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Pompano Pelican
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00090900/00305
 Material Information
Title: Pompano Pelican
Uniform Title: Pompano Pelican
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: Pompano Pelican
Place of Publication: Pompano Beach
Publication Date: 06-22-2012
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Pompano Beach
Coordinates: 26.234722 x -80.125556 ( Place of Publication )
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00090900:00305

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Friday, June 22, 2012 Vol. XX, Issue 25 Wherever you are, read The Pelican @ pompanopelican.com Send news to siren2415@gmail.com Pompano Beach Deer eld Beach Lighthouse Point Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Wilton Manors Oakland Park Hillsboro Beach The Galt Palm Aire The Pelican Pelican Hurricane HistoryWelcome to the season of anxiety, or hurricane season, in South Florida. The Pelican is grateful to Tom Nolan, accredited marine surveyor and electrical engineer who serves as assistant educational of cer for the Pompano Beach Sail and Power Club. Nolan provides the information below on on page, help for boaters at storm time. Most residents have lived through hurricanes and know the preparation required to cut the odds of damage to ourselves and our properties. Here are some of the memorable storms that left their marks on our area. Oct. 18, 1906, 105 knots, Florida Keys No Name Signi cant damage to structures Sept. 18, 1926, 115 knots, Greater Miami No Name Ended the Florida 1920s economic boom. Sept. 17, 1928, 130 knots, No Name Okeechobee The lake breached the dike and killed many. Sept. 17, 1947, 135 knots, Fort Lauderdale No Name 155 MPH of cial sustained wind at Hillsboro Lighthouse. Oct. 16, 1947, 75 knots, Hurricane 8Second one in a month, wet storm with ooding. Aug. 27, 1964, 100 knots, Cleo-Tides 5 ft. above normal in Pompano. Aug. 24, 1992, 145 knots, Andrew Cat 5 at landfall in Miami. Oct. 24, 2005, 105 knots, WilmaWidespread building and roof damage. Florida land-falling storms have occurred from May through December with September being the busiest month.By Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach It only takes one has been the mantra for re, police and other rescue services when it comes to the hurricane season. Pompano Beach Fire Chief Harry Small ascribes to the mantra and adds, When you live where we live, its not a matter of if, its when. He recalls the famous unnamed hurricane of 1947 when people on Powerline Road were waist deep in water and newspaper photos depicted refrigerators oating down roads in Pompano Beach. The 1947 hurricane was the last major storm Broward had. Andrew [in Dade County, 1992] came during a relatively slow season, he says. And Wilma was a Category 2 if that. Its all about preparation. Checking out shutters prior to any storm announcement, assessing the ability to live without access to water, electricity or food and leaving early to avoid evacuation traf c jams are all Its time now to check shutters, lay in food and water and consider evacuationSee STORM on page 20 Hurricane Wilma [2005] was not quite a Category 2, but its wrath remains a clear memory in the minds of South Floridians who watched this storm blow through town in the middle of the day. Electricity, water, food and other supplies were hard to come by in its aftermath. [Photo courtesy of Pompano Beach Fire Department]By Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach Sales are great and steady, says Rafael J. Roco division president for D.R. Horton, a Fort Worth company that is building town homes at a steady rate in Pompano Beachs Orchid Grove. Located at 649 Cypress Road between Atlantic Boulevard and McNab Road, these tony homes are a Lauderdale-By-The-Sea hit with young families. But it hasnt always been that way. The land has a long history. Once it was a booming shopping center with Publix Supermarket, an A&P, Rite Aid Drug Store, J Byrons Department Store, a laundry, shoe shop and furniture store s. The center fell on hard times in the late s and s when it was outclassed by newer and larger centers that hurt shop owners. J. Byrons closed all its stores and Publix pulled out to rebuild. The death knoll rang clearly, and the shopping center lingered into the new century a weedlled blighted area, rife with crime and vagrants. The property became an albatross. The late Mayor E. Pat Larkins suggested the land be turned into a cemetery because it already See ORCHID on page 4Orchid Grove homes prove perfect t in PompanoGet serious, Get serious, its storm season! its storm season!

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2 The PelicanFriday, June 22, 2012 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFLauderdale-By-TheSea Town commissioners agreed to move forward with nal design plans for the East Commercial Boulevard stormwater and streetscape improvement project. Commissioners approved schematic designs for two blocks from A1A to the beach during a special meeting Tuesday. Total cost of the proposed project is $1.896 million.New designs for Commercial Boulevard include stage and two beach plaza areasThe easternmost block includes plans for two plaza areas, a stage plaza and a beach plaza. In presenting the plans, Steven Fett, architect with the design team, said the elevated stage plaza could accommodate groups already performing in town and be used at other times by vendors and local businesses. The beach plaza could be a exible, always changing area, where the town could host events, he said. This area could be covered with Bermuda grass, a seashell beach-colored aggregate or with actual sand. Taking the sand idea from a sandbox, Fett said sandcastle events could be staged there under umbrellas or fundraising volleyball tournaments or concerts could take place. We were charged with creating a memorable place, he said, showing photos of a large sandbox in a street in Ottawa, Ontario with crowds playing in the sand. The beach plaza can be activated with bistro tables and serve as a waiting area for the area restaurants. After earlier meetings with the commission, the design team was directed to make sure the turn-around area at the beach pavilion was clearly marked and there would be no bottlenecks. That area has See COMMERCIAL on page 19 Harbor Village Shoppes businesses hope for the best as parking re-opens See PARKING on page 27 By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach Parking has been fully restored at the Harbor Village Shoppes, located near the beach on Atlantic Boulevard. And for business owners there, some of who say sales are down as much as 70 percent, sooner is better than later. Made up of two parking lots, the city worked on Harbor Villages east lot rst and re-opened it May 25. Work on the west lot nished a week ahead of schedule, in time for patrons to park by yesterday morning. Horacio Danovich, the engineer in charge of the parking redevelopment, said portions of the west lot would be closed at various times for construction purposes. Harry Patel, consultant for The Vega Company, which sells beer and wine on the east side of Harbor Village, estimates that since construction began on the east parking lot, business has been down about 65 percent 15 percent of that, he estimates, is the normal seasonal drop. And although parking in front of the store is open again, Patel said the fencing that has gone up in front of the businesses gives people the impression that everythings closed off. The parking lots great now that its open. Its just a matter of them getting nished [with everything],

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The Pelican 3 Friday, June 22, 2012 Advertise with The Pelican! 954-783-8700! By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach Ray Collier, this citys long serving postmaster and ardent historian, went down in history himself Tuesday night. Commissioners decreed June 19 Ray Collier Day and Historical Society Director Carolyn Morris presented him with the rst Pioneer of the Year Award. Collier, 78, a lifelong resident of the city, served 30 years on the Broward County Historical Commission and is this citys of cial historian. Said Morris, whose of ce in the Butler House is next to Colliers home on Southeast 4 Avenue said, When I need to check my facts, I call my neighbor, referring to Colliers mother lode of information. Collier was appointed postmaster here by President Lyndon B. Johnson in 1964 and served for 25 years. This city was incorporated June 25, 1925 making it 87 years old this week.Ray Collier, 78, accepts accolades from Mayor Peggy Noland for his years of serving as a Broward County historian.Collier receives Deer eld Beachs inaugural Pioneer Award from mayor Send in your news siren2415@gmail.com

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4 The PelicanFriday, June 22, 2012 was. Says Pompano Beach Mayor Lamar Fisher, D.R. Horton is a 34-year-old company and the largest builder in the country. Orchid Grove is a great economic engine for our city. It attracts new people and provides new revenues for the city. Commissioner Rex Hardin is also a big fan of D.R. Hortons work. That lot was one of the reasons I ran for of ce. We pushed for a landuse change from commercial to residential. We kept trying to bring in companies. Things didnt pan out, but we continued. year as the largest builder in the country.So how did Horton land in Pompano Beach?They found the project and stepped in. When the market turned [2007 to 2008], a lot of the smaller builders couldnt put inventory in the ground. They went out of business, said Roco. Now with its sales of ce open and active, Roco adds that the nancing options they have now are a lot better than renting. The town homes are divided into three layouts. All of the homes have three bedrooms, two and one-half baths and a one-car garage. But instead of the threestoried homes, these are all two oors. Roco adds that there is a driveway with space for the second car. Prices range between the $170,000s to the low $200,000s. There are several bene ts for public employees such as teachers where the builder may pay closing costs. The property now offers a clubhouse/ tness center, lake front homes and a childfriendly community. Call 954943-2146. Open House is seven days a week at Orchid Grove at model homes that have been decorated with simple elegance. Above is the master bedroom.; center re ects a breakfast room and marble counter, stainless steel kitchens are standard. [Staff photos] But hope rose. In 2003, Orchid Grove, a joint venture between Coscan Homes, a Fort Lauderdale company and Tarragon Corporation, a New York company, purchased the 32 acres and began to build luxury three-story town homes selling between the mid-200,000s to $500,000s. This venture failed in 2009, leaving empty lots and some half-built homes. Roco says his company stepped in to build town homes similar to the original plans, but these homes now focus on younger people: affordable prices with serious nancing plans.OrchidContinued from page 1 Hardin grew up in the area and said he had worked at one of the stores in high school. Now we have a brand new product with a clubhouse and a pool. I am absolutely thrilled. They are selling and building. This is the American recovery right here in Pompano Beach. Says Roco, D.R. Horton is in 87 markets and 27 states. We just celebrated our 10th

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The Pelican 5 Friday, June 22, 2012 By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFWilton Manors When Hurricane Wilma blew through South Florida in 2005 the biggest casualty for the City of Wilton Manors was communication. Communication was an issue, said Assistant City Attorney Leigh Ann Henderson. When Wilma hit, some city staff members were using Nextel phones. But problems with the areas Nextel tower, caused by the storm, made the phones inoperable. Since then, the city has taken steps to ensure City is con dent it has hurricane-related communications issues solvedcommunications run smoothly. City Manager Joseph Gallegos said the upgraded radio system will allow communication directly between each individual radio and with each individual department. In addition to an upgraded system, which includes a set of 13 recently purchased police radios from the City of Fort Lauderdale, Wilton Manors is also ready to coordinate posthurricane operations from its Emergency Operations Center, or EOC, inside city hall. Finding and removing debris after the high winds of Wilma proved to be one of the biggest jobs. And keeping clear records of debris clean-up is critical for FEMA reimbursement. [Photo courtesy of Wilton Manors] See COMMUNICATION on page 21

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6 The PelicanFriday, June 22, 2012 Deer eld Beach, Pompano Beach, Lighthouse Point, LauderdaleBy-The-Sea, Wilton Manors and Oakland ParkWilton Manors Oakland Park Hillsboro Beach The Pompano Pelican is published weekly on FridaysStreet Address: 1500-A E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, FL 33060 Telephone: 954-783-8700 Fax: 954-783-0093Letters to the Editor are encouraged and accepted for print if signed, although a writers name will be withheld on request; letters must also include a daytime telephone number. Advertising rates are available upon request. Subscription rate is $31.80 including tax for one years delivery in Greater Pompano Beach; $95.40/per year including tax for others in the United States; call 954-783-8700 for rates abroad. The Pelican is a nonpartisan newspaper and reserves the right to decline advertising. Copyright 2012. Reproduction of this publication in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission of the publisher. The Pelican is a member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, Deer eld Beach Chamber and the LBTS Chamber. The Pelican is a state certi ed woman-owned minority business. The Pelican is delivered to businesses, libraries, schools, of ces, hospitals, news racks and single family homes. All advertising and copy is published at the sole discretion of the publisher. We welcome your critiques and ideas concerning this publication. Anne Siren, publisherExecutive Assistant: Mary Hudson Graphics: Rachel Ramirez Windsheimer Bookkeeper: John White Classi eds: Fran Shelby Contributing Writers: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Judy Wilson, Malcolm McClintock, Judy Vik, Michael dOliveira Account Executives: Paul Shroads, Carolyn Mann, Bill Heaton, Bill Fox Special Of ce Assistant: Cathy Siren ESTABLISHED 1993 Volume XX, Issue 25 Founding Editor and PublisherAnne Hanby Siren Heres the deal with naming hurricanesCOURTESY OF THE NATIONAL HURRICANE SERVICEExperience shows that the use of short, distinctive names in written as well as spoken communications is quicker and less subject to error than the older, more cumbersome latitude-longitude identi cation methods. These advantages are especially important in exchanging detailed storm information between hundreds of widely scattered stations, coastal bases and ships at sea. The use of easily remembered names greatly reduces confusion when two or more tropical storms occur at the same time. For example, one hurricane can be moving slowly westward in the Gulf of Mexico, while at exactly the same time another hurricane can be moving rapidly northward along the Atlantic coast. In the past, confusion and false rumors have arisen when storm advisories broadcast from radio stations were mistaken for warnings concerning an entirely different storm located hundreds of miles away.History of Hurricane NamesFor several hundred years many hurricanes in the West Indies were named after the particular saints day on which the hurricane occurred. Ivan R. Tannehill describes in his book Hurricanes the major tropical storms of recorded history and mentions many hurricanes named after saints. For example, there was Hurricane Santa Ana which struck Puerto Rico with exceptional violence on July 26, 1825, and San Felipe [the rst] and San Felipe [the second] which hit Puerto Rico on September 13 in both 1876 and 1928. Tannehill also tells of Clement Wragge, an Australian meteorologist who began giving womens names to tropical storms before the end of the 19th century. An early example of the use of a womans name for a storm was in the novel Storm by George R. Stewart, published by Random House in 1941, and since lmed by Walt Disney. During World War II this practice became widespread in weather map discussions among forecasters, especially Army and Navy meteorologists who plotted the movements of storms over the wide expanses of the Paci c Ocean. In 1953, the United States abandoned a confusing two-year old plan to name storms by a phonetic alphabet [Able, Baker, Charlie] when a new, international phonetic alphabet was introduced. That year, the United States began using female names for storms. The practice of naming hurricanes solely after women came to an end in 1978 when mens and womens names were included in the Eastern North Paci c storm lists. In 1979, male and female names were included in lists for the Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico.See HURRICANES on page 12For boats too big or too cumbersome to move, oat emSecuring your vessel at a residential dockTalk to neighbors ahead of time and discuss everyones plans and timing and whether their boats are staying or leaving. If your vessel is docked on a residential canal you should allow room for other vessels to leave if they desire. If possible move your boat back away from the entrance to the canal. Look for other vessels likely to come loose in the storm and avoid them if possible. Remove shore power cables from the vessel and turn off the power to the dock. Pull the vessel farther away from the seawall than usual. Use canal-side lines attached to securely moored anchors or run across the canal. Dont tie up to a neighbors docks or trees without permission. Mooring whips can be helpful during smaller events but they may not extend long enough or be able to withstand the full force of the wind. Sometimes whips can become entangled. If you secure your vessel to the center of a canal use several sturdy lines ashore with your vessel in the center of the spider web. Anchors with adequate scope may also be necessary to prevent the vessel from moving forward and aft. Double up lines and tie all knots securely. Protect all lines by using cha ng gear at the dock and on the vessel where they can be abraded. It is better to secure the lines to dock pilings rather than to the cleats on docks. Do not put too many lines on each cleat on the vessel as the cleat may be pulled loose. Insure the direction of line pull is parallel and not perpendicular to the horns of the cleat. When you adjust the line lengths allow room for storm surge and remember that nylon lines will stretch under load. Attach preventers so that the dock lines will not oat off the top of the dock pilings when the water rises. On the dock side, use 2 x 6 wooden fender boards centered on each piling where possible. Remove the boat registration and insurance policy from the vessel and keep them with you. Once your vessel is secured take photographs of your vessel and nearby vessels from all angles prior to the storm. Online Resources http://www.boatus.com/hurricanes/brochure.asp http://www.boatus.com/hurricanes/boaterprep.asp http://www.uscg.mil/d7/airstaBorinquen/docs/HurricanePage/Boat%20Prepa ration%202008(9).pdf http://www.boatus.com/magazine/2011/june/hurricaneprep.asp http://marinesurvey.com/yacht/huricane.htm (1997) Tom Nolan is an Accredited Marine Surveyor and Electrical Engineer. He is the president of Latitude Marine Inc. which he founded in 2003. Tom is currently the District Safety Of cer/Assistant Educational Of cer for the Pompano Beach Sail and Power Squadron and was the former Flotilla Staff Of cer of Public Education for the Pompano Beach Coast Guard Auxiliary and has been boating in this area for over 25 years. Check with neighbors rst!

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The Pelican 7 Friday, June 22, 2012 Florida The League of Women Voters of Florida, or LWVF, reminds voters that the deadline to register to vote in the August 14 primary election is July 16.. Floridas primary election has never been held this early. Given the changes in the states elections laws, the League encourages Florida voters to call their local Supervisor of Elections to check their voter registration status and, if necessary, update it, said Charley Williams, LWVF Voter Services Chair. This is particularly important for voters who have recently moved or changed their names. If you plan to vote by mail, call your Supervisor to renew your vote-bymail request and make sure your ballot arrives in time for the election. If you are not sure, visit BeReadyToVote.org. LWVF has also partnered with Microsoft to offer smartphone users a quick and simple way to connect to their supervisors of ce. The League has created a unique smartphone tag that, when scanned, connects voters to a mobile website where they can access the Florida Division of Elections database to check their voter status. For more information about the upcoming elections and voter registration, make sure to visit www.BeReadyToVote. org. If you are Spanish speaker, you can visit www. VamosAVotar.org. Deadline to register for Florida primary is July 16 Deer eld Beach The major entrance road to Deer eld Beach High School, Southwest 15 Street, is not pretty. Sheila Foster told commissioners this week. The street suffers from drainage problems caused by unkempt swales, Foster said, and she asked if Community Block Grant funds could be used to remedy the problem. The local high school offers both magnet and International Baccalaureate programs which attract students from all over north Broward. Ive been told the money is not available now, Foster said, But Dixie Highway to the school is not a pretty street. Commissioner Ben Preston, whose district includes the school, agrees. This is a problem, he said. Preston said he has met with the city manager in an attempt to initiate a th Street Project that will deal with the issues. Preston said his goal is to raise the level of pride in the neighborhood but his efforts so far are preliminary were looking for money. Foster spoke as commissioners were approving a budget for $562,584 in HUD Community Development Block Grants. The money is being directed to home and business rehab, Westside Park ball elds, transportation for senior citizens, community outreach and GED tutoring and preparation. Foster also questioned the $112,516 being set aside for administering the money which is spent in low income areas. The 15th Street drainage problems are caused by the swales in front of homes being lled with debris or huge trees said Charlie DeBrusco, director of environmental services. Maintaining the swale is the responsibility of the homeowner, he added. The swale is designed to ood and take water off the streets. When it is lled in, water remains in the road longer than the 72 minutes considered normal by south Florida standards.SW 10 Street due for ninemonth improvement projectDeer eld Beach A $2.1 million improvement project on Southwest 10 Street begins Unkempt swales cause ooding on main road to Deer eld Beach High School See IMPROVEMENT on page 14By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFF

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8 The PelicanFriday, June 22, 2012 Business matters The Pelican takes a look at local business owners. Call The Pelican to nd out how you can tell your story here because business matters. 954-783-8700. By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFIf you can dream it, we can build it is the logo of this creative paver company which has been successfully making dreams come true for 21 years. Located at 4460 N. Federal Hwy., owner Jacqui Moskowitz says, All we need is a basic swimming pool and well add all of the bells and whistles including waterfalls, coping, waterline tiles, pool surfacing, spas, driveways, pergolas (an upgraded version of a tiki hut), outdoor summer kitchens, re pits and more. To enhance the value and eye appeal of ones home, stop into this unique outdoor showroom and see the hundreds of choices, colors, and shaped pavers and ideas available. Pavers can be concrete or tumble travertine. For the green buyers, Jacqui says, We even have pervious pavers that allow the water to drain into the soil. These pavers are made of a very porous concrete product and then installed in a special way to allow for perfect drainage. They are very attractive in many size, shapes and color options. They are more costly, but worth it to those who care about our environment. Jacqui was the of ce manager of The Paver Centers outdoor showroom lets clients see artistic additions for patio, home and pool areas Its hard to drive on Federal Highway and not see heads turn at the Paver Centers retro-architecture in Fort Lauderdale where pavers are transformed into countless enhancements for patios and pools. [Staff photo]The Paver Center for ten years before the former owner decided to retire and gave her the rst opportunity to buy the business. She says, I knew the business as well as he did, and he knew it. It was a perfect t for me because I really love this company and now its mine. Over the years, the options in paver choices grew to accommodate the changing tastes of customers. For example, this interview took place as The Pelican and Jacqui sat at a re pit which is also a table, a conversation center created of pavers. With the re glowing in the center, one can imagine relaxing in its ambiance while toasting marshmallows, hot dogs or grilling steaks or sh. Our hottest product currently is the tumble travertine which can be used in both the pool area and the driveway, says the owner. The variations in color and its newness on the scene make it very attractive to the current market. We are replacing a lot of older pavers with this product as clients decide to upgrade. The Paver Center keeps ve eld crews at work all the time. The teams of three and four men are mainly Brazilians who are expert in this eld according to Jacqui, and she says, Most of them have been with us for up to 15 years. We are very proud of the quality of work they do. We get calls everyday from clients who rave about the work done by these craftsmen. We also have ve design consultants who will help to make a clients dream a reality. Paver driveways remain very popular because of their curb appeal Owner, Jacqui Moskowitz, welcomes visitors to The Paver Center super showroom, which shows the variety of paver shapes and colors used to create driveways, exciting pool and patio additions available to enhance and enjoy ones property. See PAVER CENTER on page 12Pompano 4th of July Beach BashPompano Beach The city will hold its annual Beach Bash and Fireworks Extravaganza on Wednesday, July 4 at the Pompano Beach Fishing Pier, 222 N. Pompano Beach Blvd. The event begins at 10 a.m. and continues all day through the Fireworks Extravaganza which begins at 9 p.m. During the day, there will be a watermelon eating contest, relay races, arts and crafts projects, tattoos and a bounce house. Tribute bands including Doors Alive, Orange Sunshine, Turnstiles, and Classic Rock Therapy will perform at noon. Never Stop Belivin will take the stage at 7:30 p.m. featuring songs from the rock group Journey. Blankets and lawn chairs are allowed but personal reworks, glass containers, alcohol and pets are prohibited. The Northeast 14 Street Causeway and Atlantic Boulevard bridges will be in the down position from 9 to 11 p.m. Call 954-786-4111.Request a mosquito sprayBroward County The Mosquito Control Section sprays areas of Broward County by truck and plane, based on requests from residents. Seasonal rains, normally associated with spring and summer months, have contributed to the increase in mosquitoes. Visit broward.org and click Mosquito Services or call 954765-4062. Free Summer Film FestFrom now until Aug. 16, the Muvico in Pompano Beach, 2315 N. Federal Hwy., will be playing free movies every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday at 10 a.m. June 26, 27, 28 is Monsters and Aliens; July 3, 4, 5 is Megamind; July 10, 11, 12 is SpongeBob Squarepants ; July 17, 18, 19 is Rango; July 24, 25, 26 is Madagascar; July 31, Aug. 1, 2 is Shrek Forever After; Aug. 7, 8, 9 is Puss in Boots; Aug. 14, 15, 16 is Over the Hedge.

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The Pelican 9 Friday, June 22, 2012

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10 The PelicanFriday, June 22, 2012 Making a Difference Phyllis J. Neuberger wants your suggestions about people who are making a difference. Call 954-7838700. Send in your news! siren2415@gmail.com Advertise954-783-8700!Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Chamber members here are sponsoring BugFest-By-The-Sea, a week-long series of events for scuba divers taking part in Floridas annual lobster mini-season. BugFest includes a Bug Bake & Boil Lobster Cookout at El Prado Park on July 25 hosted by Lenore Nolan Ryan, a pier clean-up, photo contest, lobster hunting competition, music, a beach diving clinic and more. BugFest to date has received more than $3,500 in donated scuba gear and other prizes. Chamber President Mark Silver of Argenti Designer Jewelers designed a silver lobster pendant for the event. BugFest is on the hunt for more fun stuff to give out and is asking chamber members to donate a door prize worth $25 or more that could be given away during the lobster cookout in El Prado Park. To participate, contact BugFest Coordinator /Town PIO Steve dOliveira at 954-640-4209 or steved@lbts.govBugFest is all about the lobster Family Fun WeekLauderdale-By-The-Sea The Town of Lauderdale-By-The-Sea is hosting its Family Fun Week from Saturday, June 23 to Saturday June 30. During the week the town and local businesses will be holding special events. There will be skim boarding, scuba diving, snorkeling, dance competitions, pro footvolley matches, snorkeling, chocolate making, shing tournaments, cooking classes and more. Visit www.lbtsevents. com/activities for dates and times of activities. By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFThe Pelican pro led this active senior four years ago when he was busy volunteering at Dave Thomas Education Center in Pompano Beach as well as in John Knox Village, or JKV, where he is a resident. Since then his focus is behind a camera, taking endless photographs at every village event. Wherever he goes, theres a camera either in his pocket or dangling from a cord around his neck. I admit I have fallen in love with this hobby, he says, and the results seem to please everyone I photograph which is the biggest reward a photographer can get. I often work along side of Marty Lee, the professional consultant who does much of the village media, public relations and photography work. Marty has taught me a fantastic amount. I started out with a simple point and shoot camera. Now I use a Cannon T3I which is much more sophisticated. Ive learned that most people enjoy seeing their pictures on the computer. I create an album for each occasion and post the results on my web site for all to see. Anyone who wants copies can order them from the Kodak gallery. Rasmussen is often invited to take pictures at special occasion private parties which he does with great pleasure. People seem to be so pleased with the photos I take of them, their friends and families, he says, smiling. Thats most gratifying to me. He continues.This wonderful hobby has given me the opportunity to keep on learning. In fact, I have a tutor, Elven Booser, who has been teaching me photo shop once a week for the past ve years and well probably go on together forever. Ive learned how to improve my skills and to restore old photographs for people in the village. Their appreciation knows no bounds. Asked how much time he spends on photography, he estimates 25 hours a week. He also has served on the Village board of directors for the past eight years and says he enjoys representing the interests of the residents and the future of the village itself. I am particularly involved in the planning of the new health center which is Norm Rasmussen nds still another volunteer career as a photographer in John Knox VillageNorm Rasmussen loves being behind the camera at JKV Village events, private special occasion affairs, and during walks with his wife, Min, around the village lakes for visits with the swans and ducks. This beloved volunteer village photographer is appreciated by all of the residents as he preserves the many special moments in their lives. [Photo courtesy of Norm Rasmussen] BriefsSee PHOTOGRAPHER on page 17

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The Pelican 11 Friday, June 22, 2012

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12 The PelicanFriday, June 22, 2012 Advertise with The Pelican! 954-783-8700 and their longevity. They come with a 10-year warranty, which they usually outlast according to Jacqui who adds, The average cement driveway needs repair much more often. Many clients have told us that the paver driveway and patio improvements have helped to close the deal on their house sale. She concludes the interview saying, We do free estimates, but we invite all potential clients to visit our unusual super showroom rst to see the variety of ways to beautify their property. Visit www.pavercenter.com, its Facebook page or call 954-776-3338 for ideas and information. Paver CenterContinued from page 10Lauderdale-By-The-Sea The Chamber of Commerce Power Breakfast will be held on June 29 from 7:30 to 8:45 a.m. at the Blue Moon Fish Company Restaurant, 4405 Tradewinds Ave, Lauderdale-By-The-Sea.The featured guest speaker will be Broward County District 4 Commissioner Chip LaMarca who will discuss business development through tourism and beach renourishment. He will be introduced by LBTS Mayor Roseann Minnet. The gourmet breakfast will feature Blue Moons famous Eggs Benedict with options such as smoked salmon, ham and spinach. Vegetable quiches, breakfast meats, home fries, blintzes, fruits, oatmeal, yogurt, French toast, homemade jams and assorted juices will also be available. The cost will be $20 Reservations are encouraged. Call 954-267-9888. The event is open to members and non-members. Commissioner LaMarca joins breakfast group Retired Hurricane Names Since 1954The NHC does not control the naming of tropical storms. Instead a strict procedure has been established by an international committee of the World Meteorological Organization. For Atlantic hurricanes, there is a list of names for each of six years. In other words, one list is repeated every seventh year. The only time that there is a change is if a storm is so deadly or costly that the future use of its name on a different storm would be inappropriate for obvious reasons of sensitivity. If that occurs, then at an annual meeting by the committee (called primarily to discuss many other issues) the offending name is stricken from the list and another name is selected to replace it. There is an exception to the retirement rule, however. Before 1979, when the rst permanent six-year storm name list began, some storm names were simply not used anymore. For example, in 1966, Fern was substituted for Frieda, and no reason was cited. HurricanesContinued from page 6

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The Pelican 13 Friday, June 22, 2012 By Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach This month the Pompano Beach Rotary Club distributed $13,500 in checks to local charities. And each check came with a story regarding the charity chosen for this day. The event took place at Galuppis Restaurant with Rotary president Jay Ghanem presenting the checks. 4Kids came to the attention of the Rotary Board of Directors through Rotarian Ted Hasle. 4KIDS of South Florida is a non-pro t organization committed to providing a home for every child in crisis. Through a partnership of individuals, churches, corporations, and government agencies, 4KIDS has assisted over 15,000 children in 14 years. Hasles story is one of incredible coincidence. Four years ago, Hasle was seated at a table for the St. Marks Episcopal School graduation ceremonies. There he met a couple who volunteered for 4Kids. They mentioned a need for a photographer for the charity. Hasle responded, and he and his ancee became involved through Calvary Chapel. Two weeks later, at Rotary, the speaker representing 4Kids told the story of this charity for abandoned children. This story was pulling my heart, says Hasle, whose own father had grown up in a PB Rotary charities range from helping homeless kids to disaster reliefLighthouse Point Police Chief Ross Licata with Linda Mills as she accepts a check for Special Olympics. The Broward County Torch Run, a fundraiser for Special Olympic Games and sponsored by Broward Sheriffs Of ce, ends the Federal Highway run at Dan Witt Park in Lighthouse Point. [Staff photos] Frank Fernandez accepts a check for LifeNetfamily from Jay Ghanem. Commissioner Rex Hardin accepts a check for the Pompano Dynamos. Pompano Beach BSO Major William Knowles, Captain Wayne Adkins and Deputy Mike Johnson accept a check from Jay Ghanem for youth programs.See ROTARY on page 17

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14 The PelicanFriday, June 22, 2012 this week and sections of the road from Powerline to Newport Center Drive will be under construction until February, 2013. According to Florida Department of Transportation of cials, the road will be repaired, resurfaced, guardrails will be upgraded, ADA ramps added and new signage installed. The work will resolve some traf c issues, they said. In attempt to alert the public, a meeting will be held Thursday, June 28, 6 p.m. at the BSO Substation on Powerline Road, south of Hillsboro Boulevard. For weekly updates on lane closures, go to the website, www.d4fdot.com or call public information of cer Miranda Iglesias, 955-9407585.Aldi plans OKd; residents fear construction noise, dustDeer eld Beach Residents of Hampton Gardens sought assurances from the commission Tuesday that demolition work at a former Bible college would not begin before 8 a.m. and that some thought be given to the dirt and dust that could seep into their homes. The three-acre site at 747 S. Federal Highway will be the location of an 18,000 squarefoot Aldi Supermarket and a 4,000 square-foot bank. Work is expected to begin in the fall and last 10 months. Sal Demarco, who lives at Hampton Gardens Condominium directly behind the construction site, also wanted to know how far away loading docks will be from his home. The docks will be 50 feet from the condo property line, Aldi representative said. In an attempt to block sound, an eight-foot wall is being constructed and a tree line planted. Commissioners approved the Aldi site plan with the provision that no construction work begin before 8 a.m. The city code allows construction 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Saturday.Relay for Life supporters striving to reach $106,000Deer eld Beach Well on their way to meeting their $106,000 goal, the 11th annual Relay for Life organizers will hold fundraisers through August 31. The May 5 Relay, chaired by local businessman Gordon Vatch and his right-hand man TJ Eagan, raised $90,000 with 44 participating teams from Deer eld Beach and Lighthouse Point. Another major event set for tonight at Strikes@ Boca Raton is attracting 28 bowling teams at $150 each, good for at least $5,000 when auction items are included and Vatch said he is attempting to schedule happy hours at various restaurants for his cause. Anyone interested in supporting Relay, a major initiative of the American Cancer Society, can go to the Relay for Life website and check out whats coming up next. Herbal incense sales not legal hereDeer eld BeachCommissioners have outlawed the display or sale here of synthetic marijuana following a trend occurring across the country. Promoted as herbal incense and sold under the names K2 and Spice, the compounds are being called more potent than real cannabis and more dangerous. In some cases, use of the fake pot has precipitated psychosis in individuals as well as heart problems. In this area, Sunrise was the rst city to ban synthetic marijuana. Several others are working on it.ImprovementsContinued form page 7 Commissioner Joe Miller asked that the substance be regulated and said this week he would like see the drugs known as bath salts banned.

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The Pelican 15 Friday, June 22, 2012 By Malcolm McClintockPELICAN STAFFThe Point Cafe 420 N. Federal Hwy. Pompano Beach 954-532-1534 thepointcafe.com nitroyogurt.comThe Point Caf is an impeccably clean, albeit eccentric restaurant located The Point Caf serves up tasty meals and futuristic Nitro Yogurts [Left] The fabulous Saltimbocca Panini is loaded with lemon pepper chicken, Italian prosciutto, fresh mozzarella, pesto and tomatoes on grilled Ciabatta bread. [Above] The frozen rum pia colada with raspberry coulis packs a punch. [Photos by Malcolm McClintock]See THE POINT on page 16

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16 The PelicanFriday, June 22, 2012on Federal Highway just north of Atlantic Boulevard. This stand-alone edi ce with Greek statues guarding the front faade is divided into two main sections. On one side, is a pleasantly decorated dining section and, on the other, a remarkably quirky ice cream parlor with lifesize mannequins of mad scientists and huge tanks of liquid nitrogen lining the walls. Weve been open about a year now, says Isaac Efraim, a Brazilian native and restaurateur who has owned and operated several Broward eateries over the past few decades. I decided to open this restaurant in Pompano Beach with my wife Isis because it is a nice area where there is also a strong Brazilian community. Having owned a Subway franchise, a Monster Burger, a Ribs Express and a Captain Shrimp, Efraim has developed an unparalleled level of experience in the food business. His latest venture is an eclectic mix of high-quality traditional gourmet light fare along with space-aged Nitro yogurts and ice-creams. We are the only place in the world to make alcoholic frozen yogurt, says the creative businessman. I saw someone on TV working with liquid nitrogen and got inspired. Obtaining a frozen treat involves a four step process. First, the customer chooses the base (i.e. yogurt, ice cream or sorbet), then selects a avor from a list of 40 options (such as chocolate, passion fruit, tiramisu, peanut butter, pumpkin pie, etc), then opts for 2 mix-ins (e.g. Oreo cookie, chocolate chips, almonds, gummy bears, etc) and, nally, picks actual toppings like hot fudge, toasted marshmallows, whipped cream and the like. Nobody does it the way we do. In the evenings, we turn on the music, lasers and smoke machine it almost looks like a night club! From a more classical gastronomic perspective, The Point Cafs menu is replete with all the specialties of Efraims culinary past. Tender baby back ribs, conch fritters, snow crab, fried shrimp, BBQ pulled pork, smoked beef brisket, giant burgers, fresh salads, Alfredo pasta, breakfast specialties and, of course, eye-popping sandwiches such as Turkey with cranberry, roast beef with Dijon horseradish and even fried Tilapia. Our Saltimbocca Panini is our biggest seller, says Efraim of this gorgeous grilled Ciabatta bread sandwich over owing with lemon pepper chicken, prosciutto, fresh mozzarella, pesto sauce and tomatoes. Like all our Paninis, it is big enough for two people to share! We also have very inexpensive breakfasts, says Efraim. Indeed, The Point Caf serves the most affordable morning meals in Pompano Beach starting at $1.99 for an egg & cheese English muf n, $2.99 for bacon & eggs, and $4.99 for a large steak and egg sandwich. For lunch, I love our Philly cheesesteak and our juicy burgers. In fact, we offer the burgers in both 1/3 lb or lb sizes and use only certi ed Angus beef, insists Efraim. They go great with a cold beer, a nice glass of wine or even a frosty Tropical frozen drink. Breakfast meals start at $1.99, sandwiches and burgers at $4.99, seafood at $7.99 and specialty frozen treats at $4.99 ($7.99 with alcohol.) Beers are $1.99, wine glasses $4.99 and bottles $14.99. There is ample free parking, free wi. All major credit cards are accepted. Be it a rich coffee, a tasty Panini, loads of shrimp or an outrageous frozen treat, this is one spot that has all the right elements, including those on the periodic table. Catering is a big part of The Point Cafs business and the locale is perfect for all types of private functions including kids parties. For more info, visit the websites at www.thepointcafe.com and www.nitroyogurt.com. Enjoy! The PointContinued from page 15 Long-time associate Jean Jordan, The Point Caf owner Isaac Efraim and his friendly wife Isis show off a few house specialties.

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The Pelican 17 Friday, June 22, 2012 foster home. My father was a great man. Hasle became involved as a volunteer for the group through his photography and by assisting on the charitys business team. Two years ago, his interest in 4Kids went up a notch. He experienced the pain of watching very young children he had known get caught up in crisis and become wards of the state after their parents were arrested. When 4Kids stepped in with a home and two loving foster parents, he also experienced the relief that these children had found a safe place. Hasle says that in South Florida, nearly 200 churches actively support 4Kids and he is a frequent speaker on behalf of the charity. Other charities bene tting from this clubs fundraisers were American Cancer Society, Banche Ely High School, Broward Sheriffs Of ce Back to School and Christmas Bikes programs, Dynamos of Pompano Beach, Guatemala relief, Hope For Our Youth, Impact Broward Senior Volunteer Services, Kids in Distress, LifeNet Family Feeding Program, Rebuilding Together, Special Olympics, Broward, Woodhouse, and Boys & Girls Club. In addition to these charities, this club gave nine students college scholarship money and two disaster relief projects, one in Haiti and the other for the Alabama tornado amounted to nearly $5,000 in tents and other supplies for the people affected. One large project embraced by the club under the leadership of Rotarian Joe Usman, provided $46,000 to pay for surgeries that corrected clef palates for children in the Philippines. Rotary Club of Pompano Beach meets on Fridays for lunch at Galuppis Restaurant. To learn more, call 954-7863274. Greg Jones, director of Boys & Girls Club in Pompano Beach, arrived with a special thank you card for Rotary made and signed by the children at the club. RotaryContinued from page 13going to enable the village to have the newest and best nursing facility in Florida. Many of us are working on the speci cs to be sure that this facility is everything we hope it can be. He traded in golf and tennis for walks around the lakes with his wife, Min. We visit the ducks and swans. I carry my camera for pictures of other walkers, he says. I publish the pictures on my web site. Min and I are also getting involved in the tness center classes where we work out with guidance from our professionals. Rasmussen has had some very colorful experiences after retiring from a successful 35year career in senior management in the food industry. He signed on to the International Executive Service Corps which he claims changed my life forever. We went to Zambia, Africa where I volunteered with a dairy farmer, helping him with long range planning to become more successful. Min came with me and taught school. My next two assignments were in Zambia helping farmer/processors increase sales and productivity. In Ukraine, I created a ve-year-plan for a dairy processing plant. In Novgorod, Russia, I worked with the Municipal Agricultural Enterprise. My last African visit was to volunteer with Agricultural Cooperative Development International and Volunteers in Overseas Cooperative Assistance. When I got home from that last trip, I found out that the plane which left shortly after mine was blown up by terrorists. My wife and four children voted to have me cease my overseas travel. This ended the most exciting six years of my life. In 2003, he and Min moved into JKV and he hasnt had an idle moment since. Thank you, Norm Rasmussen, for your many years of volunteer service around the world and in JKV. PhotographerContinued from page 10

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18 The Pelican Friday, June 22, 2012

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The Pelican 19 Friday, June 22, 2012 been widened. Because of concern for sea turtles nesting at the beach lighting in the area cant face the ocean. Amber lights which face torward the ground are being designed into walls. In an effort to encourage a pedestrian-friendly atmosphere, the plans include a proposal for an all-red intersection at Commercial and A1A. With this plan, pedestrians would cross in all directions when all traf c is stopped. In the block from El Mar to A1A, sidewalks are proposed at 20 to 23 feet to allow for outdoor dining. A crosswalk is reduced from 80 feet to 37 feet. Parking has been the most contentious issue, as these plans moved forward, Fett acknowledged. With the plaza designs, all 12 parking spaces will be lost in the easternmost block of Commercial and 10 of 24 spaces lost in the second block. Three spaces will be lost on El Mar, where existing spaces closest to the crosswalk are illegal. Six spaces will be lost on A1A between the alleys. In a report to commissioners, Town Manager Connie Hoffmann said most of those eliminated parking spaces can be relocated within reasonable walking distance of the two blocks. She said the town expects to get 15 to 20 new spaces when the A1A and Wings parking lots are combined and recon gured. The commission approved a design contract for that project June 12. Municipal Services employees currently use 12 spaces in the A1A lot during daytime hours. Those spaces will be freed up when the town builds a proposed parking lot between Jarvis Hall and the Public Safety Building. Commissioners also approved the design contract for that project June 12. Staff also is working with an engineer on a design proposal to create new parallel spaces in the middle of South Bougainvilla Drive in areas where 90 degree back out parking doesnt occur on both sides of the road. We dont want sandboxes. We want a parking place that brings people in that spend money in the shops, said property owner Bill Ciani. He recently presented the commission with a petition signed by those objecting to the loss of parking with this project. If you want to do a town center with bands and weddings, do it at El Prado, he suggested. People who own businesses dont own this town, said resident Ken Kugler, urging commissioners to approve the plans, except for the sand at the plaza. Youve hired the experts. Build it, and they will come. Janet Deni, one of the owners of Kilwins Ice Cream, said she is always concerned about parking and would like to see a future plan for more parking in the community. Parking is an issue. I hear it from customers all the time. Deni said she was happy the town is being beauti ed and asked only that people be able to see through the tree canopy to the businesses. Resident Patrick Pointu said the project looks nice, but he questioned whether now was the time to spend money on beauti cation. Resident Patrick Potts urged commissioners to support the project. Do the brave thing. Let those (parking) spots go and then support the businesses. If this happens, this town will blossom far beyond what has taken place. Next it was the commissioners turn to weigh in. Commissioner Mark Brown said the town has to make these improvements. If we dont move now, we will miss the boat, he said, pointing out improvements Pompano Beach is making on Atlantic Boulevard. Brown said his biggest concern is how long it will take and the impact of disruptions on business. He wants incentives for contractors to move quickly to complete the project. Commissioner Chris Vincent agreed, noting, We need to revitalize or people will go somewhere else. We need to keep up with our neighbors. Vice Mayor Scot Sasser said he has concluded the replacement parking spaces are enough to move forward. We will have an incredible downtown area. I think we need to move forward, Mayor Roseann Minnet said. Commissioners agreed they want the seashell aggregate and not sand at the beach plaza. Several residents spoke against the sand. And they chose colorful Adirondack street furniture for the plaza areas. CommercialContinued from page 2 SightingsA community calendar of Broward County. Email events to siren2415@gmail. comSee SIGHTINGS on page 20 6-25 A kite making workshop will be held from 2 to 3 p.m. at the Pompano Beach Library, 1213 E. Atlantic Boulevard, Pompano Beach. The event is for ages 7 to 12. 954-786-2181. 6-25 Kite-making workshop 2 to 3 p.m. at the Pompano Beach Library, 1213 E. Atlantic Boulevard, Pompano Beach. Ages 7 to 12. 954-786-2181. 6-26 The Benevolent Patriotic Order of Does Drove 142 hosts a card party from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Pompano Beach Elks Lodge, 700 NE 10 St., Pompano Beach. $4. 561-4792002.

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20 The Pelican Friday, June 22, 2012 WORSHIP DIRECTORY: Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad. Rev. Hyvenson Joseph topics Small says should be in the conversation these days. This year, experts are predicting 11 tropical storms, ve hurricanes which two of them considered major hurricanes. People need to understand that when you move up in a category number, its not just a number, its exponentially higher, Small said. Categories 1 and 2 mandate evacuation for all residents living east of the Intracoastal Waterway. Categories above that mandate evacuation of all residents east of Federal Highway. We are hurricane central. Small says. People tend to be slow in evacuating. They have let their guards down because we havent had a major storm in a long time. No self-respecting Floridian should be caught in a long line [for shutters or hurricane supplies]. He adds that now is the time to have a trial run with shutters. Some will need lubrication. Plywood protection should be considered now along with the right tools and screws for installation. Its also a time to think about evacuation. Shelters are designed for ve percent of the population. If people are unprepared, they could panic and over ow the shelters. One bad storm could hit, and people wont have electricity for a month or two. I dont know if a lot of people are prepared to live within those conditions. It can take months and even years to recover, Small said. The chief said although evacuations are mandatory, re and police personnel will not drag people out of their apartments. But a surge could wipe out the electricity meaning there would be no elevators, water or food supplies. Residents might have to live without power for a long, long time. And that possibility could be deadly for people who are considered vulnerable, or those who would require assistance from others. Its been estimated that around three to four percent of this city is vulnerable, Small says. They are the ones who do not have the ability to get water, ice, food or other survival items. We are a city of 100,000, so that means about 3,000 are in this situation. After Wilma, we found people eating rotten food. Others were walking on soaked oors. If you factor in that the rest of us are able-bodied, and we look out for these people, they wont fall in the cracks. The re chief has other points that are critical to giving the community its best bet in surviving a big blow, should it be this year. Generators: Many condo associations do not allow generators because they could blow deadly fumes throughout the building. Before buying a generator, residents should check with management. Wet storms: Most people who die in hurricanes have drowned in the waters. A really wet hurricane can land 20 to 30 inches of rain and ood everything. We have built more drainage areas, but they are like saucers that once lled, spill over. The idea is to stay away from the water, Small said. Wind threats: Look at your house. Will it withstand the wind? If not, leave early. Dont wait until the eleventh hour. Whats the worst that can happen? A couple of days away from the house? Business owners: The boss should expect that people will need time at home to prepare for storms. Its a good idea to make these arrangements ahead of time. As storms approach the area, cities begin operating from emergency operation centers. This is where city employees will live and work 24/7; city hall for the duration and aftermath of a storm. But despite massive preparation Small says, Hurricanes are a mess. It will take everyones best. StormContinued from page 1SightingsContinued from page 19 6-26 The lm Moonstruck will be playing from 2 to 4:30 p.m. at the Galt Ocean Mile Library, 3403 Galt Ocean Drive, Fort Lauderdale. There will be a discussion of the lm after. 954-537-2877. 6-26 Arts and crafts 4 to 5 p.m. at the Deer eld Beach Percy White Branch Library, 837 E. Hillsboro Blvd., Deer eld Beach. 954360-1380.See SIGHTINGS on page 26

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The Pelican 21 Friday, June 22, 2012 At a cost of $400,000, funded by a federal grant, the EOC contains everything the city needs to communicate with county and state of cials and city staff after a hurricane or disaster hits. Constructed with reinforced concrete, the EOC contains laptops, phones, radios, televisions; whatever the city needs to run a response after a disaster. Weve even got air mattresses to support 24-hour staf ng, said Henderson. And to communicate and coordinate with the state and county in case of a storm, the city has two staff members trained to work with the Broward County Emergency Operations Center. The citys other facilities will also play a part in postdisaster response. The Hagen CommunicationContinued from page 5Park Community Center can be used to house city staff if needed while the Municipal Complex on Dixie Highway has shower facilities. Like city hall, both facilities are equipped with an emergency generator. And in addition to being prepared to communicate effectively, the city is ready to meet the physical needs of city staff. Along with a supply of bottled water and MREs, or Meals Ready to Eat, the city has an account with Publix and a contract with a local caterer to provide hot meals. We have a lot of things on tap, said Gallegos. After the winds die down and the waters recede, clean up efforts can begin. To handle the extra debris and yard waste generated by a hurricane, the city has contracted with two rms, one contracted to haul away the waste and the other to keep track of how much is hauled away. Keeping track of the debris is important because the Federal Emergency Management Administration, or FEMA, reimburses local governments for the expenses associated with hauling away debris. In recent months though federal of cials have asked various cities in Broward to reimburse FEMA for expenses incurred in Hurricane Wilma. The requests came because FEMA claims cities billed them for clean up projects that were ineligible. Boca Raton has been asked to give back $5.5 million, Fort Lauderdale $15 million and Deer eld Beach $1.6 million. Henderson credited the citys accounting practices with making sure it billed FEMA properly. We havent had to reimburse FEMA, she said.By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFWilton Manors Ted P. Galatis, Sr., father of Wilton Manors Commissioner Ted Galatis, Jr. and former attorney for the City of Oakland Park, died on June 13 at the age of 89. Born in Miami, Galatis, Sr., a Plantation resident, moved to Fort Lauderdale in 1938 with his parents, Peter and Florence and brother, Peter. Galatis, Sr. graduated from Fort Lauderdale High School in 1941. His family owned and operated four restaurants/ clubs in Fort Lauderdale, He graduated for the University of Florida law school in 1946. Ted Galatis, Jr., who has his own firm, Andrews & Galatis in Fort Lauderdale, said his father encouraged him to go into law ever since he was a boy. Galatis, Sr. was admitted to the Florida State Bar in 1946 and remained a member until his death. Galatis, Sr. was associated with several firms during the course of his career including Davis & Lockhart, Galatis & Kirsch and Galatis & Galatis. He also served as the city attorney for Oakland Park during the 1950s. Galatis, Sr. took a break from actively practicing law in 1952 when he was elected Justice of the Peace and judge of the Office of Small Claims Court. He resumed his practice in 1957 and continued until 2008. From 1983 to 1986, father and son worked together at Galatis & Galatis. He was the perfect mentor, said Galatis, Jr. I learned more from my father in three years than I learned in the next 10 years at a large law firm. Galatis, Sr. was a member of the Fort Lauderdale Junior Chamber of Commerce, Civitan Club, Broward County Bar Association, American Bar Association, Phi Alpha Delta, Theta Chi, Fort Lauderdales Beacon for the Blind and the founding member of the Little Theater of Fort Lauderdale. Galatis also served on the City of Plantations Planning and Zoning Board and chairman of the board of directors of Doctors Hospital in Sunrise. He is survived by his wife, Elizabeth, two sons, Ted and Charles, three grandchildren and one great-grand daughter. Funeral services will be held on June 29 at 11 a.m. at St. Gregory the Great Catholic Church, 200 N. University Dr., Plantation. The services will be held on what would have been Galatis 90th birthday.Ted P. Galatis, Sr. served as Oakland Park city attorney pompanopelican.com anytime

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22 The Pelican Friday, June 22, 2012 Classi edsCall 954-545-0013 HELP WANTEDWILLING TO EDUCATE-Highly motivated individual for rewarding career in nancial services with Primerica. Call 954-729-0192. 7/6 LOCAL PEST CONTROL CO Looking For Quality Sales/Service Tech. Must Be Dependable, Team Player, Good Drivers License & People Skills. Will Train Right Person. ALSO Of ce Assistant Computer People & Phone Skills Needed. Fax Resume 954418-3982. 6-29 MAINTENANCE TECHNICIANA Property Management Company Is Searching For A Maintenance Technician For A Mid-Rise Property Located in Pompano Beach, Fla. Candidates Need to Have General Maintenance Knowledge, Have Experience In Preparing Vacant Units For Occupancy, Be Able To Work A Flexible Schedule, Motivated & Be HVAC Certified. Position Offers Competitive Salary & Benefit Package. Interested Applicants Should E-mail Resume To hectorg@ pmiflorida.com Or Fax To 305-279-5703. 6-29 DOMESTIC HELP NEEDED Lighthouse Point. 5 Hours Once A Week! $100. Must Have Experience & References. Call 954-783-0305. 6-22 SEEKING EMPLOYMENTCAREGIVER/COMPANION Caucasian Woman With 25 Yrs. Exp. To Assist & Care For Your Loved Ones. Days / Eves / Nights. References Available. 954-482-5494. 6-22 AIDE / CNA First Hour FREE. Caring, Experienced. Licensed & Insured. Hourly, Weekly Or Live-in. References Available. Reasonable Rates. 561-367-0970. 6-22 MATURE LADY Seeking Livein Housekeeper / Companion Aide Position. Excellent References. More Information Call 305-761-7152. 6-22 CARING HOME HEALTH Seeking Live-in / Live Out. Can Be Recommended!! Please Call 954-496-4941. 7-6 MALE CNA / HHA / COMPANION. Broward Area. Former EMT. All Certi cations / Compassionate, References. Call Ron 954-232-2832. 6-22 SERVICES DANNY BOY ELECTRIC Lic & Insured. Lic. #EC13004811. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. 24/Hr Service. 954-290-1443. Beat Any Written Estimate. Sr, Discount. 6-29 GINGERS HOUSEKEEPING 20 YEARS EXP. (Licensed) References Available. Honest & Reliable Love To Clean Windows! Help Organize No Problem. FREE Estimates! 954-200-4266. 6-22 HANDYMAN PAINTING CARPENTRY Pressure Cleaning. Decks! Everything Around The House. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. Call 561-350-3781. 7-6 HONEST HANDYMAN HOME & BUILDING Maintenance/Improvements. No Job Too Small. Fast Friendly Service. Reasonable Rates. Local Resident/Homeowner. Call Today For Your FREE Upfront Quote. No Deposit Required. 754-366-1915. 622 GOT JUNK? DUMP TRUCK CONDO CLEANUPS Trees/Landscape, Yard Fill. Pressure Wash/ Roofs/Home Repairs Welding, Etc. Dave 954-818-9538. 6-29 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIESNew GREEN technology. New defroster control saves energy in home refrigerators, commercial chillers. Patented. All optical. Simple mfg. Strategic partners needed. www.NewAvionics.Com. 954-568-1991. CMUSICIANS WANTEDThe American Legion Symphonic Band is now accepting new members for the 2011-2012 season. College age to seasoned seniors are welcome. Rehearsals are held on Wed. evenings at American Legion Post 142 in Pompano. Percussionists, oboe, bassoon, trombone and euphonium players are especially needed. If you enjoy making music, call Jim McGonigal, Music Director at 954647-0700 for more info.ROMANCEATTRACTIVE SENIOR LADY Would Like Companionship Of Tall, Slim Sr. Gentleman To Dine Out. Dance! 954-633-4255 Kay. 6-22MOBILE HOMES DEERFIELD BEACH Double Wide Nice 2 Bedroom 2 Bath. 55+ Community. Pool, Tennis Courts. Asking $14,000 OBO. Call 954-531-6229. 6-22 DEERFIELD BEACH 3 Bedroom 1 Bath Very Large Kitchen. Ceramic Top Stove & Refrig Incl. Large Enclosed Porch. Utility Shed Washer, Dryer & New Gas Water Heater Included. $15,000 Cash! 954-708-3050. CO-OP SALESPOMPANO BEACH Waterfront Co-op 1/1 2 Available! Dockage Available! 2nd Floor! Side By Side. $59K Each. Coldwell Banker Barbara 954-629-1324. 7-6 HOMES FOR RENTPOMPANO COTTAGE STYLE HOUSE 2 / 1 Pool Large Fenced Yard. $1050 Month. 510 NE 35 Street. Call Darci 954-7833723. 6-29 REAL ESTATE WANTEDI BUY HOUSES!! CASH!! AS IS! QUICK CLOSE! ANY AREA ANY CONDITION! NO EQUITY OK. CALL NOW 954-914-2355. 7-20 CONDOS FOR SALEPOMPANO BEACH DIRECT OCEAN VIEW!! Pet Friendly! 2/2 AT THE BREAKERS! $269,000. Call Juliana At Barclays For Details. 1-305766-4420. 6-22 LIGHTHOUSE POINT PARADISE Beautiful Furnished 2/2! Only $115,000. English, French, Spanish, Greek. Yvette Gaussen YES WE CAN REALTY 954-6147773 Or 954-773-8340. 6-22 CONDOS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH 1 Block To Ocean!! 1 / 1 Fully Equipped. Hurricane Windows / Doors. 2 Flat Screens, DVD, WIFI, Pool, BBQ, Laundry. $850 Month + Electric Monthly Thru December. 954-540-9724. 6-22 POMPANO BEACH LEISUREVILLE 55+. Beautiful 2/1 Renovated Corner Condo 2nd Floor. Beside Pool, Clubhouse & Golf. Yrly Lease Unfurn. $800 Month. Furn. $900 Month. 1st & Last. Photos Available. prudhommejean@yahoo.com 954-784-01 19. 7-6 POMPANO BEACH 1/1 East Of Federal. 1st Floor. Small Complex, Partially Furnished. $650 Month Yearly Lease. Call 954-263-7129. 6-22 APTS FOR RENTDEERFIELD/POMPANO BEACH 1 BR & 2 BR APTS FOR RENT. Remodeled, Paint, Tile, Etc. Washer / Dryer On Site. Pool. Pet Friendly. George 954-809-5030. 6-29 POMPANO BEACH NE 2/1 $950 2/1.5 Townhouse $1095 SW 2/1 Low Move-in $950. ALL FREE WATER Rent + $70 Application Moves U In. 954-781-6299. 6-29 POMPANO BEACH / ATLANTIC / FEDERAL Ef ciency $175 Weekly. No Security Deposit. Includes Cable, Electric, Internet. FREE Washer / Dryer. No Drug Record No Evictions. 954-7090694. 6-22 POMPANO BEACH Studio Newly Renovated. Pool. Pet OK! $650 Per Month Yearly Lease. 1960 NE 48 Street. Call 954-857-5207. 6-29 POMPANO BEACH 1/1 APT. Newly Renovated! Pool, Pet OK! $700 Per Month Yearly Lease. 1960 NE 48 Street. 954857-5207. 6-29 POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 Bedroom From $495. Easy Movein. 1/2 OFF DEPOSIT. Remodeled. Great Location. 954-783-1088 For More Info. 7-13 COMMERCIAL FOR RENT-SALEPOMPANO COMMERCIAL OFFICE Spaces Available. Ranging From As Low As $500 To $700 Depending On Square Footage. Please Call Darci At 954783-3723. 6-15 DEERFIELD BEACH Retail Of ce Warehouse 700 Sq Ft With Loft. A/C, Bathroom. $575 Per Month. Call For More Info 561-654-1331 Or 561-9985681. 6-29 NEWLY EQUIPPED LOW RENT SHOP Space Ideal For Bakery Pizza Wings Crepes Etc. Corner New 12 Avenue & 34 Court Oakland Park. Indoor / Outdoor Patio Sitting. 954-563-3533. 6-15 Use The Pelican Classi eds to get the job done. Call 954-7838700 Use The Pelican Classi eds to get the job done. Call 954-7838700 Use The Pelican Classi eds to get the job done. Call 954-7838700 Use The Pelican Classi eds to get the job done. Call 954-7838700

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The Pelican 23 Friday, June 22, 2012 Classi edsCall 954-545-0013 DOCK FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH DOCK Wide Canal No Wake Area Whips. Quiet Canal. Call 954-946-3301. 6-29 DEERFIELD BEACH Dock For Rent 60 Ft. Water, Electric. No Fixed Bridges. Nice Location. $350 Month. 954-429-9347 Or Call Cell 954-288-9651. 6-29 Sheldon was a victim of the economy after his loving home was foreclosed on. He is a 7-yearold tabby and is good with dogs and cats. He was raised along with a pitt bull and they had a very close bond. Adopt Sheldon and give him his forever home. He is tested, neutered, microchipped and is up to date on his shots. You can come and meet Sheldon and all his friends at The Florida Humane Society, 3870 North Powerline Road, in Pompano Beach at the northeast corner of Powerline and Sample next to the Citco Car Wash. Hours are Thursday through Sunday 12 to 4 p.m. You can also go to www. floridahumanesociety.org or call 954-974-6152. Sheldon needs a home

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24 The Pelican Friday, June 22, 2012 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFOakland Park City commissioners want to pursue safety regulations on solicitation in the right of ways and consider regulations on panhandling. They directed the city attorney to draft an ordinance on panhandling and are taking another look at an ordinance on solicitation. Nothing upsets me more than seeing football players, cheerleaders, church groups standing in the median soliciting, Mayor Anne Sallee said at Wednesdays meeting. I dont want to see anyone standing in the median collecting funds. Its not safe. Cars dont belong on the sidewalks, and people dont belong in the street, Sallee said. Commissioner Suzanne Boisvenue said there are already laws on the books against traffic obstruction. This is too far reaching, she said, noting she couldnt support an ordinance. Vice Mayor John Adornato said he abhors seeing children in the roadway medians soliciting. Any parent who allows this should be chastised. But can we stop non-profits from doing this? he asked. Adornato said he needs a better understanding of whats on the books and should be enforced but maybe isnt being enforced. He said that good Samaritans (donating funds) should not be penalized. Adornato questioned whether developer fees were going to help the homeless. If were not collecting enough, thats an abomination. City Manager John Stunson said portions of gasoline taxes go to a fund for the homeless. The city has no impact fees to subsidize the homeless. As Adornato started to question whether there are adequate beds for the homeless, Commissioner Shari McCartney said, This is not about the homeless. Its about safety on the streets. We believe no one should be selling things in the street, but its pointless to penalize the buyer. Commissioner Jed Shank said he could support an ordinance minus a good Samaritan penalty. Its not appropriate to conduct any business in the roadway, he said. Fort Lauderdale passed an ordinance banning panhandling in places such as parks, city parking lots and government buildings. Oakland Park commissioners asked to see that ordinance, and copies were provided for discussion. Shank said he could support an ordinance that prohibits aggressive panhandling but not all panhandling. Panhandling is a First Amendment right, he said. McCartney said, This sends a signal that were a safe and clean city. This is not about homelessness, she said. She asked DJ Doody, city attorney, if he would vet the Fort Lauderdale ordinance. Doody said no. I will prepare Oakland Park of cials want panhandlers off the streets, objectors say it will hurt the homeless population and will take away First Amendment rightsSee SOLICITATION on page 25

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The Pelican 25 Friday, June 22, 2012 Advertise in The Pelican 954-783-8700! an ordinance, based on your conversation and bring back one that is legally defensible. Boisvenue asked that he also bring back information on laws are on the books regarding obstructing traffic. Father Bob Caudill of All Saints Mission said the ordinance on roadway solicitation would have a negative impact on the poor and homeless. John David, an attorney for the Homeless Voice Newspaper, said Oakland Park commissioners rightfully rejected going forward (with an ordinance) when these issues came up two years ago. These issues come back like a bad penny every three or four years. Fort Lauderdale and now the county want to legislate against homelessness. These ordinances try to criminalize homeless behavior. You cant legislate the homeless out of Broward County.SolicitationContinued from page 24

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26 The Pelican Friday, June 22, 2012 Visit us online at www.pompanopelican.com RJ BoyleRJ BOYLE STUDIOSThere is no doubt that the snapper shing will be off the chain this weekend. I am crossing my ngers hoping the wind stays light enough to go shing on Saturday. We are constantly talking to shing guys up and down the coast to nd out whats biting north and south of us. We know about migrational patterns of desired sh because we are connected with all of these other shermen. The snappers have made their way here, and its time to get tight. Yellowtail snappers, mutton snappers and mangrove snappers will be the desire of bottom shermen in our local waters for the next few weeks. We use small jigs tipped with squid or bonita for the yellowThis is the weekend for snapper Capt. RJ Boyle is an experienced angler in South Florida. His studio is located in Lighthouse Point. Call 954-420-5001.tails, For muttons and mangroves, we use live ballyhoo or dead ballyhoo plugs. Sometimes a fresh dead goggle eye on the bottom works great too. We use long 20-foot uorocarbon leaders on our bottom rig with a 5/0 circle hook, and depending on the current we may use a 6 to 12 ounce lead to keep the lead on the bottom. The rough weather over the last few days has really stirred things up, so get off the couch and go catch some dinner. For technical advice on snappers, give us a call or come by the shop.We will get you dialed in. 6-27 Puppets to Go presents the The Tortoise and the Hare from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m., Deer eld Beach Percy White Branch Library, 837 E. Hillsboro Blvd., Deereld Beach. 954-360-1380. 6-27 Beach Readers Book Club takes place from 1 to 2:30 p.m. at the Beach Branch Library, 221 Pompano Beach Blvd., Pompano Beach. 954-786-2197 6-28 Puss In Boots free at sundown at Friedt Family Park located behind town hall, 4501 Ocean Drive, Lauderdale-By-The-Sea. 965640-4200. 6-28 The Pompano Beach Republican Club meets at 7 p.m. at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach. 954-786-7536. 6-28 Wilton Manors Business Association meets for lunch at Andrews Diner, 2980 N. Andrews Ave., Wilton Manors, at 12 p.m. SightingsContinued from page 20

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The Pelican 27 Friday, June 22, 2012 ParkingContinued from page 2 said Patel, who is also overseeing the remodeling of the inside of the store. Patel wants to build a bar inside the store and said he timed the remodeling to coincide with the outside construction. The city still has to nish its planned $1.6 million in improvements to the storefront facades and $1.6 million in streetscape improvements, including additional lighting, landscaping and drainage work. About $400,000 of the money used on faade improvements is paid for by shopping center property owners. The rest of the money used for parking and streetscape improvements comes from a CRA, or Community Redevelopment Agency, grant. Danovich said delayed permitting issues have slowed down the projects progress and estimates it will be nished by the end of this year or the beginning of the next. Its going to be beautiful when they nish it but its been a tough two months, said Sheyla Rittel, owner of The KiteSurf Place, which sells sur ng and kitesur ng equipment. Rittel opened shortly before construction began on the east lot. She couldnt estimate how much business shes lost but said things have gotten worse since the lot opened in May. Shes hopeful the nished improvements will bring more people in but until then well try our best to stay open. Other business owners, located in the eastern half of the shopping center, say theyve seen an improvement since the east lot re-opened. Ive been pretty busy. People know I pay a fair price so they nd me. Its hard to say . but things have de nitely improved, said Stuart Waldron, owner of Stonehenge Estate Buyers. The main thing is having parking back. Its just made a giant difference, said Bernadette Scollin, owner of Jukebox Diner, about the new parking lot. Scollin, who estimated that she had lost 50 percent of her business when construction began, said she has seen a dramatic increase of about 10 or 20 percent since the lot was re-opened. She credited her loyal customer base with getting her through so far. Barbara Ruhl, owner of Polish Deli Pyze in the west side, said business is down 70 percent with 30 percent of that due to the normal summer slow down. When The Pelican interviewed Ruhl on Monday at 1:30 p.m., she said only one customer had been in since she opened at 11 a.m. Like others though, she is optimistic the improvements will bring more people into the shopping center once they are nished. The whole problem is The west parking lot of the Harbor Village Shoppes was re-opened yesterday. The east lot opened May 25. [Staff photo]how do you weather the storm between now and then, said George Spain, owner of G Cuts, a barber shop. Spain estimates hes lost 50 percent of his business since the west parking lot closed about three weeks ago. Its very hard for people to come in when they see all the construction. A lot of people think were closed, said Spain.

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Friday, June 22, 2012 Vol. XX, Issue 25 Wherever you are, read The Pelican @ pompanopelican.com • Send news to siren2415@gmail.com Pompano Beach • Deer eld Beach • Lighthouse Point • Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Wilton Manors • Oakland Park • Hillsboro Beach • The Galt • Palm Aire The P e l i c a n Pelican Hurricane HistoryWelcome to the season of anxiety, or hurricane season, in South Florida. The Pelican is grateful to Tom Nolan, accredited marine surveyor and electrical engineer who serves as assistant educational of cer for the Pompano Beach Sail and Power Club. Nolan provides the information below on on page, help for boaters at storm time. Most residents have lived through hurricanes and know the preparation required to cut the odds of damage to ourselves and our properties. Here are some of the memorable storms that left their marks on our area. Oct. 18, 1906 105 knots, “Florida Keys” No Name Signi cant damage to structures Sept. 18, 1926 115 knots, “Greater Miami” No Name Ended the Florida 1920s economic boom. Sept. 17, 1928 130 knots, No Name “Okeechobee” The lake breached the dike and killed many. Sept. 17, 1947 135 knots, “Fort Lauderdale” No Name 155 MPH of cial sustained wind at Hillsboro Lighthouse. Oct. 16, 1947 75 knots, “Hurricane 8”Second one in a month, wet storm with ooding. Aug. 27, 1964 100 knots, “Cleo”-Tides 5 ft. above normal in Pompano. Aug. 24, 1992 145 knots, “Andrew” Cat 5 at landfall in Miami. Oct. 24, 2005 105 knots, “Wilma”Widespread building and roof damage. Florida land-falling storms have occurred from May through December with September being the busiest month.By Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach “It only takes one” has been the mantra for re, police and other rescue services when it comes to the hurricane season. Pompano Beach Fire Chief Harry Small ascribes to the mantra and adds, “When you live where we live, it’s not a matter of ‘if,’ it’s ‘when.’” He recalls the famous unnamed hurricane of 1947 when people on Powerline Road were waist deep in water and newspaper photos depicted refrigerators oating down roads in Pompano Beach. “The 1947 hurricane was the last major storm Broward had. Andrew [in Dade County, 1992] came during a relatively slow season,” he says. “And Wilma was a Category 2 if that.” It’s all about preparation. Checking out shutters prior to any storm announcement, assessing the ability to live without access to water, electricity or food and leaving early to avoid evacuation traf c jams are all It’s time now to check shutters, lay in food and water and consider evacuationSee STORM on page 20 Hurricane Wilma [2005] was not quite a Category 2, but its wrath remains a clear memory in the minds of South Floridians who wa tched this storm blow through town in the middle of the day. Electricity, water, food and other supplies were hard to come by in its aftermath. [Photo courtesy of Pompano Beach Fire Department]By Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach – “Sales are great and steady,” says Rafael J. Roco division president for D.R. Horton, a Fort Worth company that is building town homes at a steady rate in Pompano Beach’s Orchid Grove. Located at 649 Cypress Road between Atlantic Boulevard and McNab Road, these tony homes are a Lauderdale-By-The-Sea hit with young families. But it hasn’t always been that way. The land has a long history. Once it was a booming shopping center with Publix Supermarket, an A&P, Rite Aid Drug Store, J Byron’s Department Store, a laundry, shoe shop and furniture store ’70s. The center fell on hard times in the late ‘80s and ‘90s when it was outclassed by newer and larger centers that hurt shop owners. J. Byron’s closed all its stores and Publix pulled out to rebuild. The death knoll rang clearly, and the shopping center lingered into the new century a weed lled blighted area, rife with crime and vagrants. The property became an albatross. The late Mayor E. Pat Larkins suggested the land be turned into a cemetery because “it already See ORCHID on page 4Orchid Grove homes prove perfect t in Pompano G e t s e r i o u s Get serious, i t ’ s s t o r m s e a s o n it’s storm season!

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2 The PelicanFriday, June 22, 2012 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFLauderdale-By-TheSea – Town commissioners agreed to move forward with nal design plans for the East Commercial Boulevard stormwater and streetscape improvement project. Commissioners approved schematic designs for two blocks from A1A to the beach during a special meeting Tuesday. Total cost of the proposed project is $1.896 million.New designs for Commercial Boulevard include stage and two beach plaza areasThe easternmost block includes plans for two plaza areas, a stage plaza and a beach plaza. In presenting the plans, Steven Fett, architect with the design team, said the elevated stage plaza could accommodate groups already performing in town and be used at other times by vendors and local businesses. The beach plaza could be a exible, always changing area, where the town could host events, he said. This area could be covered with Bermuda grass, a seashell beach-colored aggregate or with actual sand. Taking the sand idea from a sandbox, Fett said sandcastle events could be staged there under umbrellas or fundraising volleyball tournaments or concerts could take place. “We were charged with creating a memorable place,” he said, showing photos of a large sandbox in a street in Ottawa, Ontario with crowds playing in the sand. The beach plaza can be activated with bistro tables and serve as a waiting area for the area restaurants. After earlier meetings with the commission, the design team was directed to make sure the turn-around area at the beach pavilion was clearly marked and there would be no bottlenecks. That area has See COMMERCIAL on page 19 Harbor Village Shoppes businesses hope for the best as parking re-opens See PARKING on page 27 By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach – Parking has been fully restored at the Harbor Village Shoppes, located near the beach on Atlantic Boulevard. And for business owners there, some of who say sales are down as much as 70 percent, sooner is better than later. Made up of two parking lots, the city worked on Harbor Village’s east lot rst and re-opened it May 25. Work on the west lot nished a week ahead of schedule, in time for patrons to park by yesterday morning. Horacio Danovich, the engineer in charge of the parking redevelopment, said portions of the west lot would be closed at various times for construction purposes. Harry Patel, consultant for The Vega Company, which sells beer and wine on the east side of Harbor Village, estimates that since construction began on the east parking lot, business has been down about 65 percent – 15 percent of that, he estimates, is the normal seasonal drop. And although parking in front of the store is open again, Patel said the fencing that has gone up in front of the businesses gives people the impression that everything’s closed off. “The parking lot’s great now that it’s open. It’s just a matter of them getting nished [with everything],”

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The Pelican 3 Friday, June 22, 2012 Advertise with The Pelican! 954-783-8700! By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach – Ray Collier, this city’s long –serving postmaster and ardent historian, went down in history himself Tuesday night. Commissioners decreed June 19 “Ray Collier Day” and Historical Society Director Carolyn Morris presented him with the rst Pioneer of the Year Award. Collier, 78, a lifelong resident of the city, served 30 years on the Broward County Historical Commission and is this city’s of cial historian. Said Morris, whose of ce in the Butler House is next to Collier’s home on Southeast 4 Avenue said, “When I need to check my facts, I call my neighbor,” referring to Collier’s mother lode of information. Collier was appointed postmaster here by President Lyndon B. Johnson in 1964 and served for 25 years. This city was incorporated June 25, 1925 making it 87 years old this week.Ray Collier, 78, accepts accolades from Mayor Peggy Noland for his years of serving as a Broward County historian.Collier receives Deer eld Beach’s inaugural Pioneer Award from mayor Send in your news siren2415@gmail.com

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4 The PelicanFriday, June 22, 2012 was.” Says Pompano Beach Mayor Lamar Fisher, “D.R. Horton is a 34-year-old company and the largest builder in the country. Orchid Grove is a great economic engine for our city. It attracts new people and provides new revenues for the city.” Commissioner Rex Hardin is also a big fan of D.R. Horton’s work. “That lot was one of the reasons I ran for of ce. We pushed for a landuse change from commercial to residential. We kept trying to bring in companies. Things didn’t pan out, but we continued.” year as the largest builder in the country.”So how did Horton land in Pompano Beach?They found the project and stepped in. “When the market turned [2007 to 2008], a lot of the smaller builders couldn’t put inventory in the ground. They went out of business,” said Roco. Now with its sales of ce open and active, Roco adds that the “ nancing options they have now are a lot better than renting.” The town homes are divided into three layouts. All of the homes have three bedrooms, two and one-half baths and a one-car garage. But instead of the threestoried homes, these are all two oors. Roco adds that there is a driveway with space for the second car. Prices range between the $170,000s to the low $200,000s. There are several bene ts for public employees such as teachers where the builder may pay closing costs. The property now offers a clubhouse/ tness center, lake front homes and a childfriendly community. Call 954943-2146. Open House is seven days a week at Orchid Grove at model homes that have been decorated with simple elegance. Above is the master bedroom.; center re ects a breakfast room and marble counter, stainless steel kitchens are standard. [Staff photos] But hope rose. In 2003, Orchid Grove, a joint venture between Coscan Homes, a Fort Lauderdale company and Tarragon Corporation, a New York company, purchased the 32 acres and began to build luxury three-story town homes selling between the mid-200,000s to $500,000s. This venture failed in 2009, leaving empty lots and some half-built homes. Roco says his company stepped in to build town homes similar to the original plans, but these homes now focus on younger people: affordable prices with serious nancing plans.OrchidContinued from page 1 Hardin grew up in the area and said he had worked at one of the stores in high school. “Now we have a brand new product with a clubhouse and a pool. I am absolutely thrilled. They are selling and building. This is the American recovery right here in Pompano Beach.” Says Roco, “D.R. Horton is in 87 markets and 27 states. We just celebrated our 10th

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The Pelican 5 Friday, June 22, 2012 By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFWilton Manors – When Hurricane Wilma blew through South Florida in 2005 the biggest casualty for the City of Wilton Manors was communication. “Communication was an issue,” said Assistant City Attorney Leigh Ann Henderson. When Wilma hit, some city staff members were using Nextel phones. But problems with the area’s Nextel tower, caused by the storm, made the phones inoperable. Since then, the city has taken steps to ensure City is con dent it has hurricane-related communications issues solvedcommunications run smoothly. City Manager Joseph Gallegos said the upgraded radio system will allow communication directly between each individual radio and with each individual department. In addition to an upgraded system, which includes a set of 13 recently purchased police radios from the City of Fort Lauderdale, Wilton Manors is also ready to coordinate posthurricane operations from its Emergency Operations Center, or EOC, inside city hall. Finding and removing debris after the high winds of Wilma proved to be one of the biggest jobs. And keeping clear records of debris clean-up is critical for FEMA reimbursement. [Photo courtesy of Wilton Manors] See COMMUNICATION on page 21

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6 The PelicanFriday, June 22, 2012 Deer eld Beach, Pompano Beach, Lighthouse Point, LauderdaleBy-The-Sea, Wilton Manors and Oakland ParkWilton Manors • Oakland Park • Hillsboro Beach The Pompano Pelican is published weekly on FridaysStreet Address: 1500-A E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, FL 33060 Telephone: 954-783-8700 • Fax: 954-783-0093Letters to the Editor are encouraged and accepted for print if signed, although a writer’s name will be withheld on request; letters must also include a daytime telephone number. Advertising rates are available upon request. Subscription rate is $31.80 including tax for one year’s delivery in Greater Pompano Beach; $95.40/per year including tax for others in the United States; call 954-783-8700 for rates abroad. The Pelican is a nonpartisan newspaper and reserves the right to decline advertising. Copyright 2012. Reproduction of this publication in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission of the publisher. The Pelican is a member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, Deer eld Beach Chamber and the LBTS Chamber. The Pelican is a state certi ed woman-owned minority business. The Pelican is delivered to businesses, libraries, schools, of ces, hospitals, news racks and single family homes. All advertising and copy is published at the sole discretion of the publisher. We welcome your critiques and ideas concerning this publication. Anne Siren, publisherExecutive Assistant: Mary Hudson Graphics: Rachel Ramirez Windsheimer Bookkeeper: John White Classi eds: Fran Shelby Contributing Writers: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Judy Wilson, Malcolm McClintock, Judy Vik, Michael d’Oliveira Account Executives: Paul Shroads, Carolyn Mann, Bill Heaton, Bill Fox Special Of ce Assistant: Cathy Siren ESTABLISHED 1993 • Volume XX, Issue 25 Founding Editor and PublisherAnne Hanby Siren Here’s the deal with naming hurricanesCOURTESY OF THE NATIONAL HURRICANE SERVICEExperience shows that the use of short, distinctive names in written as well as spoken communications is quicker and less subject to error than the older, more cumbersome latitude-longitude identi cation methods. These advantages are especially important in exchanging detailed storm information between hundreds of widely scattered stations, coastal bases and ships at sea. The use of easily remembered names greatly reduces confusion when two or more tropical storms occur at the same time. For example, one hurricane can be moving slowly westward in the Gulf of Mexico, while at exactly the same time another hurricane can be moving rapidly northward along the Atlantic coast. In the past, confusion and false rumors have arisen when storm advisories broadcast from radio stations were mistaken for warnings concerning an entirely different storm located hundreds of miles away.History of Hurricane NamesFor several hundred years many hurricanes in the West Indies were named after the particular saint’s day on which the hurricane occurred. Ivan R. Tannehill describes in his book Hurricanes the major tropical storms of recorded history and mentions many hurricanes named after saints. For example, there was “Hurricane Santa Ana” which struck Puerto Rico with exceptional violence on July 26, 1825, and “San Felipe” [the rst] and “San Felipe” [the second] which hit Puerto Rico on September 13 in both 1876 and 1928. Tannehill also tells of Clement Wragge, an Australian meteorologist who began giving women’s names to tropical storms before the end of the 19th century. An early example of the use of a woman’s name for a storm was in the novel Storm by George R. Stewart, published by Random House in 1941, and since lmed by Walt Disney. During World War II this practice became widespread in weather map discussions among forecasters, especially Army and Navy meteorologists who plotted the movements of storms over the wide expanses of the Paci c Ocean. In 1953, the United States abandoned a confusing two-year old plan to name storms by a phonetic alphabet [Able, Baker, Charlie] when a new, international phonetic alphabet was introduced. That year, the United States began using female names for storms. The practice of naming hurricanes solely after women came to an end in 1978 when men’s and women’s names were included in the Eastern North Paci c storm lists. In 1979, male and female names were included in lists for the Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico.See HURRICANES on page 12For boats too big or too cumbersome to move, oat ‘emSecuring your vessel at a residential dockTalk to neighbors ahead of time and discuss everyone’s plans and timing and whether their boats are staying or leaving. If your vessel is docked on a residential canal you should allow room for other vessels to leave if they desire. If possible move your boat back away from the entrance to the canal. Look for other vessels likely to come loose in the storm and avoid them if possible. Remove shore power cables from the vessel and turn off the power to the dock. Pull the vessel farther away from the seawall than usual. Use canal-side lines attached to securely moored anchors or run across the canal. Don’t tie up to a neighbor’s docks or trees without permission. Mooring whips can be helpful during smaller events but they may not extend long enough or be able to withstand the full force of the wind. Sometimes whips can become entangled. If you secure your vessel to the center of a canal use several sturdy lines ashore with your vessel in the center of the “spider web.” Anchors with adequate scope may also be necessary to prevent the vessel from moving forward and aft. Double up lines and tie all knots securely. Protect all lines by using cha ng gear at the dock and on the vessel where they can be abraded. It is better to secure the lines to dock pilings rather than to the cleats on docks. Do not put too many lines on each cleat on the vessel as the cleat may be pulled loose. Insure the direction of line pull is parallel and not perpendicular to the horns of the cleat. When you adjust the line lengths allow room for storm surge and remember that nylon lines will stretch under load. Attach preventers so that the dock lines will not oat off the top of the dock pilings when the water rises. On the dock side, use 2” x 6” wooden fender boards centered on each piling where possible. Remove the boat registration and insurance policy from the vessel and keep them with you. Once your vessel is secured take photographs of your vessel and nearby vessels from all angles prior to the storm. Online Resources http://www.boatus.com/hurricanes/brochure.asp http://www.boatus.com/hurricanes/boaterprep.asp http://www.uscg.mil/d7/airstaBorinquen/docs/HurricanePage/Boat%20Prepa ration%202008(9).pdf http://www.boatus.com/magazine/2011/june/hurricaneprep.asp http://marinesurvey.com/yacht/huricane.htm (1997) Tom Nolan is an Accredited Marine Surveyor and Electrical Engineer. He is the president of Latitude Marine Inc. which he founded in 2003. Tom is currently the District Safety Of cer/Assistant Educational Of cer for the Pompano Beach Sail and Power Squadron and was the former Flotilla Staff Of cer of Public Education for the Pompano Beach Coast Guard Auxiliary and has been boating in this area for over 25 years. Check with neighbors rst!

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The Pelican 7 Friday, June 22, 2012 Florida The League of Women Voters of Florida, or LWVF, reminds voters that the deadline to register to vote in the August 14 primary election is July 16.. “Florida’s primary election has never been held this early. Given the changes in the state’s elections laws, the League encourages Florida voters to call their local Supervisor of Elections to check their voter registration status and, if necessary, update it,” said Charley Williams, LWVF Voter Services Chair. “This is particularly important for voters who have recently moved or changed their names. If you plan to vote by mail, call your Supervisor to renew your vote-bymail request and make sure your ballot arrives in time for the election. If you are not sure, visit BeReadyToVote.org. LWVF has also partnered with Microsoft to offer smartphone users a quick and simple way to connect to their supervisor’s of ce. The League has created a unique smartphone tag that, when scanned, connects voters to a mobile website where they can access the Florida Division of Elections database to check their voter status. For more information about the upcoming elections and voter registration, make sure to visit www.BeReadyToVote. org. If you are Spanish speaker, you can visit www. VamosAVotar.org. Deadline to register for Florida primary is July 16 Deer eld Beach – The major entrance road to Deer eld Beach High School, Southwest 15 Street, is not pretty. Sheila Foster told commissioners this week. The street suffers from drainage problems caused by unkempt swales, Foster said, and she asked if Community Block Grant funds could be used to remedy the problem. The local high school offers both magnet and International Baccalaureate programs which attract students from all over north Broward. “I’ve been told the money is not available now,” Foster said, “But Dixie Highway to the school is not a pretty street.” Commissioner Ben Preston, whose district includes the school, agrees. “This is a problem,” he said. Preston said he has met with the city manager in an attempt to initiate a “15th Street Project” that will deal with the issues. Preston said his goal is to raise the “level of pride” in the neighborhood but his efforts so far are “preliminary… we’re looking for money.” Foster spoke as commissioners were approving a budget for $562,584 in HUD Community Development Block Grants. The money is being directed to home and business rehab, Westside Park ball elds, transportation for senior citizens, community outreach and GED tutoring and preparation. Foster also questioned the $112,516 being set aside for administering the money which is spent in low income areas. The 15th Street drainage problems are caused by the swales in front of homes being lled with debris or huge trees said Charlie DeBrusco, director of environmental services. Maintaining the swale is the responsibility of the homeowner, he added. The swale is designed to ood and take water off the streets. When it is lled in, water remains in the road longer than the 72 minutes considered normal by south Florida standards.SW 10 Street due for ninemonth improvement projectDeer eld Beach – A $2.1 million improvement project on Southwest 10 Street begins Unkempt swales cause ooding on main road to Deer eld Beach High School See IMPROVEMENT on page 14By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFF

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8 The PelicanFriday, June 22, 2012 Business matters The Pelican takes a look at local business owners. Call The Pelican to nd out how you can tell your story here because business matters. 954-783-8700. By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFF“If you can dream it, we can build it” is the logo of this creative paver company which has been successfully making dreams come true for 21 years. Located at 4460 N. Federal Hwy., owner Jacqui Moskowitz says, “All we need is a basic swimming pool and we’ll add all of the bells and whistles including waterfalls, coping, waterline tiles, pool surfacing, spas, driveways, pergolas (an upgraded version of a tiki hut), outdoor summer kitchens, re pits and more.” To enhance the value and eye appeal of one’s home, stop into this unique outdoor showroom and see the hundreds of choices, colors, and shaped pavers and ideas available. Pavers can be concrete or tumble travertine. For the green buyers, Jacqui says, “We even have pervious pavers that allow the water to drain into the soil. These pavers are made of a very porous concrete product and then installed in a special way to allow for perfect drainage. They are very attractive in many size, shapes and color options. They are more costly, but worth it to those who care about our environment.” Jacqui was the of ce manager of The Paver Center’s outdoor showroom lets clients see artistic additions for patio, home and pool areas It’s hard to drive on Federal Highway and not see heads turn at the Paver Center’s retro-architecture in Fort Lauderdale where pavers are transformed into countless enhancements for patios and pools. [Staff photo]The Paver Center for ten years before the former owner decided to retire and gave her the rst opportunity to buy the business. She says, “I knew the business as well as he did, and he knew it. It was a perfect t for me because I really love this company and now it’s mine.” Over the years, the options in paver choices grew to accommodate the changing tastes of customers. For example, this interview took place as The Pelican and Jacqui sat at a re pit which is also a table, a conversation center created of pavers. With the re glowing in the center, one can imagine relaxing in its ambiance while toasting marshmallows, hot dogs or grilling steaks or sh. “Our hottest product currently is the tumble travertine which can be used in both the pool area and the driveway,” says the owner. “The variations in color and its newness on the scene make it very attractive to the current market. We are replacing a lot of older pavers with this product as clients decide to upgrade.” The Paver Center keeps ve eld crews at work all the time. The teams of three and four men are mainly Brazilians who are expert in this eld according to Jacqui, and she says, “Most of them have been with us for up to 15 years. We are very proud of the quality of work they do. We get calls everyday from clients who rave about the work done by these craftsmen. We also have ve design consultants who will help to make a client’s dream a reality.” Paver driveways remain very popular because of their curb appeal Owner, Jacqui Moskowitz, welcomes visitors to The Paver Center super showroom, which shows the variety of paver shapes and colors used to create driveways, exciting pool and patio additions available to enhance and enjoy one’s property. See PAVER CENTER on page 12Pompano 4th of July Beach BashPompano Beach – The city will hold its annual Beach Bash and Fireworks Extravaganza on Wednesday, July 4 at the Pompano Beach Fishing Pier, 222 N. Pompano Beach Blvd. The event begins at 10 a.m. and continues all day through the Fireworks Extravaganza which begins at 9 p.m. During the day, there will be a watermelon eating contest, relay races, arts and crafts projects, tattoos and a bounce house. Tribute bands including Doors Alive, Orange Sunshine, Turnstiles, and Classic Rock Therapy will perform at noon. Never Stop Belivin’ will take the stage at 7:30 p.m. featuring songs from the rock group Journey. Blankets and lawn chairs are allowed but personal reworks, glass containers, alcohol and pets are prohibited. The Northeast 14 Street Causeway and Atlantic Boulevard bridges will be in the down position from 9 to 11 p.m. Call 954-786-4111.Request a mosquito sprayBroward County – The Mosquito Control Section sprays areas of Broward County by truck and plane, based on requests from residents. Seasonal rains, normally associated with spring and summer months, have contributed to the increase in mosquitoes. Visit broward.org and click ‘Mosquito Services’ or call 954765-4062. Free Summer Film FestFrom now until Aug. 16, the Muvico in Pompano Beach, 2315 N. Federal Hwy., will be playing free movies every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday at 10 a.m. June 26, 27, 28 is Monsters and Aliens ; July 3, 4, 5 is Megamind ; July 10, 11, 12 is SpongeBob Squarepants ; July 17, 18, 19 is Rango ; July 24, 25, 26 is Madagascar ; July 31, Aug. 1, 2 is Shrek Forever After ; Aug. 7, 8, 9 is Puss in Boots ; Aug. 14, 15, 16 is Over the Hedge.

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The Pelican 9 Friday, June 22, 2012

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10 The PelicanFriday, June 22, 2012 Making a Difference Phyllis J. Neuberger wants your suggestions about people who are making a difference. Call 954-7838700. Send in your news! siren2415@gmail.com Advertise954-783-8700!Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Chamber members here are sponsoring BugFest-By-The-Sea, a week-long series of events for scuba divers taking part in Florida’s annual lobster mini-season. BugFest includes a Bug Bake & Boil Lobster Cookout at El Prado Park on July 25 hosted by Lenore Nolan Ryan, a pier clean-up, photo contest, lobster hunting competition, music, a beach diving clinic and more. BugFest to date has received more than $3,500 in donated scuba gear and other prizes. Chamber President Mark Silver of Argenti Designer Jewelers designed a silver lobster pendant for the event. BugFest is on the hunt for more fun stuff to give out and is asking chamber members to donate a door prize worth $25 or more that could be given away during the lobster cookout in El Prado Park. To participate, contact BugFest Coordinator /Town PIO Steve d’Oliveira at 954-640-4209 or steved@lbts .govBugFest is all about the lobster Family Fun WeekLauderdale-By-The-Sea – The Town of Lauderdale-By-The-Sea is hosting its Family Fun Week from Saturday, June 23 to Saturday June 30. During the week the town and local businesses will be holding special events. There will be skim boarding, scuba diving, snorkeling, dance competitions, pro footvolley matches, snorkeling, chocolate making, shing tournaments, cooking classes and more. Visit www.lbtsevents. com/activities for dates and times of activities. By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFThe Pelican pro led this active senior four years ago when he was busy volunteering at Dave Thomas Education Center in Pompano Beach as well as in John Knox Village, or JKV, where he is a resident. Since then his focus is behind a camera, taking endless photographs at every village event. Wherever he goes, there’s a camera either in his pocket or dangling from a cord around his neck. “I admit I have fallen in love with this hobby,” he says, “and the results seem to please everyone I photograph which is the biggest reward a photographer can get. I often work along side of Marty Lee, the professional consultant who does much of the village media, public relations and photography work. Marty has taught me a fantastic amount. I started out with a simple point and shoot camera. Now I use a Cannon T3I which is much more sophisticated. I’ve learned that most people enjoy seeing their pictures on the computer. I create an album for each occasion and post the results on my web site for all to see. Anyone who wants copies can order them from the Kodak gallery.” Rasmussen is often invited to take pictures at special occasion private parties which he does with great pleasure. “People seem to be so pleased with the photos I take of them, their friends and families,” he says, smiling. “That’s most gratifying to me.” He continues.“This wonderful hobby has given me the opportunity to keep on learning. In fact, I have a tutor, Elven Booser, who has been teaching me photo shop once a week for the past ve years and we’ll probably go on together forever. I’ve learned how to improve my skills and to restore old photographs for people in the village. Their appreciation knows no bounds.” Asked how much time he spends on photography, he estimates 25 hours a week. He also has served on the Village board of directors for the past eight years and says he enjoys representing the interests of the residents and the future of the village itself. “I am particularly involved in the planning of the new health center which is Norm Rasmussen nds still another volunteer career as a photographer in John Knox VillageNorm Rasmussen loves being behind the camera at JKV Village events, private special occasion affairs, and during walks with his wife, Min, around the village lakes for visits with the swans and ducks. This beloved volunteer village photographer is appreciated by all of the residents as he preserves the many special moments in their lives. [Photo courtesy of Norm Rasmussen] BriefsSee PHOTOGRAPHER on page 17

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The Pelican 11 Friday, June 22, 2012

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12 The PelicanFriday, June 22, 2012 Advertise with The Pelican 954-783-8700 and their longevity. They come with a 10-year warranty, which they usually outlast according to Jacqui who adds, “The average cement driveway needs repair much more often. Many clients have told us that the paver driveway and patio improvements have helped to close the deal on their house sale.” She concludes the interview saying, “We do free estimates, but we invite all potential clients to visit our unusual super showroom rst to see the variety of ways to beautify their property. Visit www.pavercenter.com, its Facebook page or call 954-776-3338 for ideas and information. Paver CenterContinued from page 10Lauderdale-By-The-Sea The Chamber of Commerce “Power Breakfast” will be held on June 29 from 7:30 to 8:45 a.m. at the Blue Moon Fish Company Restaurant, 4405 Tradewinds Ave, Lauderdale-By-The-Sea.The featured guest speaker will be Broward County District 4 Commissioner Chip LaMarca who will discuss business development through tourism and beach renourishment. He will be introduced by LBTS Mayor Roseann Minnet. The gourmet breakfast will feature Blue Moon’s famous Eggs Benedict with options such as smoked salmon, ham and spinach. Vegetable quiches, breakfast meats, home fries, blintzes, fruits, oatmeal, yogurt, French toast, homemade jams and assorted juices will also be available. The cost will be $20 Reservations are encouraged. Call 954-267-9888. The event is open to members and non-members. Commissioner LaMarca joins breakfast group Retired Hurricane Names Since 1954The NHC does not control the naming of tropical storms. Instead a strict procedure has been established by an international committee of the World Meteorological Organization. For Atlantic hurricanes, there is a list of names for each of six years. In other words, one list is repeated every seventh year. The only time that there is a change is if a storm is so deadly or costly that the future use of its name on a different storm would be inappropriate for obvious reasons of sensitivity. If that occurs, then at an annual meeting by the committee (called primarily to discuss many other issues) the offending name is stricken from the list and another name is selected to replace it. There is an exception to the retirement rule, however. Before 1979, when the rst permanent six-year storm name list began, some storm names were simply not used anymore. For example, in 1966, “Fern” was substituted for “Frieda,” and no reason was cited. HurricanesContinued from page 6

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The Pelican 13 Friday, June 22, 2012 By Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach – This month the Pompano Beach Rotary Club distributed $13,500 in checks to local charities. And each check came with a story regarding the charity chosen for this day. The event took place at Galuppi’s Restaurant with Rotary president Jay Ghanem presenting the checks. 4Kids came to the attention of the Rotary Board of Directors through Rotarian Ted Hasle. 4KIDS of South Florida is a non-pro t organization committed to providing a home for every child in crisis. Through a partnership of individuals, churches, corporations, and government agencies, 4KIDS has assisted over 15,000 children in 14 years. Hasle’s story is one of incredible coincidence. Four years ago, Hasle was seated at a table for the St. Mark’s Episcopal School graduation ceremonies. There he met a couple who volunteered for 4Kids. They mentioned a need for a photographer for the charity. Hasle responded, and he and his ancee became involved through Calvary Chapel. Two weeks later, at Rotary, the speaker representing 4Kids told the story of this charity for abandoned children. “This story was pulling my heart,” says Hasle, whose own father had grown up in a PB Rotary charities range from helping homeless kids to disaster reliefLighthouse Point Police Chief Ross Licata with Linda Mills as she accepts a check for Special Olympics. The Broward County Torch Run, a fundraiser for Special Olympic Games and sponsored by Broward Sheriff’s Of ce, ends the Federal Highway run at Dan Witt Park in Lighthouse Point. [Staff photos] Frank Fernandez accepts a check for LifeNetfamily from Jay Ghanem. Commissioner Rex Hardin accepts a check for the Pompano Dynamos. Pompano Beach BSO Major William Knowles, Captain Wayne Adkins and Deputy Mike Johnson accept a check from Jay Ghanem for youth programs.See ROTARY on page 17

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14 The PelicanFriday, June 22, 2012 this week and sections of the road from Powerline to Newport Center Drive will be under construction until February, 2013. According to Florida Department of Transportation of cials, the road will be repaired, resurfaced, guardrails will be upgraded, ADA ramps added and new signage installed. The work will “resolve some traf c issues,” they said. In attempt to alert the public, a meeting will be held Thursday, June 28, 6 p.m. at the BSO Substation on Powerline Road, south of Hillsboro Boulevard. For weekly updates on lane closures, go to the website, www.d4fdot.com or call public information of cer Miranda Iglesias, 955-9407585.Aldi plans OK’d; residents fear construction noise, dustDeer eld Beach – Residents of Hampton Gardens sought assurances from the commission Tuesday that demolition work at a former Bible college would not begin before 8 a.m. and that some thought be given to the dirt and dust that could seep into their homes. The three-acre site at 747 S. Federal Highway will be the location of an 18,000 squarefoot Aldi Supermarket and a 4,000 square-foot bank. Work is expected to begin in the fall and last 10 months. Sal Demarco, who lives at Hampton Gardens Condominium directly behind the construction site, also wanted to know how far away loading docks will be from his home. The docks will be 50 feet from the condo property line, Aldi representative said. In an attempt to block sound, an eight-foot wall is being constructed and a tree line planted. Commissioners approved the Aldi site plan with the provision that no construction work begin before 8 a.m. The city code allows construction 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Saturday.Relay for Life supporters striving to reach $106,000Deer eld Beach Well on their way to meeting their $106,000 goal, the 11th annual Relay for Life organizers will hold fundraisers through August 31. The May 5 Relay, chaired by local businessman Gordon Vatch and his right-hand man TJ Eagan, raised $90,000 with 44 participating teams from Deer eld Beach and Lighthouse Point. Another major event set for tonight at Strikes@ Boca Raton is attracting 28 bowling teams at $150 each, good for at least $5,000 when auction items are included and Vatch said he is attempting to schedule ‘happy hours’ at various restaurants for his cause. Anyone interested in supporting Relay, a major initiative of the American Cancer Society, can go to the Relay for Life website and check out what’s coming up next. Herbal incense sales not legal hereDeer eld Beach Commissioners have outlawed the display or sale here of synthetic marijuana following a trend occurring across the country. Promoted as “herbal incense” and sold under the names K2 and Spice, the compounds are being called more potent than real cannabis and more dangerous. In some cases, use of the fake pot has precipitated psychosis in individuals as well as heart problems. In this area, Sunrise was the rst city to ban synthetic marijuana. Several others are working on it.ImprovementsContinued form page 7 Commissioner Joe Miller asked that the substance be regulated and said this week he would like see the drugs known as “bath salts” banned.

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The Pelican 15 Friday, June 22, 2012 By Malcolm McClintockPELICAN STAFFThe Point Cafe 420 N. Federal Hwy. Pompano Beach 954-532-1534 thepointcafe.com nitroyogurt.comThe Point Caf is an impeccably clean, albeit eccentric restaurant located The Point Caf serves up tasty meals and futuristic Nitro Yogurts [Left] The fabulous Saltimbocca Panini is loaded with lemon pepper chicken, Italian prosciutto, fresh mozzarella, pesto and tomatoes on grilled Ciabatta bread. [Above] The frozen rum pia colada with raspberry coulis packs a punch. [Photos by Malcolm McClintock]See THE POINT on page 16

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16 The PelicanFriday, June 22, 2012on Federal Highway just north of Atlantic Boulevard. This stand-alone edi ce with Greek statues guarding the front faade is divided into two main sections. On one side, is a pleasantly decorated dining section and, on the other, a remarkably quirky “ice cream parlor” with lifesize mannequins of “mad scientists” and huge tanks of liquid nitrogen lining the walls. “We’ve been open about a year now,” says Isaac Efraim, a Brazilian native and restaurateur who has owned and operated several Broward eateries over the past few decades. “I decided to open this restaurant in Pompano Beach with my wife Isis because it is a nice area where there is also a strong Brazilian community.” Having owned a Subway franchise, a Monster Burger, a Ribs Express and a Captain Shrimp, Efraim has developed an unparalleled level of experience in the food business. His latest venture is an eclectic mix of high-quality traditional gourmet light fare along with space-aged Nitro yogurts and ice-creams. “We are the only place in the world to make alcoholic frozen yogurt,” says the creative businessman. “I saw someone on TV working with liquid nitrogen and got inspired.” Obtaining a frozen treat involves a four step process. First, the customer chooses the base (i.e. yogurt, ice cream or sorbet), then selects a avor from a list of 40 options (such as chocolate, passion fruit, tiramisu, peanut butter, pumpkin pie, etc…), then opts for 2 mix-ins (e.g. Oreo cookie, chocolate chips, almonds, gummy bears, etc…) and, nally, picks actual toppings like hot fudge, toasted marshmallows, whipped cream and the like. “Nobody does it the way we do. In the evenings, we turn on the music, lasers and smoke machine – it almost looks like a night club!” From a more classical gastronomic perspective, The Point Caf’s menu is replete with all the specialties of Efraim’s culinary past. Tender baby back ribs, conch fritters, snow crab, fried shrimp, BBQ pulled pork, smoked beef brisket, giant burgers, fresh salads, Alfredo pasta, breakfast specialties and, of course, eye-popping sandwiches such as Turkey with cranberry, roast beef with Dijon horseradish and even fried Tilapia. “Our Saltimbocca Panini is our biggest seller,” says Efraim of this gorgeous grilled Ciabatta bread sandwich over owing with lemon pepper chicken, prosciutto, fresh mozzarella, pesto sauce and tomatoes. “Like all our Paninis, it is big enough for two people to share!” “We also have very inexpensive breakfasts,” says Efraim. Indeed, The Point Caf serves the most affordable morning meals in Pompano Beach starting at $1.99 for an egg & cheese English muf n, $2.99 for bacon & eggs, and $4.99 for a large steak and egg sandwich. “For lunch, I love our Philly cheesesteak and our juicy burgers. In fact, we offer the burgers in both 1/3 lb or lb sizes and use only certi ed Angus beef,” insists Efraim. “They go great with a cold beer, a nice glass of wine or even a frosty Tropical frozen drink.” Breakfast meals start at $1.99, sandwiches and burgers at $4.99, seafood at $7.99 and specialty frozen treats at $4.99 ($7.99 with alcohol.) Beers are $1.99, wine glasses $4.99 and bottles $14.99. There is ample free parking, free wi All major credit cards are accepted. Be it a rich coffee, a tasty Panini, loads of shrimp or an outrageous frozen treat, this is one spot that has all the right elements, including those on the periodic table. Catering is a big part of The Point Caf’s business and the locale is perfect for all types of private functions including kids’ parties. For more info, visit the websites at www.thepointcafe.com and www.nitroyogurt.com. Enjoy! The PointContinued from page 15 Long-time associate Jean Jordan, The Point Caf owner Isaac Efraim and his friendly wife Isis show off a few house specialties.

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The Pelican 17 Friday, June 22, 2012 foster home. “My father was a great man.” Hasle became involved as a volunteer for the group through his photography and by assisting on the charity’s business team. Two years ago, his interest in 4Kids went up a notch. He experienced the pain of watching very young children he had known get caught up in crisis and become wards of the state after their parents were arrested. When 4Kids stepped in with a home and two loving foster parents, he also experienced the relief that these children had found a safe place. Hasle says that in South Florida, nearly 200 churches actively support 4Kids and he is a frequent speaker on behalf of the charity. Other charities bene tting from this club’s fundraisers were American Cancer Society, Banche Ely High School, Broward Sheriff’s Of ce Back to School and Christmas Bikes programs, Dynamos of Pompano Beach, Guatemala relief, Hope For Our Youth, Impact Broward Senior Volunteer Services, Kids in Distress, LifeNet Family Feeding Program, Rebuilding Together, Special Olympics, Broward, Woodhouse, and Boys & Girls Club. In addition to these charities, this club gave nine students college scholarship money and two disaster relief projects, one in Haiti and the other for the Alabama tornado amounted to nearly $5,000 in tents and other supplies for the people affected. One large project embraced by the club under the leadership of Rotarian Joe Usman, provided $46,000 to pay for surgeries that corrected clef palates for children in the Philippines. Rotary Club of Pompano Beach meets on Fridays for lunch at Galuppi’s Restaurant. To learn more, call 954-7863274. Greg Jones, director of Boys & Girls Club in Pompano Beach, arrived with a special thank you card for Rotary made and signed by the children at the club. RotaryContinued from page 13going to enable the village to have the newest and best nursing facility in Florida. Many of us are working on the speci cs to be sure that this facility is everything we hope it can be.” He traded in golf and tennis for walks around the lakes with his wife, Min. “We visit the ducks and swans. I carry my camera for pictures of other walkers,” he says. “I publish the pictures on my web site. Min and I are also getting involved in the tness center classes where we work out with guidance from our professionals.” Rasmussen has had some very colorful experiences after retiring from a successful 35year career in senior management in the food industry. He signed on to the International Executive Service Corps which he claims “changed my life forever. We went to Zambia, Africa where I volunteered with a dairy farmer, helping him with long range planning to become more successful. Min came with me and taught school. My next two assignments were in Zambia helping farmer/processors increase sales and productivity. In Ukraine, I created a ve-year-plan for a dairy processing plant. In Novgorod, Russia, I worked with the Municipal Agricultural Enterprise. My last African visit was to volunteer with Agricultural Cooperative Development International and Volunteers in Overseas Cooperative Assistance. When I got home from that last trip, I found out that the plane which left shortly after mine was blown up by terrorists. My wife and four children voted to have me cease my overseas travel. This ended the most exciting six years of my life.” In 2003, he and Min moved into JKV and he hasn’t had an idle moment since. Thank you, Norm Rasmussen, for your many years of volunteer service around the world and in JKV. PhotographerContinued from page 10

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The Pelican 19 Friday, June 22, 2012 been widened. Because of concern for sea turtles nesting at the beach lighting in the area can’t face the ocean. Amber lights which face torward the ground are being designed into walls. In an effort to encourage a pedestrian-friendly atmosphere, the plans include a proposal for an all-red intersection at Commercial and A1A. With this plan, pedestrians would cross in all directions when all traf c is stopped. In the block from El Mar to A1A, sidewalks are proposed at 20 to 23 feet to allow for outdoor dining. A crosswalk is reduced from 80 feet to 37 feet. Parking has been the most contentious issue, as these plans moved forward, Fett acknowledged. With the plaza designs, all 12 parking spaces will be lost in the easternmost block of Commercial and 10 of 24 spaces lost in the second block. Three spaces will be lost on El Mar, where existing spaces closest to the crosswalk are illegal. Six spaces will be lost on A1A between the alleys. In a report to commissioners, Town Manager Connie Hoffmann said most of those eliminated parking spaces can be relocated within reasonable walking distance of the two blocks. She said the town expects to get 15 to 20 new spaces when the A1A and Wings parking lots are combined and recon gured. The commission approved a design contract for that project June 12. Municipal Services employees currently use 12 spaces in the A1A lot during daytime hours. Those spaces will be freed up when the town builds a proposed parking lot between Jarvis Hall and the Public Safety Building. Commissioners also approved the design contract for that project June 12. Staff also is working with an engineer on a design proposal to create new parallel spaces in the middle of South Bougainvilla Drive in areas where 90 degree back out parking doesn’t occur on both sides of the road. “We don’t want sandboxes. We want a parking place that brings people in that spend money in the shops,” said property owner Bill Ciani. He recently presented the commission with a petition signed by those objecting to the loss of parking with this project. “If you want to do a town center with bands and weddings, do it at El Prado,” he suggested. “People who own businesses don’t own this town,” said resident Ken Kugler, urging commissioners to approve the plans, except for the sand at the plaza. “You’ve hired the experts. Build it, and they will come.” Janet Deni, one of the owners of Kilwin’s Ice Cream, said she is always concerned about parking and would like to see a future plan for more parking in the community. “Parking is an issue. I hear it from customers all the time.” Deni said she was happy the town is being beauti ed and asked only that people be able to see through the tree canopy to the businesses. Resident Patrick Pointu said the project looks nice, but he questioned whether now was the time to spend money on beauti cation. Resident Patrick Potts urged commissioners to support the project. “Do the brave thing. Let those (parking) spots go and then support the businesses. If this happens, this town will blossom far beyond what has taken place.” Next it was the commissioners’ turn to weigh in. Commissioner Mark Brown said the town has to make these improvements. “If we don’t move now, we will miss the boat,” he said, pointing out improvements Pompano Beach is making on Atlantic Boulevard. Brown said his biggest concern is how long it will take and the impact of disruptions on business. He wants incentives for contractors to move quickly to complete the project. Commissioner Chris Vincent agreed, noting, “We need to revitalize or people will go somewhere else. We need to keep up with our neighbors.” Vice Mayor Scot Sasser said he has concluded the replacement parking spaces are enough to move forward. “We will have an incredible downtown area. I think we need to move forward,” Mayor Roseann Minnet said. Commissioners agreed they want the seashell aggregate and not sand at the beach plaza. Several residents spoke against the sand. And they chose colorful Adirondack street furniture for the plaza areas. CommercialContinued from page 2 SightingsA community calendar of Broward County. Email events to siren2415@gmail. comSee SIGHTINGS on page 20 6-25 – A kite making workshop will be held from 2 to 3 p.m. at the Pompano Beach Library, 1213 E. Atlantic Boulevard, Pompano Beach. The event is for ages 7 to 12. 954-786-2181. 6-25 – Kite-making workshop 2 to 3 p.m. at the Pompano Beach Library, 1213 E. Atlantic Boulevard, Pompano Beach. Ages 7 to 12. 954-786-2181. 6-26 – The Benevolent Patriotic Order of Does Drove 142 hosts a card party from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Pompano Beach Elks Lodge, 700 NE 10 St., Pompano Beach. $4. 561-4792002.

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20 The Pelican Friday, June 22, 2012 WORSHIP DIRECTORY: Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad. Rev. Hyvenson Joseph topics Small says should be in the conversation these days. This year, experts are predicting 11 tropical storms, ve hurricanes which two of them considered major hurricanes. “People need to understand that when you move up in a category number, it’s not just a number, it’s exponentially higher,” Small said. Categories 1 and 2 mandate evacuation for all residents living east of the Intracoastal Waterway. Categories above that mandate evacuation of all residents east of Federal Highway. “We are hurricane central.” Small says. “People tend to be slow in evacuating. They have let their guards down because we haven’t had a major storm in a long time. No self-respecting Floridian should be caught in a long line [for shutters or hurricane supplies].” He adds that now is the time to have a trial run with shutters. Some will need lubrication. Plywood protection should be considered now along with the right tools and screws for installation. It’s also a time to think about evacuation. Shelters are designed for ve percent of the population. If people are unprepared, they could panic and over ow the shelters. “One bad storm could hit, and people won’t have electricity for a month or two. I don’t know if a lot of people are prepared to live within those conditions. It can take months and even years to recover,” Small said. The chief said although evacuations are mandatory, re and police personnel will not drag people out of their apartments. But a surge could wipe out the electricity meaning there would be no elevators, water or food supplies. Residents might have to live without power for a “long, long time.” And that possibility could be deadly for people who are considered “vulnerable,” or those who would require assistance from others. “It’s been estimated that around three to four percent of this city is vulnerable,” Small says. “They are the ones who do not have the ability to get water, ice, food or other survival items. We are a city of 100,000, so that means about 3,000 are in this situation. After Wilma, we found people eating rotten food. Others were walking on soaked oors. If you factor in that the rest of us are able-bodied, and we look out for these people, they won’t fall in the cracks.” The re chief has other points that are critical to giving the community its best bet in surviving a big blow, should it be this year. Generators: Many condo associations do not allow generators because they could blow deadly fumes throughout the building. Before buying a generator, residents should check with management. Wet storms: Most people who die in hurricanes have drowned in the waters. “A really wet hurricane can land 20 to 30 inches of rain and ood everything. We have built more drainage areas, but they are like saucers that once lled, spill over. The idea is to stay away from the water,” Small said. Wind threats: “Look at your house. Will it withstand the wind? If not, leave early. Don’t wait until the eleventh hour. What’s the worst that can happen? A couple of days away from the house?” Business owners: The boss should expect that people will need time at home to prepare for storms. It’s a good idea to make these arrangements ahead of time. As storms approach the area, cities begin operating from emergency operation centers. This is where city employees will live and work 24/7; city hall for the duration and aftermath of a storm. But despite massive preparation Small says, “Hurricanes are a mess. It will take everyone’s best.” StormContinued from page 1SightingsContinued from page 19 6-26 – The lm Moonstruck will be playing from 2 to 4:30 p.m. at the Galt Ocean Mile Library, 3403 Galt Ocean Drive, Fort Lauderdale. There will be a discussion of the lm after. 954-537-2877. 6-26 – Arts and crafts 4 to 5 p.m. at the Deer eld Beach Percy White Branch Library, 837 E. Hillsboro Blvd., Deer eld Beach. 954360-1380.See SIGHTINGS on page 26

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The Pelican 21 Friday, June 22, 2012 At a cost of $400,000, funded by a federal grant, the EOC contains everything the city needs to communicate with county and state of cials and city staff after a hurricane or disaster hits. Constructed with reinforced concrete, the EOC contains laptops, phones, radios, televisions; whatever the city needs to run a response after a disaster. “We’ve even got air mattresses to support 24-hour staf ng,” said Henderson. And to communicate and coordinate with the state and county in case of a storm, the city has two staff members trained to work with the Broward County Emergency Operations Center. The city’s other facilities will also play a part in postdisaster response. The Hagen CommunicationContinued from page 5Park Community Center can be used to house city staff if needed while the Municipal Complex on Dixie Highway has shower facilities. Like city hall, both facilities are equipped with an emergency generator. And in addition to being prepared to communicate effectively, the city is ready to meet the physical needs of city staff. Along with a supply of bottled water and MREs, or Meals Ready to Eat, the city has an account with Publix and a contract with a local caterer to provide hot meals. “We have a lot of things on tap,” said Gallegos. After the winds die down and the waters recede, clean up efforts can begin. To handle the extra debris and yard waste generated by a hurricane, the city has contracted with two rms, one contracted to haul away the waste and the other to keep track of how much is hauled away. Keeping track of the debris is important because the Federal Emergency Management Administration, or FEMA, reimburses local governments for the expenses associated with hauling away debris. In recent months though federal of cials have asked various cities in Broward to reimburse FEMA for expenses incurred in Hurricane Wilma. The requests came because FEMA claims cities billed them for clean up projects that were ineligible. Boca Raton has been asked to give back $5.5 million, Fort Lauderdale $15 million and Deer eld Beach $1.6 million. Henderson credited the city’s accounting practices with making sure it billed FEMA properly. “We haven’t had to reimburse FEMA,” she said.By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFWilton Manors – Ted P. Galatis, Sr., father of Wilton Manors Commissioner Ted Galatis, Jr. and former attorney for the City of Oakland Park, died on June 13 at the age of 89. Born in Miami, Galatis, Sr., a Plantation resident, moved to Fort Lauderdale in 1938 with his parents, Peter and Florence and brother, Peter. Galatis, Sr. graduated from Fort Lauderdale High School in 1941. His family owned and operated four restaurants/ clubs in Fort Lauderdale, He graduated for the University of Florida law school in 1946. Ted Galatis, Jr., who has his own firm, Andrews & Galatis in Fort Lauderdale, said his father encouraged him to go into law ever since he was a boy. Galatis, Sr. was admitted to the Florida State Bar in 1946 and remained a member until his death. Galatis, Sr. was associated with several firms during the course of his career including Davis & Lockhart, Galatis & Kirsch and Galatis & Galatis. He also served as the city attorney for Oakland Park during the 1950s. Galatis, Sr. took a break from actively practicing law in 1952 when he was elected Justice of the Peace and judge of the Office of Small Claims Court. He resumed his practice in 1957 and continued until 2008. From 1983 to 1986, father and son worked together at Galatis & Galatis. “He was the perfect mentor,” said Galatis, Jr. “I learned more from my father in three years than I learned in the next 10 years at a large law firm.” Galatis, Sr. was a member of the Fort Lauderdale Junior Chamber of Commerce, Civitan Club, Broward County Bar Association, American Bar Association, Phi Alpha Delta, Theta Chi, Fort Lauderdale’s Beacon for the Blind and the founding member of the Little Theater of Fort Lauderdale. Galatis also served on the City of Plantation’s Planning and Zoning Board and chairman of the board of directors of Doctor’s Hospital in Sunrise. He is survived by his wife, Elizabeth, two sons, Ted and Charles, three grandchildren and one great-grand daughter. Funeral services will be held on June 29 at 11 a.m. at St. Gregory the Great Catholic Church, 200 N. University Dr., Plantation. The services will be held on what would have been Galatis’ 90th birthday.Ted P. Galatis, Sr. served as Oakland Park city attorney pompanopelican.com anytime

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22 The Pelican Friday, June 22, 2012 Classi eds Call 954-545-0013 HELP WANTEDWILLING TO EDUCATE-Highly motivated individual for rewarding career in nancial services with Primerica. Call 954-729-0192. 7/6 LOCAL PEST CONTROL CO Looking For Quality Sales/Service Tech. Must Be Dependable, Team Player, Good Drivers License & People Skills. Will Train Right Person. ALSO Of ce Assistant – Computer – People & Phone Skills Needed. Fax Resume 954418-3982. 6-29 MAINTENANCE TECHNICIANA Property Management Company Is Searching For A Maintenance Technician For A Mid-Rise Property Located in Pompano Beach, Fla. Candidates Need to Have General Maintenance Knowledge, Have Experience In Preparing Vacant Units For Occupancy, Be Able To Work A Flexible Schedule, Motivated & Be HVAC Certified. Position Offers Competitive Salary & Benefit Package. Interested Applicants Should E-mail Resume To hectorg@ pmiflorida.com Or Fax To 305-279-5703. 6-29 DOMESTIC HELP NEEDED – Lighthouse Point. 5 Hours – Once A Week! $100. Must Have Experience & References. Call 954-783-0305. 6-22 SEEKING EMPLOYMENTCAREGIVER/COMPANION Caucasian Woman With 25 Yrs. Exp. To Assist & Care For Your Loved Ones. Days / Eves / Nights. References Available. 954-482-5494. 6-22 AIDE / CNA – First Hour FREE. Caring, Experienced. Licensed & Insured. Hourly, Weekly Or Live-in. References Available. Reasonable Rates. 561-367-0970. 6-22 MATURE LADY Seeking Livein Housekeeper / Companion Aide Position. Excellent References. More Information Call 305-761-7152. 6-22 CARING HOME HEALTH – Seeking Live-in / Live Out. Can Be Recommended!! Please Call 954-496-4941. 7-6 MALE CNA / HHA / COMPANION. Broward Area. Former EMT. All Certi cations / Compassionate, References. Call Ron 954-232-2832. 6-22 SERVICES DANNY BOY ELECTRIC – Lic & Insured. Lic. #EC13004811. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. 24/Hr Service. 954-290-1443. Beat Any Written Estimate. Sr, Discount. 6-29 GINGERS HOUSEKEEPING – 20 YEARS EXP. (Licensed) References Available. Honest & Reliable – Love To Clean Windows! Help Organize No Problem. FREE Estimates! 954-200-4266. 6-22 HANDYMAN – PAINTING – CARPENTRY – Pressure Cleaning. Decks! Everything Around The House. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. Call 561-350-3781. 7-6 HONEST HANDYMAN – HOME & BUILDING Maintenance/Improvements. No Job Too Small. Fast Friendly Service. Reasonable Rates. Local Resident/Homeowner. Call Today For Your FREE Upfront Quote. No Deposit Required. 754-366-1915. 622 GOT JUNK? DUMP TRUCK – CONDO CLEANUPS Trees/Landscape, Yard Fill. Pressure Wash/ Roofs/Home Repairs – Welding, Etc. Dave 954-818-9538. 6-29 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIESNew GREEN technology. New defroster control saves energy in home refrigerators, commercial chillers. Patented. All optical. Simple mfg. Strategic partners needed. www.NewAvionics.Com. 954-568-1991. CMUSICIANS WANTEDThe American Legion Symphonic Band is now accepting new members for the 2011-2012 season. College age to “seasoned seniors” are welcome. Rehearsals are held on Wed. evenings at American Legion Post 142 in Pompano. Percussionists, oboe, bassoon, trombone and euphonium players are especially needed. If you enjoy “making music,” call Jim McGonigal, Music Director at 954647-0700 for more info.ROMANCEATTRACTIVE SENIOR LADY Would Like Companionship Of Tall, Slim Sr. Gentleman To Dine Out. Dance! 954-633-4255 Kay. 6-22MOBILE HOMES DEERFIELD BEACH Double Wide Nice 2 Bedroom 2 Bath. 55+ Community. Pool, Tennis Courts. Asking $14,000 OBO. Call 954-531-6229. 6-22 DEERFIELD BEACH 3 Bedroom 1 Bath – Very Large Kitchen. Ceramic Top Stove & Refrig Incl. Large Enclosed Porch. Utility Shed – Washer, Dryer & New Gas Water Heater Included. $15,000 Cash! 954-708-3050. CO-OP SALESPOMPANO BEACH Waterfront Co-op – 1/1 – 2 Available! Dockage Available! 2nd Floor! Side By Side. $59K Each. Coldwell Banker – Barbara – 954-629-1324. 7-6 HOMES FOR RENTPOMPANO COTTAGE STYLE HOUSE – 2 / 1 Pool – Large Fenced Yard. $1050 Month. 510 NE 35 Street. Call Darci 954-7833723. 6-29 REAL ESTATE WANTEDI BUY HOUSES!! CASH!! AS IS! QUICK CLOSE! ANY AREA – ANY CONDITION! NO EQUITY OK. CALL NOW 954-914-2355. 7-20 CONDOS FOR SALEPOMPANO BEACH – DIRECT OCEAN VIEW!! Pet Friendly! 2/2 AT THE BREAKERS! $269,000. Call Juliana At Barclay’s For Details. 1-305766-4420. 6-22 LIGHTHOUSE POINT PARADISE – Beautiful Furnished 2/2! Only $115,000. English, French, Spanish, Greek. Yvette Gaussen YES WE CAN REALTY 954-6147773 Or 954-773-8340. 6-22 CONDOS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH – 1 Block To Ocean!! 1 / 1 Fully Equipped. Hurricane Windows / Doors. 2 Flat Screens, DVD, WIFI, Pool, BBQ, Laundry. $850 Month + Electric Monthly Thru December. 954-540-9724. 6-22 POMPANO BEACH LEISUREVILLE 55+. Beautiful 2/1 Renovated Corner Condo 2nd Floor. Beside Pool, Clubhouse & Golf. Yrly Lease Unfurn. $800 Month. Furn. $900 Month. 1st & Last. Photos Available. prudhommejean@yahoo.com 954-784-0119. 7-6 POMPANO BEACH 1/1 East Of Federal. 1st Floor. Small Complex, Partially Furnished. $650 Month Yearly Lease. Call 954-263-7129. 6-22 APTS FOR RENTDEERFIELD/POMPANO BEACH 1 BR & 2 BR APTS FOR RENT. Remodeled, Paint, Tile, Etc. Washer / Dryer On Site. Pool. Pet Friendly. George 954-809-5030. 6-29 POMPANO BEACH NE 2/1 $950 – 2/1.5 Townhouse $1095 – SW 2/1 Low Move-in $950. – ALL FREE WATER – Rent + $70 Application Moves – U – In. 954-781-6299. 6-29 POMPANO BEACH / ATLANTIC / FEDERAL – Ef ciency $175 Weekly. No Security Deposit. Includes Cable, Electric, Internet. FREE Washer / Dryer. No Drug Record – No Evictions. 954-7090694. 6-22 POMPANO BEACH Studio Newly Renovated. Pool. Pet OK! $650 Per Month Yearly Lease. 1960 NE 48 Street. Call 954-857-5207. 6-29 POMPANO BEACH 1/1 APT. Newly Renovated! Pool, Pet OK! $700 Per Month Yearly Lease. 1960 NE 48 Street. 954857-5207. 6-29 POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 Bedroom From $495. Easy Movein. 1/2 OFF DEPOSIT. Remodeled. Great Location. 954-783-1088 For More Info. 7-13 COMMERCIAL FOR RENT-SALEPOMPANO COMMERCIAL OFFICE Spaces Available. Ranging From As Low As $500 To $700 Depending On Square Footage. Please Call Darci At 954783-3723. 6-15 DEERFIELD BEACH – Retail Of ce Warehouse – 700 Sq Ft With Loft. A/C, Bathroom. $575 Per Month. Call For More Info 561-654-1331 Or 561-9985681. 6-29 NEWLY EQUIPPED LOW RENT SHOP – Space Ideal For Bakery – Pizza – Wings – Crepes – Etc. Corner New – 12 Avenue & 34 Court Oakland Park. Indoor / Outdoor Patio Sitting. 954-563-3533. 6-15 Use The Pelican Classi eds to get the job done. Call 954-7838700 Use The Pelican Classi eds to get the job done. Call 954-7838700 Use The Pelican Classi eds to get the job done. Call 954-7838700 Use The Pelican Classi eds to get the job done. Call 954-7838700

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The Pelican 23 Friday, June 22, 2012 Classi eds Call 954-545-0013 DOCK FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH DOCK –Wide Canal – No Wake Area – Whips. Quiet Canal. Call 954-946-3301. 6-29 DEERFIELD BEACH – Dock For Rent – 60 Ft. Water, Electric. No Fixed Bridges. Nice Location. $350 Month. 954-429-9347 Or Call Cell 954-288-9651. 6-29 Sheldon was a victim of the economy after his loving home was foreclosed on. He is a 7-yearold tabby and is good with dogs and cats. He was raised along with a pitt bull and they had a very close bond. Adopt Sheldon and give him his forever home. He is tested, neutered, microchipped and is up to date on his shots. You can come and meet Sheldon and all his friends at The Florida Humane Society, 3870 North Powerline Road, in Pompano Beach at the northeast corner of Powerline and Sample – next to the Citco Car Wash. Hours are Thursday through Sunday 12 to 4 p.m. You can also go to www. floridahumanesociety.org or call 954-974-6152. Sheldon needs a home

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24 The Pelican Friday, June 22, 2012 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFOakland Park – City commissioners want to pursue safety regulations on solicitation in the right of ways and consider regulations on panhandling. They directed the city attorney to draft an ordinance on panhandling and are taking another look at an ordinance on solicitation. “Nothing upsets me more than seeing football players, cheerleaders, church groups standing in the median soliciting,” Mayor Anne Sallee said at Wednesday’s meeting. “I don’t want to see anyone standing in the median collecting funds. It’s not safe. Cars don’t belong on the sidewalks, and people don’t belong in the street,” Sallee said. Commissioner Suzanne Boisvenue said there are already laws on the books against traffic obstruction. “This is too far reaching,” she said, noting she couldn’t support an ordinance. Vice Mayor John Adornato said he abhors seeing children in the roadway medians soliciting. “Any parent who allows this should be chastised. But can we stop non-profits from doing this?” he asked. Adornato said he needs a better understanding of what’s on the books and should be enforced but maybe isn’t being enforced. He said that good Samaritans (donating funds) should not be penalized. Adornato questioned whether developer fees were going to help the homeless. “If we’re not collecting enough, that’s an abomination.” City Manager John Stunson said portions of gasoline taxes go to a fund for the homeless. The city has no impact fees to subsidize the homeless. As Adornato started to question whether there are adequate beds for the homeless, Commissioner Shari McCartney said, “This is not about the homeless. It’s about safety on the streets. We believe no one should be selling things in the street, but it’s pointless to penalize the buyer.” Commissioner Jed Shank said he could support an ordinance minus a good Samaritan penalty. “It’s not appropriate to conduct any business in the roadway,” he said. Fort Lauderdale passed an ordinance banning panhandling in places such as parks, city parking lots and government buildings. Oakland Park commissioners asked to see that ordinance, and copies were provided for discussion. Shank said he could support an ordinance that prohibits aggressive panhandling but not all panhandling. “Panhandling is a First Amendment right,” he said. McCartney said, “This sends a signal that we’re a safe and clean city. This is not about homelessness,” she said. She asked DJ Doody, city attorney, if he would vet the Fort Lauderdale ordinance. Doody said no. “I will prepare Oakland Park of cials want panhandlers off the streets, objectors say it will hurt the homeless population and will take away First Amendment rightsSee SOLICITATION on page 25

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The Pelican 25 Friday, June 22, 2012 Advertise in The Pelican 954-783-8700! an ordinance, based on your conversation and bring back one that is legally defensible.” Boisvenue asked that he also bring back information on laws are on the books regarding obstructing traffic. Father Bob Caudill of All Saint’s Mission said the ordinance on roadway solicitation would have a negative impact on the poor and homeless. John David, an attorney for the Homeless Voice Newspaper, said Oakland Park commissioners “rightfully rejected going forward” (with an ordinance) when these issues came up two years ago. “These issues come back like a bad penny every three or four years. Fort Lauderdale and now the county want to legislate against homelessness. These ordinances try to criminalize homeless behavior. You can’t legislate the homeless out of Broward County.”SolicitationContinued from page 24

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26 The Pelican Friday, June 22, 2012 Visit us online at www.pompanopelican.com RJ BoyleRJ BOYLE STUDIOSThere is no doubt that the snapper shing will be off the chain this weekend. I am crossing my ngers hoping the wind stays light enough to go shing on Saturday. We are constantly talking to shing guys up and down the coast to nd out what’s biting north and south of us. We know about migrational patterns of desired sh because we are connected with all of these other shermen. The snappers have made their way here, and it’s time to get tight. Yellowtail snappers, mutton snappers and mangrove snappers will be the desire of bottom shermen in our local waters for the next few weeks. We use small jigs tipped with squid or bonita for the yellowThis is the weekend for snapper Capt. RJ Boyle is an experienced angler in South Florida. His studio is located in Lighthouse Point. Call 954-420-5001.tails, For muttons and mangroves, we use live ballyhoo or dead ballyhoo plugs. Sometimes a fresh dead goggle eye on the bottom works great too. We use long 20-foot uorocarbon leaders on our bottom rig with a 5/0 circle hook, and depending on the current we may use a 6 to 12 ounce lead to keep the lead on the bottom. The rough weather over the last few days has really stirred things up, so get off the couch and go catch some dinner. For technical advice on snappers, give us a call or come by the shop.We will get you dialed in. 6-27 – Puppets to Go presents the “The Tortoise and the Hare from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m., Deer eld Beach Percy White Branch Library, 837 E. Hillsboro Blvd., Deer eld Beach. 954-360-1380. 6-27 – Beach Readers Book Club takes place from 1 to 2:30 p.m. at the Beach Branch Library, 221 Pompano Beach Blvd., Pompano Beach. 954-786-2197 6-28 – Puss In Boots free at sundown at Friedt Family Park located behind town hall, 4501 Ocean Drive, Lauderdale-By-The-Sea. 965640-4200. 6-28 – The Pompano Beach Republican Club meets at 7 p.m. at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach. 954-786-7536. 6-28 – Wilton Manors Business Association meets for lunch at Andrews Diner, 2980 N. Andrews Ave., Wilton Manors, at 12 p.m. SightingsContinued from page 20

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The Pelican 27 Friday, June 22, 2012 ParkingContinued from page 2 said Patel, who is also overseeing the remodeling of the inside of the store. Patel wants to build a bar inside the store and said he timed the remodeling to coincide with the outside construction. The city still has to nish its planned $1.6 million in improvements to the storefront facades and $1.6 million in streetscape improvements, including additional lighting, landscaping and drainage work. About $400,000 of the money used on faade improvements is paid for by shopping center property owners. The rest of the money used for parking and streetscape improvements comes from a CRA, or Community Redevelopment Agency, grant. Danovich said delayed permitting issues have slowed down the project’s progress and estimates it will be nished by the end of this year or the beginning of the next. “It’s going to be beautiful when they nish it but it’s been a tough two months,” said Sheyla Rittel, owner of The KiteSurf Place, which sells sur ng and kitesur ng equipment. Rittel opened shortly before construction began on the east lot. She couldn’t estimate how much business she’s lost but said things have gotten worse since the lot opened in May. She’s hopeful the nished improvements will bring more people in but until then “we’ll try our best” to stay open. Other business owners, located in the eastern half of the shopping center, say they’ve seen an improvement since the east lot re-opened. “I’ve been pretty busy. People know I pay a fair price so they nd me. It’s hard to say . but things have de nitely improved,” said Stuart Waldron, owner of Stonehenge Estate Buyers. “The main thing is having parking back.” “It’s just made a giant difference,” said Bernadette Scollin, owner of Jukebox Diner, about the new parking lot. Scollin, who estimated that she had lost 50 percent of her business when construction began, said she has seen a “dramatic increase” of about 10 or 20 percent since the lot was re-opened. She credited her loyal customer base with getting her through so far. Barbara Ruhl, owner of Polish Deli Pyze in the west side, said business is down 70 percent with 30 percent of that due to the normal summer slow down. When The Pelican interviewed Ruhl on Monday at 1:30 p.m., she said only one customer had been in since she opened at 11 a.m. Like others though, she is optimistic the improvements will bring more people into the shopping center once they are nished. “The whole problem is The west parking lot of the Harbor Village Shoppes was re-opened yesterday. The east lot opened May 25. [Staff photo]how do you weather the storm between now and then,” said George Spain, owner of G Cuts, a barber shop. Spain estimates he’s lost 50 percent of his business since the west parking lot closed about three weeks ago. “It’s very hard for people to come in when they see all the construction. A lot of people think we’re closed,” said Spain.

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