<%BANNER%>
Pompano Pelican
ALL VOLUMES CITATION MAP IT! PDF VIEWER
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00090900/00313
 Material Information
Title: Pompano Pelican
Uniform Title: Pompano Pelican
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: Pompano Pelican
Place of Publication: Pompano Beach
Publication Date: 08-17-2012
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Pompano Beach
Coordinates: 26.234722 x -80.125556 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00090900:00313

Downloads

This item is only available as the following downloads:

( PDF )


Full Text

PAGE 1

Friday, August 17, 2012 Vol. XX, Issue 33 Wherever you are, read The Pelican @ pompanopelican.com Send news to siren2415@gmail.com Pompano Beach Deer eld Beach Lighthouse Point Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Wilton Manors Oakland Park Hillsboro Beach The Galt Palm Aire The Pelican Pelican 102 days left in 2012 Hurricane season By Judy VikPELICAN STAFF Dania Beach The young man whose award-winning design bedecks the Lauderdale-By-The-Sea beach pavilion at Commercial Boulevard is now attracting the attention of area shermen and boaters with his marine art. For the past two months Eddie Forbes has been at work transforming the ceiling of the bar at Dockers Caf and Bar in Dania Beach into a view of the ocean from the bottom looking up. He started out with one hammerhead shark and gradually added tuna, Wahoo, barracuda, a turtle and four other species of shark Pavilion artist takes talent to Dania Beach See ARTIST on page 21 Eddie Forbes is transforming the ceiling of Dockers Cafe & Bar in Dania with his depictions denizens of the ocean. [Forbes artwork]Civic amenities, hotel and restaurant development forecast a new future for Pompano BeachBy Judy VikPelican Staff Pompano Beach Pompano Beach is in the process of reinventing itself, Elaine Fitzgerald, chair of the tourism development task force of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, said this week. To reach that goal, Fitzgerald said, the citys Economic Development See FORECAST on page 7 Dead in Attic is a collection of stories by Times-Picayune columnist Chris Rose, recounting the rst harrowing year and a half of life in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina. Celebrated as a local treasure and heaped with national praise, Rose provides a rollercoaster ride of observation, commentary, emotion, tragedy and even humor in a way that only he could nd in a devastated wasteland. Amazon.com reviewBy Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFOn a recent trip to New Orleans, I nally got the courage to buy a few books that focused on Hurricane Katrina. 1 Dead in the Attic is taking me a long time. Its a bitter medicine, but Roses writing is the spoonful of sugar needed in my case. As a frequent visitor, I remember my rst trip after Katrina for the famous Jazz Fest. See 1 DEAD on page 26 Heartbreaking tales of life and death during Hurricane Katrina, a must-read for Floridians Another parasailing death occurs as Florida lawmakers stall safety legislationBy Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach A vacationing Connecticut woman died Wednesday in Pompano Beach after she fell more than 150 feet while parasailing with her husband near the Hillsboro Inlet. According to City of Pompano spokesperson Sandra King, Kathleen Miskell, 28, was parasailing in tandem with her husband, Stephen, when her See PARASAIL on page 25

PAGE 2

2 The PelicanFriday, August 17, 2012 By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFWilton Manors Every large development begins with a single step. And on Tuesday, city commissioners took that step with a unanimous vote to issue a proposal for a public/private partnership to develop the city hall parking lot. The request for proposals, or RFP, which will be sent out to various construction and development companies, will involve building either a hotel, residential units, theatre or retail complex. The city also will accept other ideas on how to utilize the property. If something is built, it would have to include a parking garage with at least 400 spaces and a public gathering space with room to display public art. There are so many steps before we get a shovel in the ground, said Heidi Shafran, community development services department director. Shafran said that once the RFP is released applicants have 90 to 120 days to respond. She expects the city to start reviewing bids by December. Wilton Manors Commission takes rst step on public/private partnershipBy Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach Following the lead of Lauderdale-By-The-Sea, Deer eld Beach and some other Broward cities, Pompano will soon see a change to the hours during which alcoholic beverages can be purchased. Voting 63.75 percent to 36.25, Pompano residents approved the amendment that will allow commissioners to change the hours. Recently, other cities in Broward have amended their ordinances to allow earlier alcohol sales on Sunday. Deer eld Beach allows Pompano voters say yes on alcohol sales, commission employment, no on city land transfers to CRA patrons to buy alcoholic beverages starting at 8 a.m. on Sundays, Lauderdale-By-TheSea and Wilton Manors allow drink sales to begin at 7 a.m. Oakland Park and Lighthouse Point prohibit alcohol sales until noon. Were putting our faith in our city commission to make the right decision, said Ric Green, president/CEO of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, who supports the change. On Tuesday, the Chamber had people at the polls passing out literature asking for voters to approve the amendment. Green said businesses in See VOTERS on page 16 See PARTNERSHIP on page 20

PAGE 3

The Pelican 3 Friday, August 17, 2012 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach Whoever said Dont bring your personal life to the workplace, didnt know about Francine Baugh, newly appointed principal at Deer eld Beach Middle School. An avid sports fan, Baugh uses sports analogies to get her points across to students, staff and parents. Sports, she For new Deer eld Beach Middle School principal, it is all about the team says, is often the common denominator that gets the conversation started. I value every opinion, Baugh said. And to get a W, everyone has to work together. A graduate of Florida State University, Baugh roots for the Seminoles and then extends her allegiance to the Dolphins, Marlins, and Miami Heat. When a former student at Deer eld Beach High School played for New York in last years Super Bowl, she became a Giants fan too. See BAUGH on page 18 City gets $1 million grant for education corridorPompano Beach The CRA team in Pompano Beach, led by Kim Briesemeister and Chris Brown have a plan for Dr. Martin Luther Kings Boulevard, and its a dream set for reality. This week, the city announced a state grant for $1 million which will be put to use on MLK Boulevard to highlight and focus on the educational promise of this city. Blanche Ely High School, a landmark of education rife with the history of the pioneer educator for whom the school is named, may not be physically on the Boulevard, but its presence permeates the entire community on and around the Boulevard. Says Chris Brown, co-director of the citys CRA, The funds will be used to add landscaping, sidewalks, lighting and See CORRIDOR on page 13Baugh

PAGE 4

4 The PelicanFriday, August 17, 2012 By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFWilton Manors For 10 years, Wilton Manors Main Street has focused on improving Wilton Drive. Now, its turning its attention to the entire city all possible after it changed its name to the Wilton Manors Development Alliance, or WMDA, earlier this month. Under Main Street, we were limited in our reach to the arts and entertainment district, said Krishan Manners, president/CEO of WMDA. By venturing out on our own, we can help the entire City of Wilton Manors. By changing the name, WMDA was able to save at least $40,000 by not hiring an executive director an expenditure they would have had to make if they remained part of Main Street. Avoiding that expense and the cost of paying dues to Main Street will allow WMDA to keep all the money it raises within the city. Staying with Main Street just isnt realistic without city funding. For a town our size it just does not make sense. Our whole city is only two square miles, said Manners. And with most Wilton Drives commercial, retail and restaurant space occupied, Manners said its time for WMDA to help develop the rest of the city. Wilton Drive has come a long way in the last 10 years. We want to bring that growth and that success to other areas of the city, said Manners. WMDA doesnt have any speci c plans yet to develop other areas but Manners and Tony LoGrande, vice president of WMDA, say everything from faade improvements, smart growth and marketing will be part of their efforts. LoGrande adds that its also about working with the neighborhood associations to attract the kinds of businesses residents want to see come into the city. If you really look at Wilton Manors, its a city of neighborhoods and each neighborhood has its distinct feel. This could really help those communities have a better identity, said LoGrande. Identity is also something the city wants. As WMDA gears up to focus more on the citys economic development, city of cials are also making their own economic development moves. Recently, Randy Welker was hired as the citys economic development coordinator, and the citys proposed budget for scal year 2012/2013 includes creating a new position that would be dedicated to marketing the citys events, programs and amenities. If hired, the person would also be responsible for bringing in sponsorship money. With the positions, the city hopes to bring in new businesses and activity to the citys commercial corridors. My job is to nd the strategies that will make that happen, said Welker. One of those strategies is making businesses attracted to the city. You want to get them interested in your community . to show them what kind of spending power you have. You have to create a market. As the city looks to further develop its commercial corridors economically, its also invested in improving streetscape conditions along them as well. Recently, new pedestrian safety and lighting features were added to Powerline Road and the city has applied for a $1 million grant to improve lighting, sidewalks and bicycle lanes along Dixie Highway south of Five Points. Northeast 15 Avenue, a mostly residential area, also recently received pedestrian and bike lane improvements. Leigh Ann Henderson, assistant city manager, said the city also wants to see improvements to Andrews Avenue. Thats something were hoping to work on this year. Were a little bit limited but we want to work with Andrews Avenue too. With name change, Main Street can focus on all of Wilton Manors economic development

PAGE 5

The Pelican 5 Friday, August 17, 2012 Tell The Pelican about your news! 954-783-8700 Deer eld Beach Bigs in Schools, a program that matches adult mentors with school children ages 6 to 18, has received a $94,000 grant from The Jim Moran Foundation. The grant was announced to commemorate what would have been Jim Morans 94th birthday on Aug. 8. Each year, the Foundation provides a Bigs grant, one for Broward County, the other in North Florida for a total gift of $188,000 to the Big Brothers Big Sisters organization. Ana M Cedeno, CEO of Big Brothers Big Sisters of Broward County said, Through the generosity of The Jim Moran Foundation, we can ensure that we improve childrens odds for succeeding in school and life. Bigs volunteer one hour of their time a week to visit the same classroom throughout the school year building friendships through one-on-one activities such as reading, working on school projects, playing games or talking. In Northeast Broward, 10 schools participate in the Bigs program which currently involves around 350 volunteer mentors. The grant money will be used to screen volunteers and match them with the appropriate students. It will enable more volunteers to be placed in the schools so that sisers McNally and McMinaida, who are pictured above, can one day be Littles in the Big program. The Jim Moran Foundation is located in Deer eld Beach and has since its inception in 2000, invested $30 million in education, elder care, after school and youth transitional living initiatives and family strenghtening. Bigs program receives generous grant from Moran FoundationDeer eld Beach Jan Moran [center], chairman and president of The Jim Moran Foundation, presented a $94,000 grant to Ana Cedeno [right], CEO of Big Brothers Big Sisters of Broward County, during Founders Day. Joining them were McCharly, a Little from Park Ridge Elementary and his mother, Natacha ([eft], and sisters, McNally and McMinalda, who are hoping to soon be matched with a Big. [Photo courtesy of JM Families]

PAGE 6

6 The PelicanFriday, August 17, 2012 Deer eld Beach, Pompano Beach, Lighthouse Point, LauderdaleBy-The-Sea, Wilton Manors and Oakland ParkWilton Manors Oakland Park Hillsboro Beach The Pompano Pelican is published weekly on FridaysStreet Address: 1500-A E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, FL 33060 Telephone: 954-783-8700 Fax: 954-783-0093Letters to the Editor are encouraged and accepted for print if signed, although a writers name will be withheld on request; letters must also include a daytime telephone number. Advertising rates are available upon request. Subscription rate is $31.80 including tax for one years delivery in Greater Pompano Beach; $95.40/per year including tax for others in the United States; call 954-783-8700 for rates abroad. The Pelican is a nonpartisan newspaper and reserves the right to decline advertising. Copyright 2012. Reproduction of this publication in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission of the publisher. The Pelican is a member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, Deer eld Beach Chamber and the LBTS Chamber. The Pelican is a state certi ed woman-owned minority business. The Pelican is delivered to businesses, libraries, schools, of ces, hospitals, news racks and single family homes. All advertising and copy is published at the sole discretion of the publisher. We welcome your critiques and ideas concerning this publication. Anne Siren, publisherExecutive Assistant: Mary Hudson Graphics: Rachel Ramirez Windsheimer Bookkeeper: John White Classi eds: Fran Shelby Contributing Writers: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Judy Wilson, Malcolm McClintock, Judy Vik, Michael dOliveira Account Executives: Paul Shroads, Carolyn Mann, Bill Heaton, Bill Fox Special Of ce Assistant: Cathy Siren ESTABLISHED 1993 Volume XX, Issue 33 Founding Editor and PublisherAnne Hanby Siren The Pelican wants to know what you think. Send your thoughts on local, state and national issues to siren2415@ gmail.com Send your letter to the editor siren2415@gmail.com LettersOpinion To the editor, Justice Sonia Sotomayor just celebrated her third anniversary on the United States Supreme Court. It is with much pride that I wish her a happy anniversary and thank President Obama for appointing the third woman and rst Hispanic to the nations highest court. The Presidents appointment of Justice Sotomayor sends a powerful message to women and girls that they can have grand aspirations for their futures because they can look and see someone in authority and in uence who looks like they do. The Presidents appointment also says to women and girls that he values them and cares about them. Throughout his term, President Obama has proven that he is a strong advocate for issues essential to women and their families. Justice Sotomayor is an important example of his commitment to women. Maggie Davidson Pompano Beach On Tuesday, July 10, 2012, Commander Charles Chuck Marchitello retired from the Lighthouse Point Police Department, following 36 years of distinguished law enforcement service. Prior to his service in Lighthouse Point, Chuck attended New York City Community College, and John J. College, holding AS degrees in marketing management and criminal justice. In 1966 Chuck entered the military service and spent three years serving in the United States Air Force. He was assigned in South Dakota and served as a jet engine mechanic. With a long time passion for policing, Chuck joined the New York City Police Department in Marchitellos 36-year service to Lighthouse Point residents is a record of distinction and pride, says police chief 1973 where he served as a patrol of cer during the rst three years of his law enforcement career. In 1976 Chuck decided to move his family to Lighthouse Point, where he wanted to raise his children in a small town, friendly atmosphere. In 1976, he began serving as a Lighthouse Point Police Department road patrol of cer, but quickly made his way up through the ranks, achieving the leadership role as corporal, sergeant, captain and commander. In 2003 Chuck also served as the Acting Chief of Police for several months while the agency went through a transition period. During the past 20 years, Chuck served as the Road Patrol Commander and served as the Police Departments Emergency Operations Commander, overseeing department hurricane planning, preparation and operations. He played an instrumental role in preparing the city for Hurricanes Wilma, Charlie, Jeanne and Frances, and through his community minded service, led a team of Lighthouse Point of cers in providing food and support to the residents of Homestead in Miami-Dade County, following the destructive aftermath of Hurricane Andrew. During the course of his professional career, Chuck was also involved in many community service activities, most notably serving for many years as a coach for summer youth programs at the Lighthouse Point Recreation Department. He has been the recipient of countless letters of appreciation from Lighthouse Point residents for his outstanding service, compassion, and helpful nature. Chuck was also recognized for life saving performance on two separate occasions. In one case, he responded to the home of a LHP family in which the grandparents were babysitting for their grandchild. The child had fallen into the swimming pool and was unresponsive when police arrived at the scene. Chuck immediately began performing life saving CPR and was successful in saving the childs life. In a second incident, Chuck responded to the Lighthouse Point Tennis Center where an elderly resident suffered a heart attack while playing tennis. When Chuck and fellow of cers arrived on scene, they found the victim in cardiac arrest and unresponsive. Chuck and his fellow of cers immediately began performing life saving CPR and rescue breathing. Within minutes, they were able to get a pulse and were ultimately successful in saving the mans life. Chuck was also the recipient of numerous commendations from the Lighthouse Point Police Department, as well as other law enforcement agencies in Broward County, for his distinguished law enforcement service. He was recognized for his role in the apprehension of criminal offenders that include in-progress armed robberies, burglaries, thefts and frauds. For 36 years, Chuck served the citizens of Lighthouse Point with distinction and pride. He became a beloved representative of the Lighthouse Point Police Department and the community and he will be sorely missed. We wish Chuck the very best in his well deserved retirement. Ross Licata Chief of Police Lighthouse Point Thank you to the 10.7 percent of the voters who went to the pollsBy Anne SirenPUBLISHERRecall The Little Red Hen who found herself with a handful of wheat seeds. According to the story, she asked, Who will help me plant these seeds? And no one answered her. No one helped her water, fertilize, weed or harvest. Remember her signature reply each time she asked? Then I shall do it myself, she said. On Tuesday, another question was posed to the more than 1 million voters in Broward County. Who will come to the polls to choose leaders, judges and school board members? The call was answered by a little more than 10 percent of those voters. A few more than 117,000 red hens and roosters showed up. They, like The Little Red Hen said, Then we shall choose them ourselves. Republicans, Democrats, Libertarians, Tea Party-ers: Heed the call to vote, for if you do not, we who vote will choose for you. Do not complain about war, taxes, the president, abortion, welfare, health care or education, do not espouse your opinions to us, for we do not care. Your words are like a clanging cymbal without an orchestra. You are the non-voters who allow Big Money to control elections. Come on back to the barnyard and help..

PAGE 7

The Pelican 7 Friday, August 17, 2012 Send your letter to the editor siren2415@gmail.com Council Tourism Committee recently proposed the city hire a full-time tourism manager beginning in FY 2013. Pompano Beach now has 2,297 hotel rooms and 147 restaurants and new hotels are on the horizon. A groundbreaking ceremony took place Wednesday for a new 219room Marriott at 1208 N. Ocean Blvd., site of the former Ocean Point. The hotel is expected to open in July. An Argentine investor has plans for a 110-room boutique hotel and condo, the Atlantic 3350 Hotel/Condo, on the block next to Walgreens. The project includes 77 condos. The Pompano Beach Fishing Village at the pier also has plans to include a 120-room boutique hotel on property that connects from the ocean to the Intracoastal Waterway, Fitzgerald said. That project will be down the road, since the land is now designated for public use and requires a land-use change. But in September, site plans will be presented in September for a hotel/marina near the Hillsboro Inlet. And a Canadian restaurant owner, who owns land on the southeast corner of Atlantic Blvd., just east of the bridge intends to open a steak house and boutique retail. So many cool things are going on. If youre in the tourism industry, you should be excited, Ric Green, chamber president/CEO, told task force members. Discussing other developments that should attract tourists, Fitzgerald said the citys new Greg Norman Signature Golf Course is scheduled to open at the end of December. And in February, Pompano Air Park completed a runway extension, to accommodate larger jet planes. City commissioners recently approved the addition of a 20,000-square-foot cultural center for the second oor of a new Broward County Library near city hall. In Old Pompano, the city soon will start on sewer and water renovations. The area is proposed to become a site for shops and art galleries. On Atlantic Boulevard, sidewalks are being widened to 20 feet and faade improvements are under way. An arcade, covered walkways and new parking lot are going in at Harbor Village. Design work is under way to give the bridge over the Intracoastal some pizazz. Planned is a public walkway and viewing areas. At the beach, equipment for an exercise trail has now been installed near the playground area and an interactive fountain should be complete by Aug. 24. A concert is planned for that evening featuring Blue Fire. The parking lot is nearing completion. Everything is a work in progress. Im really pleased with everything going on, Fitzgerald said. Green said the chamber, city and the Brazilian Business Group are teaming up to present a Brazilian Festival Nov. 24 at Community Park. TV Record, the second largest TV network in Brazil, will host the event and create a lm here featuring some of Brazils most popular and well-known entertainers. They will advertise the show and tell people to come to Broward County, Green said. Northeast Broward and southwest Boca Raton have a large concentration of Brazilians. This will be the equivalent of the Air and Sea Show in Fort Lauderdale. It will change the culture of the city and has all kinds of potential. Event volunteers can sign up from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sept. 8 at the Civic Center. In less encouraging news, Fitzgerald reported that according to VisitFLORIDA, visitors to Florida and Broward County reached an all time record in 2011. Tourism provided 18 percent of total state revenue and was the single largest private sector industry in Broward. But Pompano Beach captured less than ve percent of the dollars, she said. The city needs to increase the number of travelers to complement redevelopment efforts. We want a much larger share of visitors. We have to plan to bring them here. ForecastContinued form page 1

PAGE 8

8 The PelicanFriday, August 17, 2012 Send The Pelican your news, big or small, to siren2415@gmail.comBusiness matters The Pelican takes a look at local business owners. You can tell your story here because business matters. 954-783-8700. By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFSteve Fabrizio has owned Complete Auto Service at 3991 N. Dixie Hwy. in Deer eld Beach for the past 12 years. He says, The shop which started as a gas station has been here since 1954. My associate, Zack Pruzan, and I are both ASE, or Automotive Service Excellence, certi ed mechanics. Most of our business comes from word of mouth. We are straight forward in our assessment of what the problem is and we give our best advice on how to x it. The decision is the customers. Fabrizio started to work on cars as a teen and says hes been doing it every since. Cars have changed and servicing has changed, he says, smiling. Computer diagnostic tools nd the problem and the solution now. We offer a full array of services plus a lot of extras not available at the average service station. He lists those valuable extras as trailer hitches, handicap lifts, professional wiring and brake controllersall essential for driving safely on the highways. We get a lot of business from people who come to us for these special services, Fabrizio says. When they see our clean shop, they become customers for all of our services. Complete Auto Service may not do big price promotions, but the mechanics win a lot of customer praise when they do a free engine light scan for which their competitors all charge. And the free tire NitroFill is another accommodation that gets a big fee elsewhere. Asked why he does this, Fabrizio says, Im from the old school. I believe if you give a little, you often get a lot back from customers who remember your generosity. One grateful customer, Tom Williams wrote a note saying, Steve, thanks for the great service and for being so nice. I wish there were more people in this world like you. Jodie Fairchild wrote, Thank you for checking out my brakes and for taking such good care of my car. I cant tell you how much I appreciate your honesty. I hope to keep my car for another few years so I am grateful for a mechanic I can trust.NitroFillNitroFill gets high praise from Fabrizio because it has so many advantages in safety and tire wear. He says, I believe in the product so completely, I have it in my cars, motorcycles and even in the family bicycles. NitroFill does not leak out of tires at the speed of regular air. Tire pressure stays constant reducing wear on tires and increasing safety of passengers. This is especially true in Florida where the sun is punishing to tires as well as people. Fabrizio is a big supporter of the military and he says, I try to help our service people with special discounts and I support American Moms for Soldiers, a very worth while group. He and wife, Patti, have two sons. One is grown and working in the air conditioning eld. The other, Cross, is in high school. Dad says, Cross helps out here but does not plan on making a career in this shop. With a shrug he adds, He hopes to be a professional sherman. When The Pelican asked Cross how one becomes this, he explains, You get into all of the shing tournaments and if you are good enough, investors will start to back you. It works just like the other sport. One thing this dad and his son, Cross, share is a love for and participating in Demolition Derbies and cool motorcycles. Open Monday to Friday from 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Call 954-942-2400.Complete Auto Service offers many services for cars plus trailer hitches and handicap lifts Steve Fabrizio and his son, Cross, love to show off one of their prize motorcycles. Cross cant wait to turn 16 so that he can get his license and take off on this sunshine yellow and silver bike. [When you do Cross, dont forget your helmet. Photo by Phyllis J. Neuberger]Music Under the Stars -The popular Music Under the Stars Free Concert is back. For over past 20 years, the City of Pompano Beach has entertained the community with Music Under the Stars Concerts, providing a wide variety of music on the citys beach under the stars. Music kicks off at 7 p.m. just south of the Pompano Beach Fishing Pier, located at 222 N. Pompano Beach Boulevard. The Blue Fire Band is a combination of strong vocal abilities and incredible chemistry. Over the years, they have grown together as a group to produce one of the strongest acts on the scene. Call 954-786-4111. Music stars at Pompano Beach Greater Pompano Chamber Business Expo to be held September 12Pompano Beach -The Pompano Beach Greater Chamber of Commerce hosts its Annual Business to Business Expo on Wednesday, Sept.12 at the Pompano Beach Citi Centre. Over 100 regional businesses will gather to network and do business. Open to the public, this event offers residents a chance to learn about the many businesses in the local area. The event takes place from 5 to 8 p.m. The Pompano Beach Citi Centre is located on the corner of Copans Road and US 1 at 1955 North Federal Highway. The Expo will take place on the second oor between Lowes and Sears. Attendance to the event is open to all local business owners and the public. Cost is $10 per person. Advance tickets are two for $15. Attendees have a chance to win over 75 door prizes throughout the event by networking with the exhibitors. The Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerces 2012 Business to Business Expo on September 12 is a great opportunity to showcase businesses, products and services. A limited amount of exhibition space is still available to Chamber and nonChamber members. For more information visit www. PompanoBeachChamber.com, call 954941-2940 or email lspinelli@ pompanobeachchamber.com. Tell The Pelican about your news! 954-783-8700

PAGE 9

The Pelican 9 Friday, August 17, 2012 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFF Oakland Park Two new families got of cial welcomes to Oakland Park Tuesday when their homes were dedicated. Shukura Curtis and Lynette Robinson, both living in the 300 block of Northeast 35 Court in Harlem McBride, own the 29th and 30th Habitat for Humanity homes built here. Another two are nearing completion on Northeast 26 Street, and construction is starting on three more nearby. There is a huge need for decent, affordable housing in Broward County, Perry Ecton, executive director of Habitat for Humanity of Broward, said in an interview before the ceremonies. We wish we could serve everyone, but we have a nite amount of resources. Enrollment for housing applicants is opened annually and last time 1,500 people showed up, Ecton said. Habitat can serve only 30 to 40 families annually. Applicants are selected on a need basis. They must earn between 30 to 60 percent of the areas median income. They must pay 30 percent of their income toward mortgage, insurance and taxes. The homes are sold at appraised value. Like all Habitat homeowners, the Curtis and Robinson families contributed a minimum of 400 hours of sweat equity, working on the construction of their home and the homes of others. They also participated in educational programs designed to strengthen the entire family and help to ensure their success as new homeowners. Their low-cost, no-interest mortgage payments go toward building more Habitat Broward homes for families in need, Ecton explained. Sponsors for these homes were Bank of America Charitable Foundation and Publix Super Market Charities. Publix Super Markets Charities is proud to make the dream of home ownership a reality for one family, [the Curtises], said Kim Reynolds, Publix Miami media and community relations manager. Families desire to live in a stable and safe environment that brings comfort and pride, and Habitat affords that to hardworking individuals. We are proud to be a long-standing partner. New homeowner Shukura Curtis receives a symbolic key to her home from Kim Reynolds of Publix Supermarkets, corporate sponsor of the Curtis home. At left is Perry Ecton, executive director of Habitat for Humanity of Broward, who presided at dedication ceremonies. [Staff photos by Judy Vik]See HABITAT on page 24Two Oakland Park families move into new homes sponsored by charities of Publix Supermarkets and Bank of America

PAGE 10

10 The PelicanFriday, August 17, 2012 Pompano Beach Fuller Brothers Funeral Home plans a back to school event from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 18, at the funeral home parking lot at 1805 N. Dixie Highway. The event features free food, school supplies and haircuts. For more information, call 954-366-3758.Free school supplies, Aug. 18 Making a Difference Phyllis J. Neuberger wants your suggestions about people who are making a difference. Call 954-7838700.By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFSix lucky boys, selected by American Legion Post #142, joined a busload of other boys heading for Boys State this past July 8 to 14. Each boy received an all expenses paid week at Florida State University in Tallahassee plus $50 in spending money during the 69th session of Boys State. They participated in a one week comprehensive experience in state and local government. This leadership action program gave these high school juniors the chance to understand the political process. They elected governing of ces for a mythical 51st state. Each delegate was assigned to a political party that has no philosophy or platform until as a group they created one. Speakers from all levels of government provided valuable direction to the delegates. The use of Floridas State Capitol, actual legislature and cabinet make the experience very authentic. Pat Renneisen, American Legion Post 142 Chair of the Boys State committee, explains. We get applications out to all of the area schools, making our $500 scholarships available to all quali ed high school boys nishing up their junior year. However, Mia McFadden, Pompano Beach High School, or PBHS, seems to be the only guidance counselor American Legion Post #142 sends six juniors to Boys State for a one week exposure to Florida state government Sullivan Brown Cooperto push this valuable experience. She nds out who is interested and who is quali ed. Once applications are received, our Legionnaire panel of three men and me interview all of the applicants at the high school. The four boys chosen this year were recognized at PBHS spring awards ceremony. Our four boys were Patrick R. Sullivan and Wheeler J. Brown from Lighthouse Point, Freddy Renteria from Oakland Park and Niraj Harinarayan Maharaj from Tamarac. Our two alternates, subsidized by other posts, were Billy Norcilien from Margate and Nicholas Cooper from Pompano Beach. The transporting bus starts in the Keys and when it lls up, another bus begins the journey. Renneisen says, By the time each bus arrives in Tallahassee, the boys all know one another and are often campaigning for the job they want. One of our boys, Wheeler Brown, made Lt. Governor, the second to the top job. The boys also get the chance to earn three college credits if they choose to participate in the free class offered. The Pelican interviewed several of the boys who attended Boys State. Brown says, I was impressed with how many boys from Broward County ended up in powerful jobs. It was a great experience. I ended up as Mayor of my city and spent so much time managing my city, I did not have time to campaign for governor. But I did make Lt. Governor and I helped the Governor run his cabinet. We agreed on policies. While he was courting people, I was speaking to senators and representatives about some bills our party believed in. I helped to rewrite a few bills and got them passed. The most important one was allowing marriage equality, including same sex marriage. No Boys State had ever passed this bill. He continued, It was impressive to use the of cial chambers. I got to use the Cabinet Chamber. Asked how this experience affected him, Wheeler says, I no longer am interested in a political career because I learned its not who is the best quali ed, its whom you know. Wheeler has already attained the rank of Commander of Troops for Broward County JROTC. This title has enabled me to become battalion commander of my school and this is See BOYS STATE on page 19Bike for KIDS raceInlet challenge Bicyclers are invited to prepare and sign-up for the 11th Annual Inlet Challenge Bicycle Ride Dec. 2 from 5 a.m. to 2 p.m. The ride begins at Bahia Mar Resort in Fort Lauderdale and offer four distances: Century [100 miles], Metric Century [100 kilometers/62.5 miles], Half Metric Century [50 kilometers/31 miles], or Beach Cruiser [15 miles]. The ride is well supported with fully stocked Rest Stops, SAG, and repair services so everyone has all the assistance they need to successfully complete the route. Each rider must raise $150. All proceeds bene t Kids In Distress. Call 954-390-7654 phyllisbard@kidinc.org. Volunteer Opportunities are available at the Deer eld Beach Historical Society!Those with an inclination toward history and its impact on todays lives are invited to volunteer as tour guides of historic sites, organize photos and archives and help with general maintenance of the properties (light duties such as general housekeeping). The Deer eld Beach Historical Society is a non pro t 501 (C)(3) organization and has four sites listed on the National Register of Historical Places, join us and help us keep history alive.Call the DB Historical Society to sign up for training, (954) Tell The Pelican about your news! 954-783-8700

PAGE 11

The Pelican 11 Friday, August 17, 2012 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach Former mayor Al Capellini is scheduled to go before Circuit Court Judge Carlos Rebello Monday, Sept 10, on one count of unlawful compensation. The case has been pending in Circuit Court since Capellini was charged December 12, 2008, and has After four years, Capellini may have his day in courtbeen pending longer than any trial of a Broward County of cial, according to state attorney Tim Donnelly. Over the years, Capellinis attorney David Bogenschutz has sought dismissal of the felony charge six times before Judge Carlos Rebollo. All the motions were denied. Capellini, 64, is the owner of Crain Atlantis Engineering Co. in Deer eld Beach. He was arrested after the state attorney conducted an extensive review of his voting record and determined that on June 3, 2003, the mayor voted in favor of a land-use application for a project in Natura while his company was being paid as an engineering consultant. Residents in the over-55 community protested the project, an of ce park at the intersection of Natura Boulevard and Natura Avenue, citing traf c concerns. But the state attorney says, Crain Atlantis successfully steered the project through county and city approvals and earned a $16,000 fee. Crain of ces are located in that of ce park. Bogenschutz has contended publicly that Capellini disclosed his relationship with Atlantis several times, but on that one occasion failed to follow the state ethics rules on about disclosure. Capellinis arrest caused his removal as mayor by Gov. Charlie Christ after 20 years in local politics as a commissioner and as mayor. Donnelly said this week although the trial is on the calendar for Sept. 10, at the last minute something could happen. Donnelly said the trial could get bumped if a suspect is in custody or a more serious trial is pending. Because there is only one charge against him, Capellini does not have the option of offering a lesser plea. He has to go to trial, or plead to the charge, Donnelly said. A conviction could result in Capellini losing his professional license, and he could be sentenced to up to ve years in prison. Of Capellinis pending court appearance, Donnelly said Both sides say they are ready to go. I know wed like to get it tried. Later, at press time, Donnelly said he had heard Bogenschutz might be in a federal trial, which, if true, . . could delay the mayors day in court one more time.SightingsA community calendar of Broward County. Email events to siren2415@gmail. com 8-18 Relay for Life fundraiser at Deer eld Thrift, 1628 SE 3rd Court, Deer eld Beach. Join the treasure hunt from 9 a,m, to 5 p.m. with raf es, car washes and more. See SIGHTINGS on page 14

PAGE 12

12 The PelicanFriday, August 17, 2012 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach Time and money, the currency of a political campaign, were lacking for Broward County Vice Mayor Kristin Jacobs who lost the Democratic primary for Congressional Seat 22 resoundingly in Tuesdays election. Jacobs got into the race in February taking on former West Palm Beach mayor, Lois Frankel, who had announced more than a year ago and had won critical endorsements from key Democrats.Jacobs loses congressional bid, Democrats will rally around FrankelPriding herself on her success in the past running grass roots campaigns, Jacobs found the district too large and money too tight. She received 11,637 total votes to Frankels 18,376 but tellingly, in her home county, voters failed to capture a majority. In Broward, only 12,926 votes were cast in the race. Jacobs got 6,447 of them, Frankel 6,479 or 50.12 percent. In Palm Beach County, Frankel scored a whopping 69.80 percent of the vote. Maggie Davidson, president of the Democratic Womens Club of NE Broward said, In a race like this you have to have lead time. I really thought she would have known that. Davidson supported Frankel saying she was grati ed with Frankels results in Broward County. I was surprised Kristin didnt do better, Davidson said. Joanne Goodwin, president of the North Broward Democratic Club, supported her longtime friend Jacobs. Being late into the race and lack of money was a disadvantage, she said of the Jacobs campaign. If she had started earlier, it would have been a level playing eld and things could have turned out better. Frankel faces Republican Adam Hasner in November. Hasner is expected to be a tough opponent and to be well-funded by the National Republican Committee. Frankel goes into the runoff with a sizeable bank account, another thing which Davidson believes attracted noteworthy Democrats to her side such as House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi who visited South Florida last week. A lot of Frankels support came because Democrats believe she has the ability to go up against Hasner, Davidson said. The campaign created a rift among local Democrats, but this week Goodwin said she took healing steps. Immediately after the primary. She posted her support of Frankel on her Facebook page, texted her congratulations and urged Democrats to come together to elect Frankel in the fall. In a letter to supporters on Thursday, Jacobs praised the efforts of her team and thanked her supporters from organized labor. Jacobs had the endorsement of police and re unions and the ACL/CIO. A neighborhood activist before being elected to the county commission, she called her career in politics accidental but said she got into the race to give voters a choice.

PAGE 13

The Pelican 13 Friday, August 17, 2012 Advertise with The Pelican! 954-783-8700! possibly signage that will honor those persons who brought a higher sense of education to this city. The educational corridor on the Boulevard will be a pleasant walking, biking or other form of transit experience, he said. The Pompano Beach section of the corridor begins at North Dixie Highway and proceeds west to the Ronald Reagan Turnpike. And Broward College is just west of the turnpike. The complete corridor extends beyond Pompano Beach city limits through Margate, Coconut Creek and eventually to Coral Springs. The exact grant amount is $969,000. The Federal Highway Administration invited states, cities, tribal governments and local planning organizations to apply for federal funding from 12 grant programs. Nearly 1,500 requests poured in from every state, Puerto Rico and Washington, D.C. totaling approximately $2.5 billion. Grant funding was made available through enactment of the Surface Transportation Extension Act of 2012, Part II. The grant will fund construction on Hammondville Road/Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Boulevard from Powerline Road to the Turnpike and will also fund a study to research transit opportunities. The intent of the transit related improvements and the study are to provide greater mobility for area residents to local jobs and education opportunities with the intended result being more equitable and prosperous communities, a healthier cleaner environment and a more vibrant economy for this sector of the county. The cities of Coconut Creek and Margate have already completed or broken ground on phases of the Education Corridor project. When fully implemented, the Corridor will bene t all of Broward County, economically, educationally and environmentally.CorridorContinued from page 3

PAGE 14

14 The PelicanFriday, August 17, 2012 Funds will bene t American Cancer Societys Relay for Life. 954-871-9632 or 954304-4248. 8-18 From 8:30 to 10:30 a.m. Pompano Beach of cials will hold a contractors forum to solicit suggestions from the public on how to improve the citys permitting process. The forum will be held at city hall, 100 W. Atlantic Blvd. Call 954786-4670. 8-18 Splashes and Smiles Swim School celebrates Family Fun Day from 4:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Pompano Beach Aquatic Center, 820 NE 18 Ave. There will be swimming, re trucks, SightingsContinued from page 11 See SIGHTINGS on page 17snorkeling, games, raf e prizes and more. The event is free and all proceeds bene t the Kids Cancer Foundation of South Florida. 954-2460665. 8-19 Garage sale at the Herb Skolnick Center, 800 Southwest 36 Ave., Pompano Beach, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Hosted by Scleroderma Foundation of Southeast Florida. Vendors wanted. 954798-1854. 8-21 Groundbreaking ceremony for the new county courthouse takes place at 8;30 a.m. at 201 SE 6 St., Fort Lauderdale. The program will include remarks from judicial, county and city of cials. 8-24 Book sale at the Oakland Park Library, 1298 NE 37 St., from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Hosted by the Friends of the Oakland Park Library. 954-630-4370. Book sale resumes on Aug. 25 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. 9-1 Tickets for Night At The Ballpark are on sale at Wilton Manors City Hall, 2020 Wilton Drive, for $35 each. Cost includes bus ride to and from Marlins Stadium which departs from Wilton Manors Elementary School, 2401 NE 3 Ave., at 5 p.m. Sponsored by Wilton Manors CAAB. 954-390-2100. 9-12 & 9-26 El Club de Conversacin en Espaol: conversational Spanish practice for English speakers. Volunteers needed who speak Spanish and English. From 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. at North Regional/Broward College Library, 1100 Coconut Creek Blvd., Coconut Creek. 954201-2601. 9-14 Celebrate National Sewing Month with the Pompano Chapter of the American Sewing Guild. Hand sewing techniques will be demonstrated from 10:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at the North Regional/Broward College Library, 1100 Coconut Creek Blvd., Coconut Creek. 954201-2600. 9-17 The class Im on Facebook: Now What? will be held from 3 to 5 p.m. at the North Regional/ Broward College Library, 1100 Coconut Creek Blvd., Coconut Creek. Participants must have a Facebook account and password to attend. 954201-2600. 9-19 Art-By-TheSea group meets at the Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Community Church in

PAGE 15

The Pelican 15 Friday, August 17, 2012

PAGE 16

16 The PelicanFriday, August 17, 2012 Advertise with The Pelican! 954-783-8700! other cities have an advantage over Pompano because they offer mimosas and Bloody Marys earlier making themselves more attractive for the brunch crowd. It puts us on a level playing eld with other businesses, said Green. Resident Bob Shelley, who voted in favor of lifting the ban, said restaurants should be allowed to cater to tourists and their customers who want an alcoholic beverage before noon. Voters, by 57.25 percent to 42.75, also approved the amendment that releases commissioners from the county ethics codes requirements that they disclose nancial statements related to their outside employment. By designating commissioners as part-time employees of the city, voters placed their elected of cials under state law, which does not require nancial disclosures. But three times was not a charm as voters, 52.86 percent to 47.14, said no to the amendment that would have allowed the city to transfer land to the Community Redevelopment Agency, or CRA, for redevelopment purposes. One voter, who declined to give his name, said he thought the amendment was done under good intentions but didnt trust the commission to make good use of it, adding that he thought some previous projects werent handled right by the city. Commissioners were disappointed but said this wasnt the end of the issue. Well just have to work around it, said Commissioner Barry Dockswell. Mayor Lamar Fisher suggested the city could use long-term leases as a way for the CRA to utilize city land. I guess people just tend to get frightened when they hear things like eminent domain, said Fisher. But thats okay. Well work around it.VotersContinued from page 4 Chamber members supported Amendment 1. The signs were placed throughout the city by members. [Staff photo]

PAGE 17

The Pelican 17 Friday, August 17, 2012 SightingsContinued from page 14Friedt Family Hall, 4433 Bougainvillea Drive. Marcia Hirschy will discuss how artists can market their work. The meeting is free and open to anyone. 954-594-0444. 9-23 FAU professor and activist Mike Budd leads a discussion on Rachel Maddows new book, Drift: The Unmooring of American Military Power and the U.S. Love Affair with War. Event is free. Donations are requested. Event is at 1 p.m. at Unitarian Universalist Church of Ft Lauderdale, 3970 NW 21 Ave., Oakland Park. 908477-7812. 9-25 Card party held by the Benevolent Patriotic Order of Does Drove 142 is scheduled from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Pompano Beach Elks Lodge, 700 NE 10 St. Open to the public. Bring your table of friends or group. Cost is $4 which includes desert, coffee or tea. Call 561479-2002 for reservations. 12-2 Bike for KIDS race. Bicyclers are invited to prepare and sign-up for the 11th Annual Inlet Challenge Bicycle Ride from 5 a.m. to 2 p.m. The ride begins at Bahia Mar Resort in Fort Lauderdale and offers four distances: Century [100 miles], Metric Century [100 kilometers/62.5 miles], Half Metric Century [50 kilometers/31 miles], or Beach Cruiser [15 miles]. The ride is well supported with fully stocked Rest Stops, SAG, and repair services so everyone has all the assistance they need to successfully complete the route. Each rider must raise $150. All proceeds bene t Kids In Distress. Call 954-390-7654 phyllisbard@ kidinc.org.FridaysPompano Proud meets every second Friday of the month at McNab Park, 2250 E. Atlantic Blvd., from 8:30 to 11 a.m. Every second Sunday the group meets at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach, at 6 p.m. 954-562-3232. The Pompano Beach Rotary Club meets Fridays at 12:15 p.m. at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. 954-786-3274.SaturdaysPony rides are available at Sand & Spurs Equestrian Park, 1600 NE 5 Ave., Pompano Beach, from 9 to 11:30 See SIGHTINGS on page 27

PAGE 18

18 The Pelican Friday, August 17, 2012 At age 37, she is one of the youngest principals in Broward County. She replaces Christine Flynn who has been promoted to the of ce of School Professionalism and Accountability. Flynn had her own success story at Deer eld Beach Middle School winning the coveted Teacher of the Year Award for the county. She put out the red carpet for me, Baugh says of her predecessor. Baugh comes to the middle school with a record of improving school scores. At Deer eld Beach High School where she served as assistant principal, the schools rating rose from a C to a B. At Blanche Ely where she went speci cally to improve student reading and writing scores, the pro ciency rate rose by nine percent. DBMS is now a C school with International Baccalaureate and magnet programs. The scores are on a decline here. It will be a challenge to bring them up, but I know well be an A school in a few years, Baugh said this week. Baugh, whose entire career has been at the high school level, decided she wanted something different and applied for the principal position at four middle schools. She was delighted to be assigned to DBMS because after six years at DBHS, really loves this community. Because there are few charter schools in this area, the student population at DBMS remains at around 1,300 making it one of the largest in the county. Baugh is a rm believer in keeping the door to her of ce open for her staff, her students and their parents. She remains very visible walking around campus and eating in the school cafeteria. She encourages anyone having a bad day to come in and talk. I want everyone to know I value them, from the custodian on up. I value what they are thinking, she said. And I believe they all want to know how we are doing. She is also a disciplinarian who engages the parents when a student gets into trouble. Parents need to understand the process, she said. Ill always be honest with them, but I need their cooperation. As for the students, Baugh said she is always ready to listen and help them get to their dreams. BaughContinued from page 3

PAGE 19

The Pelican 19 Friday, August 17, 2012 Tell The Pelican about your news or special event! 954-783-8700 where I spend most of my free time. I look forward to a future as an of cer in the military. I hope to be accepted into West Point and some day become the Secretary of Defense. Nicholas Cooper, who lucked out as an alternate, says, Boys State was a great experience. I was a Mayor, a Forum delegate and eventually Forum President. I learned Parliamentary procedures and a great deal about how the senate runs its meeting. I see government in a whole new light and I have new respect for our representatives and their challenges. I would encourage others to apply for this great opportunity to experience government. It was a break that I got to go because another boy couldnt. Niraj Harinarayan Maharaj was voted in as a sheriff and eventually Sergeant at Arms for the House of Representatives. He calls Boys State one of the most memorable experiences in his life. I got to see and hear the pros and cons of government in action. Having seen this I can now make more informed decisions as a United States citizen. I would encourage next years Juniors to apply for this enriching experience. Patrick R. Sullivan calls his week at Boys State An amazing experience. I was city, county and state attorney. We tried two cases. One was the death penalty for a boy who had deliberately murdered several people in a theater. He got the death penalty. The other case dealt with internet monitoring in school. It was decided that monitoring the internet in school was allowed. This experience gave me an inside look into politics. I hope to become an attorney and maybe consider politics.The American Legion makes Boys State happenThis state wide program aspires to develop civic leadership and pride in American Citizenship and to safeguard and transmit to posterity, the principals of justice, freedom and democracy. Each Legion post like Legion Post 142 in Pompano Beach, comes up with the $500 per boy plus $50 each in spending money. For four boys that totals $2,200. Asked how they raise the money, Renneisen, says, We fund raise throughout the year to support this and a variety of other worthy causes. We have 600 male members, 300 women in the auxiliary and 75 in the Sons of the American Legion. Thats 975 paid members. The application for this annual program asks candidates basic information such as GPA, or grade point average, courses taken this semester, leadership activities, positions held in school and community, and helping projects he has participated in. Three questions asked are: What are your plans following high school graduation? What leadership trait quali es you for Boys State? If you were Governor of Florida, what is the one thing you would do to improve your state? During the interview process, a candidate might be asked the following questions. What do you think is the most pressing issue facing the state of Florida? Tell us about your school activities and favorite subjects. If selected, what bill would you intend to pass? What are your goals for the upcoming year? Are you willing to salute the ag? To receive an application for Boys State in 2013, contact your school guidance counselor or call Pat Renneisen at 954-938-9333. Thank you American Legion Post 142 for your support of Boys State scholarships to local high school boys nishing their Junior year in school. Boys StateContinued from page 10Summer Home Landscape Series 2012 concludesDania Beach Secret Woods Nature Center, 2701 W. State Road 7, Dania Beach concludes its Summer Home Landscape Series 2012, an annual series of free lectures designed for average homeowners who are interested in adding to the beauty of their homes through landscaping. The topic for the eighth and final lecture, from 7 to 8:30 p.m. on Thursday, Aug. 30, will be Fascinating Fungi, presented by Broward County Park Aide Scott Bryan. Attendees at the series will learn ways to save money on their cooling and water bills, attract wildlife, and preserve native vegetation; theyll also improve the appearance of their yards and neighborhoods as well as increase property values. All sessions are held in the nature centers airconditioned Julia Hall. The final date for the series, which runs for eight weeks

PAGE 20

20 The Pelican Friday, August 17, 2012 Pompano Pompano Green Green Market Marketevery Saturday every Saturday morning from 8 morning from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at a.m. to 2 p.m. at the corner of West the corner of West Atlantic Blvd. & Atlantic Blvd. & Cypress Road. Cypress Road. Eat Healthy! Mayor Gary Resnick said he would like to see a hotel or some kind of tourist attraction, adding that he thinks the citys lack of a hotel hurts efforts to attract tourists. Shafran said the city is combining the adjacent Hagen Park basketball court and open space as part of the 2.3acre site, which includes the old city hall site and former Rothes property. Although they will be left intact and not developed, Shafran said the basketball court and vacant lot would be included as part of the open space for whatever is built. Those pieces will not go away, she said. Former mayor John Fiore called that a shell game and suggested that the city should build something on its own by doing a revenue bond instead of giving away public land. Money will never be this cheap again, he said. Fiore also said he was disappointed no public input was sought before the city moved forward with issuing an RFP. I think you did [the public] a disservice. Resident Paul Kuta agreed, saying it was the height of chutzpah to not seek public input. He also opposes the project, believing it will eviscerate Hagen Park. This is one of your poorer moments. Bad on you, Kuta said. Commissioner Julie Carson made a motion to reconsider the RFP but it failed for lack of a second. Commissioners responded later, saying the public gave a lot of input during the last attempt to develop the site and that the current proposal was given to the Economic Task Force for its input. They also said this was just the rst step in the process and that public input would be sought after bids are submitted. Thats when we need the comments, said Commissioner Scott Newton. Resnick noted that the last RFP was rejected and that issuing this new RFP is not a guarantee were going to move forward.Commission salaries increasedCommissioners also voted to increase their own pay by $50 a month. Currently, commissioners make $7,200 a year and the mayor makes $8,400. With the increase, commissioners would make $7,800 and the mayor would make $9,000. Its not like Im getting a raise, said Commissioner Scott Newton, who voted in favor of the increase with Commissioner Ted Galatis and Mayor Gary Resnick. Vice Mayor Tom Green and Commissioner Julie Carson voted against it. Commissioners will have to vote on the pay raise again before it becomes of cial Sept. 11, 7 p.m. at city hall, 2020 Wilton Drive. Newton said, after paying his health insurance and other expenses, he makes .27 cents with each paycheck. He added that the pay increase would only help cover expenses associated with being an elected of cial. Green said in the past the commission has talked about giving itself a raise consistent with what it gives city employees; one percent this year. But Galatis said that since city employees make more money than the commission it was not a fair comparison. You have to compare apples to apples, said Galatis. Galatis also said that Green and Carson were only voting no because they were up for re-election. Newton made a similar statement at a previous meeting. I nd it somewhat presumptive that Commissioner Galatis thinks he can read my mind, said Green. I get paid a lot of money to do that, replied Galatis in jest. Well than you dont need a raise, said Green, who noted that other commissioners have also voted no when they were up for re-election. The commission hasnt voted for a pay raise for itself since 2005. Last year it was voted down when no one was running for election, said Green. PartnershipContinued from page 2 Pelican Classi eds Mean Business! 954-783-8700!

PAGE 21

The Pelican 21 Friday, August 17, 2012 WORSHIP DIRECTORY: Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad. Rev. Hyvenson Joseph to an ever-changing mural. He works through the night after the bar closes. I put my head phones on and jam out and paint, and time ies. Its my passion, he says. A recent addition is an octopus, which appears to be climbing right out of the sea. In one section a tiger shark is coming after a turtle. In another a Mahi chases a ying sh. Customers enjoy seeing it changing daily. They feel like theyre part of a work of art in progress, said Natalia Skinner, wife of restaurant owner Tommy Skinner. She said the reaction has been awesome. Many of Forbes paintings of marine life, including a tarpon, Loggerhead turtle and pelicans, are on display at Dockers. Forbes, 33, of Fort Lauderdale graduated from the Art Institute of Fort Lauderdale in December 2009 with a BS degree in industrial design. He worked for a couple years for a Miami rm designing a line of outdoor furniture for hotels and resorts. Then he and a partner started their own rm, Resortorganization, building organizational products, such as outdoor rolling bars and towel stands, for pool areas of highend resorts. After that venture didnt pan out for him, Forbes was unemployed for a year struggling to nd work. Family and friends helped him through that period. He returned to Cumberland Island, GA, for awhile, where he was brought back to inner peace and started painting again for the rst time in ve years. Forbes grew up on the outer banks of North Carolina, where his father worked for the National Park Service. At the age of 15, he was already working at an art gallery, the Twisted Fish, and painting marine life on wood. The traditional architecture he saw there helped to inspire his beach pavilion design for LBTS, which he saw as a town lost in time. He returned to Fort Lauderdale, and in March partnered with two friends from college to create Reel Deep. Forbes artwork and prints are for sale online. He paints marine life, one partner does graphic design and another marketing. Forbes also works as a waiter at Jimbos Sand Bar in Dania Beach. Forbes is an avid snorkeler and is working on getting certi ed as a diver. He grew up on the water. When he was a child, his father worked at Biscayne National Park. They also lived in Hawaii, where green turtles are everywhere. Forbes says he visits the LBTS beach pavilion often and is very proud of his design. He brings out-of-town visitors there.ArtistContinued from page 1 Artist Eddie Forbes

PAGE 22

22 The Pelican Friday, August 17, 2012 Classi edsCall 954-545-0013 Mechanic Shop for RentPompano Beach Rent this mechanical shop attached to a busy Texaco Station. Rent is negotiable. 954-941-2600. Ask for George Great opportunity. Call George. 954-941-2600 HELP WANTEDAFRAID OF DOWNSIZING? Start building a business to supplement your income. Great earnings potential on a part-time basis with Primerica. Call 954729-0192. 9-7 NOW HIRING SHORT ORDER COOKS!! Part Or Full Time. All Shifts. Open 7 Days. Apply 2211 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors Courtyard Caf. POMPANO BEACH MECHANIC/COUNTER PERSON NEEDED For WellKnown Texaco Fuel Station. References & Experience. Good People Person. Call George 954-941-2600. 8-24 SEEKING EMPLOYMENTGROCERY SHOPPING & DELIVERY From Publix To Individuals & Businesses. Serving Broward Since 2005. 954-200-0074. www. weshopanddeliver .com. 8-31 LICENSED PROFESSIONAL AVAILABLE To Care For Loved One. Experience Working With Elderly, Disabled & Youth Populations. Excellent Rates! Pompano Area. 954788-5412. CAREGIVER / COMPANION Caucasian Woman With 25 Yrs Exp. To Assist & Care For Your Loved Ones. Days / Eves / Nights. Ref. Available. 954-482-5494. HHA / CNA 13 Yrs. Exp. With Alzheimers. Live In / Out. Light Housekeeping. Caring & Loving. References Available. Call 954-638-6339. MALE CNA / HHA / COMPANION. Broward County Area. Former EMT. All Certi cations / Compassionate, References. Call Ron 954-2322832. Very Reasonable! 8-17 SERVICES DANNY BOY ELECTRIC Lic & Insured. Lic. #EC13004811. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. 24/Hr Service. 954-290-1443. Beat Any Written Estimate. Sr, Discount. GOT JUNK? TRASH HAULING CONDO CLEANUPS Trees Landscape Yard Fill Pressure Wash Roofs Home Repairs Welding Etc. Dave 954-818-9538. 8-31 CLEANING SERVICES Professional Cleaner. Years Of Experience. References Available Upon Request. Call For More Information 954682-9567. 8-17 HONEST HANDYMAN HOME & BUILDING Maintenance/Improvements. No Job Too Small. Fast Friendly Service. Reasonable Rates. Local Resident/Homeowner. Call Today For Your FREE Upfront Quote. No Deposit Required. 754-366-1915. PRIVATE INSTRUCTIONSPIANO LESSONS. ADULTS & CHILDREN. YOUR HOME. 954-938-3194. 8-17 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIESNew GREEN technology. New defroster control saves energy in home refrigerators, commercial chillers. Patented. All optical. Simple mfg. Strategic partners needed..www.NewAvionics.Com. 954-568-1991. CMUSICIANS WANTEDThe American Legion Symphonic Band is now accepting new members for the 2011-2012 season. College age to seasoned seniors are welcome. Rehearsals are held on Wed. evenings at American Legion Post 142 in Pompano. Percussionists, oboe, bassoon, trombone and euphonium players are especially needed. If you enjoy making music, call Jim McGonigal, Music Director at 954647-0700 for more info. REAL ESTATE SERVICES YES BUYING REAL ESTATE In A Good Area Is The Best Time Now. Lighthouse Point, Hillsboro Beach From $300K To $600K. We Could Find Your Paradise! YWC Real Estate. Yvette Gaussen. 954-614-7773 Or 954-773-8340. 8-17 BUYING / SELLING IN U.S. OR ABROAD? Call Me I Am Your Coldwell Banker Referral Agent. I Can Help You Today! No Fee. Barbara 954-980-6204. Also Florida Notary Services. 8-17 OPEN HOUSESPOMPANO BEACH SUNDAY 1-4PM The Triton 501 N Riverside Drive Unit 901. Spacious Remodeled 1800 Sq Ft. 2 / 2.5 Condo. Superior Kitchen, Custom Bathrooms / Closets. All Impact Windows / Doors. Inside Laundry. Fantastic Ocean / Intracoastal Views From 3 Balconies. Camille Hall Balistreri Realty. 954-254-2085. 8-17 MOBILE HOMES SALE / RENTPOMPANO BEACH COUNTRY KNOLLS Double 2 / 2 Furnished. Age Restricted. $17,500. More Information Call 954-729-4559. 8-17 ROOMS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH ROOM FURNISHED W/ADJOINING 1/2 Bath (Access To Full Bath / Laundry) In Private Home. Private Entrance. Walking Distance To Mall. $160 / Wk. 954-782-7322. 8-24 DOCKS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH DOCK Wide Canal! No Wake Area. Whips. Quiet Canal. Call For More Information 954-946-3301. 8-17 CEMETERY PLOTS2 PREMIUM LOTS SIDE BY SIDE. Forest Lawn Cemetery For Sale. $1,500 OBO Call 561-6039383. C.REAL ESTATE WANTEDI BUY HOUSES!! CASH!! AS IS! QUICK CLOSE! ANY AREA ANY CONDITION! NO EQUITY OK. CALL NOW 954-914-2355. 10-19 CONDOS FOR SALEPOMPANO BEACH DIRECT OCEAN VIEW!! Pet Friendly! 2/2 AT THE BREAKERS! $265K. Also For Rent. Call Juliana At Barclays For Details. 1-305-766-4420. 8-17

PAGE 23

The Pelican 23 Friday, August 17, 2012 Classi edsCall 954-545-0013 CONDOS FOR RENTFT LAUDERDALE ICW Gated Community. 1/1.5, Granite, Wood Floors, Lots Of Amenities. Great Location. No Pets. $950 Month. Call 954588-1644. 8-17 POMPANO BEACH OCEANFRONT Furnished 1 Bedroom. Resort Atmosphere! Indoor Parking. Security. $1,100 Month Yearly Lease. Call 954-562-7530. 8-17 POMPANO 1/1.5 UPDATED 1st Floor. Screened Patio. Community Pool. Small Waterfront Complex. $1,200 Month. Dockage Available For Rent. Ruthie Brooks Balistreri Realty. 954-8034174. POMPANO BEACH 55+ Community. Renovated 2/1 Pool!! With Sunroom Ground Floor / On Golf Course. Beautifully Furn. 1 Year +. Good Credit. $700 Month. 917-544-0771. APTS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH 1 BR & 2 BR APTS FOR RENT. Remodeled, Paint, Tile, Etc. Washer / Dryer On Site. Pool. Pet Friendly. George 954809-5030. POMPANO BEACH 1/1 Apartment. $725 Month Yearly Lease. Pool, Off Federal Hwy. Pet OK! Call Anthony 954-8575207. 8-24 POMPANO BEACH EAST OF FEDERAL HWY! Walk To Everything! 1 & 2 Bedrooms. Call For Information 954-2546325. 8-17 POMPANO BEACH SPACIOUS 2 / 2 Apt. $850 Month & 1 / 1 Apt. $700 Month. Pool, Coin Laundry, Tile Floors. Near Beach. Call 954-907-2258. 8-17 POMPANO BEACH 1/1 $650 2/1 $750 NW NE 2/1 $950 2/1,5 Townhouse $1095 SW 1/1 $750 2/1 $895 2/2 $950 3/2 $1025 ALL FREE WATER. Rent + $70 App MovU-In. 954-781-6299. 8-17 POMPANO 2/1 $825 Month Yearly Lease. Pool, Laundry Room, Close To Shopping. Pet OK! 1960 NE 48 Street. Call Anthony 954-857-5207. 8-24 DOWNTOWN LAUD BY THE SEA Clean Apartments. Near Beach, Shopping, Restaurants. On Site Courtyard, Parking, Laundry. Wayne 954-868-5560. 8-24 POMPANO ATLANTIC / INTRACOASTAL AREA South Of Publix. Ef ciency Private Entrance. Utilities Included. Non-Smoker. Long Term. $700 Month. 954-4158838. 8-17 POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 Bedroom From $500. Easy Movein. 1/2 OFF DEPOSIT. Remodeled. Great Location. 954-783-1088 For More Info. 9-14 COMMERCIAL FOR RENT-SALEPOMPANO COMMERCIAL OFFICE Spaces Available. Ranging From As Low As $500 To $700 Depending On Square Footage. Please Call Darci At 954-7833723. 9-7 DEERFIELD BEACH Retail Of ce Warehouse 700 Sq Ft With Loft. A/C, Bathroom. $575 Per Month. Call For More Info 561-654-1331 Or 561-9985681. 8-24 NEWLY EQUIPPED FAST FOOD Or Retail Space. Great Corner Exposure Oakland Park By Dixie. Ready To Go. In / Out Seating. Extra Low Rent To New Business. 954563-3533. 8-17 GARAGE SALESCORAL SPRINGS Moving Sale! Saturday August 18 8:30am. 8971 NW 33 Street (1 Block E & 1 Block In From Charter School, Sample Road) Furniture, Household, Liquor Decanters, Car Wheel Covers, Christmas Items & Much More. 8-17 In Pompano BeachPompano Library, 1213 E. Atlantic Blvd. Auto Tech, 429 N. Dixie Hwy. Sample Road Auto Spa, 2501 W. Sample Road NuTurf, 2801 N. Dixie Hwy. Chit Chat Lounge, 651 N. Federal Hwy. Sunnys Produce, 677 N. Federal Hwy. Golden Corral, 2100 W. Atlantic Blvd. Brandys Shoes, 1290 N. Federal Hwy.

PAGE 24

24 The Pelican Friday, August 17, 2012 partner. Shukura Curtis and her three sons, Malachi, 10, Jovani, 8, and Khabar, 6 weeks, moved to the new home, their rst house, from an apartment in Lauderdale Lakes. She works in telecommunications at the Broward County Courthouse. Shukura said she got to see the house progress step by step and helped with construction, along with family and volunteers. Lori Chevy, market president for Broward County Bank of America, said the bank celebrates home ownership and recognizes the critical role housing plays in stabilizing communities and advancing economic development. Chevy said more than 70 Bank of America teammates worked on the Robinson home since July. We share this proud accomplishment with the Robinson family and our colleagues at Habitat for Humanity of Broward, she said. Its been a long, long journey, but its well worth it, Lynette Robinson said during the ceremonies. She spoke for both new homeowners in offering their thanks to all who helped. Robinson, who works for the Broward County Clerk of Courts of ce in Plantation, has two children Niyah, 11, and Jorey, 6. They moved from Fort Lauderdale. Many of the volunteers turned out for the ceremony, including Joshua Novick, 17, of Davie, who spent all summer volunteering at the site. Its real special to me. Its really cool to see that a family has moved in, he said. Habitat for Humanity is celebrating 30 years of building houses in Broward County. It is the sixth largest independent builder in the U.S. That couldnt happen without volunteer labor and corporate support, Ecton said. Were creating a longterm environment for the families, he added. Were here to build a community. Then he warned the new homeowners to get ready for some uninvited guests on an extended basis. The volunteers will be driving by with friends to show off the house they helped to build, he said. HabitatContinued from page 9Shukura Curtis poses with her three sons, Jovani, Malachi and Khabar outside their new home in Oakland Park.

PAGE 25

The Pelican 25 Friday, August 17, 2012 harness broke at about 3:15 p.m. and she plummeted into the water. Pompano Beach Fire-Rescue personnel attempted CPR and advanced life support techniques but Miskell died at Broward Health North in Deer eld Beach later that day. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission is investigating the incident with the U.S. Coast Guard and Broward County Sheriffs Of ce, or BSO. Unfortunately, this isnt Pompanos rst parasailingrelated death. In 2007, Amber White, 15, and her sister, Crystal, 17, were parasailing off of Pompano when they were slammed into the Beachcomber Hotel & Villas. Crystal was eventually released from the hospital but Amber died after succumbing to her injuries. According to BSO, while the sisters were parasailing the winds suddenly increased from 15 mph to 40 mph. The hydraulic winch was not strong enough so the boat was pulled into the shore. Then, the parasail began to spin out of control and both sisters were dragged onto the roof of the Beachcomber and through several trees in the hotels courtyard. But the death of White and Miskell are both tragedies that, say local and state of cials, might have been prevented with tougher regulations. Here we are again with a loss of another life. Its inexcusable, said Pompano Mayor Lamar Fisher. Pompano has prodded legislators for tougher regulations of commercial parasailing in the past, only to see the efforts go nowhere. Were going to get on the bandwagon again. So no one else gets killed, he said. At least two attempts to increase regulation have failed. The most recent was in 2011. Florida HB 451, the Alejandra White Act, and Florida SB 392 were both postponed while in committee and never came to a vote. If passed, the bills would have created equipment standards, licensing procedures, liability insurance requirements and prohibitedDparasailing under certain weather conditions. Rep. James Frishe and Sen. Dennis Jones, both Republicans, sponsored the bills. They were co-sponsored by two other Republicans and one Democrat. I proposed the bill because of exactly this sort of thing, said Frishe, referring to Miskells death. Frishe said the parasailing industry came to him wanting to create certain standards to help weed out companies that dont implement their own adequate safety precautions. There are people out there trying to do the right thing, he said. Frishe added that hes not a pro-regulation guy but thought that regulations in this case could be used to prevent some tragedies. There are preventable deaths occurring in the parasailing industry. Asked why the bill failed to get out of committee, Frishe said the atmosphere in Tallahassee isnt conducive to getting any kind of additional regulations passed. According to state regulations, vessels towing parasailers have to have one person observing the activity in addition to the person operating the vessel. Calls to WaveBlast Water Sports, the company involved in the incident, were not returned in time for publication. Regulations also prohibit parasailing 30 minutes before sunrise and 30 minutes after sunset, require use of Coast Guard-approved oatation devices and boats are barred from traveling within 100 feet of any marked channel. But state regulations do not include any requirements for operators to carry insurance liability, special parasailing licenses or equipment safety checks. Fort Lauderdale Attorney Jason Chalik, whose rm represented the White family in a lawsuit, says insurance requirements would go a long way to improving safety. The insurance company is not going to insure you unless you meet certain standards because theyre not going to want to pay out if they dont have to. Chalik said his rm has represented other clients involved in parasailing incidents. All of our cases have been tourists who came down from [the Northeast]. They assume this is a safe sport. ParasailContinued from page 1Art Gallery 21 openWilton Manors Art Gallery 21 will be open for the public from 7 to 9 p.m. on Aug. 24. The gallery, located at the Womans Club of Wilton Manors, 600 NE 21 Court, features various artwork. Admission is free and the gallery is open every Friday from 7 to 9 p.m. Visit www.canawm. org for more information.

PAGE 26

26 The Pelican Friday, August 17, 2012 1 DeadContinued from page 1 It had been a year since the city had been hit. Driving the streets, there were no words to utter as we saw the horrors that Rose has compiled in his book. I remembered the night as the nation watched the clouds of storms over the Gulf of Mexico. I pestered my two sons as Katrina got closer. I pleaded with them to leave. In my heart, I feared they would not leave. The mojo of New Orleans makes people do strange things. Braving hurricanes there in a city three feet below sea level is one of them. Hurricane parties and even the famous Hurricane drink from Pat OBriens, 624 Bourbon St., were for storm celebrations: man defying nature. When Hurricane Betsy hit New Orleans in 1965, the meaning of the clich Its not a question of if, its when proved to hold truth. At that time, our family lived near the Mississippi River on Laurel Street. At one time, this may have been a grand home for an aristocratic Creole family. We rented one of the four apartments [$25 per month] that had been carved out of the old home. My husband and I were still hanging out with old fraternity and sorority pals from high school and college. Monday night dinners consisted of red beans and rice with French bread accompanied by Coca Cola. Our living room had once been the dining room of this old house. A bay window complete with a window seat may have looked over a massive lawn at one time. But by the time we settled in, the view would have been perfect for voyeurs, as our neighbors kitchen and back porch were a small toss of the coin from us. That afternoon, I had made a corned beef dinner, replete with potatoes, carrots and onions. Both my husband and I had survived hurricanes as we both had grown up on the Gulf, he in New Orleans and I in Pascagoula. Betsy rolled in as a Category 5 on Sept. 9 in the late evening. The sky darkened, and Betsys fury likened to a woman scorned. We soon realized we were not safe although the house had survived several storms. Around midnight, the furniture tap-danced across the bedroom. The electricity failed, and there we were in that arrogant de ance of nature. We stuffed a pillow in the one bedroom window, not in hopes of protecting the window. Rather we were trying to protect ourselves from ying glass. Outside, trees, cars and street signs rose and fell, crashing into each other and into houses. The house reacted to each bang and crash with its own shuddering. We took our baby from her crib and lay in the bed with the child between us. Hope of survival shifted to hope that we would all at least die together. When the eye passed over us, we plucked up enough courage to open the door. Outside, the only noise was the sizzling and popping of downed wires, hopping from car to pavement, shooting wild sparks in an otherwise silent night. There was no escape. We retreated into the house and prepared for the second half of the storm. When dawn rose over the city, we had put away our arrogance of ever riding out a hurricane again. And if mere survival had not been enough to shake our senses, the days that followed cemented our respect for any future hurricane. Betsy had driven a storm surge into Lake Pontchartrain, just north of New Orleans, and into the Mississippi River Gulf Outlet. Levees for the Mississippi River Gulf Outlet along Florida Avenue in the Lower Ninth Ward and on both sides of the Industrial Canal failed. The ood water reached the eaves of houses in some places and over some onestory roofs in the Lower Ninth Ward. Some residents drowned in their attics trying to escape the rising waters. Like Katrina, the stories of heroism and tragedy during Hurricane Betsy consumed most conversations for months. Four years later, 1969, Hurricane Camille hit near Biloxi. Those who remember that storm also remember the popularity of hosting hurricane parties. The late Walter Cronkite had this to say about one partys guest list. This is the site of the Richelieu Apartments in Pass Christian, Mississippi, Cronkite said. This is the place where 23 people laughed in the face of death. And where 23 people died. These hurricanes and others came to life in the theater of my head as Katrinas path was directed toward my two sons and many of my other loved ones. The boys nally left with what they could carry. Their homes were destroyed, their livelihoods ended. Each of my boys carries his separate memory of what was lost. Anger still rises when the word Katrina slips into a family conversation. While we loved the jazz fest that year, we visited the remains of death as we drove around. Doors of homes that had been abandoned bore these symbols and numbers: 1 woman dead, 1 man dead/1 dog dead. These cryptic notes to the world symbolized all hope abandoned. I Dead in Attic sounds like it should be ction. But we know it isnt. August and September are the hot months for hurricanes. While my sons will always regret their losses of special treasures, a Steinway grand piano, original music scores and so much more, I thank God that there was no spraypainted message on either of the doors of their homes. Its important to let nature have her way, and its very smart to leave the playground before she enters it. She doesnt care.

PAGE 27

The Pelican 27 Friday, August 17, 2012 Now Online www.pompanopelican.com a.m. Cost is $3 per ride. 954786-4507. The Pompano Beach Kiwanis Club Westside meets the rst and third Saturdays of the month at 8:30 a.m. at the E. Pat Larkins Community Center, 520 MLK Blvd., Pompano Beach. 954-782-8096. The Deer eld Beach West Kiwanis Club meets the second and fourth Saturdays of the month at 9 a.m. at Westside Park, 445 SW 2 St., Deer eld Beach. 954-54-7329883. Kayak rentals are available Saturdays and Sundays at Richardson Historic Park, 1937 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Visit www.AtlanticCoastKayak.com or 954-7810073 for rates. The Wilton Manors Green Market is held every Saturday and Sunday at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. 954-592-0381. The Deer eld Beach West Kiwanis Club meets the second and fourth Saturdays of the month at 9 a.m. at Westside Park, 445 SW 2 St., Deer eld Beach. 954-54-7329883. Pompano Green Market is held every Saturday from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the corner of Atlantic Boulevard and Cypress Road. Vendors wanted. 954-782-3015.MondaysPlay ping-pong from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Cost is $1. All ages can participate. 954-3902130. The Gold Coast Toastmasters Club meets on the second and third Monday of the month from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Dennys, 3151 NW 9 Ave., Fort Lauderdale. 954895-3555 or 954-782-9951.TuesdaysDeer eld Beach Rotary Club meets every Tuesday at 12 p.m. at the Deer Creek SightingsContinued from page 17 See SIGHTINGS on page 28

PAGE 28

28 The Pelican Friday, August 17, 2012 Golf Club, 2801 Deer Creek Country Club Blvd., Deer eld Beach. 954-630-9593. English Caf: a conversation practice class for intermediate learners of English from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. For information, contact Lana at 954-201-2601. Pompano Beach-Lighthouse Rotary Club meets every Tuesday at 7:30 a.m. at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. 954972-7178. The American Legion Auxiliary Unit 142, 171 SW 2 St., Pompano Beach, has Bingo on Tuesdays at 7 p.m. Food is available from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. 954-942-2448. A Yoga class is available for all levels at Hagen Park 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors, on Tuesday nights from 6:30 to 8 p.m. and Saturday mornings from 10:30 a.m. until noon. The cost is $7. 305-607-3520. Zonta International meets on the third Tuesday of the month at Duffys Diner, 401 N. Federal Hwy., Deer eld Beach, at 11:15 a.m. Zonta International works to advance the status of women. 561-392-2223.WednesdaysThe Wilton Manors Kiwanis Club meets Wednesdays at 6:30 p.m. at 2749 NE 14 Ave., Wilton Manors. 954561-9785. The Oakland Park Kiwanis Club meets Wednesdays from 7:30 to 8:30 a.m. at Peter Pan Diner, 1216 E. Oakland Park Blvd., Oakland Park. 954-566-9957. The Pompano Beach Kiwanis Club meets Wednesdays at noon at the Riverside Grille at the Sands Resort, 125 N. Riverside Drive, Pompano Beach. 954-444-4815. The Greater Pompano Beach Senior Citizens Club meets on the second Wednesday of the month at the Emma Lou Olson Community Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach, at 10 a.m. 954-9437787. The Alzheimers Caregivers Support Group meets Wednesdays from 10 a.m. to noon at the NE Focal Point Alzheimers Day Care Center, 301 NW 2 Ave., Deer eld BeachThursdaysLearn how to access free eBooks from 10:30 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. every Thursday. Register at the reference desk or call 954-201-2601. Registration recommended, but walk-ins welcome. Held at North Regional/Broward College Library, 1100 Coconut Creek Blvd., Coconut Creek. 954-201-2600.Send your Sightings to The Pelican! 954783-8700!SightingsContinued from page 27

PAGE 29

The Pelican 29 Friday, August 17, 2012 STOP HERE STOP HERE STOP HERE

PAGE 30

30 The Pelican Friday, August 17, 2012

PAGE 31

The Pelican 31 Friday, August 17, 2012

PAGE 32

32 The Pelican Friday, August 17, 2012

PAGE 33

The Pelican 33 Friday, August 17, 2012 STOP HERE STOP HERE STOP HERE

PAGE 34

34 The Pelican Friday, August 17, 2012 color

PAGE 35

The Pelican 35 Friday, August 17, 2012

PAGE 36

36 The Pelican Friday, August 17, 2012



PAGE 1

Friday, August 17, 2012 Vol. XX, Issue 33 Wherever you are, read The Pelican @ pompanopelican.com • Send news to siren2415@gmail.com Pompano Beach • Deer eld Beach • Lighthouse Point • Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Wilton Manors • Oakland Park • Hillsboro Beach • The Galt • Palm Aire The P e l i c a n Pelican 102 days left in 2012 Hurricane season By Judy VikPELICAN STAFF Dania Beach The young man whose award-winning design bedecks the Lauderdale-By-The-Sea beach pavilion at Commercial Boulevard is now attracting the attention of area shermen and boaters with his marine art. For the past two months Eddie Forbes has been at work transforming the ceiling of the bar at Dockers Caf and Bar in Dania Beach into a view of the ocean from the bottom looking up. He started out with one hammerhead shark and gradually added tuna, Wahoo, barracuda, a turtle and four other species of shark Pavilion artist takes talent to Dania Beach See ARTIST on page 21 Eddie Forbes is transforming the ceiling of Docker’s Cafe & Bar in Dania with his depictions denizens of the ocean. [Forbes art work]Civic amenities, hotel and restaurant development forecast a new future for Pompano BeachBy Judy VikPelican Staff Pompano Beach Pompano Beach is in the process of reinventing itself, Elaine Fitzgerald, chair of the tourism development task force of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, said this week. To reach that goal, Fitzgerald said, the city’s Economic Development See FORECAST on page 7 “1 Dead in Attic is a collection of stories by Times-Picayune columnist Chris Rose, recounting the rst harrowing year and a half of life in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina. Celebrated as a local treasure and heaped with national praise, Rose provides a rollercoaster ride of observation, commentary, emotion, tragedy and even humor in a way that only he could nd in a devastated wasteland.” – Amazon.com reviewBy Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFOn a recent trip to New Orleans, I nally got the courage to buy a few books that focused on Hurricane Katrina. 1 Dead in the Attic is taking me a long time. It’s a bitter medicine, but Rose’s writing is the spoonful of sugar needed in my case. As a frequent visitor, I remember my rst trip after Katrina for the famous Jazz Fest. See 1 DEAD on page 26 Heartbreaking tales of life and death during Hurricane Katrina, a must-read for Floridians Another parasailing death occurs as Florida lawmakers stall safety legislationBy Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach – A vacationing Connecticut woman died Wednesday in Pompano Beach after she fell more than 150 feet while parasailing with her husband near the Hillsboro Inlet. According to City of Pompano spokesperson Sandra King, Kathleen Miskell, 28, was parasailing in tandem with her husband, Stephen, when her See PARASAIL on page 25

PAGE 2

2 The PelicanFriday, August 17, 2012 By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFWilton Manors – Every large development begins with a single step. And on Tuesday, city commissioners took that step with a unanimous vote to issue a proposal for a public/private partnership to develop the city hall parking lot. The request for proposals, or RFP, which will be sent out to various construction and development companies, will involve building either a hotel, residential units, theatre or retail complex. The city also will accept other ideas on how to utilize the property. If something is built, it would have to include a parking garage with at least 400 spaces and a public gathering space with room to display public art. “There are so many steps before we get a shovel in the ground,” said Heidi Shafran, community development services department director. Shafran said that once the RFP is released applicants have 90 to 120 days to respond. She expects the city to start reviewing bids by December. Wilton Manors Commission takes rst step on public/private partnershipBy Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach – Following the lead of Lauderdale-By-The-Sea, Deer eld Beach and some other Broward cities, Pompano will soon see a change to the hours during which alcoholic beverages can be purchased. Voting 63.75 percent to 36.25, Pompano residents approved the amendment that will allow commissioners to change the hours. Recently, other cities in Broward have amended their ordinances to allow earlier alcohol sales on Sunday. Deer eld Beach allows Pompano voters say yes on alcohol sales, commission employment, no on city land transfers to CRA patrons to buy alcoholic beverages starting at 8 a.m. on Sundays, Lauderdale-By-TheSea and Wilton Manors allow drink sales to begin at 7 a.m. Oakland Park and Lighthouse Point prohibit alcohol sales until noon. “We’re putting our faith in our city commission to make the right decision,” said Ric Green, president/CEO of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, who supports the change. On Tuesday, the Chamber had people at the polls passing out literature asking for voters to approve the amendment. Green said businesses in See VOTERS on page 16 See PARTNERSHIP on page 20

PAGE 3

The Pelican 3 Friday, August 17, 2012 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach – Whoever said “Don’t bring your personal life to the workplace,” didn’t know about Francine Baugh, newly appointed principal at Deer eld Beach Middle School. An avid sports fan, Baugh uses sports analogies to get her points across to students, staff and parents. Sports, she For new Deer eld Beach Middle School principal, it is all about the “team” says, is often the common denominator that gets the conversation started. “I value every opinion,” Baugh said. “And to get a “W,” everyone has to work together. A graduate of Florida State University, Baugh roots for the Seminoles and then extends her allegiance to the Dolphins, Marlins, and Miami Heat. When a former student at Deer eld Beach High School played for New York in last year’s Super Bowl, she became a Giants fan too. See BAUGH on page 18 City gets $1 million grant for education corridorPompano Beach The CRA team in Pompano Beach, led by Kim Briesemeister and Chris Brown have a plan for Dr. Martin Luther King’s Boulevard, and it’s a dream set for reality. This week, the city announced a state grant for $1 million which will be put to use on MLK Boulevard to highlight and focus on the educational promise of this city. Blanche Ely High School, a landmark of education rife with the history of the pioneer educator for whom the school is named, may not be physically on the Boulevard, but its presence permeates the entire community on and around the Boulevard. Says Chris Brown, co-director of the city’s CRA, “The funds will be used to add landscaping, sidewalks, lighting and See CORRIDOR on page 13Baugh

PAGE 4

4 The PelicanFriday, August 17, 2012 By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFWilton Manors – For 10 years, Wilton Manors Main Street has focused on improving Wilton Drive. Now, it’s turning its attention to the entire city – all possible after it changed its name to the Wilton Manors Development Alliance, or WMDA, earlier this month. “Under Main Street, we were limited in our reach to the arts and entertainment district,” said Krishan Manners, president/CEO of WMDA. “By venturing out on our own, we can help the entire City of Wilton Manors.” By changing the name, WMDA was able to save at least $40,000 by not hiring an executive director – an expenditure they would have had to make if they remained part of Main Street. Avoiding that expense and the cost of paying dues to Main Street will allow WMDA to keep all the money it raises within the city. “Staying with Main Street just isn’t realistic without city funding. For a town our size it just does not make sense. Our whole city is only two square miles,” said Manners. And with most Wilton Drive’s commercial, retail and restaurant space occupied, Manners said it’s time for WMDA to help develop the rest of the city. “Wilton Drive has come a long way in the last 10 years. We want to bring that growth and that success to other areas of the city,” said Manners. WMDA doesn’t have any speci c plans yet to develop other areas but Manners and Tony LoGrande, vice president of WMDA, say everything from faade improvements, smart growth and marketing will be part of their efforts. LoGrande adds that it’s also about working with the neighborhood associations to attract the kinds of businesses residents want to see come into the city. “If you really look at Wilton Manors, it’s a city of neighborhoods and each neighborhood has its distinct feel. This could really help those communities have a better identity,” said LoGrande. Identity is also something the city wants. As WMDA gears up to focus more on the city’s economic development, city of cials are also making their own economic development moves. Recently, Randy Welker was hired as the city’s economic development coordinator, and the city’s proposed budget for scal year 2012/2013 includes creating a new position that would be dedicated to marketing the city’s events, programs and amenities. If hired, the person would also be responsible for bringing in sponsorship money. With the positions, the city hopes to bring in new businesses and activity to the city’s commercial corridors. “My job is to nd the strategies that will make that happen,” said Welker. One of those strategies is making businesses attracted to the city. “You want to get them interested in your community . to show them what kind of spending power you have. You have to create a market.” As the city looks to further develop its commercial corridors economically, it’s also invested in improving streetscape conditions along them as well. Recently, new pedestrian safety and lighting features were added to Powerline Road and the city has applied for a $1 million grant to improve lighting, sidewalks and bicycle lanes along Dixie Highway south of Five Points. Northeast 15 Avenue, a mostly residential area, also recently received pedestrian and bike lane improvements. Leigh Ann Henderson, assistant city manager, said the city also wants to see improvements to Andrews Avenue. “That’s something we’re hoping to work on this year. We’re a little bit limited but we want to work with Andrews Avenue too.” With name change, Main Street can focus on all of Wilton Manors’ economic development

PAGE 5

The Pelican 5 Friday, August 17, 2012 Tell The Pelican about your news! 954-783-8700 Deer eld Beach – Bigs in Schools, a program that matches adult mentors with school children ages 6 to 18, has received a $94,000 grant from The Jim Moran Foundation. The grant was announced to commemorate what would have been Jim Moran’s 94th birthday on Aug. 8. Each year, the Foundation provides a Bigs grant, one for Broward County, the other in North Florida for a total gift of $188,000 to the Big Brothers Big Sisters organization. Ana M Cedeno, CEO of Big Brothers Big Sisters of Broward County said, “Through the generosity of The Jim Moran Foundation, we can ensure that we improve children’s odds for succeeding in school and life.” “Bigs” volunteer one hour of their time a week to visit the same classroom throughout the school year building friendships through one-on-one activities such as reading, working on school projects, playing games or talking. In Northeast Broward, 10 schools participate in the Bigs program which currently involves around 350 volunteer mentors. The grant money will be used to screen volunteers and match them with the appropriate students. It will enable more volunteers to be placed in the schools so that sisers McNally and McMinaida, who are pictured above, can one day be “Littles” in the Big program. The Jim Moran Foundation is located in Deer eld Beach and has since its inception in 2000, invested $30 million in education, elder care, after school and youth transitional living initiatives and family strenghtening. Bigs program receives generous grant from Moran FoundationDeer eld Beach Jan Moran [center], chairman and president of The Jim Moran Foundation, presented a $94,000 grant to Ana Cedeno [right], CEO of Big Brothers Big Sisters of Broward County, during Founder’s Day. Joining them were McCharly, a “Little” from Park Ridge Elementary and his mother, Natacha ([eft], and sisters, McNally and McMinalda, who are hoping to soon be matched with a “Big.” [Photo courtesy of JM Families]

PAGE 6

6 The PelicanFriday, August 17, 2012 Deer eld Beach, Pompano Beach, Lighthouse Point, LauderdaleBy-The-Sea, Wilton Manors and Oakland ParkWilton Manors • Oakland Park • Hillsboro Beach The Pompano Pelican is published weekly on FridaysStreet Address: 1500-A E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, FL 33060 Telephone: 954-783-8700 • Fax: 954-783-0093Letters to the Editor are encouraged and accepted for print if signed, although a writer’s name will be withheld on request; letters must also include a daytime telephone number. Advertising rates are available upon request. Subscription rate is $31.80 including tax for one year’s delivery in Greater Pompano Beach; $95.40/per year including tax for others in the United States; call 954-783-8700 for rates abroad. The Pelican is a nonpartisan newspaper and reserves the right to decline advertising. Copyright 2012. Reproduction of this publication in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission of the publisher. The Pelican is a member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, Deer eld Beach Chamber and the LBTS Chamber. The Pelican is a state certi ed woman-owned minority business. The Pelican is delivered to businesses, libraries, schools, of ces, hospitals, news racks and single family homes. All advertising and copy is published at the sole discretion of the publisher. We welcome your critiques and ideas concerning this publication. Anne Siren, publisherExecutive Assistant: Mary Hudson Graphics: Rachel Ramirez Windsheimer Bookkeeper: John White Classi eds: Fran Shelby Contributing Writers: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Judy Wilson, Malcolm McClintock, Judy Vik, Michael d’Oliveira Account Executives: Paul Shroads, Carolyn Mann, Bill Heaton, Bill Fox Special Of ce Assistant: Cathy Siren ESTABLISHED 1993 • Volume XX, Issue 33 Founding Editor and PublisherAnne Hanby Siren The Pelican wants to know what you think. Send your thoughts on local, state and national issues to siren2415@ gmail.com Send your letter to the editor siren2415@gmail.com LettersOpinion To the editor, Justice Sonia Sotomayor just celebrated her third anniversary on the United States Supreme Court. It is with much pride that I wish her a happy anniversary and thank President Obama for appointing the third woman and rst Hispanic to the nation’s highest court. The President’s appointment of Justice Sotomayor sends a powerful message to women and girls that they can have grand aspirations for their futures because they can look and see someone in authority and in uence who looks like they do. The President’s appointment also says to women and girls that he values them and cares about them. Throughout his term, President Obama has proven that he is a strong advocate for issues essential to women and their families. Justice Sotomayor is an important example of his commitment to women. Maggie Davidson Pompano Beach On Tuesday, July 10, 2012, Commander Charles “Chuck” Marchitello retired from the Lighthouse Point Police Department, following 36 years of distinguished law enforcement service. Prior to his service in Lighthouse Point, Chuck attended New York City Community College, and John J. College, holding AS degrees in marketing management and criminal justice. In 1966 Chuck entered the military service and spent three years serving in the United States Air Force. He was assigned in South Dakota and served as a jet engine mechanic. With a long time passion for policing, Chuck joined the New York City Police Department in Marchitello’s 36-year service to Lighthouse Point residents is a record of ‘distinction and pride,’ says police chief 1973 where he served as a patrol of cer during the rst three years of his law enforcement career. In 1976 Chuck decided to move his family to Lighthouse Point, where he wanted to raise his children in a small town, friendly atmosphere. In 1976, he began serving as a Lighthouse Point Police Department road patrol of cer, but quickly made his way up through the ranks, achieving the leadership role as corporal, sergeant, captain and commander. In 2003 Chuck also served as the Acting Chief of Police for several months while the agency went through a transition period. During the past 20 years, Chuck served as the Road Patrol Commander and served as the Police Departments Emergency Operations Commander, overseeing department hurricane planning, preparation and operations. He played an instrumental role in preparing the city for Hurricanes Wilma, Charlie, Jeanne and Frances, and through his community minded service, led a team of Lighthouse Point of cers in providing food and support to the residents of Homestead in Miami-Dade County, following the destructive aftermath of Hurricane Andrew. During the course of his professional career, Chuck was also involved in many community service activities, most notably serving for many years as a coach for summer youth programs at the Lighthouse Point Recreation Department. He has been the recipient of countless letters of appreciation from Lighthouse Point residents for his outstanding service, compassion, and helpful nature. Chuck was also recognized for life saving performance on two separate occasions. In one case, he responded to the home of a LHP family in which the grandparents were babysitting for their grandchild. The child had fallen into the swimming pool and was unresponsive when police arrived at the scene. Chuck immediately began performing life saving CPR and was successful in saving the child’s life. In a second incident, Chuck responded to the Lighthouse Point Tennis Center where an elderly resident suffered a heart attack while playing tennis. When Chuck and fellow of cers arrived on scene, they found the victim in cardiac arrest and unresponsive. Chuck and his fellow of cers immediately began performing life saving CPR and rescue breathing. Within minutes, they were able to get a pulse and were ultimately successful in saving the man’s life. Chuck was also the recipient of numerous commendations from the Lighthouse Point Police Department, as well as other law enforcement agencies in Broward County, for his distinguished law enforcement service. He was recognized for his role in the apprehension of criminal offenders that include in-progress armed robberies, burglaries, thefts and frauds. For 36 years, Chuck served the citizens of Lighthouse Point with distinction and pride. He became a beloved representative of the Lighthouse Point Police Department and the community and he will be sorely missed. We wish Chuck the very best in his well deserved retirement. Ross Licata Chief of Police Lighthouse Point Thank you to the 10.7 percent of the voters who went to the pollsBy Anne SirenPUBLISHERRecall The Little Red Hen who found herself with a handful of wheat seeds. According to the story, she asked, “Who will help me plant these seeds?” And no one answered her. No one helped her water, fertilize, weed or harvest. Remember her signature reply each time she asked? “Then I shall do it myself,” she said. On Tuesday, another question was posed to the more than 1 million voters in Broward County. “Who will come to the polls to choose leaders, judges and school board members? The call was answered by a little more than 10 percent of those voters. A few more than 117,000 red hens and roosters showed up. They, like The Little Red Hen said, “Then we shall choose them ourselves.” Republicans, Democrats, Libertarians, Tea Party-ers: Heed the call to vote, for if you do not, we who vote will choose for you. Do not complain about war, taxes, the president, abortion, welfare, health care or education, do not espouse your opinions to us, for we do not care. Your words are like a clanging cymbal without an orchestra. You are the non-voters who allow Big Money to control elections. Come on back to the barnyard and help..

PAGE 7

The Pelican 7 Friday, August 17, 2012 Send your letter to the editor siren2415@gmail.com Council Tourism Committee recently proposed the city hire a full-time tourism manager beginning in FY 2013. Pompano Beach now has 2,297 hotel rooms and 147 restaurants and new hotels are on the horizon. A groundbreaking ceremony took place Wednesday for a new 219room Marriott at 1208 N. Ocean Blvd., site of the former Ocean Point. The hotel is expected to open in July. An Argentine investor has plans for a 110-room boutique hotel and condo, the Atlantic 3350 Hotel/Condo, on the block next to Walgreen’s. The project includes 77 condos. The Pompano Beach Fishing Village at the pier also has plans to include a 120-room boutique hotel on property that connects from the ocean to the Intracoastal Waterway, Fitzgerald said. That project will be down the road, since the land is now designated for public use and requires a land-use change. But in September, site plans will be presented in September for a hotel/marina near the Hillsboro Inlet. And a Canadian restaurant owner, who owns land on the southeast corner of Atlantic Blvd., just east of the bridge intends to open a steak house and boutique retail. “So many cool things are going on. If you’re in the tourism industry, you should be excited,” Ric Green, chamber president/CEO, told task force members. Discussing other developments that should attract tourists, Fitzgerald said the city’s new Greg Norman Signature Golf Course is scheduled to open at the end of December. And in February, Pompano Air Park completed a runway extension, to accommodate larger jet planes. City commissioners recently approved the addition of a 20,000-square-foot cultural center for the second oor of a new Broward County Library near city hall. In Old Pompano, the city soon will start on sewer and water renovations. The area is proposed to become a site for shops and art galleries. On Atlantic Boulevard, sidewalks are being widened to 20 feet and faade improvements are under way. An arcade, covered walkways and new parking lot are going in at Harbor Village. Design work is under way to give the bridge over the Intracoastal some pizazz. Planned is a public walkway and viewing areas. At the beach, equipment for an exercise trail has now been installed near the playground area and an interactive fountain should be complete by Aug. 24. A concert is planned for that evening featuring “Blue Fire.” The parking lot is nearing completion. “Everything is a work in progress. I’m really pleased with everything going on,” Fitzgerald said. Green said the chamber, city and the Brazilian Business Group are teaming up to present a Brazilian Festival Nov. 24 at Community Park. TV Record, the second largest TV network in Brazil, will host the event and create a lm here featuring some of Brazil’s most popular and well-known entertainers. “They will advertise the show and tell people to come to Broward County,” Green said. “Northeast Broward and southwest Boca Raton have a large concentration of Brazilians. This will be the equivalent of the Air and Sea Show in Fort Lauderdale. It will change the culture of the city and has all kinds of potential.” Event volunteers can sign up from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sept. 8 at the Civic Center. In less encouraging news, Fitzgerald reported that according to VisitFLORIDA, visitors to Florida and Broward County reached an all time record in 2011. Tourism provided 18 percent of total state revenue and was the single largest private sector industry in Broward. “But Pompano Beach captured less than ve percent of the dollars,” she said. “The city needs to increase the number of travelers to complement redevelopment efforts. We want a much larger share of visitors. We have to plan to bring them here.” ForecastContinued form page 1

PAGE 8

8 The PelicanFriday, August 17, 2012 Send The Pelican your news, big or small, to siren2415@gmail.com Business matters The Pelican takes a look at local business owners. You can tell your story here because business matters. 954-783-8700. By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFSteve Fabrizio has owned Complete Auto Service at 3991 N. Dixie Hwy. in Deer eld Beach for the past 12 years. He says, “The shop which started as a gas station has been here since 1954. My associate, Zack Pruzan, and I are both ASE, or Automotive Service Excellence, certi ed mechanics. Most of our business comes from word of mouth. We are straight forward in our assessment of what the problem is and we give our best advice on how to x it. The decision is the customer’s.” Fabrizio started to work on cars as a teen and says he’s been doing it every since.” Cars have changed and servicing has changed,” he says, smiling. “Computer diagnostic tools nd the problem and the solution now. We offer a full array of services plus a lot of extras not available at the average service station.” He lists those valuable extras as trailer hitches, handicap lifts, professional wiring and brake controllers—all essential for driving safely on the highways. “We get a lot of business from people who come to us for these special services,” Fabrizio says. ”When they see our clean shop, they become customers for all of our services.” Complete Auto Service may not do big price promotions, but the mechanics win a lot of customer praise when they do a free engine light scan for which their competitors all charge. And the free tire NitroFill is another accommodation that gets a big fee elsewhere. Asked why he does this, Fabrizio says, “I’m from the old school. I believe if you give a little, you often get a lot back from customers who remember your generosity.” One grateful customer, Tom Williams wrote a note saying, “Steve, thanks for the great service and for being so nice. I wish there were more people in this world like you.” Jodie Fairchild wrote, “Thank you for checking out my brakes and for taking such good care of my car. I can’t tell you how much I appreciate your honesty. I hope to keep my car for another few years so I am grateful for a mechanic I can trust.”NitroFillNitroFill gets high praise from Fabrizio because it has so many advantages in safety and tire wear. He says, “I believe in the product so completely, I have it in my cars, motorcycles and even in the family bicycles. NitroFill does not leak out of tires at the speed of regular air. Tire pressure stays constant reducing wear on tires and increasing safety of passengers. This is especially true in Florida where the sun is punishing to tires as well as people. Fabrizio is a big supporter of the military and he says, ”I try to help our service people with special discounts and I support American Moms for Soldiers, a very worth while group.” He and wife, Patti, have two sons. One is grown and working in the air conditioning eld. The other, Cross, is in high school. Dad says, “Cross helps out here but does not plan on making a career in this shop.” With a shrug he adds, “He hopes to be a professional sherman.” When The Pelican asked Cross how one becomes this, he explains, “You get into all of the shing tournaments and if you are good enough, investors will start to back you. It works just like the other sport.” One thing this dad and his son, Cross, share is a love for and participating in Demolition Derbies and “cool” motorcycles. Open Monday to Friday from 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Call 954-942-2400.Complete Auto Service offers many services for cars plus trailer hitches and handicap lifts Steve Fabrizio and his son, Cross, love to show off one of their prize motorcycles. Cross can’t wait to turn 16 so that he can get his license and take off on this sunshine yellow and silver bike. [When you do Cross, don’t forget your helmet. Photo by Phyllis J. Neuberger]Music Under the Stars -The popular Music Under the Stars Free Concert is back. For over past 20 years, the City of Pompano Beach has entertained the community with Music Under the Stars Concerts, providing a wide variety of music on the city’s beach – under the stars. Music kicks off at 7 p.m. just south of the Pompano Beach Fishing Pier, located at 222 N. Pompano Beach Boulevard. The Blue Fire Band is a combination of strong vocal abilities and incredible chemistry. Over the years, they have grown together as a group to produce one of the strongest acts on the scene. Call 954-786-4111. Music stars at Pompano Beach Greater Pompano Chamber Business Expo to be held September 12Pompano Beach -The Pompano Beach Greater Chamber of Commerce hosts its Annual Business to Business Expo on Wednesday, Sept.12 at the Pompano Beach Citi Centre. Over 100 regional businesses will gather to network and do business. Open to the public, this event offers residents a chance to learn about the many businesses in the local area. The event takes place from 5 to 8 p.m. The Pompano Beach Citi Centre is located on the corner of Copans Road and US 1 at 1955 North Federal Highway. The Expo will take place on the second oor between Lowe’s and Sears. Attendance to the event is open to all local business owners and the public. Cost is $10 per person. Advance tickets are two for $15. Attendees have a chance to win over 75 door prizes throughout the event by networking with the exhibitors. The Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce’s 2012 Business to Business Expo on September 12 is a great opportunity to showcase businesses, products and services. A limited amount of exhibition space is still available to Chamber and nonChamber members. For more information visit www. PompanoBeachChamber.com, call 954941-2940 or email lspinelli@ pompanobeachchamber.com. Tell The Pelican about your news! 954-783-8700

PAGE 9

The Pelican 9 Friday, August 17, 2012 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFF Oakland Park – Two new families got of cial welcomes to Oakland Park Tuesday when their homes were dedicated. Shukura Curtis and Lynette Robinson, both living in the 300 block of Northeast 35 Court in Harlem McBride, own the 29th and 30th Habitat for Humanity homes built here. Another two are nearing completion on Northeast 26 Street, and construction is starting on three more nearby. “There is a huge need for decent, affordable housing in Broward County,” Perry Ecton, executive director of Habitat for Humanity of Broward, said in an interview before the ceremonies. “We wish we could serve everyone, but we have a nite amount of resources.” Enrollment for housing applicants is opened annually and last time 1,500 people showed up, Ecton said. Habitat can serve only 30 to 40 families annually. Applicants are selected on a need basis. They must earn between 30 to 60 percent of the area’s median income. They must pay 30 percent of their income toward mortgage, insurance and taxes. The homes are sold at appraised value. Like all Habitat homeowners, the Curtis and Robinson families contributed a minimum of 400 hours of “sweat equity,” working on the construction of their home and the homes of others. They also participated in educational programs designed to strengthen the entire family and help to ensure their success as new homeowners. Their low-cost, no-interest mortgage payments go toward building more Habitat Broward homes for families in need, Ecton explained. Sponsors for these homes were Bank of America Charitable Foundation and Publix Super Market Charities. “Publix Super Markets Charities is proud to make the dream of home ownership a reality for one family, [the Curtises]”, said Kim Reynolds, Publix’ Miami media and community relations manager. “Families desire to live in a stable and safe environment that brings comfort and pride, and Habitat affords that to hardworking individuals. We are proud to be a long-standing partner.” New homeowner Shukura Curtis receives a symbolic key to her home from Kim Reynolds of Publix Supermarkets, corporate sponsor of the Curtis home. At left is Perry Ecton, executive director of Habitat for Humanity of Broward, who presided at dedication ceremonies. [Staff photos by Judy Vik]See HABITAT on page 24Two Oakland Park families move into new homes sponsored by charities of Publix Supermarkets and Bank of America

PAGE 10

10 The PelicanFriday, August 17, 2012 Pompano Beach – Fuller Brothers Funeral Home plans a back to school event from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 18, at the funeral home parking lot at 1805 N. Dixie Highway. The event features free food, school supplies and haircuts. For more information, call 954-366-3758 .Free school supplies, Aug. 18 Making a Difference Phyllis J. Neuberger wants your suggestions about people who are making a difference. Call 954-7838700.By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFSix lucky boys, selected by American Legion Post #142, joined a busload of other boys heading for Boys State this past July 8 to 14. Each boy received an all expenses paid week at Florida State University in Tallahassee plus $50 in spending money during the 69th session of Boys State. They participated in a one week comprehensive experience in state and local government. This leadership action program gave these high school juniors the chance to understand the political process. They elected governing of ces for a mythical 51st state. Each delegate was assigned to a political party that has no philosophy or platform until as a group they created one. Speakers from all levels of government provided valuable direction to the delegates. The use of Florida’s State Capitol, actual legislature and cabinet make the experience very authentic. Pat Renneisen, American Legion Post 142 Chair of the Boys State committee, explains. “We get applications out to all of the area schools, making our $500 scholarships available to all quali ed high school boys nishing up their junior year. However, Mia McFadden, Pompano Beach High School, or PBHS, seems to be the only guidance counselor American Legion Post #142 sends six juniors to Boys State for a one week exposure to Florida state government Sullivan Brown Cooperto push this valuable experience. She nds out who is interested and who is quali ed. Once applications are received, our Legionnaire panel of three men and me interview all of the applicants at the high school. The four boys chosen this year were recognized at PBHS spring award’s ceremony. Our four boys were Patrick R. Sullivan and Wheeler J. Brown from Lighthouse Point, Freddy Renteria from Oakland Park and Niraj Harinarayan Maharaj from Tamarac. Our two alternates, subsidized by other posts, were Billy Norcilien from Margate and Nicholas Cooper from Pompano Beach.” The transporting bus starts in the Keys and when it lls up, another bus begins the journey. Renneisen says, “By the time each bus arrives in Tallahassee, the boys all know one another and are often campaigning for the job they want. One of our boys, Wheeler Brown, made Lt. Governor, the second to the top job. The boys also get the chance to earn three college credits if they choose to participate in the free class offered.” The Pelican interviewed several of the boys who attended Boys State. Brown says, “I was impressed with how many boys from Broward County ended up in powerful jobs. It was a great experience. I ended up as Mayor of my city and spent so much time managing my city, I did not have time to campaign for governor. But I did make Lt. Governor and I helped the Governor run his cabinet. We agreed on policies. While he was courting people, I was speaking to senators and representatives about some bills our party believed in. I helped to rewrite a few bills and got them passed. The most important one was allowing marriage equality, including same sex marriage. No Boys State had ever passed this bill.” He continued, “It was impressive to use the of cial chambers. I got to use the Cabinet Chamber. Asked how this experience affected him, Wheeler says, “I no longer am interested in a political career because I learned it’s not who is the best quali ed, it’s whom you know.” Wheeler has already attained the rank of Commander of Troops for Broward County JROTC. “This title has enabled me to become battalion commander of my school and this is See BOYS STATE on page 19Bike for KIDS raceInlet challenge – Bicyclers are invited to prepare and sign-up for the 11th Annual Inlet Challenge Bicycle Ride Dec. 2 from 5 a.m. to 2 p.m. The ride begins at Bahia Mar Resort in Fort Lauderdale and offer four distances: Century [100 miles], Metric Century [100 kilometers/62.5 miles], Half Metric Century [50 kilometers/31 miles], or Beach Cruiser [15 miles]. The ride is well supported with fully stocked Rest Stops, SAG, and repair services so everyone has all the assistance they need to successfully complete the route. Each rider must raise $150. All proceeds bene t Kids In Distress. Call 954-390-7654 phyllisbard@kidinc.org. Volunteer Opportunities are available at the Deer eld Beach Historical Society!Those with an inclination toward history and its impact on today’s lives are invited to volunteer as tour guides of historic sites, organize photos and archives and help with general maintenance of the properties (light duties such as general housekeeping). The Deer eld Beach Historical Society is a non pro t 501 (C)(3) organization and has four sites listed on the National Register of Historical Places, join us and help us keep history alive.Call the DB Historical Society to sign up for training, (954) Tell The Pelican about your news! 954-783-8700

PAGE 11

The Pelican 11 Friday, August 17, 2012 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach Former mayor Al Capellini is scheduled to go before Circuit Court Judge Carlos Rebello Monday, Sept 10, on one count of unlawful compensation. The case has been pending in Circuit Court since Capellini was charged December 12, 2008, and has After four years, Capellini may have his day in courtbeen pending longer than any trial of a Broward County of cial, according to state attorney Tim Donnelly. Over the years, Capellini’s attorney David Bogenschutz has sought dismissal of the felony charge six times before Judge Carlos Rebollo. All the motions were denied. Capellini, 64, is the owner of Crain Atlantis Engineering Co. in Deer eld Beach. He was arrested after the state attorney conducted an extensive review of his voting record and determined that on June 3, 2003, the mayor voted in favor of a land-use application for a project in Natura while his company was being paid as an engineering consultant. Residents in the over-55 community protested the project, an of ce park at the intersection of Natura Boulevard and Natura Avenue, citing traf c concerns. But the state attorney says, Crain Atlantis successfully steered the project through county and city approvals and earned a $16,000 fee. Crain of ces are located in that of ce park. Bogenschutz has contended publicly that Capellini disclosed his relationship with Atlantis several times, but on that one occasion failed to follow the state ethics rules on about disclosure. Capellini’s arrest caused his removal as mayor by Gov. Charlie Christ after 20 years in local politics as a commissioner and as mayor. Donnelly said this week although the trial is on the calendar for Sept. 10, “at the last minute something could happen.” Donnelly said the trial could get bumped if a suspect is in custody or a more serious trial is pending. Because there is only one charge against him, Capellini does not have the option of offering a lesser plea. “He has to go to trial, or plead to the charge,” Donnelly said. A conviction could result in Capellini losing his professional license, and he could be sentenced to up to ve years in prison. Of Capellini’s pending court appearance, Donnelly said “Both sides say they are ready to go. I know we’d like to get it tried.” Later, at press time, Donnelly said he had heard Bogenschutz might be in a federal trial, which, if true, “. . could delay the mayor’s day in court one more time.”SightingsA community calendar of Broward County. Email events to siren2415@gmail. com 8-18 – Relay for Life fundraiser at Deer eld Thrift, 1628 SE 3rd Court, Deer eld Beach. Join the treasure hunt from 9 a,m, to 5 p.m. with raf es, car washes and more. See SIGHTINGS on page 14

PAGE 12

12 The PelicanFriday, August 17, 2012 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach – Time and money, the currency of a political campaign, were lacking for Broward County Vice Mayor Kristin Jacobs who lost the Democratic primary for Congressional Seat 22 resoundingly in Tuesday’s election. Jacobs got into the race in February taking on former West Palm Beach mayor, Lois Frankel, who had announced more than a year ago and had won critical endorsements from key Democrats.Jacobs loses congressional bid, Democrats will rally around FrankelPriding herself on her success in the past running grass roots campaigns, Jacobs found the district too large and money too tight. She received 11,637 total votes to Frankel’s 18,376 but tellingly, in her home county, voters failed to capture a majority. In Broward, only 12,926 votes were cast in the race. Jacobs got 6,447 of them, Frankel 6,479 or 50.12 percent. In Palm Beach County, Frankel scored a whopping 69.80 percent of the vote. Maggie Davidson, president of the Democratic Women’s Club of NE Broward said, “In a race like this you have to have lead time. I really thought she would have known that.” Davidson supported Frankel saying she was “grati ed” with Frankel’s results in Broward County. “I was surprised Kristin didn’t do better,” Davidson said. Joanne Goodwin, president of the North Broward Democratic Club, supported her longtime friend Jacobs. “Being late into the race and lack of money was a disadvantage,” she said of the Jacobs campaign. “If she had started earlier, it would have been a level playing eld and things could have turned out better.” Frankel faces Republican Adam Hasner in November. Hasner is expected to be a tough opponent and to be well-funded by the National Republican Committee. Frankel goes into the runoff with a sizeable bank account, another thing which Davidson believes attracted noteworthy Democrats to her side such as House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi who visited South Florida last week. “A lot of Frankel’s support came because Democrats believe she has the ability to go up against Hasner,” Davidson said. The campaign created a rift among local Democrats, but this week Goodwin said she took healing steps. Immediately after the primary. She posted her support of Frankel on her Facebook page, texted her congratulations and urged Democrats to come together to elect Frankel in the fall. In a letter to supporters on Thursday, Jacobs praised the efforts of her team and thanked her supporters from organized labor. Jacobs had the endorsement of police and re unions and the ACL/CIO. A neighborhood activist before being elected to the county commission, she called her career in politics “accidental” but said she got into the race “to give voters a choice.”

PAGE 13

The Pelican 13 Friday, August 17, 2012 Advertise with The Pelican 954-783-8700! possibly signage that will honor those persons who brought a higher sense of education to this city. The educational corridor on the Boulevard will be a pleasant walking, biking or other form of transit experience,” he said. “The Pompano Beach section of the corridor begins at North Dixie Highway and proceeds west to the Ronald Reagan Turnpike. And Broward College is just west of the turnpike.” The complete corridor extends beyond Pompano Beach city limits through Margate, Coconut Creek and eventually to Coral Springs. The exact grant amount is $969,000. The Federal Highway Administration invited states, cities, tribal governments and local planning organizations to apply for federal funding from 12 grant programs. Nearly 1,500 requests poured in from every state, Puerto Rico and Washington, D.C. totaling approximately $2.5 billion. Grant funding was made available through enactment of the Surface Transportation Extension Act of 2012, Part II. The grant will fund construction on Hammondville Road/Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Boulevard from Powerline Road to the Turnpike and will also fund a study to research transit opportunities. The intent of the transit related improvements and the study are to provide greater mobility for area residents to local jobs and education opportunities with the intended result being more equitable and prosperous communities, a healthier cleaner environment and a more vibrant economy for this sector of the county. The cities of Coconut Creek and Margate have already completed or broken ground on phases of the Education Corridor project. When fully implemented, the Corridor will bene t all of Broward County, economically, educationally and environmentally.CorridorContinued from page 3

PAGE 14

14 The PelicanFriday, August 17, 2012 Funds will bene t American Cancer Society’s Relay for Life. 954-871-9632 or 954304-4248. 8-18 – From 8:30 to 10:30 a.m. Pompano Beach of cials will hold a contractors forum to solicit suggestions from the public on how to improve the city’s permitting process. The forum will be held at city hall, 100 W. Atlantic Blvd. Call 954786-4670. 8-18 – Splashes and Smiles Swim School celebrates Family Fun Day from 4:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Pompano Beach Aquatic Center, 820 NE 18 Ave. There will be swimming, re trucks, SightingsContinued from page 11 See SIGHTINGS on page 17snorkeling, games, raf e prizes and more. The event is free and all proceeds bene t the Kid’s Cancer Foundation of South Florida. 954-2460665. 8-19 – Garage sale at the Herb Skolnick Center 800 Southwest 36 Ave., Pompano Beach, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Hosted by Scleroderma Foundation of Southeast Florida. Vendors wanted. 954798-1854. 8-21 – Groundbreaking ceremony for the new county courthouse takes place at 8;30 a.m. at 201 SE 6 St., Fort Lauderdale. The program will include remarks from judicial, county and city of cials. 8-24 – Book sale at the Oakland Park Library 1298 NE 37 St., from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Hosted by the Friends of the Oakland Park Library. 954-630-4370. Book sale resumes on Aug. 25 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. 9-1 – Tickets for Night At The Ballpark are on sale at Wilton Manors City Hall, 2020 Wilton Drive, for $35 each. Cost includes bus ride to and from Marlins Stadium which departs from Wilton Manors Elementary School, 2401 NE 3 Ave., at 5 p.m. Sponsored by Wilton Manors CAAB. 954-390-2100. 9-12 & 9-26 – El Club de Conversacin en Espaol: conversational Spanish practice for English speakers. Volunteers needed who speak Spanish and English. From 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. at North Regional/Broward College Library, 1100 Coconut Creek Blvd., Coconut Creek. 954201-2601. 9-14 – Celebrate National Sewing Month with the Pompano Chapter of the American Sewing Guild. Hand sewing techniques will be demonstrated from 10:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at the North Regional/Broward College Library, 1100 Coconut Creek Blvd., Coconut Creek. 954201-2600. 9-17 – The class “I’m on Facebook: Now What?” will be held from 3 to 5 p.m. at the North Regional/ Broward College Library, 1100 Coconut Creek Blvd., Coconut Creek. Participants must have a Facebook account and password to attend. 954201-2600. 9-19 – Art-By-TheSea group meets at the Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Community Church in

PAGE 15

The Pelican 15 Friday, August 17, 2012

PAGE 16

16 The PelicanFriday, August 17, 2012 Advertise with The Pelican! 954-783-8700! other cities have an advantage over Pompano because they offer mimosas and Bloody Mary’s earlier – making themselves more attractive for the brunch crowd. “It puts us on a level playing eld with other businesses,” said Green. Resident Bob Shelley, who voted in favor of lifting the ban, said restaurants should be allowed to cater to tourists and their customers who want an alcoholic beverage before noon. Voters, by 57.25 percent to 42.75, also approved the amendment that releases commissioners from the county ethics code’s requirements that they disclose nancial statements related to their outside employment. By designating commissioners as part-time employees of the city, voters placed their elected of cials under state law, which does not require nancial disclosures. But three times was not a charm as voters, 52.86 percent to 47.14, said no to the amendment that would have allowed the city to transfer land to the Community Redevelopment Agency, or CRA, for redevelopment purposes. One voter, who declined to give his name, said he thought the amendment was done under good intentions but didn’t trust the commission to make good use of it, adding that he thought some previous projects weren’t handled right by the city. Commissioners were disappointed but said this wasn’t the end of the issue. “We’ll just have to work around it,” said Commissioner Barry Dockswell. Mayor Lamar Fisher suggested the city could use long-term leases as a way for the CRA to utilize city land. “I guess people just tend to get frightened when they hear things like ‘eminent domain,’” said Fisher. “But that’s okay. We’ll work around it.”VotersContinued from page 4 Chamber members supported Amendment 1. The signs were placed throughout the city by members. [Staff photo]

PAGE 17

The Pelican 17 Friday, August 17, 2012 SightingsContinued from page 14Friedt Family Hall, 4433 Bougainvillea Drive. Marcia Hirschy will discuss how artists can market their work. The meeting is free and open to anyone. 954-594-0444. 9-23 – FAU professor and activist Mike Budd leads a discussion on Rachel Maddow’s new book, Drift: The Unmooring of American Military Power and the U.S. Love Affair with War. Event is free. Donations are requested. Event is at 1 p.m. at Unitarian Universalist Church of Ft Lauderdale, 3970 NW 21 Ave., Oakland Park. 908477-7812. 9-25 – Card party held by the Benevolent Patriotic Order of Does Drove 142 is scheduled from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Pompano Beach Elks Lodge, 700 NE 10 St. Open to the public. Bring your table of friends or group. Cost is $4 which includes desert, coffee or tea. Call 561479-2002 for reservations. 12-2 – Bike for KIDS race. Bicyclers are invited to prepare and sign-up for the 11th Annual Inlet Challenge Bicycle Ride from 5 a.m. to 2 p.m. The ride begins at Bahia Mar Resort in Fort Lauderdale and offers four distances: Century [100 miles], Metric Century [100 kilometers/62.5 miles], Half Metric Century [50 kilometers/31 miles], or Beach Cruiser [15 miles]. The ride is well supported with fully stocked Rest Stops, SAG, and repair services so everyone has all the assistance they need to successfully complete the route. Each rider must raise $150. All proceeds bene t Kids In Distress. Call 954-390-7654 phyllisbard@ kidinc.org.FridaysPompano Proud meets every second Friday of the month at McNab Park, 2250 E. Atlantic Blvd., from 8:30 to 11 a.m. Every second Sunday the group meets at Galuppi’s, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach, at 6 p.m. 954-562-3232. The Pompano Beach Rotary Club meets Fridays at 12:15 p.m. at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. 954-786-3274.SaturdaysPony rides are available at Sand & Spurs Equestrian Park, 1600 NE 5 Ave., Pompano Beach, from 9 to 11:30 See SIGHTINGS on page 27

PAGE 18

18 The Pelican Friday, August 17, 2012 At age 37, she is one of the youngest principals in Broward County. She replaces Christine Flynn who has been promoted to the of ce of School Professionalism and Accountability. Flynn had her own success story at Deer eld Beach Middle School winning the coveted Teacher of the Year Award for the county. “She put out the red carpet for me,” Baugh says of her predecessor. Baugh comes to the middle school with a record of improving school scores. At Deer eld Beach High School where she served as assistant principal, the school’s rating rose from a “C” to a “B”. At Blanche Ely where she went speci cally to improve student reading and writing scores, the pro ciency rate rose by nine percent. DBMS is now a “C” school with International Baccalaureate and magnet programs. “The scores are on a decline here. It will be a challenge to bring them up, but I know we’ll be an “A” school in a few years,” Baugh said this week. Baugh, whose entire career has been at the high school level, decided she wanted something different and applied for the principal position at four middle schools. She was delighted to be assigned to DBMS because after six years at DBHS, really “loves this community.” Because there are few charter schools in this area, the student population at DBMS remains at around 1,300 making it one of the largest in the county. Baugh is a rm believer in keeping the door to her of ce open for her staff, her students and their parents. She remains “very visible” walking around campus and eating in the school cafeteria. She encourages anyone having a bad day to come in and talk. ”I want everyone to know I value them, from the custodian on up. I value what they are thinking,” she said. And I believe they all want to know how we are doing.” She is also a disciplinarian who engages the parents when a student gets into trouble. “Parents need to understand the process,” she said. “I’ll always be honest with them, but I need their cooperation.” As for the students, Baugh said she is always ready to listen and “help them get to their dreams.” BaughContinued from page 3

PAGE 19

The Pelican 19 Friday, August 17, 2012 Tell The Pelican about your news or special event! 954-783-8700 where I spend most of my free time. I look forward to a future as an of cer in the military. I hope to be accepted into West Point and some day become the Secretary of Defense.” Nicholas Cooper, who lucked out as an alternate, says, “Boys State was a great experience. I was a Mayor, a Forum delegate and eventually Forum President. I learned Parliamentary procedures and a great deal about how the senate runs its meeting. I see government in a whole new light and I have new respect for our representatives and their challenges. I would encourage others to apply for this great opportunity to experience government. It was a break that I got to go because another boy couldn’t.” Niraj Harinarayan Maharaj was voted in as a sheriff and eventually Sergeant at Arms for the House of Representatives. He calls Boys State one of the most memorable experiences in his life. “I got to see and hear the pros and cons of government in action. Having seen this I can now make more informed decisions as a United States citizen. I would encourage next year’s Juniors to apply for this enriching experience.” Patrick R. Sullivan calls his week at Boys State “An amazing experience. I was city, county and state attorney. We tried two cases. One was the death penalty for a boy who had deliberately murdered several people in a theater. He got the death penalty. The other case dealt with internet monitoring in school. It was decided that monitoring the internet in school was allowed. This experience gave me an inside look into politics. I hope to become an attorney and maybe consider politics.”The American Legion makes Boys State happenThis state wide program aspires to develop civic leadership and pride in American Citizenship and to safeguard and transmit to posterity, the principals of justice, freedom and democracy. Each Legion post like Legion Post 142 in Pompano Beach, comes up with the $500 per boy plus $50 each in spending money. For four boys that totals $2,200. Asked how they raise the money, Renneisen, says, “We fund raise throughout the year to support this and a variety of other worthy causes. We have 600 male members, 300 women in the auxiliary and 75 in the Sons of the American Legion. That’s 975 paid members. The application for this annual program asks candidates basic information such as GPA, or grade point average, courses taken this semester, leadership activities, positions held in school and community, and helping projects he has participated in. Three questions asked are: What are your plans following high school graduation? What leadership trait quali es you for Boys State? If you were Governor of Florida, what is the one thing you would do to improve your state? During the interview process, a candidate might be asked the following questions. What do you think is the most pressing issue facing the state of Florida? Tell us about your school activities and favorite subjects. If selected, what bill would you intend to pass? What are your goals for the upcoming year? Are you willing to salute the ag? To receive an application for Boys State in 2013, contact your school guidance counselor or call Pat Renneisen at 954-938-9333. Thank you American Legion Post 142 for your support of Boys State scholarships to local high school boys nishing their Junior year in school. Boys StateContinued from page 10Summer Home Landscape Series 2012 concludesDania Beach Secret Woods Nature Center, 2701 W. State Road 7, Dania Beach concludes its Summer Home Landscape Series 2012, an annual series of free lectures designed for average homeowners who are interested in adding to the beauty of their homes through landscaping. The topic for the eighth and final lecture, from 7 to 8:30 p.m. on Thursday, Aug. 30, will be “Fascinating Fungi,” presented by Broward County Park Aide Scott Bryan. Attendees at the series will learn ways to save money on their cooling and water bills, attract wildlife, and preserve native vegetation; they’ll also improve the appearance of their yards and neighborhoods as well as increase property values. All sessions are held in the nature center’s airconditioned Julia Hall. The final date for the series, which runs for eight weeks

PAGE 20

20 The Pelican Friday, August 17, 2012 P o m p a n o Pompano G r e e n Green M a r k e t Market e v e r y S a t u r d a y every Saturday m o r n i n g f r o m 8 morning from 8 a m t o 2 p m a t a.m. to 2 p.m. at t h e c o r n e r o f W e s t the corner of West A t l a n t i c B l v d & Atlantic Blvd. & C y p r e s s R o a d Cypress Road. Eat Healthy! Mayor Gary Resnick said he would like to see a hotel or some kind of tourist attraction, adding that he thinks the city’s lack of a hotel hurts efforts to attract tourists. Shafran said the city is combining the adjacent Hagen Park basketball court and open space as part of the 2.3acre site, which includes the old city hall site and former Rothe’s property. Although they will be left intact and not developed, Shafran said the basketball court and vacant lot would be included as part of the open space for whatever is built. “Those pieces will not go away,” she said. Former mayor John Fiore called that a “shell game” and suggested that the city should build something on its own by doing a revenue bond instead of “giving away public land. Money will never be this cheap again,” he said. Fiore also said he was disappointed no public input was sought before the city moved forward with issuing an RFP. “I think you did [the public] a disservice.” Resident Paul Kuta agreed, saying it was the “height of chutzpah” to not seek public input. He also opposes the project, believing it will “eviscerate” Hagen Park. “This is one of your poorer moments. Bad on you,” Kuta said. Commissioner Julie Carson made a motion to reconsider the RFP but it failed for lack of a second. Commissioners responded later, saying the public gave a lot of input during the last attempt to develop the site and that the current proposal was given to the Economic Task Force for its input. They also said this was just the rst step in the process and that public input would be sought after bids are submitted. “That’s when we need the comments,” said Commissioner Scott Newton. Resnick noted that the last RFP was rejected and that issuing this new RFP “is not a guarantee we’re going to move forward.”Commission salaries increasedCommissioners also voted to increase their own pay by $50 a month. Currently, commissioners make $7,200 a year and the mayor makes $8,400. With the increase, commissioners would make $7,800 and the mayor would make $9,000. “It’s not like I’m getting a raise,” said Commissioner Scott Newton, who voted in favor of the increase with Commissioner Ted Galatis and Mayor Gary Resnick. Vice Mayor Tom Green and Commissioner Julie Carson voted against it. Commissioners will have to vote on the pay raise again before it becomes of cial – Sept. 11, 7 p.m. at city hall, 2020 Wilton Drive. Newton said, after paying his health insurance and other expenses, he makes .27 cents with each paycheck. He added that the pay increase would only help cover expenses associated with being an elected of cial. Green said in the past the commission has talked about giving itself a raise consistent with what it gives city employees; one percent this year. But Galatis said that since city employees make more money than the commission it was not a fair comparison. “You have to compare apples to apples,” said Galatis. Galatis also said that Green and Carson were only voting no because they were up for re-election. Newton made a similar statement at a previous meeting. “I nd it somewhat presumptive that Commissioner Galatis thinks he can read my mind,” said Green. “I get paid a lot of money to do that,” replied Galatis in jest. “Well than you don’t need a raise,” said Green, who noted that other commissioners have also voted no when they were up for re-election. The commission hasn’t voted for a pay raise for itself since 2005. “Last year it was voted down when no one was running for election,” said Green. PartnershipContinued from page 2 Pelican Classi eds Mean Business! 954-783-8700!

PAGE 21

The Pelican 21 Friday, August 17, 2012 WORSHIP DIRECTORY: Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad. Rev. Hyvenson Joseph to an ever-changing mural. He works through the night after the bar closes. “I put my head phones on and jam out and paint, and time ies. It’s my passion,” he says. A recent addition is an octopus, which appears to be climbing right out of the sea. In one section a tiger shark is coming after a turtle. In another a Mahi chases a ying sh. “Customers enjoy seeing it changing daily. They feel like they’re part of a work of art in progress,” said Natalia Skinner, wife of restaurant owner Tommy Skinner. She said the reaction has been awesome. Many of Forbes’ paintings of marine life, including a tarpon, Loggerhead turtle and pelicans, are on display at Dockers. Forbes, 33, of Fort Lauderdale graduated from the Art Institute of Fort Lauderdale in December 2009 with a BS degree in industrial design. He worked for a couple years for a Miami rm designing a line of outdoor furniture for hotels and resorts. Then he and a partner started their own rm, Resortorganization, building organizational products, such as outdoor rolling bars and towel stands, for pool areas of highend resorts. After that venture didn’t pan out for him, Forbes was unemployed for a year struggling to nd work. Family and friends helped him through that period. He returned to Cumberland Island, GA, for awhile, where he was “brought back to inner peace and started painting again for the rst time in ve years.” Forbes grew up on the outer banks of North Carolina, where his father worked for the National Park Service. At the age of 15, he was already working at an art gallery, the Twisted Fish, and painting marine life on wood. The traditional architecture he saw there helped to inspire his beach pavilion design for LBTS, which he saw as “a town lost in time.” He returned to Fort Lauderdale, and in March partnered with two friends from college to create Reel Deep. Forbes’ artwork and prints are for sale online. He paints marine life, one partner does graphic design and another marketing. Forbes also works as a waiter at Jimbo’s Sand Bar in Dania Beach. Forbes is an avid snorkeler and is working on getting certi ed as a diver. He grew up on the water. When he was a child, his father worked at Biscayne National Park. They also lived in Hawaii, where green turtles are everywhere. Forbes says he visits the LBTS beach pavilion often and is very proud of his design. He brings out-of-town visitors there.ArtistContinued from page 1 Artist Eddie Forbes

PAGE 22

22 The Pelican Friday, August 17, 2012 Classi eds Call 954-545-0013 Mechanic Shop for RentPompano Beach Rent this mechanical shop attached to a busy Texaco Station. Rent is negotiable. 954-941-2600. Ask for George Great opportunity. Call George. 954-941-2600 HELP WANTEDAFRAID OF DOWNSIZING? Start building a business to supplement your income. Great earnings potential on a part-time basis with Primerica. Call 954729-0192. 9-7 NOW HIRING SHORT ORDER COOKS!! Part Or Full Time. All Shifts. Open 7 Days. Apply 2211 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors – Courtyard Caf. POMPANO BEACH – MECHANIC/COUNTER PERSON NEEDED For WellKnown Texaco Fuel Station. References & Experience. Good People Person. Call George 954-941-2600. 8-24 SEEKING EMPLOYMENTGROCERY SHOPPING & DELIVERY From Publix To Individuals & Businesses. Serving Broward Since 2005. 954-200-0074. www. weshopanddeliver.com 8-31 LICENSED PROFESSIONAL AVAILABLE To Care For Loved One. Experience Working With Elderly, Disabled & Youth Populations. Excellent Rates! Pompano Area. 954788-5412. CAREGIVER / COMPANION Caucasian Woman With 25 Yrs Exp. To Assist & Care For Your Loved Ones. Days / Eves / Nights. Ref. Available. 954-482-5494. HHA / CNA – 13 Yrs. Exp. With Alzheimer’s. Live In / Out. Light Housekeeping. Caring & Loving. References Available. Call 954-638-6339. MALE CNA / HHA / COMPANION. Broward County Area. Former EMT. All Certi cations / Compassionate, References. Call Ron 954-2322832. Very Reasonable! 8-17 SERVICES DANNY BOY ELECTRIC – Lic & Insured. Lic. #EC13004811. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. 24/Hr Service. 954-290-1443. Beat Any Written Estimate. Sr, Discount. GOT JUNK? TRASH HAULING – CONDO CLEANUPS – Trees – Landscape – Yard Fill – Pressure Wash – Roofs – Home Repairs – Welding – Etc. Dave 954-818-9538. 8-31 CLEANING SERVICES – Professional Cleaner. Years Of Experience. References Available Upon Request. Call For More Information 954682-9567. 8-17 HONEST HANDYMAN – HOME & BUILDING Maintenance/Improvements. No Job Too Small. Fast Friendly Service. Reasonable Rates. Local Resident/Homeowner. Call Today For Your FREE Upfront Quote. No Deposit Required. 754-366-1915. PRIVATE INSTRUCTIONSPIANO LESSONS. ADULTS & CHILDREN. YOUR HOME. 954-938-3194. 8-17 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIESNew GREEN technology. New defroster control saves energy in home refrigerators, commercial chillers. Patented. All optical. Simple mfg. Strategic partners needed..www.NewAvionics.Com. 954-568-1991. CMUSICIANS WANTEDThe American Legion Symphonic Band is now accepting new members for the 2011-2012 season. College age to “seasoned seniors” are welcome. Rehearsals are held on Wed. evenings at American Legion Post 142 in Pompano. Percussionists, oboe, bassoon, trombone and euphonium players are especially needed. If you enjoy “making music,” call Jim McGonigal, Music Director at 954647-0700 for more info. REAL ESTATE SERVICES YES BUYING REAL ESTATE In A Good Area Is The Best Time Now. Lighthouse Point, Hillsboro Beach – From $300K To $600K. We Could Find Your Paradise! YWC Real Estate. Yvette Gaussen. 954-614-7773 Or 954-773-8340. 8-17 BUYING / SELLING – IN U.S. OR ABROAD? Call Me I Am Your Coldwell Banker Referral Agent. I Can Help You Today! No Fee. Barbara 954-980-6204. Also Florida Notary Services. 8-17 OPEN HOUSESPOMPANO BEACH SUNDAY 1-4PM – The Triton 501 N Riverside Drive Unit 901. Spacious Remodeled 1800 Sq Ft. 2 / 2.5 Condo. Superior Kitchen, Custom Bathrooms / Closets. All Impact Windows / Doors. Inside Laundry. Fantastic Ocean / Intracoastal Views From 3 Balconies. Camille Hall Balistreri Realty. 954-254-2085. 8-17 MOBILE HOMES SALE / RENTPOMPANO BEACH COUNTRY KNOLLS Double 2 / 2 Furnished. Age Restricted. $17,500. More Information Call 954-729-4559. 8-17 ROOMS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH ROOM FURNISHED W/ADJOINING 1/2 Bath (Access To Full Bath / Laundry) In Private Home. Private Entrance. Walking Distance To Mall. $160 / Wk. 954-782-7322. 8-24 DOCKS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH DOCK – Wide Canal! No Wake Area. Whips. Quiet Canal. Call For More Information 954-946-3301. 8-17 CEMETERY PLOTS2 PREMIUM LOTS – SIDE BY SIDE. Forest Lawn Cemetery For Sale. $1,500 OBO Call 561-6039383. C.REAL ESTATE WANTEDI BUY HOUSES!! CASH!! AS IS! QUICK CLOSE! ANY AREA – ANY CONDITION! NO EQUITY OK. CALL NOW 954-914-2355. 10-19 CONDOS FOR SALEPOMPANO BEACH – DIRECT OCEAN VIEW!! Pet Friendly! 2/2 AT THE BREAKERS! $265K. Also For Rent. Call Juliana At Barclay’s For Details. 1-305-766-4420. 8-17

PAGE 23

The Pelican 23 Friday, August 17, 2012 Classi eds Call 954-545-0013 CONDOS FOR RENTFT LAUDERDALE ICW Gated Community. 1/1.5, Granite, Wood Floors, Lots Of Amenities. Great Location. No Pets. $950 Month. Call 954588-1644. 8-17 POMPANO BEACH OCEANFRONT Furnished 1 Bedroom. Resort Atmosphere! Indoor Parking. Security. $1,100 Month Yearly Lease. Call 954-562-7530. 8-17 POMPANO 1/1.5 UPDATED 1st Floor. Screened Patio. Community Pool. Small Waterfront Complex. $1,200 Month. Dockage Available For Rent. Ruthie Brooks – Balistreri Realty. 954-8034174. POMPANO BEACH 55+ Community. Renovated 2/1 – Pool!! With Sunroom – Ground Floor / On Golf Course. Beautifully Furn. 1 Year +. Good Credit. $700 Month. 917-544-0771. APTS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH 1 BR & 2 BR APTS FOR RENT. Remodeled, Paint, Tile, Etc. Washer / Dryer On Site. Pool. Pet Friendly. George 954809-5030. POMPANO BEACH 1/1 Apartment. $725 Month Yearly Lease. Pool, Off Federal Hwy. Pet OK! Call Anthony 954-8575207. 8-24 POMPANO BEACH – EAST OF FEDERAL HWY! Walk To Everything! 1 & 2 Bedrooms. Call For Information 954-2546325. 8-17 POMPANO BEACH SPACIOUS 2 / 2 Apt. $850 Month & 1 / 1 Apt. $700 Month. Pool, Coin Laundry, Tile Floors. Near Beach. Call 954-907-2258. 8-17 POMPANO BEACH 1/1 $650 – 2/1 $750 NW – NE 2/1 $950 – 2/1,5 Townhouse $1095 SW 1/1 $750 – 2/1 $895 – 2/2 $950 – 3/2 $1025 ALL FREE WATER. Rent + $70 App MovU-In. 954-781-6299. 8-17 POMPANO 2/1 $825 Month Yearly Lease. Pool, Laundry Room, Close To Shopping. Pet OK! 1960 NE 48 Street. Call Anthony 954-857-5207. 8-24 DOWNTOWN LAUD BY THE SEA – Clean Apartments. Near Beach, Shopping, Restaurants. On Site Courtyard, Parking, Laundry. Wayne 954-868-5560. 8-24 POMPANO ATLANTIC / INTRACOASTAL AREA – South Of Publix. Ef ciency – Private Entrance. Utilities Included. Non-Smoker. Long Term. $700 Month. 954-4158838. 8-17 POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 Bedroom From $500. Easy Movein. 1/2 OFF DEPOSIT. Remodeled. Great Location. 954-783-1088 For More Info. 9-14 COMMERCIAL FOR RENT-SALEPOMPANO COMMERCIAL OFFICE Spaces Available. Ranging From As Low As $500 To $700 Depending On Square Footage. Please Call Darci At 954-7833723. 9-7 DEERFIELD BEACH – Retail Of ce Warehouse – 700 Sq Ft With Loft. A/C, Bathroom. $575 Per Month. Call For More Info 561-654-1331 Or 561-9985681. 8-24 NEWLY EQUIPPED FAST FOOD Or Retail Space. Great Corner Exposure – Oakland Park By Dixie. Ready To Go. In / Out Seating. Extra Low Rent To New Business. 954563-3533. 8-17 GARAGE SALESCORAL SPRINGS – Moving Sale! Saturday August 18 – 8:30am. 8971 NW 33 Street (1 Block E & 1 Block In From Charter School, Sample Road) Furniture, Household, Liquor Decanters, Car Wheel Covers, Christmas Items & Much More. 8-17 In Pompano BeachPompano Library, 1213 E. Atlantic Blvd. Auto Tech, 429 N. Dixie Hwy. Sample Road Auto Spa, 2501 W. Sample Road NuTurf, 2801 N. Dixie Hwy. Chit Chat Lounge, 651 N. Federal Hwy. Sunny’s Produce, 677 N. Federal Hwy. Golden Corral, 2100 W. Atlantic Blvd. Brandy’s Shoes, 1290 N. Federal Hwy.

PAGE 24

24 The Pelican Friday, August 17, 2012 partner.” Shukura Curtis and her three sons, Malachi, 10, Jovani, 8, and Khabar, 6 weeks, moved to the new home, their rst house, from an apartment in Lauderdale Lakes. She works in telecommunications at the Broward County Courthouse. Shukura said she got to see the house progress step by step and helped with construction, along with family and volunteers. Lori Chevy, market president for Broward County Bank of America, said the bank celebrates home ownership and recognizes the critical role housing plays in stabilizing communities and advancing economic development. Chevy said more than 70 Bank of America teammates worked on the Robinson home since July. “We share this proud accomplishment with the Robinson family and our colleagues at Habitat for Humanity of Broward,” she said. “It’s been a long, long journey, but it’s well worth it,” Lynette Robinson said during the ceremonies. She spoke for both new homeowners in offering their thanks to all who helped. Robinson, who works for the Broward County Clerk of Court’s of ce in Plantation, has two children Niyah, 11, and Jorey, 6. They moved from Fort Lauderdale. Many of the volunteers turned out for the ceremony, including Joshua Novick, 17, of Davie, who spent all summer volunteering at the site. “It’s real special to me. It’s really cool to see that a family has moved in,” he said. Habitat for Humanity is celebrating 30 years of building houses in Broward County. It is the sixth largest independent builder in the U.S. “That couldn’t happen without volunteer labor and corporate support,” Ecton said. “We’re creating a longterm environment for the families,” he added. “We’re here to build a community.” Then he warned the new homeowners to get ready for some uninvited guests on an extended basis. “The volunteers will be driving by with friends to show off the house they helped to build,” he said. HabitatContinued from page 9Shukura Curtis poses with her three sons, Jovani, Malachi and Khabar outside their new home in Oakland Park.

PAGE 25

The Pelican 25 Friday, August 17, 2012 harness broke at about 3:15 p.m. and she plummeted into the water. Pompano Beach Fire-Rescue personnel attempted CPR and advanced life support techniques but Miskell died at Broward Health North in Deer eld Beach later that day. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission is investigating the incident with the U.S. Coast Guard and Broward County Sheriff’s Of ce, or BSO. Unfortunately, this isn’t Pompano’s rst parasailingrelated death. In 2007, Amber White, 15, and her sister, Crystal, 17, were parasailing off of Pompano when they were slammed into the Beachcomber Hotel & Villas. Crystal was eventually released from the hospital but Amber died after succumbing to her injuries. According to BSO, while the sisters were parasailing the winds suddenly increased from 15 mph to 40 mph. The hydraulic winch was not strong enough so the boat was pulled into the shore. Then, the parasail began to spin out of control and both sisters were dragged onto the roof of the Beachcomber and through several trees in the hotel’s courtyard. But the death of White and Miskell are both tragedies that, say local and state of cials, might have been prevented with tougher regulations. “Here we are again with a loss of another life. It’s inexcusable,” said Pompano Mayor Lamar Fisher. Pompano has prodded legislators for tougher regulations of commercial parasailing in the past, only to see the efforts go nowhere. “We’re going to get on the bandwagon again. So no one else gets killed,” he said. At least two attempts to increase regulation have failed. The most recent was in 2011. Florida HB 451, the Alejandra White Act, and Florida SB 392 were both postponed while in committee and never came to a vote. If passed, the bills would have created equipment standards, licensing procedures, liability insurance requirements and prohibitedDparasailing under certain weather conditions. Rep. James Frishe and Sen. Dennis Jones, both Republicans, sponsored the bills. They were co-sponsored by two other Republicans and one Democrat. “I proposed the bill because of exactly this sort of thing,” said Frishe, referring to Miskell’s death. Frishe said the parasailing industry came to him wanting to create certain standards to help weed out companies that don’t implement their own adequate safety precautions. “There are people out there trying to do the right thing,” he said. Frishe added that he’s not a “pro-regulation guy” but thought that regulations in this case could be used to prevent some tragedies. “There are preventable deaths occurring in the parasailing industry.” Asked why the bill failed to get out of committee, Frishe said the atmosphere in Tallahassee isn’t conducive to getting any kind of additional regulations passed. According to state regulations, vessels towing parasailers have to have one person observing the activity in addition to the person operating the vessel. Calls to WaveBlast Water Sports, the company involved in the incident, were not returned in time for publication. Regulations also prohibit parasailing 30 minutes before sunrise and 30 minutes after sunset, require use of Coast Guard-approved oatation devices and boats are barred from traveling within 100 feet of any marked channel. But state regulations do not include any requirements for operators to carry insurance liability, special parasailing licenses or equipment safety checks. Fort Lauderdale Attorney Jason Chalik, whose rm represented the White family in a lawsuit, says insurance requirements would go a long way to improving safety. “The insurance company is not going to insure you unless you meet certain standards because they’re not going to want to pay out if they don’t have to.” Chalik said his rm has represented other clients involved in parasailing incidents. “All of our cases have been tourists who came down from [the Northeast]. They assume this is a safe sport.” ParasailContinued from page 1Art Gallery 21 openWilton Manors – Art Gallery 21 will be open for the public from 7 to 9 p.m. on Aug. 24. The gallery, located at the Woman’s Club of Wilton Manors, 600 NE 21 Court, features various artwork. Admission is free and the gallery is open every Friday from 7 to 9 p.m. Visit www.canawm. org for more information.

PAGE 26

26 The Pelican Friday, August 17, 2012 1 DeadContinued from page 1 It had been a year since the city had been hit. Driving the streets, there were no words to utter as we saw the horrors that Rose has compiled in his book. I remembered the night as the nation watched the clouds of storms over the Gulf of Mexico. I pestered my two sons as Katrina got closer. I pleaded with them to leave. In my heart, I feared they would not leave. The mojo of New Orleans makes people do strange things. Braving hurricanes there in a city three feet below sea level is one of them. Hurricane parties and even the famous “Hurricane” drink from Pat O’Brien’s, 624 Bourbon St., were for storm celebrations: man defying nature. When Hurricane Betsy hit New Orleans in 1965, the meaning of the clich “It’s not a question of ‘if,’ it’s when” proved to hold truth. At that time, our family lived near the Mississippi River on Laurel Street. At one time, this may have been a grand home for an aristocratic Creole family. We rented one of the four apartments [$25 per month] that had been carved out of the old home. My husband and I were still hanging out with old fraternity and sorority pals from high school and college. Monday night dinners consisted of red beans and rice with French bread accompanied by Coca Cola. Our living room had once been the dining room of this old house. A bay window complete with a window seat may have looked over a massive lawn at one time. But by the time we settled in, the view would have been perfect for voyeurs, as our neighbor’s kitchen and back porch were a small toss of the coin from us. That afternoon, I had made a corned beef dinner, replete with potatoes, carrots and onions. Both my husband and I had survived hurricanes as we both had grown up on the Gulf, he in New Orleans and I in Pascagoula. Betsy rolled in as a Category 5 on Sept. 9 in the late evening. The sky darkened, and Betsy’s fury likened to “a woman scorned.’ We soon realized we were not safe although the house had survived several storms. Around midnight, the furniture tap-danced across the bedroom. The electricity failed, and there we were in that arrogant de ance of nature. We stuffed a pillow in the one bedroom window, not in hopes of protecting the window. Rather we were trying to protect ourselves from ying glass. Outside, trees, cars and street signs rose and fell, crashing into each other and into houses. The house reacted to each bang and crash with its own shuddering. We took our baby from her crib and lay in the bed with the child between us. Hope of survival shifted to hope that we would all at least die together. When the eye passed over us, we plucked up enough courage to open the door. Outside, the only noise was the sizzling and popping of downed wires, hopping from car to pavement, shooting wild sparks in an otherwise silent night. There was no escape. We retreated into the house and prepared for the second half of the storm. When dawn rose over the city, we had put away our arrogance of ever riding out a hurricane again. And if mere survival had not been enough to shake our senses, the days that followed cemented our respect for any future hurricane. Betsy had driven a storm surge into Lake Pontchartrain, just north of New Orleans, and into the Mississippi River Gulf Outlet. Levees for the Mississippi River Gulf Outlet along Florida Avenue in the Lower Ninth Ward and on both sides of the Industrial Canal failed. The ood water reached the eaves of houses in some places and over some onestory roofs in the Lower Ninth Ward. Some residents drowned in their attics trying to escape the rising waters. Like Katrina, the stories of heroism and tragedy during Hurricane Betsy consumed most conversations for months. Four years later, 1969, Hurricane Camille hit near Biloxi. Those who remember that storm also remember the popularity of hosting hurricane parties. The late Walter Cronkite had this to say about one party’s guest list. “This is the site of the Richelieu Apartments in Pass Christian, Mississippi,” Cronkite said. “This is the place where 23 people laughed in the face of death. And where 23 people died.” These hurricanes and others came to life in the theater of my head as Katrina’s path was directed toward my two sons and many of my other loved ones. The boys nally left with what they could carry. Their homes were destroyed, their livelihoods ended. Each of my boys carries his separate memory of what was lost. Anger still rises when the word Katrina slips into a family conversation. While we loved the jazz fest that year, we visited the remains of death as we drove around. Doors of homes that had been abandoned bore these symbols and numbers: 1 woman dead, 1 man dead/1 dog dead. These cryptic notes to the world symbolized all hope abandoned. “I Dead in Attic” sounds like it should be ction. But we know it isn’t. August and September are the hot months for hurricanes. While my sons will always regret their losses of special treasures, a Steinway grand piano, original music scores and so much more, I thank God that there was no spraypainted message on either of the doors of their homes. It’s important to let nature have her way, and it’s very smart to leave the playground before she enters it. She doesn’t care.

PAGE 27

The Pelican 27 Friday, August 17, 2012 Now Online • www.pompanopelican.com a.m. Cost is $3 per ride. 954786-4507. The Pompano Beach Kiwanis Club Westside meets the rst and third Saturdays of the month at 8:30 a.m. at the E. Pat Larkins Community Center, 520 MLK Blvd., Pompano Beach. 954-782-8096. The Deer eld Beach West Kiwanis Club meets the second and fourth Saturdays of the month at 9 a.m. at Westside Park, 445 SW 2 St., Deer eld Beach. 954-54-7329883. Kayak rentals are available Saturdays and Sundays at Richardson Historic Park, 1937 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Visit www.AtlanticCoastKayak.com or 954-7810073 for rates. The Wilton Manors Green Market is held every Saturday and Sunday at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. 954-592-0381. The Deer eld Beach West Kiwanis Club meets the second and fourth Saturdays of the month at 9 a.m. at Westside Park, 445 SW 2 St., Deer eld Beach. 954-54-7329883. Pompano Green Market is held every Saturday from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the corner of Atlantic Boulevard and Cypress Road. Vendors wanted. 954-782-3015.MondaysPlay ping-pong from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at Hagen Park 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Cost is $1. All ages can participate. 954-3902130. The Gold Coast Toastmasters Club meets on the second and third Monday of the month from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Denny’s, 3151 NW 9 Ave., Fort Lauderdale. 954895-3555 or 954-782-9951.TuesdaysDeer eld Beach Rotary Club meets every Tuesday at 12 p.m. at the Deer Creek SightingsContinued from page 17 See SIGHTINGS on page 28

PAGE 28

28 The Pelican Friday, August 17, 2012 Golf Club, 2801 Deer Creek Country Club Blvd., Deer eld Beach. 954-630-9593. English Caf: a conversation practice class for intermediate learners of English from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. For information, contact Lana at 954-201-2601. Pompano Beach-Lighthouse Rotary Club meets every Tuesday at 7:30 a.m. at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. 954972-7178. The American Legion Auxiliary Unit 142 171 SW 2 St., Pompano Beach, has Bingo on Tuesdays at 7 p.m. Food is available from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. 954-942-2448. A Yoga class is available for all levels at Hagen Park 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors, on Tuesday nights from 6:30 to 8 p.m. and Saturday mornings from 10:30 a.m. until noon. The cost is $7. 305-607-3520. Zonta International meets on the third Tuesday of the month at Duffy’s Diner, 401 N. Federal Hwy., Deer eld Beach, at 11:15 a.m. Zonta International works to advance the status of women. 561-392-2223.WednesdaysThe Wilton Manors Kiwanis Club meets Wednesdays at 6:30 p.m. at 2749 NE 14 Ave., Wilton Manors. 954561-9785. The Oakland Park Kiwanis Club meets Wednesdays from 7:30 to 8:30 a.m. at Peter Pan Diner, 1216 E. Oakland Park Blvd., Oakland Park. 954-566-9957. The Pompano Beach Kiwanis Club meets Wednesdays at noon at the Riverside Grille at the Sands Resort, 125 N. Riverside Drive, Pompano Beach. 954-444-4815. The Greater Pompano Beach Senior Citizens Club meets on the second Wednesday of the month at the Emma Lou Olson Community Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach, at 10 a.m. 954-9437787. The Alzheimer’s Caregivers Support Group meets Wednesdays from 10 a.m. to noon at the NE Focal Point Alzheimer’s Day Care Center, 301 NW 2 Ave., Deer eld BeachThursdaysLearn how to access free eBooks from 10:30 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. every Thursday. Register at the reference desk or call 954-201-2601. Registration recommended, but walk-ins welcome. Held at North Regional/Broward College Library, 1100 Coconut Creek Blvd., Coconut Creek. 954-201-2600.Send your Sightings to The Pelican! 954783-8700!SightingsContinued from page 27

PAGE 29

The Pelican 29 Friday, August 17, 2012 STOP HERE STOP HERE STOP HERE

PAGE 30

30 The Pelican Friday, August 17, 2012

PAGE 31

The Pelican 31 Friday, August 17, 2012

PAGE 32

32 The Pelican Friday, August 17, 2012

PAGE 33

The Pelican 33 Friday, August 17, 2012 STOP HERE STOP HERE STOP HERE

PAGE 34

34 The Pelican Friday, August 17, 2012 color

PAGE 35

The Pelican 35 Friday, August 17, 2012

PAGE 36

36 The Pelican Friday, August 17, 2012