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Pompano Pelican
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00090900/00307
 Material Information
Title: Pompano Pelican
Uniform Title: Pompano Pelican
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: Pompano Pelican
Place of Publication: Pompano Beach
Publication Date: 07-06-2012
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Pompano Beach
Coordinates: 26.234722 x -80.125556 ( Place of Publication )
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00090900:00307

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Friday, July 6, 2012 Vol. XX, Issue 27 Wherever you are, read The Pelican @ pompanopelican.com Send news to siren2415@gmail.com Pompano Beach Deer eld Beach Lighthouse Point Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Wilton Manors Oakland Park Hillsboro Beach The Galt Palm Aire The Pelican Pelican 144 days left in 2012 Hurricane season By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFHurricanes bring a set of unique challenges for pet owners. The major question is what to do with fourlegged family members during a hurricane, and it can be a tough one to answer. For those who want to ride out the storm with their pets, Millennium Middle School, 5803 NW 94 Ave., Tamarac, is Broward Countys only of cial shelter that allows people to bring their pets with them. Run by the Humane Society of Broward County and the American Like humans, pets need plans for hurricane seasonRed Cross, the pet-friendly shelter has room for up to 300 people and 500 pets. Its geared towards families who are in evacuation zones, said Lacey Freeman, clinic administrative assistant at the Humane Society. Evacuation zones include areas east of Federal Highway and people living in mobile homes. In order for families or individuals to gain access to the shelter with their pets, they must be pre-registered and have valid proof of residence [an electric, water or cable bill]. Also required is proof of rabies vaccination, contact information for the pets veterinarian and a current photo of the pets that will use the shelter Freeman said during previous storms the shelter housed an average of 80 families and 200 pets. And this year there is still plenty of room on the registration list. Those who stay at the shelter should bring a crate, weeks worth of food and medicine for each pet and the same amount for each person. People should also bring their own cots, air mattresses or something to sleep on. To pre-register, call 954266-6828See PETS on page 20 Reuse water grows healthy lawns and saves everyone moneyBy Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach Imagine being able to turn on your lawn sprinklers every day of the week for as long as you like. Well, for some residents, customers of the citys Oasis reclaimed water system, thats a fact. This reclaimed, treated water is available to single-family homeowners at less than half the cost of dousing grass and plants with drinking water. And during the past year, after the conservation initiative I Can Water was launched, more than 400 residents See REUSE on page 4 Commission reduces lien fees by $245,000 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFF Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Town commissioners accepted a lien settlement of $20,000 this week rather than the $265,050 the town had imposed upon longtime business owner Sandra Stella. According to town staff, Stella was 502 days delinquent in paying vacation rental permit fees and had gone 382 days without a business tax receipt. Fines grew at the rate of $100 a day. Stella, who owns Sandy by the Sea Realty, had incurred six code enforcement liens on three properties for not renewing her business tax [a $6 annual fee] and for not renewing her See LIEN on page 16 Damien Maraj, 5, of Margate, takes a tumble down an in atable slide during Pompano Beachs Fourth of July celebration on the beach. The citys celebrations included games, arts and crafts, a watermelon eating contest, a professionally-built sand castle and live entertainment. [Photo by Michael dOliveira] Westside Park and SW 15 Street will bene t from unspent HUD allocationsBy Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach The athletic elds at Westside Park will be due for a major expansion if nearly $1.1 million in Community Development Block Grants, or CDBG, are approved this summer by the Department of Housing and Urban Development, or HUD. The money is being reprogrammed from unspent block grant allocations in the years 2006 through 2011. The city commission approved the new project building a lighted baseball complex at the park on June 19. The See PARK on page 7

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2 The PelicanFriday, July 6, 2012 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFF Lauderdale-By-TheSea Town commissioners unanimously approved a $40,664 request from the Chamber of Commerce for operation of the Tourist Information Center/Welcome Center, a slight increase over last year. The increase will keep the center manned seven days a week for eight hours a day, Town Manager Connie Hoffmann noted in recommending approval. The chamber will pay for other costs incurred in operation of the center, such as computer maintenance, printing, internet and cable. The chamber didnt fare as well in its request for $22,000 for newspaper, magazine, radio, TV and online advertising. Hoffmann did not recommend approving these funds, since the chamber didnt indicate in its request that they had a marketing plan or how they would track their efforts. Rather than approve the request, Hoffmann recommended funds for marketing be set aside in the town budget. She suggested that chamber board members could work with town staff and the towns marketing consultants to develop a marketing plan. Commissioners unanimously approved her suggestions. The chamber will continue to print and distribute the Visitors Guide and maintain a website and Facebook page. Many events are planned, such as a revamped Taste of the Beach, improved Arts & Crafts shows, power breakfasts, Resident Appreciation, Charity Gala on the Pier and Food Truck/Art Walk evenings to attract visitors. In its letter, the chamber said it will not be able to fund or organize the Christmas By The Sea event this year because of a shortage of funds. The cost of the event is about $12,000. Furthermore the Christmas tree is in poor condition and is expected to last about one more season. Estimated cost of a new tree is $33,000. Cost to erect the tree is $4,346. Town balks at giving Chamber marketing money, but visitor center gets full support See CHAMBER on page 18 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFHillsboro Beach A letter asking the Department of Environmental Protection or, DEP, to re-evaluate the sand content of the area between the Boca Raton Inlet and the Hillsboro Inlet and the sand bypassing approach for the Boca Raton Inlet was approved this week by the town commission. According to Vice Mayor Claire Schubert, Hillsboros beach commissioner, the area has not been surveyed for eight years and it is an opportunistic moment to make the request. We are not trying to be hostile to Boca, Schubert said. And we are not questioning the gures. In fact, according to DEP guidelines, Boca is pumping the required amount. Hillsboros north beach suffers from continual erosion. Last year 340,000 cubic yards of sand were pumped onto the beach. Experts have said this hotspot is caused by Deer elds beach groin system but the amount of sand being pumped from the Boca Inlet is also a factor. Sand pumped from the Boca Inlet drifts southward onto the beaches in Deer eld and Hillsboro. In a study conducted in 2004 for the DEP, Dr. Robert Dean recommended that the City of Boca Raton pump 100,000 cubic yards annually which would include dredging an ebb shoal at the mouth of the inlet. The sediment budget at that time, 83,000 cubic Town seeking DEP study of Boca Inlets sand bypass See STUDY on page 25

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The Pelican 3 Friday, July 6, 2012 By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFOakland Park Cautious optimism is the sentiment of most city commissioners when it comes to the possibility of a new Walmart taking over the space currently occupied by Kmart on Oakland Park Boulevard. It certainly would be an improvement, said Commissioner Suzanne Boisvenue, who called Kmart an eyesore and views Walmart as an opportunity to bring new jobs to the city. Because its currently zoned, I dont have a problem with it. Walmart recently purchased the Kmart at 670 E. Oakland Park Blvd. and the adjacent Holsum Bakery at 790 E. Oakland Park Blvd. for $11 million. Steven Restivo, Walmart director of community affairs, said the company is still working on how it will develop the site, speci cally what kind of Walmart store will be built and whether or not the existing structure will be torn down. Walmart has decided to let Kmart stay in the store until its lease ends Oakland Park Commission mostly optimistic about proposed Walmartin 2015. Restivo did say that Walmart would work with the city on the design and layout of the site. If they go in there and knock it down, theyll have to get a conditional-use approval, said Justin Pro t, Oakland Park senior planner. The site is currently zoned B1, community business, which allows for department stores like Walmart and Kmart. Under a conditional use the approval process requires a public hearing at the planning and zoning board and two public hearings at city commission meetings. But we dont have an application yet so we dont know exactly what they want to do, said Pro t. Depending on what Walmart builds, the new store could be between 108,000 See WALMART on page 19 Jakob Kaye, 5, of Margate, digs his teeth into a piece of watermelon in a watermelon eating contest held during the City of Pompano Beachs Fourth of July celebration. [Photo by Michael dOliveira]

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4 The PelicanFriday, July 6, 2012 signed on. Thats more than halfway to the citys two-year goal of 770 customers. It costs nothing upfront to hook up to the reclaimed water system and doing so creates a long list of bene ts: it conserves the citys potable water supply and delays the need for upgrades to the water plants, it is available without watering restrictions, it is much cheaper than drinking water, it is regulated by the ReuseContinued from page 1EPA and treated to a higher standard than the lake or canal water sometimes used by homeowners for irrigation, and it reduces the amount of runoff in the ocean outfall system. On top of all that, the grass likes it better than treated tap water because it contains phosphorous and nitrogen, reducing the need for fertilizers. Right now, the program serves those single-family homeowners living near the municipal golf course and the air park, and area bounded by Northeast 15 Street and Southeast 5 Street, from the Intracoastal Waterway to Federal Highway. Next phase will take in neighborhoods south of Atlantic Boulevard, the Lake Santa Barbara district as well as Old Pompano. Currently, Utilities Director Randy Brown is working with a budget of $300,000 a year to expand the system, money earned by selling water. Every 10,000 feet of new line services 160 to 200 homes, he said. Currently, Oasis is available to 1,200 See REUSE on page 5Map courtesy of the City of Pompano Beach.

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The Pelican 5 Friday, July 6, 2012 homeowners. When 770 homeowners are connected, 92 million gallons of drinking water will be saved annually. Just since October 2011, I Can Water customers have saved the city 27 million gallons of potable water. Expansion will be in those areas closest to the Intracoastal Waterway where salt water intrusion is always a threat. In fact, Oasis is a product of the salt water intrusion that seeped into the city wells located around the municipal golf course back in the s. Under a mandate to create a reuse water system, those wells were closed, and a system installed to reclaim water which was then used to irrigate the golf course and other public places. For every foot of water in the ground, saltwater is pushed 40 feet eastward. We are the only city to reverse salt water intrusion, Brown said. Becoming an Oasis customer became much easier when City Manager Dennis Beach and Browns staff decided to promote the reuse water to the homeowner. The system had been in place for six years, but had attracted merely 70 users. So the new conservation mantra I Can Water was born, the city eliminated the permit requirement and installs and maintains the back ow preventer. Upfront cost for installing the reuse water line was eliminated and now that expense, $795, is incorporated into the customers water bill until it is paid off. It adds 24 cents per gallon to the reuse water rate of 85 cents per gallon, still a considerable savings over the average $2.65 a gallon residents pay for drinking water. The treated water can used for almost anything other than drinking, said Sandra Anderson, spokesperson for the Environmental PR Group, the citys consultants for the I Can Water program. It is safe for vegetables and all landscape plants. It is not recommended for cooking or washing of vehicles. This week, Mayor Lamar Fisher gave Andersons rm credit for the programs new start up. Having these folks on board has ignited success, he said. The city commission worked very hard to make this program successful. Every year we will expand the lines until, hopefully, everybody in the city can be served. Former mayor John Rayson has gone public on the I Can Water website saying Oasis is the bomb. Rayson chaired the states water policy committee when he was in the legislature some years ago and is aware of the increasing demand for fresh water. He urges residents to connect to the super chlorinated reuse water. Brown and his staff survey their reuse customers and get a 40 percent return rate on the mailed pieces, the majority of them expressing positive opinions. Of 113 surveys returned recently, 99 of them were from customers who highly approved of the I Can Water program. To become an irrigation conservationist, call 954-3248434 and complete a simple application. The utilities department will do the rest. ReuseContinued from page 4Food donations needed for seniorsDeer eld Beach The NE Focal Point is asking that non-perishable items such as canned vegetables, canned tuna, chicken or turkey, dried or canned milk, cereal, rice, pasta, pasta sauces, canned soups, stews and fruits be donated to its food pantry. The food will go to local seniors who cant provide for themselves. Food items can be dropped off at NE Focal Point Center, 227 NW 2 St. For more, call 954-480-4449. We are The Pelican What can we do for you?

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6 The PelicanFriday, July 6, 2012 Deer eld Beach, Pompano Beach, Lighthouse Point, LauderdaleBy-The-Sea, Wilton Manors and Oakland ParkWilton Manors Oakland Park Hillsboro Beach The Pompano Pelican is published weekly on FridaysStreet Address: 1500-A E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, FL 33060 Telephone: 954-783-8700 Fax: 954-783-0093Letters to the Editor are encouraged and accepted for print if signed, although a writers name will be withheld on request; letters must also include a daytime telephone number. Advertising rates are available upon request. Subscription rate is $31.80 including tax for one years delivery in Greater Pompano Beach; $95.40/per year including tax for others in the United States; call 954-783-8700 for rates abroad. The Pelican is a nonpartisan newspaper and reserves the right to decline advertising. Copyright 2012. Reproduction of this publication in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission of the publisher. The Pelican is a member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, Deer eld Beach Chamber and the LBTS Chamber. The Pelican is a state certi ed woman-owned minority business. The Pelican is delivered to businesses, libraries, schools, of ces, hospitals, news racks and single family homes. All advertising and copy is published at the sole discretion of the publisher. We welcome your critiques and ideas concerning this publication. Anne Siren, publisherExecutive Assistant: Mary Hudson Graphics: Rachel Ramirez Windsheimer Bookkeeper: John White Classi eds: Fran Shelby Contributing Writers: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Judy Wilson, Malcolm McClintock, Judy Vik, Michael dOliveira Account Executives: Paul Shroads, Carolyn Mann, Bill Heaton, Bill Fox Special Of ce Assistant: Cathy Siren ESTABLISHED 1993 Volume XX, Issue 26 Founding Editor and PublisherAnne Hanby Siren Take Spunky home! Keeping children sun-safe this summer and all year longThe Skin Cancer Foundation Offers Sun Safety Tips for KidsWith summer under way, children will spend more time outdoors, in backyards and at parks, summer camps, beaches and other vacation destinations. So, it is important to remember that exposure to the suns ultraviolet radiation, or UVR, is strongly linked to all forms of skin cancer. Luckily, with good sun safety habits including proper clothing and sunscreen, children can enjoy all sorts of outdoor activities without risking their health. By teaching your children to incorporate sun protection into their daily routine, youll signi cantly lower their risk of developing skin cancer as an adult, says Perry Robins, MD, president of The Skin Cancer Foundation. Take these tips to heart Seek the Shade: Remind kids to play in shaded areas in order to limit UV exposure. Check with camps to see if there are adequate places for campers to seek shade during outdoor activities taking place between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m., when UV rays are most intense. Avoid Tanning: Tweens and teens may be tempted to lie out or visit tanning salons. But there is no such thing as a safe, healthy or protective tan, because tanning itself is caused by DNA damage to the skin. One or more blistering sunburns in childhood or adolescence more than doubles a persons chances of developing potentially deadly melanomas later in life. Cover up with Clothing: Consider dressing them in swim shirts or rash guards while in the water at the pool or beach. Protect the face, neck and eyes with broad-brimmed hats and UV-blocking sunglasses. Use Sunscreen: For everyday use, look for broad spectrum (UVA/UVB) sunscreen with an SPF of 15 or higher. If your child will be spending extended time outdoors, use a water-resistant, broad spectrum sunscreen with an SPF of 30 or higher. Apply 1 ounce (2 tablespoons) of sunscreen to your childs entire body 30 minutes before going outside. Assist children in reapplying sunscreen every two hours and after swimming or playing sports, because water and sweat wash sunscreen away. If your children apply their own sunscreen, remind them to cover easy-to-miss spots, such as the backs of ears and neck, as well as the tops of feet and hands. Keep newborns out of the sun Sunscreen should be used on babies over the age of six months. Practice What You Preach: Incorporate these tips into your own lifestyle. Youll not only set a good example, but youll reduce your risk of skin cancer, sun damage and skin aging.More detailed suggestions and recommendations are available in the 2012 Skin Cancer Foundation Journal article, Repelling the Rays When Kids Play, available at www.skincancer.org/journal .Additionally, The Skin Cancer Foundation recently debuted Sun Smart U, an interactive education program that teaches students in grades six through twelve how to make sun-safe choices that are vital in preventing skin cancer. The program highlights the importance of following a proper sun protection regimen and the dangers of tanning through the real-life story of a young woman with Stage III melanoma. To download the free curriculum, please visit www.skincancer.org/education. Contact: Carla Barry-Austin, 212-725-5641; cbarryaustin@skincancer.org) Becky Wiley, 646-583-7988; rwiley@skincancer.org) About The Skin Cancer Foundation The Skin Cancer Foundation is the only global organization solely devoted to the prevention, early detection and treatment of skin cancer. The mission of the Foundation is to decrease the incidence of skin cancer through public and professional education and research. For more information, visit www. SkinCancer.org.We cannot ignore the suns danger to residents and to touristsThis newspaper has more than once urged city governments to warn everyone of the suns dangers. Skin cancer can be avoided when parents, teachers and local of cials instill in everyone the dangers of too much sun. Yet, parade permits are issued at times when the noon-day heat can cause in nite dangers to those who want to participate or watch the fun events. If permits were issued only for times when the sunlight is on the decline, we could all have more fun, stay cooler and live longer. Dealing with the dangerous rays of the South Florida sun will take some intelligent discussions and serious marketing. Generations of Americans have changed their habits regarding littering and smoking. Those changes, both initiated by government, came about through a strong marketing campaign. Later laws were put into effect: big nes for littering and a banning indoor smoking. Beating the sun dangers should begin in South Florida as we are the closest state in the continental United States to the equator. We urge all local governments to begin a plan to start the education.Volunteers needed in Deer eldApplication window for city boards and committees openResidents or business owners with a desire to contribute to the progress of this city may be perfect candidates for one of the citys boards or committees. The commission is seeking quali ed applicants willing to serve as board or committee members. The application window will be open through Monday, July 30 at 5 p.m.. Appointments are being considered for the Beauti cation Authority, Cultural Committee, Memorial Committee, Planning and Zoning Board, Community Appearance Board, and Unsafe Structures Board. All boards have regular and alternate positions available, except for the Planning and Zoning Board, which has only one alternate vacancy for District 2. The Community Appearance Board has both regular and alternate vacancies, also for District 2. Permanent residents of the city are eligible to serve on these boards. For the Community Appearance Board, a member may serve if he or she is either a resident OR has a business in the city. Some technical expertise requirements, in addition to the residency requirement apply to the Community Appearance and Unsafe Structures Boards. Interested persons should call 954-480-4263. Spunky is an eightyear-old Spaniel mix and has been with The Florida Humane Society since he was eight months old. Spunky is a happy-golucky dog who loves to play with his toys and play fetch. Hes good with other dogs and older children too. To adopt Spunky, call The Florida Humane Society at 954974 6152.

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The Pelican 7 Friday, July 6, 2012 county commission and HUD must approve the funding. Deadline for sending in the amended expenditure to HUD is Aug. 15 and that agency has 45 days to reply said Donna DeFronzo, Deer elds director of senior services and community development. Largest unspent HUD grant was is $480,109, allocated in 2006, a year during which the citys community development department was experiencing dif culties. The department was dissolved last year and put under DeFronzos supervision. Day-to-day operations have been contracted out to a private agency. Reclaiming the unspent funds was put on a fast track this year in order to meet HUD deadlines. The amounts ranged from $489,000 in 2006 to $32,000 in 2008. Kara Petty, assistant director, parks and recreation, said the reprogrammed funds will be used to build the baseball eld on the Southeast corner of the park, install energy ef cient lighting, fencing and landscaping, and resurface the basketball courts. Currently Westside Park has a lighted football eld, basketball courts and a recreation center. Almost $160,000 in unspent funds will go to address improvements to Southwest 15 Street. This money comes from unspent funds for home repairs and home buyers assistance. Some funds remaining in the 2011 CDBG will go to helping youngsters obtain their GEDs. The condition of Southwest 15 Street, from Dixie Highway to Deer eld Beach High School, has been an issue with Commissioner Ben Preston. HUD funds can be used to improve safety, traf c ow and for beauti cation, but not to repair or improve drainage in the swales which are privately owned. All the HUD funds are being spent in Prestons district. I am excited about the programs going on in District 2 young people will be better guided and hopefully be able to make contributions to their community, he said. ParkContinued from page 1 Artist John May, of Living Sand, works on the sand castle that was part of Pompano Beachs Fourth of July celebration on the beach. [Photo by Michael dOliveira]

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8 The PelicanFriday, July 6, 2012 Business matters The Pelican takes a look at local business owners. You can tell your story here because business matters. 954-783-8700. Briefs By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFLighthouse Point Wes Lasher, manager of Phil Smiths Kia dealership, is all smiles when he points with pride to the banner that announces this agency to be number one in the district in customer service satisfaction ve quarters in a row. Located at 4230 N. Federal Hwy. in Lighthouse Point this dealership has been exclusively Kia since 2002. We are part of the Phil Smith Auto Group which represents 17 or 18 brands and is the 55th largest automotive group is the U.S., he says as he continues to tell the Kia story. Kia was transformed six years ago by Peter Schreyer, the former design director of Audi. He created the fusion of European and Asian vehicles into todays Kia, one of the most sought after cars in the industry. In fact, Kia was named Best Brand in Kelly Blue Books 2012 Total Cost of Ownership Awards. The reason given: This overall brand winner is a relatively newcomer to the U.S. The quiet little Korean carmaker has been progressing steadily in quality and sales and is now seen as a strong bargain when it comes to ownership as well. Such stylish and fun-to-drive Kia offerings such as the Optima, Sorento and Soul specialize in delivering the practical blessings of excellent fuel economy and inspired resale value. Lasher says, Kias are built in the United States and Korea. The Optima and Sorento are built in West Point, GA in a state-of-the-art facility. Our showroom features the full line which includes 2012 and 2013 Rios; three versions of 2012 Forte and the 2013 Optima standard and Optima Hybrid. We also have the Sedonas, Sorentos and Souls in the showroom. Our price range is $14,000 to $22,000 and every Kia comes with a 10-year or 100,000 miles power train warrantythe best in the business. He describes the entry level Rio as the perfect choice for everyone with its 40 miles per gallon economy. Our Forte comes in three, four and ve-door models for those wanting sporty to space. It gets 35 miles per gallon and rivals Hondas Civic, Toyotas Corolla. It also comes with a 10-year, or 100,000 mile warranty. Lasher continues his description of Kia models. Optima is our luxury sedan. It was voted the Best Car of 2011 by Car.com. Keith Nealy agrees. I own a 2012 Optima, and its a fantastic, smooth ride. I test drove a lot of the other makes, and this is the best. I get about 30 miles per gallon, all the great features and the service department is excellent.Phil Smiths award winning Kia dealership in Lighthouse Point is buzzing with businessWes Lasher, general manager of Phil Smith Kia, beams with pride because this Kia agency has won the number one award in Customer Service Satisfaction ve quarters in a row, beating out the other 774 Kia dealerships in the country. He says, Were quick, inexpensive and convenient. We do everything but body work and we do it well! [Photos by Phyllis J. Neuberger]CRA resource center offers clinics, art showPompano Beach Several events are set for the Pompano Beach CRA Business Resource Center, 50 NE 1 St., Pompano Beach. Most clinics and events are free. All are open to the public. A Grassroots Marketing Workshop July 16 from 5:30 to 7 p.m. will demonstrate effective ways to market a business through direct mail, trade shows, radio, newspapers and the Internet. Call 954-586-1111. Light refreshments will be served. The next Art Hall event takes place July 18 at the Center from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. A computer clinic with a one-onone consultation takes place from 9 to 11 a.m. at the center. Wilton Wilson will discuss computer issues ranging from viruses to targeting strategies. A Lunch and Learn workshop takes place July 31 from noon to 2 p.m. where participants will discuss how to revitalize a business and other strategies for success. The facilitator is Paul Skyers. Cost is $10. More information on any of the above events, call 954-586-1111.Democrats take on new state amendmentsPompano Beach The Democratic Womens Club meets July 18 at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St. at 7 p.m. This month the speaker, Corinne Miller, representing The League of Women Voters, will discuss constitutional amendments on the November ballot and the retention vote for three Florida Supreme Court Justices. 954-9428711Shopping spree to bene t Relay for LifeMark your calendar for July 14 for a fabulous Ladies Indoor Clothing Sale at the Crystal Lake Golf Villas Clubhouse, 4791 NW 18 Avenue, Deer eld Beach just south of Green Road east of Powerline Road. The sale features new and gently used high quality ladies clothing and accessories and will be held indoors for air conditioned comfort. All proceeds bene t the American Cancer Society Relay For Life. Sale hours are 7 a.m. until Noon, rain or shine. Clothing donations accepted prior to the sale by appointment only. Call or text 954818-2051 or 954-263-7324. This Kia four-door 2013 Optima SX Limited is Kias luxury sedan. It was voted the Best Car of 2011 by Car.com.See KIA on page 24

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The Pelican 9 Friday, July 6, 2012

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10 The PelicanFriday, July 6, 2012 Making a Difference Phyllis J. Neuberger wants your suggestions about people who are making a difference. Call 954-7838700. BriefsBy Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFF There are an estimated 1,000 World War II Veterans dying every day. It is therefore very thrilling to know that an all-volunteer organization, Honor Flights, is paying tribute to and honoring the service of those veterans who are still living by transporting them to see the WW II Memorial in Washington, D.C. at no cost to them. On one of the recent trips from this area, veteran Bill Borough, well known Deer eld Beach artist says, It was a high point in my life. He was happy to share some of the highlights of his recent ight and visit. Two Honor Flights, donated by U.S. Air and piloted by volunteers, left from West Palm Beach on May 12, each with over 80 veterans on board. Each of us had a volunteer guardian who stayed with us for the entire trip. Each guardian, in addition to volunteering his time, paid $400 for the privilege of traveling with us. Isnt that amazing? My buddy John Belisi and I had two retired reman as our guardians. Before we lifted off at 7 a.m. two re trucks gave us a water salute on the runway to send us off on a high. These dedicated and patriotic reman did the same thing when we landed. Borough ashed back to talk about his service in 1943. I enlisted in the U.S. Navy and became an Electricians Mate, Third Class on the USS PGM 31. I was in for two and a half years. May 12 Honor Flights visit to the WW II Memorial in Washington, D.C. included local vet, Bill Borough Guardians William Lewis and Barry Duralia with Veterans John Delisi and Bill Borough. Wheel chairs were part of the day for all veterans due to the exhaustive tour that took up the day after they arrived by Honor Flight. Each veteran was accompanied by volunteers who paid $400 for the opportunity to assist these men and women of the Greatest Generation. Veterans make a stop at the Iwo Jima Memorial. The Memorial recalls one of the bloodiest battles in the Paci c that took the lives of 6,800 Americans and 23,000 Japanese. Americans attacked the island on Feb. 19, 1945. For many of these visitors, this was their rst look at the famous memorial.See HONOR FLIGHTS on page 26Summer Book FairWilton Manors The Friends of the Wilton Manors Library will host its semi-annual Book Fair on Saturday, July 14 from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Parking and admission are free. More than 4,000 ction and nonction books and videos for adults and children are offered to the public for a requested donation of no more than $1 per item. Proceeds bene t the Wilton Manors Library. For more, call 954566-9019.Register to voteFort Lauderdale The Broward Supervisor of Elections Of ce will hold a voter registration event on July 9 from 7:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the Broward Central Bus Terminal on Broward Boulevard. Those who register will be eligible to vote in the Aug. 14, primary. Visit www. browardsoe.org or call 954-357-7050.Caregiver support groupDeer eld Beach The NE Focal Point Alzheimers Day Care Center, 227 NW 2 Street, offers a support group on Wednesdays. On July 11, Abby Blacker of Comforcare Senior services, will discuss Brain Fitness and Stimulation of Thinking at 10 a.m. The event is free and open to the public. For more, call 954-480-4449. Citizens insurance workshopMiami On July 16 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Citizens Property Insurance Corporation will hold a public workshop to discuss the possible increase on new insurance policies. In 2010, the Florida legislature voted to allow Citizens to increase rates by up to 10 percent for new policies beginning in Jan.2011. But Citizens is now trying to remove the cap. The workshop will be held at the JW Marriott, 1109 Brickell Ave., Miami. For more, call 888-685-1555.

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The Pelican 11 Friday, July 6, 2012 By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFWilton Manors Its been two years since Broward County purchased a boardedup apartment building on Powerline Road. And city of cials are less than enthusiastic over the progress made in getting it ready for new tenants. Purchased in August 2010 for $448,000 using the Neighborhood Stabilization Program, or NSP, the county plans to start renting the buildings 16 units by March of 2013. Its going to be a rental and we are planning to maintain ownership long term, said Mandy Bartle, executive director of South Florida Community Land Trust, the non-pro t hired by the county to oversee the property.Of cials frustrated over progress of affordable housing projectWilton Manors Police Sgt. Gary Blocker said in June of 2011 the building had major trash and overgrowth problems but the county took care of them. Since then no documented code violations have taken place. The property is currently fencedoff from the street and the windows are boarded-up. The area is mostly trash free and maintained. Apartments will be rented to families with low-incomes and individuals who earn 50 percent below the countys median income and cant qualify for home loans. The county plans to spend close to $1 million on improvements, which include an updated air conditioning system, tankless water heaters, a new electrical system and impact-resistant hurricane windows. But nding funding for those improvements, said Bartle, is what has delayed the project. Weve been waiting for the notice of funding availability [from the federal government], she said. The renovations, partially funded by NSP, are slated to begin in September. But if the grants dont get approved, Bartle said the county would have to look for loans from the private sector to move forward. NSP is a federal program that is used to purchase rundown properties that are hurting the property values of the surrounding homes. Once purchased, they are renovated so that they no longer negatively impact the neighborhood. But for Wilton Manors Mayor Gary Resnick progress See APARTMENTS on page 21

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12 The PelicanFriday, July 6, 2012 JM Family donates $50,000 for relief following DebbyDeer eld Beach Colin Brown, president and CEO of JM Family Enterprises, Inc., announced a $50,000 donation to the American Red Cross to support disaster relief efforts in North Florida following Tropical Storm Debby. Responding to our communities during times of crisis is a part of who we are, Brown said. Through our support of the American Red Cross, we know these funds will make a difference for those impacted by the storm as they begin to rebuild. The company chose the American Red Cross because it has the network of volunteers and disaster relief specialists to effectively address urgent needs and establish the foundation for a long-term recovery. JM Familys subsidiary, Southeast Toyota Distributors, which has a signi cant business presence in Jacksonville was not impacted by the storm. Southeast Toyota distributes vehicles, parts and accessories to 175 independent Toyota dealers in the ve southeastern states. The company has 700 associates in Jacksonville.Jacobs joins ocean task forceBroward Vice Mayor, Kristin Jacobs accepted a post on the Intergovernmental Coastal Task Force, or ICTF. The group, which consists of a four-county collaboration, city of cials, state organizations and environmental voices, will develop recommendations for coastal conservation. Last year, Jacobs served as chair of the White House National Ocean Councils Governance Coordinating Committee, which advises President Obama on local government perspectives on ocean policy. Children in Lauderdale-By-The-Sea power up their bicycles with red, white and blue for the annual Fourth of July parade.Bikes on parade

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The Pelican 13 Friday, July 6, 2012 By Mike dOliveiaPELICAN STAFFLighthouse Point Members of the Lighthouse Point Chamber of Commerce met at Orange Theory, a tness center located in the Venetian Isles shopping center in Lighthouse Point, to network, enjoy refreshments and celebrate the Chambers new board members. The new board includes Michael McLain, president, Summit Brokerage Services; Gene Petilli, vice president, Florida State Restoration Services; Penni Morris, treasurer, Pac N Send; Rene Turner-Mahfood, secretary, The Light Magazine, Rene Sabatini, secretary, Azure Realty, Charlie Davis, board member, Beacon Light Jewelry, Jon Frangipane, board member, Lighthouse Lighthouse Chamber celebrates new board members at social eventSee BOARD on page 15Board member Lynn Smith, left, of Bateman, Gordon & Sands; Diane Jurcik, of Beltone Hearing Care Center, and board member Dominic Romano, of Romano Law Of ce. Board member Julie Mahfood, left, of Campbell & Rosemurgy Real Estate; Karen Hammett, of Howard Grace Mortgage; Denise Brown, of Orange Theory and chamber secretary Rene Turner-Mahfood, of The Light Magazine.

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14 The PelicanFriday, July 6, 2012 Family Day at the Elks Lodge The local Elks Lodge in Pompano Beach is a traditional favorite for feeding patriotism and bellies on July 4. Among those attending this year were Gerri Boldovitch, Sara Rogers, Madeleleine, 2; Daphne, 4, Jason Rogers and Al Rogers. [Staff photo] Happy Birthday, America! Property, tax questions answeredOakland Park The Broward County Property Appraisers Of ce will hold a community outreach event on Tuesday, July 10 from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Oakland Park City Hall, 3650 NE 12 Ave. Appraisers will be available to assist with homestead, senior and other property tax exemption applications, as well as answer questions on property taxes. They are also accepting applications for portability. Those who attend should bring a current Florida drivers license or Florida identi cation card and a current voter registration card or declaration of domicile. Non-citizens must provide proof of permanent residency. For more information, visit www.bcpa. net or call 954-357-5579. Budget workshop meetingWilton Manors The budget review committee will meet on July 17 at 7 p.m. at city hall, 2020 Wilton Drive. The purpose of the meeting is to make recommendations to the mayor, city commissioners and city staff regarding the scal year 2012/2013 budget. Generator-ready businesses to know aboutBroward In case of a power loss after the next hurricane hits, Broward County has a list of gas stations, department stores, supermarkets and home improvement stores that are generator-ready. Visit www.broward.org/Hurricane/Stores.

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The Pelican 15 Friday, July 6, 2012 Point Magazine Julie Mahfood, board member, Campbell & Rosemurgy Real Estate; Nico Romano, board member, Romano Law Of ce; Lynn Smith, board member, Bateman, Gordon & Sands and Charles Spalma, board member, Balistreri Realty. [Photos by Michael dOliveira] BoardContinued from page 13Toni Santos, left, of Say Fitness, and chamber treasurer Penni Morris, of Pac N Send. Newly elected chamber president Michael McLain, of Summit Brokerage Services with outgoing president Lucille Pignataro of Bank United.

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16 The PelicanFriday, July 6, 2012 The Pelican Call us! 954-783-8700 vacation rental permits. Commissioners had already reduced Stellas nes to $53,000, plus another $1,500 for administrative costs at a previous meeting. Commissioner Mark Brown, who voted for the earlier settlement, asked that the issue be reconsidered. Brown said he didnt dispute any of the facts or the right of the commission to set the nes. But he was ashamed of himself over the earlier vote. He said it nally hit him when he got home just how severe a ne we were imposing on a town resident for a violation that didnt involve any public safety hazard. They werent running a crack house or a prostitution ring. It wasnt a retrap. The yard wasnt left in disrepair. This was a failure to renew a $6 business license. Brown said he questioned, What kind of message did I send up here? Are we going to be hard-nosed, moneygrubbing guys and anybody who breaks the law for any reason, youre going to be stuck with a 20 percent ne? Or are we going to send a message that were willing to look at individual circumstances involving every violation and be willing to make sure the punishment ts the crime? Brown supported Stellas settlement offer of $20,000. He had been prepared to suggest $10,000. The town issued notice of violations on Aug. 18, 2010 and Jan. 5, 2011. Each case was presented before the special magistrate and a time given to comply before nes started. Stella corrected the violations on May 2 by acquiring the business tax receipts and vacation rental permits. In arguing for relief from the liens, Stellas attorney, Kara Cannizzaro, said the nature and gravity of each violation was minimal. No real damage has been suffered by the city with respect to these violations, she wrote. She said they are not safety or nuisance issues and arent violations of the building code. Cannizzaro said Stella has been in business for over 30 years and was the rst to apply for vacation rental licensing. She has purchased, built and remodeled over 30 properties in LBTS. Stella acknowledges she was not responsive to notices concerning hearings on the violations. At the time, she was focused on her daughter who had been diagnosed with a rare eye disease which would ultimately lead to blindness. She spent her resources visiting over 25 physicians seeking treatment for her daughter, Cannizzaro said. This made it dif cult for her to maintain her typical business practices and bookkeeping. During her travels, Stella did not receive the violation notices until after the hearings occurred. Once she became aware of impending liens, she paid $1,920, bringing the properties into full compliance on May 2. In the meantime, Stella has fallen behind on payments on her three properties. This abatement would allow her to keep her homes and keep the properties out of foreclosure, Cannizzaro said. Cannizzaro also argued that $100 per day per violation is excessive for non-renewal of a business tax receipt when the annual payment for the receipt is $6. She said the towns code limits penalties for nonrenewal of this receipt to 25 percent of the tax. She asked the town to reduce nes from $100 to $25 a day. Cannizzaro also pointed out that the property at 4557 Poinciana was occupied by Stellas daughter from March to November 2011 and not used as a vacation rental, so there was no violation during that time. The other two properties were only intermittently used as vacation rentals. Commissioner Stuart Dodd asked if Stella failed to pay electric or water bills or shut down her business during this time frame and Stella said he had not. Dodd said he felt a 20 percent payment was fair and reasonable. He was the lone dissenting vote on the settlement gure. LienContinued from page 1

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The Pelican 17 Friday, July 6, 2012 By Malcolm McClintockPELICAN WRITERThe early morning hour did not deter about 50 sharply dressed area business owners from attending the much anticipated Lauderdale-ByThe-Sea, or LBTS, Chamber of Commerce gourmet Power Breakfast. Held June 29 at the famous Blue Moon Fish Co., those in attendance were there to do some serious networking, enjoy a sumptuous morning meal and listen to an insightful talk given by District 4 County Commissioner Chip Lamarca, eloquently introduced by LBTS Mayor Roseann Minnet. Lamarca, whose district covers parts of Fort Lauderdale, Pompano Beach, Lighthouse Point, Deerfield Beach, Sea Ranch Lakes, Oakland Park, Hillsboro Beach and LauderdaleBy-The-Sea, spoke on the many business development opportunities brought about by the vibrant South Florida tourism industry. He also discussed the positive impacts of upcoming large scale projects such as the $321 million deep channel dredging of Port Everglades, designed to accommodate todays much larger ships, and the new $790 million runway at the Fort LauderdaleHollywood International airport. We tell people that the Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport is a great place to breeze in and breeze out, says Lamarca. In fact, we liked the slogan so much that we bought billboard space outside Miami International Airport to let visitors know that they should consider using our airport as a less cumbersome alternative. Commissioner Lamarca LBTS Chamber packs the house at its monthly gourmet Power Breakfast also touched on the subject of beach re-nourishment before fielding a few questions from the audience. I think this has been an extraordinarily successful event, says Chamber President Mark Silver. We are grateful that Commissioner Lamarca could take some time out of his busy schedule to be with us this morning. I am thrilled with the turnout, says Blue Moons General Manager Alan Forgea. We worked hard on providing a high-quality breakfast in a lovely setting right on the Intracoastal. The next Power Breakfast at Blue Moon is scheduled for July 27 when State Senator Ellyn Bogdanoff will give a legislative update on changes made during the session and how they will impact local business.District 4 County Commissioner Chip Lamarca, left, with LBTS Chamber of Commerce President Mark Silver, Commercial Building Con sultants President Greg Trotter and Windjammer Beach Resort General Manager John Boutin.

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18 The Pelican Friday, July 6, 2012 Pompano Pompano Green Green Market Marketevery every Saturday Saturday morning from morning from 8 a.m. to 2 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the p.m. at the corner of West corner of West Atlantic Blvd. Atlantic Blvd. & Cypress & Cypress Road. Road. Eat Healthy!Hoffmann said she had no idea the chamber wasnt going to sponsor ChristmasBy-the-Sea, so she wasnt prepared with a recommendation on that matter and asked for commission direction. Commissioner Stuart Dodd asked how many years the chamber has run the event on a budget given by the town. Chamber board member Paul Novak said the tree was originally purchased by donations from businesses, and the chamber took over the event in the good times. Now [the chamber] has a new board of younger people, and they dont think Christmas-By-The-Sea is a chamber event. They look at it as a town event, Novak said. It brings people in, but it doesnt help businesses west of A1A. To spend $12,000 you dont have doesnt make sense. Thats the board consensus. It isnt something we want to step away from, board member Chuck Maxwell added. If we cant afford it, we shouldnt move forward with it. Silver suggested perhaps another kind of event could be planned that would encourage people to walk through the town and keep the stores open. Were all saddened by it, but we have to look at the black and white, Silver said. Mayor Roseann Minnet said she was sad to think the event would go by the wayside. Vice Mayor Scot Sasser said he also was saddened with the news. I will be a staunch supporter of continuing this at our expense if we have to, Sasser said. This is something traditional. Im very, very disappointed. Minnet said more discussions will be held on the holiday event. Commissioner Stuart Dodd asked chamber of cials if they would again seek funds from Broward County for the Welcome Center. Last year the county Tourist Development Council provided $10,000, which went to help with the Visitors Guide. Malcolm McClintock, chamber executive director, said he lobbied County Commissioner Chip LaMarca for funds when he addressed the group June 29. ChamberContinued from page 2 SightingsA community calendar of Broward County. Email events to siren2415@gmail. comSee SIGHTINGS on page 197-7 & 7-18 Museum of Discovery and Science, 401 SW 2 St., Fort Lauderdale, will hold an ice cream making demonstration at 2:30 p.m. 954-467-6637. 7-8 Pancake breakfast hosted by the Benevolent Patriotic Order of DOES, Drove 142 at the Elks lodge, 700 N.E. 10 St., Pompano Beach, from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. Cost is $5 for adults and $2.50 for children. 954-587-1121. 7-9 The Gold Coast Toastmasters meet at 7 p.m. at Dennys, 3151 NW 9 Ave., Oakland Park. 954-954-6822642. 7-11 Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce will host Business With A Twist at the Muvico Theatre, 2315 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Cost is $10 for members and $15 for nonmembers. 954~941-2940. 7-11 The Deerfield Beach Chamber of Commerce Luncheon Lead$ Group meets from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the chamber offices, 1601 E. Hillsboro Blvd., Deerfield Beach. 954-946-5452. 7-11 Kids can paint their own zombie t-shirts at the Pompano Beach Branch Library, 1213 E. Atlantic Blvd. from 5 to 6 p.m. For ages 12 to 18. Bring your own t-shirt. 954-786-2181. 7-12 Nature Tots program at Fern Forest Nature Center, 201 Lyons Rd. South, Coconut Creek, from 10 to 11 a.m. Cost is $5 per child. Program held at Secret Woods Nature Center, 2701 W. State Rd. 84, Dania Beach, on July 26. 954-357-5198. 7-13 Splash Ahoy at Quiet Waters Park, 401 S. Powerline Road, Deerfield Beach, from 6 to 10 p.m. Cost is $6 per person. Pirate games, bounce house and other activities. 954-357-5100. 7-13 Pompano Proud unveils artwork at McNab Park, 2250 E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach. Event is at McNab Park at 8:30 a.m. Light refreshments will be

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The Pelican 19 Friday, July 6, 2012 sq. ft. and 185,000 sq. ft and employ between 225 and 350 people. A Kmart spokesperson was unable to speci cally determine how big the Kmart in Oakland Park is or how many people work there but she said the average Kmart store is 94,000 sq. ft and employs 40 to 90 people. Mayor Anne Sallee, Vice Mayor John Adornato and Commissioner Shari McCartney say they dont necessarily want a Walmart going in but they do want new development. We need to make sure it doesnt negatively impact the community, said McCartney, who added that the additional traf c to the area is a concern that needs to be addressed. Boisvenue said drawing more traf c to the area could be a good thing for nearby businesses. The overwhelming majority of surrounding merchants provide products or services not offered by Walmart. Linda Damiani, who owns the Bedpost, which sells mattresses, beds and other furniture items Walmart sells said shes not really worried the discount giant will hurt her business. Bringing more traf c here is a good thing. Kmart has already brought customers here, said Damiani, whose business is across from Kmart in Wilton Manors. Its just not an area with a lot of local stores, said Bill Tapp an Oakland Park resident who lives in the condo complex directly adjacent to the Kmart. I think it will bene t the whole neighborhood. It surely outweighs what we have now. Adornato said the city needs to make sure it encourages economic development and smart growth. This is a proposal thats on the table and I want to learn about it. Residential input will be incredibly important, he said. Sallee said whatever is proposed needs to fall within the citys Community Redevelopment Agency guidelines. Sallee, Adornato, Boisvenue and Commissioner Jed Shank want whatever is proposed to include improvements to the waterfront area. Boisvenue said she envisions an outside eatery being built along the water. The other commissioners have similar ideas on redeveloping that part of the property. Shank said he thinks the city can hold out for something better and wants to raise the bar on what comes into the city. And residential input would be key. Im going to be listening very carefully to the community and the direction they want to go. Too often the electeds think we know more than anyone else. WalmartContinued from page 3 SightingsContinued from page 18 See SIGHTINGS on page 21 served. 954-562-3232. 7-14 Free live music during Music By The Sea in front of the Athena-By-TheSea restaurant, 4400 N. Ocean Blvd. Lauderdale-By-TheSea, from 7 to 11 p.m. Event takes place every Saturday. 954-776-1000. 7-14 Free car seat safety check from 9 a.m. to noon at Pompano Beach Fire-Rescue Station 24, 2001 NE 10 St. Appointments are required. 954-786-4510. 7-19 The Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce will host a membership breakfast from 7:45 to 9 a.m. at Premier Residence Inn, 1371 N. Ocean Blvd., Pompano Beach. Cost is $10 and $15 for those who dont RSVP by July 18. 954941-2940. 7-19 The Deerfield Beach Chamber of Commerce hosts After Hours N Deerfield at 5:30 p.m. at AmTrust Bank, 3600 W. Hillsboro Blvd., Deerfield Beach. 954-9465452. 7-20 Sol Children Theatre Troupe presents Charlottes Web the Musical. On Fridays and Saturdays the musical is at 7 p.m. and 2 p.m. on Saturdays and Sundays. Performances run through Aug. 5 but no performance on

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20 The Pelican Friday, July 6, 2012 Send The Pelican your news to mdpelican@yahoo. WORSHIP DIRECTORY: Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad. Rev. Hyvenson Joseph PetsContinued from page 1Boarding optionsFor individuals and families who choose to board their pets during a hurricane, there are private animal hospitals and pet shelters that provide service. In contrast to Browards hurricane pet shelter, which is free, the cost is greater at pet hospitals and requires pets be more prepared such as having multiple vaccinations in addition to rabies. Amber Caro, manager at Camp Canine, which has locations in Fort Lauderdale, Hollywood and Boca Raton, said her company requires proof of vaccinations for rabies, distemper, bordetella and parvo. Just like the Broward shelter, Caro recommends leavpano Pet Lodge, 900 NW 31 Ave., Pompano Beach, 954-972-5584; Oakland Park Animal Hospital, 2200 W. Oakland Park Blvd., 954-6447281; Arbor Pet Hospital, 1220 northeast 26 Street, Wilton Manors, 954-565-1896 and Camp Canine, 808 W. Broward Blvd., Fort Lauderdale, 954-468-2663. Visit www.humanebroward.com for more information on preparing a pet for a hurricane. ing a weeks worth of food and medicine with the pet at a private shelter. Especially storm anxiety medicine or other important medication, said Caro. Caro, who worked at Camp Canine through Hurricanes Ivan, Katrina and Wilma, says storms kick up a lot of eas and ticks so owners should make sure to administer ea and tick preventatives as well as heart worm medication before a storm. Some of the private animal hospitals that board pets during storms are Deer Run Animal Hospital, 3360 W. Hillsboro Blvd., Deer eld Beach, 954-421-2244; Pom-By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach Those with a passion for fishing can help Special Olympics athletes follow their passions by joining the competition during the 12th Annual Walk On Water Salt Water Fishing Tournament, July 28. Hosted by the Mens Club of St. Coleman Catholic Parish, money raised during the Walk On Water tournament benefits Special Olympics of Broward County Linda Mills, director of Special Olympics, said donations to her organization are spent on travel, lodging, uniforms, equipment, training and other expenses that allow athletes to compete across the state and country. Were 100 percent funded through community donations. So everything we can get helps us a great deal, said Mills. We really count on our community donations, especially groups like the Mens Club that support us from year to year. Jerry Squadrito, tournament chair, said the economy has taken a toll on sponsorships but the Mens Club decided to keep the tournament going for another year, even if it means the club will have to contribute more money than in years past. But its not too late for the business community to get involved. We welcome any donations, regardless of size, and encourage local businesses to provide any promotional products they Walk-on-Water tournament to bene t Special Olympics may have available that could be used as prizes or raffle items. In the past weve received everything from pens, caps, shirts, hats, to electronics, fishing gear, and even gift certificates for goods and/or services, said Squadrito. Right now, Squadrito said he has four of five boats signed up but expects a lot more the closer the tournament gets. Typically they dont sign up until a week or two before. Cost is up to $200 per boat, up to eight anglers per boat. Early registration is $200 by July 20 and $225 after July 20. Additional anglers can be See WALK on page 25

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The Pelican 21 Friday, July 6, 2012 ApartmentsContinued from page 11isnt fast enough. This is an eyesore in our city, the mayor said. They need to take action or sell it. Resnick said hes not con dent in the countys ability to get federal funding or serve as long term managers. He added that private developers, speci cally Stellar Homes Group, which has purchased and renovated ve other apartment buildings along Powerline, have made more progress improving the area. Larry Baum of Stellar Homes Group said his company has invested about $6 million in the buildings and rents range from $700 to $1,000 per month. Rents at the countys building would range between $700 and $850 per month. Renters would also be given a utility allowance. There is a large need for affordable rental housing in the community, said Bartle. Broward County plans to turn the apartment complex, located at 2417 Powerline Road, into affordable housing. [Photo by Michael SightingsContinued from page 19 See SIGHTINGS on page 24 Aug. 3. Tickets are $15/$10 for 11 years old and older and $12/$8 for 11 years old and younger. 561-447-8829 8-4 The Crockett Family Health & Community Festival will be held from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Pompano Citi Centre, corner of Copans Road and Federal Highway. Free health screenings and giveaways will be offered. 954-943-4685.FridaysThe Pompano Beach Rotary Club meets Fridays at 12:15 p.m. at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. 954-786-3274.SaturdaysPony rides are available at Sand & Spurs Equestrian Park, 1600 NE 5 Ave., Pompano Beach, from 9 to 11:30 a.m. Cost is $3 per ride. 954-786-4507. The Pompano Beach Kiwanis Club Westside meets the first and third Saturdays of the month at 8:30 a.m. at the E. Pat Larkins Community Center, 520 MLK Blvd., Pompano Beach. 954782-8096.

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22 The Pelican Friday, July 6, 2012 Tell The Pelican about your news! 954-783-8700 Classi edsCall 954-545-0013 Pelican Classi ed ads Mean Business! HELP WANTEDWILLING TO EDUCATE-Highly motivated individual for rewarding career in nancial services with Primerica. Call 954-729-0192. 7/6 LOCAL PEST CONTROL CO Looking For Quality Sales/Service Tech. Must Be Dependable, Team Player, Good Drivers License & People Skills. Will Train Right Person. ALSO Of ce Assistant Computer People & Phone Skills Needed. Fax Resume 954418-3982. 7-27 SEEKING EMPLOYMENTCAREGIVER/COMPANION Caucasian Woman. 25 Years Experience To Assist & Care For Your Loved Ones. Days / Eves / Nights. References Avail. 954-482-5494. 7-6 CARING HOME HEALTH Seeking Live-in / Live Out. Can Be Recommended!! Please Call 954-496-4941. 7-6 CNA / HHA 20 Yrs Exp. Available 24/7. Will Take Care Of Your Loved One. References Upon Request. Call 954-8265499. 7-6 CNA AVAILABLE Nights, Days & Weekends. Full Time Or Part Time. Excellent References & Reasonable Rates. Call 954-696-2091. 7-6 MALE CNA / HHA / COMPANION. Broward County Area. Former EMT. All Certi cations / Compassionate, References. Call Ron 954-2322832. Very Reasonable! 7-6 SERVICES DANNY BOY ELECTRIC Lic & Insured. Lic. #EC13004811. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. 24/Hr Service. 954-290-1443. Beat Any Written Estimate. Sr, Discount. 7-27 CALL BRENDAN THE HANDYMAN. Construction & Repairs. Carpentry, Plumbing, Roo ng, Masonry, Windows, Painting, Decking, Tile. FREE Estimates! 954-773-6134 Emergency Calls. 7-20 HANDYMAN PAINTING CARPENTRY Pressure Cleaning. Decks! Everything Around The House. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. Call 561-350-3781. 7-6 HONEST HANDYMAN HOME & BUILDING Maintenance/Improvements. No Job Too Small. Fast Friendly Service. Reasonable Rates. Local Resident/Homeowner. Call Today For Your FREE Upfront Quote. No Deposit Required. 754-366-1915. 7-6 GOT JUNK? TRASH HAULING-CONDO CLEANUPS Trees/ Landscape, Yard Fill. Pressure Wash/ Roofs/Home Repairs Welding, Etc. Dave 954-8189538. 7-27 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIESNew GREEN technology. New defroster control saves energy in home refrigerators, commercial chillers. Patented. All optical. Simple mfg. Strategic partners needed..www.NewAvionics.Com. 954-568-1991. CMUSICIANS WANTEDThe American Legion Symphonic Band is now accepting new members for the 2011-2012 season. College age to seasoned seniors are welcome. Rehearsals are held on Wed. evenings at American Legion Post 142 in Pompano. Percussionists, oboe, bassoon, trombone and euphonium players are especially needed. If you enjoy making music, call Jim McGonigal, Music Director at 954647-0700 for more info.REAL ESTATE SERVICESBUYING OR SELLING A Property With Me You Will Receive A Bonus Of $500 For Property Value Up To $300,000! A Bonus Of $1,000 For Property Value Above $300,000! Yvette Gaussen. YES WE CAN REALTY. 954-6147773 Or 954-773-8340. 7-6 DOCK SPACES.E. POMPANO DOCK 1 Bridge. Water And Electric. Proof Of Insurance! $200 Month. Please Call 954-9411103. 7-6 CO-OP SALESPOMPANO BEACH Waterfront Co-op 1/1 2 Available! Dockage Available! 2nd Floor! Side By Side. $59K Each. Coldwell Banker Barbara 954-629-1324. 7-6 TOWNHOUSESWILTON MANORS / OAKLAND PARK Town Home. Huge Designers Dream 2500 Sq Ft. Possible Home Of ce 3/2.5 Large Dining Room, Eat-in Kitchen, Patio, Living Room 16 Ceilings, 2 Car Garage. F/L/S Lease $1575 Per Month. 954-806-8821. 7-13 HOUSE TO SHARENORTH POMPANO FURNISHED Bedroom Handicapped Accessible. $450 Month Share Utilities. Leave Message 954-785-7671. 7-6 HOMES FOR RENTPOMPANO 2/1 DEN OR 3RD Bedroom, C/A, Fenced Yard. Newer Roof. $1050 Mo. Yrly Lease. Call Darci 954-783-3723. 520 NE 34 St. REAL ESTATE WANTEDI BUY HOUSES!! CASH!! AS IS! QUICK CLOSE! ANY AREA ANY CONDITION! NO EQUITY OK. CALL NOW 954-914-2355. 7-20 CONDOS FOR SALEPOMPANO BEACH DIRECT OCEAN VIEW!! Pet Friendly! 2/2 AT THE BREAKERS! $269,000. Call Juliana At Barclays For Details. 1-305766-4420. 7-20 LIGHTHOUSE POINT PARADISE Beautiful Furnished 2/2! Only $115,000. English, French, Spanish, Greek. Yvette Gaussen YES WE CAN REALTY 954-6147773 Or 954-773-8340. 6-22 LIGHTHOUSE POINT 2/2 1st Floor 55+ Complex. No Pets. Great Amenities. $55,000. Call Barbara @ Balistreri RE. 954263-7129. 7-6 POMPANO BEACH PALMAIRE 3/2.5 King Model! 2 Balconies, W / D In Unit. Small Pet OK! $159,900. Ruthie Brooks Balistreri Realty 954803-4174. 7-6 CONDOS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH LEISUREVILLE 55+. Beautiful 2/1 Renovated Corner Condo 2nd Floor. Beside Pool, Clubhouse & Golf. Yrly Lease Unfurn. $800 Month. Furn. $900 Month. 1st & Last. Photos Available. prudhommejean@yahoo.com. 954-784-0119. 7-6 POMPANO 1/1 E OF FEDERAL2nd Floor-Small Complex. No Pets. $625 Month Yearly Lease. 954-263-7129. Call Barbara. 7-6 POMPANO BEACH LARGE 2/2 With Den. All Renovated. Pool. 1/4 Mile From Beach. W/D. Small Pet OK! $1,300 Month Yearly. 561-703-6545 Or 754-264-3289. 7-20

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The Pelican 23 Friday, July 6, 2012 Classi edsCall 954-545-0013 Pelican Classi ed ads Mean Business! 954-7838700! APTS FOR RENTDEERFIELD/POMPANO BEACH 1 BR & 2 BR APTS FOR RENT. Remodeled, Paint, Tile, Etc. Washer / Dryer On Site. Pool. Pet Friendly. George 954-809-5030. 7-27 POMPANO BEACH A1A 1 & 2 Bedrooms, Ef ciencies, Fully Furnished Including Utilities, Cable, WIFI, Laundry, Pool, BBQ. 700 To The Beach. Starting At $269 Per Week. 954-943-3020. 7-20 POMPANO MCNAB RD & NE 18 AVENUE 1 & 2 Bedrooms Furnished / Unfurnished. $695 $895 And Up. Pool, Tile Floors. Central A/C. 954-610-2327. 7-6 POMPANO BEACH 2 / 1 $825 MONTH Yearly Lease. Pool, Off Federal Hwy. Pet OK! Call Anthony 954-857-5207. 7-13 POMPANO BEACH / ATLANTIC / FEDERAL Ef ciency $175 Weekly. No Security Deposit. Includes Cable, Electric, Internet. FREE Washer / Dryer. No Drug Record No Evictions. 954-709-0694. 7-6 POMPANO BEACH 900 TO BEACH! Spotless 1 / 1 In 4 Unit 1 Level Building. No Pets! No Smoking! Walk To Shopping. $850 Month Lease Includes Direct TV. 401-461-8683. 7-6 POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 Bedroom From $495. Easy Movein. 1/2 OFF DEPOSIT. Remodeled. Great Location. 954-783-1088 For More Info. 7-13 COMMERCIAL FOR RENT-SALEPOMPANO COMMERCIAL OFFICE Spaces Available. Ranging From As Low As $500 To $700 Depending On Square Footage. Please Call Darci At 954-7833723. 7/13 DEERFIELD BEACH Retail Of ce Warehouse 700 Sq Ft With Loft. A/C, Bathroom. $575 Per Month. Call For More Info 561-654-1331 Or 561-9985681. 7-27 NEWLY EQUIPPED LOW RENT Shop Space Ideal For Bakery Pizza Wings Crepes Etc. Corner New 12 Avenue & 34 Court, Oakland Park. Indoor / Outdoor Patio Sitting. 954-563-3533. 7-13 Tell The Pelican about your news! 954-783-8700

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24 The Pelican Friday, July 6, 2012 Lasher describes the Soul model the highest volume seller because of its universal appeal to young and old. Its versatile, roomy and gets 35 miles per gallon, he says. Pagan Mallory just bought a Kia Soul and says, My husband and I love it! We tried out quite a few of the competitive cars and chose the Soul because its roomy enough for our scuba gear and our two dogs. Its easy to get in and out of. We love the great features, the good mileage available as a turbo and a hybrid which gets 40 miles per gallon. Standard features in every Kia include power windows, air conditioning, blue tooth and iPad connectivity, plus all desired safety features. In a 2012 competition that saw more that 4,500 products entered by 1800 car manufacturers from 58 countries, Kias Picanto and Rio models won the top two honors in the reddot design award. In 2009, the Soul Crossover won. Sportage and Venga compacts won in 2010. In 2011, Kias Optima was named best of the best. Lasher says, With so many award winning vehicles, its not a surprise that we have so many lookers and buyers in our showroom today.Kia began in 1962The rst motor vehicle to come off the production line was a three-wheel truck. Improved variations came along and between 1962 and 1973 Kia sold 25,000 three wheelers which were used for hauling small sized cargo. Since then, Kia has come a long way, joining the ranks of the worlds top ten global manufacturers, with a sales presence in 170 countries and annual sales of 2.5 million units. For more information, call 954-545-7200 or visit www. philsmithkia.com KiaContinued from page 8 SightingsContinued from page 21 See SIGHTINGS on page 25The Deerfield Beach West Kiwanis Club meets the second and fourth Saturdays of the month at 9 a.m. at Westside Park, 445 SW 2 St., Deerfield Beach. 954-54-7329883. Kayak rentals are available Saturdays and Sundays at Richardson Historic Park, 1937 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Visit www. AtlanticCoastKayak.com or 954-781-0073 for rates. The Wilton Manors Green Market is held every Saturday and Sunday at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. 954-592-0381. The Deerfield Beach West Kiwanis Club meets the second and fourth Saturdays of the month at 9 a.m. at Westside Park, 445 SW 2 St., Deerfield Beach. 954-54-7329883.SundaysSt. Elizabeths of Hungary Parish hosts a pancake breakfast at 3331 NE 10 Terrace, Pompano Beach, on every third Sunday of the month from 7:30 a.m. to noon. The breakfast benefits the Parish. 954-263 8415.MondaysPlay ping-pong from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Cost is $1. All ages can participate. 954-3902130. The Gold Coast Toastmasters Club meets on the second and third Monday of the month from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Dennys, 3151 NW 9 Ave., Fort Lauderdale. 954895-3555 or 954-782-9951.TuesdaysDeerfield Beach Rotary Club meets every Tuesday at 12 p.m. at the Deer Creek Golf Club, 2801 Deer Creek Country Club Blvd., Deerfield Beach. 954-630-9593. Pompano BeachLighthouse Rotary Club meets every Tuesday at 7:30 a.m. at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. 954-972-7178. The American Legion Auxiliary Unit 142, 171 SW 2 St., Pompano Beach, has Bingo on Tuesdays at 7 p.m. Food is available from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. 954-942-2448. Yoga classes are available for all levels at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors, on Tuesday nights from 6:30 to 8 p.m. and Saturday mornings from 10:30 a.m. until noon. The cost is $7. 305-607-3520. Zonta International meets

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The Pelican 25 Friday, July 6, 2012 Advertise with The Pelican Today! 954-783-8700added for $20 each. The fishing begins July 28 at 7 a.m. at the Hillsboro Inlet in Pompano Beach with lines out at 4 p.m. A kick off party and captains meeting will be held July 27 at St. Colemans, 1200 S. Federal Hwy., from 6 to 9 p.m. The awards party and dinner will be held July 28 at St. Colemans from 6 to 9 p.m. Cash prizes, trophies, raffles and door prizes will be given away to anglers. For more, call 954-6822128. WalkContinued from page 20 cubic yards annually, is the basis for Bocas current bypassing goals. Since this study used 2002 gures, Schubert said she believes the towns update request will be received favorably at the DEP. The DEP does periodic surveys and its budget for 2013-14 is being drawn now. Schubert said she is seeking a meeting with city of cials in Boca Raton and hopes that Deer eld Beach will be a partner in the DEP request. The draft letter approved this week has not yet been circulated to these municipalities. In her letter to the DEP, Schubert noted that the Hillsboro Inlet is one of the most successfully managed inlets in the state, evidenced by the fact that Pompano Beach does not have to renourish it beaches. StudyContinued from page 2SightingsContinued from page 24on the third Tuesday of the month at Duffys Diner, 401 N. Federal Hwy., Deerfield Beach, at 11:15 a.m. Zonta International works to advance the status of women. 561-392-2223.WednesdaysThe Wilton Manors Kiwanis Club meets Wednesdays at 6:30 p.m. at 2749 NE 14 Ave., Wilton Manors. 954-5619785. The Oakland Park Kiwanis Club meets Wednesdays from 7:30 to 8:30 a.m. at Peter Pan Diner, 1216 E. Oakland Park Blvd., Oakland Park. 954-566-9957. The Pompano Beach Kiwanis Club meets Wednesdays at noon at the Riverside Grille at the Sands Resort, 125 N. Riverside Drive, Pompano Beach. 954444-4815. The Greater Pompano Beach Senior Citizens Club meets on the second Wednesday of the month at the Emma Lou Olson Community Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach, at 10 a.m. 954-943-7787. Alzheimers Caregivers Support Group meets Wednesdays from 10 a.m. to noon at the NE Focal Point Alzheimers Day Care Center, 301 NW 2 Ave., Deerfield BeachThursdaysRotary Club of Oakland Park/Wilton Manors meets every Thursday from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. at Tequila Sunrise Mexican Grill, 4711 N. Dixie Hwy., Oakland Park. 954-491-6158. The Deerfield Beach Kiwanis Club meets at noon every Thursday at the Deerfield Beach Hilton, 100 Fairway Dr., Deerfield Beach 954-242-6083.

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26 The Pelican Friday, July 6, 2012 We were in the Paci c supporting those who were ghting in Okinawa. Our job was to follow mine sweepers and detonate the mines. After the Japanese surrendered, we were hit with a typhoon. The Japanese told us how to get into a safe harbor. Imagine that. They saved our lives. On the day after we had stopped killing each other, they were willing to save our lives. I always wanted to thank them for that. We were the rst ones in Japan, but that fact was never recorded because [Gen. Douglas] MacArthur wanted that honor for himself. Borough left those long ago memories to share highlights from his recent trip to Washington, DC thanks to the all volunteer Honor Flight. We were greeted by crowds of cheering men, women and children and music. Those folks just wanted to shake our hands and thank us for our service. There we were, sitting in wheel chairs, getting love and respect like nothing I had ever experienced. We were all in tears and so were those wonderful people who had come to welcome us. Five buses took us to the National Cemetery and the Changing of the Guard. We had lunch along side the Potomac. We traveled to the WW II Memorial which gave most of us goose bumps and tears. There is a gold bordered memorial on the west side overlooking the Lincoln Memorial. Filled with gold stars, each star represents 100 lost servicemen and women. Never forget, women did serve. In fact, we had a former WAC with us on this trip. The names of the battles fought are engraved on the Atlantic and the Paci c sides. I had a picture taken on the Okinawa and Japan engraving. For most of us, this was a rst viewing of the monument and a very emotional day. We also visited the Iwo Jima monument for group photos. Most of the veterans felt that this was the welcome home they had always wanted.History of Honor FlightsThe rst Honor Flight took place in May of 2005. Six small planes ew out of Spring eld, Ohio taking 12 veterans to the memorial in Washington, DC. By August of that year, there were so many veterans on the waiting list for an Honor Flight that commercial airlines were contacted and the Honor Flight Network was created. Conceived by Earl Morse, a physician assistant and retired Air Force Captain, Earl wanted to honor the veterans he had taken care of for the past 27 years. After retiring from the Air Force in 1998, Earl was hired by the Department of Veterans Affairs to work in a small clinic in Spring eld, Ohio. When the memorial was nally completed and dedicated in 2004, Earl realized it was a major topic of conversation among his veteran patients. Many hoped to visit the memorial but were unable to do so because of physical and nancial limitations. Most of these senior heroes were now in their 80s. They lacked the physical and mental wherewithal to complete a trip on their own. Earl decided there had to be a way to help. When he asked some of these veterans if they would like a free trip to see the memorial, they often broke down and cried. He decided to ask for help from other pilots. He addressed the 150 members of the AERO club during a meeting, specifying that veterans must pay nothing. Volunteer pilots had to pay to rent the aircraft for the day at a cost of $600 to $1,200. Pilots promised to not only y veterans free but to escort them around D.C. for the day. Eleven pilots volunteered and the Honor Flight was launched. In May of 2008, Southwest Airlines stepped up by donating thousands of free tickets and was named the of cial carrier of the Honor Flight Network. Now there is a network of participating programs nationwide to assist these senior heroes get to the memorial safely.Success in numbersIn 2005, Honor Flight Network, or HFN, transported 137 veterans at no cost to them. In 2006, the number became 891. In 2007, the number grew to 5,000. By the end of 2011 ying season in November, HFN had transported more than 81,000 veterans of WW II, Korea and Vietnam to see the memorials built to honor their suffering and sacri ce to keep this great nation free and a world leader.About Bill BoroughBoroughs is a Deer eld Beach artist, well known in South Florida for his water colors of Key West homes and marine scenes. His work was seen at most art festivals from 1982 to 1998. Although he has stopped painting, his fans continue to seek out pieces from his remaining collection. He still shows at the Lighthouse Point Yacht Club annual art show. Married to Virginia for over 60 years, they have three daughters, six grandchildren and one great granddaughter. Every WW 11 veteran is invited to make this one day, sentimental journey. To contact Honor Flights, go to the web site: www.honorightse .org/ Call Elaine Penn and Tony Reese at 1772781-2212 or email:honor ightse @live.comHonor ightsContinued from page 10

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The Pelican 27 Friday, July 6, 2012 Capt. RJ Boyle is an experienced angler in South Florida. His studio is located in Lighthouse Point. Call 954-420-5001. By RJ BoyleRJ BOYLE STUDIOSWe decided to change up our usual shing schedule this week. We had shed two days for sword sh and one day for dolphin. Up to that point it had been a stellar week. We caught ve sword sh, weighing-in at a combined 400 lbs. and a few dolphin in the 30-lb. range. I was tired from shing a few days in a row, but as I sat on the couch trying to relax, I found myself feeling like I had to go shing. The weather was so Driftin and Dreaminbeautiful outside. I came up with a plan, and what a plan it was. I called my guys from the shop and said Lets go on the Fish City Pride and sh for some snapper. At $40, we could sh and get off the boat and not have to do anything. They were all red-up to go, so I ordered ten sub sandwiches, and we made our way to the Hillsboro Inlet. There were a bunch of people already in line. You could just feel the excitement in the air. We got seats in the bow of the boat and proceeded to rig-up for a night of hard-core reef shing. Everybody seemed to be rigging up a little different, hoping to get an edge. We all SEE DREAMIN on page 28

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28 The Pelican Friday, July 6, 2012 put in our $5 for the biggest sh pool and we all felt like we were gonna take home the prize. Tensions were high as the lines hit the water on the rst drift of the night. Fishing started slow, but Capt. Dwight on the second drift put us on the sh and the RJ Boyle crew never looked back. My cousins, Fred and Joey Gushue, got hot and put two ag yellowtails in the boat while Jeff Walls, my store manager, boated a nice mangrove snapper. Max Golliger caught a few reef sh and started to get hot. To that point I was struggling and started to receive some heckling from my crew. I knew I had to bear down and get serious if I was going to win the pool. Halfway through the trip all I had caught was a doctor sh and the heckling became unbearable. With two drifts to go in the trip I broke out all the stops and went to my old reliable bottom sh rig. From that point forward, it was over. Max switched to my same rig and challenged me to catch the most sh of anyone on the trip. In the end I caught 31 sh to Maxs ve and my con dence was restored. All of the heckling stopped as sh kept coming over the rail. Jeff Walls was staying quiet during this time and had snuck out one of his secret rigs. Right at the end of the trip Jeff hooked a sh that we knew was the right one. He weaved himself up and down the rail until nally a beautiful mutton snapper emerged from the depths. He pulled the sh over the rail and with that won the pool. He won $150 and bragging rights until our next trip. What a trip it was. If you get a chance ride out on the Fish City Pride out of Hillsboro Inlet. The crew was great and the shing was off the chain. RJ Boyle, third from left, and crew enjoy some shing time on a boat thats not their own. [Photo courtesy of RJ Boyle]

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Friday, July 6, 2012 Vol. XX, Issue 27 Wherever you are, read The Pelican @ pompanopelican.com • Send news to siren2415@gmail.com Pompano Beach • Deer eld Beach • Lighthouse Point • Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Wilton Manors • Oakland Park • Hillsboro Beach • The Galt • Palm Aire The P e l i c a n Pelican 144 days left in 2012 Hurricane season By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFHurricanes bring a set of unique challenges for pet owners. The major question is what to do with fourlegged family members during a hurricane, and it can be a tough one to answer. For those who want to ride out the storm with their pets, Millennium Middle School, 5803 NW 94 Ave., Tamarac, is Broward County’s only of cial shelter that allows people to bring their pets with them. Run by the Humane Society of Broward County and the American Like humans, pets need plans for hurricane seasonRed Cross, the pet-friendly shelter has room for up to 300 people and 500 pets. “It’s geared towards families who are in evacuation zones,” said Lacey Freeman, clinic administrative assistant at the Humane Society. Evacuation zones include areas east of Federal Highway and people living in mobile homes. In order for families or individuals to gain access to the shelter with their pets, they must be pre-registered and have valid proof of residence [an electric, water or cable bill]. Also required is proof of rabies vaccination, contact information for the pet’s veterinarian and a current photo of the pets that will use the shelter Freeman said during previous storms the shelter housed an average of 80 families and 200 pets. And this year there is still plenty of room on the registration list. Those who stay at the shelter should bring a crate, week’s worth of food and medicine for each pet and the same amount for each person. People should also bring their own cots, air mattresses or something to sleep on. To pre-register, call 954266-6828See PETS on page 20 Reuse water grows healthy lawns and saves everyone moneyBy Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach – Imagine being able to turn on your lawn sprinklers every day of the week for as long as you like. Well, for some residents, customers of the city’s Oasis reclaimed water system, that’s a fact. This reclaimed, treated water is available to single-family homeowners at less than half the cost of dousing grass and plants with drinking water. And during the past year, after the conservation initiative I Can Water was launched, more than 400 residents See REUSE on page 4 Commission reduces lien fees by $245,000 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFF Lauderdale-By-The-Sea – Town commissioners accepted a lien settlement of $20,000 this week rather than the $265,050 the town had imposed upon longtime business owner Sandra Stella. According to town staff, Stella was 502 days delinquent in paying vacation rental permit fees and had gone 382 days without a business tax receipt. Fines grew at the rate of $100 a day. Stella, who owns Sandy by the Sea Realty, had incurred six code enforcement liens on three properties for not renewing her business tax [a $6 annual fee] and for not renewing her See LIEN on page 16 Damien Maraj, 5, of Margate, takes a tumble down an in atable slide during Pompano Beach’s Fourth of July celebration on the beach. The city’s celebrations included games, arts and crafts, a watermelon eating contest, a professionally-built sand castle and live entertainment. [Photo by Michael d’Oliveira] Westside Park and SW 15 Street will bene t from unspent HUD allocationsBy Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach – The athletic elds at Westside Park will be due for a major expansion if nearly $1.1 million in Community Development Block Grants, or CDBG, are approved this summer by the Department of Housing and Urban Development, or HUD. The money is being reprogrammed from unspent block grant allocations in the years 2006 through 2011. The city commission approved the new project – building a lighted baseball complex at the park – on June 19. The See PARK on page 7

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2 The PelicanFriday, July 6, 2012 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFF Lauderdale-By-TheSea – Town commissioners unanimously approved a $40,664 request from the Chamber of Commerce for operation of the Tourist Information Center/Welcome Center, a slight increase over last year. The increase will keep the center manned seven days a week for eight hours a day, Town Manager Connie Hoffmann noted in recommending approval. The chamber will pay for other costs incurred in operation of the center, such as computer maintenance, printing, internet and cable. The chamber didn’t fare as well in its request for $22,000 for newspaper, magazine, radio, TV and online advertising. Hoffmann did not recommend approving these funds, since the chamber didn’t indicate in its request that they had a marketing plan or how they would track their efforts. Rather than approve the request, Hoffmann recommended funds for marketing be set aside in the town budget. She suggested that chamber board members could work with town staff and the town’s marketing consultants to develop a marketing plan. Commissioners unanimously approved her suggestions. The chamber will continue to print and distribute the Visitor’s Guide and maintain a website and Facebook page. Many events are planned, such as a revamped Taste of the Beach, improved Arts & Crafts shows, power breakfasts, Resident Appreciation, Charity Gala on the Pier and “Food Truck/Art Walk” evenings to attract visitors. In its letter, the chamber said it will not be able to fund or organize the Christmas By The Sea event this year because of a shortage of funds. The cost of the event is about $12,000. Furthermore the Christmas tree is in poor condition and is expected to last about one more season. Estimated cost of a new tree is $33,000. Cost to erect the tree is $4,346. Town balks at giving Chamber marketing money, but visitor center gets full support See CHAMBER on page 18 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFHillsboro Beach – A letter asking the Department of Environmental Protection or, DEP, to re-evaluate the sand content of the area between the Boca Raton Inlet and the Hillsboro Inlet and the sand bypassing approach for the Boca Raton Inlet was approved this week by the town commission. According to Vice Mayor Claire Schubert, Hillsboro’s beach commissioner, the area has not been surveyed for eight years and it is “an opportunistic moment” to make the request. “We are not trying to be hostile to Boca,” Schubert said. “And we are not questioning the gures. In fact, according to DEP guidelines, Boca is pumping the required amount.” Hillsboro’s north beach suffers from continual erosion. Last year 340,000 cubic yards of sand were pumped onto the beach. Experts have said this ‘hotspot’ is caused by Deer eld’s beach groin system but the amount of sand being pumped from the Boca Inlet is also a factor. Sand pumped from the Boca Inlet drifts southward onto the beaches in Deer eld and Hillsboro. In a study conducted in 2004 for the DEP, Dr. Robert Dean recommended that the City of Boca Raton pump 100,000 cubic yards annually which would include dredging an ebb shoal at the mouth of the inlet. The sediment budget at that time, 83,000 cubic Town seeking DEP study of Boca Inlet’s sand bypass See STUDY on page 25

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The Pelican 3 Friday, July 6, 2012 By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFOakland Park – Cautious optimism is the sentiment of most city commissioners when it comes to the possibility of a new Walmart taking over the space currently occupied by Kmart on Oakland Park Boulevard. “It certainly would be an improvement,” said Commissioner Suzanne Boisvenue, who called Kmart an eyesore and views Walmart as an opportunity to bring new jobs to the city. “Because it’s currently zoned, I don’t have a problem with it.” Walmart recently purchased the Kmart at 670 E. Oakland Park Blvd. and the adjacent Holsum Bakery at 790 E. Oakland Park Blvd. for $11 million. Steven Restivo, Walmart director of community affairs, said the company is still working on how it will develop the site, speci cally what kind of Walmart store will be built and whether or not the existing structure will be torn down. Walmart has decided to let Kmart stay in the store until its lease ends Oakland Park Commission mostly optimistic about proposed Walmartin 2015. Restivo did say that Walmart would work with the city on the design and layout of the site. “If they go in there and knock it down, they’ll have to get a conditional-use approval,” said Justin Pro t, Oakland Park senior planner. The site is currently zoned B1, community business, which allows for department stores like Walmart and Kmart. Under a conditional use the approval process requires a public hearing at the planning and zoning board and two public hearings at city commission meetings. “But we don’t have an application yet so we don’t know exactly what they want to do,” said Pro t. Depending on what Walmart builds, the new store could be between 108,000 See WALMART on page 19 Jakob Kaye, 5, of Margate, digs his teeth into a piece of watermelon in a watermelon eating contest held during the City of Pompano Beach’s Fourth of July celebration. [Photo by Michael d’Oliveira]

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4 The PelicanFriday, July 6, 2012 signed on. That’s more than halfway to the city’s two-year goal of 770 customers. It costs nothing upfront to hook up to the reclaimed water system and doing so creates a long list of bene ts: it conserves the city’s potable water supply and delays the need for upgrades to the water plants, it is available without watering restrictions, it is much cheaper than drinking water, it is regulated by the ReuseContinued from page 1EPA and treated to a higher standard than the lake or canal water sometimes used by homeowners for irrigation, and it reduces the amount of runoff in the ocean outfall system. On top of all that, the grass likes it better than treated tap water because it contains phosphorous and nitrogen, reducing the need for fertilizers. Right now, the program serves those single-family homeowners living near the municipal golf course and the air park, and area bounded by Northeast 15 Street and Southeast 5 Street, from the Intracoastal Waterway to Federal Highway. Next phase will take in neighborhoods south of Atlantic Boulevard, the Lake Santa Barbara district as well as Old Pompano. Currently, Utilities Director Randy Brown is working with a budget of $300,000 a year to expand the system, money earned by selling water. Every 10,000 feet of new line services 160 to 200 homes, he said. Currently, Oasis is available to 1,200 See REUSE on page 5Map courtesy of the City of Pompano Beach.

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The Pelican 5 Friday, July 6, 2012 homeowners. When 770 homeowners are connected, 92 million gallons of drinking water will be saved annually. Just since October 2011, I Can Water customers have saved the city 27 million gallons of potable water. Expansion will be in those areas closest to the Intracoastal Waterway where salt water intrusion is always a threat. In fact, Oasis is a product of the salt water intrusion that seeped into the city wells located around the municipal golf course back in the ‘80s. Under a mandate to create a reuse water system, those wells were closed, and a system installed to reclaim water which was then used to irrigate the golf course and other public places. For every foot of water in the ground, saltwater is pushed 40 feet eastward. “We are the only city to reverse salt water intrusion,” Brown said. Becoming an Oasis customer became much easier when City Manager Dennis Beach and Brown’s staff decided to promote the reuse water to the homeowner. The system had been in place for six years, but had attracted merely 70 users. So the new conservation mantra I Can Water was born, the city eliminated the permit requirement and installs and maintains the back ow preventer. Upfront cost for installing the reuse water line was eliminated and now that expense, $795, is incorporated into the customer’s water bill until it is paid off. It adds 24 cents per gallon to the reuse water rate of 85 cents per gallon, still a considerable savings over the average $2.65 a gallon residents pay for drinking water. The treated water can used for almost anything other than drinking, said Sandra Anderson, spokesperson for the Environmental PR Group, the city’s consultants for the I Can Water program. It is safe for vegetables and all landscape plants. It is not recommended for cooking or washing of vehicles. This week, Mayor Lamar Fisher gave Anderson’s rm credit for the program’s new start up. “Having these folks on board has ignited success,” he said. “The city commission worked very hard to make this program successful. Every year we will expand the lines until, hopefully, everybody in the city can be served.” Former mayor John Rayson has gone public on the I Can Water website saying Oasis “is the bomb.” Rayson chaired the state’s water policy committee when he was in the legislature some years ago and is aware of the increasing demand for fresh water. He urges residents to connect to the ”super chlorinated reuse water.” Brown and his staff survey their reuse customers and get a 40 percent return rate on the mailed pieces, the majority of them expressing positive opinions. Of 113 surveys returned recently, 99 of them were from customers who highly approved of the I Can Water program. To become an irrigation conservationist, call 954-3248434 and complete a simple application. The utilities department will do the rest. ReuseContinued from page 4Food donations needed for seniorsDeer eld Beach – The NE Focal Point is asking that non-perishable items such as canned vegetables, canned tuna, chicken or turkey, dried or canned milk, cereal, rice, pasta, pasta sauces, canned soups, stews and fruits be donated to its food pantry. The food will go to local seniors who can’t provide for themselves. Food items can be dropped off at NE Focal Point Center, 227 NW 2 St. For more, call 954-480-4449. We are The Pelican What can we do for you?

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6 The PelicanFriday, July 6, 2012 Deer eld Beach, Pompano Beach, Lighthouse Point, LauderdaleBy-The-Sea, Wilton Manors and Oakland ParkWilton Manors • Oakland Park • Hillsboro Beach The Pompano Pelican is published weekly on FridaysStreet Address: 1500-A E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, FL 33060 Telephone: 954-783-8700 • Fax: 954-783-0093Letters to the Editor are encouraged and accepted for print if signed, although a writer’s name will be withheld on request; letters must also include a daytime telephone number. Advertising rates are available upon request. Subscription rate is $31.80 including tax for one year’s delivery in Greater Pompano Beach; $95.40/per year including tax for others in the United States; call 954-783-8700 for rates abroad. The Pelican is a nonpartisan newspaper and reserves the right to decline advertising. Copyright 2012. Reproduction of this publication in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission of the publisher. The Pelican is a member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, Deer eld Beach Chamber and the LBTS Chamber. The Pelican is a state certi ed woman-owned minority business. The Pelican is delivered to businesses, libraries, schools, of ces, hospitals, news racks and single family homes. All advertising and copy is published at the sole discretion of the publisher. We welcome your critiques and ideas concerning this publication. Anne Siren, publisherExecutive Assistant: Mary Hudson Graphics: Rachel Ramirez Windsheimer Bookkeeper: John White Classi eds: Fran Shelby Contributing Writers: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Judy Wilson, Malcolm McClintock, Judy Vik, Michael d’Oliveira Account Executives: Paul Shroads, Carolyn Mann, Bill Heaton, Bill Fox Special Of ce Assistant: Cathy Siren ESTABLISHED 1993 • Volume XX, Issue 26 Founding Editor and PublisherAnne Hanby Siren Take Spunky home! Keeping children sun-safe this summer and all year longThe Skin Cancer Foundation Offers Sun Safety Tips for KidsWith summer under way, children will spend more time outdoors, in backyards and at parks, summer camps, beaches and other vacation destinations. So, it is important to remember that exposure to the sun’s ultraviolet radiation, or UVR, is strongly linked to all forms of skin cancer. Luckily, with good sun safety habits including proper clothing and sunscreen, children can enjoy all sorts of outdoor activities without risking their health. “By teaching your children to incorporate sun protection into their daily routine, you’ll signi cantly lower their risk of developing skin cancer as an adult,” says Perry Robins, MD, president of The Skin Cancer Foundation. Take these tips to heart• Seek the Shade : Remind kids to play in shaded areas in order to limit UV exposure. Check with camps to see if there are adequate places for campers to seek shade during outdoor activities taking place between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m., when UV rays are most intense. • Avoid Tanning: Tweens and teens may be tempted to “lie out” or visit tanning salons. But there is no such thing as a safe, healthy or protective tan, because tanning itself is caused by DNA damage to the skin. One or more blistering sunburns in childhood or adolescence more than doubles a person’s chances of developing potentially deadly melanomas later in life. • Cover up with Clothing : Consider dressing them in swim shirts or rash guards while in the water at the pool or beach. Protect the face, neck and eyes with broad-brimmed hats and UV-blocking sunglasses. • Use Sunscreen: For everyday use, look for broad spectrum (UVA/UVB) sunscreen with an SPF of 15 or higher. If your child will be spending extended time outdoors, use a water-resistant, broad spectrum sunscreen with an SPF of 30 or higher. Apply 1 ounce (2 tablespoons) of sunscreen to your child’s entire body 30 minutes before going outside. Assist children in reapplying sunscreen every two hours and after swimming or playing sports, because water and sweat wash sunscreen away. If your children apply their own sunscreen, remind them to cover easy-to-miss spots, such as the backs of ears and neck, as well as the tops of feet and hands. • Keep newborns out of the sun Sunscreen should be used on babies over the age of six months. • Practice What You Preach: Incorporate these tips into your own lifestyle. You’ll not only set a good example, but you’ll reduce your risk of skin cancer, sun damage and skin aging. More detailed suggestions and recommendations are available in the 2012 Skin Cancer Foundation Journal article, “Repelling the Rays When Kids Play,” available at www.skincancer.org/journal Additionally, The Skin Cancer Foundation recently debuted Sun Smart U, an interactive education program that teaches students in grades six through twelve how to make sun-safe choices that are vital in preventing skin cancer. The program highlights the importance of following a proper sun protection regimen and the dangers of tanning through the real-life story of a young woman with Stage III melanoma. To download the free curriculum, please visit www.skincancer.org/education. Contact: Carla Barry-Austin, 212-725-5641; cbarryaustin@skincancer.org) Becky Wiley, 646-583-7988; rwiley@skincancer.org) About The Skin Cancer Foundation The Skin Cancer Foundation is the only global organization solely devoted to the prevention, early detection and treatment of skin cancer. The mission of the Foundation is to decrease the incidence of skin cancer through public and professional education and research. For more information, visit www. SkinCancer.org.We cannot ignore the sun’s danger to residents and to touristsThis newspaper has more than once urged city governments to warn everyone of the sun’s dangers. Skin cancer can be avoided when parents, teachers and local of cials instill in everyone the dangers of too much sun. Yet, parade permits are issued at times when the noon-day heat can cause in nite dangers to those who want to participate or watch the fun events. If permits were issued only for times when the sunlight is on the decline, we could all have more fun, stay cooler and live longer. Dealing with the dangerous rays of the South Florida sun will take some intelligent discussions and serious marketing. Generations of Americans have changed their habits regarding littering and smoking. Those changes, both initiated by government, came about through a strong marketing campaign. Later laws were put into effect: big nes for littering and a banning indoor smoking. Beating the sun dangers should begin in South Florida as we are the closest state in the continental United States to the equator. We urge all local governments to begin a plan to start the education.Volunteers needed in Deer eldApplication window for city boards and committees openResidents or business owners with a desire to contribute to the progress of this city may be perfect candidates for one of the city’s boards or committees. The commission is seeking quali ed applicants willing to serve as board or committee members. The application window will be open through Monday, July 30 at 5 p.m.. Appointments are being considered for the Beauti cation Authority, Cultural Committee, Memorial Committee, Planning and Zoning Board, Community Appearance Board, and Unsafe Structures Board. All boards have regular and alternate positions available, except for the Planning and Zoning Board, which has only one alternate vacancy for District 2. The Community Appearance Board has both regular and alternate vacancies, also for District 2. Permanent residents of the city are eligible to serve on these boards. For the Community Appearance Board, a member may serve if he or she is either a resident OR has a business in the city. Some technical expertise requirements, in addition to the residency requirement apply to the Community Appearance and Unsafe Structures Boards. Interested persons should call 954-480-4263. Spunky is an eightyear-old Spaniel mix and has been with The Florida Humane Society since he was eight months old. Spunky is a happy-golucky dog who loves to play with his toys and play fetch. He’s good with other dogs and older children too. To adopt Spunky, call The Florida Humane Society at 954974 6152.

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The Pelican 7 Friday, July 6, 2012 county commission and HUD must approve the funding. Deadline for sending in the amended expenditure to HUD is Aug. 15 and that agency has 45 days to reply said Donna DeFronzo, Deer eld’s director of senior services and community development. Largest unspent HUD grant was is $480,109, allocated in 2006, a year during which the city’s community development department was experiencing dif culties. The department was dissolved last year and put under DeFronzo’s supervision. Day-to-day operations have been contracted out to a private agency. Reclaiming the unspent funds was put on a fast track this year in order to meet HUD deadlines. The amounts ranged from $489,000 in 2006 to $32,000 in 2008. Kara Petty, assistant director, parks and recreation, said the reprogrammed funds will be used to build the baseball eld on the Southeast corner of the park, install energy ef cient lighting, fencing and landscaping, and resurface the basketball courts. Currently Westside Park has a lighted football eld, basketball courts and a recreation center. Almost $160,000 in unspent funds will go to address improvements to Southwest 15 Street. This money comes from unspent funds for home repairs and home buyers assistance. Some funds remaining in the 2011 CDBG will go to helping youngsters obtain their GEDs. The condition of Southwest 15 Street, from Dixie Highway to Deer eld Beach High School, has been an issue with Commissioner Ben Preston. HUD funds can be used to improve safety, traf c ow and for beauti cation, but not to repair or improve drainage in the swales which are privately owned. All the HUD funds are being spent in Preston’s district. “I am excited about the programs going on in District 2 … young people will be better guided and hopefully be able to make contributions to their community,” he said. ParkContinued from page 1 Artist John May, of Living Sand, works on the sand castle that was part of Pompano Beach’s Fourth of July celebration on the beach. [Photo by Michael d’Oliveira]

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8 The PelicanFriday, July 6, 2012 Business matters The Pelican takes a look at local business owners. You can tell your story here because business matters. 954-783-8700. Briefs By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFLighthouse Point Wes Lasher, manager of Phil Smith’s Kia dealership, is all smiles when he points with pride to the banner that announces this agency to be number one in the district in customer service satisfaction ve quarters in a row. Located at 4230 N. Federal Hwy. in Lighthouse Point this dealership has been exclusively Kia since 2002. “We are part of the Phil Smith Auto Group which represents 17 or 18 brands and is the 55th largest automotive group is the U.S.,” he says as he continues to tell the Kia story. “Kia was transformed six years ago by Peter Schreyer, the former design director of Audi. He created the fusion of European and Asian vehicles into today’s Kia, one of the most sought after cars in the industry.” In fact, Kia was named “Best Brand” in Kelly Blue Book’s 2012 “Total Cost of Ownership” Awards. The reason given: “This overall brand winner is a relatively newcomer to the U.S. The quiet little Korean carmaker has been progressing steadily in quality and sales and is now seen as a strong bargain when it comes to ownership as well. Such stylish and fun-to-drive Kia offerings such as the Optima, Sorento and Soul specialize in delivering the practical blessings of excellent fuel economy and inspired resale value.” Lasher says, “Kias are built in the United States and Korea. The Optima and Sorento are built in West Point, GA in a state-of-the-art facility. Our showroom features the full line which includes 2012 and 2013 Rios; three versions of 2012 Forte and the 2013 Optima standard and Optima Hybrid. We also have the Sedonas, Sorentos and Souls in the showroom. Our price range is $14,000 to $22,000 and every Kia comes with a 10-year or 100,000 miles power train warranty—the best in the business.” He describes the entry level Rio as the perfect choice for everyone with its 40 miles per gallon economy. “Our Forte comes in three, four and ve-door models for those wanting sporty to space. It gets 35 miles per gallon and rivals Honda’s Civic, Toyota’s Corolla. It also comes with a 10-year, or 100,000 mile warranty.” Lasher continues his description of Kia models. “Optima is our luxury sedan. It was voted the Best Car of 2011 by Car.com.” Keith Nealy agrees. “I own a 2012 Optima, and it’s a fantastic, smooth ride. I test drove a lot of the other makes, and this is the best. I get about 30 miles per gallon, all the great features and the service department is excellent.”Phil Smith’s award winning Kia dealership in Lighthouse Point is buzzing with businessWes Lasher, general manager of Phil Smith Kia, beams with pride because this Kia agency has won the number one award in Customer Service Satisfaction ve quarters in a row, beating out the other 774 Kia dealerships in the country. He says, “We’re quick, inexpensive and convenient. We do everything but body work and we do it well!” [Photos by Phyllis J. Neuberger]CRA resource center offers clinics, art showPompano Beach – Several events are set for the Pompano Beach CRA Business Resource Center, 50 NE 1 St., Pompano Beach. Most clinics and events are free. All are open to the public. A Grassroots Marketing Workshop July 16 from 5:30 to 7 p.m. will demonstrate effective ways to market a business through direct mail, trade shows, radio, newspapers and the Internet. Call 954-586-1111. Light refreshments will be served. The next Art Hall event takes place July 18 at the Center from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. A computer clinic with a one-onone consultation takes place from 9 to 11 a.m. at the center. Wilton Wilson will discuss computer issues ranging from viruses to targeting strategies. A Lunch and Learn workshop takes place July 31 from noon to 2 p.m. where participants will discuss how to revitalize a business and other strategies for success. The facilitator is Paul Skyers. Cost is $10. More information on any of the above events, call 954-586-1111.Democrats take on new state amendmentsPompano Beach – The Democratic Women’s Club meets July 18 at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St. at 7 p.m. This month the speaker, Corinne Miller, representing The League of Women Voters, will discuss constitutional amendments on the November ballot and the retention vote for three Florida Supreme Court Justices. 954-9428711Shopping spree to bene t Relay for LifeMark your calendar for July 14 for a fabulous Ladies Indoor Clothing Sale at the Crystal Lake Golf Villas Clubhouse, 4791 NW 18 Avenue, Deer eld Beach just south of Green Road east of Powerline Road. The sale features new and gently used high quality ladies clothing and accessories and will be held indoors for air conditioned comfort. All proceeds bene t the American Cancer Society Relay For Life. Sale hours are 7 a.m. until Noon, rain or shine. Clothing donations accepted prior to the sale by appointment only. Call or text 954818-2051 or 954-263-7324. This Kia four-door 2013 Optima SX Limited is Kia’s luxury sedan. It was voted the Best Car of 2011 by Car.com.”See KIA on page 24

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The Pelican 9 Friday, July 6, 2012

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10 The PelicanFriday, July 6, 2012 Making a Difference Phyllis J. Neuberger wants your suggestions about people who are making a difference. Call 954-7838700. BriefsBy Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFF There are an estimated 1,000 World War II Veterans dying every day. It is therefore very thrilling to know that an all-volunteer organization, Honor Flights, is paying tribute to and honoring the service of those veterans who are still living by transporting them to see the WW II Memorial in Washington, D.C. at no cost to them. On one of the recent trips from this area, veteran Bill Borough, well known Deer eld Beach artist says, “It was a high point in my life.” He was happy to share some of the highlights of his recent ight and visit. “Two Honor Flights, donated by U.S. Air and piloted by volunteers, left from West Palm Beach on May 12, each with over 80 veterans on board. Each of us had a volunteer guardian who stayed with us for the entire trip. Each guardian, in addition to volunteering his time, paid $400 for the privilege of traveling with us. Isn’t that amazing? My buddy John Belisi and I had two retired reman as our guardians. Before we lifted off at 7 a.m. two re trucks gave us a water salute on the runway to send us off on a high. These dedicated and patriotic reman did the same thing when we landed.” Borough ashed back to talk about his service in 1943. “I enlisted in the U.S. Navy and became an Electricians Mate, Third Class on the USS PGM 31. I was in for two and a half years. May 12 Honor Flight’s visit to the WW II Memorial in Washington, D.C. included local vet, Bill Borough Guardians William Lewis and Barry Duralia with Veterans John Delisi and Bill Borough. Wheel chairs were part of the day for all veterans due to the exhaustive tour that took up the day after they arrived by Honor Flight. Each veteran was accompanied by volunteers who paid $400 for the opportunity to assist these men and women of the Greatest Generation. Veterans make a stop at the Iwo Jima Memorial. The Memorial recalls one of the bloodiest battles in the Paci c that took the lives of 6,800 Americans and 23,000 Japanese. Americans attacked the island on Feb. 19, 1945. For many of these visitors, this was their rst look at the famous memorial.See HONOR FLIGHTS on page 26Summer Book FairWilton Manors – The Friends of the Wilton Manors Library will host its semi-annual Book Fair on Saturday, July 14 from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Parking and admission are free. More than 4,000 ction and non ction books and videos for adults and children are offered to the public for a requested donation of no more than $1 per item. Proceeds bene t the Wilton Manors Library. For more, call 954566-9019.Register to voteFort Lauderdale – The Broward Supervisor of Elections Of ce will hold a voter registration event on July 9 from 7:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the Broward Central Bus Terminal on Broward Boulevard. Those who register will be eligible to vote in the Aug. 14, primary. Visit www. browardsoe.org or call 954-357-7050.Caregiver support groupDeer eld Beach – The NE Focal Point Alzheimer’s Day Care Center, 227 NW 2 Street, offers a support group on Wednesdays. On July 11, Abby Blacker of Comforcare Senior services, will discuss “Brain Fitness and Stimulation of Thinking” at 10 a.m. The event is free and open to the public. For more, call 954-480-4449. Citizens insurance workshopMiami – On July 16 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Citizens Property Insurance Corporation will hold a public workshop to discuss the possible increase on new insurance policies. In 2010, the Florida legislature voted to allow Citizens to increase rates by up to 10 percent for new policies beginning in Jan.2011. But Citizens is now trying to remove the cap. The workshop will be held at the JW Marriott, 1109 Brickell Ave., Miami. For more, call 888-685-1555.

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The Pelican 11 Friday, July 6, 2012 By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFWilton Manors – It’s been two years since Broward County purchased a boardedup apartment building on Powerline Road. And city of cials are less than enthusiastic over the progress made in getting it ready for new tenants. Purchased in August 2010 for $448,000 using the Neighborhood Stabilization Program, or NSP, the county plans to start renting the building’s 16 units by March of 2013. “It’s going to be a rental and we are planning to maintain ownership long term,” said Mandy Bartle, executive director of South Florida Community Land Trust, the non-pro t hired by the county to oversee the property.Of cials frustrated over progress of affordable housing projectWilton Manors Police Sgt. Gary Blocker said in June of 2011 the building had major trash and overgrowth problems but the county took care of them. Since then no documented code violations have taken place. The property is currently fencedoff from the street and the windows are boarded-up. The area is mostly trash free and maintained. Apartments will be rented to families with low-incomes and individuals who earn 50 percent below the county’s median income and can’t qualify for home loans. The county plans to spend close to $1 million on improvements, which include an updated air conditioning system, tankless water heaters, a new electrical system and impact-resistant hurricane windows. But nding funding for those improvements, said Bartle, is what has delayed the project. “We’ve been waiting for the notice of funding availability [from the federal government],” she said. The renovations, partially funded by NSP, are slated to begin in September. But if the grants don’t get approved, Bartle said the county would have to look for loans from the private sector to move forward. NSP is a federal program that is used to purchase rundown properties that are hurting the property values of the surrounding homes. Once purchased, they are renovated so that they no longer negatively impact the neighborhood. But for Wilton Manors Mayor Gary Resnick progress See APARTMENTS on page 21

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12 The PelicanFriday, July 6, 2012 JM Family donates $50,000 for relief following DebbyDeer eld Beach Colin Brown, president and CEO of JM Family Enterprises, Inc., announced a $50,000 donation to the American Red Cross to support disaster relief efforts in North Florida following Tropical Storm Debby. “Responding to our communities during times of crisis is a part of who we are,” Brown said. “Through our support of the American Red Cross, we know these funds will make a difference for those impacted by the storm as they begin to rebuild.” The company chose the American Red Cross because it has the network of volunteers and disaster relief specialists to effectively address urgent needs and establish the foundation for a long-term recovery. JM Family’s subsidiary, Southeast Toyota Distributors, which has a signi cant business presence in Jacksonville was not impacted by the storm. Southeast Toyota distributes vehicles, parts and accessories to 175 independent Toyota dealers in the ve southeastern states. The company has 700 associates in Jacksonville.Jacobs joins ocean task forceBroward Vice Mayor, Kristin Jacobs accepted a post on the Intergovernmental Coastal Task Force, or ICTF. The group, which consists of a four-county collaboration, city of cials, state organizations and environmental voices, will develop recommendations for coastal conservation. Last year, Jacobs served as chair of the White House National Ocean Council’s Governance Coordinating Committee, which advises President Obama on local government perspectives on ocean policy. Children in Lauderdale-By-The-Sea power up their bicycles with red, white and blue for the annual Fourth of July parade.Bikes on parade

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The Pelican 13 Friday, July 6, 2012 By Mike d’OliveiaPELICAN STAFFLighthouse Point – Members of the Lighthouse Point Chamber of Commerce met at Orange Theory, a tness center located in the Venetian Isles shopping center in Lighthouse Point, to network, enjoy refreshments and celebrate the Chamber’s new board members. The new board includes Michael McLain, president, Summit Brokerage Services; Gene Petilli, vice president, Florida State Restoration Services; Penni Morris, treasurer, Pac N Send; Rene Turner-Mahfood, secretary, The Light Magazine Rene Sabatini, secretary, Azure Realty, Charlie Davis, board member, Beacon Light Jewelry, Jon Frangipane, board member, Lighthouse Lighthouse Chamber celebrates new board members at social eventSee BOARD on page 15Board member Lynn Smith, left, of Bateman, Gordon & Sands; Diane Jurcik, of Beltone Hearing Care Center, and board member Dominic Romano, of Romano Law Of ce. Board member Julie Mahfood, left, of Campbell & Rosemurgy Real Estate; Karen Hammett, of Howard Grace Mortgage; Denise Brown, of Orange Theory and chamber secretary Rene Turner-Mahfood, of The Light Magazine

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14 The PelicanFriday, July 6, 2012 Family Day at the Elks Lodge The local Elks Lodge in Pompano Beach is a traditional favorite for feeding patriotism and bellies on July 4. Among those attending this year were Gerri Boldovitch, Sara Rogers, Madeleleine, 2; Daphne, 4, Jason Rogers and Al Rogers. [Staff photo] Happy Birthday, America! Property, tax questions answeredOakland Park – The Broward County Property Appraiser’s Of ce will hold a community outreach event on Tuesday, July 10 from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Oakland Park City Hall, 3650 NE 12 Ave. Appraisers will be available to assist with homestead, senior and other property tax exemption applications, as well as answer questions on property taxes. They are also accepting applications for portability. Those who attend should bring a current Florida driver’s license or Florida identi cation card and a current voter registration card or declaration of domicile. Non-citizens must provide proof of permanent residency. For more information, visit www.bcpa. net or call 954-357-5579. Budget workshop meetingWilton Manors The budget review committee will meet on July 17 at 7 p.m. at city hall, 2020 Wilton Drive. The purpose of the meeting is to make recommendations to the mayor, city commissioners and city staff regarding the scal year 2012/2013 budget. Generator-ready businesses to know aboutBroward – In case of a power loss after the next hurricane hits, Broward County has a list of gas stations, department stores, supermarkets and home improvement stores that are generator-ready. Visit www.broward.org/Hurricane/Stores.

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The Pelican 15 Friday, July 6, 2012 Point Magazine Julie Mahfood, board member, Campbell & Rosemurgy Real Estate; Nico Romano, board member, Romano Law Of ce; Lynn Smith, board member, Bateman, Gordon & Sands and Charles Spalma, board member, Balistreri Realty. [Photos by Michael d’Oliveira] BoardContinued from page 13Toni Santos, left, of Say Fitness, and chamber treasurer Penni Morris, of Pac N Send. Newly elected chamber president Michael McLain, of Summit Brokerage Services with outgoing president Lucille Pignataro of Bank United.

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16 The PelicanFriday, July 6, 2012 The Pelican Call us! 954-783-8700 vacation rental permits. Commissioners had already reduced Stella’s nes to $53,000, plus another $1,500 for administrative costs at a previous meeting. Commissioner Mark Brown, who voted for the earlier settlement, asked that the issue be reconsidered. Brown said he didn’t dispute any of the facts or the right of the commission to set the nes. But he was ashamed of himself over the earlier vote. He said it nally hit him when he got home “just how severe a ne we were imposing on a town resident for a violation that didn’t involve any public safety hazard. They weren’t running a crack house or a prostitution ring. It wasn’t a retrap. The yard wasn’t left in disrepair. This was a failure to renew a $6 business license.” Brown said he questioned, “What kind of message did I send up here? Are we going to be hard-nosed, moneygrubbing guys and anybody who breaks the law for any reason, you’re going to be stuck with a 20 percent ne? Or are we going to send a message that we’re willing to look at individual circumstances involving every violation and be willing to make sure the punishment ts the crime?” Brown supported Stella’s settlement offer of $20,000. He had been prepared to suggest $10,000. The town issued notice of violations on Aug. 18, 2010 and Jan. 5, 2011. Each case was presented before the special magistrate and a time given to comply before nes started. Stella corrected the violations on May 2 by acquiring the business tax receipts and vacation rental permits. In arguing for relief from the liens, Stella’s attorney, Kara Cannizzaro, said the nature and gravity of each violation was minimal. “No real damage has been suffered by the city with respect to these violations…,” she wrote. She said they are not safety or nuisance issues and aren’t violations of the building code. Cannizzaro said Stella has been in business for over 30 years and was the rst to apply for vacation rental licensing. She has purchased, built and remodeled over 30 properties in LBTS. Stella acknowledges she was not responsive to notices concerning hearings on the violations. At the time, she was focused on her daughter who had been diagnosed with a rare eye disease which would ultimately lead to blindness. “She spent her resources visiting over 25 physicians seeking treatment for her daughter,” Cannizzaro said. This made it dif cult for her to maintain her typical business practices and bookkeeping. During her travels, Stella did not receive the violation notices until after the hearings occurred. Once she became aware of impending liens, she paid $1,920, bringing the properties into full compliance on May 2. In the meantime, Stella has fallen behind on payments on her three properties. “This abatement would allow her to keep her homes and keep the properties out of foreclosure,” Cannizzaro said. Cannizzaro also argued that $100 per day per violation is excessive for non-renewal of a business tax receipt when the annual payment for the receipt is $6. She said the town’s code limits penalties for nonrenewal of this receipt to 25 percent of the tax. She asked the town to reduce nes from $100 to $25 a day. Cannizzaro also pointed out that the property at 4557 Poinciana was occupied by Stella’s daughter from March to November 2011 and not used as a vacation rental, so there was no violation during that time. The other two properties were only intermittently used as vacation rentals. Commissioner Stuart Dodd asked if Stella failed to pay electric or water bills or shut down her business during this time frame and Stella said he had not. Dodd said he felt a 20 percent payment was fair and reasonable. He was the lone dissenting vote on the settlement gure. LienContinued from page 1

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The Pelican 17 Friday, July 6, 2012 By Malcolm McClintockPELICAN WRITERThe early morning hour did not deter about 50 sharply dressed area business owners from attending the much anticipated Lauderdale-ByThe-Sea, or LBTS, Chamber of Commerce gourmet “Power Breakfast.” Held June 29 at the famous Blue Moon Fish Co., those in attendance were there to do some serious networking, enjoy a sumptuous morning meal and listen to an insightful talk given by District 4 County Commissioner Chip Lamarca, eloquently introduced by LBTS Mayor Roseann Minnet. Lamarca, whose district covers parts of Fort Lauderdale, Pompano Beach, Lighthouse Point, Deerfield Beach, Sea Ranch Lakes, Oakland Park, Hillsboro Beach and LauderdaleBy-The-Sea, spoke on the many business development opportunities brought about by the vibrant South Florida tourism industry. He also discussed the positive impacts of upcoming large scale projects such as the $321 million deep channel dredging of Port Everglades, designed to accommodate today’s much larger ships, and the new $790 million runway at the Fort LauderdaleHollywood International airport. “We tell people that the Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport is a great place to “breeze in and breeze out,’” says Lamarca. “In fact, we liked the slogan so much that we bought billboard space outside Miami International Airport to let visitors know that they should consider using our airport as a less cumbersome alternative.” Commissioner Lamarca LBTS Chamber packs the house at its monthly gourmet “Power Breakfast” also touched on the subject of beach re-nourishment before fielding a few questions from the audience. “I think this has been an extraordinarily successful event,” says Chamber President Mark Silver. “We are grateful that Commissioner Lamarca could take some time out of his busy schedule to be with us this morning.” “I am thrilled with the turnout,” says Blue Moon’s General Manager Alan Forgea. “We worked hard on providing a high-quality breakfast in a lovely setting right on the Intracoastal.” The next “Power Breakfast” at Blue Moon is scheduled for July 27 when State Senator Ellyn Bogdanoff will give a legislative update on changes made during the session and how they will impact local business.District 4 County Commissioner Chip Lamarca, left, with LBTS Chamber of Commerce President Mark Silver, Commercial Building Con sultants President Greg Trotter and Windjammer Beach Resort General Manager John Boutin.

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18 The Pelican Friday, July 6, 2012 P o m p a n o Pompano G r e e n Green M a r k e t Market e v e r y every S a t u r d a y Saturday m o r n i n g f r o m morning from 8 a m t o 2 8 a.m. to 2 p m a t t h e p.m. at the c o r n e r o f W e s t corner of West A t l a n t i c B l v d Atlantic Blvd. & C y p r e s s & Cypress R o a d Road. Eat Healthy!Hoffmann said she had no idea the chamber wasn’t going to sponsor ChristmasBy-the-Sea, so she wasn’t prepared with a recommendation on that matter and asked for commission direction. Commissioner Stuart Dodd asked how many years the chamber has run the event on a budget given by the town. Chamber board member Paul Novak said the tree was originally purchased by donations from businesses, and the chamber took over the event “in the good times.” “Now [the chamber] has a new board of younger people, and they don’t think Christmas-By-The-Sea is a chamber event. They look at it as a town event,” Novak said. “It brings people in, but it doesn’t help businesses west of A1A. To spend $12,000 you don’t have doesn’t make sense. That’s the board consensus.” “It isn’t something we want to step away from,” board member Chuck Maxwell added. “If we can’t afford it, we shouldn’t move forward with it.” Silver suggested perhaps another kind of event could be planned that would encourage people to walk through the town and keep the stores open. “We’re all saddened by it, but we have to look at the black and white,” Silver said. Mayor Roseann Minnet said she was sad to think the event would go by the wayside. Vice Mayor Scot Sasser said he also was saddened with the news. “I will be a staunch supporter of continuing this at our expense if we have to,” Sasser said. “This is something traditional. I’m very, very disappointed.” Minnet said more discussions will be held on the holiday event. Commissioner Stuart Dodd asked chamber of cials if they would again seek funds from Broward County for the Welcome Center. Last year the county Tourist Development Council provided $10,000, which went to help with the Visitor’s Guide. Malcolm McClintock, chamber executive director, said he lobbied County Commissioner Chip LaMarca for funds when he addressed the group June 29. ChamberContinued from page 2 SightingsA community calendar of Broward County. Email events to siren2415@gmail. comSee SIGHTINGS on page 197-7 & 7-18 – Museum of Discovery and Science, 401 SW 2 St., Fort Lauderdale, will hold an ice cream making demonstration at 2:30 p.m. 954-467-6637. 7-8 – Pancake breakfast hosted by the Benevolent Patriotic Order of DOES, Drove 142 at the Elks lodge, 700 N.E. 10 St., Pompano Beach, from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. Cost is $5 for adults and $2.50 for children. 954-587-1121. 7-9 – The Gold Coast Toastmasters meet at 7 p.m. at Denny’s, 3151 NW 9 Ave., Oakland Park. 954-954-6822642. 7-11 – Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce will host Business With A Twist at the Muvico Theatre, 2315 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Cost is $10 for members and $15 for nonmembers. 954~941-2940. 7-11 – The Deerfield Beach Chamber of Commerce Luncheon Lead$ Group meets from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the chamber offices, 1601 E. Hillsboro Blvd., Deerfield Beach. 954-946-5452. 7-11 – Kids can paint their own zombie t-shirts at the Pompano Beach Branch Library, 1213 E. Atlantic Blvd. from 5 to 6 p.m. For ages 12 to 18. Bring your own t-shirt. 954-786-2181. 7-12 – Nature Tots program at Fern Forest Nature Center, 201 Lyons Rd. South, Coconut Creek, from 10 to 11 a.m. Cost is $5 per child. Program held at Secret Woods Nature Center, 2701 W. State Rd. 84, Dania Beach, on July 26. 954-357-5198. 7-13 – Splash Ahoy at Quiet Waters Park, 401 S. Powerline Road, Deerfield Beach, from 6 to 10 p.m. Cost is $6 per person. Pirate games, bounce house and other activities. 954-357-5100. 7-13 – Pompano Proud unveils artwork at McNab Park, 2250 E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach. Event is at McNab Park at 8:30 a.m. Light refreshments will be

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The Pelican 19 Friday, July 6, 2012 sq. ft. and 185,000 sq. ft and employ between 225 and 350 people. A Kmart spokesperson was unable to speci cally determine how big the Kmart in Oakland Park is or how many people work there but she said the average Kmart store is 94,000 sq. ft and employs 40 to 90 people. Mayor Anne Sallee, Vice Mayor John Adornato and Commissioner Shari McCartney say they don’t necessarily want a Walmart going in but they do want new development. “We need to make sure it doesn’t negatively impact the community,” said McCartney, who added that the additional traf c to the area is a concern that needs to be addressed. Boisvenue said drawing more traf c to the area could be a good thing for nearby businesses. The overwhelming majority of surrounding merchants provide products or services not offered by Walmart. Linda Damiani, who owns the Bedpost, which sells mattresses, beds and other furniture – items Walmart sells – said she’s not really worried the discount giant will hurt her business. “Bringing more traf c here is a good thing. Kmart has already brought customers here,” said Damiani, whose business is across from Kmart in Wilton Manors. “It’s just not an area with a lot of local stores,” said Bill Tapp an Oakland Park resident who lives in the condo complex directly adjacent to the Kmart. “I think it will bene t the whole neighborhood. It surely outweighs what we have now.” Adornato said the city needs to make sure it encourages economic development and smart growth. “This is a proposal that’s on the table and I want to learn about it. Residential input will be incredibly important,” he said. Sallee said whatever is proposed needs to fall within the city’s Community Redevelopment Agency guidelines. Sallee, Adornato, Boisvenue and Commissioner Jed Shank want whatever is proposed to include improvements to the waterfront area. Boisvenue said she envisions an outside eatery being built along the water. The other commissioners have similar ideas on redeveloping that part of the property. Shank said he thinks the city “can hold out for something better” and wants to “raise the bar” on what comes into the city. And residential input would be key. “I’m going to be listening very carefully to the community and the direction they want to go. Too often the electeds think we know more than anyone else.” WalmartContinued from page 3 SightingsContinued from page 18 See SIGHTINGS on page 21 served. 954-562-3232. 7-14 – Free live music during Music By The Sea in front of the Athena-By-TheSea restaurant, 4400 N. Ocean Blvd. Lauderdale-By-TheSea, from 7 to 11 p.m. Event takes place every Saturday. 954-776-1000. 7-14 – Free car seat safety check from 9 a.m. to noon at Pompano Beach Fire-Rescue Station 24, 2001 NE 10 St. Appointments are required. 954-786-4510. 7-19 – The Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce will host a membership breakfast from 7:45 to 9 a.m. at Premier Residence Inn, 1371 N. Ocean Blvd., Pompano Beach. Cost is $10 and $15 for those who don’t RSVP by July 18. 954941-2940. 7-19 – The Deerfield Beach Chamber of Commerce hosts After Hours N’ Deerfield at 5:30 p.m. at AmTrust Bank, 3600 W. Hillsboro Blvd., Deerfield Beach. 954-9465452. 7-20 – Sol Children Theatre Troupe presents Charlotte’s Web the Musical. On Fridays and Saturdays the musical is at 7 p.m. and 2 p.m. on Saturdays and Sundays. Performances run through Aug. 5 but no performance on

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20 The Pelican Friday, July 6, 2012 Send The Pelican your news to mdpelican@yahoo. WORSHIP DIRECTORY: Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad. Rev. Hyvenson Joseph PetsContinued from page 1Boarding optionsFor individuals and families who choose to board their pets during a hurricane, there are private animal hospitals and pet shelters that provide service. In contrast to Broward’s hurricane pet shelter, which is free, the cost is greater at pet hospitals and requires pets be more prepared – such as having multiple vaccinations in addition to rabies. Amber Caro, manager at Camp Canine, which has locations in Fort Lauderdale, Hollywood and Boca Raton, said her company requires proof of vaccinations for rabies, distemper, bordetella and parvo. Just like the Broward shelter, Caro recommends leavpano Pet Lodge, 900 NW 31 Ave., Pompano Beach, 954-972-5584; Oakland Park Animal Hospital, 2200 W. Oakland Park Blvd., 954-6447281; Arbor Pet Hospital, 1220 northeast 26 Street, Wilton Manors, 954-565-1896 and Camp Canine, 808 W. Broward Blvd., Fort Lauderdale, 954-468-2663. Visit www.humanebroward.com for more information on preparing a pet for a hurricane. ing a week’s worth of food and medicine with the pet at a private shelter. “Especially storm anxiety medicine or other important medication,” said Caro. Caro, who worked at Camp Canine through Hurricanes Ivan, Katrina and Wilma, says storms kick up a lot of eas and ticks so owners should make sure to administer ea and tick preventatives as well as heart worm medication before a storm. Some of the private animal hospitals that board pets during storms are Deer Run Animal Hospital, 3360 W. Hillsboro Blvd., Deer eld Beach, 954-421-2244; Pom-By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach – Those with a passion for fishing can help Special Olympics athletes follow their passions by joining the competition during the 12th Annual Walk On Water Salt Water Fishing Tournament, July 28. Hosted by the Men’s Club of St. Coleman Catholic Parish, money raised during the Walk On Water tournament benefits Special Olympics of Broward County Linda Mills, director of Special Olympics, said donations to her organization are spent on travel, lodging, uniforms, equipment, training and other expenses that allow athletes to compete across the state and country. “We’re 100 percent funded through community donations. So everything we can get helps us a great deal,” said Mills. “We really count on our community donations, especially groups like the Men’s Club that support us from year to year.” Jerry Squadrito, tournament chair, said the economy has taken a toll on sponsorships but the Men’s Club decided to keep the tournament going for another year, even if it means the club will have to contribute more money than in years past. But it’s not too late for the business community to get involved. “We welcome any donations, regardless of size, and encourage local businesses to provide any promotional products they Walk-on-Water tournament to bene t Special Olympics may have available that could be used as prizes or raffle items. In the past we’ve received everything from pens, caps, shirts, hats, to electronics, fishing gear, and even gift certificates for goods and/or services,” said Squadrito. Right now, Squadrito said he has four of five boats signed up but expects a lot more the closer the tournament gets. “Typically they don’t sign up until a week or two before.” Cost is up to $200 per boat, up to eight anglers per boat. Early registration is $200 by July 20 and $225 after July 20. Additional anglers can be See WALK on page 25

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The Pelican 21 Friday, July 6, 2012 ApartmentsContinued from page 11isn’t fast enough. “This is an eyesore in our city,” the mayor said. “They need to take action or sell it.” Resnick said he’s not con dent in the county’s ability to get federal funding or serve as long term managers. He added that private developers, speci cally Stellar Homes Group, which has purchased and renovated ve other apartment buildings along Powerline, have made more progress improving the area. Larry Baum of Stellar Homes Group said his company has invested about $6 million in the buildings and rents range from $700 to $1,000 per month. Rents at the county’s building would range between $700 and $850 per month. Renters would also be given a utility allowance. “There is a large need for affordable rental housing in the community,” said Bartle. Broward County plans to turn the apartment complex, located at 2417 Powerline Road, into affordable housing. [Photo by Michael SightingsContinued from page 19 See SIGHTINGS on page 24 Aug. 3. Tickets are $15/$10 for 11 years old and older and $12/$8 for 11 years old and younger. 561-447-8829 8-4 – The Crockett Family Health & Community Festival will be held from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Pompano Citi Centre, corner of Copans Road and Federal Highway. Free health screenings and giveaways will be offered. 954-943-4685.FridaysThe Pompano Beach Rotary Club meets Fridays at 12:15 p.m. at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. 954-786-3274.SaturdaysPony rides are available at Sand & Spurs Equestrian Park, 1600 NE 5 Ave., Pompano Beach, from 9 to 11:30 a.m. Cost is $3 per ride. 954-786-4507. The Pompano Beach Kiwanis Club Westside meets the first and third Saturdays of the month at 8:30 a.m. at the E. Pat Larkins Community Center, 520 MLK Blvd., Pompano Beach. 954782-8096.

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22 The Pelican Friday, July 6, 2012 Tell The Pelican about your news! 954-783-8700 Classi eds Call 954-545-0013 Pelican Classi ed ads Mean Business! HELP WANTEDWILLING TO EDUCATE-Highly motivated individual for rewarding career in nancial services with Primerica. Call 954-729-0192. 7/6 LOCAL PEST CONTROL CO Looking For Quality Sales/Service Tech. Must Be Dependable, Team Player, Good Drivers License & People Skills. Will Train Right Person. ALSO Of ce Assistant – Computer – People & Phone Skills Needed. Fax Resume 954418-3982. 7-27 SEEKING EMPLOYMENTCAREGIVER/COMPANION Caucasian Woman. 25 Years Experience To Assist & Care For Your Loved Ones. Days / Eves / Nights. References Avail. 954-482-5494. 7-6 CARING HOME HEALTH – Seeking Live-in / Live Out. Can Be Recommended!! Please Call 954-496-4941. 7-6 CNA / HHA – 20 Yrs Exp. Available 24/7. Will Take Care Of Your Loved One. References Upon Request. Call 954-8265499. 7-6 CNA – AVAILABLE Nights, Days & Weekends. Full Time Or Part Time. Excellent References & Reasonable Rates. Call 954-696-2091. 7-6 MALE CNA / HHA / COMPANION. Broward County Area. Former EMT. All Certi cations / Compassionate, References. Call Ron 954-2322832. Very Reasonable! 7-6 SERVICES DANNY BOY ELECTRIC – Lic & Insured. Lic. #EC13004811. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. 24/Hr Service. 954-290-1443. Beat Any Written Estimate. Sr, Discount. 7-27 CALL BRENDAN THE HANDYMAN. Construction & Repairs. Carpentry, Plumbing, Roo ng, Masonry, Windows, Painting, Decking, Tile. FREE Estimates! 954-773-6134 – Emergency Calls. 7-20 HANDYMAN – PAINTING – CARPENTRY – Pressure Cleaning. Decks! Everything Around The House. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. Call 561-350-3781. 7-6 HONEST HANDYMAN – HOME & BUILDING Maintenance/Improvements. No Job Too Small. Fast Friendly Service. Reasonable Rates. Local Resident/Homeowner. Call Today For Your FREE Upfront Quote. No Deposit Required. 754-366-1915. 7-6 GOT JUNK? TRASH HAULING-CONDO CLEANUPS Trees/ Landscape, Yard Fill. Pressure Wash/ Roofs/Home Repairs – Welding, Etc. Dave 954-8189538. 7-27 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIESNew GREEN technology. New defroster control saves energy in home refrigerators, commercial chillers. Patented. All optical. Simple mfg. Strategic partners needed..www.NewAvionics.Com. 954-568-1991. CMUSICIANS WANTEDThe American Legion Symphonic Band is now accepting new members for the 2011-2012 season. College age to “seasoned seniors” are welcome. Rehearsals are held on Wed. evenings at American Legion Post 142 in Pompano. Percussionists, oboe, bassoon, trombone and euphonium players are especially needed. If you enjoy “making music,” call Jim McGonigal, Music Director at 954647-0700 for more info.REAL ESTATE SERVICESBUYING OR SELLING A Property With Me You Will Receive A Bonus Of $500 For Property Value Up To $300,000! A Bonus Of $1,000 For Property Value Above $300,000! Yvette Gaussen. YES WE CAN REALTY. 954-6147773 Or 954-773-8340. 7-6 DOCK SPACES.E. POMPANO DOCK – 1 Bridge. Water And Electric. Proof Of Insurance! $200 Month. Please Call 954-9411103. 7-6 CO-OP SALESPOMPANO BEACH Waterfront Co-op – 1/1 – 2 Available! Dockage Available! 2nd Floor! Side By Side. $59K Each. Coldwell Banker – Barbara – 954-629-1324. 7-6 TOWNHOUSESWILTON MANORS / OAKLAND PARK Town Home. Huge Designer’s Dream – 2500 Sq Ft. Possible Home Of ce – 3/2.5 – Large Dining Room, Eat-in Kitchen, Patio, Living Room 16’ Ceilings, 2 Car Garage. F/L/S Lease $1575 Per Month. 954-806-8821. 7-13 HOUSE TO SHARENORTH POMPANO FURNISHED Bedroom – Handicapped Accessible. $450 Month – Share Utilities. Leave Message 954-785-7671. 7-6 HOMES FOR RENTPOMPANO 2/1 DEN OR 3RD Bedroom, C/A, Fenced Yard. Newer Roof. $1050 Mo. Yrly Lease. Call Darci 954-783-3723. 520 NE 34 St. REAL ESTATE WANTEDI BUY HOUSES!! CASH!! AS IS! QUICK CLOSE! ANY AREA – ANY CONDITION! NO EQUITY OK. CALL NOW 954-914-2355. 7-20 CONDOS FOR SALEPOMPANO BEACH – DIRECT OCEAN VIEW!! Pet Friendly! 2/2 AT THE BREAKERS! $269,000. Call Juliana At Barclay’s For Details. 1-305766-4420. 7-20 LIGHTHOUSE POINT PARADISE – Beautiful Furnished 2/2! Only $115,000. English, French, Spanish, Greek. Yvette Gaussen YES WE CAN REALTY 954-6147773 Or 954-773-8340. 6-22 LIGHTHOUSE POINT 2/2 1st Floor – 55+ Complex. No Pets. Great Amenities. $55,000. Call Barbara @ Balistreri RE. 954263-7129. 7-6 POMPANO BEACH PALMAIRE 3/2.5 King Model! 2 Balconies, W / D In Unit. Small Pet OK! $159,900. Ruthie Brooks Balistreri Realty 954803-4174. 7-6 CONDOS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH LEISUREVILLE 55+. Beautiful 2/1 Renovated Corner Condo 2nd Floor. Beside Pool, Clubhouse & Golf. Yrly Lease Unfurn. $800 Month. Furn. $900 Month. 1st & Last. Photos Available. prudhommejean@yahoo.com. 954-784-0119. 7-6 POMPANO 1/1 E OF FEDERAL2nd Floor-Small Complex. No Pets. $625 Month Yearly Lease. 954-263-7129. Call Barbara. 7-6 POMPANO BEACH LARGE 2/2 With Den. All Renovated. Pool. 1/4 Mile From Beach. W/D. Small Pet OK! $1,300 Month Yearly. 561-703-6545 Or 754-264-3289. 7-20

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The Pelican 23 Friday, July 6, 2012 Classi eds Call 954-545-0013 Pelican Classi ed ads Mean Business! 954-7838700! APTS FOR RENTDEERFIELD/POMPANO BEACH 1 BR & 2 BR APTS FOR RENT. Remodeled, Paint, Tile, Etc. Washer / Dryer On Site. Pool. Pet Friendly. George 954-809-5030. 7-27 POMPANO BEACH A1A – 1 & 2 Bedrooms, Ef ciencies, Fully Furnished Including Utilities, Cable, WIFI, Laundry, Pool, BBQ. 700’ To The Beach. Starting At $269 Per Week. 954-943-3020. 7-20 POMPANO – MCNAB RD & NE 18 AVENUE – 1 & 2 Bedrooms Furnished / Unfurnished. $695 $895 And Up. Pool, Tile Floors. Central A/C. 954-610-2327. 7-6 POMPANO BEACH 2 / 1 $825 MONTH Yearly Lease. Pool, Off Federal Hwy. Pet OK! Call Anthony 954-857-5207. 7-13 POMPANO BEACH / ATLANTIC / FEDERAL – Ef ciency $175 Weekly. No Security Deposit. Includes Cable, Electric, Internet. FREE Washer / Dryer. No Drug Record – No Evictions. 954-709-0694. 7-6 POMPANO BEACH 900’ TO BEACH! Spotless 1 / 1 In 4 Unit 1 Level Building. No Pets! No Smoking! Walk To Shopping. $850 Month Lease Includes Direct TV. 401-461-8683. 7-6 POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 Bedroom From $495. Easy Movein. 1/2 OFF DEPOSIT. Remodeled. Great Location. 954-783-1088 For More Info. 7-13 COMMERCIAL FOR RENT-SALEPOMPANO COMMERCIAL OFFICE Spaces Available. Ranging From As Low As $500 To $700 Depending On Square Footage. Please Call Darci At 954-7833723. 7/13 DEERFIELD BEACH – Retail Of ce Warehouse – 700 Sq Ft With Loft. A/C, Bathroom. $575 Per Month. Call For More Info 561-654-1331 Or 561-9985681. 7-27 NEWLY EQUIPPED LOW RENT Shop Space – Ideal For Bakery – Pizza – Wings – Crepes – Etc. Corner New – 12 Avenue & 34 Court, Oakland Park. Indoor / Outdoor Patio Sitting. 954-563-3533. 7-13 Tell The Pelican about your news! 954-783-8700

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24 The Pelican Friday, July 6, 2012 Lasher describes the Soul model the highest volume seller because of its universal appeal to young and old. “It’s versatile, roomy and gets 35 miles per gallon,” he says. Pagan Mallory just bought a Kia Soul and says, “My husband and I love it! We tried out quite a few of the competitive cars and chose the Soul because it’s roomy enough for our scuba gear and our two dogs. It’s easy to get in and out of. We love the great features, the good mileage available as a turbo and a hybrid which gets 40 miles per gallon.” Standard features in every Kia include power windows, air conditioning, blue tooth and iPad connectivity, plus all desired safety features. In a 2012 competition that saw more that 4,500 products entered by 1800 car manufacturers from 58 countries, Kia’s Picanto and Rio models won the top two honors in the reddot design award. In 2009, the Soul Crossover won. Sportage and Venga compacts won in 2010. In 2011, Kia’s Optima was named best of the best. Lasher says, “With so many award winning vehicles, it’s not a surprise that we have so many lookers and buyers in our showroom today.”Kia began in 1962The rst motor vehicle to come off the production line was a three-wheel truck. Improved variations came along and between 1962 and 1973 Kia sold 25,000 three wheelers which were used for hauling small sized cargo. Since then, Kia has come a long way, joining the ranks of the world’s top ten global manufacturers, with a sales presence in 170 countries and annual sales of 2.5 million units. For more information, call 954-545-7200 or visit www. philsmithkia.com KiaContinued from page 8 SightingsContinued from page 21 See SIGHTINGS on page 25The Deerfield Beach West Kiwanis Club meets the second and fourth Saturdays of the month at 9 a.m. at Westside Park, 445 SW 2 St., Deerfield Beach. 954-54-7329883. Kayak rentals are available Saturdays and Sundays at Richardson Historic Park, 1937 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Visit www. AtlanticCoastKayak.com or 954-781-0073 for rates. The Wilton Manors Green Market is held every Saturday and Sunday at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. 954-592-0381. The Deerfield Beach West Kiwanis Club meets the second and fourth Saturdays of the month at 9 a.m. at Westside Park, 445 SW 2 St., Deerfield Beach. 954-54-7329883.SundaysSt. Elizabeth’s of Hungary Parish hosts a pancake breakfast at 3331 NE 10 Terrace, Pompano Beach, on every third Sunday of the month from 7:30 a.m. to noon. The breakfast benefits the Parish. 954-263 8415.MondaysPlay ping-pong from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Cost is $1. All ages can participate. 954-3902130. The Gold Coast Toastmasters Club meets on the second and third Monday of the month from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Denny’s, 3151 NW 9 Ave., Fort Lauderdale. 954895-3555 or 954-782-9951.TuesdaysDeerfield Beach Rotary Club meets every Tuesday at 12 p.m. at the Deer Creek Golf Club, 2801 Deer Creek Country Club Blvd., Deerfield Beach. 954-630-9593. Pompano BeachLighthouse Rotary Club meets every Tuesday at 7:30 a.m. at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. 954-972-7178. The American Legion Auxiliary Unit 142 171 SW 2 St., Pompano Beach, has Bingo on Tuesdays at 7 p.m. Food is available from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. 954-942-2448. Yoga classes are available for all levels at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors, on Tuesday nights from 6:30 to 8 p.m. and Saturday mornings from 10:30 a.m. until noon. The cost is $7. 305-607-3520. Zonta International meets

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The Pelican 25 Friday, July 6, 2012 Advertise with The Pelican Today! 954-783-8700 added for $20 each. The fishing begins July 28 at 7 a.m. at the Hillsboro Inlet in Pompano Beach with lines out at 4 p.m. A kick off party and captain’s meeting will be held July 27 at St. Coleman’s, 1200 S. Federal Hwy., from 6 to 9 p.m. The awards party and dinner will be held July 28 at St. Coleman’s from 6 to 9 p.m. Cash prizes, trophies, raffles and door prizes will be given away to anglers. For more, call 954-6822128. WalkContinued from page 20 cubic yards annually, is the basis for Boca’s current bypassing goals. Since this study used 2002 gures, Schubert said she believes the town’s update request will be received favorably at the DEP. The DEP does periodic surveys and its budget for 2013-14 is being drawn now. Schubert said she is seeking a meeting with city of cials in Boca Raton and hopes that Deer eld Beach will be a partner in the DEP request. The draft letter approved this week has not yet been circulated to these municipalities. In her letter to the DEP, Schubert noted that the Hillsboro Inlet is one of the most successfully managed inlets in the state, evidenced by the fact that Pompano Beach does not have to renourish it beaches. StudyContinued from page 2SightingsContinued from page 24on the third Tuesday of the month at Duffy’s Diner, 401 N. Federal Hwy., Deerfield Beach, at 11:15 a.m. Zonta International works to advance the status of women. 561-392-2223.WednesdaysThe Wilton Manors Kiwanis Club meets Wednesdays at 6:30 p.m. at 2749 NE 14 Ave., Wilton Manors. 954-5619785. The Oakland Park Kiwanis Club meets Wednesdays from 7:30 to 8:30 a.m. at Peter Pan Diner, 1216 E. Oakland Park Blvd., Oakland Park. 954-566-9957. The Pompano Beach Kiwanis Club meets Wednesdays at noon at the Riverside Grille at the Sands Resort, 125 N. Riverside Drive, Pompano Beach. 954444-4815. The Greater Pompano Beach Senior Citizens Club meets on the second Wednesday of the month at the Emma Lou Olson Community Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach, at 10 a.m. 954-943-7787. Alzheimer’s Caregivers Support Group meets Wednesdays from 10 a.m. to noon at the NE Focal Point Alzheimer’s Day Care Center, 301 NW 2 Ave., Deerfield BeachThursdaysRotary Club of Oakland Park/Wilton Manors meets every Thursday from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. at Tequila Sunrise Mexican Grill, 4711 N. Dixie Hwy., Oakland Park. 954-491-6158. The Deerfield Beach Kiwanis Club meets at noon every Thursday at the Deerfield Beach Hilton, 100 Fairway Dr., Deerfield Beach 954-242-6083.

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26 The Pelican Friday, July 6, 2012 We were in the Paci c supporting those who were ghting in Okinawa. Our job was to follow mine sweepers and detonate the mines. After the Japanese surrendered, we were hit with a typhoon. The Japanese told us how to get into a safe harbor. Imagine that. They saved our lives. On the day after we had stopped killing each other, they were willing to save our lives. I always wanted to thank them for that. We were the rst ones in Japan, but that fact was never recorded because [Gen. Douglas] MacArthur wanted that honor for himself.” Borough left those long ago memories to share highlights from his recent trip to Washington, DC thanks to the all volunteer Honor Flight. “We were greeted by crowds of cheering men, women and children and music. Those folks just wanted to shake our hands and thank us for our service. There we were, sitting in wheel chairs, getting love and respect like nothing I had ever experienced. We were all in tears and so were those wonderful people who had come to welcome us. “Five buses took us to the National Cemetery and the Changing of the Guard. We had lunch along side the Potomac. We traveled to the WW II Memorial which gave most of us goose bumps and tears. “There is a gold bordered memorial on the west side overlooking the Lincoln Memorial. Filled with gold stars, each star represents 100 lost servicemen and women. Never forget, women did serve. In fact, we had a former WAC with us on this trip.” “The names of the battles fought are engraved on the Atlantic and the Paci c sides. I had a picture taken on the Okinawa and Japan engraving. For most of us, this was a rst viewing of the monument and a very emotional day. We also visited the Iwo Jima monument for group photos. Most of the veterans felt that this was the welcome home they had always wanted.”History of Honor FlightsThe rst Honor Flight took place in May of 2005. Six small planes ew out of Spring eld, Ohio taking 12 veterans to the memorial in Washington, DC. By August of that year, there were so many veterans on the waiting list for an Honor Flight that commercial airlines were contacted and the Honor Flight Network was created. Conceived by Earl Morse, a physician assistant and retired Air Force Captain, Earl wanted to honor the veterans he had taken care of for the past 27 years. After retiring from the Air Force in 1998, Earl was hired by the Department of Veterans Affairs to work in a small clinic in Spring eld, Ohio. When the memorial was nally completed and dedicated in 2004, Earl realized it was a major topic of conversation among his veteran patients. Many hoped to visit the memorial but were unable to do so because of physical and nancial limitations. Most of these senior heroes were now in their 80s. They lacked the physical and mental wherewithal to complete a trip on their own. Earl decided there had to be a way to help. When he asked some of these veterans if they would like a free trip to see the memorial, they often broke down and cried. He decided to ask for help from other pilots. He addressed the 150 members of the AERO club during a meeting, specifying that veterans must pay nothing. Volunteer pilots had to pay to rent the aircraft for the day at a cost of $600 to $1,200. Pilots promised to not only y veterans free but to escort them around D.C. for the day. Eleven pilots volunteered and the Honor Flight was launched. In May of 2008, Southwest Airlines stepped up by donating thousands of free tickets and was named the of cial carrier of the Honor Flight Network. Now there is a network of participating programs nationwide to assist these senior heroes get to the memorial safely.Success in numbersIn 2005, Honor Flight Network, or HFN, transported 137 veterans at no cost to them. In 2006, the number became 891. In 2007, the number grew to 5,000. By the end of 2011 ying season in November, HFN had transported more than 81,000 veterans of WW II, Korea and Vietnam to see the memorials built to honor their suffering and sacri ce to keep this great nation free and a world leader.”About Bill BoroughBoroughs is a Deer eld Beach artist, well known in South Florida for his water colors of Key West homes and marine scenes. His work was seen at most art festivals from 1982 to 1998. Although he has stopped painting, his fans continue to seek out pieces from his remaining collection. He still shows at the Lighthouse Point Yacht Club annual art show. Married to Virginia for over 60 years, they have three daughters, six grandchildren and one great granddaughter. Every WW 11 veteran is invited to make this one day, sentimental journey. To contact Honor Flights, go to the web site: www.honor ightse .org/ Call Elaine Penn and Tony Reese at 1772781-2212 or email:honor ightse @live.comHonor ightsContinued from page 10

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The Pelican 27 Friday, July 6, 2012 Capt. RJ Boyle is an experienced angler in South Florida. His studio is located in Lighthouse Point. Call 954-420-5001. By RJ BoyleRJ BOYLE STUDIOSWe decided to change up our usual shing schedule this week. We had shed two days for sword sh and one day for dolphin. Up to that point it had been a stellar week. We caught ve sword sh, weighing-in at a combined 400 lbs. and a few dolphin in the 30-lb. range. I was tired from shing a few days in a row, but as I sat on the couch trying to relax, I found myself feeling like I had to go shing. The weather was so Driftin’ and Dreamin’beautiful outside. I came up with a plan, and what a plan it was. I called my guys from the shop and said ‘Let’s go on the Fish City Pride and sh for some snapper.’ At $40, we could sh and get off the boat and not have to do anything. They were all red-up to go, so I ordered ten sub sandwiches, and we made our way to the Hillsboro Inlet. There were a bunch of people already in line. You could just feel the excitement in the air. We got seats in the bow of the boat and proceeded to rig-up for a night of hard-core reef shing. Everybody seemed to be rigging up a little different, hoping to get an edge. We all SEE DREAMIN’ on page 28

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28 The Pelican Friday, July 6, 2012 put in our $5 for the biggest sh pool and we all felt like we were gonna take home the prize. Tensions were high as the lines hit the water on the rst drift of the night. Fishing started slow, but Capt. Dwight on the second drift put us on the sh and the RJ Boyle crew never looked back. My cousins, Fred and Joey Gushue, got hot and put two ag yellowtails in the boat while Jeff Walls, my store manager, boated a nice mangrove snapper. Max Golliger caught a few reef sh and started to get hot. To that point I was struggling and started to receive some heckling from my crew. I knew I had to bear down and get serious if I was going to win the pool. Halfway through the trip all I had caught was a doctor sh and the heckling became unbearable. With two drifts to go in the trip I broke out all the stops and went to my old reliable bottom sh rig. From that point forward, it was over. Max switched to my same rig and challenged me to catch the most sh of anyone on the trip. In the end I caught 31 sh to Max’s ve and my con dence was restored. All of the heckling stopped as sh kept coming over the rail. Jeff Walls was staying quiet during this time and had snuck out one of his secret rigs. Right at the end of the trip Jeff hooked a sh that we knew was the right one. He weaved himself up and down the rail until nally a beautiful mutton snapper emerged from the depths. He pulled the sh over the rail and with that won the pool. He won $150 and bragging rights until our next trip. What a trip it was. If you get a chance ride out on the Fish City Pride out of Hillsboro Inlet. The crew was great and the shing was off the chain. RJ Boyle, third from left, and crew enjoy some shing time on a boat that’s not their own. [Photo courtesy of RJ Boyle]

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