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Pompano Pelican
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00090900/00306
 Material Information
Title: Pompano Pelican
Uniform Title: Pompano Pelican
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: Pompano Pelican
Place of Publication: Pompano Beach
Publication Date: 06-29-2012
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Pompano Beach
Coordinates: 26.234722 x -80.125556 ( Place of Publication )
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00090900:00306

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Friday, June 29, 2012 Vol. XX, Issue 26 Wherever you are, read The Pelican @ pompanopelican.com Send news to siren2415@gmail.com Pompano Beach Deer eld Beach Lighthouse Point Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Wilton Manors Oakland Park Hillsboro Beach The Galt Palm Aire The Pelican Pelican City must redraw commission districtsSome voters appear headed for changeBy Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach The citys voting districts will be redrawn for the March 2013 city election, this time based on U.S. Census gures rather than the unof cial guesstimates used in 2008. Voters most likely to be affected are in District 3 Century See DISTRICTS on page 19 151 days left in 2012 Hurricane season By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFLauderdale-By-The-Sea Since the town of Lauderdale-By-TheSea is in an evacuation zone, all residents must leave their homes, condominiums and apartments when the National Hurricane Center in Miami issues a Hurricane Warning for Broward County.Evacuation orders should be heeded by everyoneIf you refuse orders to evacuate, the Broward Sheriffs Of ce will ask you for information on how to contact your next of kin. Once a warning is issued, this is a mandatory evacuation zone. Our message is to get people off the island in order to be out of harms way, said Lt. Angelo Cedeno of BSO. If and when a storm approaches, emergency personnel relocate to Holy Cross Medical Center. After a storm, when an assessment for damages is completed and the area is deemed safe to re-enter, residents will be given clearance to come back, Cedeno said. Individuals will be asked to show their drivers license or state ID card before they will be allowed to re-enter See EVACUATION on page 20By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach When Pompano Beach resident Kim Boehm saw her Citizens hurricane insurance bill jump to be $2,000 more than last year she knew she wasnt going to pay it without a ght. On June 13 Boehm and other area residents met one-on-one with two representatives from Citizens Property Insurance Corporation in State Rep. Gwyn Clarke-Reeds of ce at Pompano Beach City Hall to ask questions and see if they could get their premiums lowered. Thats why Im here. Im here ghting it, said Boehm. Last year, Boehm paid $3,000 to Citizens. But two months ago an inspector from Citizens cited a block glass window on her house that made her property Locals reacting to big hikes in Citizens insurance rates Its the only insurance left for homeowners in Florida after other companies got out See CITIZENS on page 27 Clothing collection bins disappearing from the sceneMost are illegal; some are fraudulentBy Judy Wilson PELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach Those donation bins that make it seem like a good thing to give old clothes to charity are, in fact, in violation of city codes. Furthermore, some of them are operated by for-pro t companies or companies who dont deliver as promised. In October of last year, Jim Moyer, donor program manager with the Salvation Army, asked that the organization be allowed to place bins around this city where a new resale store had opened on Federal Highway. Noting that the code prohibits storage See BINS on page 25 Alley Oop instructor, Drew Cornwall, demonstrates his skimboarding skills in Lauderdale-ByThe-Sea. On Saturday, Alley Oop held free skimboaring lessons as part of Lauderdale-By-TheSeas Family Fun Week. [Photo by Michael dOliveira]

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2 The PelicanFriday, June 29, 2012 Big blue recycling carts expected to bring in more recyclablesBy Judy VikPELICAN STAFFOakland Park City of cials are hoping to go to 65-gallon recycling carts next year, using $703,451 allocated by the RRB, or Resource Recovery Board. The decision to equip homeowners with the blue carts was made after an eight-week test program that resulted in high approvals from residents. This city was the rst in Broward County to implement a curbside recycling program and one of the rst to institute singlestream recycling at the curb, done in July, 2009. City Commissioners have approved submission of a grant application to the RRB and told staff to execute the agreement between the city and RRB. Currently, homeowners use 18-gallon recycling bins which are open to the elements and require employees to manually load the material into the trucks. In the last four years, the city has gone from collecting 110 tons a month of recycled materials to a high of 180 tons per month for an average of 1,700 to 1,800 tons a year. Less than ve percent of the citys current solid waste stream is being recycled through the 18-gallon bins. In Miami-Dade, implementing the carts increased the amount of recyclable collected by 285 percent. Its curbside recycling program has increased from 2,100 tons per month to almost 6,000 tons. Here, to test the use of the 65-gallon carts, the city provided them to 55 residents taking part over eight-weeks. Overall, residents favored the carts. A larger, 95-gallon cart will also be available upon request. Vice Mayor John Adornato and Commisioner Shari McCartney said they were ecstatic about the proposed cart recycling, and McCartney said she liked the pretty blue cart. If approved, staff anticipates implementing the revised recycling program in January 2013, after securing the equipment and providing signi cant outreach. LBTS says no funding this year for Boy Scout requestBy Judy VikPELICAN STAFFLauderdale-By-The-Sea Town commissioners approved $14,000 in funding requests from four non-pro t organizations on Tuesday, but rejected a request from the Boy Scouts for $1,500 for camping scholarships because its national charter discriminates against gay leaders. Commissioner Mark Brown, a former Eagle Scout, took See FUNDING on page 27

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The Pelican 3 Friday, June 29, 2012 Some residents will see drop in water bills next yearBy Judy VikPELICAN STAFFLauderdale-By-TheSea Town commissioners tentatively adopted a 10 percent reduction in sewer rates in 2013 for the south end of town after hearing from a consultant hired to do a rate analysis. An ordinance re ecting the change will be presented at a public hearing Aug. 21. The town hired Burton & Associates to analyze input from commercial property owners and residents regarding the impact of a January 2011 sewer rate increase for properties from Pine Avenue south. The commission also asked Burton to gure how much money should be in the sewer reserve fund. The recommendation was six months of operating and maintenance costs. Mike Burton said the key issues are less water use due to economic and weather conditions and an increase in operating costs. Burton said commissioners could choose to make no adjustment in rates until 2017. Then annual 2 percent increases would be needed from 2018-2022 to cover anticipated costs and maintain an adequate operating reserve. Or they could reduce rates by 10 percent in 2013, make no change in 2014 and then raise rates by three percent in 2015-2017 and raise rates by 3.85 percent in 2017-2022 to fund capital improvements. Commissioners tentatively approved this choice. Burton recommended they set a proposed rate structure to recover costs from all types of properties.Rate methodologyUnder the rate structure being proposed, single-family residential uses would pay a base rate of $12.71 instead of the current $14.89 a month but would get an increase in the volume rate from See WATER RATES on page 24By Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFLighthouse Point Cobwebs on the ceiling, light xtures with warning tags, a cracked window, a stuck hurricane shutter and one unhappy commissioner add up to a problem at the Lighthouse Point branch post of ce on Sample Road. Inside the lobby, dirt is evident on the oors and walls. Large pieces of paint hang ready to fall and only a few overhead lights appear to be working in this building which is open 24/7 for patrons picking up or sending mail. This isnt the rst time this has come up, says Lighthouse Point Commissioner Sandy Johnson. Its been going on Paper inserted in light xtures serve as warnings of possible electronic problems. Note: four light fixtures do not dispense light.Light xtures in lobby area need bulbs and repair. Lighthouse Point PO in need of repairs and better housekeeping service See POST OFFICE on page 21

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4 The PelicanFriday, June 29, 2012 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFLighthouse Point We do a lot with a little, Mayor Fred Schorr said this week about the towns proposed $12.3 million operating budget for 2012-13. Schorr said property owners can expect the millage to remain at 3.65 mils, Browards third lowest. As presented to commissioners earlier this month, the new budget increases expenditures by $340,328, the majority of that money spent on police and re services where salaries are the big item. While the police budget went from $4.6 million LHP budget re ects ef ciencies and changes to $4.7 and re went from $3 million to $3.3 million, other departments show decreases. Only the city-run library gains in the new scal year with a $30,000 infusion into the $65,000 book fund. We cut it last year because we knew Doreen [Gauthier] was leaving, so this year we put it back to normal, the mayor said. We are still affecting ef cient changes, Shorr said. We dont need to raise millage to provide the same services. We are continually saving and at times our revenues exceed expectations. See LHP BUDGET on page 20 Wilton Manors alters pain management lawBy Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFWilton Manors In response to the concerns of two pharmacies, on Tuesday Wilton Manors commissioners amended the citys restrictions on pharmacies and pain management clinics. The change removes the limit of 5,000 pills dispensed per month. In January, after a ninemonth moratorium on new pain management clinics, the city placed restrictions on pharmacies and pain management clinics that sold controlled substances. The moratorium and restrictions were established to prevent pill mills from opening in the city. A pill mill is a business that sells high volumes of pain medication to patients without See PILL MILLS on page 12 By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach When members of Pompano Proud wanted to spruce up McNab Park, they turned to local artist Pat Anderson. Pompano Proud, an organization dedicated to beautifying Pompano, commissioned Anderson to create four paintings of native ora that have since been installed on the back of the scoreboards at McNab Parks shuf eboard court. Its the 60th anniversary [of McNab Park] and we wanted to do something nice Pompano Proud, local artist team up to beautify McNab Park for 60th anniversary See MCNAB on page 9Local artist Pat Anderson stands proudly in front of one of her paintings at McNab Park in Pompano Beach. [Photo by Michael dOliveira]

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The Pelican 5 Friday, June 29, 2012 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach The owners of a strip of beach sand north of the shing pier want to provide beach-related services to the public and this week city commissioners took steps to curtail how they can use their property. The proposed ordinance allows rentals of surfboards, paddleboards, snorkeling equipment, kayaks, beach chairs, umbrellas, cabanas, tents, beach toys, and sales of sunscreen and other beach products. Surf camps and lessons on using the equipment are allowed. No City takes steps to limit commerce on private beach lotsmotorized equipment is allowed and the sale of food or beverage is prohibited. Structures must be no larger than 10-foot by 16-foot chickee huts or tents which can be moved, not powered with electricity or plumbed. No live entertainment will be allowed. The business must operate at least 135 feet west of the high water mark. Permit fees of $250 and liability insurance must be provided as well as the names of all those involved in the vending operation. Background checks will be done on everyone associated with the operation. The new rules apply to privately-owned open space, most of which is north of the shing pier. Deer elds beach is dotted with privately-owned wedges of sand, the most famous one owned by Boca restaurateur Pete Boinis adjacent to the shing pier. Several years ago, after a battle that ended with Boinis erecting no trespassing signs, it was purchased by the city so that pier enhancements could be made. According to City Attorney Andy Maurodis, not many of the remaining lots are suitable for business development. We have made every effort to provide limitations, he added. Case law says that both public and private owners have the right to the use of beach property. The proposed law is designed to limit commercial activity but enhance the beach by making available certain goods and services. The permitting process assures the publics use is protected. City Commissioner Joe Miller, whose district includes the beach, said the intent of the proposed law is to prevent private owners from obstructing access to the beach. He said he noti ed the management at Tiara East Condominium that their neighboring property owners planned to rent beach equipment, but heard no protest from the residents. Frankly, it doesnt seem to be a big thing, he said. SightingsA community calendar of Broward County. Email events to siren2415@gmail. com 6-30 Local performing artist Sara Grant will be performing Songs of Old and New at 3333 N. Federal Hwy., Boca Raton, at 7 p.m. Tickets are $15. Visit www. solchildren.org or call 561447-8829. 6-30 Royal Piano Music r for a King or Queen at 7:30 p.m. at All Saints Episcopal Church, 333 Tarpon Drive, Fort Lauderdale. Donation requested. Call 305505-8704. 7-1 The Oakland Park Historical Society is celebrating the 83rd birthday of the City of Oakland Park at the Mai Kai, 3599 N. Federal Hwy., Oakland Park, from 1 to 3:30 p.m. To reserve a seat, call 954-563-8307.See SIGHTINGS on page 14

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6 The PelicanFriday, June 29, 2012 Deer eld Beach, Pompano Beach, Lighthouse Point, LauderdaleBy-The-Sea, Wilton Manors and Oakland ParkWilton Manors Oakland Park Hillsboro Beach The Pompano Pelican is published weekly on FridaysStreet Address: 1500-A E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, FL 33060 Telephone: 954-783-8700 Fax: 954-783-0093Letters to the Editor are encouraged and accepted for print if signed, although a writers name will be withheld on request; letters must also include a daytime telephone number. Advertising rates are available upon request. Subscription rate is $31.80 including tax for one years delivery in Greater Pompano Beach; $95.40/per year including tax for others in the United States; call 954-783-8700 for rates abroad. The Pelican is a nonpartisan newspaper and reserves the right to decline advertising. Copyright 2012. Reproduction of this publication in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission of the publisher. The Pelican is a member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, Deer eld Beach Chamber and the LBTS Chamber. The Pelican is a state certi ed woman-owned minority business. The Pelican is delivered to businesses, libraries, schools, of ces, hospitals, news racks and single family homes. All advertising and copy is published at the sole discretion of the publisher. We welcome your critiques and ideas concerning this publication. Anne Siren, publisherExecutive Assistant: Mary Hudson Graphics: Rachel Ramirez Windsheimer Bookkeeper: John White Classi eds: Fran Shelby Contributing Writers: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Judy Wilson, Malcolm McClintock, Judy Vik, Michael dOliveira Account Executives: Paul Shroads, Carolyn Mann, Bill Heaton, Bill Fox Special Of ce Assistant: Cathy Siren ESTABLISHED 1993 Volume XX, Issue 26 Founding Editor and PublisherAnne Hanby Siren Rockin 4th of July on the beach Deer eld Beach The beach will rock Wednesday, July 4, to the music of Luminotti, Andrew Morris, Jimmy Stowe and the Stowaways and Hot Brass Monkey beginning at 1 p.m. in the Main Beach Parking Lot, Ocean Way and SE 1 Street. Sponsored by the Community Redevelopment District, the celebration includes arts and crafts displays and clothing booths; food and liquid refreshments. Fireworks will rocket off the shing pier beginning at 9:15 p.m. Beach parking will be extremely limited but free parking is available in the Cove Shopping Center. A free shuttle bus will operate 11 a.m. to 5:45 p.m. and 11 p.m. to midnight. The Intracoastal Waterway Bridge will close to vehicular traf c at 6 p.m. and be in lock down for waterway traf c from 7 to 11 p.m. The shing pier will close at noon, July 3, and reopen 6 a.m. Thursday, July 5. Ocean Way is closed to traf c all day on The Fourth. Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Festivities get under way at 10 a.m. on July 4 with the traditional parade. The parade begins on Bougainvilla Drive behind Town Hall, heads north to Pine Avenue, east to El Mar Drive, south to Hibiscus and then west back to Bougainvilla before heading north and returning to the starting point. At 11:30 a.m., members of the towns Volunteer Fire Department, or VFD, will demonstrate equipment and provide water hose play for children and photos of children with Sparky, their mascot. Beach activities are planned from 12:30 to 3 p.m. starting with a sandcastle building contest with prizes and judging by Aruba Beach Caf. A chance to cool off and have some fun with water rides courtesy of The Village Grille, Aruba Beach Caf and Ocean 101. Kilwins will dish out ice cream. The VFD hosts a tug of war at the beach. Burger FI will host eating contests in the afternoon. A custard eating contest for children is set for 3 p.m. and a hamburger eating contest for adults at 4 p.m. Fireworks will go off at the beach at El Prado Park at 9 p.m. Commissioner Chris Vincent is chairing the annual festivities with help from a committee of volunteers. Its a family July 4th here with re engines, ice cream and water ridesPompano Beach Plan the entire day and most of the night in this city to celebrate Independence Day, July 4, at the beach. The bash begins at 10 a.m. at the Pompano Beach Fishing Pier, 222 N. Pompano Beach Blvd. with watermelon contests, relay races, arts and live entertainment. At noon, featured bands perform and more music takes place on the city stage at 7:30 p.m. with hits from the rock group, Journey. Fireworks start at 9 p.m. launched from a barge off the shing pier. Revelers are welcome to take lawn chairs, picnics and blankets are welcome. Alcohol, personal reworks, pets and glass containers are prohibited at the beach. The Atlantic Bridge and 14th Street Causeway Bridge will be in the down position from 9 to 11 p.m. Call 954-786-4111.Extravaganza reworks, music, games and patriotism in Pompano July 4th activities planned in your hometowns To the editor, Having just moved here as a year round resident from the Boston area, I have to comment on the parking situation in Pompano Beach, Lauderdale-ByThe-Sea, or LBTS, and Fort Lauderdale area. Several residents have told me that the areas here make more money from the parking meters than they do from the taxes. Well, I totally believe that statement. I understand that after one area started with the parking meters, every beach area followed suit. Everywhere you go, there are parking stations or meters. It is very discouraging to think that if I want to go to lunch or dinner in the LBTS area, it is going to cost me at least an additional $3 for parking. How the area continues to survive with the parking restrictions is a mystery to me. Why not during the off season, have one day a week that the meters are free with a three-hour limit? Or maybe the powers that be could allow parking after 8 p.m. to be free. Now I take public transportation or head to Flanagans or other establishments on Federal Highway that do not have the parking issues that the beachfront areas have. C. Kennedy LBTSExpensive beach parking forces reader to seek inland businesses Recently, the Pompano Beach Rotary Club-sponsored softball team played in the Sunshine Senior Softball League in Pompano Beach. In the bottom row are Tom Abramouski, Claude LaBrie, Bob Harris, Jerry Meehan and Tony Hernandez. Picture in the top row are Bob Johnson, Rick Elbaz, Jim Ritacco, Tom Savino, Frank Monti and Don Schaeffer. Not pictured are Sandy Koplowitz, Tony Longabardo and Cedric Wolfman. For more in Rotary, call 954-786-3274. For more on the Sunshine Senior Softball League, call 954-421-6892. [Photo courtesy of Jerry Meehan]Take me home! Victor is very energetic, playful, loving black and white male cat approximately 18 months old. He gets along with other cats and has been in The Florida Humane Societys shelter for several months. He is tested, neutered and has his shots up to date. He, along with other cats and dogs, is available for adoption at The Florida Humane Society, 3870 N. Powerline Road, Pompano Beach. Hours are Thursday to Sunday from 12 to 4 p.m. Visit www.floridahumanesociety.org or call 954 974 6152.

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The Pelican 7 Friday, June 29, 2012 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFLauderdale-By-The-Sea Town commissioners on Tuesday unanimously approved a requested $764,203 operating budget for the towns Volunteer Fire Department, or VFD, for 2013. Thats about a $10,000 or 1 percent increase over the current operating budget and will pay re ghters to provide beach coverage 265 days in ready response mode. The budget includes a signi cant decrease from $40,000 to $10,000for medical call assistance to AMR due to recent changes which have resulted in the volunteers responding to fewer medical calls. Fuel is projected to be more costly next year, and more funds will be spent on training and training supplies as the department continues to place a heavy emphasis on professional training. In the current year, the town budgeted $339,500 for the purchase of a new re engine. Those funds are included in the re fund, separate from the VFD contract. The VFD has proposed capital expenditures of $55,600 next year: $25,000 for a new extrication tool, $17,000 for a new compressor for air tanks, $8,500 for an infrared camera to assist re ghters in burning buildings, $2,800 for a truck generator and $2,300 for a 50-foot ladder. The proposed budget must also be presented to the VFD membership for their approval. Commissioners unanimously agreed to keep the residential re fee at $130 annually. That will result in a separate fund of $247,000 by 2017, Tony Bryan, nance director, noted. Commissioners decided they dont want a study done to determine alternate methods of assessing re fees. Fire budget holds the lineBy Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach Broward County Vice Mayor Kristin Jacobs, a candidate for the 22nd Congressional District, said this week her opponent, former West Palm Beach Mayor Lois Frankel, has refused offers to debate her. Speaking at a coffee here this week, Jacobs said the Palm Beach Post and its af liate Channel 5, issued invitations to both candidates to debate on July 12. CBS Channel 4 also wanted to set up a debate between the two Democrat hopefuls and offered several dates. According to Jacobs, who wanted to set up four debates, Frankel refused. Frankels campaign manager Greg Richardson had not returned phone calls or emails at press time Thursday. The people of District 22 have the right to see their candidates side-byside, Jacobs said. Voters deserve to know about the key differences between the candidates. To date, Frankel and Jacobs have appeared together in the same place only at club and association meetings, said Jacobs campaign manager Jacobs urging Frankel to debate face-to-face so far, congressional challenger has refusedMarcia Monserrat. Kristin will debate her anytime, anyplace, Monserrat said. Jacobs, a county commissioner for 14 years and Frankel, a former Florida senator and mayor of West Palm Beach for eight years, face one another in the Aug. 14 primary for the seat now held by Cong. Allen West who moved his campaign to the 18th Congressional District, hoping for more favorable election results. Wests new District is north of his former district. The 22 District runs along the coast from Fort Lauderdale through Riviera Beach taking in some western precincts in Palm Beach County. Frankel has been on the campaign trail for well over See JACOBS on page 28

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8 The PelicanFriday, June 29, 2012 Business matters The Pelican takes a look at local business owners. Call The Pelican to nd out how you can tell your story here because business matters. 954-783-8700. Briefs Send The Pelican your news, big or small, to siren2415@gmail.com By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach David Case is the friendly owner of Plumbing World, Inc., a family business thats been assisting area residents for 51 years from the same location at 1777 NE 33rd St. in Shoppers Haven, Pompano Beach. Case says, When my father-in-law retired, I bought him out. That was in 1996, but Ive been working here for a long time and pretty much learned everything I know about plumbing on the job. We specialize in repair and supplies, working with plumbers and Do-It-Yourselfers. We learn from each other. Not a day goes by that I havent learned something new. Theres always something different to solve in a new way. People bring in faucets, toilet tanks and anything you can think of, and we help them determine what can and cant be xed, he adds. He no sooner made that statement when customer, Hank Berman stopped in with a faucet in hand, asking, Can you explain why this brand-new faucet is leaking? It took just a few minutes to solve his problem which turned out to be a missing piece that should have been included in the faucet he had just purchased elsewhere. A phone call from Case to the retailer handled the problem, and a grateful Berman left, faucet in hand. Plumbing World is lled with in-depth stocks of every plumbing piece and part that can t into the store including faucet stems, handles, trims, toilet parts, hard to nd one piece toilet repair parts, sinks, PVC piping, lters and more. Repair parts for shower valves and toilets are the most frequent requests. Case estimates that half of his stock comes from local distributers and the other half from national distributors. He says, We can ll special orders within a day if local distributors have the product. Our space is limited. We can only show so many sinks and toilets, but many more are available from suppliers. Were not into heavy commercial plumbing which calls for different parts and, in many cases, much larger parts. We are geared to individual residences such as free standing homes, condos and co-ops, and the plumbers who service the owners. I have long time customers who y in from the Bahamas and other islands because its tough to get the parts where they live. Andy St. Laurent, plumber, says he visits Plumbing World almost every day. David is a very knowledgeable man and always a gentleman to do business with. Ive seen him reach for a part to t a customers faucet before the customer even reaches the counter. For 51 years, Plumbing World has offered repair service, supplies, help to Do-It-Yourselfers He knows the eld and is always eager to help. The store stocks anything and everything I might need. Case is pleased with Andys comments and says, We get many referrals from customers and the big box stores and we appreciate this referral business because we know David Case, owner of Plumbing World, Inc. helps Hank Berman gure out why his brand new faucet leaks. This family business has been in the same 33rd Street location for 51 years. The store stocks a huge inventory of parts, offers repair service and assistance to plumbers and Do-It-Yourselfers. [Photos by Phyllis J. Neuberger.]that we have parts that cannot be found elsewhere. After years in this business, we know our parts and can identify whats needed. There really arent many one size ts all solutions in this eld. Were proud of our reputation and we work hard to maintain it. Call 954-781-2255. Plumbing World is lled with in-depth stocks of every plumbing piece and part that can t into the store including faucet stems, handles, trims, toilet parts, hard to nd one piece toilet repair parts, sinks, PVC piping, lters and more. Property, tax questions answeredOakland Park The Broward County Property Appraisers Of ce will hold a community outreach event Tuesday, July 10 from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Oakland Park City Hall, 3650 NE 12 Ave. Appraisers will be available to assist with homestead, senior and other property tax exemption applications, as well as answer questions on property taxes. They are also accepting applications for portability. Those who attend should bring a current Florida drivers license or Florida identi cation card and a current voter registration card or declaration of domicile. Non-citizens must provide proof of permanent residency. For more information, visit www.bcpa.net or call 954-357-5579. Humane Society celebrates twoyear anniversaryPompano Beach On July 7 and 8 from 12 to 4 p.m., The Florida Humane Society will host an event celebrating the two-year anniversary of the grand opening of its current location at 3870 N. Powerline Road, Pompano Beach. There will be raf es, food, a bake sale and discounts on pet supplies. The Florida Humane Society is a no-pro t, no-kill pet shelter that has cats and dogs available for adoption. For more, visit www. oridahumanesociety.org or call 954974-6152.Library closing for maintenanceDeer eld Beach The Percy White Library, 837 E. Hillsboro Blvd., will be closed for air conditioning maintenance Thursday, July 12 and Friday, July 13 and will reopen Saturday, July 14 at 10 a.m. While Percy White is closed, library patrons can visit the Century Plaza Branch Library, 1856A W. Hillsboro Blvd., Pompano Beach Branch, 1213 E. Atlantic Blvd., or the North Library at 100 Coconut Creek Blvd.

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The Pelican 9 Friday, June 29, 2012 for the community, said Sherry Walters, president of Pompano Proud. The scoreboards were looking pretty shabby. And were really happy with what she came up with. The paintings are also in celebration of Pompano Prouds efforts to get McNab Park, 2250 E. Atlantic Blvd., certi ed as National Wildlife Federation, or NWF, habitat. NDF habitats are backyards, public parks and other green spaces that have certain features that attract and support local wildlife, such as birds and squirrels. Were just always looking for projects to help the community, said Walters. Anderson, a 30-year Pompano resident whose store is located in the Shoppes at Beacon Light in Lighthouse Point, said shes proud to be a part of the beauti cation and redevelopment of Atlantic Boulevard. Im tickled. Ive always been into souvenir artwork, she said, referring to the theme of the paintings. Sandy Von Staden, Pompano Proud board member, said the goal of the organization is to commission more artists in the future and display new art work at the shuf eboard court about every six months. We hope that it will inspire other organizations to work with the city on public art on beauti cation, said Von Staden. We enjoyed such cooperation from the city and we hope it will continue. Pompano Proud is funded through the efforts of members who volunteer at the Pompano Beach Seafood Festival, collecting donations in exchange for Pompano Proud t-shirts and selling bags at the Green Market. On Friday, July 13 at 8:30 a.m. at McNab Park, Pompano Proud will be of cially unveiling Andersons art work. The event is open to the public and light refreshments will be served. For more on Pompano Proud, visit www. pompanoproud.com or call 954-562-3232. McNabContinued from page 4Fundraiser to aid children with autism July 4Oakland Park With hopes high for $10,000, Forever Propane, 350 E. Prospect Road, will host a day of raf es, food and music to help fund the South Florida Autism Association. The event takes place July 4 from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Maria Taylor, marketing director for Forever Propane, says she has come to know a child with autism, and being a mom, I want to help as much as I can. This rst fundraiser is planned for the family and includes a free barbecue with a donation to the cause. Taylor says this will be one of many events. The company also plans a walk later in the year as one of many different events to reach the company goal. Forever Propane Sales & Service has three locations in South Florida: Hollywood, Boca Raton and Oakland Park. To donate or sponsor this event, call 954-654-0872.

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10 The PelicanFriday, June 29, 2012 Making a Difference Phyllis J. Neuberger wants your suggestions about people who are making a difference. Call 954-7838700. Send in your news! siren2415@gmail.com Briefs By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFWhen the Lighthouse Point Library, or LHP library, moved into its current location in the mid 1980s, Doreen Gauthier began a weekly Tiny Tots and Moms story time. I believed then, and still do, that the earlier you expose little ones to books and sounds, the better your chance to create life long readers, Gauthier says. I was inspired by Dr. Henrietta Smith who taught childrens literature at the University of South Florida, and by Dr. Ellin Greene whose book, Babies and Libraries, also encouraged me. Greene, by the way, was a part time LHP resident. Gauthiers efforts were a great success. She says, I get a special thrill when I hear that one of my tots now brings her own little one to the story time. And they do! Cathy Anthony, now a LHP librarian, says, I remember bringing my daughter, Lindsay, to Doreens story time and now Lindsay brings her daughter, Mackenzy who adores the group. Gauthier recently retired as director of the library. Her successor, Christy Keyes, continues to conduct a story time group for a new ock of tots [ages 18 month to three years] and moms every Friday morning at 10:30 a.m. The Pelican dropped in to see what was happening. Much to Keyes surprise, her Tiny Tots and Moms story time is drawing at least 20 moms and their excited little ones. Tiny tots get an early start with books and sounds at the Doreen Gauthier Lighthouse Point LibraryShe says, I was happily surprised to see that, despite the tremendous focus on technology, story time is still very popular. The attention span of this age group is very short so we switch focus often moving from an abbreviated book to a song to marching and back to a second bookall in just one half an hour. If the group is very active, we may do only one story. If they seem attentive, we may do two stories. She starts out by introducing herself and then each child tells his or her name. Then the group says Hi and the childs name. This may seem very basic, and it is, but these children are being exposed to the library, to books, to group involvement, and they are learning to listen. When the half hour is up, many moms stay on with their little ones to look at books, work puzzles, or to just enjoy the company of other children. We watch them form attachments and create their own social situations. Its wonderful to see, Keyes says. One mom, Leila Pollack brings daughter, Alexandria, every Friday if shes not working and says, We enjoy it so much and miss it when we cant come.See STORYTIME on page 24Choose plastic bladder over bathtub when storing waterDeer eld Beach A clean, emergency water supply is vital to preparing for hurricanes and the Deer eld Beach Chamber of Commerce has a product that is far safer than lling the bathtub. The Chamber is selling a 55gallon, plastic bladder that will hold enough potable water for a family of four for two weeks. And it comes with a pump to transfer the water to other containers. The bladder is placed near a water source and lled. It can be stored safely in a bathtub or large sink. Water that is held in bathtubs often leaks out, becomes contaminated and presents a hazard to small children. Cost of the bladder is $25 at the Chamber, a hefty reduction in the $39.99 retail price. Buying enough bottled water to meet the one-gallon per person per day recommendation could cost up to $60. The Chamber offer is open to the public. The of ce is located at 1601 E. Hillsboro Boulevard, Deer eld Beach. Free trees in Pompano BeachPompano Beach On July 14 and 21, the citys nursery will be open to the public to give away thousands of native plants and trees. Those who can provide local residency will receive two native trees or other plants until supplies run out. Residents will also receive instructions on planting the trees. The city nursery is located at 1000 NE 3 Ave., Pompano Beach. Tree choices include Gumbo Limbo. Live Oak, palms, poinciana and more. Call 954-786-5516. Christy Keyes, director of the Doreen Gauthier Lighthouse Point Library, uses drama, song and stories to hold the attention of her tiny tots and moms at storytime. [Photo by Phyllis J. Neuberger]

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The Pelican 11 Friday, June 29, 2012 15,000 show up for Wilton Manors Stonewall paradeWilton Manors Reece Darham, chair of Stonewall Summer Pride, estimates that about 15,000 people attended the annual event this past Sunday. The event is named in honor of the 1969 Stonewall Riots after members of New York Citys gay community, frustrated with abuse and harassment by the citys police department, started protesting. [Right] Wilton Manors Mayor Gary Resnick throws beads to members of the crowd during the Stonewall Parade. [Above] The Stonewall Library & Archives oat drives down the parade route. [Photos by Michael dOliveira] Provide food for birds and butter ies. Include plants with at daisy-like owers like pentas, zinnias, and cosmos to attract butter ies. For hummingbirds, include some plants with tubular owers including nicotiana, cuphea, salvia, and fuchsia. And dont forget about the hungry caterpillars that will soon turn into beautiful butter ies. Parsley, bronze fennel, and licorice vines are a few favorites that make great additions to container gardens. You can even create containers that will attract seed-eating birds. Purple Majesty millet, cone ower, coreopsis, and Rudbeckias will keep many of the birds returning to your landscape. Water the birds and the butter ies with a small waterlled saucer on a rod-homemade or purchased.Container gardens abound with joy

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12 The PelicanFriday, June 29, 2012 Advertise with The Pelican! 954783-8700!a proper medical examination. In many cases, the pills are sold to people who dont need them and are then abused or re-sold illegally on the street. Shortly after the city passed its regulations, Fort Lauderdale attorney George Castrataro, representing Quick Script and The Medicine Shoppe on Andrews Avenue, sent a letter to the city asking of cials to amend the law. Because the restrictions exempted big chain pharmacies like CVS, Walgreens and Publix, Castrataro and his clients viewed the ordinance as unfairly targeting independent pharmacies and clinics. The biggest sticking point was the limit on the number of pills that could be dispensed per month. The original law prohibited businesses from selling and dispensing more than 5,000 pills of Schedule II substances per month. Schedule II includes codeine, morphine, oxycodone, hydrocodone and opium. In the revised law, pain management clinics and pharmacies that are licensed by the state are exempt from the citys licensing procedure. Licensed pharmacies are already heavily regulated by the state, said City Attorney Kerry Ezrol at the June 12 commission meeting. Ezrol added that his of ce was unable to nd any legal basis for limiting the number of pills to 5,000. The only substantive change [to the law] is the number of pills, said Ezrol. Vice Mayor Tom Green said he was uncomfortable with removing the 5,000 pill limit. He views the limit as reasonable but voted in favor of the new law. I really hate approving this but I dont see any alternative. Mayor Gary Resnick said the changes addressed the previously overbroad law but the new restrictions, like one prohibiting doctors from issuing more than a 72-hour supply of medication to one patient, would still prevent pill mills from opening in the city. Sam Fawaz, owner of Quick Script, said overall the changes are acceptable, but hes still not happy with having to give the police department a monthly list of all the Schedule II substances that his pharmacy has dispensed a requirement the big pharmacies are exempt from. Castrataro commended the city for addressing the concerns of his clients and considers the matter closed. I think generally speaking, [city of cials] were all primarily fairness orientated. I dont think they intended to indiscriminately [target small pharmacies] but [the law] had unintended consequences. Pill millsContinued from page 4

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The Pelican 13 Friday, June 29, 2012 By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFWilton Manors Commissioners reluctantly voted Tuesday 4-0 to pay $210,000 to buy a single family home, 2524 NE 8 Terrace, for the purpose of eventually turning the land into a parking lot. Originally commissioners had agreed to pay $165,000 for the property but Chase, the bank that owns the house and Parking needs outweigh costs to city, banner law booted for nowis trying to sell the property through a short sale, refused the offer and now wants $210,000. I think were overpaying by a lot, said Commissioner Scott Newton. If the sale goes through the city would combine the land with the other adjacent property it owns and the piece of land it is leasing from Kids In Distress. The three lots would make one large parking lot. City staff estimates that all three properties, after being paved, would be big enough to t about 45 new parking spaces. The city is currently working on speci c plans that will give it an exact number of spaces that can be built. The cost of buying the two properties, leasing the Kids In Distress property [$10 a year for ve years], demolishing the two houses currently standing and paving all three lots would cost an estimated $650,000 money provided through the $1.1 million the city borrowed to make parking improvements along Wilton Drive. None of the commissioners were happy with the increase but said getting as much additional parking on Wilton Drive was important enough to pay the additional cost. I hate to be held hostage, said Commissioner Julie Carson. Vice Mayor Tom Green and Commissioner Ted Galatis said the cost was worth it. That property is so important, said Green. There just isnt very much [parking] in that area, said Galatis. Commissioners also discussed possibly combining the three properties and the Acapulco Lindo property, located next to the three lots, to create a parking structure. But of cials said talks with the owner of Acapulco Lindo havent made any progress yet. Mayor Gary Resnick refrained from commenting or voting because his law rm represents Chase in other matters.Banner ban bootedWilton Manors To help local business owners get through the summer, Wilton Manors commissioners voted unanimously Tuesday to lift its ban on temporary banners and/or vertical feather ags through Dec. 31. Merchants may now place See BANNERS on page 14

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14 The PelicanFriday, June 29, 2012 one sign in front of their business as long as its not on a sidewalk or public-right-ofway. Heidi Shafran, community development services director, said the idea came about when she was approached by business owners. Business owners claim that temporary signs attract customers. Janet Conklin, co-owner of Lolas Healthy Pet Caf at Five Points, said when she had her sign up for two weeks her business increased dramatically. Business owners previously could display signs for up to two-weeks with a city permit. Permits are not required through Dec. 31. Were trying to do a good deed for the city, said Commissioner Julie Carson. Commissioners did request that code enforcement to make sure things dont get out of hand and owners limit themselves to one sign. Commissioners brought up examples of some owners who have multiple signs out. When asked why code enforcement wasnt enforcing the rules, Police Chief Paul OConnell said the department was in transition. Thats the only answer I can give, he said.BannersContinued from page 137-4 Pompano Beach will host its annual Beach Bash and Fireworks Extravaganza at the Pompano Beach Fishing Pier, 222 N. Pompano Beach Blvd. Beach Bash begins at 10 a.m. Fireworks Extravaganza begins at 9 p.m. The Northeast 14 Street Causeway and Atlantic Boulevard bridges will be in the down position from 9 to 11 p.m. 954-786-4111. 7-5 The Broward Sierra Club meets at 7:30 p.m. at Fern Forest Nature Center, 201 Lyons Rd. S., Coconut Creek. Lou Fisher, natural resource specialist with Broward County, will be giving a presentation on beach renewal, coral reef protection, arti cial reefs, manatees, sea turtles and more. 954-9467359. 7-5 A lecture will be given at The Museum of Discovery and Science, 401 SW Second St., Fort Lauderdale, regarding the condition of the Staghorn coral off the coast of South Florida. 954-467-6637. 7-6 The Sol Children Theatre Performing Arts Camp presents Guys and Dolls at 2 and 7 p.m. at the Olympic Heights Fine Arts Theatre, 20101 Lyons Road, Boca Raton. Tickets are $12 per seat. Visit www. solchildren.org or 561-4478829. 7-7 & 7-18 The Museum of Discovery and Science, 401 SW Second St., Fort Lauderdale, will hold an ice cream making demonstration at 2:30 p.m. 954-467-6637. 7-14 Free car seat safety check from 9 a.m. to noon at Pompano Beach Fire-Rescue Station 24, 2001 NE 10 St. Appointments are required. 954-786-4510. 7/14 Pompano Pier Clean-up from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. TO help, call 954-9331862.-FridaysThe Pompano Beach Rotary Club meets Fridays at 12:15 p.m. at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. 954-786-3274.SaturdaysPony rides are available See SIGHTINGS on page 16SightingsContinued from page 5Advertise with The Pelican! 954-783-8700!

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The Pelican 15 Friday, June 29, 2012

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16 The PelicanFriday, June 29, 2012 at Sand & Spurs Equestrian Park, 1600 NE 5 Ave., Pompano Beach, from 9 to 11:30 a.m. Cost is $3 per ride. 954-786-4507. The Pompano Beach Kiwanis Club Westside meets the rst and third Saturdays of the month at 8:30 a.m. at the E. Pat Larkins Community Center, 520 MLK Blvd., Pompano Beach. 954782-8096. The Deer eld Beach West Kiwanis Club meets the second and fourth Saturdays of the month at 9 a.m. at Westside Park, 445 SW 2 St., Deer eld Beach. 954-54-7329883. Kayak rentals are available Saturdays and Sundays at Richardson Historic Park, 1937 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Visit www.AtlanticCoastKayak. com or 954-781-0073 for rates. The Wilton Manors Green Market is held every Saturday and Sunday at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. 954-592-0381. The Deer eld Beach West Kiwanis Club meets the second and fourth Saturdays of the month at 9 a.m. at Westside Park, 445 SW 2 St., Deer eld Beach. 954-54-7329883.SundaysSt. Elizabeths of Hungary Parish hosts a pancake breakfast at 3331 NE 10 Terrace, Pompano Beach, on every third Sunday of the month from 7:30 a.m. to noon. The breakfast bene ts the Parish. 954-263 8415.MondaysPlay ping-pong from 6:30 SightingsContinued from page 5 See SIGHTINGS on page 19 to 8:30 p.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Cost is $1. All ages can participate. 954-3902130. The Gold Coast Toastmasters Club meets on the second and third Monday of the month from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Dennys, 3151 NW 9 Ave., Fort Lauderdale. 954895-3555 or 954-782-9951.TuesdaysDeer eld Beach Rotary Club meets every Tuesday at 12 p.m. at the Deer Creek Golf Club, 2801 Deer Creek Country Club Blvd., Deer eld Beach. 954-630-9593. Pompano BeachLighthouse Rotary Club meets every Tuesday at 7:30 a.m. at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano

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The Pelican 17 Friday, June 29, 2012 Cypress Nook201 E. McNab Road Pompano Beach 954-781-3464 Hours: 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. 954-933-7311 Dinner 5 to 10 p.m. Wednesday to Saturday www.cypressnook.com By Malcolm McCLintockPELICAN STAFFThis quaint German eatery, located mere yards from the water, is a true Pompano Beach landmark. My family has been running this place continuously for the past 34 years, says friendly restaurateur Michael Gerike. Although we recently decided to start offering dinner service, it is breakfast and lunch that have been the lifeblood of our business. Be it eggs any style with mouthwatering meats, fully loaded omelettes, comforting home fries, French toast or fluffy pancakes, just about every classic breakfast favorite makes an appearance on the menu. Cypress Nook is also a reliable destination at lunchtime for its wide array of sandwiches, salads, sausages and German specialties such as pork tenderloin schnitzel, goulash and beef roulade. We also make phenomenal Black Angus Burgers. They truly are the best in town, adds Michael. We have been successful because we love our customers. Honestly, my mother hugs just about everyone that walks through the door! says the mildmannered host with not a hint of exaggeration in his By day, its a hot spot for breakfast and lunch, by night Cypress Nook offers German cuisine with lager, wines and sweet nalesvoice. It is indeed true that indefatigable matriarch Ilse Wettengel has been personally welcoming hungry patrons 7 days a week for over 3 decades. But the truly exciting news revolves around this German familys decision to start offering all the best specialties of its homeland in the evenings. My mother will continue to do the morning and noon service while I will take care of dinner Wednesday through Saturday.See CYPRESS NOOK on page 18Cypress Nooks Michael Gerike shows off a house specialty. The rich, three layer Sachertorte chocolate cake is loaded with walnuts and raspberry preserves topped with chocolate ganache. [Photos by Malcolm McClintock]

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18 The Pelican Friday, June 29, 2012 And when asked about the most popular dinner options, Michael immediately responds that the Schweinshaxe is our signature dish. It is a 2 lbs portion of ham hock slow cooked for hours and served with rich gravy and 2 sides. Indeed, this eye-popping platter will elicit a Pavlovian salivation response in meat aficionados. The enormous serving of Bavarian style, bone-in flavorful pork smothered in a rich savory gravy is sinfully tender and conspicuously abundant. Accompanied by homemade side dishes such as, fresh potatoes, egg noodles, tangy red cabbage or even garlic spinach, the Schweinshaxe is a must-try for those with limitless appetites. Everything is made in house, from the spaetzel to the red cabbage, says Michael who, on most evenings, enjoys the support of his wife Hannah, a native Hungarian. Other highly prized options include the Deutsche Wurst Platter overflowing with sausage samples of German Bratwurst, Frankfurter and Bavarian Weisswurst, the vinegar marinated tender beef Sauerbraten, the German meatloaf Hackbraten, the melt-in-your-mouth medallions of Chicken Zuricher Geschnetzeltes with wine sauce, the Parisian style pan seared fish and, of course, the classic Wiener Schnitzel. The veal Jaeger with mushrooms in a creamy wine sauce is also another one of my favorites, says Michael as he breezes from one table to another with typical Teutonic efficiency and gregariousness. Another notable feature of the Cypress Nook menu is the tantalizing curry component. Curry is actually one of the most popular dishes in Germany, says Michael as he brings a pleasantly pungent serving of Curry Knockwurst. The plump sausage is smothered in an berflavorsome mlange of spices that titillates the palette. We will soon be updating our menu and do a big curry push. I make it personally and really want people to understand that it is not spicy, just very flavorful. It would be criminal to not mention the plethora of toothsome German beers that perfectly complement a copious meal. For the lager leery, a nice selection of red and white wines is also available. Most large entres are in the $12-$18 range, imported German beers are $5, wines glasses start at $5 and bottles at $19. An early bird special is offered from 5-6 pm. The portions are gargantuan and will definitely provide some leftovers to take home. There is plenty of free parking and credit cards are only accepted in the evenings. Additionally, this cozy restaurant is an ideal place to hold private parties from Sun-Tue. It seats 40 people and there are 4 outside patio tables as well. Reservations are recommended in season as space is limited. By the way, if you somehow still have room for dessert, Cypress Nook impresses with a delightful apple strudel, German chocolate cakes and the Oma Ilses award winning key lime pie. Guten appetite! Cypress NookContinued from page 17[Right] The Schweinhaxe a fall off-the-bone, slow cooked ham hock with savory brown gravy, mashed potatoes and garlic spinach. [Left] The Curry Knockwurst features a maelstrom of piquant avors enveloping the famous German sausage. It is served here with potatoes and red cabbage.

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The Pelican 19 Friday, June 29, 2012 Village, Crystal Lake, District 4 and all the remaining neighborhoods west of I-95 to the city limits. City commissioners heard Dr. Lenore Alpert, a consultant in public policy, explain the need for redistricting and the principles behind it at last weeks commission meeting. They will take up the matter in August. Census gures show that the population here is 75,018, about 3,000 less than the gure used in 2008. Alpert said that probably does not re ect a loss of residents, but rather the faulty estimates used to draw the current districts. Those estimates have now left the city with clearly disproportionate representation, she said, the worst cases District 2 with a population of around 18,100 and District 4 with 19,600 residents. What the commission should strive for are districts of equal numbers, Dr. Alpert said, in this case around 18,755. Other criteria in drawing voting districts is that they be contiguous, that minorities have a reasonable chance of electing one of their own, that the districts re ect a community of interest and that the district include the residence of a sitting commissioner who has yet to complete his term. The citys current districts show an 8.3 percent deviation in population. The legal limit is 10 percent, Alpert said, which means shifting some boundaries is necessary. Alpert said, District 2s population is 60 percent African-American and is clearly a majority minority district which must be preserved. And District 4s population is well above the average putting the current plan at risk. Dr. Alpert presented four new options that fall within the legal limits, that is within the 10 percent population differential, but which got progressively more deviant as the boundaries shifted. Options 2 and 3 mirror the current districts except that in Option 3, a swath west of I-95 is moved into District 2. Option 4 places Deer Creek and areas north of Hillsboro Boulevard and east of Powerline Road into District 3 and Option 5 returns Deer Creek to District 4 and extends District 3 to Sample Road east of Military Trail. Currently the boundaries are matched to major roadways: District 1 east of US 1 except for a triangle south of 48 Street to Sample Road; District 2 east of Dixie Highway to I-95, District 3 west of I-95 south of Hillsboro Boulevard and District 4 west of District 3 and north of Hillsboro Blvd. Alperts maps are posted on the citys website. By city charter, the voting districts must be examined every four years. DistrictsContinued from page 1 Beach. 954-972-7178. The American Legion Auxiliary Unit 142, 171 SW 2 St., Pompano Beach, has Bingo on Tuesdays at 7 p.m. Food is available from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. 954-942-2448. Yoga classes are available for all levels at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors, on Tuesday nights from 6:30 to 8 p.m. and Saturday mornings from 10:30 a.m. until noon. The cost is $7. 305-607-3520. Zonta International meets on the third Tuesday of the month at Duffys Diner, 401 N. Federal Hwy., Deereld Beach, at 11:15 a.m. Zonta International works to advance the status of women. 561-392-2223.WednesdaysThe Wilton Manors Kiwanis Club meets Wednesdays at 6:30 p.m. at 2749 NE 14 Ave., Wilton Manors. 954561-9785. The Oakland Park Kiwanis Club meets Wednesdays from 7:30 to 8:30 a.m. at Peter Pan Diner, 1216 E. Oakland Park Blvd., Oakland Park. 954-566-9957. The Pompano Beach Kiwanis Club meets Wednesdays at noon at the Riverside Grille at the Sands Resort, 125 N. Riverside Drive, Pompano Beach. 954-444-4815. The Greater Pompano Beach Senior Citizens Club meets on the second Wednesday of the month at the Emma Lou Olson Community Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach, at 10 a.m. 954-9437787. The Alzheimers Caregivers Support Group meets Wednesdays from 10 a.m. to noon at the NE Focal Point Alzheimers Day Care Center, 301 NW 2 Ave., Deer eld BeachThursdaysThe Rotary Club of Oakland Park/Wilton Manors meets every Thursday from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. at Tequila Sunrise Mexican Grill, 4711 N. Dixie Hwy., Oakland Park. 954-491-6158. SightingsContinued from page 16 See SIGHTNGS on page 25

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20 The Pelican Friday, June 29, 2012 Send The Pelican your news to mdpelican@yahoo. WORSHIP DIRECTORY: Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad. Rev. Hyvenson Joseph enter the town. If a person has no ID, a resident with a valid ID who knows the person requesting entrance may vouch for the person. Cedeno advised securing important documents such as bank statements, passport and birth certi cates. And obtain cash in case power is lost and you cant get to an ATM. In its Hurricane Guide [online at sheriff.org] he said BSO advises, as you prepare supplies for hurricane season, assume that you will need supplies for a minimum of three days, but stock enough for seven days. Begin gathering hurricane supplies at the start of the season in June, especially drinking water at least one gallon per person per day, and have at least a seven-day supply. Water is generally the rst commodity to disappear from store shelves when a hurricane is approaching. Use this checklist as a guide for your preparations: 1. Have plenty of canned food and a manual can opener; perishable food items will spoil quickly if electricity is lost and refrigerators are inoperable. 2. Stock evaporated milk and other non-perishables like peanut butter, cereal, granola bars, instant drink mixes, dried fruits and pet food 3. Store bottled drinking water before the rush begins. Allow at least one gallon per person per day for two weeks. 4. Have several batterypowered radios, ashlights, lanterns, extra batteries and battery-powered televisions. 5. Purchase a tube of silicone caulk for sealing bathtub drains. 6. Check rst aid kits to make sure its properly stocked and over-the-counter medications have not expired. 7. Inspect hurricane shutters; replace missing or damaged panels. Check plywood to cover windows and doors. 8. For those without hurricane shutters, June is generally too late to order them for the current season. Buy plywood now and dont forget the hardware and tools youll need to attach it. 9. Remove damaged limbs from trees and prune branches so winds can blow through. Dispose of trimmings as soon as possible. Never leave trimmings where winds can turn them into projectiles. 10. Consider the purchase of a propane-fueled camp stove or grill. If electricity is lost, this may be the only way to cook. Only use these items outdoors. 11. Make sure chain saws are lled with gas, oiled and ready for use. 12. If purchasing a generator, buy it well before a storm approaches when supplies and selections are plentiful. If LBTS residents need help physically getting ready for a storm, such as assistance putting up shutters, members of the towns Volunteer Fire Department will be more than glad to come out and help, said Fire Chief Steve Paine. If you need help, call the VFD at 954-640-4250 to arrange an appointment. EvacuateContinued from page 1The citys chief sources of revenue are ad valorum taxes, $5.8 million, and the utility tax, $2.1 million, both numbers up $100,000 over last years projections. The city operates with a contingency fund of $5 million for shortfall in operating revenues, the costs associated with hurricanes and other natural disasters and emergency infrastructure repairs. Budget hearings will be held for the public Thursday, Sept. 13 and Monday, Sept. 24 after which the nal budget and millage will be formally adopted. By that time, the citys new nance director Frank DiPaolo will be in place. DiPaolo replaces Terry Sharp who retired in June. The comptroller for Dania Beach since 2006, DiPaolo graduated from the University of Florida in 2002 and from Nova Southeast in 2007. He became a CPA in 2009. Dipaolo will assume his duties here after July 4. We wanted someone with governmental background, the mayor about his choice for the job. Lighthouse Point budgetContinued from page 4

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The Pelican 21 Friday, June 29, 2012 for years. Some time ago, I noticed that the American Flag here was in tatters. They took care of that on the same day. Johnson added that the post of ce pays for a cleaning service that is supposed to clean every day. Frank Mariano, manager of the Tropical Reef post of ces, that includes this citys and a new of ce on West Atlantic Boulevard, con rmed that Support Services of America has the contract for the post of ce. Mariano says that the cleaning service is responsible for the employees bathrooms, break rooms and outside lobby. But he added that nonfunctioning lights and peeling interior paint require professional experts. We have had work orders in for this post of ce location for two years. But funds for the repairs have not yet been approved, he said. We are always looking for donations. Mariano suggested that if an electrician wanted to donate the services, the lights might get repaired sooner. City Administrator John Lavisky said the city had requested that the cleanup get started over two years ago. But the most that was done to spruce up the building was a new paint job underwritten by the leasing company Brixmor, Commissioner Sandy Johnson points out a damaged electrical outlet. See insert.located in the Venetian Isles Shopping Center. A spokesperson for Support Services of America at its California of ce said he would nd out if Support Services of America had the contract and if so, make an attempt to see where the breakdown was. Meanwhile, business is active here regardless of the low light, dirty fans, peeling paint and requests for help tied up in red tape. That is to saythe mail is getting through. Peeling paint is a common sight in the Post Of ce lobby. [Staff photos] Post of ceContinued from page 3

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22 The Pelican Friday, June 29, 2012 Classi edsCall 954-545-0013 Pelican Classi ed ads Mean Business! 954-783-8700! Use The Pelican Classi eds to get the job done. Call 954-7838700 HELP WANTEDWILLING TO EDUCATE-Highly motivated individual for rewarding career in nancial services with Primerica. Call 954-729-0192. 7/6 LOCAL PEST CONTROL CO Looking For Quality Sales/Service Tech. Must Be Dependable, Team Player, Good Drivers License & People Skills. Will Train Right Person. ALSO Of ce Assistant Computer People & Phone Skills Needed. Fax Resume 954418-3982. 6-29 MAINTENANCE TECHNICIANA Property Management Company Is Searching For A Maintenance Technician For A Mid-Rise Property Located in Pompano Beach, Fla. Candidates Need to Have General Maintenance Knowledge, Have Experience In Preparing Vacant Units For Occupancy, Be Able To Work A Flexible Schedule, Motivated & Be HVAC Certified. Position Offers Competitive Salary & Benefit Package. Interested Applicants Should E-mail Resume To hectorg@ pmiflorida.com Or Fax To 305-279-5703. 6-29SEEKING EMPLOYMENTCAREGIVER/COMPANION Caucasian Woman With 25 Yrs. Exp. To Assist & Care For Your Loved Ones. Days / Eves / Nights. References Available. 954-482-5494. 6-29 CARING HOME HEALTH Seeking Live-in / Live Out. Can Be Recommended!! Please Call 954-496-4941. 7-6 CNA / HHA 20 Yrs Exp. Available 24/7. Will Take Care Of Your Loved One. References Upon Request. Call 954-8265499. 7-6 CAREGIVER CERTIFIED Seeks Position To Work With Sick Or Elderly Open Availability! Inside Or Outside Of Home. Experienced With All Cases. 407-501-1656, 6-29 CNA AVAILABLE Nights, Days & Weekends. Full Time Or Part Time. Excellent References & Reasonable Rates. Call 954-696-2091. 7-6 CERTIFIED HOME HEALTH AIDE With CPR Certi cate. Will Care For The Elderly Or Sick. Honest, Compassionate. 15 Yrs. Experience. 954-4867630. 6-29 NURSES AIDE / SITTER To Care For Your Loved One. Excellent References. Drive Own Car. Nights Or Days. 770-709-1875. 6-29 MALE CNA / HHA / COMPANION. Broward Area. Former EMT. All Certi cations / Compassionate, References. Call Ron 954-232-2832. Very Reasonable! 6-29 SERVICES DANNY BOY ELECTRIC Lic & Insured. Lic. #EC13004811. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. 24/Hr Service. 954-290-1443. Beat Any Written Estimate. Sr, Discount. 6-29 GINGERS HOUSEKEEPING 20 YEARS EXP. (Licensed) References Available. Honest & Reliable Love To Clean Windows! Help Organize No Problem. FREE Estimates! 954-200-4266. 6-29 CALL BRENDAN THE HANDYMAN. Construction & Repairs. Carpentry, Plumbing, Roo ng, Masonry, Windows, Painting, Decking, Tile. FREE Estimates! 954-773-6134 Emergency Calls. 7-20 LINDAS CLEANING SERVICE Residential Commercial Offices. Licensed!! Call 954-601-7978. 6-29 HANDYMAN PAINTING CARPENTRY Pressure Cleaning. Decks! Everything Around The House. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. Call 561-350-3781. 7-6 HONEST HANDYMAN HOME & BUILDING Maintenance/Improvements. No Job Too Small. Fast Friendly Service. Reasonable Rates. Local Resident/Homeowner. Call Today For Your FREE Upfront Quote. No Deposit Required. 754-366-1915. 629 GOT JUNK? DUMP TRUCK CONDO CLEANUPS Trees/Landscape, Yard Fill. Pressure Wash/ Roofs/Home Repairs Welding, Etc. Dave 954-818-9538. 6-29 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIESNew GREEN technology. New defroster control saves energy in home refrigerators, commercial chillers. Patented. All optical. Simple mfg. Strategic partners needed..www.NewAvionics.Com. 954-568-1991. CMUSICIANS WANTEDThe American Legion Symphonic Band is now accepting new members for the 2011-2012 season. College age to seasoned seniors are welcome. Rehearsals are held on Wed. evenings at American Legion Post 142 in Pompano. Percussionists, oboe, bassoon, trombone and euphonium players are especially needed. If you enjoy making music, call Jim McGonigal, Music Director at 954647-0700 for more info. MEDICAL HOVEROUND MVP5 Electric Wheel Chair! Includes Owners Manual, Head & Feet Rest, Battery Charger, DVD & Cup Holder $800. Pompano 954366-6788 Ray. 6-29 MOBILE HOMESDEERFIELD BEACH 3 Bedroom 1 Bath Very Large Kitchen. Ceramic Top Stove & Refrig Incl. Large Enclosed Porch. Utility Shed Washer, Dryer & New Gas Water Heater Included. $15,000 Cash! 954-708-3050. 6-29 CO-OP SALESPOMPANO BEACH Waterfront Co-op 1/1 2 Available! Dockage Available! 2nd Floor! Side By Side. $59K Each. Coldwell Banker Barbara 954-629-1324. 7-6 ROOMS FOR RENTPOMPANO PRIVATE ROOM Furn / Unfurn In 3 / 2 Pool Home. $650 /Month. Includes W / D, Electric, Water, Cable, Internet. Mature Stable Male. 954-782-0471. 6-29 REAL ESTATE SERVICESSLIGTHOUSE POINT Is Floridas Paradise! Selling Or Buying Real Estate Call The International Realtor! English, French, Spanish, Greek. Yvette Gaussen YES WE CAN REALTY 954-6147773 Or 954-773-8340.. 6-29 HOMES FOR RENTPOMPANO 2/1 DEN OR 3RD Bedroom, C/A, Fenced Yard. Newer Roof. $1050 Mo. Yrly Lease. Call Darci 954-783-3723. 520 NE 34 St.

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The Pelican 23 Friday, June 29, 2012 Tell The Pelican about your special event 954-783-8700 Tell The Pelican about your special event 954-783-8700 Classi edsCall 954-545-0013 If you cannot locate a Pelican call 954-783-8700 Advertise with The Pelican 954-783-8700 REAL ESTATE WANTEDI BUY HOUSES!! CASH!! AS IS! QUICK CLOSE! ANY AREA ANY CONDITION! NO EQUITY OK. CALL NOW 954-914-2355. 7-20 CONDOS FOR SALEPOMPANO BEACH DIRECT OCEAN VIEW!! Pet Friendly! 2/2 AT THE BREAKERS! $269,000. Call Juliana At Barclays For Details. 1-305766-4420. 7-20 LIGHTHOUSE POINT PARADISE Beautiful Furnished 2/2! Only $115,000. English, French, Spanish, Greek. Yvette Gaussen YES WE CAN REALTY 954-6147773 Or 954-773-8340. 6-22 LIGHTHOUSE POINT 2/2 1st Floor 55+ Complex. No Pets. Great Amenities. $55,000. Call Barbara @ Balistreri RE. 954263-7129. 6-29 CONDOS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH LEISUREVILLE 55+. Beautiful 2/1 Renovated Corner Condo 2nd Floor. Beside Pool, Clubhouse & Golf. Yrly Lease Unfurn. $800 Month. Furn. $900 Month. 1st & Last. Photos Available. prudhommejean@yahoo.com 954-784-01 19. 7-6 APTS FOR RENTDEERFIELD/POMPANO BEACH 1 BR & 2 BR APTS FOR RENT. Remodeled, Paint, Tile, Etc. Washer / Dryer On Site. Pool. Pet Friendly. George 954-809-5030. 6-29 POMPANO BEACH A1A 1 & 2 Bedrooms, Ef ciencies, Fully Furnished Including Utilities, Cable, WIFI, Laundry, Pool, BBQ. 700 To The Beach. Starting At $269 Per Week. 954-943-3020. 7-20 POMPANO MCNAB RD & NE 18 AVENUE 1 & 2 Bedrooms Furnished / Unfurnished. $695 $895 And Up. Pool, Tile Floors. Central A/C. 954-610-2327. 7-6 POMPANO BEACH NE 2/1 $950 2/1.5 Townhouse $1095 SW 2/1 Low Move-in $950. ALL FREE WATER Rent + $70 Application Moves U In. 954-781-6299. 6-29 POMPANO BEACH / ATLANTIC / FEDERAL Ef ciency $175 Weekly. No Security Deposit. Includes Cable, Electric, Internet. FREE Washer / Dryer. No Drug Record No Evictions. 954-7090694. 6-29 POMPANO BEACH Studio Newly Renovated. Pool. Pet OK! $650 Per Month Yearly Lease. 1960 NE 48 Street. Call 954-857-5207. 6-29 POMPANO BEACH 1/1 APT. Newly Renovated! Pool, Pet OK! $700 Per Month Yearly Lease. 1960 NE 48 Street. 954857-5207. 6-29 POMPANO BEACH 900 TO BEACH! Spotless 1 / 1 In 4 Unit 1 Level Building. No Pets! No Smoking! Walk To Shopping. $850 Month Lease Includes Direct TV. 401-461-8683. 7-6 POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 Bedroom From $495. Easy Movein. 1/2 OFF DEPOSIT. Remodeled. Great Location. 954-783-1088 For More Info. 7-13 COMMERCIAL FOR RENT-SALEPOMPANO COMMERCIAL OFFICE Spaces Available. Ranging From As Low As $500 To $700 Depending On Square Footage. Please Call Darci At 954-7833723. 7/13 DEERFIELD BEACH Retail Of ce Warehouse 700 Sq Ft With Loft. A/C, Bathroom. $575 Per Month. Call For More Info 561-654-1331 Or 561-9985681. 6-29 DOCK FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH DOCK Wide Canal No Wake Area Whips. Quiet Canal. Call 954-946-3301. 6-29 DEERFIELD BEACH Dock For Rent 60 Ft. Water, Electric. No Fixed Bridges. Nice Location. $350 Month. 954-429-9347 Or Call Cell 954-288-9651. 6-29

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24 The Pelican Friday, June 29, 2012 Chihiro Kesterson and Ali dont miss a Friday story time. Mom says, Ali loves to see the other children and listen to the stories. Beverly Swanson brings grandson, Jaden. She says, He loves it here and reminds me to come every Friday. I know he looks forward to it. Julie Lynctt brought her 20-month-old daughter, Olivia, for the rst time. Olivia sat very still but looked and listened as each child spoke. This is great. Im excited by this opportunity to introduce Olivia to the library, said Julie. When the children in this group outgrow it, they can move right into Miss Jans group for three to ve-yearolds which meets on Mondays from 11 to 12 a.m. Jan Cashette who heads up this activity says, Enthusiasm runs high with my little ones as we read and explore crafts. Were not rigid on the ages and welcome a few who are slightly older or younger. Some of the moms bring siblings. We work it out. Any child who loves stories, the written word and hands on crafts is welcome. Always ready to take on the next generation, this library staff encourages children to be involved. During the school year, Donna Beale has a Tuesday evening story hour at 7 p.m. for ve to eight-year-olds who bring moms, dads, brothers and sisters. Keyes laughs because Donnas group shows up in both pajamas and street clothing. Its a great bonding experience for child and parent, she says. A time when the technology is turned off, and child and parent listen to wonderful stories and share some time together at the days end. The Pelican salutes this library, its new director and StorytimeContinued from page 10the volunteer story ladies. These library doors open wide to children of all ages and their families, inviting them into the world of books, art, lectures, clubs, computers, classes, personal assistance and the newest stateof-theart technology. No wonder the Doreen Gauthier Lighthouse Point library is known as the citys jewel. Young readers are at home in the Lighthouse Point Library.per 1,000 gallons used to $5.70. The increases for customers using between 5,000 and 7,000 gallons a month would be 28 to 35 percent. Multi-family residences would get a perunit drop from $14.26 to $6.01 a month because, Burton said, less demand is placed on the sewer system. They would be charged the same volume rate [$5.70 per thousand gallons] as single-family homes. Residents living in duplexes will see reductions in their bills from 4 to 62 percent if their usage is less than 8,000 gallons a month. More than that and the bills will increase. The biggest change would occur in rates for commercial properties. The difference in demand on the system from one commercial property to another is signi cant, Burton said. He recommended assigning a certain number of units to commercial properties based on meter size. The base charge would be apportioned by multiplying the single-family charge by the number of equivalent units. Burton proposed adding administrative fees on bills for meter reading and customer service costs. Residential units will be charged by the unit; commercial properties by the size of the meter. Under the current rate structure, restaurants and laundromats are assigned as one unit which means they arent paying their fair share, Burton said. Under the proposed rate structure, hotels would be charged by meter size, not by the number of rooms. One person said paying by use is the only fair way. Mayor Roseann Minnet asked Burton why the town couldnt do that, Just charge everyone by what they use. Burton said the town has xed costs whether the service is used or not. You have fees for readiness to serve. Without that, he said snowbirds wouldnt be paying when theyre not here. In 2021, the town will need to rebuild two lift stations, Town Manager Connie Hoffmann said. Cost is estimated at $1.1 million. Water ratesContinued from page 3

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The Pelican 25 Friday, June 29, 2012 BinsContinued from page 1containers in business zones 1 and 2, the commission took no action, saying that to allow Moyer his bins would require granting him a variance. Then bins began appearing all over the city. Some were labeled Shoes for the Cure, and bore the Kiwanis Club logo. Others indicated donations would go to good causes and had contact phone numbers. But some bore no information other than a recycling symbol and a request for clothing. In an effort to stem the proliferation of these illegal containers, Deer eld of cials considered passing legislation. Assistant City Manager Keven Klopp said the city looked at many model ordinances but, when you dealing with rogue operators, creating an ordinance is not rational. Many cities enacted legislation and found it didnt work. Why set up a permitting process if it is not followed? We are getting results with outreach and education. We tell the property owner the box is not in compliance and they are responsible for its removal. And we have gotten results. Most property owners are unaware they are responsible for removing the bins, or that they are not in compliance. In some cases, the property owner does not even know who placed the bin. The most common infraction is that the collection bin is not on the business site plan. Since code enforcement began telling property owners the bins had to go, 16 large ones have been removed. One, with no ID or phone number, still hangs out on the east end of the Target Superstore center at Powerline Road. Still on the streets, however, are small bins that claim to be collecting Shoes for the Cure. Lured by the thought that it would be good for the community to recycle old shoes and by the promise of some cash, the local Kiwanis Club undertook Shoes for the Cure as a project and placed bins in prominent places around town. There is a bin at Deer eld Beach City Hall, at the city recycling center, Deer eld Country Club and at several business locations. Project Chair Avis Swenson lled her car trunk with donated shoes for the bins and got permission to place them at all the locations. But somehow the promise made By Shoes for the Cure founder Adam Levine, never materialized. The Kiwanis Club was promised 10 cents of every 30 cents he made selling the shoes to recyclers. We made about $140, Swenson said this week. Aware that the city was cracking down on the bins, she attempted repeatedly to call Levine. It was not until this week, when she left a message that wasnt so nice, that Levine responded saying he would pick up his bins. I repeatedly called for him to pick the bins up, Swenson said. The Kiwanis logo is on there, but we never got payments. I asked BSO If I could remove them myself and they said no, they were private property. I didnt know what to do. Klopp said the property owner can remove the bins if the collector refuses to do so without violating any law. Levines excuse for letting down the Kiwanis Club is that he had troubles with my partner. He said he had his bins in many schools in Boca Raton that participate with him in providing shoes for the poor and in the recycling effort. Levine blames the big collectors the Salvation Army, the Red Cross and the unnamed bins that have sprung up for squelching someone who is just trying to make a living. For the big collectors, used clothing is a multi-million business, according to Levine, and there is little charity involved. Klopp said for legit charities, such as the Salvation Army, the collection bins would be legal if the site plan is modi ed. Its a minor change, Klopp said. The Deer eld Beach Kiwanis Club meets at noon every Thursday at the Deer eld Beach Hilton, 100 Fairway Dr., Deer eld Beach 954-242-6083. The Pompano Beach Republican Club meets on the fourth Thursday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach. 954-786-7536.SightingsContinued from 19 The Pelican Call us! 954-783-8700

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26 The Pelican Friday, June 29, 2012 Capt. RJ Boyle is an experienced angler in South Florida. His studio is located in Lighthouse Point. Call 954-420-5001. Deer eld Beach Andrew Carter Morris, a resident of Deer eld Beach, has signed with new Nashville label, MTD, which will release his CD in September. Morris grew up singing songs in the style of George Jones, Johnny Cash and Waylon Jennings and it is this return to old country that attracted MTD president Ron Fitzgerald. Morriss four-piece band will be on stage at the Deer eld Beach Fourth of July celebration, 3 to 5:15 p.m. He can also be seen and heard July Hometown boy performs July 4thPlan for some dolphin this weekendImmokalee The annual Elvis Fest competition brought a dozen Elvis tribute artists to Immokalee. First-time contestant David Morin of Pompano Beach, Fla. won the second place prize of $1,500. He sang I Was the One, and Shake, Rattle and Roll. Third place, $1,000, went to Jeff LaJess of Seminole, Fla. LaJess has competed in every Elvis Fest held at the casino. First place winner was Irv Cass of Fenton Michagan. He received $2,500 with renditions of Let It Be me and Suspicious Minds.Pompano resident takes second spot in Elvis Fest Lighthouse Point Those looking to cap their week by catching some dolphin will be in luck. Late this week big dolphin were being caught weighing up to 45 pounds offshore. One bene t of Tropical Storm Debby, says Capt. JR Boyle, is some good shing. Its basically shaking up the water column. And shing for this weekend should be really good. But inshore shing, should be pretty good too. King sh and snapper seem to be biting the most. Catching them with live bait however might be a tricky task. And thats because live bait gets scarce with the full moon. A full moon is scheduled this weekend. Its tough to catch live bait on the full moon. They move and relocate. So Boyle suggests stocking up on plenty of chum and sardines.

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The Pelican 27 Friday, June 29, 2012 Tell The Pelican about your special event 954-783-8700 vulnerable to a hurricane. Theyre going to investigate it [again], said Boehm after meeting with the Citizens representative. Citizens, a non-pro t insurance company, was established by state of cials to provide insurance to Florida residents after many private insurance companies left Florida because it was no longer pro table. Deer eld Beach resident Neville Gombs says the inspector who came to his house told him the property was made of too much wood. For that, hes facing an increase of at least $600 a year. It seems like every time I look around, they keep raising insurance, said Gombs, who has owned his home for 30 years and says hurricanes have never caused any real damage to his property. We havent had a hurricane since what, 2005? So why should we have to suffer every time something happens? he asked. Citizens requires that homes be insured for 100 percent of the replacement cost. To calculate the cost of replacing a damaged or destroyed home, Citizens looks at construction labor and material expenses, code variations, demographics and other costs related to residential construction. A free inspection is provided to review each property. Citizens spokesperson Candace Bunker, in an email to The Pelican wrote that as an alternative to Citizens premium calculator, customers can also have another insurance company inspect their property. In addition to the cost of premiums, if a catastrophic storm were to deplete Citizens funding, the company has the right to levy a onetime assessment of between 15 and 45 percent. Dirk DeJong, president of Frank H. Furman Insurance, located in Pompano Beach, says homeowners can do a lot to get a cheaper premium. Updating old systems, such as plumbing and electrical work, can lead to a lower premium because the older something is the more prone is to be damaged during a storm; newer systems are more likely to survive a storm without incident. Its important that people update and that their homes are in good shape, said DeJong. He added that inspectors also look at the condition of the roof, support tresses, garage doors, front doors and hurricane shutters. You will get a substantial credit on your windstorm policy [if all those are in good shape], said DeJong. Pompano resident Brad Tremper, facing an increase of $1,200, is also wondering why he is paying more when his home has never seen serious damage. The house has been there for almost 50 years and not a thing has happened. Eight years ago he was paying $1,100 a year. Now his Citizens bill is $5,000. Its sad. I could just save my darn money and put a new roof on the house for what they want to charge, said Tremper. But although homeowners without a mortgage can legally decline insurance, its not something DeJong recommends. Insurance is relatively inexpensive based on the size of your asset, he said, adding that homeowners could save money over a few years but if a big storm comes through and wipes out the home they would lose their biggest asset. Like some of her constituents, Clarke-Reeds home also failed inspection a bathroom door that leads to a patio area outside lacked a shutter. In 2010, she was with the majority of state legislators who voted to allow Citizens to increase rates by up to 10 percent for new policies beginning in January 2011. But she says Citizens is now trying to remove the cap. On July 16, a public workshop will be held to discuss the possible removal of the cap. The workshop will be held in Miami but Citizens has not chosen an exact time or location. Clarke-Reed said she understands that Citizens has to be kept solvent and ready to absorb the costs associated with the next hurricane but if the residents cant pay, it will never be actuarially sound. Visit www.citizens a. com for more. Rep. Gwyn Clarke-Reed has also opened her of ce to those who have questions about Citizens. Call 954-786-4848. CitizensContinued from page 1 the lead on the issue. He asked the petitioner, All my best experiences as a young person involved the Boy Scouts. I wont beat around the bush. If a kid belongs to the Boy Scouts or an adult is a leader in the Boys Scout and information comes out that the person is gay, could he be prohibited from joining the Boys Scouts or prohibited from participating? Keith Jones of the South Florida Council of Boy Scouts said, A kid, no. A leader, theres a possibility, yes. Because of the national charter? Brown asked. Jones said, yes. Brown said he had no problem with a private organization having membership requirements. But he said he has a philosophical problem providing public funding if there is discrimination, and he would not support the fund request. When you stop the funding, the kids I serve wont be able to participate, Jones said. Vice Mayor Scot Sasser moved to support Jones request, but his motion died for lack of a second. The commission did approve a $10,120 contribution to the Aging & Disability Resource Council, $2,000 to Women in Distress, $1,547 to Kids Vote Broward and $551 for Family Central. In 2011, the Aging & Disability Resource Council provided town residents with $20,289 in services. The town has 3,526 residents over age 60. The Family Central grant will yield $31,802 in federal dollars. The program provides childcare so low-income parents can work and take part in training programs. FundingContinued from page 2

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28 The Pelican Friday, June 29, 2012 is the underdog in the nancial contest but says she is counting on grassroots support to get her elected. She points to her election to the county commission when she won with very few campaign dollars against an incumbent. Following the 2010 U.S. Census, party af liations shifted in Dist. 22 enough to give Democrat candidates the edge after a long history of Republican representation. The winner of the democrat primary will face Republican Adam Hasner, a member of the Florida House. While Frankel is getting support from Democrat heavy-hitters such as former governor Buddy McKay, Cong. Alcee Hastings and Cong. Frederica Wilson, former education commissioner Betty Castor, former gubernatorial candidate Alex Sink and Broward county Commissioner Suzanne Gunzberger, Jacobs has gathered endorsements from the unions AFL/ CIO, the state and county Police Benevolent Association, the Broward County Council of Fire ghters, the United Transportation Union as well as the groups Democracy for America and the Palm Beach Voters Coalition. A resident of Pompano Beach, she is also supported by a number of local elected of cials.JacobsContinued from page 7Primary elections take place Aug. 14 for Congressional candidates. Frankel and Jacobs will face each other. On Nov. 6, the winner of the primary will face the Republican candidate for the 22 District Congressional Seat. Pompano Pompano Green Green Market Marketevery every Saturday Saturday morning from morning from 8 a.m. to 2 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the p.m. at the corner of West corner of West Atlantic Blvd. Atlantic Blvd. & Cypress & Cypress Road. Road. Eat Healthy!

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Friday, June 29, 2012 Vol. XX, Issue 26 Wherever you are, read The Pelican @ pompanopelican.com • Send news to siren2415@gmail.com Pompano Beach • Deer eld Beach • Lighthouse Point • Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Wilton Manors • Oakland Park • Hillsboro Beach • The Galt • Palm Aire The P e l i c a n Pelican City must redraw commission districtsSome voters appear headed for changeBy Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach The city’s voting districts will be redrawn for the March 2013 city election, this time based on U.S. Census gures rather than the unof cial guesstimates used in 2008. Voters most likely to be affected are in District 3 Century See DISTRICTS on page 19 151 days left in 2012 Hurricane season By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFLauderdale-By-The-Se a Since the town of Lauderdale-By-TheSea is in an evacuation zone, all residents must leave their homes, condominiums and apartments when the National Hurricane Center in Miami issues a Hurricane Warning for Broward County.Evacuation orders should be heeded by everyoneIf you refuse orders to evacuate, the Broward Sheriff’s Of ce will ask you for information on how to contact your next of kin. “Once a warning is issued, this is a mandatory evacuation zone. Our message is to get people off the island in order to be out of harm’s way,” said Lt. Angelo Cedeno of BSO. If and when a storm approaches, emergency personnel relocate to Holy Cross Medical Center. After a storm, when an assessment for damages is completed and the area is deemed safe to re-enter, residents will be given clearance to come back, Cedeno said. Individuals will be asked to show their drivers license or state ID card before they will be allowed to re-enter See EVACUATION on page 20By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach When Pompano Beach resident Kim Boehm saw her Citizens hurricane insurance bill jump to be $2,000 more than last year she knew she wasn’t going to pay it without a ght. On June 13 Boehm and other area residents met one-on-one with two representatives from Citizens Property Insurance Corporation in State Rep. Gwyn Clarke-Reed’s of ce at Pompano Beach City Hall to ask questions and see if they could get their premiums lowered. “That’s why I’m here. I’m here ghting it,” said Boehm. Last year, Boehm paid $3,000 to Citizens. But two months ago an inspector from Citizens cited a block glass window on her house that made her property Locals reacting to big hikes in Citizens insurance rates It’s the only insurance left for homeowners in Florida after other companies got out See CITIZENS on page 27 Clothing collection bins disappearing from the sceneMost are illegal; some are fraudulentBy Judy Wilson PELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach Those donation bins that make it seem like a good thing to give old clothes to charity are, in fact, in violation of city codes. Furthermore, some of them are operated by for-pro t companies or companies who don’t deliver as promised. In October of last year, Jim Moyer, donor program manager with the Salvation Army, asked that the organization be allowed to place bins around this city where a new resale store had opened on Federal Highway. Noting that the code prohibits storage See BINS on page 25 Alley Oop instructor, Drew Cornwall, demonstrates his skimboarding skills in Lauderdale-ByThe-Sea. On Saturday, Alley Oop held free skimboaring lessons as part of Lauderdale-By-TheSea’s Family Fun Week. [Photo by Michael d’Oliveira]

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2 The PelicanFriday, June 29, 2012 Big blue recycling carts expected to bring in more recyclablesBy Judy VikPELICAN STAFFOakland Park –City of cials are hoping to go to 65-gallon recycling carts next year, using $703,451 allocated by the RRB, or Resource Recovery Board. The decision to equip homeowners with the blue carts was made after an eight-week test program that resulted in high approvals from residents. This city was the rst in Broward County to implement a curbside recycling program and one of the rst to institute singlestream recycling at the curb, done in July, 2009. City Commissioners have approved submission of a grant application to the RRB and told staff to execute the agreement between the city and RRB. Currently, homeowners use 18-gallon recycling bins which are open to the elements and require employees to manually load the material into the trucks. In the last four years, the city has gone from collecting 110 tons a month of recycled materials to a high of 180 tons per month for an average of 1,700 to 1,800 tons a year. Less than ve percent of the city’s current solid waste stream is being recycled through the 18-gallon bins. In Miami-Dade, implementing the carts increased the amount of recyclable collected by 285 percent. Its curbside recycling program has increased from 2,100 tons per month to almost 6,000 tons. Here, to test the use of the 65-gallon carts, the city provided them to 55 residents taking part over eight-weeks. Overall, residents favored the carts. A larger, 95-gallon cart will also be available upon request. Vice Mayor John Adornato and Commisioner Shari McCartney said they were ecstatic about the proposed cart recycling, and McCartney said she liked the “pretty blue cart.” If approved, staff anticipates implementing the revised recycling program in January 2013, after securing the equipment and providing signi cant outreach. LBTS says no funding this year for Boy Scout requestBy Judy VikPELICAN STAFFLauderdale-By-The-Sea – Town commissioners approved $14,000 in funding requests from four non-pro t organizations on Tuesday, but rejected a request from the Boy Scouts for $1,500 for camping scholarships because its national charter discriminates against gay leaders. Commissioner Mark Brown, a former Eagle Scout, took See FUNDING on page 27

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The Pelican 3 Friday, June 29, 2012 Some residents will see drop in water bills next yearBy Judy VikPELICAN STAFFLauderdale-By-TheSea – Town commissioners tentatively adopted a 10 percent reduction in sewer rates in 2013 for the south end of town after hearing from a consultant hired to do a rate analysis. An ordinance re ecting the change will be presented at a public hearing Aug. 21. The town hired Burton & Associates to analyze input from commercial property owners and residents regarding the impact of a January 2011 sewer rate increase for properties from Pine Avenue south. The commission also asked Burton to gure how much money should be in the sewer reserve fund. The recommendation was six months of operating and maintenance costs. Mike Burton said the key issues are less water use due to economic and weather conditions and an increase in operating costs. Burton said commissioners could choose to make no adjustment in rates until 2017. Then annual 2 percent increases would be needed from 2018-2022 to cover anticipated costs and maintain an adequate operating reserve. Or they could reduce rates by 10 percent in 2013, make no change in 2014 and then raise rates by three percent in 2015-2017 and raise rates by 3.85 percent in 2017-2022 to fund capital improvements. Commissioners tentatively approved this choice. Burton recommended they set a proposed rate structure to recover costs from all types of properties.Rate methodologyUnder the rate structure being proposed, single-family residential uses would pay a base rate of $12.71 instead of the current $14.89 a month but would get an increase in the volume rate from See WATER RATES on page 24By Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFLighthouse Point – Cobwebs on the ceiling, light xtures with “warning tags,” a cracked window, a stuck hurricane shutter and one unhappy commissioner add up to a problem at the Lighthouse Point branch post of ce on Sample Road. Inside the lobby, dirt is evident on the oors and walls. Large pieces of paint hang ready to fall and only a few overhead lights appear to be working in this building which is open 24/7 for patrons picking up or sending mail. “This isn’t the rst time this has come up,” says Lighthouse Point Commissioner Sandy Johnson. “It’s been going on Paper inserted in light xtures serve as warnings of possible electronic problems. Note: four light fixtures do not dispense light.Light xtures in lobby area need bulbs and repair. Lighthouse Point PO in need of repairs and better housekeeping service See POST OFFICE on page 21

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4 The PelicanFriday, June 29, 2012 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFLighthouse Point – “We do a lot with a little,” Mayor Fred Schorr said this week about the town’s proposed $12.3 million operating budget for 2012-13. Schorr said property owners can expect the millage to remain at 3.65 mils, Broward’s third lowest. As presented to commissioners earlier this month, the new budget increases expenditures by $340,328, the majority of that money spent on police and re services where salaries are the big item. While the police budget went from $4.6 million LHP budget re ects ef ciencies and changes to $4.7 and re went from $3 million to $3.3 million, other departments show decreases. Only the city-run library gains in the new scal year with a $30,000 infusion into the $65,000 book fund. “We cut it last year because we knew Doreen [Gauthier] was leaving, so this year we put it back to normal,” the mayor said. “We are still affecting ef cient changes,” Shorr said. “We don’t need to raise millage to provide the same services. We are continually saving and at times our revenues exceed expectations.” See LHP BUDGET on page 20 Wilton Manors alters pain management lawBy Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFWilton Manors – In response to the concerns of two pharmacies, on Tuesday Wilton Manors commissioners amended the city’s restrictions on pharmacies and pain management clinics. The change removes the limit of 5,000 pills dispensed per month. In January, after a ninemonth moratorium on new pain management clinics, the city placed restrictions on pharmacies and pain management clinics that sold controlled substances. The moratorium and restrictions were established to prevent “pill mills” from opening in the city. A “pill mill” is a business that sells high volumes of pain medication to patients without See PILL MILLS on page 12 By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach – When members of Pompano Proud wanted to spruce up McNab Park, they turned to local artist Pat Anderson. Pompano Proud, an organization dedicated to beautifying Pompano, commissioned Anderson to create four paintings of native ora that have since been installed on the back of the scoreboards at McNab Park’s shuf eboard court. “It’s the 60th anniversary [of McNab Park] and we wanted to do something nice Pompano Proud, local artist team up to beautify McNab Park for 60th anniversary See MCNAB on page 9Local artist Pat Anderson stands proudly in front of one of her paintings at McNab Park in Pompano Beach. [Photo by Michael d’Oliveira]

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The Pelican 5 Friday, June 29, 2012 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach – The owners of a strip of beach sand north of the shing pier want to provide beach-related services to the public and this week city commissioners took steps to curtail how they can use their property. The proposed ordinance allows rentals of surfboards, paddleboards, snorkeling equipment, kayaks, beach chairs, umbrellas, cabanas, tents, beach toys, and sales of sunscreen and other beach products. Surf camps and lessons on using the equipment are allowed. No City takes steps to limit commerce on private beach lotsmotorized equipment is allowed and the sale of food or beverage is prohibited. Structures must be no larger than 10-foot by 16-foot chickee huts or tents which can be moved, not powered with electricity or plumbed. No live entertainment will be allowed. The business must operate at least 135 feet west of the high water mark. Permit fees of $250 and liability insurance must be provided as well as the names of all those involved in the vending operation. Background checks will be done on everyone associated with the operation. The new rules apply to privately-owned open space, most of which is north of the shing pier. Deer eld’s beach is dotted with privately-owned wedges of sand, the most famous one owned by Boca restaurateur Pete Boinis adjacent to the shing pier. Several years ago, after a battle that ended with Boinis erecting no trespassing signs, it was purchased by the city so that pier enhancements could be made. According to City Attorney Andy Maurodis, not many of the remaining lots are suitable for business development. “We have made every effort to provide limitations,” he added. Case law says that both public and private owners have the right to the use of beach property. The proposed law is designed to limit commercial activity but enhance the beach by making available certain goods and services. The permitting process assures the public’s use is protected. City Commissioner Joe Miller, whose district includes the beach, said the intent of the proposed law is to prevent private owners from obstructing access to the beach. He said he noti ed the management at Tiara East Condominium that their neighboring property owners planned to rent beach equipment, but heard no protest from the residents. “Frankly, it doesn’t seem to be a big thing,” he said. SightingsA community calendar of Broward County. Email events to siren2415@gmail. com 6-30 – Local performing artist Sara Grant will be performing “Songs of Old and New” at 3333 N. Federal Hwy., Boca Raton, at 7 p.m. Tickets are $15. Visit www. solchildren.org or call 561447-8829. 6-30 – Royal Piano Music r for a King or Queen at 7:30 p.m. at All Saints Episcopal Church, 333 Tarpon Drive, Fort Lauderdale. Donation requested. Call 305505-8704. 7-1 – The Oakland Park Historical Society is celebrating the 83rd birthday of the City of Oakland Park at the Mai Kai, 3599 N. Federal Hwy., Oakland Park, from 1 to 3:30 p.m. To reserve a seat, call 954-563-8307.See SIGHTINGS on page 14

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6 The PelicanFriday, June 29, 2012 Deer eld Beach, Pompano Beach, Lighthouse Point, LauderdaleBy-The-Sea, Wilton Manors and Oakland ParkWilton Manors • Oakland Park • Hillsboro Beach The Pompano Pelican is published weekly on FridaysStreet Address: 1500-A E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, FL 33060 Telephone: 954-783-8700 • Fax: 954-783-0093Letters to the Editor are encouraged and accepted for print if signed, although a writer’s name will be withheld on request; letters must also include a daytime telephone number. Advertising rates are available upon request. Subscription rate is $31.80 including tax for one year’s delivery in Greater Pompano Beach; $95.40/per year including tax for others in the United States; call 954-783-8700 for rates abroad. The Pelican is a nonpartisan newspaper and reserves the right to decline advertising. Copyright 2012. Reproduction of this publication in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission of the publisher. The Pelican is a member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, Deer eld Beach Chamber and the LBTS Chamber. The Pelican is a state certi ed woman-owned minority business. The Pelican is delivered to businesses, libraries, schools, of ces, hospitals, news racks and single family homes. All advertising and copy is published at the sole discretion of the publisher. We welcome your critiques and ideas concerning this publication. Anne Siren, publisherExecutive Assistant: Mary Hudson Graphics: Rachel Ramirez Windsheimer Bookkeeper: John White Classi eds: Fran Shelby Contributing Writers: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Judy Wilson, Malcolm McClintock, Judy Vik, Michael d’Oliveira Account Executives: Paul Shroads, Carolyn Mann, Bill Heaton, Bill Fox Special Of ce Assistant: Cathy Siren ESTABLISHED 1993 • Volume XX, Issue 26 Founding Editor and PublisherAnne Hanby Siren Rockin’ 4th of July on the beach Deer eld Beach – The beach will rock Wednesday, July 4, to the music of Luminotti, Andrew Morris, Jimmy Stowe and the Stowaways and Hot Brass Monkey beginning at 1 p.m. in the Main Beach Parking Lot, Ocean Way and SE 1 Street. Sponsored by the Community Redevelopment District, the celebration includes arts and crafts displays and clothing booths; food and liquid refreshments. Fireworks will rocket off the shing pier beginning at 9:15 p.m. Beach parking will be extremely limited but free parking is available in the Cove Shopping Center. A free shuttle bus will operate 11 a.m. to 5:45 p.m. and 11 p.m. to midnight. The Intracoastal Waterway Bridge will close to vehicular traf c at 6 p.m. and be in lock down for waterway traf c from 7 to 11 p.m. The shing pier will close at noon, July 3, and reopen 6 a.m. Thursday, July 5. Ocean Way is closed to traf c all day on The Fourth. Lauderdale-By-The-Sea – Festivities get under way at 10 a.m. on July 4 with the traditional parade. The parade begins on Bougainvilla Drive behind Town Hall, heads north to Pine Avenue, east to El Mar Drive, south to Hibiscus and then west back to Bougainvilla before heading north and returning to the starting point. At 11:30 a.m., members of the town’s Volunteer Fire Department, or VFD, will demonstrate equipment and provide water hose play for children and photos of children with Sparky, their mascot. Beach activities are planned from 12:30 to 3 p.m. starting with a sandcastle building contest with prizes and judging by Aruba Beach Caf. A chance to cool off and have some fun with water rides courtesy of The Village Grille, Aruba Beach Caf and Ocean 101. Kilwin’s will dish out ice cream. The VFD hosts a tug of war at the beach. Burger FI will host eating contests in the afternoon. A custard eating contest for children is set for 3 p.m. and a hamburger eating contest for adults at 4 p.m. Fireworks will go off at the beach at El Prado Park at 9 p.m. Commissioner Chris Vincent is chairing the annual festivities with help from a committee of volunteers. It’s a family July 4th here with re engines, ice cream and water ridesPompano Beach – Plan the entire day and most of the night in this city to celebrate Independence Day, July 4, at the beach. The bash begins at 10 a.m. at the Pompano Beach Fishing Pier, 222 N. Pompano Beach Blvd. with watermelon contests, relay races, arts and live entertainment. At noon, featured bands perform and more music takes place on the city stage at 7:30 p.m. with hits from the rock group, Journey Fireworks start at 9 p.m. launched from a barge off the shing pier. Revelers are welcome to take lawn chairs, picnics and blankets are welcome. Alcohol, personal reworks, pets and glass containers are prohibited at the beach. The Atlantic Bridge and 14th Street Causeway Bridge will be in the down position from 9 to 11 p.m. Call 954-786-4111.Extravaganza reworks, music, games and patriotism in Pompano July 4th activities planned in your hometowns To the editor, Having just moved here as a year round resident from the Boston area, I have to comment on the parking situation in Pompano Beach, Lauderdale-ByThe-Sea, or LBTS, and Fort Lauderdale area. Several residents have told me that the areas here make more money from the parking meters than they do from the taxes. Well, I totally believe that statement. I understand that after one area started with the parking meters, every beach area followed suit. Everywhere you go, there are parking stations or meters. It is very discouraging to think that if I want to go to lunch or dinner in the LBTS area, it is going to cost me at least an additional $3 for parking. How the area continues to survive with the parking restrictions is a mystery to me. Why not during the off season, have one day a week that the meters are free with a three-hour limit? Or maybe the powers that be could allow parking after 8 p.m. to be free. Now I take public transportation or head to Flanagans or other establishments on Federal Highway that do not have the parking issues that the beachfront areas have. C. Kennedy LBTSExpensive beach parking forces reader to seek inland businesses Recently, the Pompano Beach Rotary Club-sponsored softball team played in the Sunshine Senior Softball League in Pompano Beach. In the bottom row are Tom Abramouski, Claude LaBrie, Bob Harris, Jerry Meehan and Tony Hernandez. Picture in the top row are Bob Johnson, Rick Elbaz, Jim Ritacco, Tom Savino, Frank Monti and Don Schaeffer. Not pictured are Sandy Koplowitz, Tony Longabardo and Cedric Wolfman. For more in Rotary, call 954-786-3274. For more on the Sunshine Senior Softball League, call 954-421-6892. [Photo courtesy of Jerry Meehan]Take me home! Victor is very energetic, playful, loving black and white male cat approximately 18 months old. He gets along with other cats and has been in The Florida Humane Society’s shelter for several months. He is tested, neutered and has his shots up to date. He, along with other cats and dogs, is available for adoption at The Florida Humane Society, 3870 N. Powerline Road, Pompano Beach. Hours are Thursday to Sunday from 12 to 4 p.m. Visit www.floridahumanesociety.org or call 954 974 6152.

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The Pelican 7 Friday, June 29, 2012 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFLauderdale-By-The-Sea – Town commissioners on Tuesday unanimously approved a requested $764,203 operating budget for the town’s Volunteer Fire Department, or VFD, for 2013. That’s about a $10,000 or 1 percent increase over the current operating budget and will pay re ghters to provide beach coverage 265 days in ready response mode. The budget includes a signi cant decrease from $40,000 to $10,000for medical call assistance to AMR due to recent changes which have resulted in the volunteers responding to fewer medical calls. Fuel is projected to be more costly next year, and more funds will be spent on training and training supplies as the department continues to place a heavy emphasis on professional training. In the current year, the town budgeted $339,500 for the purchase of a new re engine. Those funds are included in the re fund, separate from the VFD contract. The VFD has proposed capital expenditures of $55,600 next year: $25,000 for a new extrication tool, $17,000 for a new compressor for air tanks, $8,500 for an infrared camera to assist re ghters in burning buildings, $2,800 for a truck generator and $2,300 for a 50-foot ladder. The proposed budget must also be presented to the VFD membership for their approval. Commissioners unanimously agreed to keep the residential re fee at $130 annually. That will result in a separate fund of $247,000 by 2017, Tony Bryan, nance director, noted. Commissioners decided they don’t want a study done to determine alternate methods of assessing re fees. Fire budget holds the lineBy Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach – Broward County Vice Mayor Kristin Jacobs, a candidate for the 22nd Congressional District, said this week her opponent, former West Palm Beach Mayor Lois Frankel, has refused offers to debate her. Speaking at a coffee here this week, Jacobs said the Palm Beach Post and its af liate Channel 5, issued invitations to both candidates to debate on July 12. CBS Channel 4 also wanted to set up a debate between the two Democrat hopefuls and offered several dates. According to Jacobs, who wanted to set up four debates, Frankel refused. Frankel’s campaign manager Greg Richardson had not returned phone calls or emails at press time Thursday. “The people of District 22 have the right to see their candidates side-byside,” Jacobs said. “Voters deserve to know about the key differences between the candidates.” To date, Frankel and Jacobs have appeared together in the same place only at club and association meetings, said Jacobs’ campaign manager Jacobs urging Frankel to debate “face-to-face” so far, congressional challenger has refusedMarcia Monserrat. ‘Kristin will debate her anytime, anyplace,” Monserrat said. Jacobs, a county commissioner for 14 years and Frankel, a former Florida senator and mayor of West Palm Beach for eight years, face one another in the Aug. 14 primary for the seat now held by Cong. Allen West who moved his campaign to the 18th Congressional District, hoping for more favorable election results. West’s new District is north of his former district. The 22 District runs along the coast from Fort Lauderdale through Riviera Beach taking in some western precincts in Palm Beach County. Frankel has been on the campaign trail for well over See JACOBS on page 28

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8 The PelicanFriday, June 29, 2012 Business matters The Pelican takes a look at local business owners. Call The Pelican to nd out how you can tell your story here because business matters. 954-783-8700. Briefs Send The Pelican your news, big or small, to siren2415@gmail.com By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach David Case is the friendly owner of Plumbing World, Inc., a family business that’s been assisting area residents for 51 years from the same location at 1777 NE 33rd St. in Shopper’s Haven, Pompano Beach. Case says, “When my father-in-law retired, I bought him out. That was in 1996, but I’ve been working here for a long time and pretty much learned everything I know about plumbing on the job. We specialize in repair and supplies, working with plumbers and Do-It-Yourselfers. We learn from each other. Not a day goes by that I haven’t learned something new. There’s always something different to solve in a new way.” “People bring in faucets, toilet tanks and anything you can think of, and we help them determine what can and can’t be xed,“ he adds. He no sooner made that statement when customer, Hank Berman stopped in with a faucet in hand, asking, “Can you explain why this brand-new faucet is leaking?” It took just a few minutes to solve his problem which turned out to be a missing piece that should have been included in the faucet he had just purchased elsewhere. A phone call from Case to the retailer handled the problem, and a grateful Berman left, faucet in hand. Plumbing World is lled with in-depth stocks of every plumbing piece and part that can t into the store including faucet stems, handles, trims, toilet parts, hard to nd one piece toilet repair parts, sinks, PVC piping, lters and more. Repair parts for shower valves and toilets are the most frequent requests. Case estimates that half of his stock comes from local distributers and the other half from national distributors. He says, “We can ll special orders within a day if local distributors have the product. Our space is limited. We can only show so many sinks and toilets, but many more are available from suppliers. We’re not into heavy commercial plumbing which calls for different parts and, in many cases, much larger parts. We are geared to individual residences such as free standing homes, condos and co-ops, and the plumbers who service the owners. I have long time customers who y in from the Bahamas and other islands because it’s tough to get the parts where they live.” Andy St. Laurent, plumber, says he visits Plumbing World almost every day. “David is a very knowledgeable man and always a gentleman to do business with. I’ve seen him reach for a part to t a customer’s faucet before the customer even reaches the counter. For 51 years, Plumbing World has offered repair service, supplies, help to Do-It-Yourselfers He knows the eld and is always eager to help. The store stocks anything and everything I might need.” Case is pleased with Andy’s comments and says, “We get many referrals from customers and the big box stores and we appreciate this referral business because we know David Case, owner of Plumbing World, Inc. helps Hank Berman gure out why his brand new faucet leaks. This family business has been in the same 33rd Street location for 51 years. The store stocks a huge inventory of parts, offers repair service and assistance to plumbers and Do-It-Yourselfers. [Photos by Phyllis J. Neuberger.]that we have parts that cannot be found elsewhere. After years in this business, we know our parts and can identify what’s needed. There really aren’t many “one size ts all” solutions in this eld. We’re proud of our reputation and we work hard to maintain it.” Call 954-781-2255. Plumbing World is lled with in-depth stocks of every plumbing piece and part that can t into the store including faucet stems, handles, trims, toilet parts, hard to nd one piece toilet repair parts, sinks, PVC piping, lters and more. Property, tax questions answeredOakland Park – The Broward County Property Appraiser’s Of ce will hold a community outreach event Tuesday, July 10 from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Oakland Park City Hall, 3650 NE 12 Ave. Appraisers will be available to assist with homestead, senior and other property tax exemption applications, as well as answer questions on property taxes. They are also accepting applications for portability. Those who attend should bring a current Florida driver’s license or Florida identi cation card and a current voter registration card or declaration of domicile. Non-citizens must provide proof of permanent residency. For more information, visit www.bcpa.net or call 954-357-5579. Humane Society celebrates twoyear anniversaryPompano Beach – On July 7 and 8 from 12 to 4 p.m., The Florida Humane Society will host an event celebrating the two-year anniversary of the grand opening of its current location at 3870 N. Powerline Road, Pompano Beach. There will be raf es, food, a bake sale and discounts on pet supplies. The Florida Humane Society is a no-pro t, no-kill pet shelter that has cats and dogs available for adoption. For more, visit www. oridahumanesociety.org or call 954974-6152.Library closing for maintenanceDeer eld Beach – The Percy White Library, 837 E. Hillsboro Blvd., will be closed for air conditioning maintenance Thursday, July 12 and Friday, July 13 and will reopen Saturday, July 14 at 10 a.m. While Percy White is closed, library patrons can visit the Century Plaza Branch Library, 1856A W. Hillsboro Blvd., Pompano Beach Branch, 1213 E. Atlantic Blvd., or the North Library at 100 Coconut Creek Blvd.

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The Pelican 9 Friday, June 29, 2012 for the community,” said Sherry Walters, president of Pompano Proud. “The scoreboards were looking pretty shabby. And we’re really happy with what she came up with.” The paintings are also in celebration of Pompano Proud’s efforts to get McNab Park, 2250 E. Atlantic Blvd., certi ed as National Wildlife Federation, or NWF, habitat. NDF habitats are backyards, public parks and other green spaces that have certain features that attract and support local wildlife, such as birds and squirrels. “We’re just always looking for projects to help the community,” said Walters. Anderson, a 30-year Pompano resident whose store is located in the Shoppes at Beacon Light in Lighthouse Point, said she’s proud to be a part of the beauti cation and redevelopment of Atlantic Boulevard. “I’m tickled. I’ve always been into souvenir artwork,” she said, referring to the theme of the paintings. Sandy Von Staden, Pompano Proud board member, said the goal of the organization is to commission more artists in the future and display new art work at the shuf eboard court about every six months. “We hope that it will inspire other organizations to work with the city on public art on beauti cation,” said Von Staden. “We enjoyed such cooperation from the city and we hope it will continue.” Pompano Proud is funded through the efforts of members who volunteer at the Pompano Beach Seafood Festival, collecting donations in exchange for Pompano Proud t-shirts and selling bags at the Green Market. On Friday, July 13 at 8:30 a.m. at McNab Park, Pompano Proud will be of cially unveiling Anderson’s art work. The event is open to the public and light refreshments will be served. For more on Pompano Proud, visit www. pompanoproud.com or call 954-562-3232. McNabContinued from page 4Fundraiser to aid children with autism July 4Oakland Park – With hopes high for $10,000, Forever Propane, 350 E. Prospect Road, will host a day of raf es, food and music to help fund the South Florida Autism Association. The event takes place July 4 from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Maria Taylor, marketing director for Forever Propane, says she has come to know a child with autism, “and being a mom, I want to help as much as I can.” This rst fundraiser is planned for the family and includes a free barbecue with a donation to the cause. Taylor says this will be one of many events. The company also plans a walk later in the year as one of many different events to reach the company goal. Forever Propane Sales & Service has three locations in South Florida: Hollywood, Boca Raton and Oakland Park. To donate or sponsor this event, call 954-654-0872.

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10 The PelicanFriday, June 29, 2012 Making a Difference Phyllis J. Neuberger wants your suggestions about people who are making a difference. Call 954-7838700. Send in your news! siren2415@gmail.com Briefs By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFWhen the Lighthouse Point Library, or LHP library, moved into its current location in the mid 1980s, Doreen Gauthier began a weekly Tiny Tots and Moms story time. “I believed then, and still do, that the earlier you expose little ones to books and sounds, the better your chance to create life long readers,” Gauthier says. “I was inspired by Dr. Henrietta Smith who taught children’s literature at the University of South Florida, and by Dr. Ellin Greene whose book, Babies and Libraries, also encouraged me. Greene, by the way, was a part time LHP resident.” Gauthier’s efforts were a great success. She says, “I get a special thrill when I hear that one of my tots now brings her own little one to the story time.” And they do! Cathy Anthony, now a LHP librarian, says, “I remember bringing my daughter, Lindsay, to Doreen’s story time and now Lindsay brings her daughter, Mackenzy who adores the group.” Gauthier recently retired as director of the library. Her successor, Christy Keyes, continues to conduct a story time group for a new ock of tots [ages 18 month to three years] and moms every Friday morning at 10:30 a.m. The Pelican dropped in to see what was happening. Much to Keyes’ surprise, her Tiny Tots and Moms story time is drawing at least 20 moms and their excited little ones. Tiny tots get an early start with books and sounds at the Doreen Gauthier Lighthouse Point LibraryShe says, “I was happily surprised to see that, despite the tremendous focus on technology, story time is still very popular. The attention span of this age group is very short so we switch focus often moving from an abbreviated book to a song to marching and back to a second book—all in just one half an hour. If the group is very active, we may do only one story. If they seem attentive, we may do two stories.” She starts out by introducing herself and then each child tells his or her name. Then the group says “Hi and the child’s name.” This may seem very basic, and it is, but these children are being exposed to the library, to books, to group involvement, and they are learning to listen. When the half hour is up, many moms stay on with their little ones to look at books, work puzzles, or to just enjoy the company of other children. We watch them form attachments and create their own social situations. It’s wonderful to see,” Keyes says. One mom, Leila Pollack brings daughter, Alexandria, every Friday if she’s not working and says, “We enjoy it so much and miss it when we can’t come.”See STORYTIME on page 24Choose plastic bladder over bathtub when storing waterDeer eld Beach – A clean, emergency water supply is vital to preparing for hurricanes and the Deer eld Beach Chamber of Commerce has a product that is far safer than lling the bathtub. The Chamber is selling a 55gallon, plastic bladder that will hold enough potable water for a family of four for two weeks. And it comes with a pump to transfer the water to other containers. The bladder is placed near a water source and lled. It can be stored safely in a bathtub or large sink. Water that is held in bathtubs often leaks out, becomes contaminated and presents a hazard to small children. Cost of the bladder is $25 at the Chamber, a hefty reduction in the $39.99 retail price. Buying enough bottled water to meet the one-gallon per person per day recommendation could cost up to $60. The Chamber offer is open to the public. The of ce is located at 1601 E. Hillsboro Boulevard, Deer eld Beach. Free trees in Pompano BeachPompano Beach On July 14 and 21, the city’s nursery will be open to the public to give away thousands of native plants and trees. Those who can provide local residency will receive two native trees or other plants until supplies run out. Residents will also receive instructions on planting the trees. The city nursery is located at 1000 NE 3 Ave., Pompano Beach. Tree choices include Gumbo Limbo. Live Oak, palms, poinciana and more. Call 954-786-5516. Christy Keyes, director of the Doreen Gauthier Lighthouse Point Library, uses drama, song and stories to hold the attention of her tiny tots and moms at storytime. [Photo by Phyllis J. Neuberger]

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The Pelican 11 Friday, June 29, 2012 15,000 show up for Wilton Manors Stonewall paradeWilton Manors – Reece Darham, chair of Stonewall Summer Pride, estimates that about 15,000 people attended the annual event this past Sunday. The event is named in honor of the 1969 Stonewall Riots after members of New York City’s gay community, frustrated with abuse and harassment by the city’s police department, started protesting. [Right] Wilton Manors Mayor Gary Resnick throws beads to members of the crowd during the Stonewall Parade. [Above] The Stonewall Library & Archives oat drives down the parade route. [Photos by Michael d’Oliveira] Provide food for birds and butter ies. Include plants with at daisy-like owers like pentas, zinnias, and cosmos to attract butter ies. For hummingbirds, include some plants with tubular owers including nicotiana, cuphea, salvia, and fuchsia. And don’t forget about the hungry caterpillars that will soon turn into beautiful butter ies. Parsley, bronze fennel, and licorice vines are a few favorites that make great additions to container gardens. You can even create containers that will attract seed-eating birds. Purple Majesty millet, cone ower, coreopsis, and Rudbeckias will keep many of the birds returning to your landscape. Water the birds and the butter ies with a small water lled saucer on a rod-homemade or purchased.Container gardens abound with joy

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12 The PelicanFriday, June 29, 2012 Advertise with The Pelican! 954783-8700!a proper medical examination. In many cases, the pills are sold to people who don’t need them and are then abused or re-sold illegally on the street. Shortly after the city passed its regulations, Fort Lauderdale attorney George Castrataro, representing Quick Script and The Medicine Shoppe on Andrews Avenue, sent a letter to the city asking of cials to amend the law. Because the restrictions exempted big chain pharmacies like CVS, Walgreens and Publix, Castrataro and his clients viewed the ordinance as unfairly targeting independent pharmacies and clinics. The biggest sticking point was the limit on the number of pills that could be dispensed per month. The original law prohibited businesses from selling and dispensing more than 5,000 pills of Schedule II substances per month. Schedule II includes codeine, morphine, oxycodone, hydrocodone and opium. In the revised law, pain management clinics and pharmacies that are licensed by the state are exempt from the city’s licensing procedure. “Licensed pharmacies are already heavily regulated by the state,” said City Attorney Kerry Ezrol at the June 12 commission meeting. Ezrol added that his of ce was unable to nd any legal basis for limiting the number of pills to 5,000. “The only substantive change [to the law] is the number of pills,” said Ezrol. Vice Mayor Tom Green said he was uncomfortable with removing the 5,000 pill limit. He views the limit as “reasonable” but voted in favor of the new law. “I really hate approving this but I don’t see any alternative.” Mayor Gary Resnick said the changes addressed the previously “overbroad” law but the new restrictions, like one prohibiting doctors from issuing more than a 72-hour supply of medication to one patient, would still prevent “pill mills” from opening in the city. Sam Fawaz, owner of Quick Script, said overall the changes are acceptable, but he’s still not happy with having to give the police department a monthly list of all the Schedule II substances that his pharmacy has dispensed – a requirement the big pharmacies are exempt from. Castrataro commended the city for addressing the concerns of his clients and considers the matter closed. “I think generally speaking, [city of cials] were all primarily fairness orientated. I don’t think they intended to indiscriminately [target small pharmacies] but [the law] had unintended consequences.” Pill millsContinued from page 4

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The Pelican 13 Friday, June 29, 2012 By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFWilton Manors Commissioners reluctantly voted Tuesday 4-0 to pay $210,000 to buy a single family home, 2524 NE 8 Terrace, for the purpose of eventually turning the land into a parking lot. Originally commissioners had agreed to pay $165,000 for the property but Chase, the bank that owns the house and Parking needs outweigh costs to city, banner law booted for nowis trying to sell the property through a short sale, refused the offer and now wants $210,000. “I think we’re overpaying by a lot,” said Commissioner Scott Newton. If the sale goes through the city would combine the land with the other adjacent property it owns and the piece of land it is leasing from Kids In Distress. The three lots would make one large parking lot. City staff estimates that all three properties, after being paved, would be big enough to t about 45 new parking spaces. The city is currently working on speci c plans that will give it an exact number of spaces that can be built. The cost of buying the two properties, leasing the Kids In Distress property [$10 a year for ve years], demolishing the two houses currently standing and paving all three lots would cost an estimated $650,000 – money provided through the $1.1 million the city borrowed to make parking improvements along Wilton Drive. None of the commissioners were happy with the increase but said getting as much additional parking on Wilton Drive was important enough to pay the additional cost. “I hate to be held hostage,” said Commissioner Julie Carson. Vice Mayor Tom Green and Commissioner Ted Galatis said the cost was worth it. “That property is so important,” said Green. “There just isn’t very much [parking] in that area,” said Galatis. Commissioners also discussed possibly combining the three properties and the Acapulco Lindo property, located next to the three lots, to create a parking structure. But of cials said talks with the owner of Acapulco Lindo haven’t made any progress yet. Mayor Gary Resnick refrained from commenting or voting because his law rm represents Chase in other matters.Banner ban bootedWilton Manors To help local business owners get through the summer, Wilton Manors commissioners voted unanimously Tuesday to lift its ban on temporary banners and/or vertical feather ags through Dec. 31. Merchants may now place See BANNERS on page 14

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14 The PelicanFriday, June 29, 2012 one sign in front of their business as long as it’s not on a sidewalk or public-right-ofway. Heidi Shafran, community development services director, said the idea came about when she was approached by business owners. Business owners claim that temporary signs attract customers. Janet Conklin, co-owner of Lola’s Healthy Pet Caf at Five Points, said when she had her sign up for two weeks her business increased dramatically. Business owners previously could display signs for up to two-weeks with a city permit. Permits are not required through Dec. 31. “We’re trying to do a good deed for the city,” said Commissioner Julie Carson. Commissioners did request that code enforcement to make sure things don’t get out of hand and owners limit themselves to one sign. Commissioners brought up examples of some owners who have multiple signs out. When asked why code enforcement wasn’t enforcing the rules, Police Chief Paul O’Connell said the department was in transition. “That’s the only answer I can give,” he said.BannersContinued from page 137-4 – Pompano Beach will host its annual Beach Bash and Fireworks Extravaganza at the Pompano Beach Fishing Pier, 222 N. Pompano Beach Blvd. Beach Bash begins at 10 a.m. Fireworks Extravaganza begins at 9 p.m. The Northeast 14 Street Causeway and Atlantic Boulevard bridges will be in the down position from 9 to 11 p.m. 954-786-4111. 7-5 – The Broward Sierra Club meets at 7:30 p.m. at Fern Forest Nature Center, 201 Lyons Rd. S., Coconut Creek. Lou Fisher, natural resource specialist with Broward County, will be giving a presentation on beach renewal, coral reef protection, arti cial reefs, manatees, sea turtles and more. 954-9467359. 7-5 – A lecture will be given at The Museum of Discovery and Science, 401 SW Second St., Fort Lauderdale, regarding the condition of the Staghorn coral off the coast of South Florida. 954-467-6637. 7-6 – The Sol Children Theatre Performing Arts Camp presents Guys and Dolls at 2 and 7 p.m. at the Olympic Heights Fine Arts Theatre, 20101 Lyons Road, Boca Raton. Tickets are $12 per seat. Visit www. solchildren.org or 561-4478829. 7-7 & 7-18 – The Museum of Discovery and Science, 401 SW Second St., Fort Lauderdale, will hold an ice cream making demonstration at 2:30 p.m. 954-467-6637. 7-14 – Free car seat safety check from 9 a.m. to noon at Pompano Beach Fire-Rescue Station 24, 2001 NE 10 St. Appointments are required. 954-786-4510. 7/14 Pompano Pier Clean-up from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. TO help, call 954-9331862.-FridaysThe Pompano Beach Rotary Club meets Fridays at 12:15 p.m. at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. 954-786-3274.SaturdaysPony rides are available See SIGHTINGS on page 16SightingsContinued from page 5Advertise with The Pelican! 954-783-8700!

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The Pelican 15 Friday, June 29, 2012

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16 The PelicanFriday, June 29, 2012 at Sand & Spurs Equestrian Park, 1600 NE 5 Ave., Pompano Beach, from 9 to 11:30 a.m. Cost is $3 per ride. 954-786-4507. The Pompano Beach Kiwanis Club Westside meets the rst and third Saturdays of the month at 8:30 a.m. at the E. Pat Larkins Community Center, 520 MLK Blvd., Pompano Beach. 954782-8096. The Deer eld Beach West Kiwanis Club meets the second and fourth Saturdays of the month at 9 a.m. at Westside Park, 445 SW 2 St., Deer eld Beach. 954-54-7329883. Kayak rentals are available Saturdays and Sundays at Richardson Historic Park, 1937 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Visit www.AtlanticCoastKayak. com or 954-781-0073 for rates. The Wilton Manors Green Market is held every Saturday and Sunday at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. 954-592-0381. The Deer eld Beach West Kiwanis Club meets the second and fourth Saturdays of the month at 9 a.m. at Westside Park, 445 SW 2 St., Deer eld Beach. 954-54-7329883.SundaysSt. Elizabeth’s of Hungary Parish hosts a pancake breakfast at 3331 NE 10 Terrace, Pompano Beach, on every third Sunday of the month from 7:30 a.m. to noon. The breakfast bene ts the Parish. 954-263 8415.MondaysPlay ping-pong from 6:30 SightingsContinued from page 5 See SIGHTINGS on page 19 to 8:30 p.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Cost is $1. All ages can participate. 954-3902130. The Gold Coast Toastmasters Club meets on the second and third Monday of the month from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Denny’s, 3151 NW 9 Ave., Fort Lauderdale. 954895-3555 or 954-782-9951.TuesdaysDeer eld Beach Rotary Club meets every Tuesday at 12 p.m. at the Deer Creek Golf Club, 2801 Deer Creek Country Club Blvd., Deer eld Beach. 954-630-9593. Pompano BeachLighthouse Rotary Club meets every Tuesday at 7:30 a.m. at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano

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The Pelican 17 Friday, June 29, 2012 Cypress Nook201 E. McNab Road Pompano Beach 954-781-3464 Hours: 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. 954-933-7311 Dinner 5 to 10 p.m. Wednesday to Saturday www.cypressnook.com By Malcolm McCLintockPELICAN STAFFThis quaint German eatery, located mere yards from the water, is a true Pompano Beach landmark. “My family has been running this place continuously for the past 34 years,” says friendly restaurateur Michael Gerike. “Although we recently decided to start offering dinner service, it is breakfast and lunch that have been the lifeblood of our business.” Be it eggs any style with mouthwatering meats, fully loaded omelettes, comforting home fries, French toast or fluffy pancakes, just about every classic breakfast favorite makes an appearance on the menu. Cypress Nook is also a reliable destination at lunchtime for its wide array of sandwiches, salads, sausages and German specialties such as pork tenderloin schnitzel, goulash and beef roulade. “We also make phenomenal Black Angus Burgers. They truly are the best in town,” adds Michael. “We have been successful because we love our customers. Honestly, my mother hugs just about everyone that walks through the door!” says the mildmannered host with not a hint of exaggeration in his By day, it’s a hot spot for breakfast and lunch, by night Cypress Nook offers German cuisine with lager, wines and sweet nalesvoice. It is indeed true that indefatigable matriarch Ilse Wettengel has been personally welcoming hungry patrons 7 days a week for over 3 decades. But the truly exciting news revolves around this German family’s decision to start offering all the best specialties of its homeland in the evenings. “My mother will continue to do the morning and noon service while I will take care of dinner Wednesday through Saturday.”See CYPRESS NOOK on page 18Cypress Nook’s Michael Gerike shows off a house specialty. The rich, three layer Sachertorte chocolate cake is loaded with walnuts and raspberry preserves topped with chocolate ganache. [Photos by Malcolm McClintock]

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18 The Pelican Friday, June 29, 2012 And when asked about the most popular dinner options, Michael immediately responds that “the Schweinshaxe is our signature dish. It is a 2 lbs portion of ham hock slow cooked for hours and served with rich gravy and 2 sides.” Indeed, this eye-popping platter will elicit a Pavlovian salivation response in meat aficionados. The enormous serving of Bavarian style, bone-in flavorful pork smothered in a rich savory gravy is sinfully tender and conspicuously abundant. Accompanied by homemade side dishes such as, fresh potatoes, egg noodles, tangy red cabbage or even garlic spinach, the Schweinshaxe is a must-try for those with limitless appetites. “Everything is made in house, from the spaetzel to the red cabbage,” says Michael who, on most evenings, enjoys the support of his wife Hannah, a native Hungarian. Other highly prized options include the Deutsche Wurst Platter overflowing with sausage samples of German Bratwurst, Frankfurter and Bavarian Weisswurst, the vinegar marinated tender beef Sauerbraten, the German meatloaf Hackbraten, the melt-in-your-mouth medallions of Chicken Zuricher Geschnetzeltes with wine sauce, the Parisian style pan seared fish and, of course, the classic Wiener Schnitzel. “The veal Jaeger with mushrooms in a creamy wine sauce is also another one of my favorites,” says Michael as he breezes from one table to another with typical Teutonic efficiency and gregariousness. Another notable feature of the Cypress Nook menu is the tantalizing curry component. “Curry is actually one of the most popular dishes in Germany,” says Michael as he brings a pleasantly pungent serving of Curry Knockwurst. The plump sausage is smothered in an berflavorsome mlange of spices that titillates the palette. “We will soon be updating our menu and do a big curry push. I make it personally and really want people to understand that it is not spicy, just very flavorful.” It would be criminal to not mention the plethora of toothsome German beers that perfectly complement a copious meal. For the lager leery, a nice selection of red and white wines is also available. Most large entres are in the $12-$18 range, imported German beers are $5, wines glasses start at $5 and bottles at $19. An early bird special is offered from 5-6 pm. The portions are gargantuan and will definitely provide some leftovers to take home. There is plenty of free parking and credit cards are only accepted in the evenings. Additionally, this cozy restaurant is an ideal place to hold private parties from Sun-Tue. It seats 40 people and there are 4 outside patio tables as well. Reservations are recommended in season as space is limited. By the way, if you somehow still have room for dessert, Cypress Nook impresses with a delightful apple strudel, German chocolate cakes and the Oma Ilse’s award winning key lime pie. Guten appetite! Cypress NookContinued from page 17[Right] The Schweinhaxe – a fall off-the-bone, slow cooked ham hock with savory brown gravy, mashed potatoes and garlic spinach [Left] The Curry Knockwurst features a maelstrom of piquant avors enveloping the famous German sausage. It is served here with potatoes and red cabbage.

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The Pelican 19 Friday, June 29, 2012 Village, Crystal Lake, District 4 and all the remaining neighborhoods west of I-95 to the city limits. City commissioners heard Dr. Lenore Alpert, a consultant in public policy, explain the need for redistricting and the principles behind it at last week’s commission meeting. They will take up the matter in August. Census gures show that the population here is 75,018, about 3,000 less than the gure used in 2008. Alpert said that probably does not re ect a loss of residents, but rather the faulty estimates used to draw the current districts. Those estimates have now left the city with “clearly disproportionate representation,” she said, the worst cases District 2 with a population of around 18,100 and District 4 with 19,600 residents. What the commission should strive for are districts of equal numbers, Dr. Alpert said, in this case around 18,755. Other criteria in drawing voting districts is that they be contiguous, that minorities have a reasonable chance of electing one of their own, that the districts re ect a “community of interest” and that the district include the residence of a sitting commissioner who has yet to complete his term. The city’s current districts show an 8.3 percent deviation in population. The legal limit is 10 percent, Alpert said, which means shifting some boundaries is necessary. Alpert said, District 2’s population is 60 percent African-American and “is clearly a majority minority district which must be preserved.” And District 4’s population is well above the average putting the current plan at risk. Dr. Alpert presented four new options that fall within the legal limits, that is within the 10 percent population differential, but which got progressively more deviant as the boundaries shifted. Options 2 and 3 mirror the current districts except that in Option 3, a swath west of I-95 is moved into District 2. Option 4 places Deer Creek and areas north of Hillsboro Boulevard and east of Powerline Road into District 3 and Option 5 returns Deer Creek to District 4 and extends District 3 to Sample Road east of Military Trail. Currently the boundaries are matched to major roadways: District 1 east of US 1 except for a triangle south of 48 Street to Sample Road; District 2 east of Dixie Highway to I-95, District 3 west of I-95 south of Hillsboro Boulevard and District 4 west of District 3 and north of Hillsboro Blvd. Alpert’s maps are posted on the city’s website. By city charter, the voting districts must be examined every four years. DistrictsContinued from page 1 Beach. 954-972-7178. The American Legion Auxiliary Unit 142, 171 SW 2 St., Pompano Beach, has Bingo on Tuesdays at 7 p.m. Food is available from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. 954-942-2448. Yoga classes are available for all levels at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors, on Tuesday nights from 6:30 to 8 p.m. and Saturday mornings from 10:30 a.m. until noon. The cost is $7. 305-607-3520. Zonta International meets on the third Tuesday of the month at Duffy’s Diner, 401 N. Federal Hwy., Deer eld Beach, at 11:15 a.m. Zonta International works to advance the status of women. 561-392-2223.WednesdaysThe Wilton Manors Kiwanis Club meets Wednesdays at 6:30 p.m. at 2749 NE 14 Ave., Wilton Manors. 954561-9785. The Oakland Park Kiwanis Club meets Wednesdays from 7:30 to 8:30 a.m. at Peter Pan Diner, 1216 E. Oakland Park Blvd., Oakland Park. 954-566-9957. The Pompano Beach Kiwanis Club meets Wednesdays at noon at the Riverside Grille at the Sands Resort, 125 N. Riverside Drive, Pompano Beach. 954-444-4815. The Greater Pompano Beach Senior Citizens Club meets on the second Wednesday of the month at the Emma Lou Olson Community Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach, at 10 a.m. 954-9437787. The Alzheimer’s Caregivers Support Group meets Wednesdays from 10 a.m. to noon at the NE Focal Point Alzheimer’s Day Care Center, 301 NW 2 Ave., Deer eld BeachThursdaysThe Rotary Club of Oakland Park/Wilton Manors meets every Thursday from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. at Tequila Sunrise Mexican Grill, 4711 N. Dixie Hwy., Oakland Park. 954-491-6158. SightingsContinued from page 16 See SIGHTNGS on page 25

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20 The Pelican Friday, June 29, 2012 Send The Pelican your news to mdpelican@yahoo. WORSHIP DIRECTORY: Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad. Rev. Hyvenson Joseph enter the town. If a person has no ID, a resident with a valid ID who knows the person requesting entrance may vouch for the person. Cedeno advised securing important documents such as bank statements, passport and birth certi cates. And obtain cash in case power is lost and you can’t get to an ATM. In its Hurricane Guide [online at sheriff.org] he said BSO advises, as you prepare supplies for hurricane season, assume that you will need supplies for a minimum of three days, but stock enough for seven days. Begin gathering hurricane supplies at the start of the season in June, especially drinking water at least one gallon per person per day, and have at least a seven-day supply. Water is generally the rst commodity to disappear from store shelves when a hurricane is approaching. Use this checklist as a guide for your preparations: 1. Have plenty of canned food and a manual can opener; perishable food items will spoil quickly if electricity is lost and refrigerators are inoperable. 2. Stock evaporated milk and other non-perishables like peanut butter, cereal, granola bars, instant drink mixes, dried fruits and pet food 3. Store bottled drinking water before the rush begins. Allow at least one gallon per person per day for two weeks. 4. Have several batterypowered radios, ashlights, lanterns, extra batteries and battery-powered televisions. 5. Purchase a tube of silicone caulk for sealing bathtub drains. 6. Check rst aid kits to make sure it’s properly stocked and over-the-counter medications have not expired. 7. Inspect hurricane shutters; replace missing or damaged panels. Check plywood to cover windows and doors. 8. For those without hurricane shutters, June is generally too late to order them for the current season. Buy plywood now and don’t forget the hardware and tools you’ll need to attach it. 9. Remove damaged limbs from trees and prune branches so winds can blow through. Dispose of trimmings as soon as possible. Never leave trimmings where winds can turn them into projectiles. 10. Consider the purchase of a propane-fueled camp stove or grill. If electricity is lost, this may be the only way to cook. Only use these items outdoors. 11. Make sure chain saws are lled with gas, oiled and ready for use. 12. If purchasing a generator, buy it well before a storm approaches when supplies and selections are plentiful. If LBTS residents need help physically getting ready for a storm, such as assistance putting up shutters, members of the town’s Volunteer Fire Department will be more than glad to come out and help, said Fire Chief Steve Paine. If you need help, call the VFD at 954-640-4250 to arrange an appointment. EvacuateContinued from page 1The city’s chief sources of revenue are ad valorum taxes, $5.8 million, and the utility tax, $2.1 million, both numbers up $100,000 over last year’s projections. The city operates with a contingency fund of $5 million for shortfall in operating revenues, the costs associated with hurricanes and other natural disasters and emergency infrastructure repairs. Budget hearings will be held for the public Thursday, Sept. 13 and Monday, Sept. 24 after which the nal budget and millage will be formally adopted. By that time, the city’s new nance director Frank DiPaolo will be in place. DiPaolo replaces Terry Sharp who retired in June. The comptroller for Dania Beach since 2006, DiPaolo graduated from the University of Florida in 2002 and from Nova Southeast in 2007. He became a CPA in 2009. Dipaolo will assume his duties here after July 4. “We wanted someone with governmental background,” the mayor about his choice for the job. Lighthouse Point budgetContinued from page 4

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The Pelican 21 Friday, June 29, 2012 for years. Some time ago, I noticed that the American Flag here was in tatters. They took care of that on the same day.” Johnson added that the post of ce pays for a cleaning service that is supposed to clean every day. Frank Mariano, manager of the Tropical Reef post of ces, that includes this city’s and a new of ce on West Atlantic Boulevard, con rmed that Support Services of America has the contract for the post of ce. Mariano says that the cleaning service is responsible for the employee’s bathrooms, break rooms and outside lobby. But he added that nonfunctioning lights and peeling interior paint require professional experts. “We have had work orders in for this post of ce location for two years. But funds for the repairs have not yet been approved,” he said. “We are always looking for donations.” Mariano suggested that if an electrician wanted to donate the services, the lights might get repaired sooner. City Administrator John Lavisky said the city had requested that the cleanup get started over two years ago. But the most that was done to spruce up the building was a new paint job underwritten by the leasing company Brixmor, Commissioner Sandy Johnson points out a damaged electrical outlet. See insert.located in the Venetian Isles Shopping Center. A spokesperson for Support Services of America at its California of ce said he would nd out if Support Services of America had the contract and if so, make an attempt to see where the breakdown was. Meanwhile, business is active here regardless of the low light, dirty fans, peeling paint and requests for help tied up in red tape. That is to say—the mail is getting through. Peeling paint is a common sight in the Post Of ce lobby. [Staff photos] Post of ceContinued from page 3

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22 The Pelican Friday, June 29, 2012 Classi eds Call 954-545-0013 Pelican Classi ed ads Mean Business! 954-783-8700! Use The Pelican Classi eds to get the job done. Call 954-7838700 HELP WANTEDWILLING TO EDUCATE-Highly motivated individual for rewarding career in nancial services with Primerica. Call 954-729-0192. 7/6 LOCAL PEST CONTROL CO Looking For Quality Sales/Service Tech. Must Be Dependable, Team Player, Good Drivers License & People Skills. Will Train Right Person. ALSO Of ce Assistant – Computer – People & Phone Skills Needed. Fax Resume 954418-3982. 6-29 MAINTENANCE TECHNICIANA Property Management Company Is Searching For A Maintenance Technician For A Mid-Rise Property Located in Pompano Beach, Fla. Candidates Need to Have General Maintenance Knowledge, Have Experience In Preparing Vacant Units For Occupancy, Be Able To Work A Flexible Schedule, Motivated & Be HVAC Certified. Position Offers Competitive Salary & Benefit Package. Interested Applicants Should E-mail Resume To hectorg@ pmiflorida.com Or Fax To 305-279-5703. 6-29SEEKING EMPLOYMENTCAREGIVER/COMPANION Caucasian Woman With 25 Yrs. Exp. To Assist & Care For Your Loved Ones. Days / Eves / Nights. References Available. 954-482-5494. 6-29 CARING HOME HEALTH – Seeking Live-in / Live Out. Can Be Recommended!! Please Call 954-496-4941. 7-6 CNA / HHA – 20 Yrs Exp. Available 24/7. Will Take Care Of Your Loved One. References Upon Request. Call 954-8265499. 7-6 CAREGIVER CERTIFIED Seeks Position To Work With Sick Or Elderly – Open Availability! Inside Or Outside Of Home. Experienced With All Cases. 407-501-1656, 6-29 CNA – AVAILABLE Nights, Days & Weekends. Full Time Or Part Time. Excellent References & Reasonable Rates. Call 954-696-2091. 7-6 CERTIFIED HOME HEALTH AIDE With CPR Certi cate. Will Care For The Elderly Or Sick. Honest, Compassionate. 15 Yrs. Experience. 954-4867630. 6-29 NURSES AIDE / SITTER To Care For Your Loved One. Excellent References. Drive Own Car. Nights Or Days. 770-709-1875. 6-29 MALE CNA / HHA / COMPANION. Broward Area. Former EMT. All Certi cations / Compassionate, References. Call Ron 954-232-2832. Very Reasonable! 6-29 SERVICES DANNY BOY ELECTRIC – Lic & Insured. Lic. #EC13004811. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. 24/Hr Service. 954-290-1443. Beat Any Written Estimate. Sr, Discount. 6-29 GINGERS HOUSEKEEPING – 20 YEARS EXP. (Licensed) References Available. Honest & Reliable – Love To Clean Windows! Help Organize No Problem. FREE Estimates! 954-200-4266. 6-29 CALL BRENDAN THE HANDYMAN. Construction & Repairs. Carpentry, Plumbing, Roo ng, Masonry, Windows, Painting, Decking, Tile. FREE Estimates! 954-773-6134 – Emergency Calls. 7-20 LINDA’S CLEANING SERVICE – Residential – Commercial – Offices. Licensed!! Call 954-601-7978. 6-29 HANDYMAN – PAINTING – CARPENTRY – Pressure Cleaning. Decks! Everything Around The House. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. Call 561-350-3781. 7-6 HONEST HANDYMAN – HOME & BUILDING Maintenance/Improvements. No Job Too Small. Fast Friendly Service. Reasonable Rates. Local Resident/Homeowner. Call Today For Your FREE Upfront Quote. No Deposit Required. 754-366-1915. 629 GOT JUNK? DUMP TRUCK – CONDO CLEANUPS Trees/Landscape, Yard Fill. Pressure Wash/ Roofs/Home Repairs – Welding, Etc. Dave 954-818-9538. 6-29 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIESNew GREEN technology. New defroster control saves energy in home refrigerators, commercial chillers. Patented. All optical. Simple mfg. Strategic partners needed..www.NewAvionics.Com. 954-568-1991. CMUSICIANS WANTEDThe American Legion Symphonic Band is now accepting new members for the 2011-2012 season. College age to “seasoned seniors” are welcome. Rehearsals are held on Wed. evenings at American Legion Post 142 in Pompano. Percussionists, oboe, bassoon, trombone and euphonium players are especially needed. If you enjoy “making music,” call Jim McGonigal, Music Director at 954647-0700 for more info. MEDICAL HOVEROUND MVP5 Electric Wheel Chair! Includes Owners Manual, Head & Feet Rest, Battery Charger, DVD & Cup Holder $800. Pompano 954366-6788 Ray. 6-29 MOBILE HOMESDEERFIELD BEACH 3 Bedroom 1 Bath – Very Large Kitchen. Ceramic Top Stove & Refrig Incl. Large Enclosed Porch. Utility Shed – Washer, Dryer & New Gas Water Heater Included. $15,000 Cash! 954-708-3050. 6-29 CO-OP SALESPOMPANO BEACH Waterfront Co-op – 1/1 – 2 Available! Dockage Available! 2nd Floor! Side By Side. $59K Each. Coldwell Banker – Barbara – 954-629-1324. 7-6 ROOMS FOR RENTPOMPANO PRIVATE ROOM Furn / Unfurn In 3 / 2 Pool Home. $650 /Month. Includes W / D, Electric, Water, Cable, Internet. Mature Stable Male. 954-782-0471. 6-29 REAL ESTATE SERVICESSLIGTHOUSE POINT Is Florida’s Paradise! Selling Or Buying Real Estate Call The International Realtor! English, French, Spanish, Greek. Yvette Gaussen YES WE CAN REALTY 954-6147773 Or 954-773-8340.. 6-29 HOMES FOR RENTPOMPANO 2/1 DEN OR 3RD Bedroom, C/A, Fenced Yard. Newer Roof. $1050 Mo. Yrly Lease. Call Darci 954-783-3723. 520 NE 34 St.

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The Pelican 23 Friday, June 29, 2012 Tell The Pelican about your special event 954-783-8700 Tell The Pelican about your special event 954-783-8700 Classi eds Call 954-545-0013 If you cannot locate a Pelican call 954-783-8700 Advertise with The Pelican 954-783-8700 REAL ESTATE WANTEDI BUY HOUSES!! CASH!! AS IS! QUICK CLOSE! ANY AREA – ANY CONDITION! NO EQUITY OK. CALL NOW 954-914-2355. 7-20 CONDOS FOR SALEPOMPANO BEACH – DIRECT OCEAN VIEW!! Pet Friendly! 2/2 AT THE BREAKERS! $269,000. Call Juliana At Barclay’s For Details. 1-305766-4420. 7-20 LIGHTHOUSE POINT PARADISE – Beautiful Furnished 2/2! Only $115,000. English, French, Spanish, Greek. Yvette Gaussen YES WE CAN REALTY 954-6147773 Or 954-773-8340. 6-22 LIGHTHOUSE POINT 2/2 1st Floor – 55+ Complex. No Pets. Great Amenities. $55,000. Call Barbara @ Balistreri RE. 954263-7129. 6-29 CONDOS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH LEISUREVILLE 55+. Beautiful 2/1 Renovated Corner Condo 2nd Floor. Beside Pool, Clubhouse & Golf. Yrly Lease Unfurn. $800 Month. Furn. $900 Month. 1st & Last. Photos Available. prudhommejean@yahoo.com 954-784-0119. 7-6 APTS FOR RENTDEERFIELD/POMPANO BEACH 1 BR & 2 BR APTS FOR RENT. Remodeled, Paint, Tile, Etc. Washer / Dryer On Site. Pool. Pet Friendly. George 954-809-5030. 6-29 POMPANO BEACH A1A – 1 & 2 Bedrooms, Ef ciencies, Fully Furnished Including Utilities, Cable, WIFI, Laundry, Pool, BBQ. 700’ To The Beach. Starting At $269 Per Week. 954-943-3020. 7-20 POMPANO – MCNAB RD & NE 18 AVENUE – 1 & 2 Bedrooms Furnished / Unfurnished. $695 $895 And Up. Pool, Tile Floors. Central A/C. 954-610-2327. 7-6 POMPANO BEACH NE 2/1 $950 – 2/1.5 Townhouse $1095 – SW 2/1 Low Move-in $950. – ALL FREE WATER – Rent + $70 Application Moves – U – In. 954-781-6299. 6-29 POMPANO BEACH / ATLANTIC / FEDERAL – Ef ciency $175 Weekly. No Security Deposit. Includes Cable, Electric, Internet. FREE Washer / Dryer. No Drug Record – No Evictions. 954-7090694. 6-29 POMPANO BEACH Studio Newly Renovated. Pool. Pet OK! $650 Per Month Yearly Lease. 1960 NE 48 Street. Call 954-857-5207. 6-29 POMPANO BEACH 1/1 APT. Newly Renovated! Pool, Pet OK! $700 Per Month Yearly Lease. 1960 NE 48 Street. 954857-5207. 6-29 POMPANO BEACH 900’ TO BEACH! Spotless 1 / 1 In 4 Unit 1 Level Building. No Pets! No Smoking! Walk To Shopping. $850 Month Lease Includes Direct TV. 401-461-8683. 7-6 POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 Bedroom From $495. Easy Movein. 1/2 OFF DEPOSIT. Remodeled. Great Location. 954-783-1088 For More Info. 7-13 COMMERCIAL FOR RENT-SALEPOMPANO COMMERCIAL OFFICE Spaces Available. Ranging From As Low As $500 To $700 Depending On Square Footage. Please Call Darci At 954-7833723. 7/13 DEERFIELD BEACH – Retail Of ce Warehouse – 700 Sq Ft With Loft. A/C, Bathroom. $575 Per Month. Call For More Info 561-654-1331 Or 561-9985681. 6-29 DOCK FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH DOCK –Wide Canal – No Wake Area – Whips. Quiet Canal. Call 954-946-3301. 6-29 DEERFIELD BEACH – Dock For Rent – 60 Ft. Water, Electric. No Fixed Bridges. Nice Location. $350 Month. 954-429-9347 Or Call Cell 954-288-9651. 6-29

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24 The Pelican Friday, June 29, 2012 Chihiro Kesterson and Ali don’t miss a Friday story time. Mom says, “Ali loves to see the other children and listen to the stories.” Beverly Swanson brings grandson, Jaden. She says, “He loves it here and reminds me to come every Friday. I know he looks forward to it.” Julie Lynctt brought her 20-month-old daughter, Olivia, for the rst time. Olivia sat very still but looked and listened as each child spoke. “This is great. I’m excited by this opportunity to introduce Olivia to the library,” said Julie. When the children in this group outgrow it, they can move right into Miss Jan’s group for three to ve-yearolds which meets on Mondays from 11 to 12 a.m. Jan Cashette who heads up this activity says, ”Enthusiasm runs high with my little ones as we read and explore crafts. We’re not rigid on the ages and welcome a few who are slightly older or younger. Some of the moms bring siblings. We work it out. Any child who loves stories, the written word and hands on crafts is welcome.” Always ready to take on the next generation, this library staff encourages children to be involved. During the school year, Donna Beale has a Tuesday evening story hour at 7 p.m. for ve to eight-year-olds who bring moms, dads, brothers and sisters. Keyes laughs because Donna’s group shows up in both pajamas and street clothing. “It’s a great bonding experience for child and parent,” she says. “A time when the technology is turned off, and child and parent listen to wonderful stories and share some time together at the day’s end.” The Pelican salutes this library, its new director and StorytimeContinued from page 10the volunteer story ladies. These library doors open wide to children of all ages and their families, inviting them into the world of books, art, lectures, clubs, computers, classes, personal assistance and the newest state–of-theart technology. No wonder the Doreen Gauthier Lighthouse Point library is known as “the city’s jewel.” Young readers are at home in the Lighthouse Point Library.per 1,000 gallons used to $5.70. The increases for customers using between 5,000 and 7,000 gallons a month would be 28 to 35 percent. Multi-family residences would get a perunit drop from $14.26 to $6.01 a month because, Burton said, less demand is placed on the sewer system. They would be charged the same volume rate [$5.70 per thousand gallons] as single-family homes. Residents living in duplexes will see reductions in their bills from 4 to 62 percent if their usage is less than 8,000 gallons a month. More than that and the bills will increase. The biggest change would occur in rates for commercial properties. The difference in demand on the system from one commercial property to another is signi cant, Burton said. He recommended assigning a certain number of units to commercial properties based on meter size. The base charge would be apportioned by multiplying the single-family charge by the number of equivalent units. Burton proposed adding administrative fees on bills for meter reading and customer service costs. Residential units will be charged by the unit; commercial properties by the size of the meter. Under the current rate structure, restaurants and laundromats are assigned as one unit which means they aren’t paying their fair share, Burton said. Under the proposed rate structure, hotels would be charged by meter size, not by the number of rooms. One person said paying by use is the only fair way. Mayor Roseann Minnet asked Burton why the town couldn’t do that, “Just charge everyone by what they use.” Burton said the town has xed costs whether the service is used or not. “You have fees for ‘readiness to serve.’” Without that, he said snowbirds wouldn’t be paying when they’re not here. In 2021, the town will need to rebuild two lift stations, Town Manager Connie Hoffmann said. Cost is estimated at $1.1 million. Water ratesContinued from page 3

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The Pelican 25 Friday, June 29, 2012 BinsContinued from page 1containers in business zones 1 and 2, the commission took no action, saying that to allow Moyer his bins would require granting him a variance. Then bins began appearing all over the city. Some were labeled “Shoes for the Cure,” and bore the Kiwanis Club logo. Others indicated donations would go to good causes and had contact phone numbers. But some bore no information other than a recycling symbol and a request for clothing. In an effort to stem the proliferation of these illegal containers, Deer eld of cials considered passing legislation. Assistant City Manager Keven Klopp said the city looked at many model ordinances but, “when you dealing with rogue operators, creating an ordinance is not rational. Many cities enacted legislation and found it didn’t work. Why set up a permitting process if it is not followed? We are getting results with outreach and education. We tell the property owner the box is not in compliance and they are responsible for its removal. And we have gotten results.” Most property owners are unaware they are responsible for removing the bins, or that they are not in compliance. In some cases, the property owner does not even know who placed the bin. The most common infraction is that the collection bin is not on the business site plan. Since code enforcement began telling property owners the bins had to go, 16 large ones have been removed. One, with no ID or phone number, still hangs out on the east end of the Target Superstore center at Powerline Road. Still on the streets, however, are small bins that claim to be collecting “Shoes for the Cure.” Lured by the thought that it would be good for the community to recycle old shoes and by the promise of some cash, the local Kiwanis Club undertook “Shoes for the Cure” as a project and placed bins in prominent places around town. There is a bin at Deer eld Beach City Hall, at the city recycling center, Deer eld Country Club and at several business locations. Project Chair Avis Swenson lled her car trunk with donated shoes for the bins and got permission to place them at all the locations. But somehow the promise made “By Shoes for the Cure” founder Adam Levine, never materialized. The Kiwanis Club was promised 10 cents of every 30 cents he made selling the shoes to recyclers. “We made about $140,” Swenson said this week. Aware that the city was cracking down on the bins, she attempted repeatedly to call Levine. It was not until this week, when she left “a message that wasn’t so nice,” that Levine responded saying he would pick up his bins. “I repeatedly called for him to pick the bins up,” Swenson said. “The Kiwanis logo is on there, but we never got payments. I asked BSO If I could remove them myself and they said no, they were private property. I didn’t know what to do.” Klopp said the property owner can remove the bins if the collector refuses to do so without violating any law. Levine’s excuse for letting down the Kiwanis Club is that he had “troubles with my partner.” He said he had his bins in many schools in Boca Raton that participate with him in providing shoes for the poor and in the recycling effort. Levine blames the big collectors – the Salvation Army, the Red Cross and the unnamed bins that have sprung up for squelching someone “who is just trying to make a living.” For the big collectors, used clothing is a “multi-million business,” according to Levine, and there is little charity involved. Klopp said for legit charities, such as the Salvation Army, the collection bins would be legal if the site plan is modi ed. “It’s a minor change,” Klopp said. The Deer eld Beach Kiwanis Club meets at noon every Thursday at the Deer eld Beach Hilton, 100 Fairway Dr., Deer eld Beach 954-242-6083. The Pompano Beach Republican Club meets on the fourth Thursday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach. 954-786-7536.SightingsContinued from 19 The Pelican Call us! 954-783-8700

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26 The Pelican Friday, June 29, 2012 Capt. RJ Boyle is an experienced angler in South Florida. His studio is located in Lighthouse Point. Call 954-420-5001. Deer eld Beach Andrew Carter Morris, a resident of Deer eld Beach, has signed with new Nashville label, MTD, which will release his CD in September. Morris grew up singing songs in the style of George Jones, Johnny Cash and Waylon Jennings and it is this return to “old country” that attracted MTD president Ron Fitzgerald. Morris’s four-piece band will be on stage at the Deer eld Beach Fourth of July celebration, 3 to 5:15 p.m. He can also be seen and heard July Hometown boy performs July 4thPlan for some dolphin this weekendImmokalee The annual Elvis Fest competition brought a dozen Elvis tribute artists to Immokalee. First-time contestant David Morin of Pompano Beach, Fla. won the second place prize of $1,500. He sang “I Was the One,” and “Shake, Rattle and Roll.” Third place, $1,000, went to Jeff LaJess of Seminole, Fla. LaJess has competed in every Elvis Fest held at the casino. First place winner was Irv Cass of Fenton Michagan. He received $2,500 with renditions of “Let It Be me” and “Suspicious Minds.”Pompano resident takes second spot in Elvis Fest Lighthouse Point Those looking to cap their week by catching some dolphin will be in luck. Late this week big dolphin were being caught weighing up to 45 pounds offshore. One bene t of Tropical Storm Debby, says Capt. JR Boyle, is some good shing. It’s basically shaking up the water column. And shing for this weekend should be really good. But inshore shing, should be pretty good too. King sh and snapper seem to be biting the most. Catching them with live bait however might be a tricky task. And that’s because live bait gets scarce with the full moon. A full moon is scheduled this weekend. “It’s tough to catch live bait on the full moon. They move and relocate.” So Boyle suggests stocking up on plenty of chum and sardines.

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The Pelican 27 Friday, June 29, 2012 Tell The Pelican about your special event 954-783-8700 vulnerable to a hurricane. “They’re going to investigate it [again],” said Boehm after meeting with the Citizens representative. Citizens, a non-pro t insurance company, was established by state of cials to provide insurance to Florida residents after many private insurance companies left Florida because it was no longer pro table. Deer eld Beach resident Neville Gombs says the inspector who came to his house told him the property was made of too much wood. For that, he’s facing an increase of at least $600 a year. “It seems like every time I look around, they keep raising insurance,” said Gombs, who has owned his home for 30 years and says hurricanes have never caused any real damage to his property. “We haven’t had a hurricane since what, 2005? So why should we have to suffer every time something happens?” he asked. Citizens requires that homes be insured for 100 percent of the replacement cost. To calculate the cost of replacing a damaged or destroyed home, Citizens looks at construction labor and material expenses, code variations, demographics and other costs related to residential construction. A free inspection is provided to review each property. Citizens spokesperson Candace Bunker, in an email to The Pelican wrote that as an alternative to Citizens’ premium calculator, customers can also have another insurance company inspect their property. In addition to the cost of premiums, if a catastrophic storm were to deplete Citizens’ funding, the company has the right to levy a onetime assessment of between 15 and 45 percent. Dirk DeJong, president of Frank H. Furman Insurance, located in Pompano Beach, says homeowners can do a lot to get a cheaper premium. Updating old systems, such as plumbing and electrical work, can lead to a lower premium because the older something is the more prone is to be damaged during a storm; newer systems are more likely to survive a storm without incident. “It’s important that people update and that their homes are in good shape,” said DeJong. He added that inspectors also look at the condition of the roof, support tresses, garage doors, front doors and hurricane shutters. “You will get a substantial credit on your windstorm policy [if all those are in good shape],” said DeJong. Pompano resident Brad Tremper, facing an increase of $1,200, is also wondering why he is paying more when his home has never seen serious damage. “The house has been there for almost 50 years and not a thing has happened.” Eight years ago he was paying $1,100 a year. Now his Citizen’s bill is $5,000. “It’s sad. I could just save my darn money and put a new roof on the house for what they want to charge,” said Tremper. But although homeowners without a mortgage can legally decline insurance, it’s not something DeJong recommends. “Insurance is relatively inexpensive based on the size of your asset,” he said, adding that homeowners could save money over a few years but if a big storm comes through and wipes out the home they would lose their biggest asset. Like some of her constituents, Clarke-Reed’s home also failed inspection – a bathroom door that leads to a patio area outside lacked a shutter. In 2010, she was with the majority of state legislators who voted to allow Citizens to increase rates by up to 10 percent for new policies beginning in January 2011. But she says Citizens is now trying to remove the cap. On July 16, a public workshop will be held to discuss the possible removal of the cap. The workshop will be held in Miami but Citizens has not chosen an exact time or location. Clarke-Reed said she understands that Citizens has to be kept solvent and ready to absorb the costs associated with the next hurricane but “if the residents can’t pay, it will never be actuarially sound.” Visit www.citizens a. com for more. Rep. Gwyn Clarke-Reed has also opened her of ce to those who have questions about Citizens. Call 954-786-4848. CitizensContinued from page 1 the lead on the issue. He asked the petitioner, “All my best experiences as a young person involved the Boy Scouts. I won’t beat around the bush. If a kid belongs to the Boy Scouts or an adult is a leader in the Boys Scout and information comes out that the person is gay, could he be prohibited from joining the Boys Scouts or prohibited from participating?” Keith Jones of the South Florida Council of Boy Scouts said, “A kid, no. A leader, there’s a possibility, yes.” Because of the national charter?” Brown asked. “Jones said, yes.” Brown said he had no problem with a private organization having membership requirements. But he said he has a philosophical problem providing public funding if there is discrimination, and he would not support the fund request. “When you stop the funding, the kids I serve won’t be able to participate,” Jones said. Vice Mayor Scot Sasser moved to support Jones’ request, but his motion died for lack of a second. The commission did approve a $10,120 contribution to the Aging & Disability Resource Council, $2,000 to Women in Distress, $1,547 to Kids Vote Broward and $551 for Family Central. In 2011, the Aging & Disability Resource Council provided town residents with $20,289 in services. The town has 3,526 residents over age 60. The Family Central grant will yield $31,802 in federal dollars. The program provides childcare so low-income parents can work and take part in training programs. FundingContinued from page 2

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28 The Pelican Friday, June 29, 2012 is the underdog in the nancial contest but says she is counting on “grassroots support” to get her elected. She points to her election to the county commission when she won with very few campaign dollars against an incumbent. Following the 2010 U.S. Census, party af liations shifted in Dist. 22 enough to give Democrat candidates the edge after a long history of Republican representation. The winner of the democrat primary will face Republican Adam Hasner, a member of the Florida House. While Frankel is getting support from Democrat heavy-hitters such as former governor Buddy McKay, Cong. Alcee Hastings and Cong. Frederica Wilson, former education commissioner Betty Castor, former gubernatorial candidate Alex Sink and Broward county Commissioner Suzanne Gunzberger, Jacobs has gathered endorsements from the unions – AFL/ CIO, the state and county Police Benevolent Association, the Broward County Council of Fire ghters, the United Transportation Union as well as the groups Democracy for America and the Palm Beach Voter’s Coalition. A resident of Pompano Beach, she is also supported by a number of local elected of cials.JacobsContinued from page 7Primary elections take place Aug. 14 for Congressional candidates. Frankel and Jacobs will face each other. On Nov. 6, the winner of the primary will face the Republican candidate for the 22 District Congressional Seat. P o m p a n o Pompano G r e e n Green M a r k e t Market e v e r y every S a t u r d a y Saturday m o r n i n g f r o m morning from 8 a m t o 2 8 a.m. to 2 p m a t t h e p.m. at the c o r n e r o f W e s t corner of West A t l a n t i c B l v d Atlantic Blvd. & C y p r e s s & Cypress R o a d Road. Eat Healthy!

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