<%BANNER%>
Pompano Pelican
ALL VOLUMES CITATION MAP IT! PDF VIEWER
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00090900/00303
 Material Information
Title: Pompano Pelican
Uniform Title: Pompano Pelican
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: Pompano Pelican
Place of Publication: Pompano Beach
Publication Date: 06-08-2012
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Pompano Beach
Coordinates: 26.234722 x -80.125556 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00090900:00303

Downloads

This item is only available as the following downloads:

( PDF )


Full Text

PAGE 1

Friday, June 8, 2012 Vol. XX, Issue 23 Wherever you are, read The Pelican @ pompanopelican.com Send news to siren2415@gmail.com Pompano Beach Deer eld Beach Lighthouse Point Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Wilton Manors Oakland Park Hillsboro Beach The Galt Palm Aire The Pelican Pelican By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFLauderdale-By-The-Sea This town and a variety of businesses are teaming up to sponsor a week of special events geared to attracting families to vacation here later this month. Plan a vacation now in Lauderdale-ByThe-Sea See VACATION on page 21Developer envisions 5-Star resortBy Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFHillsboro Beach The owner of 11 acres of beachfront and Intracoastal Waterway property has proposed to residents here that he be allowed to build a 5-Star resort that would add another jewel to the town. The land is owned by Palm Beach County developer John Kennelly who in the past has presented a number of development proposals to the town commission including one called The Enclave comprised of singlefamily homes, a marina and a luxury townhome complex connected by a tunnel under State Road A1A. In a letter being circulated this month, Kennelly wrote that changes in the economy made both plans impossible despite efforts to nd funding. Kennelly has been a property owner in the town since 1979. Local cub scouts place American ags at the grave sites of soldiers at the Pompano Beach Cemetery. Joseph Miller, pictured, places a ag at the entry to the Vietnam Vets memorial prior to Memorial Day. More than 15 cub packs participated in the ag-placing event. County passes $2.4 Million tab to Pompano for police dispatchBy Judy VikPELICAN STAFF Pompano Beach City commissioners agreed to direct staff to provide them with direction on the legal rami cations if they dont pay the Broward Sheriffs Of ce the $2.4 million theyre asking annually for dispatch services. Fort Lauderdale is not paying BSO for dispatch services, and they dont intend to pay until disparities (in what cities are paying) are adjusted, Pompano Beach City Manager Dennis Beach informed commissioners during a budget workshop Wednesday. (Fort Lauderdale) proposes to go to the Broward County Commission to propose some different ways to allocate dispatch service. The county has refused to pay for Fort Lauderdale, Beach said. The county pays $18 million a year to subsidize communities that See TAB on page 2 See RESORT on page 16 Keep dog park free say advisory membersBy Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach When it comes to charging a fee to use the citys dog park, the parks and recreation advisory board favors the status quo keeping the park free. On Wednesday at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, board members voted not to advise the city commission to charge dog park users for use of the facility. Because its only an advisory committee the Sunday ban on alcohol removed Footvolley organizer given OK to distribute beerBy Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach Commissioners approved two measures concerning the distribution of alcoholic beverages this week. Both agenda items drew opposition from speakers concerned about religious and family values. Sergio Menezes, founder of Pro Footvolley LLC, was given permission to distribute Bud Light Lime only from a designated area for his Pro Footvolley Championship Tournament being held on the beach here Sept. 20-23. Menezes See ALCOHOL on page 27 See DOG PARK on page 3

PAGE 2

2 The PelicanFriday, June 8, 2012 have dispatch services they dont pay for, Beach said. The county has suggested they may quit doing that. If Pompano Beach commissioners consider not paying for dispatch, Beach said one repercussion could be that BSO would start removing law enforcement. We have a stronger case than Fort Lauderdale, Commissioner Barry Dockswell said. Fort Lauderdale is not paying for dispatch, and they dont have BSO service. Id be willing to have this commission be much more assertive. If we cant negotiate with BSO, I would be in favor of us being more assertive on this and calling the countys bluff, he said. Brian Donovan, budget director, said he has been trying to arrange a meeting with BSOs budget staff, but has not received a response to his requests. Mayor Lamar Fisher noted that the citys contract with BSO calls for the city to pay $2.4 million for dispatch. While agreeing the city needs to take a hard stand, he said the commission needs to be sure its not in violation of the contract and putting the city in jeopardy. Were paying the tab for Fort Lauderdale, and our taxpayers are subsidizing other communities, Commissioner Rex Hardin said. How can we hold our heads up? I dont want to go down a road where we nd ourselves in a lawsuit that would cost us more than what we pay for dispatch, said Vice Mayor George Brummer. The best message we can give the county and the sheriff is to take small steps to reform our police department, Brummer added. We cant afford to reduce dispatch services, and I dont want to reduce police services. The only way is to gradually make a move to assume control. Dockswell said he didnt know what gradual steps could be taken. We need to stand up for our rights with our partner, the BSO. Id rather be in a lawsuit than get screwed over and not complain. Unless youre willing to ride this horse until the end, I wouldnt get on it, Beach said. He referred to the end as the city restarting its own police department. Thats not my goal, but we have to be willing to do it, Dockswell said. Were being treated unfairly, and were being meek and ineffective. The city attorney will assess the contract to provide direction on the impact of non-payment for dispatch. Commissioner Charlotte Burrie said the crime rate is very high. I get nervous when we talk about creating our own police department. If we do that, we arent going to catch the bad guys like they do now, she said. Commissioners were presented three options for setting the millage rate. They selected the rst option, which included an increase of $11 to the current $111, the current payment for a single-family re assessment fee and an increase in millage rate from 5.2027 to 5.4722. Increased re fees will go to the replacement of Station 103 in the Cresthaven area and enhancements to old stations. Dockswell, who didnt like any of the options proposed, said he wanted the city to look at outsourcing some services, such as engineering, building or public works. Brummer opposed increasing re assessments. He said a unit assessed at $30,000 shouldnt be paying the same as a $500,000 house. Brummer also didnt want to set aside some capital improvement projects, as Dockswell suggested. He preferred a slight increase in ad valorem taxes. The city has to have a future, and we have to see that it has some rosiness, he said. Dockswell said they should resolve the dispatch issue and consider a re department analysis before picking an option. He said the focus should be on the expenditure side rather than raising taxes every year. Property valuation for Pompano is $8.73 billion, down from $8.81 billion last year. New construction accounted for $15 million. Projected revenues in the general fund for FY are $110.5 million and projected expenses $113.6 million. Dr. Ken Campbell was the only resident to address commissioners during public comments. He said they should delay certain things. Our economy is not recovering. Things wont get better next year or the year after, he said. Think about how you can make our dollars stretch the farthest. Additional budget workshops will be held in July.TabContinued from page 1

PAGE 3

The Pelican 3 Friday, June 8, 2012 ultimate decision on dog park fees will be made by commissioners. Originally, city staff recommended a fee of $60 per year per dog for residents and $120 for non-residents but cut those in half by the meeting Wednesday. City staff also recommended a six-month fee of $20 for residents and $40 for non-residents, with a $10 for each additional dog, and a $5 per visit fee for residents and $10 for non-residents. Scott Moore, parks and recreation department staff member, said the city spends about $2,000 a month on the park, including cutting and watering the grass and chemical treatments. Moore said the proposed fee was reduced to mirror what some of the other dog parks in the county charge. The meeting became a clash of ideas between those who say a fee would kill attendance at a park which has bene ts for the city and those who say users need to help fund it. Its going to do wonders for eliminating the number of dogs [that visit the park], said board member Chris Mullon about the fee. Rafael Katz, board member, said dog park users attracted to the area spend money at businesses nearby; money that would be reduced because a fee would deter people from coming. Residents and board members who spoke in favor of the fee cited how residents are charged for the use of other facilities and how the money generated helps subsidize maintenance costs. I cant believe everyones talking over $30 a year, said board member Jim Santomassimo, who voted in favor of the fee. Santomassimo added that, Dog parkContinued from page 1compared to the other costs associated with owning a dog, $30 is something dog owners should easily be able to afford. According to the American Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, the average annual cost to provide and take care of a dog runs between $1,314 and $1,843 depending on the size of the animal. Another vote by the board, to propose the city purchase a computer system that requires park users to swipe their pass to gain entry, resulted in a tie with no recommendation on monitoring the park. Currently, the city does not control who enters the park. Some city staff members and residents have said many users disregard the rules. At the advisory board meeting in May, David Aycock, Pompano Beach Animal Control of cer, said hes seen a lot of incidents of dogs attacking other dogs. Regardless of whether theres a fee, we need to get some control, he said last month.

PAGE 4

4 The PelicanFriday, June 8, 2012 Advertise with The Pelican Today! By Judy VikPELICAN STAFF Hillsboro Beach Town commissioners agreed Tuesday to issue a request for proposals for solid waste collection. The vote was 4-1, Commissioner Dick Maggiore dissenting. Deadline for submission of proposals is Monday, July 2. The towns current contract with Waste Management expires Sept. 30. Mayor Dan Dodge noted that while the town has had an excellent history with this company, I believe its a good time to go out to bid. Commissioner Javier Garcia said its good business practice and would be in our best interests to go out there and see our options. Maggiore disagreed, suggesting the commission instead renew the existing contract. When the town issued an RFP two years ago, these guys [Waste Management] were way below everyone else. I dont think an RFP is needed, he said. Vice Mayor Claire Schubert said she would like to see what other communities are paying. Waste Management collects garbage twice a week in Hillsboro Beach at a charge of $4.74 per unit per month, according to Anthony Spadaccia, manager of government affairs with Waste Management. In addition, the county charges a tipping fee of $30 per ton. Those tipping fees will be reduced substantially next year since bonds have been paid off, he said.Of cer Steve Kelly receives lifesaving awardIn other business, commissioners recognized Of cer Steve Kelly of the Hillsboro Police Department for his efforts in saving a woman from drowning. Police received a 911 call around midnight May 9 requesting assistance behind the Rainbow Inn in reference to a 56-year-old woman who was in distress as she ventured out into the ocean. Kelly arrived on the scene and without regard for his own safety, swam out about 50 yards and rescued her, Major Jay Szesnat said. He was awarded the Hillsboro Beach Police Lifesaving Award.Water plant update James Ravideau of CH2M Hill reported that 99 percent of concrete work is now complete on the water plant. Framework is now being installed on the chemical building. Last week the town submitted modi ed landscape Garbage rates, vendors considered as Hillsboro Beach contract nears plans to Pompano Beach, and Pompano has agreed to relax some of the previous requirements, which should mean a substantial difference in price. The number of oak trees required has been reduced from up to 14 trees to four.

PAGE 5

The Pelican 5 Friday, June 8, 2012 By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFWilton Manors With only today until noon left to le as a candidate for city commission, incumbent Mayor Gary Resnick may win a third term unopposed. By press time Thursday, Resnick was the only candidate to le for the mayoral race. So far, three candidates have led for the two commission seats up for grabs Vice Mayor Tom Green, Commissioner Julie Carson and Kimber White, a member of the citys Economic Task Force and newcomer to Wilton Manors political scene. Because the city is not divided by districts, the two candidates with the most votes Gary Resnick may go unopposed for WIlton Manors mayoral racewill win. Candidates have until 12 p.m. today to le for the Nov. 6 election. Leigh Ann Henderson, assistant city manager, said Carson had been working volunteer residents dedicated to helping out their neighbors physically or code and ordinance changes and the citys green building program which See WM RACE on page 9 Julie Carson Carson, rst elected during a special election in 2010, said shes come up with ways to save the city money, including trimming legal costs. She also served as interim commissioner from November 2008 to February 2009. Speci cally, Carson suggested using less block billing which can be vague and use paralegals when possible. If a legal document can be drafted by a less expensive paralegal [we should do that], said Carson.Carson Greenwith the city attorneys of ce to help save money but was unable to estimate how much has been saved. I think my service has been suf cient and I just hope that everyone else will see that, said Carson. If she gets another term she wants to continue to listen to the concerns of residents and act on them when and where appropriate as well as increase safety in residential neighborhoods, in part, by creating a more visible police presence. Carson also said she wants to create a Citizen Corps of White nancially. Thats the kind of energy Id like to create. Carson is a senior paralegal with Gator Investments, a real estate management rm in North Miami. Tom Green In his rst term Green, elected in 2008, said hes focused a lot of time on Resnickprovides incentives to incorporate green technologies and materials into the construction of new homes. Our vice mayor had a bunch of good suggestions when we were formulating

PAGE 6

6 The PelicanFriday, June 8, 2012 Deer eld Beach, Pompano Beach, Lighthouse Point, LauderdaleBy-The-Sea, Wilton Manors and Oakland ParkWilton Manors Oakland Park Hillsboro Beach The Pompano Pelican is published weekly on FridaysStreet Address: 1500-A E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, FL 33060 Telephone: 954-783-8700 Fax: 954-783-0093Letters to the Editor are encouraged and accepted for print if signed, although a writers name will be withheld on request; letters must also include a daytime telephone number. Advertising rates are available upon request. Subscription rate is $31.80 including tax for one years delivery in Greater Pompano Beach; $95.40/per year including tax for others in the United States; call 954-783-8700 for rates abroad. The Pelican is a nonpartisan newspaper and reserves the right to decline advertising. Copyright 2012. Reproduction of this publication in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission of the publisher. The Pelican is a member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, Deer eld Beach Chamber and the LBTS Chamber. The Pelican is a state certi ed woman-owned minority business. The Pelican is delivered to businesses, libraries, schools, of ces, hospitals, news racks and single family homes. All advertising and copy is published at the sole discretion of the publisher. We welcome your critiques and ideas concerning this publication. Anne Siren, publisherExecutive Assistant: Mary Hudson Graphics: Rachel Ramirez Windsheimer Bookkeeper: John White Classi eds: Fran Shelby Contributing Writers: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Judy Wilson, Malcolm McClintock, Judy Vik, Michael dOliveira Account Executives: Paul Shroads, Carolyn Mann, Bill Heaton, Bill Fox Special Of ce Assistant: Cathy Siren ESTABLISHED 1993 Volume XX, Issue 23 Founding Editor and PublisherAnne Hanby Siren Letters & OpinionsEight ve-year-olds graduated from the NE Focal Point Childcare Center last week. Special guest was Mayor Peggy Noland who said, This is a big day for you all and Im so proud of you! Before accepting their diplomas, the students presented a play, Hats off to Helpers. Children ages two through ve are accepted in the Focal Points pre-school program. A summer session runs June 11 to Aug. 9 and the fall program begins Aug. 20 and continues until June. Pictured from left are proud grads JaVanti Walker, Genari Epps, Jamie Thomas, Makayla Cordova, Jacob Washington, Pedro Gill and Jordan Joseph. And we present the class of 2012 . Pompano should make the right move to reduce bulk pick-up daysBy Anne SirenPUBLISHERPompano Beach There are simply too many garbage trucks running the streets of Pompano Beach. They come twice a week for the trash cans. They come twice a week to pick up the bulk items. They are loud, gas-guzzlers that have voracious appetites similar to Grendel, the monster of the epic poem, Beowulf Reducing the number of trips these huge trucks make throughout the city to retrieve rusty refrigerators, stained sofas and infested carpets will decrease the fumes and carbon emissions that attack everyones well being. And that removal reduces the blight that these bulky items create for neighborhoods throughout the city. In this issue, we show two examples of residents who carelessly tossed unwanted items on the streets without thought to their neighbors. Besides the unsightly sprawl that encroached on the sidewalk, where people walk and children ride bikes or skateboards, these mounds of debris offer housing to pests, vermin and spiders. We as citizens must take responsibility for our waste and prepare it for recycling or for trash pick-up in a more responsible manner. What kind of neighbors are we if our trash must become a neighbors unscenic view day after day? Now the city wants to place some very basic rules on the way trash is put on the streets for pick-up. Rules that most people should want to do on their own as simple courtesy to their neighbors. Bulk pick-up eight times a month is frivolous. Although it does not add to the Waste Management bill in Pompano Beach, it certainly adds to crime. Since its free, some residents are renting their own yard space to other companies who can save money by dumping trash or vegetation in Pompano Beach rather than dumping it legally at a county site. New laws always appear on the books when citizens refuse to police their own behavior. This new law which will come before the commission before long will put several constraints and regulations on this simple matter of trash pick-up, and there will be penalties for those who fail to follow the law. Bring it on sooner, we say. This law will decrease pollution, stop criminals from dupping in Pompano Beach and enhance neighborhoods.Shade the childrenBy Anne SirenPUBLISHERIf there is ever any doubt about the power of the sun, think back on this last Memorial Day. It was near high noon when the parade marched into the cemetery. Those lining the small road waved their ags with one hand and drank bottled water with the other. The crowd brought their folding chairs, ice chests and hats as they watched the young performers entertain as homage to our veterans. Eventually, all attention turned to the portable stage where dignitaries and elected of cials sat under the shaded stage. Put emphasis on the word shaded. The suns rays in South Florida, a sub-tropical part of the planet, can do great damage in a very short period of time. Skin cancer is rampant here. Heat is a death threat to small children who are easily dehydrated. And yet there is talk about building a public playground on the beach for youngsters, and along with that talk, there is disagreement as to how or whether this public beach playground should be shaded. The playground is meant to encourage families to visit the beach, enjoy the ocean and spend the day there. With that encouragement, city of cials must own up to the knowledge that safety measures at the beach regarding heat and sun rays are just as critical as the safety measures that provide swimmers with lifeguards. Not only should shade be part of any public playground built in this city, owning up to the sub tropical climate should encourage other safety signage like Protect Your Baby with a Hat. Signs should also remind parents to keep infants and children hydrated. Building a public playground without serious shading to accompany it is tantamount to a public swimming pool without lifeguards.

PAGE 7

The Pelican 7 Friday, June 8, 2012 By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach SaveA-Lot, a nationwide discount grocery store chain, is in the process of getting its newest distribution center, 2800 N. Andrews Ave., Pompano Beach, ready for the rst truckload of groceries. Chon Tomlin, spokesperson for Save-A-Lot, said the distribution center will open in November and service 150 stores in South Florida and the Caribbean, including the Save-A-Lot on Sample Road in Pompano. The center, which includes large refrigeration units, Save-A-Lot opens new distribution centerwill be used to temporarily store goods while they await delivery to area Save-A-Lots. This area works really well for us for the southern portion of Florida, she said, adding that the new facility would allow Save-A-Lot to save money on transportation and storage costs. Save-ALot stores now receive goods from Plant City in Central Florida. Formerly a US. Foods cold storage facility, the distribution center was originally 217,000 sq. ft but is being expanded to 250,000 sq. ft. Tomlin said the distribution center would add new jobs to the area but was unable to provide an estimate before press time. Besides jobs, Mayor Lamar Fisher said the center will mean an increase in tax revenue and make the city more attractive to other businesses. It creates an economic engine for us, said Fisher. The facility itself was already in great shape. It just needed some additional requirements to accommodate [our needs], Tomlin said. The property was sold to KTR Capital Partners in 2006 for $18.2 million and has an assessed value of $10.2 million. Save-A-Lot is leasing the property from KTR. Lauderdale by the Sea Chamber welcomes Sushi by the SeaSUSHI BY THE SEA 238 E. Commercial Blvd. in Lauderdale-By-TheSea opens its doors. Owners Vivian Ophelan and Mishihiro Hirano offer high quality sushi at competitive prices and are already acquiring a loyal following. Sponsored by the Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Chamber of Commerce, the ribbon-cutting ceremony was attended by LBTS Mayor Roseann Minnet, LBTS Chamber of Commerce President Mark Silver & Executive Director Malcolm McClintock, friends, family and customers.

PAGE 8

8 The PelicanFriday, June 8, 2012 Business matters The Pelican takes a look at local business owners. Call The Pelican to nd out how you can tell your story here because business matters. 954-783-8700. Pompano Beach Broward County Commissioner Chip LaMarca will be guest speaker at the next meeting of the Cresthaven Civic Association. The session is set for 7:30 p.m. Thursday, June 14, at the Moose Club, 3321 NE Sixth Terrace. Representatives of the Broward Sheriffs Of ce also will be on hand to report on crime trends in the area. For more information, contact CresthavenNews@aol.com or call 954-709-5894. Citizens Insurance offers residents help with policiesPompano Beach State Representative Gwyndolen ClarkeReed invites residents to meet with Citizens Property Insurance on June 13 from 1 to 3 p.m. at Pompano Beach City Hall, 100 W. Atlantic Blvd., Room 275. A Citizens staff member will answer questions and assist constituents who have been experiencing dif culties with their policies. Citizens is currently the largest insurer in the State of Florida providing insurance coverage to Floridians unable to nd affordable coverage in the private market. Appointments are required. No walk-ins allowed. Call 954-786-4848.By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFRock bottom interest rates and an unpredictable market have sent many investors buying and selling coins, precious metals, collectibles and memorabilia as a way to preserve and appreciate their capital. Over at Lighthouse Point Coins and Commemoratives, 5360 N. Federal Hwy., in Lighthouse Point, owners John Donofrio and George Sara anos are rushing around to keep up with demand for in-hand valuables. They buy and sell in the store and on eBay where they are a power seller with a awless rating. Rounding out their staff are Sylvia Benko, online researcher, and Paul Spano, manager. Highly trained Naldo is their guard dog and mascot. Instead of CDs, clients are choosing metals, Spano reports and gives examples of why this is happening. In 2006, silver was roughly $10 an ounce. Now its $50 an ounce. In 2002; gold was $300 an ounce. Now its $1,600 for the same amount. Were seeing average folks, young career people coming in and investing this way because they want their money to appreciate. Petite Sylvia Benko says, Im one of those young people that Paul is talking about. I cash my pay check and buy coins every week. I invest only the amount I can afford and Investors check out Lighthouse Point coins and collectibles for portfolio appreciationdo not need immediately. I want to sell only when there is a nancial advantage for me. I make my choices based on the expertise of the owners and Paul. I have learned that two coins may look alike, but their values might differ a great deal. Factoring in are the condition of the coin, where it was minted, how many were minted, and the date of the coin. As an online researcher, Benkos job is to determine market value of speci c collectibles. She says, The buying public is choosing gold and silver coins, bars, and rounds. The store has been open for almost See COINS on page 28Cresthaven to host LaMarca Lighthouse Point Coins and Commemoratives owners John Donofrio and George Sara anos hold an 1879 Carson City silver dollar in mint state 65, saying This was $17,000 in 2001. Today it sells for $39,000.

PAGE 9

The Pelican 9 Friday, June 8, 2012 SightingsA community calendar of Broward County. Email events to siren2415@gmail. com 6-9 Deer eld Beach City Shred from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. at the Recycling DropOff Center, 401 SW 4 St. One to ve boxes is $10. Six to ten boxes is $20. Checks only. 954-480-4379. 6-9 Junior Bass Tournament for ages 12 to 17 at Quiet Waters Park, 401 S. Powerline Road, Deer eld Beach. $75. 954-985-1980. 6-9 Free car seat safety check event from 9 a.m. to noon. Call 954-786-4510 to schedule an appointment. 6-10 Pancake breakfast from 9 a.m. to noon hosted by the Benevolent Patriotic Order of DOES Drove 142 at the Elks lodge, 700 N.E. 10 St., Pompano Beach. Adults $5, children $2.50. Open to the public. 954-587-1121 6-10 American Legion Post 142 and Auxiliary Unit 142 will hold a blood drive on June 10 from 11 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at 171 SW 2 St., Pompano Beach. Free hot dog or hamburger for all donors. 954-942-2448. 6-11 The Pompano Beach Business Resource Center, 50 NE 1 St., hosts a networking event from 5:30 to 7 p.m. for website designers and business owners looking for a website designer. 954586-1111. 6-12 Oakland Park/ Wilton Manors Council Chamber luncheon at 11:30 a.m. at Gallery One Resort Hotel, 2670 E. Sunrise Blvd., Fort Lauderdale. 954-4626000. 6-12 Wilton Manors City Commission meeting at 7 p.m. at city hall, 2020 Wilton Drive. 6-12 Pompano Beach City Commission meeting at 7 p.m. at city hall, 100 W. Atlantic Blvd. 6-12 Lighthouse Point City Commission meeting at 7:30 p.m. at city hall, 2200 N.E. 38 St. 6-12 Lauderdale-ByThe-Sea Town Commission meeting at 7 p.m. at Jarvis Hall, 4501 Ocean Drive. 6-14 Broward Shell Club meets at 6:30 p.m. at 6:30 p.m. at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach. 954296-5633. 6-14 Pony rides at Sand & Spurs Equestrian Park, 1600 NE 5 Ave., just north of Goodyear Blimp Base, from 9 to 11:30 a.m. Cost is $3 per ride. 954-786-4507. 6-16 Fathers Day Fishing Tournament from 7 to 10 a.m. at Royal Palm Park Lake, 1701 NW 38 St., Oakland Park. Open to all ages. 954-630-4500. 6-16 Kayak and paddleboard tournament will be held at 7:30 a.m. at South Beach Park, 1100 Seabreeze Blvd., Fort Lauderdale. Bene t the American Cancer Society. www.kayuba.org or See SIGHTINGS on page 13 that ordinance, said City Manager Joseph Gallegos about the building program. Id say he had a good part of it. If elected to another term, Green said he wants to push smart redevelopment while protecting neighborhoods as well as focus on public transportation, including brining an FEC commuter station to Five Points and rental bike stations to Wilton Drive. I think Ive tried to do a good job representing the city, said Green. Green is an adjunct professor at Broward College. Gary Resnick Resnick was rst elected to the commission in 1998 and won his rst term as mayor in 2008 and was reelected in 2010. Resnick is an attorney with GrayRobinson in Fort Lauderdale. Resnick did not return a message left by The Pelican by press time. Kimber White White, a resident since 2005, was appointed to the Economic Task Force in February. If elected, White said he wants to concentrate on brining in new businesses to the city as well as provide incentives for people to live and work in Wilton Manors. He also wants to create a business incubator and focus more attention and resources on developing other areas of the city. Hes also against a city takeover of Wilton Drive until the nancial situation improves. Ive seen a lot of reactiveness instead of proactiveness, he said. White is the managing partner of United American Mortgage in Oakland Park.WM raceContinued from page 5 Vote Nov. 6

PAGE 10

10 The PelicanFriday, June 8, 2012 Making a DifferencePhyllis J. Neuberger wants your suggestions about people who are making a difference. Call 954-7838700. By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFIt was the Fourth of July, and I was meeting my friend Ruth on Main Street to watch the parade, wave to friends in the oats and enjoy the special festivities. If I close my eyes, I can still visit that memory from so long ago. Once again, I smell the melted butter from the popcorn wagon on the corner. I hear the furious popping of hard yellow corn kernels as they bang against the greasy, glass sides of the huge popper and magically turn into uffy white tasty morsels. Looking across the street, I spot the man dressed like Uncle Sam with a high hat in his red, white and blue costume. Phyllis J.. Neuberger has for nearly 20 years, used this space to spotlight people in the community who have made a difference for the good. Residents have openly shared their stories with Phyllis which in turn were shared with The Pelican readers over these years. And now in the true sense that turn-about is fair play, Phyllis shares excerpts from her memoirs, a work in progress. Enjoy.The Cymbals Player, or how I got my rst real taste of power on July 4 in Iron Mountain, Michigan Hes stoking up his restaurant grill where hot dogs will soon be sizzling and smelling so good, theyll pull business to him like a magnet. Why do charred hot dogs taste so much better than boiled ones? I want one right now, but I make myself wait until Ruth joins me. Patriotic music blasts from a loud speaker set up in the Chamber of Commerce Building. Main Street is lined with dads in straw boaters decorated with red, white and blue hat bands. Women, waving little ags, wear cool sleeveless sundresses and wide brimmed, billowy straw hats. A few daring, young women wear shorts, showing off their strong tanned legs. Children run wild, impatient for the See CYMBALS on page 20 Pier clean up is SaturdayDeer eld Beach The waters beneath the International Fishing Pier will be cleaned of debris and tangled shing line and volunteers who clean up the beach Saturday, June 9, 9 a.m. until noon. Local dive shop owner Ari Pavon organizes the event which puts up to 100 divers in the water to collects hundreds of pounds of discarded shing gear and other trash. Free parking for divers and beach cleaners will be provided at the main beach parking lot. This is the 6th annual cleanup.Initial budget explanations next week Deer eld Beach City department heads will make brief presentations on the services they provide, and the costs, at two budget work sessions next week. Up front Tuesday, June 12, will be spokespersons for nance, parks and recreation, senior services, planning and development and information technology. On Wednesday, June 13, environmental services, solid waste and recycling, BSO re and law enforcement will be explained. Both sessions begin at 6:30 p.m. at the Central City Campus, 402 SW 4 Street. Public input begins at 7:45 p.m.Splash Adventure at Quiet WatersDeer eld Beach Quiet Waters Park, 401 S. Powerline Road., Deer eld Beach, will host Splash Ahoy, for all ages, on June 15, from 6 to 10 p.m. Cost is $6 per person. Space is limited. Advance ticket sales are required. Call 954-357-5100.

PAGE 11

The Pelican 11 Friday, June 8, 2012 City considering cutting frequency of bulk pickup serviceBy Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach This city has a wide reputation for its generous bulk pick-up service, so wide that some residents are renting out their yards for dumping. Waste Management, Inc., the company that contracts with the city for waste and bulk pick-up, presently picks up bulk at no extra charge eight times a month. Bulk is de ned as non-containable items such as sofas, refrigerators or landscape vegetation. Walter Syrick, a member of the Highlands Civic Association, asked the commission recently to reduce bulk pick-up service to once a month. We see piles of trash, mattresses and beds [on the streets]. Theres nothing worse for a neighborhood. Since the pickups are included in the monthly Vegetation like this should be contained. This is also an example of trash that can attract vermin and other problem creatures. [Staff photo]residential bills, some residents are renting space in their yards to outside business owners who nd it cheaper to dump their junk in Pompano Beach rather than pay county fees to do it legally. On May 22, commissioners struck the once-a-month proposal from the agenda after discussion on the dais failed to produce a consensus. Commissioner Charlotte Burrie objected to once a month bulk pick-up but added she would settle for twice a month. Twice weekly bulk pickup is available to single, duplex and triplex residential properties only. For out-of-town poachers, the city and Broward Sheriffs

PAGE 12

12 The PelicanFriday, June 8, 2012 Of ce plan to work together using a hot line. Residents who see illegal dumping can call the hot line and operators will quickly dispatch a deputy to the address. Callers, who remain anonymous, can receive a $250 reward upon the conviction of the perpetrator. Other changes In addition to reducing the bulk pick-up days, residents will see other changes in trash pick-up if the new law is passed. For weekly pick-up, plastic bags may be used for solid waste materials, but they must be of suf cient strength to contain the materials. Residents are limited to eight cubic yards of bulk pickup per month. A $10 charge for each additional cubic yard, along with any other Trash like this is a nuisance to any neighborhood. To contain this bulk, a resident must take it apart so it can be placed in a safe container for disposal. [Staff photo] violations like placing the bulk on the street more than 24 hours prior to pickup, will be charged and added to the customers water bill. Failure to pay will result in property liens. Curb appeal costsStaf ng and enforcing the proposed changes in trash and bulk pick-up will cost BulkContinued from pageabout $230,693. For the rst year, those costs include a new vehicle [$23,648] and the money to operate it [$2,857]; a computer [$2,000] and an air card [$516] and salaries and bene ts [ranging up to $80,500]. Two inspectors are suggested, and would require additional hours of an existing employee to man the transfer station would be required for free bulk drop-off at the city dump. The second and future years are estimated to cost about $179,397. The new plans for the citys bulk pick-up will be rescheduled for an upcoming city commission meeting.

PAGE 13

The Pelican 13 Friday, June 8, 2012 SightingsContinued form page 9 call 954-801-1833. 6-16 & 17 Suncoast Gun and Knife Show at War Memorial Auditorium, 800 NE 8 St., Fort Lauderdale. Cost is $8 for adults and free for children 12 and under. Saturday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Visit www. suncoastgunshows.com or call 954-828-5380 6-19 Oakland Park Historical Society meets from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. at the Oakland Park Library, 1298 NE 37 St. 954-566-9957. 6-19 The Oakland Park Garden Club meets from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at the Jaco Pastorius Park Community Center, 1098 NE 40 Court, Oakland Park. 954-630-4511. 6-19 Broward County Property Appraiser of cials will hold a meeting to answer property-related questions from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Deer eld Beach City Hall, 150 NE 2 Ave. 954-357-5579. 6-20 ArtHall opening reception from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Business Resource Center, 50 NE 1 St. Event is free. 954-586-1111. 6-22 Computer expert on hand at the Pompano Beach Business Resource Center. 50 NE 1 St., from 9 to 11 a.m. to answer questions. 954-586-1111. 6-22 Beach Sounds Concert Series from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Main Beach Parking Lot, 149 SE 2 Ave., Deer eld Beach. Event is free. 954-480-4429. 6-22 6/24 Concert of Pops music by Sol Childrens Theatre, 3333 N. Federal Hwy., Boca Raton. Sing-a-long and performance at 7 p.m. Cost is $15. 561447-8829. 6-22 South Florida Amateur Astronomers meet at Fern Forest nature Center, 201 Lyons Road South, Coconut Creek from 7 to 9 p.m. Free for all ages. Call 954-357-5198. See SIGHTINGS on page 16 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFF Oakland Park City of cials here appear open to turning re services over to another entity, either the City of Fort Lauderdale or BSO. OP gathering info on outsourcing re servicesOn Wednesday they directed City Manager John Stunson to begin a dialogue with Fort Lauderdale after Stunson said that city would be a more logical suitor than BSO. The city is currently in contract negotiations with its own re department which has been reducing staff while maintaining a minimum of 14 employees 24/7. Reducing staff any further could conceivably be a problem, Stunson said. Broward Sheriff Fire Rescue is a capable entity that could provide re service. Theres no doubt about that, Stunson said. But if youre looking to contract for services going forward, a more logical suitor would be Fort Lauderdale. One of the issues with BSO contracts is bene ts, and employees would have a choice of retaining bene ts in the city pension plan or going with the Florida Retirement System, Stunson said. Pension costs have increased from $900,000 in 2008 to $1.9 million for next year. And while it appears Fort Lauderdale could provide services, You can control costs better by retaining the service yourselves, Stunson said. A staff report concludes that if Oakland Park were to contract with BSO Fire, it is highly likely all re rescue employees would be retained and receive pay comparable to what they currently earn. Oakland Park would be responsible for any accumulated bene ts in excess of what BSO allows. The city currently spends about 90 percent of its $8.3 million budget See FIRE SERVICES on page 14

PAGE 14

14 The PelicanFriday, June 8, 2012 Advertise with The Pelican Today! 954-783-8700 Business with a Twist including a few bowling ball and great eatsThe Greater Pompano Beach Chamber partnered with Diamond Strike Lanes, 2200 North Federal Highway, Pompano Beach for an evening of gourmet treats, business card exchanges and some late bowling last week at Business with a Twist evening. Pictured here are Cletus Kilker, Ralph Brigida, marsha Brigida and Gail Farkas. To catch the next Business with a Twist, call 954-941-2940.Debbie Feder, special events coordinator for Diamond Strike Lanes Nancy Kirsch and Debra Landsberg

PAGE 15

The Pelican 15 Friday, June 8, 2012 on compensation. Staffs preliminary conclusion is there would be little, if any, compensation savings in outsourcing to BSO. Florida law guarantees employees the right to remain in their city pension plans if theyre transitioned to a county position. Little, or no, pension expense relief should be anticipated from outsourcing, the report said. Were struggling to deal with pension obligations and are now negotiating our way through a contract, Commissioner Shari McCartney said. Preliminary analysis suggests we should look further into it. Lets ask for more data from Fort Lauderdale. If were asking for proposals, I would like to put it on the street, and include BSO, Commissioner Suzanne Boisvenue said. Its clear BSO has more services they can offer than the others. Commissioner Jed Shank said the commission needs more information and that two parameters must be met. We must maintain the same or better quality of service. And any decision must have some level of cost savings. Shank noted the city is surrounded on three sides by Fort Lauderdale. We have a great re rescue department. Im proud of them, and I know the residents are, said Commissioner John Adornato. He said he is open for more discussion. Were facing a season where revenues arent going up, Mayor Anne Sallee said. We have to maintain best services and rein in costs. We have an outstanding re department. The residents are very satis ed with the re department we have. I hope we can negotiate and come up with a solution that makes everyone happy. Sallee said the department cant keep increasing costs and asking residents to pay more. From what Ive heard (residents) rst choice would be to keep the Oakland Park Fire Department. She said Wilton Manors isnt happy with Fort Lauderdale as its re department. McCartney said wanted more detailed information noting she didnt think that would happen in this budget season. Boisvenue also wanted numbers, so comparisons could be made. She tried unsuccessfully to have the discussion of re service options postponed to October. Fire servicesContinued from page 13 Advertise with The Pelican Today! 954-783-8700

PAGE 16

16 The PelicanFriday, June 8, 2012 He claims he can get nancing for a boutique hotel and spa such as The Four Seasons or Waldorf Astoria which would have minimal impact on the town and present a rst-class image. The letter also discusses the need for a potable water source with the development of a facility with up to 358 hotel rooms. Kennelly suggests he will build a reverse osmosis water plant on the grounds of town hall and provide all the residents with water for 15 years at current user rates. He also indicates he would upgrade water lines. Current zoning on the land allows 16 living units per acre, or 176. The town has no zoning for hotel use. Kennelly is asking for a conditional variance to build the hotel but has not presented formal plans to the town. The item has not been advertised for a public hearing. Former mayor, Carmen McGarry, is very much ResortContinued from page 1SightingsContinued from page 136-23 The Coast Guard Auxiliary in Boca Raton, one-day class About Boating Safely from 9 a.m. 5 p.m. at Spanish River Park, 3001 N. State Road A-1-A, Boca Raton. Cost is $35. RSVP at 561-391-3600. 6-28 Pompano Beach Republican Club meets at 7 p.m. at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach. 954-7867536.FridaysThe Pompano Beach Rotary Club meets Fridays at 12:15 p.m. at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. 954-786-3274.SaturdaysPony rides are at Sand & Spurs Equestrian Park, 1600 NE 5 Ave., Pompano Beach, from 9 to 11:30 a.m. Cost is $3 per ride. 954-786-4507. Pompano Beach Kiwanis Club Westside meets the rst and third Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. at the E. Pat Larkins Community Center, 520 MLK Blvd., Pompano Beach. 954782-8096.See SIGHTINGS on page 19 against Kennellys request for a variance. Citing the possibility of 600 guests a day in the hotel and another 300 in staff, McGarry said traf c would be a disaster. People think a commercial project would reduce their property taxes, but this does not happen, she said this week. There would be increases in the cost of police protection, traf c, water use and sanitation. When other large condos were built such as Ocean Grande and Mediterranea, our tax bills did not decrease. She also believes a resort would provide more public access to the towns now private beaches and doubts the feasibility of a desalination plant. Further studies need to be made before such a project becomes acceptable, McGarry said. Rene Males, president of Hillsboro Ocean Club, said his board of directors is split on the issue. Three believe that a 5-Star hotel would enhance property values and protect the land from a more disagreeable use and three who agree with him that there is no assurance as to what would be built on the property if the variance is granted. We want to force him to abide by our current zoning laws, Males said.

PAGE 17

The Pelican 17 Friday, June 8, 2012 By Malcolm McClintockPELICAN STAFFGourmands, epicureans and assorted gluttons recently had the opportunity to partake in the newly created Foodie Field Trip. Brainchild of Lauderdale-By-The-Seas Lenore Nolan-Ryan, the concept involves showing up at her eponymous school for a brief champagne-soaked meet n greet before boarding a private bus destined for a few esoteric culinary hot spots on Las Olas Boulevard. It has been a huge success, says Lenore. This will be our third outing this month. The first stop was Cheese Culture [813 E. Las Olas Blvd., 954-533-9178], where owners Susan and Mitchell Phipps had chosen red and white wines to be paired with a selection of the shops fine cheeses. On this occasion, Spanish sheeps milk Manchego and goats milk Garroxta were coupled with a refreshing white Roth Sauvignon Blanc from Alexander Valley in California. Cheese expert Susan advises to smell the cheese, taste it fully and then let it sit a little bit in your mouth before hitting it with the wine. Her husband Mitchell noted that as a rule of thumb, goat and sheeps milk cheeses go very well with white wines. He subsequently unveiled a fantastic Piatelli Malbec Premium from the Mendoza Valley in Argentina. This full-bodied vintage was set against the back drop of a California Midnight Moon goats cheese and an ber-The Lenore Nolan-Ryan Cooking School serves up good food and good times on its Foodie Field Trips [Left] Cheeses abound at the Cheese-Culture on Las Olas Blvd. [Above] Owners Susan and Mitchell Phipps show off a few of the evenings specialties. [Photos by Malcolm McClintock]See FOODIE on page 25

PAGE 18

18 The Pelican Friday, June 8, 2012

PAGE 19

The Pelican 19 Friday, June 8, 2012 Wilton Manors Green Market is held every Saturday and Sunday at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. 954-592-0381. The Deer eld Beach West Kiwanis Club meets the second and fourth Saturdays of the month at 9 a.m. at Westside Park, 445 SW 2 St., Deer eld Beach. 954-54-7329883. Alley Oop Skim Clinics at 9 a.m.Learn skim boarding from South Floridas top professionals. Alley Oop is offering a fun, interactive experience where kids, teenagers AND adults can try skim boarding out just for fun. Offering instructions and guidance no matter what level you are at, we meet at the shoreline.SundaysSt. Elizabeths of Hungary Parish hosts a pancake breakfast at 3331 NE 10 Terrace, Pompano Beach, on third Sundays from 7:30 a.m. to noon. The breakfast bene ts the Parish. 954-263 8415. Discover Scuba Sundays at 10 a.m. 259 E. Commercial Blvd., Lauderdale-By-TheSea. Cost $80. Call 954-6165909. MondaysPlay ping-pong from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Cost is $1. All ages can participate. 954-3902130. SightingsContinued from page 16 See SIGHTINGS on page 20 Fort Lauderdale Showing their patriotic pride on the day before Memorial Day, Senior Helpers employees and guests gathered at the Senior Helpers offices in Fort Lauderdale. Senior Helpers is a private organization which provides seniors with various in home and outside services. [Photos by Michael dOliveira]Senior Helpers celebrate Memorial Day

PAGE 20

20 The Pelican Friday, June 8, 2012 WORSHIP DIRECTORY: Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad. Rev. Hyvenson Joseph parade. It wont take much to get them under control. A bag of popcorn or a stick of cotton candy from the vendor will do the trick. My friend Ruth appears in her navy, white and gold uniform, carrying her clarinet. I forgot that shes marching in the high school band. March along with me, she says. No one will care. Are you sure? Im sure, she laughs and we walk one street over where the band members are gathering and getting their instructions from the band director, Mr. T.R. Ulinger, who was also our history teacher. When we arrived at the meeting place for the band, Mr. Ulinger stopped snapping out instructions long enough to grab my arm, saying, Phyllis, my cymbal player didnt show up. Want to be in the band and do the cymbals? Sure, I answered liking the idea. What do I do? Theres nothing to it. When I give you a signal, hit em together. You can do it. Get over there, he handed me the cymbals and pointed me to a spot in the band. I looked at Ruth, who shrugged her shoulders and said, What the hay, do it! The parade began. Marching was fun. When Mr. Ulinger gave me the rst signal, I crashed the cymbals, and the band began to play. I chuckled to myself when I realized I had the power to start the music going. Wed been marching for a short while when I felt we should be doing something besides walking. I banged the cymbals against each other, and the band immediately started to play. The kids who werent blowing something began to laugh. Mr. Ulinger gave me a really dirty look as we moved along. I did it a number of times never realizing that it was a challenge for the musicians to march and play. They needed space breaks, but I didnt give them many. The parade was a success. Everyone cheered the band and its constant music. The band members didnt seem to mind my mischief. I was drunk with power not noticing that Mr. Ulinger was ready to put my head between the cymbals. He gave me a good verbal reaming when the parade was over. I deserved it. I was never asked to ll in again. In fact, that was the end of my cymbal career. My punishment was facing a very hostile history teacher when school started that fall. The July 4th festivities were far from over. When the parade ended, people walked home leisurely and got ready for the picnic. No one had grills back then. People packed up picnic dinners in ice boxes and baskets and headed for the public parks and beaches where they would meet friends, taste each others specialties and gossip. There would be swimming, baseball games and often music in a park band shell. Ruth and I sought other girls and boys we knew so we could hang out together, waiting for dark when the reworks would light up the sky and one might get a kiss or two from a special boy. You knew the night was ending when the park garbage cans began to over ow, cranky babies started to cry and overtired kids whined. Parents called their missing teens back to the fold. Now, a new parade began to form as a chain of car lights lit up the road for miles. Weary dads, who had too much beer, were especially careful as they drove their families home. Home at last, the sprinklers were turned off, ags lowered, kids tucked in and one by one, house lights went out. The town slept. July 4th was over. CymbalsContinued from page 10SightingsContinued from page 19 The Gold Coast Toastmasters Club meets on the second and third Monday of the month from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Dennys, 3151 NW 9 Ave., Fort Lauderdale. 954895-3555 or 954-782-9951.TuesdaysDeer eld Beach Rotary Club meets every Tuesday at 12 p.m. at the Deer Creek Golf Club, 2801 Deer Creek Country Club Blvd., Deer eld Beach. 954-630-9593. Pompano Beach-Lighthouse Rotary Club meets every Tuesday at 7:30 a.m. at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal See SIGHTINGS on page 21

PAGE 21

The Pelican 21 Friday, June 8, 2012 The event, dubbed Family Fun Week, runs from June 23 to 30. What started out as a way to put heads in beds mushroomed into a week lled with events for the entire family, according to Pat Himelberger, assistant to the town manager. The time is one of the shoulder seasons, when the number of visitors is usually down. We wanted to target families, a new demographic for LBTS, and let them know this is a great, affordable place to come for a vacation, she said. And while the beach is a major attraction, organizers also want visitors to know there are other reasons to come here. Retailers and other businesses got involved, and now, A myriad of things are planned up and down the street, Himelberger said. Among them are dance and skimboard lessons, a jewelry party and a scavenger hunt. The town contributed $5,000 for marketing and $4,000 for special events that week. Retailers matched those funds with another $4,000. Marketing has been targeted at the Northeast and Southeast through Visit Florida, Facebook and Google ads and through a website Traveling Mom.com. Several hotels are offering discounts for the week, ranging from 20 percent to 50 percent off their usual summer rates. Weve had a great deal of interest online, but bookings for hotels and events are light, Himelberger said. People from as far as China, Hong Kong and Malaysia have visited the website. Residents are welcome to take part in the events, as well. The town is sponsoring several free events, including two movies in Friedt Park, a concert by Jimmy Stowe and the Stowaways and arts and crafts for children. This is the town coming together as a whole to create an event, with retailers, restaurants and some of the hotels in a new venture. Well see what the response is, Himelberger said. Anything you do for the rst time you have to build on. People are excited that were all working together for a common goal to bring new visitors. The event is designed for the town to market itself as a family vacation destination, said John Boutin, manager of the Windjammer Resort, one of the event committee members. He said the event is generating a lot of interest, and there have been been thousands of visits to the website. When you target a new audience, sometimes it takes time and it grows as it gets successful. Boutin said its taken hard work by many people to make this happen. He credits Himelberger with keeping them on track.Saturday, June 23Free skim boarding lessons from 9 to 10:30 a.m. Children, teens and adults can try skim boarding just for fun. Meet at the shoreline at the north side of pier off Commercial Boulevard. Guided Snorkel Adventure, led by Gold Coast Scuba, is set from 4 to 6 p.m. Saturday or noon to 2 p.m. Thursday. Cost is $25 per person.Sunday, June 24Pro Footvolley Tour Exhibition from 4 to 6 p.m. The public will have a chance to try footvolley, a new trend sport. Art by the Sea Gallery offers a free young beginner watercolor painting class from 2 to 3 p.m. for children and teenagers. Children under 18 must be accompanied by a parent the entire time. RSVP required. Email jshampaign@ bellsouth.net.Family events planned for Fun Week Monday, June 25Fishing tournament for children at Anglins Pier from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday to Friday. Cost is $40 to participate. Children must be under 12 years old and accompanied by a parent or guardian. On Monday at 8 a.m. a fishing instructor will give a one-hour fishing lesson and tips on where to fish on VacationContinued from page 1 See FUN on page 24 SightingsContinued from page 20 Hwy., Pompano Beach. 954972-7178. The American Legion Auxiliary Unit 142, 171 SW 2 St., Pompano Beach, has Bingo on Tuesdays at 7 p.m. Food is available from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. 954-942-2448. A Yoga class is available for all levels at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors, on Tuesday nights from 6:30 to 8 p.m. and Saturday mornings from 10:30 a.m. until noon. The cost is $7. 305-607-3520. Zonta International meets on the third Tuesday of the month at Duffys Diner, 401 N. Federal Hwy., Deer eld Beach, at 11:15 a.m. Zonta International works to advance the status of women. 561-3922223.WednesdaysThe Wilton Manors Kiwanis Club meets Wednesdays at 6:30 p.m. at 2749 NE 14 Ave., Wilton Manors. 954561-9785. The Oakland Park Ki-See SIGHTINGS on page 24

PAGE 22

22 The Pelican Friday, June 8, 2012 Tell The Pelican about your special event 954-783-8700 Classi edsCall 954-545-0013 Liquidation SaleEveryday 10 to 4 Ocean Villa Motel/Apartments317 S. Ocean Blvd. [A1A], 3 blocks south of Hillsboro Beach Deer eld BeachEverything Goes!Coin-operated W/D, Soda Vending Machine, Bedroom Sets Refrigerators [Mini & Big], Micros, Paintings, Sheets/All Sizes; Bedspreads, Silverware, Pots & Pans, Air Conditioners, Suitcases left behind, Lamps, Dining Room Table More, Chairs, Dressers & More Make Your Deal Today HELP WANTEDDIESEL / REFRIGERATION Truck Mechanic We Have Immediate Openings For Diesel Mechanics In Pompano Beach. We Provide Excellent Pay & Bene ts. We Require A Minimum 2 Years Experience. Your Own Tools, Good Driving & Work History. CDL Driver License Would Be Helpful But Is Not Required. Apply Online At www.salemleasing. com. 6-8 LOCAL PEST CONTROL CO Looking For Quality Sales/Service Tech. Must Be Dependable, Team Player, Good Drivers License & People Skills. Will Train Right Person. ALSO Of ce Assistant Computer People & Phone Skills Needed. Fax Resume 954418-3982. 6-29 SEEKING EMPLOYMENTCHILD CARE / NANNY Experienced As Elementary Teacher Counselor Nanny Caring Patient. Prefer Pompano Beach Area. 954788-5412. 6-8 MALE CNA / HHA / SR. COMPANION. Broward Area. Former EMT. All Certi cations / Compassionate, References. Call Ron 954-232-2832. 6-8 WEEKENDS!!! Dog Sitting Or Dog Walking. Pompano Beach Area. Call After 6PM 754-245-8999. 6-8 SERVICES DANNY BOY ELECTRIC Lic & Insured. Lic. #EC13004811. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. 24/Hr Service. 954-290-1443. Beat Any Written Estimate. Sr, Discount. 6-29 GINGERS HOUSEKEEPING 20 YEARS EXP. (Licensed) References Available. Honest & Reliable Love To Clean Windows! Help Organize No Problem. FREE Estimates! 954-200-4266. 6-8 HANDYMAN PAINTING CARPENTRY Pressure Cleaning. Decks! Everything Around The House. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. Call 561-350-3781. 6-8 HONEST HANDYMAN HOME & BUILDING Maintenance/Improvements. No Job Too Small. Fast Friendly Service. Reasonable Rates. Local Resident/Homeowner. Call Today For Your FREE Upfront Quote. No Deposit Required. 754-366-1915. 6-8 GOT JUNK? DUMP TRUCK CONDO CLEANUPS Trees/Landscape, Yard Fill. Pressure Wash/ Roofs/Home Repairs Welding, Etc. Dave 954-818-9538. 6-29 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIESNew GREEN technology. New defroster control saves energy in home refrigerators, commercial chillers. Patented. All optical. Simple mfg. Strategic partners needed..www.NewAvionics.Com. 954-568-1991. CMUSICIANS WANTEDThe American Legion Symphonic Band is now accepting new members for the 2011-2012 season. College age to seasoned seniors are welcome. Rehearsals are held on Wed. evenings at American Legion Post 142 in Pompano. Percussionists, oboe, bassoon, trombone and euphonium players are especially needed. If you enjoy making music, call Jim McGonigal, Music Director at 954647-0700 for more info. PRAYERSST. JUDE NOVENA May the Sacred Heart of Jesus be adored, glori ed, loved and preserved throughout the world now and forever. Sacred Heart of Jesus pray for us. St. Jude, Worker of Miracles pray for us. St. Jude Helper of the Helpless pray for us. Say this prayer 9 times a day. The 8th day your prayer will be answered. This has never been known to fail. Thank You St. Jude for prayers answered. L.P. 6-8 CEMETERY PLOTSINGLE CEMETERY PLOT In Forest Lawn Memorial Gardens Pompano Beach, Memories #2, Lot 156, Space 3. $1,800. 954-644-9354. 6-15 HOMES FOR RENTPOMPANO COTTAGE STYLE HOUSE 2 / 1 Pool Large Fenced Yard. $1050 Month. 510 NE 35 Street. Call Darci 954-7833723. 6-29 OUT OF AREAFURNISHED RENTAL MILFORD PA. Get Out Of The Heat Come To The Mountains. Small Private One Bedroom Cottage, Stone FP, HW Floors. Finished Attic, Walk To Pristine 120 Acre Lake, Boat, Swim, Relax$850 Per Month By The Month Or By The Year. Call Audrey 570246-9240 Cell Or 570-296-7717 x121. 6-8REAL ESTATE SERVICESREAL ESTATE SELLING OR BUYING The Most Important Thing When Choosing A Real Estate Professional Is To Find Someone You Can Trust! Relocation Specialist. 18 Years Experience. English, French, Spanish, Greek. Yvette Gaussen YES WE CAN REALTY 954-614-7773 Or 954-773-8340. 6-8 ROOMMATE WANTEDFREE RENT For Female Roommate In Expanded Mobile Home Pompano In Exchange For Light Cooking Wont Last! Call Paul 954200-4456. 6-8 REAL ESTATE WANTEDI BUY HOUSES!! CASH!! AS IS! QUICK CLOSE! ANY AREA ANY CONDITION! NO EQUITY OK. CALL NOW 954-914-2355. 7-20 CONDOS FOR SALEPOMPANO BEACH DIRECT OCEAN VIEW!! Pet Friendly! 2/2 AT THE BREAKERS! $269,000. Call Juliana At Barclays For Details. 1-305766-4420. 6-22CONDOS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH 1 Block To Ocean!! 1 / 1 Fully Equipped. Hurricane Windows / Doors. 2 Flat Screens, DVD, WIFI, Pool, BBQ, Laundry. $850 Month + Electric Monthly Thru December. 954-540-9724. 6-15 DEERFIELD BEACH 2/2 CONDO Corner Unit, Pool. $800. Good Credit Required. No Pets Or Realtors. 631-8853342. 6-8 APTS FOR RENTDEERFIELD/POMPANO BEACH 1 BR & 2 BR APTS FOR RENT. Remodeled, Paint, Tile, Etc. Washer / Dryer On Site. Pool. Pet Friendly. George 954-809-5030. 6-29 POMPANO BEACH 1 BEDROOMS AND EFFICIENCY Apts. Fully Furnished With Kitchen, Cable, Internet, Pool, Laundry. 500 To The Beach. Weekly Monthly Yearly. 954-2948483 Or 248-736-1533, 6-15 POMPANO BEACH NE 2/1 $950 2/1.5 Townhouse $1095 SW 2/2 $950 ALL FREE WATER Rent + $70 Application Moves U In. 954-781-6299. 6-15 POMPANO BEACH / ATLANTIC / FEDERAL Ef ciency $175 Weekly. No Security Deposit. Includes Cable, Electric, Internet. FREE Washer / Dryer. No Drug Record No Evictions. 954-7090694. 6-8 POMPANO BEACH Studio Newly Renovated. Pool. Pet OK! $650 Per Month Yearly Lease. 1960 NE 48 Street. Call 954-857-5207. 6-15 POMPANO BEACH A1A 1 & 2 Bedrooms, Ef ciencies Fully Furnished Includes Utilities, Cable, WIFI, Laundry, Pool, BBQ. 700 To The Beach. Starting At $269 Per Week. 954-943-3020. 6-15 POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 Bedroom From $495. Easy Movein. 1/2 OFF DEPOSIT. Remodeled. Great Location. 954-783-1088 For More Info. 7-13 GOLDEN ACRES DEVELOPMENT is the best value for apartment rental in the city of Pompano Beach. Newly renovated kitchen cabinets, new appliances, energy saving HVAC wall units, 24-hr maintenance, playgrounds and daycare. Rentals starting at $500. Section 8 Voucher holders are welcome to apply. Please contact Helen Mitchell at 954-972-1444. Domestic farm workers will be given priority in renting available units. Professionally managed by Nelson & Associates, Inc. Pelican Classi ed ads Mean Business! Pelican Classi ed ads Mean Business!

PAGE 23

The Pelican 23 Friday, June 8, 2012 Tell The Pelican about your special event 954-783-8700 Classi edsCall 954-545-0013 In Pompano BeachiBeria Bank, 990 N. Federal Hwy. Dairy Queen, 2901 N. FederalHwy. Publix, 1405 S. Federal Hwy. Lous Giant Subs, 1721 N. Dixie Hwy. In Deer eld Beach Walgreens, Hillsboro & Federal Hwy. Josephs Italian Bakery, 788 S. Fed. COMMERCIAL FOR RENT-SALEPOMPANO COMMERCIAL OFFICE Spaces Available. Ranging From As Low As $500 To $700 Depending On Square Footage. Please Call Darci At 954-7833723. 6-15 DEERFIELD BEACH Retail Of ce Warehouse 700 Sq Ft With Loft. A/C, Bathroom. $575 Per Month. Call For More Info 561-654-1331 Or 561-9985681. 6-29 NEWLY EQUIPPED LOW RENT SHOP Space Ideal For Bakery Pizza Wings Crepes Etc. Corner New 12 Avenue & 34 Court Oakland Park. Indoor / Outdoor Patio Sitting. 954-563-3533. 6-15 DOCK FOR RENT60 FT DOCK THE COVE MARINA 50 AMP / H20 Included. $1,200 Month Price Negotiable Depending On Boat Size. Restaurant & Fuel On Premises. 954-9140053. a.j.barsotti@comcast. net. 6-22 COVE DOCK FOR RENT!! 60 FT Water, Electric. No Fixed Bridges. Nice Location. $350 Mo. 954-429-9347 Or Call Cell 954-288-9651. 6-8 POMPANO BEACH DOCK Wide Canal No Wake Area Whips. Quiet Canal. Call 954-946-3301. 6-15 CARS FOR SALE1997 WHITE PONTIAC FIREBIRD 6 Cylinder, Automatic, Runs Great, New Tires & Brakes. Good On Gas. 160K Miles. $2,600. Pompano. 1-845-807-8693. 6-8 MISC ITEMS FOR SALEMENS CALOI CRUISER BIKE Used Carpentry Items. Fishing Rods. Air Compressor. Large Construction Fan. Pompano 954-471-3402. 6-8 If you cannot locate a Pelican call 954-783-8700 Advertise with The Pelican 954-783-8700Tell The Pelican about your special event 954-783-8700

PAGE 24

24 The Pelican Friday, June 8, 2012 the pier and answer questions about fishing. Participants receive a twopiece fishing pole to use and keep as a souvenir. Experience chocolate making at Kilwins Ice Cream from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. at 117 Commercial Blvd. Learn about the history of chocolate and dip a chocolate treat. Space is limited and reservations taken at 954267-8991. Open to 8 to 16-year-olds. Cost is $5 per participant. Family Fun HandsOn Cooking Classes are offered from noon to 1:30 p.m. Monday to Thursday at Lenore Nolan-Ryan Cooking School & Catering. Cost is $30 per person.Tuesday, June 26Creative Crafts, offered by the town from 3 to 5 p.m. Free arts and crafts projects for children at Jarvis Hall. Danny Carter is offering 50 percent discounts on group ballroom and Latin dance classes at Dance Move studio, 220 E. Commercial Blvd., Suite 201. Instruction that is usually $10 per class will be $5 per class from 3 to 4 p.m. Tuesday, June 26, and from 3 to 4 p.m. Thursday, June 28. P.J. Rossi Jewelers offers a Jewelry Scavenger Hunt from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. TuesdayThursday. Participants will come in and receive a list of items (on a card) to find in the store. Price is $5 per play. Yoga with Lesley offers classes on the beach at Commercial and A1A from 8 to 9 a.m. Exercise mind, body and soul for $5 per class.Wednesday, June 27Free concert in El Prado Park from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. to the sounds of Rockin in the Tropics. Fitness boot camp by The Sports Edge. Physical fitness experts offer sessions from 9 to 10 a.m. Price is $30 for the entire family.Thursday, June 28Free Movie Puss in Boots, at sundown in Friedt Family Park. Bring blankets, snacks and drinks. Theres a playground at the site for the little ones. Sponsored by the town. Sand Sculpture Contest at 3 p.m. at the beach in front of El Prado Park. Cost is $10 per entry. Skimboarding Camp from 9 a.m. to noon. Cost is $99 per skimmer. Alley Oop is offering three, three-hour skim clinics for visitors to master this sport. Registration is required, and availability is limited. Call 954-530-4954.Friday, June 29Free belly dance lessons at 8 p.m. and 20 percent off meals at Athena by the Sea. Interior Digs offers a party from 5 to 7 p.m. Treat yourself to a shopping experience. Cost is $10 per person. Happy hour at Aruba Beach Caf from 4 to 7 p.m. Enjoy the pig roast buffet. Free music at Friday Night Jazz on the Square, presented by the Village Grille. Saturday, June 30 Argenti Designer Jewelry presents Ladies Jewelry Party from noon to 2 p.m. Cost is $10. Helpful information plus 50 percent off select designer sterling silver jewelry. All week long: Rent a bike at Pedritos Bike Shop for more than two days and get 20 percent off. All week long: 20 percent off fashions at Style Nest boutique. Raffles at 4 p.m. Wednesday to Saturday. Price $10. For a complete list of events, to go lbtsevents.FunContinued from page 21 wanis Club meets Wednesdays from 7:30 to 8:30 a.m. at Peter Pan Diner, 1216 E. Oakland Park Blvd., Oakland Park. 954-566-9957. The Pompano Beach Kiwanis Club meets Wednesdays at noon at the Riverside Grille at the Sands Resort, 125 N. Riverside Drive, Pompano Beach. 954-444-4815. The Greater Pompano Beach Senior Citizens Club meets on the second Wednesday of the month at the Emma Lou Olson Community Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach, at 10 a.m. 954-943-7787. The Alzheimers Caregivers Support Group meets Wednesdays from SightingsContinued from page 21 See SIGHTINGS on page 26

PAGE 25

The Pelican 25 Friday, June 8, 2012 The Pelican 954-783-8700 FoodieContinued from page 17pungent Cabot Clothbound Cheddar from Vermont. You can actually tell what the cow was eating with this cheese! chimed in Susan. Guests were able to purchase the wines and cheeses at reduced prices before getting back on the bus for the next stop on the tour. Only a short drive away, the lively group paid a visit to the Spice Quarter [2324 E. Las Olas Blvd., 954-652-1025.] Charismatic owner Paul Rydza gave an in-depth lesson on aged balsamic vinegars of Modena, exotic spice blends and Spanish olive oils. Ive been a home cook for 15 years and noticed that there were no good spice shops in the area. So I decided to open one up! says Rydza. After sampling various oil and vinegar products, many guests were eager to stock up on myriad exotic spices such as Spanish saffron, Kaffir lime leaves, Greek oregano and Hungarian paprika to name but a few. Of particular interest is the house special blend that offers a perfectly balanced mixture of select herbs and spices that will elevate just about any dish imaginable. The last leg of the journey was a return trip to LenoreRyans school for a quick cooking demonstration and preparation of tasty items such as goat cheese, artichoke pesto and tomato jam crostini; caramelized onion, olive and manchego tart; and mozzarella and prosciutto tapas. Finally, for a sweet ending with a twist, patrons devoured Blue Bell chocolate ice cream topped with a touch of olive oil and a sprinkle of espresso sea salt a somewhat unusual yet surprisingly pleasant taste sensation. More info can be obtained at www.lenorenolanryan.com www.cheese-culture.com and www.thespicequarter.com. I decided to offer this Foodie Tour as a birthday present to my friend, says local nurse Arlene Silberman. I am having a wonderful time, says lucky birthday girl Susana Andrade. For a mere $125, this exclusive sybaritic soire overflows with good cheer and great food. Be sure to get on board the next time the bus goes by. A true crowd pleaser: Lenores popular mozzarella and prosciutto tapas is a perfect way to open up a meal.

PAGE 26

26 The Pelican Friday, June 8, 2012 Advertise in The Pelican for coverage in nine North Broward cities. Capt. RJ Boyle is an experienced angler in South Florida. His studio is located in Lighthouse Point. Call 954-420-5001. By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFThose looking to catch a swordfish this weekend should have a good time of it this weekend. RJ Boyle, owner of RJ Boyle Studios in Lighthouse Point, has already caught three this week and expects light winds and calm seas should make for some more. The swordfish are biting. There are numerous fish in the 100 to 200-lbs. range, he said. The best depth is ay 1,715. Boyle was with a charter boat customer from New Good weather, calm seas should make for good sword shing this Jersey when he brought in his haul. He bought all the tackle from the store. Hes looking to take what hes learned and go back up to New Jersey to do some fishing. But, says Boyle, theres a lot more than swords biting this week. Fishing for yellowfin tunas been really food. And as of yesterday, there were still consistent dolphin. So dont be afraid to run off shore and tackle some big game.SightingsContinued from page 24 10 a.m. to noon at the NE Focal Point Alzheimers Day Care Center, 301 NW 2 Ave., Deer eld BeachThursdaysThe Rotary Club of Oakland Park/Wilton Manors meets every Thursday from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. at Tequila Sunrise Mexican Grill, 4711 N. Dixie Hwy., Oakland Park. 954-491-6158. The Deer eld Beach Kiwanis Club meets at noon every Thursday at the Deer eld Beach Hilton, 100 Fairway Dr., Deer eld Beach 954-242-6083. The Pompano Beach Republican Club meets on the fourth Thursday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach. 954-786-7536.

PAGE 27

The Pelican 27 Friday, June 8, 2012 said he would distribute his sponsors product from a VIP beer garden and is willing to give up any proceeds from beer sales to a charity. Commissioner Ben Preston was against beer being consumed on the beach but the rest of the board said alcohol was sold at other beachside events and to ban it would be inconsistent. Footvolley is played by two-man teams on the sand with a 6 net. Object is to keep the volleyball in play using only the feet. The sport has a national tour that includes Daytona Beach, Santa Barbara, CA and Virginia Beach. The more controversial item, a change in the law to allow sale of alcohol on Sundays between 8 a.m. and noon, drew a number of opponents who spoke to the detrimental effects of alcohol on society. Ginger Alvarez urged commissioners to stick by the law which provides a control. Our morals are deteriorating, Alvarez said. If we could ban the sale of alcohol until noon every day, I would be for that. Laws are there to protect us. Jim McGeary said additional revenues from the Sunday sales would be muniscule and Debbie Brown said, I oppose this. I cant see how this bene ts society in any way. Rev. Anthony Pelt, representing the Deer eld Beach Ministerial Association, said his organization opposed the change and that the public should be able to live without alcohol until noon on Sundays. Others spoke to keeping Deer elds image as familyfriendly and Amie Kay Tanner said, Why cant people buy their alcohol the night before? Its (the ban) only a short time. We have to live by some rules. Commissioner Ben Preston, the sole no vote on the issue said, There is no data on the scal impact (of alcohol sales). Preston argued that few people from the business community were present to make their point adding that while people are drinking mimosas on the beach, people in his district are being challenged by drugs and alcohol. In support of the new law, Vice Mayor Bill Ganz said, This is a Blue Law designed to regulate morals and conduct, based on religious reasons. It is exclusionary it forces others to recognize a Sabbath that is not theirs. It is not fair. Commissioner Marty Popelsky said he is a believer in freedom of choice and Mayor Peggy Noland said the manager at JBs on the Beach estimates he loses about $800 on a Sunday morning because he cannot sell alcohol with his brunch menu until noon. Resident David Cohen said the law as it stands it in icts your faith on mine and Dick Maggiore, the owner of the Tipperary Pub said he turns away people on Sunday morning who then take their business to Lighthouse Point. Also speaking for the change Bett Willett said, Selling a mimosa before noon wont make a difference and it may help some restaurants and package stores. Its a law that respects one religion over others. Willett and other speakers pointed out that some religions meet on Fridays or Saturdays. Respecting a Sunday morning is in effect government sanctioning a certain religion, she said.AlcoholContinued from page 1DBHA board position lledDeer eld Beach Rev. Anthony Pelt was appointed to the Deer eld Beach Housing Authority Board of Commissioners this week. Pelt is the founder of the Radiant Living Worship Center and according to his website hold degrees in political science and public administration from the University of Central Florida. His appointment lls a vacant seat created with the city commission removed Caryl Berner from the board last month.

PAGE 28

28 The Pelican Friday, June 8, 2012 two years, but the owners who live in LHP, are long time collectors themselves. Sara anos has collected sports memorabilia since childhood. Donofrio has been collecting coins since his Boy Scout days. He says, Knowledge and timing are important in this business. We have a large reference library. We get the weekly Coin Dealer Newsletter and were on line constantly taking advantage of the latest technology. Our clients are also on line constantly. Donofrio holds up an 1879 Carson City silver dollar in mint state 65, saying This was $17,000 in 2001. Today it sells for $39,000. He holds up another coin, saying. Heres a Morgan $20 coin, minted in 1881 in Carson City. Its in uncirculated condition, meaning it has not been handled. It was worth $10 in 2007. Today its worth about $100. Our clients are also on line constantly. One client, David Wagner, believes that gold and silver metals are the place to invest, the economy being like it is. He says, Ive been trading with these people since they opened and Im satis ed that they are fair and competitive. Ive shopped around. Spano adds, We need to educate each customer. Is the goal long or short term? He says, Coins are ideal for those who want to hold their investment for a number of years. Short term investors tend to choose bullion and take advantage of market jumps to take their pro ts. We sell and buy every day. Short term investors check the internet, the nancial channels and make decisions just like we do. For the past few weeks, prices on gold and silver are down so customers are buying. When prices go up, theyll be selling. He continues, We work patiently with new clients. There are decisions to be made. For example, do you have safe storage? A 100ounce bar of silver is heavy. It might be smarter to choose 2-oz. of gold for the same price and put it in ones safety deposit box. Some people choose silver eagles which have been issued since 1986. Each year theres a new one. In 1986, they had a value of $6. Now, they are at $35. They make great gifts and show nicely in a collection. Stephen Lucy has been a client for two to three years. He says, I buy and sell. I talk things over with Paul a lot and we often decide what the trends are and whats moving in what direction. The owners and Paul are all very pleasant and willing to work with a client. They are very competitive. The owners are very proud to be the home of the Wallits which Sara anos explains are popular with collectors and for gift giving. He says, These are individually designed frames with front and back views, good photo and signature reproductions, real coins and bills of the collectors choice. Its a handsome CoinsContinued from page 8 In 2006, silver was roughly $10 an ounce. Now its $50 an ounce. In 2002, gold was $300 an ounce. Now its $1,600. Spano showcase to display collector items and were pleased to offer customized Wall-its to our clients. Open Mon. to Fri. from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; By appointment at other times. Call 954-482-0705.

PAGE 29

The Pelican 29 Friday, June 8, 2012 STOP HERE STOP HERE STOP HERE

PAGE 30

30 The Pelican Friday, June 8, 2012

PAGE 31

The Pelican 31 Friday, June 8, 2012

PAGE 32

32 The Pelican Friday, June 8, 2012

PAGE 33

The Pelican 33 Friday, June 8, 2012 STOP HERE STOP HERE STOP HERE

PAGE 34

34 The Pelican Friday, June 8, 2012 color

PAGE 35

The Pelican 35 Friday, June 8, 2012

PAGE 36

36 The Pelican Friday, June 8, 2012



PAGE 1

Friday, June 8, 2012 Vol. XX, Issue 23 Wherever you are, read The Pelican @ pompanopelican.com • Send news to siren2415@gmail.com Pompano Beach • Deer eld Beach • Lighthouse Point • Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Wilton Manors • Oakland Park • Hillsboro Beach • The Galt • Palm Aire The P e l i c a n Pelican By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFLauderdale-By-The-Sea – This town and a variety of businesses are teaming up to sponsor a week of special events geared to attracting families to vacation here later this month. Plan a vacation now in Lauderdale-ByThe-Sea See VACATION on page 21Developer envisions 5-Star resortBy Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFHillsboro Beach – The owner of 11 acres of beachfront and Intracoastal Waterway property has proposed to residents here that he be allowed to build a 5-Star resort that would “add another jewel to the town.” The land is owned by Palm Beach County developer John Kennelly who in the past has presented a number of development proposals to the town commission including one called The Enclave comprised of singlefamily homes, a marina and a luxury townhome complex connected by a tunnel under State Road A1A. In a letter being circulated this month, Kennelly wrote that changes in the economy made both plans impossible despite efforts to nd funding. Kennelly has been a property owner in the town since 1979. Local cub scouts place American ags at the grave sites of soldiers at the Pompano Beach Cemetery. Joseph Miller, pictured, places a ag at the entry to the Vietnam Vets memorial prior to Memorial Day. More than 15 cub packs participated in the ag-placing event. County passes $2.4 Million tab to Pompano for police dispatchBy Judy VikPELICAN STAFF Pompano Beach – City commissioners agreed to direct staff to provide them with direction on the legal rami cations if they don’t pay the Broward Sheriff’s Of ce the $2.4 million they’re asking annually for dispatch services. “Fort Lauderdale is not paying BSO for dispatch services, and they don’t intend to pay until disparities (in what cities are paying) are adjusted,” Pompano Beach City Manager Dennis Beach informed commissioners during a budget workshop Wednesday. (Fort Lauderdale) proposes to go to the Broward County Commission to propose some different ways to allocate dispatch service. The county has refused to pay for Fort Lauderdale, Beach said. “The county pays $18 million a year to subsidize communities that See TAB on page 2 See RESORT on page 16 Keep dog park free say advisory membersBy Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach – When it comes to charging a fee to use the city’s dog park, the parks and recreation advisory board favors the status quo – keeping the park free. On Wednesday at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, board members voted not to advise the city commission to charge dog park users for use of the facility. Because it’s only an advisory committee the Sunday ban on alcohol removed Footvolley organizer given OK to distribute beerBy Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach –Commissioners approved two measures concerning the distribution of alcoholic beverages this week. Both agenda items drew opposition from speakers concerned about religious and family values. Sergio Menezes, founder of Pro Footvolley LLC, was given permission to distribute Bud Light Lime only from a designated area for his Pro Footvolley Championship Tournament being held on the beach here Sept. 20-23. Menezes See ALCOHOL on page 27 See DOG PARK on page 3

PAGE 2

2 The PelicanFriday, June 8, 2012 have dispatch services they don’t pay for,” Beach said. “The county has suggested they may quit doing that.” If Pompano Beach commissioners consider not paying for dispatch, Beach said one repercussion could be that BSO would start removing law enforcement. “We have a stronger case than Fort Lauderdale,” Commissioner Barry Dockswell said. “Fort Lauderdale is not paying for dispatch, and they don’t have BSO service. I’d be willing to have this commission be much more assertive. If we can’t negotiate with BSO, I would be in favor of us being more assertive on this and calling the county’s bluff,” he said. Brian Donovan, budget director, said he has been trying to arrange a meeting with BSO’s budget staff, but has not received a response to his requests. Mayor Lamar Fisher noted that the city’s contract with BSO calls for the city to pay $2.4 million for dispatch. While agreeing the city needs to take a hard stand, he said the commission needs to be sure it’s not in violation of the contract and putting the city in jeopardy. “We’re paying the tab for Fort Lauderdale, and our taxpayers are subsidizing other communities,” Commissioner Rex Hardin said. “How can we hold our heads up?” “I don’t want to go down a road where we nd ourselves in a lawsuit that would cost us more than what we pay for dispatch,” said Vice Mayor George Brummer. “The best message we can give the county and the sheriff is to take small steps to reform our police department,” Brummer added. “We can’t afford to reduce dispatch services, and I don’t want to reduce police services. The only way is to gradually make a move to assume control.” Dockswell said he didn’t know what gradual steps could be taken. “We need to stand up for our rights with our partner, the BSO. I’d rather be in a lawsuit than get screwed over and not complain.” “Unless you’re willing to ride this horse until the end, I wouldn’t get on it,” Beach said. He referred to the end as the city restarting its own police department. “That’s not my goal, but we have to be willing to do it,” Dockswell said. “We’re being treated unfairly, and we’re being meek and ineffective.” The city attorney will assess the contract to provide direction on the impact of non-payment for dispatch. Commissioner Charlotte Burrie said the crime rate is very high. “I get nervous when we talk about creating our own police department. If we do that, we aren’t going to catch the bad guys like they do now,” she said. Commissioners were presented three options for setting the millage rate. They selected the rst option, which included an increase of $11 to the current $111, the current payment for a single-family re assessment fee and an increase in millage rate from 5.2027 to 5.4722. Increased re fees will go to the replacement of Station 103 in the Cresthaven area and enhancements to old stations. Dockswell, who didn’t like any of the options proposed, said he wanted the city to look at outsourcing some services, such as engineering, building or public works. Brummer opposed increasing re assessments. He said a unit assessed at $30,000 shouldn’t be paying the same as a $500,000 house. Brummer also didn’t want to set aside some capital improvement projects, as Dockswell suggested. He preferred a slight increase in ad valorem taxes. “The city has to have a future, and we have to see that it has some rosiness,” he said. Dockswell said they should resolve the dispatch issue and consider a re department analysis before picking an option. He said the focus should be on the expenditure side rather than raising taxes every year. Property valuation for Pompano is $8.73 billion, down from $8.81 billion last year. New construction accounted for $15 million. Projected revenues in the general fund for FY ’13 are $110.5 million and projected expenses $113.6 million. Dr. Ken Campbell was the only resident to address commissioners during public comments. He said they should delay certain things. “Our economy is not recovering. Things won’t get better next year or the year after,” he said. “Think about how you can make our dollars stretch the farthest.” Additional budget workshops will be held in July.TabContinued from page 1

PAGE 3

The Pelican 3 Friday, June 8, 2012 ultimate decision on dog park fees will be made by commissioners. Originally, city staff recommended a fee of $60 per year per dog for residents and $120 for non-residents but cut those in half by the meeting Wednesday. City staff also recommended a six-month fee of $20 for residents and $40 for non-residents, with a $10 for each additional dog, and a $5 per visit fee for residents and $10 for non-residents. Scott Moore, parks and recreation department staff member, said the city spends about $2,000 a month on the park, including cutting and watering the grass and chemical treatments. Moore said the proposed fee was reduced to mirror what some of the other dog parks in the county charge. The meeting became a clash of ideas between those who say a fee would kill attendance at a park which has bene ts for the city and those who say users need to help fund it. “It’s going to do wonders for eliminating the number of dogs [that visit the park],” said board member Chris Mullon about the fee. Rafael Katz, board member, said dog park users attracted to the area spend money at businesses nearby; money that would be reduced because a fee would deter people from coming. Residents and board members who spoke in favor of the fee cited how residents are charged for the use of other facilities and how the money generated helps subsidize maintenance costs. “I can’t believe everyone’s talking over $30 a year,” said board member Jim Santomassimo, who voted in favor of the fee. Santomassimo added that, Dog parkContinued from page 1compared to the other costs associated with owning a dog, $30 is something dog owners should easily be able to afford. According to the American Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, the average annual cost to provide and take care of a dog runs between $1,314 and $1,843 depending on the size of the animal. Another vote by the board, to propose the city purchase a computer system that requires park users to swipe their pass to gain entry, resulted in a tie with no recommendation on monitoring the park. Currently, the city does not control who enters the park. Some city staff members and residents have said many users disregard the rules. At the advisory board meeting in May, David Aycock, Pompano Beach Animal Control of cer, said he’s seen a lot of incidents of dogs attacking other dogs. “Regardless of whether there’s a fee, we need to get some control,” he said last month.

PAGE 4

4 The PelicanFriday, June 8, 2012 Advertise with The Pelican Today! By Judy VikPELICAN STAFF Hillsboro Beach – Town commissioners agreed Tuesday to issue a request for proposals for solid waste collection. The vote was 4-1, Commissioner Dick Maggiore dissenting. Deadline for submission of proposals is Monday, July 2. The town’s current contract with Waste Management expires Sept. 30. Mayor Dan Dodge noted that while the town has had an excellent history with this company, “I believe it’s a good time to go out to bid.” Commissioner Javier Garcia said it’s good business practice and “would be in our best interests to go out there and see our options.” Maggiore disagreed, suggesting the commission instead renew the existing contract. When the town issued an RFP two years ago, “these guys [Waste Management] were way below everyone else. I don’t think an RFP is needed,” he said. Vice Mayor Claire Schubert said she would like to see what other communities are paying. Waste Management collects garbage twice a week in Hillsboro Beach at a charge of $4.74 per unit per month, according to Anthony Spadaccia, manager of government affairs with Waste Management. In addition, the county charges a tipping fee of $30 per ton. Those tipping fees will be reduced substantially next year since bonds have been paid off, he said.Of cer Steve Kelly receives lifesaving awardIn other business, commissioners recognized Of cer Steve Kelly of the Hillsboro Police Department for his efforts in saving a woman from drowning. Police received a 911 call around midnight May 9 requesting assistance behind the Rainbow Inn in reference to a 56-year-old woman who was in distress as she ventured out into the ocean. “Kelly arrived on the scene and without regard for his own safety, swam out about 50 yards and rescued her,” Major Jay Szesnat said. He was awarded the Hillsboro Beach Police Lifesaving Award.Water plant update James Ravideau of CH2M Hill reported that 99 percent of concrete work is now complete on the water plant. Framework is now being installed on the chemical building. Last week the town submitted modi ed landscape Garbage rates, vendors considered as Hillsboro Beach contract nears plans to Pompano Beach, and Pompano has agreed to relax some of the previous requirements, which should mean a substantial difference in price. The number of oak trees required has been reduced from up to 14 trees to four.

PAGE 5

The Pelican 5 Friday, June 8, 2012 By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFWilton Manors With only today until noon left to le as a candidate for city commission, incumbent Mayor Gary Resnick may win a third term unopposed. By press time Thursday, Resnick was the only candidate to le for the mayoral race. So far, three candidates have led for the two commission seats up for grabs – Vice Mayor Tom Green, Commissioner Julie Carson and Kimber White, a member of the city’s Economic Task Force and newcomer to Wilton Manors’ political scene. Because the city is not divided by districts, the two candidates with the most votes Gary Resnick may go unopposed for WIlton Manors mayoral racewill win. Candidates have until 12 p.m. today to le for the Nov. 6 election. Leigh Ann Henderson, assistant city manager, said Carson had been working volunteer residents dedicated to helping out their neighbors physically or code and ordinance changes” and the city’s green building program which See WM RACE on page 9 Julie Carson Carson, rst elected during a special election in 2010, said she’s come up with ways to save the city money, including trimming legal costs. She also served as interim commissioner from November 2008 to February 2009. Speci cally, Carson suggested using less block billing “which can be vague” and use paralegals when possible. “If a legal document can be drafted by a less expensive paralegal [we should do that],” said Carson.Carson Greenwith the city attorney’s of ce to help save money but was unable to estimate how much has been saved. “I think my service has been suf cient and I just hope that everyone else will see that,” said Carson. If she gets another term she wants to continue to listen to the concerns of residents and act on them “when and where appropriate” as well as increase safety in residential neighborhoods, in part, by creating a more visible police presence. Carson also said she wants to create a “Citizen Corps” of White nancially. “That’s the kind of energy I’d like to create.” Carson is a senior paralegal with Gator Investments, a real estate management rm in North Miami. Tom Green In his rst term Green, elected in 2008, said he’s focused “a lot of time on Resnickprovides incentives to incorporate green technologies and materials into the construction of new homes. “Our vice mayor had a bunch of good suggestions when we were formulating

PAGE 6

6 The PelicanFriday, June 8, 2012 Deer eld Beach, Pompano Beach, Lighthouse Point, LauderdaleBy-The-Sea, Wilton Manors and Oakland ParkWilton Manors • Oakland Park • Hillsboro Beach The Pompano Pelican is published weekly on FridaysStreet Address: 1500-A E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, FL 33060 Telephone: 954-783-8700 • Fax: 954-783-0093Letters to the Editor are encouraged and accepted for print if signed, although a writer’s name will be withheld on request; letters must also include a daytime telephone number. Advertising rates are available upon request. Subscription rate is $31.80 including tax for one year’s delivery in Greater Pompano Beach; $95.40/per year including tax for others in the United States; call 954-783-8700 for rates abroad. The Pelican is a nonpartisan newspaper and reserves the right to decline advertising. Copyright 2012. Reproduction of this publication in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission of the publisher. The Pelican is a member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, Deer eld Beach Chamber and the LBTS Chamber. The Pelican is a state certi ed woman-owned minority business. The Pelican is delivered to businesses, libraries, schools, of ces, hospitals, news racks and single family homes. All advertising and copy is published at the sole discretion of the publisher. We welcome your critiques and ideas concerning this publication. Anne Siren, publisherExecutive Assistant: Mary Hudson Graphics: Rachel Ramirez Windsheimer Bookkeeper: John White Classi eds: Fran Shelby Contributing Writers: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Judy Wilson, Malcolm McClintock, Judy Vik, Michael d’Oliveira Account Executives: Paul Shroads, Carolyn Mann, Bill Heaton, Bill Fox Special Of ce Assistant: Cathy Siren ESTABLISHED 1993 • Volume XX, Issue 23 Founding Editor and PublisherAnne Hanby Siren Letters & OpinionsEight ve-year-olds graduated from the NE Focal Point Childcare Center last week. Special guest was Mayor Peggy Noland who said, “Thi s is a big day for you all and I’m so proud of you!” Before accepting their diplomas, the students presented a play, ”Hats off to Helpers.” Children ages two through ve are accepted in the Focal Point’s pre-school program. A summer session runs June 11 to Aug. 9 and the fall program begins Aug. 20 and continues until June. Pictured from left are proud grads JaVanti Walker, Genari Epps, Jamie Thomas, Makayla Cordova, Jacob Washington, Pedro Gill and Jordan Joseph. And we present the class of 2012 . Pompano should make the right move to reduce bulk pick-up daysBy Anne SirenPUBLISHERPompano Beach – There are simply too many garbage trucks running the streets of Pompano Beach. They come twice a week for the trash cans. They come twice a week to pick up the bulk items. They are loud, gas-guzzlers that have voracious appetites similar to Grendel, the monster of the epic poem, Beowulf Reducing the number of trips these huge trucks make throughout the city to retrieve rusty refrigerators, stained sofas and infested carpets will decrease the fumes and carbon emissions that attack everyone’s well being. And that removal reduces the blight that these bulky items create for neighborhoods throughout the city. In this issue, we show two examples of residents who carelessly tossed unwanted items on the streets without thought to their neighbors. Besides the unsightly sprawl that encroached on the sidewalk, where people walk and children ride bikes or skateboards, these mounds of debris offer housing to pests, vermin and spiders. We as citizens must take responsibility for our waste and prepare it for recycling or for trash pick-up in a more responsible manner. What kind of neighbors are we if our trash must become a neighbor’s unscenic view day after day? Now the city wants to place some very basic rules on the way trash is put on the streets for pick-up. Rules that most people should want to do on their own as simple courtesy to their neighbors. Bulk pick-up eight times a month is frivolous. Although it does not add to the Waste Management bill in Pompano Beach, it certainly adds to crime. Since it’s free, some residents are renting their own yard space to other companies who can save money by dumping trash or vegetation in Pompano Beach rather than dumping it legally at a county site. New laws always appear on the books when citizens refuse to police their own behavior. This new law which will come before the commission before long will put several constraints and regulations on this simple matter of trash pick-up, and there will be penalties for those who fail to follow the law. Bring it on sooner, we say. This law will decrease pollution, stop criminals from dupping in Pompano Beach and enhance neighborhoods.Shade the childrenBy Anne SirenPUBLISHERIf there is ever any doubt about the power of the sun, think back on this last Memorial Day. It was near high noon when the parade marched into the cemetery. Those lining the small road waved their ags with one hand and drank bottled water with the other. The crowd brought their folding chairs, ice chests and hats as they watched the young performers entertain as homage to our veterans. Eventually, all attention turned to the portable stage where dignitaries and elected of cials sat under the shaded stage. Put emphasis on the word “shaded.” The sun’s rays in South Florida, a sub-tropical part of the planet, can do great damage in a very short period of time. Skin cancer is rampant here. Heat is a death threat to small children who are easily dehydrated. And yet there is talk about building a public playground on the beach for youngsters, and along with that talk, there is disagreement as to how or whether this public beach playground should be shaded. The playground is meant to encourage families to visit the beach, enjoy the ocean and spend the day there. With that encouragement, city of cials must own up to the knowledge that safety measures at the beach regarding heat and sun rays are just as critical as the safety measures that provide swimmers with lifeguards. Not only should shade be part of any public playground built in this city, owning up to the sub tropical climate should encourage other safety signage like “Protect Your Baby with a Hat.” Signs should also remind parents to keep infants and children hydrated. Building a public playground without serious shading to accompany it is tantamount to a public swimming pool without lifeguards.

PAGE 7

The Pelican 7 Friday, June 8, 2012 By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach – SaveA-Lot, a nationwide discount grocery store chain, is in the process of getting its newest distribution center, 2800 N. Andrews Ave., Pompano Beach, ready for the rst truckload of groceries. Chon Tomlin, spokesperson for Save-A-Lot, said the distribution center will open in November and service 150 stores in South Florida and the Caribbean, including the Save-A-Lot on Sample Road in Pompano. The center, which includes large refrigeration units, Save-A-Lot opens new distribution centerwill be used to temporarily store goods while they await delivery to area Save-A-Lot’s. “This area works really well for us for the southern portion of Florida,” she said, adding that the new facility would allow Save-A-Lot to save money on transportation and storage costs. Save-ALot stores now receive goods from Plant City in Central Florida. Formerly a US. Foods cold storage facility, the distribution center was originally 217,000 sq. ft but is being expanded to 250,000 sq. ft. Tomlin said the distribution center would add new jobs to the area but was unable to provide an estimate before press time. Besides jobs, Mayor Lamar Fisher said the center will mean an increase in tax revenue and make the city more attractive to other businesses. “It creates an economic engine for us,” said Fisher. The facility itself was already in great shape. It just needed some additional requirements to accommodate [our needs], Tomlin said.” The property was sold to KTR Capital Partners in 2006 for $18.2 million and has an assessed value of $10.2 million. Save-A-Lot is leasing the property from KTR. Lauderdale by the Sea Chamber welcomes Sushi by the SeaSUSHI BY THE SEA 238 E. Commercial Blvd. in Lauderdale-By-TheSea opens its doors. Owners Vivian Ophelan and Mishihiro Hirano offer high quality sushi at competitive prices and are already acquiring a loyal following. Sponsored by the Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Chamber of Commerce, the ribbon-cutting ceremony was attended by LBTS Mayor Roseann Minnet, LBTS Chamber of Commerce President Mark Silver & Executive Director Malcolm McClintock, friends, family and customers.

PAGE 8

8 The PelicanFriday, June 8, 2012 Business matters The Pelican takes a look at local business owners. Call The Pelican to nd out how you can tell your story here because business matters. 954-783-8700. Pompano Beach – Broward County Commissioner Chip LaMarca will be guest speaker at the next meeting of the Cresthaven Civic Association. The session is set for 7:30 p.m. Thursday, June 14, at the Moose Club, 3321 NE Sixth Terrace. Representatives of the Broward Sheriff’s Of ce also will be on hand to report on crime trends in the area. For more information, contact CresthavenNews@aol.com or call 954-709-5894. Citizens Insurance offers residents help with policiesPompano Beach State Representative Gwyndolen ClarkeReed invites residents to meet with Citizens Property Insurance on June 13 from 1 to 3 p.m. at Pompano Beach City Hall, 100 W. Atlantic Blvd., Room 275. A Citizens staff member will answer questions and assist constituents who have been experiencing dif culties with their policies. Citizens is currently the largest insurer in the State of Florida providing insurance coverage to Floridians unable to nd affordable coverage in the private market. Appointments are required. No walk-ins allowed. Call 954-786-4848.By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFRock bottom interest rates and an unpredictable market have sent many investors buying and selling coins, precious metals, collectibles and memorabilia as a way to preserve and appreciate their capital. Over at Lighthouse Point Coins and Commemoratives, 5360 N. Federal Hwy., in Lighthouse Point, owners John D’onofrio and George Sara anos are rushing around to keep up with demand for in-hand valuables. They buy and sell in the store and on eBay where they are a power seller with a awless rating.” Rounding out their staff are Sylvia Benko, online researcher, and Paul Spano, manager. Highly trained Naldo is their guard dog and mascot. “Instead of CDs, clients are choosing metals,” Spano reports and gives examples of why this is happening. “In 2006, silver was roughly $10 an ounce. Now it’s $50 an ounce. In 2002; gold was $300 an ounce. Now it’s $1,600 for the same amount. We’re seeing average folks, young career people coming in and investing this way because they want their money to appreciate.” Petite Sylvia Benko says, “I’m one of those young people that Paul is talking about. I cash my pay check and buy coins every week. I invest only the amount I can afford and Investors check out Lighthouse Point coins and collectibles for portfolio appreciationdo not need immediately. I want to sell only when there is a nancial advantage for me. I make my choices based on the expertise of the owners and Paul. I have learned that two coins may look alike, but their values might differ a great deal. Factoring in are the condition of the coin, where it was minted, how many were minted, and the date of the coin.” As an online researcher, Benko’s job is to determine market value of speci c collectibles. She says, “The buying public is choosing gold and silver coins, bars, and rounds.” The store has been open for almost See COINS on page 28Cresthaven to host LaMarca Lighthouse Point Coins and Commemoratives owners John D’onofrio and George Sara anos hold an 1879 Carson City silver dollar in mint state 65, saying “This was $17,000 in 2001. Today it sells for $39,000.

PAGE 9

The Pelican 9 Friday, June 8, 2012 SightingsA community calendar of Broward County. Email events to siren2415@gmail. com 6-9 – Deer eld Beach City Shred from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. at the Recycling DropOff Center, 401 SW 4 St. One to ve boxes is $10. Six to ten boxes is $20. Checks only. 954-480-4379. 6-9 – Junior Bass Tournament for ages 12 to 17 at Quiet Waters Park, 401 S. Powerline Road, Deer eld Beach. $75. 954-985-1980. 6-9 – Free car seat safety check event from 9 a.m. to noon. Call 954-786-4510 to schedule an appointment. 6-10 – Pancake breakfast from 9 a.m. to noon hosted by the Benevolent Patriotic Order of DOES Drove 142 at the Elks lodge, 700 N.E. 10 St., Pompano Beach. Adults $5, children $2.50. Open to the public. 954-587-1121 6-10 – American Legion Post 142 and Auxiliary Unit 142 will hold a blood drive on June 10 from 11 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at 171 SW 2 St., Pompano Beach. Free hot dog or hamburger for all donors. 954-942-2448. 6-11 – The Pompano Beach Business Resource Center, 50 NE 1 St., hosts a networking event from 5:30 to 7 p.m. for website designers and business owners looking for a website designer. 954586-1111. 6-12 – Oakland Park/ Wilton Manors Council Chamber luncheon at 11:30 a.m. at Gallery One Resort Hotel, 2670 E. Sunrise Blvd., Fort Lauderdale. 954-4626000. 6-12 – Wilton Manors City Commission meeting at 7 p.m. at city hall, 2020 Wilton Drive. 6-12 – Pompano Beach City Commission meeting at 7 p.m. at city hall, 100 W. Atlantic Blvd. 6-12 – Lighthouse Point City Commission meeting at 7:30 p.m. at city hall, 2200 N.E. 38 St. 6-12 – Lauderdale-ByThe-Sea Town Commission meeting at 7 p.m. at Jarvis Hall, 4501 Ocean Drive. 6-14 – Broward Shell Club meets at 6:30 p.m. at 6:30 p.m. at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach. 954296-5633. 6-14 – Pony rides at Sand & Spurs Equestrian Park, 1600 NE 5 Ave., just north of Goodyear Blimp Base, from 9 to 11:30 a.m. Cost is $3 per ride. 954-786-4507. 6-16 – Father’s Day Fishing Tournamen t from 7 to 10 a.m. at Royal Palm Park Lake, 1701 NW 38 St., Oakland Park. Open to all ages. 954-630-4500. 6-16 – Kayak and paddleboard tournament will be held at 7:30 a.m. at South Beach Park, 1100 Seabreeze Blvd., Fort Lauderdale. Bene t the American Cancer Society. www.kayuba.org or See SIGHTINGS on page 13 that ordinance,” said City Manager Joseph Gallegos about the building program. “I’d say he had a good part of it.” If elected to another term, Green said he wants to “push smart redevelopment while protecting neighborhoods” as well as focus on public transportation, including brining an FEC commuter station to Five Points and rental bike stations to Wilton Drive. “I think I’ve tried to do a good job representing the city,” said Green. Green is an adjunct professor at Broward College. Gary Resnick Resnick was rst elected to the commission in 1998 and won his rst term as mayor in 2008 and was reelected in 2010. Resnick is an attorney with GrayRobinson in Fort Lauderdale. Resnick did not return a message left by The Pelican by press time. Kimber White White, a resident since 2005, was appointed to the Economic Task Force in February. If elected, White said he wants to concentrate on brining in new businesses to the city as well as provide incentives for people to live and work in Wilton Manors. He also wants to create a business incubator and focus more attention and resources on developing other areas of the city. He’s also against a city takeover of Wilton Drive until the nancial situation improves. “I’ve seen a lot of reactiveness instead of proactiveness,” he said. White is the managing partner of United American Mortgage in Oakland Park.WM raceContinued from page 5 Vote Nov. 6

PAGE 10

10 The PelicanFriday, June 8, 2012 Making a DifferencePhyllis J. Neuberger wants your suggestions about people who are making a difference. Call 954-7838700. By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFIt was the Fourth of July, and I was meeting my friend Ruth on Main Street to watch the parade, wave to friends in the oats and enjoy the special festivities. If I close my eyes, I can still visit that memory from so long ago. Once again, I smell the melted butter from the popcorn wagon on the corner. I hear the furious popping of hard yellow corn kernels as they bang against the greasy, glass sides of the huge popper and magically turn into uffy white tasty morsels. Looking across the street, I spot the man dressed like Uncle Sam with a high hat in his red, white and blue costume. Phyllis J.. Neuberger has for nearly 20 years, used this space to spotlight people in the community who have made a difference for the good. Residents have openly shared their stories with Phyllis which in turn were shared with The Pelican readers over these years. And now in the true sense that turn-about is fair play, Phyllis shares excerpts from her memoirs, a work in progress. Enjoy.The Cymbals Player, or how I got my rst real taste of power on July 4 in Iron Mountain, Michigan He’s stoking up his restaurant grill where hot dogs will soon be sizzling and smelling so good, they’ll pull business to him like a magnet. Why do charred hot dogs taste so much better than boiled ones? I want one right now, but I make myself wait until Ruth joins me. Patriotic music blasts from a loud speaker set up in the Chamber of Commerce Building. Main Street is lined with dads in straw boaters decorated with red, white and blue hat bands. Women, waving little ags, wear cool sleeveless sundresses and wide brimmed, billowy straw hats. A few daring, young women wear shorts, showing off their strong tanned legs. Children run wild, impatient for the See CYMBALS on page 20 Pier clean up is SaturdayDeer eld Beach – The waters beneath the International Fishing Pier will be cleaned of debris and tangled shing line and volunteers who clean up the beach Saturday, June 9, 9 a.m. until noon. Local dive shop owner Ari Pavon organizes the event which puts up to 100 divers in the water to collects hundreds of pounds of discarded shing gear and other trash. Free parking for divers and beach cleaners will be provided at the main beach parking lot. This is the 6th annual cleanup.Initial budget explanations next week Deer eld Beach – City department heads will make brief presentations on the services they provide, and the costs, at two budget work sessions next week. Up front Tuesday, June 12, will be spokespersons for nance, parks and recreation, senior services, planning and development and information technology. On Wednesday, June 13, environmental services, solid waste and recycling, BSO re and law enforcement will be explained. Both sessions begin at 6:30 p.m. at the Central City Campus, 402 SW 4 Street. Public input begins at 7:45 p.m.Splash Adventure at Quiet WatersDeer eld Beach – Quiet Waters Park, 401 S. Powerline Road., Deer eld Beach, will host Splash Ahoy, for all ages, on June 15, from 6 to 10 p.m. Cost is $6 per person. Space is limited. Advance ticket sales are required. Call 954-357-5100.

PAGE 11

The Pelican 11 Friday, June 8, 2012 City considering cutting frequency of bulk pickup serviceBy Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach This city has a wide reputation for its generous bulk pick-up service, so wide that some residents are renting out their yards for dumping. Waste Management, Inc., the company that contracts with the city for waste and bulk pick-up, presently picks up bulk at no extra charge eight times a month. Bulk is de ned as non-containable items such as sofas, refrigerators or landscape vegetation. Walter Syrick, a member of the Highlands Civic Association, asked the commission recently to reduce bulk pick-up service to once a month. “We see piles of trash, mattresses and beds [on the streets]. There’s nothing worse for a neighborhood.” Since the pickups are included in the monthly Vegetation like this should be contained. This is also an example of trash that can attract vermin and other problem creatures. [Staff photo]residential bills, some residents are renting space in their yards to outside business owners who nd it cheaper to dump their junk in Pompano Beach rather than pay county fees to do it legally. On May 22, commissioners struck the once-a-month proposal from the agenda after discussion on the dais failed to produce a consensus. Commissioner Charlotte Burrie objected to once a month bulk pick-up but added she would settle for twice a month. Twice weekly bulk pickup is available to single, duplex and triplex residential properties only. For out-of-town poachers, the city and Broward Sheriff’s

PAGE 12

12 The PelicanFriday, June 8, 2012 Of ce plan to work together using a hot line. Residents who see illegal dumping can call the hot line and operators will quickly dispatch a deputy to the address. Callers, who remain anonymous, can receive a $250 reward upon the conviction of the perpetrator. Other changes In addition to reducing the bulk pick-up days, residents will see other changes in trash pick-up if the new law is passed. For weekly pick-up, plastic bags may be used for solid waste materials, but they must be of suf cient strength to contain the materials. Residents are limited to eight cubic yards of bulk pickup per month. A $10 charge for each additional cubic yard, along with any other Trash like this is a nuisance to any neighborhood. To contain this bulk, a resident must take it apart so it can be placed in a safe container for disposal. [Staff photo] violations like placing the bulk on the street more than 24 hours prior to pickup, will be charged and added to the customer’s water bill. Failure to pay will result in property liens. Curb appeal costsStaf ng and enforcing the proposed changes in trash and bulk pick-up will cost BulkContinued from pageabout $230,693. For the rst year, those costs include a new vehicle [$23,648] and the money to operate it [$2,857]; a computer [$2,000] and an air card [$516] and salaries and bene ts [ranging up to $80,500]. Two inspectors are suggested, and would require additional hours of an existing employee to man the transfer station would be required for free bulk drop-off at the city dump. The second and future years are estimated to cost about $179,397. The new plans for the city’s bulk pick-up will be rescheduled for an upcoming city commission meeting.

PAGE 13

The Pelican 13 Friday, June 8, 2012 SightingsContinued form page 9 call 954-801-1833. 6-16 & 17 – Suncoast Gun and Knife Show at War Memorial Auditorium, 800 NE 8 St., Fort Lauderdale. Cost is $8 for adults and free for children 12 and under. Saturday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Visit www. suncoastgunshows.com or call 954-828-5380 6-19 – Oakland Park Historical Society meets from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. at the Oakland Park Library, 1298 NE 37 St. 954-566-9957. 6-19 – The Oakland Park Garden Club meets from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at the Jaco Pastorius Park Community Center, 1098 NE 40 Court, Oakland Park. 954-630-4511. 6-19 – Broward County Property Appraiser of cials will hold a meeting to answer property-related questions from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Deer eld Beach City Hall, 150 NE 2 Ave. 954-357-5579. 6-20 – ArtHall opening reception from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Business Resource Center, 50 NE 1 St. Event is free. 954-586-1111. 6-22 – Computer expert on hand at the Pompano Beach Business Resource Center. 50 NE 1 St., from 9 to 11 a.m. to answer questions. 954-586-1111. 6-22 – Beach Sounds Concert Series from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Main Beach Parking Lot, 149 SE 2 Ave., Deer eld Beach. Event is free. 954-480-4429. 6-22 6/24 – Concert of “Pops” music by Sol Children’s Theatre, 3333 N. Federal Hwy., Boca Raton. Sing-a-long and performance at 7 p.m. Cost is $15. 561447-8829. 6-22 – South Florida Amateur Astronomers meet at Fern Forest nature Center, 201 Lyons Road South, Coconut Creek from 7 to 9 p.m. Free for all ages. Call 954-357-5198. See SIGHTINGS on page 16 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFF Oakland Park – City of cials here appear open to turning re services over to another entity, either the City of Fort Lauderdale or BSO. OP gathering info on outsourcing re servicesOn Wednesday they directed City Manager John Stunson to begin a dialogue with Fort Lauderdale after Stunson said that city would be “a more logical suitor” than BSO. The city is currently in contract negotiations with its own re department which has been reducing staff while maintaining a minimum of 14 employees 24/7. “Reducing staff any further could conceivably be a problem,” Stunson said. “Broward Sheriff Fire Rescue is a capable entity that could provide re service. There’s no doubt about that,” Stunson said. “But if you’re looking to contract for services going forward, a more logical suitor would be Fort Lauderdale.” One of the issues with BSO contracts is bene ts, and employees would have a choice of retaining bene ts in the city pension plan or going with the Florida Retirement System, Stunson said. Pension costs have increased from $900,000 in 2008 to $1.9 million for next year. And while it appears Fort Lauderdale could provide services, “You can control costs better by retaining the service yourselves,” Stunson said. A staff report concludes that if Oakland Park were to contract with BSO Fire, it is highly likely all re rescue employees would be retained and receive pay comparable to what they currently earn. Oakland Park would be responsible for any accumulated bene ts in excess of what BSO allows. The city currently spends about 90 percent of its $8.3 million budget See FIRE SERVICES on page 14

PAGE 14

14 The PelicanFriday, June 8, 2012 Advertise with The Pelican Today! 954-783-8700 Business with a Twist including a few bowling ball and great eatsThe Greater Pompano Beach Chamber partnered with Diamond Strike Lanes, 2200 North Federal Highway, Pompano Beach for an evening of gourmet treats, business card exchanges and some late bowling last week at Business with a Twist evening. Pictured here are Cletus Kilker, Ralph Brigida, marsha Brigida and Gail Farkas. To catch the next Business with a Twist, call 954-941-2940.Debbie Feder, special events coordinator for Diamond Strike Lanes Nancy Kirsch and Debra Landsberg

PAGE 15

The Pelican 15 Friday, June 8, 2012 on compensation. Staff’s preliminary conclusion is there would be little, if any, compensation savings in outsourcing to BSO. Florida law guarantees employees the right to remain in their city pension plans if they’re transitioned to a county position. Little, or no, pension expense relief should be anticipated from outsourcing, the report said. “We’re struggling to deal with pension obligations and are now negotiating our way through a contract,” Commissioner Shari McCartney said. “Preliminary analysis suggests we should look further into it. Let’s ask for more data from Fort Lauderdale.” “If we’re asking for proposals, I would like to put it on the street, and include BSO,” Commissioner Suzanne Boisvenue said. “It’s clear BSO has more services they can offer than the others.” Commissioner Jed Shank said the commission needs more information and that two parameters must be met. “We must maintain the same or better quality of service. And any decision must have some level of cost savings.” Shank noted the city is surrounded on three sides by Fort Lauderdale. “We have a great re rescue department. I’m proud of them, and I know the residents are,” said Commissioner John Adornato. He said he is open for more discussion. “We’re facing a season where revenues aren’t going up,” Mayor Anne Sallee said. “We have to maintain best services and rein in costs. We have an outstanding re department. The residents are very satis ed with the re department we have. I hope we can negotiate and come up with a solution that makes everyone happy.” Sallee said the department can’t keep increasing costs and asking residents to pay more. “From what I’ve heard (residents’) rst choice would be to keep the Oakland Park Fire Department.” She said Wilton Manors isn’t happy with Fort Lauderdale as its re department. McCartney said wanted more detailed information noting she didn’t think that would happen in this budget season. Boisvenue also wanted numbers, so comparisons could be made. She tried unsuccessfully to have the discussion of re service options postponed to October. Fire servicesContinued from page 13 Advertise with The Pelican Today! 954-783-8700

PAGE 16

16 The PelicanFriday, June 8, 2012 He claims he can get nancing for a boutique hotel and spa such as The Four Seasons or Waldorf Astoria which would have minimal impact on the town and present a rst-class image. The letter also discusses the need for a potable water source with the development of a facility with up to 358 hotel rooms. Kennelly suggests he will build a reverse osmosis water plant on the grounds of town hall and provide all the residents with water for 15 years at current user rates. He also indicates he would upgrade water lines. Current zoning on the land allows 16 living units per acre, or 176. The town has no zoning for hotel use. Kennelly is asking for a conditional variance to build the hotel but has not presented formal plans to the town. The item has not been advertised for a public hearing. Former mayor, Carmen McGarry, is very much ResortContinued from page 1SightingsContinued from page 136-23 – The Coast Guard Auxiliary in Boca Raton one-day class “About Boating Safely” from 9 a.m. 5 p.m. at Spanish River Park, 3001 N. State Road A-1-A, Boca Raton. Cost is $35. RSVP at 561-391-3600. 6-28 – Pompano Beach Republican Club meets at 7 p.m. at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach. 954-7867536.FridaysThe Pompano Beach Rotary Club meets Fridays at 12:15 p.m. at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. 954-786-3274.SaturdaysPony rides are at Sand & Spurs Equestrian Park, 1600 NE 5 Ave., Pompano Beach, from 9 to 11:30 a.m. Cost is $3 per ride. 954-786-4507. Pompano Beach Kiwanis Club Westside meets the rst and third Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. at the E. Pat Larkins Community Center, 520 MLK Blvd., Pompano Beach. 954782-8096.See SIGHTINGS on page 19 against Kennelly’s request for a variance. Citing the possibility of 600 guests a day in the hotel and another 300 in staff, McGarry said traf c would be a disaster. “People think a commercial project would reduce their property taxes, but this does not happen,” she said this week. “There would be increases in the cost of police protection, traf c, water use and sanitation. When other large condos were built such as Ocean Grande and Mediterranea, our tax bills did not decrease.” She also believes a resort would provide more public access to the town’s now private beaches and doubts the feasibility of a desalination plant. “Further studies need to be made before such a project becomes acceptable,” McGarry said. Rene Males, president of Hillsboro Ocean Club, said his board of directors is split on the issue. Three believe that a 5-Star hotel would enhance property values and protect the land from a more disagreeable use and three who agree with him that there is no assurance as to what would be built on the property if the variance is granted. “We want to force him to abide by our current zoning laws,” Males said.

PAGE 17

The Pelican 17 Friday, June 8, 2012 By Malcolm McClintockPELICAN STAFFGourmands, epicureans and assorted gluttons recently had the opportunity to partake in the newly created “Foodie Field Trip.” Brainchild of Lauderdale-By-The-Sea’s Lenore Nolan-Ryan, the concept involves showing up at her eponymous school for a brief champagne-soaked meet n’ greet before boarding a private bus destined for a few esoteric culinary hot spots on Las Olas Boulevard. “It has been a huge success,” says Lenore. “This will be our third outing this month.” The first stop was Cheese Culture [813 E. Las Olas Blvd., 954-533-9178], where owners Susan and Mitchell Phipps had chosen red and white wines to be paired with a selection of the shop’s fine cheeses. On this occasion, Spanish sheep’s milk Manchego and goat’s milk Garroxta were coupled with a refreshing white Roth Sauvignon Blanc ‘10 from Alexander Valley in California. Cheese expert Susan advises to “smell the cheese, taste it fully and then let it sit a little bit in your mouth before hitting it with the wine.” Her husband Mitchell noted that “as a rule of thumb, goat and sheep’s milk cheeses go very well with white wines.” He subsequently unveiled a fantastic Piatelli Malbec Premium ’09 from the Mendoza Valley in Argentina. This full-bodied vintage was set against the back drop of a California Midnight Moon goat’s cheese and an ber-The Lenore Nolan-Ryan Cooking School serves up good food and good times on its ‘Foodie Field Trips’ [Left] Cheeses abound at the Cheese-Culture on Las Olas Blvd. [Above] Owners Susan and Mitchell Phipps show off a few of the evening’s specialties. [Photos by Malcolm McClintock]See FOODIE on page 25

PAGE 18

18 The Pelican Friday, June 8, 2012

PAGE 19

The Pelican 19 Friday, June 8, 2012 Wilton Manors Green Market is held every Saturday and Sunday at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. 954-592-0381. T he Deer eld Beach West Kiwanis Club meets the second and fourth Saturdays of the month at 9 a.m. at Westside Park, 445 SW 2 St., Deer eld Beach. 954-54-7329883. Alley Oop Skim Clinics at 9 a.m.Learn skim boarding from South Florida’s top professionals. Alley Oop is offering a fun, interactive experience where kids, teenagers AND adults can try skim boarding out just for fun. Offering instructions and guidance no matter what level you are at, we meet at the shoreline.SundaysSt. Elizabeth’s of Hungary Parish hosts a pancake breakfast at 3331 NE 10 Terrace, Pompano Beach, on third Sundays from 7:30 a.m. to noon. The breakfast bene ts the Parish. 954-263 8415. Discover Scuba Sundays at 10 a.m. 259 E. Commercial Blvd., Lauderdale-By-TheSea. Cost $80. Call 954-6165909. MondaysPlay ping-pong from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Cost is $1. All ages can participate. 954-3902130. SightingsContinued from page 16 See SIGHTINGS on page 20 Fort Lauderdale Showing their patriotic pride on the day before Memorial Day, Senior Helpers employees and guests gathered at the Senior Helpers offices in Fort Lauderdale. Senior Helpers is a private organization which provides seniors with various in home and outside services. [Photos by Michael d’Oliveira]Senior Helpers celebrate Memorial Day

PAGE 20

20 The Pelican Friday, June 8, 2012 WORSHIP DIRECTORY: Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad. Rev. Hyvenson Joseph parade. It won’t take much to get them under control. A bag of popcorn or a stick of cotton candy from the vendor will do the trick. My friend Ruth appears in her navy, white and gold uniform, carrying her clarinet. I forgot that she’s marching in the high school band. “March along with me,” she says. “No one will care.” “Are you sure? “I’m sure,” she laughs and we walk one street over where the band members are gathering and getting their instructions from the band director, Mr. T.R. Ulinger, who was also our history teacher. When we arrived at the meeting place for the band, Mr. Ulinger stopped snapping out instructions long enough to grab my arm, saying, “Phyllis, my cymbal player didn’t show up. Want to be in the band and do the cymbals?” “Sure,” I answered liking the idea. “What do I do?” “There’s nothing to it. When I give you a signal, hit ‘em together. You can do it. Get over there,” he handed me the cymbals and pointed me to a spot in the band. I looked at Ruth, who shrugged her shoulders and said, “What the hay, do it!” The parade began. Marching was fun. When Mr. Ulinger gave me the rst signal, I crashed the cymbals, and the band began to play. I chuckled to myself when I realized I had the power to start the music going. We’d been marching for a short while when I felt we should be doing something besides walking. I banged the cymbals against each other, and the band immediately started to play. The kids who weren’t blowing something began to laugh. Mr. Ulinger gave me a really dirty look as we moved along. I did it a number of times never realizing that it was a challenge for the musicians to march and play. They needed space breaks, but I didn’t give them many. The parade was a success. Everyone cheered the band and its constant music. The band members didn’t seem to mind my mischief. I was drunk with power not noticing that Mr. Ulinger was ready to put my head between the cymbals. He gave me a good verbal reaming when the parade was over. I deserved it. I was never asked to ll in again. In fact, that was the end of my cymbal career. My punishment was facing a very hostile history teacher when school started that fall. The July 4th festivities were far from over. When the parade ended, people walked home leisurely and got ready for the picnic. No one had grills back then. People packed up picnic dinners in ice boxes and baskets and headed for the public parks and beaches where they would meet friends, taste each other’s specialties and gossip. There would be swimming, baseball games and often music in a park band shell. Ruth and I sought other girls and boys we knew so we could hang out together, waiting for dark when the reworks would light up the sky and one might get a kiss or two from a special boy. You knew the night was ending when the park garbage cans began to over ow, cranky babies started to cry and overtired kids whined. Parents called their missing teens back to the fold. Now, a new parade began to form as a chain of car lights lit up the road for miles. Weary dads, who had too much beer, were especially careful as they drove their families home. Home at last, the sprinklers were turned off, ags lowered, kids tucked in and one by one, house lights went out. The town slept. July 4th was over. CymbalsContinued from page 10SightingsContinued from page 19 The Gold Coast Toastmasters Club meets on the second and third Monday of the month from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Denny’s, 3151 NW 9 Ave., Fort Lauderdale. 954895-3555 or 954-782-9951.TuesdaysDeer eld Beach Rotary Club meets every Tuesday at 12 p.m. at the Deer Creek Golf Club, 2801 Deer Creek Country Club Blvd., Deer eld Beach. 954-630-9593. Pompano Beach-Lighthouse Rotary Club meets every Tuesday at 7:30 a.m. at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal See SIGHTINGS on page 21

PAGE 21

The Pelican 21 Friday, June 8, 2012 The event, dubbed “Family Fun Week,” runs from June 23 to 30. What started out as a way “to put heads in beds” mushroomed into a week lled with events for the entire family, according to Pat Himelberger, assistant to the town manager. The time is one of the shoulder seasons, when the number of visitors is usually down. “We wanted to target families, a new demographic for LBTS, and let them know this is a great, affordable place to come for a vacation,” she said. And while the beach is a major attraction, organizers also want visitors to know there are other reasons to come here. Retailers and other businesses got involved, and now, “A myriad of things are planned up and down the street,” Himelberger said. Among them are dance and skimboard lessons, a jewelry party and a scavenger hunt. The town contributed $5,000 for marketing and $4,000 for special events that week. Retailers matched those funds with another $4,000. Marketing has been targeted at the Northeast and Southeast through Visit Florida, Facebook and Google ads and through a website Traveling Mom.com. Several hotels are offering discounts for the week, ranging from 20 percent to 50 percent off their usual summer rates. “We’ve had a great deal of interest online, but bookings for hotels and events are light,” Himelberger said. People from as far as China, Hong Kong and Malaysia have visited the website. Residents are welcome to take part in the events, as well. The town is sponsoring several free events, including two movies in Friedt Park, a concert by Jimmy Stowe and the Stowaways and arts and crafts for children. “This is the town coming together as a whole to create an event, with retailers, restaurants and some of the hotels in a new venture. We’ll see what the response is,” Himelberger said. “Anything you do for the rst time you have to build on. People are excited that we’re all working together for a common goal – to bring new visitors.” “The event is designed for the town to market itself as a family vacation destination,” said John Boutin, manager of the Windjammer Resort, one of the event committee members. He said the event is generating a lot of interest, and there have been been thousands of visits to the website. “When you target a new audience, sometimes it takes time and it grows as it gets successful.” Boutin said it’s taken hard work by many people to make this happen. He credits Himelberger with keeping them on track.Saturday, June 23Free skim boarding lessons from 9 to 10:30 a.m. Children, teens and adults can try skim boarding just for fun. Meet at the shoreline at the north side of pier off Commercial Boulevard. Guided Snorkel Adventure led by Gold Coast Scuba, is set from 4 to 6 p.m. Saturday or noon to 2 p.m. Thursday. Cost is $25 per person.Sunday, June 24Pro Footvolley Tour Exhibition from 4 to 6 p.m. The public will have a chance to try footvolley, a new trend sport. Art by the Sea Gallery offers a free young beginner watercolor painting class from 2 to 3 p.m. for children and teenagers. Children under 18 must be accompanied by a parent the entire time. RSVP required. Email jshampaign@ bellsouth.net.Family events planned for ‘Fun Week’ Monday, June 25Fishing tournament for children at Anglin’s Pier from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday to Friday. Cost is $40 to participate. Children must be under 12 years old and accompanied by a parent or guardian. On Monday at 8 a.m. a fishing instructor will give a one-hour fishing lesson and tips on where to fish on VacationContinued from page 1 See FUN on page 24 SightingsContinued from page 20 Hwy., Pompano Beach. 954972-7178. The American Legion Auxiliary Unit 142 171 SW 2 St., Pompano Beach, has Bingo on Tuesdays at 7 p.m. Food is available from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. 954-942-2448. A Yoga class is available for all levels at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors, on Tuesday nights from 6:30 to 8 p.m. and Saturday mornings from 10:30 a.m. until noon. The cost is $7. 305-607-3520. Zonta International meets on the third Tuesday of the month at Duffy’s Diner, 401 N. Federal Hwy., Deer eld Beach, at 11:15 a.m. Zonta International works to advance the status of women. 561-3922223.WednesdaysThe Wilton Manors Kiwanis Club meets Wednesdays at 6:30 p.m. at 2749 NE 14 Ave., Wilton Manors. 954561-9785. The Oakland Park Ki-See SIGHTINGS on page 24

PAGE 22

22 The Pelican Friday, June 8, 2012 Tell The Pelican about your special event 954-783-8700 Classi eds Call 954-545-0013 Liquidation SaleEveryday 10 to 4 Ocean Villa Motel/Apartments317 S. Ocean Blvd. [A1A], 3 blocks south of Hillsboro Beach Deer eld BeachEverything Goes!Coin-operated W/D, Soda Vending Machine, Bedroom Sets Refrigerators [Mini & Big], Micros, Paintings, Sheets/All Sizes; Bedspreads, Silverware, Pots & Pans, Air Conditioners, Suitcases left behind, Lamps, Dining Room Table More, Chairs, Dressers & More Make Your Deal Today HELP WANTEDDIESEL / REFRIGERATION Truck Mechanic – We Have Immediate Openings For Diesel Mechanics In Pompano Beach. We Provide Excellent Pay & Bene ts. We Require A Minimum 2 Years Experience. Your Own Tools, Good Driving & Work History. CDL Driver License Would Be Helpful But Is Not Required. Apply Online At www.salemleasing. com. 6-8 LOCAL PEST CONTROL CO Looking For Quality Sales/Service Tech. Must Be Dependable, Team Player, Good Drivers License & People Skills. Will Train Right Person. ALSO Of ce Assistant – Computer – People & Phone Skills Needed. Fax Resume 954418-3982. 6-29 SEEKING EMPLOYMENTCHILD CARE / NANNY – Experienced As Elementary Teacher – Counselor – Nanny – Caring – Patient. Prefer Pompano Beach Area. 954788-5412. 6-8 MALE CNA / HHA / SR. COMPANION. Broward Area. Former EMT. All Certi cations / Compassionate, References. Call Ron 954-232-2832. 6-8 WEEKENDS!!! – Dog Sitting Or Dog Walking. Pompano Beach Area. Call After 6PM 754-245-8999. 6-8 SERVICES DANNY BOY ELECTRIC – Lic & Insured. Lic. #EC13004811. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. 24/Hr Service. 954-290-1443. Beat Any Written Estimate. Sr, Discount. 6-29 GINGERS HOUSEKEEPING – 20 YEARS EXP. (Licensed) References Available. Honest & Reliable – Love To Clean Windows! Help Organize No Problem. FREE Estimates! 954-200-4266. 6-8 HANDYMAN – PAINTING – CARPENTRY – Pressure Cleaning. Decks! Everything Around The House. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. Call 561-350-3781. 6-8 HONEST HANDYMAN – HOME & BUILDING Maintenance/Improvements. No Job Too Small. Fast Friendly Service. Reasonable Rates. Local Resident/Homeowner. Call Today For Your FREE Upfront Quote. No Deposit Required. 754-366-1915. 6-8 GOT JUNK? DUMP TRUCK – CONDO CLEANUPS Trees/Landscape, Yard Fill. Pressure Wash/ Roofs/Home Repairs – Welding, Etc. Dave 954-818-9538. 6-29 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIESNew GREEN technology. New defroster control saves energy in home refrigerators, commercial chillers. Patented. All optical. Simple mfg. Strategic partners needed..www.NewAvionics.Com. 954-568-1991. CMUSICIANS WANTEDThe American Legion Symphonic Band is now accepting new members for the 2011-2012 season. College age to “seasoned seniors” are welcome. Rehearsals are held on Wed. evenings at American Legion Post 142 in Pompano. Percussionists, oboe, bassoon, trombone and euphonium players are especially needed. If you enjoy “making music,” call Jim McGonigal, Music Director at 954647-0700 for more info. PRAYERSST. JUDE NOVENA – May the Sacred Heart of Jesus be adored, glori ed, loved and preserved throughout the world now and forever. Sacred Heart of Jesus pray for us. St. Jude, Worker of Miracles pray for us. St. Jude Helper of the Helpless pray for us. Say this prayer 9 times a day. The 8th day your prayer will be answered. This has never been known to fail. Thank You St. Jude for prayers answered. L.P. 6-8 CEMETERY PLOTSINGLE CEMETERY PLOT In Forest Lawn Memorial Gardens – Pompano Beach, Memories #2, Lot 156, Space 3. $1,800. 954-644-9354. 6-15 HOMES FOR RENTPOMPANO COTTAGE STYLE HOUSE – 2 / 1 Pool – Large Fenced Yard. $1050 Month. 510 NE 35 Street. Call Darci 954-7833723. 6-29 OUT OF AREAFURNISHED RENTAL – MILFORD PA. Get Out Of The Heat – Come To The Mountains. Small Private One Bedroom Cottage, Stone FP, HW Floors. Finished Attic, Walk To Pristine 120 Acre Lake, Boat, Swim, Relax…$850 Per Month – By The Month Or By The Year. Call Audrey 570246-9240 Cell Or 570-296-7717 x121. 6-8REAL ESTATE SERVICESREAL ESTATE SELLING OR BUYING – The Most Important Thing When Choosing A Real Estate Professional Is To Find Someone You Can Trust! Relocation Specialist. 18 Years Experience. English, French, Spanish, Greek. Yvette Gaussen – YES WE CAN REALTY – 954-614-7773 Or 954-773-8340. 6-8 ROOMMATE WANTEDFREE RENT For Female Roommate In Expanded Mobile Home – Pompano In Exchange For Light Cooking – Won’t Last! Call Paul 954200-4456. 6-8 REAL ESTATE WANTEDI BUY HOUSES!! CASH!! AS IS! QUICK CLOSE! ANY AREA – ANY CONDITION! NO EQUITY OK. CALL NOW 954-914-2355. 7-20 CONDOS FOR SALEPOMPANO BEACH – DIRECT OCEAN VIEW!! Pet Friendly! 2/2 AT THE BREAKERS! $269,000. Call Juliana At Barclay’s For Details. 1-305766-4420. 6-22CONDOS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH – 1 Block To Ocean!! 1 / 1 Fully Equipped. Hurricane Windows / Doors. 2 Flat Screens, DVD, WIFI, Pool, BBQ, Laundry. $850 Month + Electric Monthly Thru December. 954-540-9724. 6-15 DEERFIELD BEACH 2/2 CONDO – Corner Unit, Pool. $800. Good Credit Required. No Pets Or Realtors. 631-8853342. 6-8 APTS FOR RENTDEERFIELD/POMPANO BEACH 1 BR & 2 BR APTS FOR RENT. Remodeled, Paint, Tile, Etc. Washer / Dryer On Site. Pool. Pet Friendly. George 954-809-5030. 6-29 POMPANO BEACH 1 BEDROOMS AND EFFICIENCY Apts. Fully Furnished With Kitchen, Cable, Internet, Pool, Laundry. 500’ To The Beach. Weekly – Monthly – Yearly. 954-2948483 Or 248-736-1533, 6-15 POMPANO BEACH NE 2/1 $950 – 2/1.5 Townhouse $1095 – SW 2/2 $950 – ALL FREE WATER – Rent + $70 Application Moves – U – In. 954-781-6299. 6-15 POMPANO BEACH / ATLANTIC / FEDERAL – Ef ciency $175 Weekly. No Security Deposit. Includes Cable, Electric, Internet. FREE Washer / Dryer. No Drug Record – No Evictions. 954-7090694. 6-8 POMPANO BEACH Studio Newly Renovated. Pool. Pet OK! $650 Per Month Yearly Lease. 1960 NE 48 Street. Call 954-857-5207. 6-15 POMPANO BEACH A1A – 1 & 2 Bedrooms, Ef ciencies – Fully Furnished – Includes Utilities, Cable, WIFI, Laundry, Pool, BBQ. 700’ To The Beach. Starting At $269 Per Week. 954-943-3020. 6-15 POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 Bedroom From $495. Easy Movein. 1/2 OFF DEPOSIT. Remodeled. Great Location. 954-783-1088 For More Info. 7-13 GOLDEN ACRES DEVELOPMENT is the best value for apartment rental in the city of Pompano Beach. Newly renovated kitchen cabinets, new appliances, energy saving HVAC wall units, 24-hr maintenance, playgrounds and daycare. Rentals starting at $500. Section 8 Voucher holders are welcome to apply. Please contact Helen Mitchell at 954-972-1444. Domestic farm workers will be given priority in renting available units. Professionally managed by Nelson & Associates, Inc. Pelican Classi ed ads Mean Business! Pelican Classi ed ads Mean Business!

PAGE 23

The Pelican 23 Friday, June 8, 2012 Tell The Pelican about your special event 954-783-8700 Classi eds Call 954-545-0013 In Pompano BeachiBeria Bank, 990 N. Federal Hwy. Dairy Queen, 2901 N. FederalHwy. Publix, 1405 S. Federal Hwy. Lou’s Giant Subs, 1721 N. Dixie Hwy. In Deer eld Beach Walgreen’s, Hillsboro & Federal Hwy. Joseph’s Italian Bakery, 788 S. Fed. COMMERCIAL FOR RENT-SALEPOMPANO COMMERCIAL OFFICE Spaces Available. Ranging From As Low As $500 To $700 Depending On Square Footage. Please Call Darci At 954-7833723. 6-15 DEERFIELD BEACH – Retail Of ce Warehouse – 700 Sq Ft With Loft. A/C, Bathroom. $575 Per Month. Call For More Info 561-654-1331 Or 561-9985681. 6-29 NEWLY EQUIPPED LOW RENT SHOP – Space Ideal For Bakery – Pizza – Wings – Crepes – Etc. Corner New – 12 Avenue & 34 Court Oakland Park. Indoor / Outdoor Patio Sitting. 954-563-3533. 6-15 DOCK FOR RENT60 FT DOCK – THE COVE MARINA – 50 AMP / H20 Included. $1,200 Month – Price Negotiable Depending On Boat Size. Restaurant & Fuel On Premises. 954-9140053. a.j.barsotti@comcast. net 6-22 COVE – DOCK FOR RENT!! 60 FT. Water, Electric. No Fixed Bridges. Nice Location. $350 Mo. 954-429-9347 Or Call Cell 954-288-9651. 6-8 POMPANO BEACH DOCK –Wide Canal – No Wake Area – Whips. Quiet Canal. Call 954-946-3301. 6-15 CARS FOR SALE1997 WHITE PONTIAC FIREBIRD – 6 Cylinder, Automatic, Runs Great, New Tires & Brakes. Good On Gas. 160K Miles. $2,600. Pompano. 1-845-807-8693. 6-8 MISC ITEMS FOR SALEMEN’S CALOI CRUISER BIKE – Used Carpentry Items. Fishing Rods. Air Compressor. Large Construction Fan. Pompano 954-471-3402. 6-8 If you cannot locate a Pelican call 954-783-8700 Advertise with The Pelican 954-783-8700Tell The Pelican about your special event 954-783-8700

PAGE 24

24 The Pelican Friday, June 8, 2012 the pier and answer questions about fishing. Participants receive a twopiece fishing pole to use and keep as a souvenir. Experience chocolate making at Kilwin’s Ice Cream from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. at 117 Commercial Blvd. Learn about the history of chocolate and dip a chocolate treat. Space is limited and reservations taken at 954267-8991. Open to 8 to 16-year-olds. Cost is $5 per participant. “Family Fun HandsOn Cooking Classes” are offered from noon to 1:30 p.m. Monday to Thursday at Lenore Nolan-Ryan Cooking School & Catering Cost is $30 per person.Tuesday, June 26“Creative Crafts,” offered by the town from 3 to 5 p.m. Free arts and crafts projects for children at Jarvis Hall. Danny Carter is offering 50 percent discounts on group ballroom and Latin dance classes at Dance Move studio, 220 E. Commercial Blvd., Suite 201. Instruction that is usually $10 per class will be $5 per class from 3 to 4 p.m. Tuesday, June 26, and from 3 to 4 p.m. Thursday, June 28. P.J. Rossi Jewelers offers a Jewelry Scavenger Hunt from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. TuesdayThursday. Participants will come in and receive a list of items (on a card) to find in the store. Price is $5 per play. Yoga with Lesley offers classes on the beach at Commercial and A1A from 8 to 9 a.m. Exercise mind, body and soul for $5 per class.Wednesday, June 27Free concert in El Prado Park from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. to the sounds of Rockin’ in the Tropics. Fitness boot camp by The Sports Edge. Physical fitness experts offer sessions from 9 to 10 a.m. Price is $30 for the entire family.Thursday, June 28Free Movie “Puss in Boots,” at sundown in Friedt Family Park. Bring blankets, snacks and drinks. There’s a playground at the site for the little ones. Sponsored by the town. Sand Sculpture Contest at 3 p.m. at the beach in front of El Prado Park. Cost is $10 per entry. Skimboarding Camp from 9 a.m. to noon. Cost is $99 per skimmer. Alley Oop is offering three, three-hour skim clinics for visitors to master this sport. Registration is required, and availability is limited. Call 954-530-4954.Friday, June 29Free belly dance lessons at 8 p.m. and 20 percent off meals at Athena by the Sea. Interior Digs offers a party from 5 to 7 p.m. Treat yourself to a shopping experience. Cost is $10 per person. Happy hour at Aruba Beach Caf from 4 to 7 p.m. Enjoy the pig roast buffet. Free music at “Friday Night Jazz on the Square,” presented by the Village Grille. Saturday, June 30 Argenti Designer Jewelry presents Ladies Jewelry Party from noon to 2 p.m. Cost is $10. Helpful information plus 50 percent off select designer sterling silver jewelry. All week long: Rent a bike at Pedrito’s Bike Shop for more than two days and get 20 percent off. All week long: 20 percent off fashions at Style Nest boutique. Raffles at 4 p.m. Wednesday to Saturday. Price $10. For a complete list of events, to go lbtsevents.FunContinued from page 21 wanis Club meets Wednesdays from 7:30 to 8:30 a.m. at Peter Pan Diner, 1216 E. Oakland Park Blvd., Oakland Park. 954-566-9957. The Pompano Beach Kiwanis Club meets Wednesdays at noon at the Riverside Grille at the Sands Resort, 125 N. Riverside Drive, Pompano Beach. 954-444-4815. The Greater Pompano Beach Senior Citizens Club meets on the second Wednesday of the month at the Emma Lou Olson Community Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach, at 10 a.m. 954-943-7787. The Alzheimer’s Caregivers Support Group meets Wednesdays from SightingsContinued from page 21 See SIGHTINGS on page 26

PAGE 25

The Pelican 25 Friday, June 8, 2012 The Pelican 954-783-8700 FoodieContinued from page 17pungent Cabot Clothbound Cheddar from Vermont. “You can actually tell what the cow was eating with this cheese!” chimed in Susan. Guests were able to purchase the wines and cheeses at reduced prices before getting back on the bus for the next stop on the tour. Only a short drive away, the lively group paid a visit to the Spice Quarter [2324 E. Las Olas Blvd., 954-652-1025.] Charismatic owner Paul Rydza gave an in-depth lesson on aged balsamic vinegars of Modena, exotic spice blends and Spanish olive oils. “I’ve been a home cook for 15 years and noticed that there were no good spice shops in the area. So I decided to open one up!” says Rydza. After sampling various oil and vinegar products, many guests were eager to stock up on myriad exotic spices such as Spanish saffron, Kaffir lime leaves, Greek oregano and Hungarian paprika to name but a few. Of particular interest is the house special blend that offers a perfectly balanced mixture of select herbs and spices that will elevate just about any dish imaginable. The last leg of the journey was a return trip to LenoreRyan’s school for a quick cooking demonstration and preparation of tasty items such as goat cheese, artichoke pesto and tomato jam crostini; caramelized onion, olive and manchego tart; and mozzarella and prosciutto tapas. Finally, for a sweet ending with a twist, patrons devoured Blue Bell chocolate ice cream topped with a touch of olive oil and a sprinkle of espresso sea salt a somewhat unusual yet surprisingly pleasant taste sensation. More info can be obtained at www.lenorenolanryan.com www.cheese-culture.com and www.thespicequarter.com “I decided to offer this Foodie Tour as a birthday present to my friend,” says local nurse Arlene Silberman. “I am having a wonderful time,” says lucky birthday girl Susana Andrade. For a mere $125, this exclusive sybaritic soire overflows with good cheer and great food. Be sure to get on board the next time the bus goes by. A true crowd pleaser: Lenore’s popular mozzarella and prosciutto tapas is a perfect way to open up a meal.

PAGE 26

26 The Pelican Friday, June 8, 2012 Advertise in The Pelican for coverage in nine North Broward cities. Capt. RJ Boyle is an experienced angler in South Florida. His studio is located in Lighthouse Point. Call 954-420-5001. By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFThose looking to catch a swordfish this weekend should have a good time of it this weekend. RJ Boyle, owner of RJ Boyle Studios in Lighthouse Point, has already caught three this week and expects light winds and calm seas should make for some more. “The swordfish are biting. There are numerous fish in the 100 to 200-lbs. range,” he said. “The best depth is ay 1,715.” Boyle was with a charter boat customer from New Good weather, calm seas should make for good sword shing this Jersey when he brought in his haul. “He bought all the tackle from the store. He’s looking to take what he’s learned and go back up to New Jersey to do some fishing.” But, says Boyle, there’s a lot more than swords biting this week. “Fishing for yellowfin tuna’s been really food. And as of yesterday, there were still consistent dolphin. So don’t be afraid to run off shore and tackle some big game.”SightingsContinued from page 24 10 a.m. to noon at the NE Focal Point Alzheimer’s Day Care Center, 301 NW 2 Ave., Deer eld BeachThursdaysThe Rotary Club of Oakland Park/Wilton Manors meets every Thursday from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. at Tequila Sunrise Mexican Grill, 4711 N. Dixie Hwy., Oakland Park. 954-491-6158. The Deer eld Beach Kiwanis Club meets at noon every Thursday at the Deer eld Beach Hilton, 100 Fairway Dr., Deer eld Beach 954-242-6083. The Pompano Beach Republican Club meets on the fourth Thursday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach. 954-786-7536.

PAGE 27

The Pelican 27 Friday, June 8, 2012 said he would distribute his sponsor’s product from a VIP beer garden and is willing to give up any proceeds from beer sales to a charity. Commissioner Ben Preston was against beer being consumed on the beach but the rest of the board said alcohol was sold at other beachside events and to ban it would be “inconsistent.” Footvolley is played by two-man teams on the sand with a 6’9” net. Object is to keep the volleyball in play using only the feet. The sport has a national tour that includes Daytona Beach, Santa Barbara, CA and Virginia Beach. The more controversial item, a change in the law to allow sale of alcohol on Sundays between 8 a.m. and noon, drew a number of opponents who spoke to the detrimental effects of alcohol on society. Ginger Alvarez urged commissioners to stick by the law which provides a control. “Our morals are deteriorating,” Alvarez said. “If we could ban the sale of alcohol until noon every day, I would be for that. Laws are there to protect us.” Jim McGeary said additional revenues from the Sunday sales would be “muniscule ” and Debbie Brown said, “I oppose this. I can’t see how this bene ts society in any way.” Rev. Anthony Pelt, representing the Deer eld Beach Ministerial Association, said his organization opposed the change and that the public should be able to live without alcohol until noon on Sundays. Others spoke to keeping Deer eld’s image as “familyfriendly” and Amie Kay Tanner said, “Why can’t people buy their alcohol the night before? It’s (the ban) only a short time. We have to live by some rules.” Commissioner Ben Preston, the sole “no” vote on the issue said, “There is no data on the scal impact (of alcohol sales).” Preston argued that few people from the business community were present to make their point adding that while people are drinking mimosas on the beach, people in his district are being “challenged by drugs and alcohol.” In support of the new law, Vice Mayor Bill Ganz said, “This is a Blue Law designed to regulate morals and conduct, based on religious reasons. It is exclusionary… it forces others to recognize a Sabbath that is not theirs. It is not fair.” Commissioner Marty Popelsky said he is a believer in freedom of choice and Mayor Peggy Noland said the manager at JB’s on the Beach estimates he loses about $800 on a Sunday morning because he cannot sell alcohol with his brunch menu until noon. Resident David Cohen said the law as it stands it “in icts your faith on mine” and Dick Maggiore, the owner of the Tipperary Pub said he turns away people on Sunday morning who then take their business to Lighthouse Point. Also speaking for the change Bett Willett said, “Selling a mimosa before noon won’t make a difference and it may help some restaurants and package stores. It’s a law that respects one religion over others.” Willett and other speakers pointed out that some religions meet on Fridays or Saturdays. “Respecting a Sunday morning is in effect government sanctioning a certain religion,” she said.AlcoholContinued from page 1DBHA board position lledDeer eld Beach – Rev. Anthony Pelt was appointed to the Deer eld Beach Housing Authority Board of Commissioners this week. Pelt is the founder of the Radiant Living Worship Center and according to his website hold degrees in political science and public administration from the University of Central Florida. His appointment lls a vacant seat created with the city commission removed Caryl Berner from the board last month.

PAGE 28

28 The Pelican Friday, June 8, 2012 two years, but the owners who live in LHP, are long time collectors themselves. Sara anos has collected sports memorabilia since childhood. D’onofrio has been collecting coins since his Boy Scout days. He says, “Knowledge and timing are important in this business. We have a large reference library. We get the weekly Coin Dealer Newsletter and we’re on line constantly taking advantage of the latest technology. Our clients are also on line constantly.” D’onofrio holds up an 1879 Carson City silver dollar in mint state 65, saying “This was $17,000 in 2001. Today it sells for $39,000. He holds up another coin, saying. “Here’s a Morgan $20 coin, minted in 1881 in Carson City. It’s in uncirculated condition, meaning it has not been handled. It was worth $10 in 2007. Today it’s worth about $100.” Our clients are also on line constantly.” One client, David Wagner, believes that gold and silver metals are the place to invest, the economy being like it is. He says, “I’ve been trading with these people since they opened and I’m satis ed that they are fair and competitive. I’ve shopped around.” Spano adds, “We need to educate each customer. Is the goal long or short term? He says, “Coins are ideal for those who want to hold their investment for a number of years. Short term investors tend to choose bullion and take advantage of market jumps to take their pro ts. We sell and buy every day. Short term investors check the internet, the nancial channels and make decisions just like we do. For the past few weeks, prices on gold and silver are down so customers are buying. When prices go up, they’ll be selling.” He continues, “We work patiently with new clients. There are decisions to be made. For example, do you have safe storage? A 100ounce bar of silver is heavy. It might be smarter to choose 2-oz. of gold for the same price and put it in one’s safety deposit box. Some people choose silver eagles which have been issued since 1986. Each year there’s a new one. In 1986, they had a value of $6. Now, they are at $35. They make great gifts and show nicely in a collection.” Stephen Lucy has been a client for two to three years. He says, “I buy and sell. I talk things over with Paul a lot and we often decide what the trends are and what’s moving in what direction. The owners and Paul are all very pleasant and willing to work with a client. They are very competitive.” The owners are very proud to be the home of the “Wallits” which Sara anos explains are popular with collectors and for gift giving. He says, “These are individually designed frames with front and back views, good photo and signature reproductions, real coins and bills of the collector’s choice. It’s a handsome CoinsContinued from page 8 In 2006, silver was roughly $10 an ounce. Now it’s $50 an ounce. In 2002, gold was $300 an ounce. Now it’s $1,600.” Spano showcase to display collector items and we’re pleased to offer customized “Wall-its” to our clients.” Open Mon. to Fri. from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; By appointment at other times. Call 954-482-0705.

PAGE 29

The Pelican 29 Friday, June 8, 2012 STOP HERE STOP HERE STOP HERE

PAGE 30

30 The Pelican Friday, June 8, 2012

PAGE 31

The Pelican 31 Friday, June 8, 2012

PAGE 32

32 The Pelican Friday, June 8, 2012

PAGE 33

The Pelican 33 Friday, June 8, 2012 STOP HERE STOP HERE STOP HERE

PAGE 34

34 The Pelican Friday, June 8, 2012 color

PAGE 35

The Pelican 35 Friday, June 8, 2012

PAGE 36

36 The Pelican Friday, June 8, 2012