love what they do. “The beauty of dermatology is that we do everything,” explains Melanie. “We see men, women and children, and the situation in each examination room is different.” The doctors may remove a skin cancer from one patient and perform a cosmetic procedure on the next. “The variety makes for an interesting day,” Melanie says. Besides taking much satisfaction in helping people, the Hecker doctors like the size and personal nature of their practice, which is at 3500 NE 5th Avenue, just off Sample Road near Dixie Highway, in Pompano Beach. They call it a “mom and pop” or “boutique operation.” The doctors entered careers in dermatology from different directions. As a teenager growing up in Hollywood, Florida, David was impressed by his dermatologist, who became a role model and mentor. He decided then to pursue such a medical career himself. During his medical residency at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City, David trained with an internationally recognized expert on psoriasis, and he developed a special interest in that disease. He did research and published professional papers on the subject. He is excited about “a big revolution in the treatment of psoriasis” – a new class of medication called biologics. Psoriasis is a chronic disease, he explains. There is no cure. Patients must stay on the drug forever, but their skin is clear. “We’ve never gotten someone clear before,” he says. “This is exciting because I can help people in a way that I never could before.” Melanie’s path to health care is probably not surprising, considering that her father and three brothers are medical doctors. But she did not take a direct route to her medical practice. After earning an MBA in nance, she began a career on Wall Street. While she enjoyed Wall Street, it wasn’t as satisfying as she’d like, so she headed for medical school and a career based on helping people directly. Her education led her to research dermatology at Weill Cornell Medical Center in New York City at the same time David was studying there. They met while making “rounds” at the hospital. The rest, as they say, is history – a meeting that led to marriage, three children, a medical practice together in Pompano Beach, and a home in Lighthouse Point. They began their medical careers in 1999 with David rst practicing in Boca Raton. He still sees patients part-time in Boynton Beach. But it was always their hope to practice together, and he joined Melanie in Pompano Beach a couple of years ago. Despite their busy medical practice and the demands of parenting three children, the Doctors Hecker make time for community service. They have participated in numerous free cancer screening events sponsored by various community groups, distributing information, providing advice and screening hundreds of people for signs of cancer. They are quick to stress the importance of these screening events. “Routine body checks can prevent you from having cancer down the road,” Melanie says. It’s important because one person in the U.S. dies every hour from melanoma -one of the fastest growing cancers in the U.S.” She explains that 80 percent of the damage to your skin is done before you are 18 years old, so it’s important to educate children. “That’s why we like to see families,” she adds. The realities and economics of practicing medicine today result in many dermatologists joining larger group practices. But the Heckers plan to stay right where they are to continue their “mom and pop” approach to serving patients for just as long as they can.Together Husband and wife physicians in Pompano Beach, Drs. Melanie and David Hecker. Pompano Beach Hecker Dermatology Group, focuses on diseases of the skin and cosmetic procedures.Hecker Dermatology Group, 3500 NE 5th Avenue, Pompano Beach 954-783-2323