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Pompano Pelican
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00090900/00301
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Title: Pompano Pelican
Uniform Title: Pompano Pelican
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: Pompano Pelican
Place of Publication: Pompano Beach
Publication Date: 05-25-2012
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Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Pompano Beach
Coordinates: 26.234722 x -80.125556 ( Place of Publication )
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00090900:00301

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Friday, May 25, 2012 Vol. XX, Issue 21 Wherever you are, read The Pelican @ pompanopelican.com • Send news to siren2415@gmail.com Pompano Beach • Deer eld Beach • Lighthouse Point • Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Wilton Manors • Oakland Park • Hillsboro Beach • The Galt • Palm Aire The P e l i c a n Pelican Candidate ned $300 in failed election bidBy Judy VikPELICAN STAFFLauderdale-By-The-Sea The Florida Elections Commission has found Edmund Malkoon, unsuccessful candidate for Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Town Commission, in violation of state law for actions taken during the campaign. Mark Brown, who beat Malkoon in the Jan. 31 election, filed several complaints against his opponent with the Elections Commission. “An initial staff review determined my complaints legally sufficient, and they opened a full staff investigation,” Brown said at Tuesday’s commission meeting. After hearing Malkoon’s defense, “The commission See MALKOON on page 31 By Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach Something as simple as a well-designed business card is of major importance to this year’s Small Business Person of the Year. “A person’s business card creates an impression, and I want that impression to be the best it can be,” says Leila Moavero, this year’s honoree with the Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce. Moavero’s destiny in the printing business began in 1979 in San Francisco, but when she left the business to study pre-med at Berkeley, she soon learned that she was missing something. She returned to that printing company and discovered that “ink was in her blood,” she says. She eventually bought the business, with a partner worked as managing editor of WREN, or Western Real Estate News, the commercial industrial Real Estate “Bible” to the industry in the Western United States. That was then. Today, Moavero is the owner of Executive Printing & Mailing, 1800 NW 15 Ave. #140, in Pompano Beach. Her history with this business dates back 18 years when she Leila Moavero named Small Business Person of the Year by Pompano Beach Chamber of CommerceSee MOAVERO on page 23 Leila Moavero, owner of Executive Printing & Mailing in Pompano Beach named Small Business Person of the Year. Pain clinics down as tax fraud risesBy Judy VikPELICAN STAFFOakland Park “Public safety is the number one priority of government. But policing is a partnership. We can’t arrest ourselves out of every situation,” Broward Sheriff Al Lamberti said in opening remarks at a recent town hall meeting in Oakland Park. Lamberti introduced a panel of BSO officers from the Oakland Park District, who spoke at the meeting sponsored by the North Andrews Neighborhood Association. The sheriff said the number one problem BSO is seeing is identity theft. “The best thing you can do is to shred everything,” he said, urging residents to come to one of BSO’s monthly shredathons, where up to five boxes of documents can be shredded for free. See FRAUD on page 15 Our vanishing shoreline: It’s more about chemistry than mechanicsBy Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFHillsboro Beach Young chemist Peter Rehage sees the beach as “a carnival of movement,” where water, wind and sand create a surge toward the shore and back out to sea. It is this carnival that is eroding the shoreline at a pace never before seen. But, according to Rehage, it is not the movement that is to blame, it’s the chemistry –pollutants. Dirty sand is causing the shoreline to act unnaturally.See SHORELINE on page 20 Only a short distance from Paris, the endless rows of white crosses on the shores of Normandy are a stark reminder of the gruesome bloodletting that de ned a generation. The Pelican met up with a person whose genesis begins with World War II. See page 11. [Photo by Ernie Gutierrez] Memorial Day May 28

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2 The PelicanFriday, May 25, 2012 SightingsA community calendar of Broward County. Email events to siren2415@gmail. com By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFWilton Manors In future city elections, the withdrawal of a candidate from the race may not automatically sweep his or her opponent into of-Wilton Manors of cials to change rules regarding candidate withdrawalsfice. But before any changes will take effect, commissioners decided to give the idea more thought. On Tuesday, city commissioners tabled an ordinance that would deal with what happens if two candidates are running for same seat, and one of them withdraws from the race after the filing deadline. According to the proposed ordinance, if a candidate withdraws from the race with less than 45 days before the election and only one candidate is left; that person would be automatically elected to office. If more than 45 days remain before election day and a candidate withdraws, the city would reopen the registration for the seat for an additional five days. This year, candidates have between June 4 and June 8 to qualify for the election on Nov. 6. If no candidates sign up to run, the proposed law would allow the commission to appoint someone to serve in the position until the next election. If commissioners are unable to appoint someone, a special election would be held to fill the seat. City Attorney Kerry Ezrol said the proposed change was modeled closely after the city’s current procedures for replacing elected officials who die or resign before his or her term expires. Unanimously, commissioners decided to postpone a vote on the issue after Commissioners Scott Newton and Ted Galatis expressed doubts. Newton said he was uncomfortable with the idea of allowing someone to come into a race less than two months before election day after the other candidate had already been campaigning for six months or more. “What commitment does somebody have at that point?” asked Newton. Galatis said he was worried the change might open the door to someone orchestrating the withdrawal of a candidate and entering the race themselves. “Especially considering the salary,” joked Vice Mayor Tom Green. According to city staff, the mayor gets an annual salarySee CANDIDATES on page 19 5-25 – Wine tasting from 5 to 7 p.m. at Monk’s Wine & Liquor Cave, 3912 N. Ocean Blvd., Fort Lauderdale. Sample cheese, crackers and wine. 954-561-3423. 5-26 – Movie with Popcorn for ages 6 to 9 at the See SIGHTINGS on page 14

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The Pelican 3 Friday, May 25, 2012 By Christopher SirenMUSIC WRITERThis week, the Gold Coast Youth Orchestra tackled the Italian Baroque masters under the baton of Timothy S. Byrns. But not before they paid a grand tribute in honor of Memorial Day. A noble rendition of the Star Spangled Banner in collaboration with the Jr. R.O.T.C of Pompano Beach High School was followed by an arrangement that included signature anthems for each branch of the United States Armed Forces. Veterans in the audience rose to acknowledge Youth Orchestra wows audience with Baroque presentationtheir hymns from the Navy to the U.S. Marines. After such a refined and polished performance, the meatier portion of the program commenced. Keep in mind, this is a training orchestra of young musicians of various backgrounds. But they were masterful. The program included two Orchestral Suites performed in their entirety by the Italian Baroque composers, Archangelo Corelli and Antonio Vivaldi. This youth orchestra possessed the stamina and technical ability to perform these major works of standard orchestral literature with surprising execution. The program continued with Italian composers, including the classic opera favorite, “Intermezzo Sinfonica” from Cavaliera Rusticana by Pietro Antonio Stefano Mascagni, which served as a thoughtful post-intermission programming idea. Such memorable melodies would stay with anyone new or old to the opera world. Shifting from the Italians to Norway’s Edvard Grieg, with the Holberg Suite Opus 40, the group demonstrated its ability to change their sound and meet the demands of a more challenging piece that continued through the final “Rigaudon” movement. While it was clear that this group reflected an accomplished sense of relief at the program’s conclusion, this audience begged for more with a standing ovation. Giving in to the steady applause, the orchestra played as See ORCHESTRA on page 12Florida Youth Orchestra performersMusic Review

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4 The PelicanFriday, May 25, 2012 By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach In the heyday of the Bailey Hotel, the Farmers Market bustled with growers loading up FEC trains heading north with cars packed with beans, peppers and other winter vegetables. In those days, the hotel was an anchor in downtown Pompano. It sat next to the Farmers Bank where farmers deposited their growing fortunes. Guests then at the Bailey Hotel were business men and food brokers capitalizing on the good times. The hotel and the bank continue to stand in what is now Historic Old Downtown, but they are showing severe signs of sun, hurricane damage and Pompano Beach of cials have artistic plans for historic Bailey Hotel neglect. But not for long. Bailey’s future inhabitants will busy themselves with painting, drawing, dance and other artistic pursuits. Pompano Beach officials recently purchased the old hotel, 51 NE 1 St., for $370,000 and plan to use the 12,000 sq. ft. structure as a gathering place for art and culture, with artist studios on the second floor and gallery space and possibly a dance studio below. Built sometime between 1922 and 1924, the Bailey was one business among many, including Pompano Pharmacy, still open directly across the street, Hirshman Shoe Store, a billiard parlor and Downie’s Jewelers. And like the rest of Pompano, east of Dixie Highway, in the era of segregation, the hotel was for white’s only. “They didn’t have integrated hotels back then,” said Dan Hobby, executive director of the Pompano Beach Historical Society. “There are so many possibilities,” said Sharon McCormick, director of marketing for Redevelopment Management Associates, which manages the Community Redevelopment Agency. McCormick said the concept was inspired by the Bakehouse Art Complex in Miami, a non-profit organization dedicated to attracting artists to South Florida by providing galleries, professional development opportunities and affordable studio space. Susan Kores, program director for the city’s Business Resource Center, said the hotel could also include an arts supply store or other complimentary uses. “This is really just the beginning,” she said.See BAILEY on page 30 Tuesday, May 29 thru Friday, June 1

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The Pelican 5 Friday, May 25, 2012 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeerfield Beach Sand volleyball athlete Ranse Jones Jr. died in 2010 from the complications of a brain aneurysm. He was 34-years-old and a popular member of the American Volleyball Professionals circuit. In November of that year, a major tournament held in Deerfield Beach was named in his honor that raised $30,000 to help offset his medical expenses. This November 8 through 10, the Ranse Jones Classic returns to this beach. The money raised will go to the Ranse Jones Stroke Awareness Fund that will be administered by Broward Health Ranse Jones Fund and Broward North team up to ght the effects of strokesNorth. The partnership was announced Wednesday at the medical center’s annual stroke seminar. Money in the fund will be used to educate the public about strokes. Instrumental in getting the two entities together was local businessman John Esposito, who has long been a supporter of beach volleyball in this city and Broward Health Marketing Manager Lyn Clark. Speaking this week at at the seminar was Ranse’s dad, Bob Jones, of St. Augustine, who showed a tribute video of his son in action. Ranse’s motto was “Live Simple. Play Hard.” Said Broward North Community Relations Specialist Victoria Israels, “This partnership will provide an ongoing legacy to Ranse.” North Broward Health is a comprehensive stroke center lead by interventional neurologist Dr. Ridwon Lin who is licensed to go above and beyond the usual treatment for stroke victims. Two procedures are done there one that coils the aneurysm, the other that vacuums the bleed both produce amazing results, Israels said. Other speakers Wednesday were Dr. Jonathon Harris and Dr. Thomas Hammand. Stroke is the third leading cause of death in this country and the lead cause of long term patient disability. However, with education, it is 80 percent preventable, Israels said.Bob Jones, father of Ranse Jones Jr., chats with John Esposito of Deer eld Beach after announcement of Ranse Jones Stroke Awareness Fund. [Staff photos by Judy Vik]

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6 The PelicanFriday, May 25, 2012 Deer eld Beach, Pompano Beach, Lighthouse Point, LauderdaleBy-The-Sea, Wilton Manors and Oakland ParkWilton Manors • Oakland Park • Hillsboro Beach The Pompano Pelican is published weekly on FridaysStreet Address: 1500-A E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, FL 33060 Telephone: 954-783-8700 • Fax: 954-783-0093Letters to the Editor are encouraged and accepted for print if signed, although a writer’s name will be withheld on request; letters must also include a daytime telephone number. Advertising rates are available upon request. Subscription rate is $31.80 including tax for one year’s delivery in Greater Pompano Beach; $95.40/per year including tax for others in the United States; call 954-783-8700 for rates abroad. The Pelican is a nonpartisan newspaper and reserves the right to decline advertising. Copyright 2012. Reproduction of this publication in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission of the publisher. The Pelican is a member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, Deer eld Beach Chamber and the LBTS Chamber. The Pelican is a state certi ed woman-owned minority business. The Pelican is delivered to businesses, libraries, schools, of ces, hospitals, news racks and single family homes. All advertising and copy is published at the sole discretion of the publisher. We welcome your critiques and ideas concerning this publication. Anne Siren, publisherExecutive Assistant: Mary Hudson Graphics: Rachel Ramirez Windsheimer Bookkeeper: John White Classi eds: Fran Shelby Contributing Writers: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Judy Wilson, Malcolm McClintock, Judy Vik, Michael d’Oliveira Account Executives: Paul Shroads, Carolyn Mann, Bill Heaton, Bill Fox Special Of ce Assistant: Cathy Siren ESTABLISHED 1993 • Volume XX, Issue 21 Founding Editor and PublisherAnne Hanby Siren Letters & Opinions The Pelican wants to know what you think. Send your thoughts on local, state and national issues to siren2415@gmail.com Setting the record straightOn May 18, 2012, The Pelican published an article entitled “In the Wake of Fire ghter’s Death, Panel Suggests Safety Measures.” This article was about the Pompano Beach Fire Rescue review of the death of Fire ghter Bill Elliott, which occurred during a training exercise on January 6, 2012. Unfortunately, the statements that were made in the article concerning the ndings of the investigative panel were misleading. The conclusion to the report was simply left out. As a result, this article has caused unwanted grief for the family, friends and fellow re ghters and could be misleading to the public. It should be noted that no one from the Fire Department investigative panel was contacted for comment about the report. As a member of the investigative panel, I would like to set the record straight. The Pompano Pelican article stated “(the investigation) reports that a roof hook was not secured with the proper mounts and that the department had no guidelines on how to climb the ladder and no requirement for protective equipment.” This statement is very misleading and must be clari ed. The fact is that the manufacturer, as well as the Fire Department, provided a comprehensive training program on the full operation of the new ladder truck prior to the truck being placed into service. This training program included instruction on how to climb the ladder and what protective equipment should be worn. These procedures are a standard in the re service and can be found in the manufacturer’s literature, as well as industry textbooks on aerial ladder operations. In fact, during the ladder climb, each member wore a NFPA Class I harness (ladder belt). The panel was simply recommending that the Fire Department formalize the training that was delivered into a written guideline, such as a Department standard operating procedure. In addition, the statement concerning the roof hook not being secured with the proper mounts is also misleading. It was clear in the investigation that Fire ghter Elliott did not grab the roof hook, but rather unintentionally dislodged the hook with his body during the initial fall. As such, the roof hook was not a factor in the accident. In addition to clarifying the statements made in the article, the conclusion reached by the investigative panel should have been presented. The panel determined that the comprehensive training provided by the manufacturer as well as the Department’s Fire Training Division prior to placing the apparatus in service was more than adequate; therefore training was not considered a contributory factor in this accident. The training conducted on January 6, 2012 was not unlike training that occurs everyday in the re service across the country re ghters working to improve their pro ciency. The Fire Department personnel that participated in this training followed proper procedure for aerial operations. This type of accident could not have been predicted. While there are no published reports of accidents similar to this one occurring in the past, there are lessons learned from the results of the investigation that may help prevent similar occurrences in the future. Division Chief Michael Hohl, Pompano Beach Fire Rescue Deerfield Beach – History at High Noon lecturer Juan Riera returns to Deerfield Beach to share stories of Florida’s railroads at the annual Historical Society dinner and auction Saturday, June 2 at the Deerfield Train Station Museum. Riera, a historian from Miami, is well known for his lectures on pirate wrecks and sunken treasure in South Florida. He lectures at Nova Southeastern University’s Lifelong Learning classes and has taught at FSU and Texas Tech. He also leads history tours in Florida and around the world. For this lecture, Riera will speak about the influence of Florida’s railroad men, Henry Plant and Henry Flagler in the 20th century and how their legacies continue to this day. “Everyone forgets how they influence our lives now every day,” Riera said this week. Riera will also distribute free tickets to the Gold Coast Railroad Museum during his visit here. The local railroad museum has been reopened after a major refurbishment and this dinner will be its debut. Admission to the dinner/auction is $30 and RSVPs by May 25 would be appreciated. Dress is casual. The Railroad Museum is at 1300 W. Hillsboro Boulevard at the Tri-Rail Station.Historical Society dinner at Railroad Museum focuses on the lasting in uence of Flagler Pompano Beach On Monday, May 28, a small crowd will gather on Southeast 23 Avenue and East Atlantic Boulevard to wave on this city’s annual Memorial Day parade. There won’t be any Democrats, Republicans, men or women at this parade; they will all be people who have the character and the discipline to say thank you. Some of us will be black. Some of us will be illegal. Some of us will be white, and some of us will not speak English. But when we gather in that hot sun at 11 a.m., we will soon get thirsty, sweaty and hot. When that happens, especially the thirsty part, we will have a small inkling of what it could be like to be a wounded soldier, nearing death and staring up at a blazing sun. Whether we are Christians, Jews, Buddhists, Muslims, Atheists or Tree worshippers, we’ll still be hot. We’ll feel our tongues swell just a bit, warning us of dehydration possibilities. About that time we will be able to reach into that ice chest and pull out some chilly water. But not those soldiers who happen to be black, white, Jews, illegal . you get it. Right? Of course, you get it. On May 28, Memorial Day, we are just people who are living in this country—“living” is the operative word. On this day, we stand wherever we are to say thank you to that whatever or whomever we believe in, and give thanks for those men and women who have died in military service. It doesn’t mean that we supported the war that killed him or her; it just means those people really deserve something from us, the living. Memorial Day is a holiday. Even the word “holiday” has a history of sacredness. It is derived from the Old English, h ligdg which is translated into Holy Day. So wherever you end up on this h ligdg, we hope you take the time to say thanks. And if you don’t have any plans, check out Sightings in this paper for Memorial Day events in your city. We’ll be standing with you— hot, sweaty and thirsty. Even if it’s holy hot on Memorial Day, we hope you show upBy Anne SirenPUBLISHER Memorial Day May 28

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The Pelican 7 Friday, May 25, 2012 Camp offers young sleuths a hands-on experienceLighthouse Point – Summer camp for kids in Lighthouse Point will be an interactive experience where youngsters investigate a crime scene, learn to process evidence and get to conduct a mock investigation. CSI: Summer Camp will introduce children in rst through fth grades to biology, chemistry and physics as they study spatters, decomposition rates, contamination, ber analysis and other crime evidence. The camp location is at St. Paul the Apostle Catholic Church, 2700 NE 36 St., beginning Monday, June 11 through Friday, June 15, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Cost is $195 and includes snack but not lunch. Registration is being taken at the Doreen Gauthier Library by Rosemary Wilson, 954-946-6398. The camp is sponsored by the Kids Wealth Institute and the LHP Library. Nan Rich, keynote speaker at Democratic Women’s Mad Hatters Tea Party Maggie Davidson and Senator Nan Rich. Jerry Ann Capotosto and Eileen Pangione. Mad Hat winners Wanda Francis, Jennifer Fletcher and Linda Eidinger. [Photos courtesy of the Democratic Women’s Club]Tell The Pelican about your special event. 954-783-8700

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8 The PelicanFriday, May 25, 2012 Business matters The Pelican takes a look at local business owners. Call The Pelican to nd out how you can tell your story here because business matters. 954-783-8700. Briefs By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFF“We’re the company that didn’t need to take bail-out money because our cars were selling well, even in a bad economy, without tax payers’ money.” says Brian Jewell who has been in the sales division of this dealership for the past four years. This Pompano Ford and Lincoln business, 2741 N. Federal Hwy. has been in this Pompano Beach location since 1974. Owned by Holman Automotive in South New Jersey, it has been connected with the Ford Motor Co. since 1924. As far as Jewell is concerned, the showroom is lled with Ford and Lincoln vehicles that will go up against and often surpass any new car on the road. He says, “People who haven’t driven Fords lately are coming by often these days. They are hearing good reports from friends who own Fords. Many want to buy from an American company. The buzz is good because people want a quality reliable vehicle that performs and that’s us.” Then he gave The Pelican a run down on 2012 Ford models available in the showroom. “The Fiesta is an ideal choice for rst-time buyers, students and those who drive a lot of miles every week. It’s our economy car that gets 28 miles per gallon in town and about 38 on the highway. Sales of the Fiesta rise with the price of gas. The Fiesta is priced Brian Jewell is proud of the products offered at Pompano Ford and Lincoln DealershipPompano Ford Salesman Brian Jewell introduces visitors to all of the 2012 showroom cars on display and is quick to explain the advantages of each. He’s proud to remind them that Ford made it through a bad economy without bailout money because Ford products have always been reliable and desirable. [Photo by Phyllis J. Neuberger]from mid-teens to low 20s.” “The completely redesigned Focus looks great and gets the same good mileage as the Fiesta, and it offers more room and upgrades. The Focus is priced from high teens to mid 20s.” “The Fusion is available as a regular vehicle and as a hybrid which means 41 miles per gallon around town. The hybrid runs on battery rst, and as the speed picks up at 45 miles per hour, gas takes over. This is our CRA to meet May 29Deer eld Beach – There will be a CRA, Community Redevelopment Agency, meeting Tuesday, May 29 at 6:30 p.m. at City Hall, 150 NE 2nd Avenue, in the Commission Chambers. The meeting was rescheduled from May 8. For more information, visit www.Deer eldBeach.com.See FORD on page 17Memorial Day in Oakland ParkOakland Park – A Memorial Day Remembrance ceremony is set for 11 a.m. on Monday, May 28, at the agpole at Jaco Pastorius Park, 4000 N. Dixie Hwy. Representatives of American Legion Post #222 will take part. Call 954-565-6501 for more information.Gourmet on WheelsOakland Park – Oakland Park Main Street, in partnership with Big Dog Station, presents Gourmet on Wheels from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday, June 2, at 3148 NE 12 Ave. Food trucks and vendors will be in downtown Oakland Park for an evening of food and live music. For more information, call 754-214-0041 or 954-561-4304.

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The Pelican 9 Friday, May 25, 2012 Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFHillsboro Beach This small town stands to lose $20,000 in outstanding water bills, and according to accountant firm Severn Trent, there has never been a mechanism in place to shut off the water of customers who don’t pay their water bills each month. Hillsboro lacks mechanism to turn off unpaid water accountsSaid a town hall spokesperson, ”We never really had anyone who didn’t pay.” Developer John Kennelly and his son may be two property owners reluctant to pay the bill. Between them they own five properties, four of them vacant parcels where the last payment received for those addresses was in September of 2010. Four of the properties showed a balance owed as of March of this year. City Clerk June Marie Mark said the meters were pulled on the Kennelly properties last year. Mark said she did not know the names or addresses that Ken Cassel, a Severn Trent representative, referenced at the last town meeting. Cassel urged a resolution be put in place to allow the town to turn off water for non-payment. Mark said no resolution has yet been presented for the town’s next commission meeting Tuesday, June 5 but Mayor Dan Dodge said he is confident the commission will address the matter and take appropriate measures. Dodge also said not many property owners are delinquent. Memorial Day May 28

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10 The PelicanFriday, May 25, 2012 Making a DifferencePhyllis J. Neuberger wants your suggestions about people who are making a difference. Call 954-7838700. By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFDeerfield Beach Carolyn Morris is the executive director of the Deerfield Beach Historical Society, or DBHS, located in the Butler House at 380 E. Hillsboro Blvd. in Deerfield Beach. She began her job 5 years ago, not long after moving to the area with husband, Jack, and their two young adult sons. “I really knew nothing about Deerfield Beach, nor about the Butler House,” she admits, adding, “and now I’m immersed in the house and the history of this fascinating town.” Between budget cuts and the economy, this formerly salaried lady says she is now a volunteer. “Now, I’m doing the job for love. Of course, I hope things will pick up and that local businesses and residents will once again support this important Butler House and its contents. After all, our society and the house are very valuable historical resources with artifacts and data accessible to the public, school children and future historians.” The Pelican learned a lot about Deerfield Beach on this visit. In 1898, the city with 20 settlers, got its first post office. Most of the settlers were farmers who thought the beach was worthless because nothing would Visit Deer eld Historical Society, Butler House, with Carolyn Morris for a nostalgic trip back in time Furnishings at the Butler House, still intact, were used by Alice Butler in her home which was furnished in 1923. Above Carolyn Morris is seated in the parlor. Other rooms showcase the china cabinet [top] and the dining room that offered a view of the gardens. [Photos by Phyllis Neuberger]See BUTLER on page 22Gourmet food trucks keep on serving it up Lighthouse Point – The city’s Cultural Arts Committee and Lighthouse Point Chamber of Commerce will host the rst Food Truck event and Expo, on Sunday, May 27 between 5 and 9 p.m. at Frank Mc Donough Park, 3500 NE 27 Ave. The event is for guests of all ages. “This will be a great event over Memorial Day weekend, and the chamber is glad to partner with the new Cultural Committee to put this together,” said Lucille Pignataro, outgoing Lighthouse Point Chamber president The Lighthouse Point Cultural Arts Committee was formed last year by current Commissioner Becky Lysengen to help generate a variety of cultural events in the city. “Guests are welcome to enjoy food from South Florida’s renowned food trucks, dance to music by Lighthouse Point’s very own Joe Balistreri, and play fun games” said Lysengen. Creative balloons, face-painting and magic fun will be provided by Strawberry the Clown. Visit www.lhpchamber.com Open Mic NightOn June 8, the microphone is open for local talent of all ages. The event takes place from 7 to 11 p.m. at Daily Grind Coffee House and Cafe, 3650 N. Federal Hwy., Lighthouse Point. Call 954-657-8355. Memorial Day May 28

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The Pelican 11 Friday, May 25, 2012 By Malcolm McClintockPELICAN STAFF(May 18th 2012 at Galuppi’s Restaurant in Pompano Beach, this interview was translated from French) “To this day, I do not know who my father was,” says a wistful Alain Blatier, a resident of Normandy who was recently in Pompano Beach for his annual pilgrimage to America. “My mother is 92 years old and still refuses to tell me the truth. I know something terrible must have happened for her to keep this secret locked up inside her for so long . .”Forgotten victims – the wretched whispers of war still echo loudly in the hearts of the children who were cheated by war of childhoodBorn in Nazi-occupied France in 1941, at the height of the great con agration, Blatier’s mother abandoned him. He spent several years being shuf ed from one safe house to another, one makeshift orphanage to another, one stranger’s arms to another… Finally, long after the guns had gone silent and the res of lunacy has been extinguished did Blatier’s mother come looking for him. “She later told me that she tried to pretend I had never existed,” says the Frenchman. “but eventually, she decided to track me down.” “I was then sent away to a boarding school near Paris until I was an adult,” he. says Blatier is the epitome of the forgotten European generation who struggled to de ne normalcy in the post WWII era. Eventually, Blatier enjoyed a successful career as a journalist. He travelled the world writing and reporting for his French employers. From the deepest recesses of See War on page 18 Visiting from Normandy and wearing his Omaha Beach Golf Club shirt, Alain Blatier enjoys a quick bite at the Pompano Beach Municipal Golf Course. [Photo by Malcolm McClintock]

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12 The PelicanFriday, May 25, 2012 Advertise with The Pelican 954-783-8700 an encore “ A Field of Gold” by Sting. This may have been added to the orchestra’s repertoire in an effort to reach the not -so-regular chamber orchestra ticket buyer. It turned out to be a very well written arrangement of what is now perhaps considered a popular standard. This chamber orchestra is a gem for all the residents of Pompano Beach and the surrounding areas; we are fortunate to have such talent in our own backyard. I for one look forward to seeing and hearing more of them in the future. The Gold Coast Youth Orchestra is a non-profit organization offering young musicians from middle through undergraduate school an opportunity to study and perform standard chamber orchestral literature. These young musicians attend schools from all over Broward County. For more information about the Gold Coast Youth Orchestra, visit www.gycofl.org or Facebook.Christopher Siren received his BA in music at Southeastern Louisiana University. He is a teacher and performer. His studio is located in Pom pano Beach. He can be reached at 954-9463197.OrchestraContinued from page 3Local grads can walk away with diplomas, LPN and ahead of the game in college Chamber honors Broward teachersBy Judy VikPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach The focus should be on the whole child and not just the FCAT, Broward County School Board Member Robin Bartleman said at a Teacher Appreciation Luncheon last Robin Peters, pre-school principal at Highlands Christian School, with Ginger Alvarez, teacher of the year. [Staff photos by Judy Vik] Roberta Greenberg, teacher of the year at Bright Horizons, with Carol Levin, assistant principal.See TEACHERS on page 13

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The Pelican 13 Friday, May 25, 2012 week. Bartleman was the keynote speaker at a luncheon, sponsored by the Pompano Beach Chamber, at John Knox Village. She said 56 percent of Broward teachers have master’s or doctorate degrees. And Broward has the highest number of board-certi ed teachers in the state. The district has received an A grade from the state. Bartleman said the district has plans for numerous reforms, including the conversion of a bus lot on Stirling Road into an automotive service school with training for bus and truck drivers. A military academy is planned at Hollywood Hills High School. Currently, students enrolled in College Academy can attend high school and Broward College simultaneously and wind up with a high school diploma and an AS degree. At Ely High School, students enrolled in the licensed practical nursing program can earn both diplomas and become LPNs. Bartleman urged the audience to become involved as partners with the schools and suggested everyone get involved with neighborhood schools as volunteers. Bartleman said, “We give every child a chance to succeed. This is the most important job we have, to educate our youth. We need your expertise,” she said. 2012 Teachers of the Year were recognized. They are: Djuna Robinson, Blanche Ely High School; Roberta Greenberg, Bright Horizons; Lisa Dima, Cresthaven Elementary; Marissa Singer-Orr, Charles Drew Elementary; Dana Thomson, Cross Creek School; Johnnie Sloan, Crystal Lake Middle School; Kathleen Rains, Cypress Elementary; Samuel Smith II, Cypress Run Education Center; Also: Sabrina ColstonLeslie, Dave Thomas Education Center; Sarah Hotaling, Deer eld Beach Elementary; Dawn Boothe, Deer eld Beach High School; Catherine Sanghera, Deer eld Beach Middle School; Simone Kent, Deer eld Park Elementary; Giner Alvarez, Highlands Christian Academy; Lisa Webel, Lighthouse Christian School; Zan Davis, Robert Markham Elementary; And: Heather Martin, McNab Elementary; Karen Deleuze, Norcrest Elementary; Junoisier Allen, Palmview Elementary; Mary Mannarino, Park Ridge Elementary; Rhonda Leon, Pompano Beach Elementary; Candace Gregg, Pompano Beach Middle School; Carol Margaret Mackey, Pompano Beach High School; Althean Clarke-Smith, Sanders Park Elementary; and Amy Stender, Tedder Elementary. Rosa Carranza, president of the Parent-Teacher Association at Cresthaven Elementary School, attended the Teacher Appreciation Luncheon with Lisa Dima, Cresthaven Teacher of the Year, and Joshua Kisten, principal.TeachersContinued from page 12

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14 The PelicanFriday, May 25, 2012 Miami In April, the median sales price of singlefamily homes in Broward County was $205,000, up 17 percent compared to April 2011 and 14 percent compared to the previous month, according to the 25,000-member MIAMI Association of REALTORS and the local Multiple Listing Service, or MLS,systems. The median sales price for condominiums increased 17.4 percent to $84,300 compared to a year prior and 14.3 percent compared to the previous month. Broward County condominium prices have increased 15 out of the last 16 months. The median sales prices for non-distressed properties sold in April in Broward were $264,000 for singlefamily homes and $99,750 for condominiums. The average sales price for total single-family homes increased 12 percent, from $256,979 to $287,302. The average sales prices for condominiums rose 10 percent, from $120,689 in April 2011 to $137,173 last month. The average sales prices for non-distressed properties sold in April in Broward were $374,670 for single-family homes and $166,854 for condominiums. “Home prices in Broward County are experiencing double-digit appreciation much sooner than expected, which is a very positive sign,” said Rick Burch, 2012 president of the Broward County Board of Governors of the MIAMI Association of REALTORS. “Homes sales also remain at historically strong levels, which re ects the demand that is driving home prices in our area.” Statewide median sales prices in April increased 10.2 percent to $144,350 for condominiums and 16.1 percent to $108,000 for single-family homes, according to data from Florida Realtors Industry Data and Broward County Home Prices Continue to RiseAnalysis department and vendor partner 10K Research and Marketing. The national median existing-home price for all housing types was $177,400 in April, a 10.1 percent increase from April 2011.Broward Housing Inventory Declines 33 PercentThe inventory of residential listings in Broward County over the last year has decreased 30 percent from 15,781 to 11,086. Compared to the previous month, the total inventory of homes dropped four percent. Total housing inventory nationally See HOUSING on page 16Northwest Branch Library, 580 NW 3 Ave., Pompano Beach, from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. 954-786-2186. 5-26 – Famous Asian American Professionals presentation from noon to 1 p.m. at the Northwest Branch Library, 580 NW 3 Ave., Pompano Beach, from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. 954-786-2186. 5-28 – American Legion Memorial Day in Deer eld Beach : 9:15 a.m., Pineview Cemetery, 400 SW 4 St.; 9:45 a.m., Memorial Cemetery, 380 NE 6 Ave.; 10:30 a.m., International Fishing Pier, 200 NE 21 Ave. The observation at the pier will include a prayer service and a 21 gun salute. 5-28 – Patriotic Family Day in Pompano Beach: 9 a.m., Westview Cemetery, 2100 W. Copans Rd.; 11 a.m., Pompano Beach Cemetery, 400 SE 23 Ave. An open house at Pompano Beach American Legion Post 142, 171 SW 2 St., will be held after the ceremonies and feature performances by “New Young Patriots” and “Heavenly Hands.” 6-1, 6-2 – Used book sale from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Oakland Park Library, 1298 NE 37 St., organized by the Oakland Park Friends of the Library. On June 2 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. 954-630-4370. See SIGHTINGS on page 16SightingsContinued from page 2

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The Pelican 15 Friday, May 25, 2012 Home alertsOne of the biggest crime problems in the city of Oakland Park is residential burglaries. This year BSO has arrested 26 people for breaking into homes, Lt. Al Hubrig, executive officer for the Oakland Park District said. “And 80 percent of the arrests were made because someone in the community called us,” Hubrig added. “The bad guys don’t do one crime. They do many crimes. And they go where the crime is easiest. We need to make it so they go elsewhere,” he said. “You know your neighbors. If something looks suspicious to you, it’s suspicious to us.” If you’re unsure, Hubrig advised giving police a call and making note of a car’s license number and a description of the suspicious person and his or her clothing. Lt. Linda Canada Stuck reminded residents to lock their vehicles and remove anything of value inside that would attract burglars.Illegal pain clinics bustedPain clinics were once a huge problem in the city. After hundreds of arrests, cities, including Oakland Park, passed stricter laws making it more difficult to open clinics that dispense pain medication. Today only three local pain clinics remain, Debbie Wallace, code investigator, said.Clinics in Broward are downIn 2007, there were four pain clinics in Broward County. Two years later there were 130, Lamberti said. Today there are 57. “Oakland Park was ground zero. We don’t know why unless it was the location near I-95,” he said. Curbing the clinics took legislative changes from Tallahassee and the city commission along with police going undercover to make arrests, he said.Tax return crimes in the spotlightIn the last two years, police have seen an increase in the numbers of false tax returns filed, Sgt. Richard LaCerra said. As a result, BSO put together an operation identifying several tax businesses operating without proper licenses. Hubrig explained how this crime works. People walk into tax business offices prepared to file returns. A person may be expecting a $1,500 rebate, but the “unscrupulous” business owner can find ways to increase the return to $5,000 since returns are not audited prior to sending the tax rebate checks. The business owner charges $2,000 for filing, and the client goes home with twice the money he thought he was getting But in the end, after the audit, the IRS can charge the taxpayer with filing a false return. Hubrig adds that by the time the IRS acts, the tax business that filed the return will be long gone. One business, opened for only two weeks, had received $1 million in tax returns. Besides being charged with falsifying tax returns, these victims who had written their social security numbers on the forms are vulnerable for identification theft. “If you give someone your SS number,” Hubrig said, “be sure you get some identification from that person.”Brushing up on preventionThe Sheriff’s office also offers crime prevention programs. Members of a neighborhood response team, led by Deputy Ira Rubinstein, will come to Oakland Park homes and advise residents on how to secure their properties to deter crime. They also offer drowning prevention programs where they teach children how to get to the side of a swimming pool. Thirty-two residents currently volunteer in the local Citizen Observer Patrol program. They patrol neighborhoods and assist with DUI checkpoints and help at the courthouse information desk. Call 954202-3131.FraudContinued from page 1 Broward Sheriff Al Lamberti meets with Oakland Park resident Rocky Fodero following a Town Hall meeting at North Andrews Community Center. [Staff photo by Judy Vik] Memorial Day May 28

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16 The PelicanFriday, May 25, 2012Advertise 954-783-8700! rose 9.5 percent at the end of April but was 20.6 percent below a year ago. “The remarkable recovery of the Broward housing market bene ts our community at large, as real estate is an integral part of the economy,” said Ernesto Vega, president-elect of the Broward County Board of Governors of the MIAMI Association of REALTORS. “Unlike other markets throughout the U.S., demand for housing in Broward County should remain strong long into the future due to both U.S. and international buyers who are increasingly attracted to the local area.” In Broward County, single-family home sales increased 6.0 percent, from 1,124 in April 2011 to 1,190 last month. Condominium sales dropped 4.4 percent in April compared to a year earlier, from 1,645 to 1,572. Statewide sales of existing single-family homes totaled 17,544 in April 2012, down 0.7 percent compared to a year ago. Statewide condominium sales totaled 9,765, down 4.9 percent from those sold in April 2011. Nationally, sales of existing single-family homes, townhomes, condominiums, and co-ops increased 3.4 percent from March and were 10 percent higher than they were in April 2011, according to the National Association of Realtors (NAR).Distressed PropertiesIn April, 38 percent of all closed residential sales in Broward County were distressed, including REOs, or Bank-Owned Properties, and short sales, compared to 50 percent in April 2011 and 41 percent the previous month.International Buyers Fuel Cash SalesIn April, cash sales accounted for 64 percent of all residential sales, 40 percent of single-family and 83 percent of condominium closings, in Broward County. Nearly 90 percent of international buyers in South Florida purchase properties all cash. Nationally, all-cash sales fell to 29 percent in April from 32 percent in March and 21 percent in April 2011 re ecting the stronger presence of international buyers in the South Florida real estate market. Note: Statistics in this HousingContinued from page 15 news release may vary depending on reporting dates. Statistics reported by MIAMI are not impacted by NAR’s rebenchmarking efforts. MIAMI reports exact statistics directly from its MLS system. About the MIAMI Association of REALTORS The MIAMI Association of REALTORS was chartered by the National Association of Realtors in 1920 and is celebrating its 90th year of service to Realtors, the buying and selling public, and the communities in South Florida. Comprised of four organizations, the Residential Association, the Realtors Commercial Alliance, the Broward County Board of Governors, and the International Council, it represents more than 25,000 real estate professionals in all aspects of real estate sales, marketing, and brokerage. It is the largest local association in the National Association of Realtors, and has partnerships with more than 100 international organizations worldwide. MIAMI’s of cial website is www.miamire.com.SightingsContinued from page 146-1 – Friday Evening Social at Sol Children Theatre, 3333 N. Federal Highway, Boca Raton, from 6 to 8 p.m. Meet the actors, dancers, directors and teachers. 561-447-8829 6-2 & 3 – Intergalactic Bead Show & Sale from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center; 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach. Visit www.beadshows.com or call 888-729-6904. 6-2 – Gourmet on Wheels from 5 to 9 p.m. on Northeast 12 Avenue, Oakland Park. 754-214-0041. 6-3 – Rumplestiltskin auditions from 1 to 3 p.m. at Sol Children Theatre, 3333 N. Federal Highway, Boca Raton. Auditions also on June 5 from 6 to 8 p.m. By appointment only. 561-4478829. 6-4 – Preschool Storytime, ages two to ve, from 10:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the Wilton Manors Library, 500 NE 26 St. 954-390-2195. See SIGHTINGS on page 18

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The Pelican 17 Friday, May 25, 2012 “ premier seller from the low 20s to low 30s.” Jim Heidisch just bought a 2012 Fusion that is not a hybrid. He says, “Jim Brown from their service department recommended me to Brian Jewell, and I would do the same. Brian was so helpful. It’s a great car, and I’m very pleased with the mileage.” Jewell paused here to talk about “loaded features.” “Loaded means luxury and optional upgrades of which there are many. Many clients are willing to wait the eight to 12 weeks it takes to have us order the exact car they want, in the color they want, with the exact options they choose. And that’s what they get direct from the factory. “The Taurus is still the agship, full size sedan which continues to be in demand by space lovers who feel more comfortable and safer in a big car. “The Crossovers are vehicles that ride like cars but have the space of an SUV. Ford offers three ne crossovers: the Escape, the Edge and the Explorer which are currently the hottest sellers because of look and function. They sit up higher for a better view of the road and are great for a family with sporting gear.” “The Expedition is great for those who need even more room than the Crossover buyer.” Jewell names the F150 as the dealership’s mainstay because it can be a work truck or a family vehicle. In June the redesigned 2013 version of the Ford Escape will be in the showroom. The 2013 Fusion will be arriving in early fall. Jewell says “We’re already writing orders for both.Luxurious LincolnsThe ve luxury Lincolns available run the gamut from mid to full size. Each model has its own selling points and advantages. All models boast heated and air conditioned front seats, back up censors, four-year, or 50,000 miles, bumper to bumper warranty and no charge maintenance for the same period. “We hear from customers that our technology is ahead of the rest,” Jewell says, adding, “The sync enables drivers to answer the phone and use voice activated music players hands free.” Although this agency no longer carries the Mercury line, Ken Ringwood has nothing but praise for Brian Jewell, saying “I wanted a used, 2008 Mercury Sable Premier in mint condition with low mileage. I searched the Internet for six months, but Brian is the one who found me a perfect car. He was outstanding. He got me the lowest and the best price in the country.” Asked what he drives, Jewell replies, “I drive a Ford Edge. This crossover is perfect for my family which includes two daughters. I even can throw in a bike if I need to do so.” Open Mon. to Fri. 8:30 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Sat. 9 to 6; Sun. 12 to 5. Call 954-7828110 or Jewell on 954-7757017. People who haven’t driven Fords lately are coming by often these days. They are hearing good reports from Ford owners. Many want to buy American. The buzz is good. People want a quality reliable vehicle that performs and that’s us.” FordContinued from page 8

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18 The Pelican Friday, May 25, 2012 Africa to bustling MiddleEastern bazaars to the most exotic enclaves of Asia, this solitary man had overcome extraordinary odds to become a seemingly well-adjusted and productive human being. During a short-lived mariage, Blatier produced a lovely daughter who has now given birth to a grandson. Miraculously, the wheel of life never ceases to turn despite the abominations of Man. Blatier is now a member of the Omaha Beach Golf Course, where he plays the game next to the once bloodsoaked cliffs of Northern France. “There are so many white crosses nearby… We will never forget the sacri ces the Americans and others made for the cause of freedom, ” he said. “My mother once let slip that my biological father was a very important man.” says 71-year-old Blatier. “But I do not know for which side he fought. Who knows? Maybe I am half German…” The atrocities of war are a product of all combatants. The scars do not discriminate between who is wrong and who is right, who is guilty and who is innocent. WarContinued from page 11A quaint port near Trouville (Northern France) still conceals many secrets from an abhorrent chapter in human history. [Photo by Ernie Gutierrez] Memorial Day May 28 6-7 –Wilton Manors Mayor’s Business Roundtable Breakfast meets June 7 from 8:30 to 10 a.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive. SightingsContinued from page 16 See SIGHTINGS on page 25

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The Pelican 19 Friday, May 25, 2012 CandidatesContinued from page 2of $8,400 a year plus benefits and commissioners make $7,200 per year plus benefits. In September, commissioners denied themselves a two percent cost of living adjustment. Ezrol advised commissioners that they can vote to allow a remaining candidate to be automatically elected, if his or his opponent exits the campaign, but they have to come up with some kind of mechanism that would deal with the situation if it ever occurred.New parking lots to be pavedCommissioners also approved work paving the city’s newly purchased parking lots along Northeast 8 Terrace, between Northeast 26 Street and Wilton Drive. Parking has been a leading issue for the city for years with residents, visitors and business owners regularly complaining that there isn’t enough parking available along Wilton Drive. Recently, city commissioners approved the purchase of two properties for a total of about $400,000 and entered into an agreement with Kids In Distress to use that property for parking; all three properties are adjacent to each other and will be paved as one single lot To fund the purchases, the city has borrowed $1.1 million specifically for parking improvements. Chen & Associates, an engineering firm that has done work for the city in the past, has been hired to complete the project and estimates the cost will be about $29,000 and would take up to three months to complete. The estimated number of parking spaces created would be between 38 and 45. At a previous meeting, Commissioner Scott Newton expressed an interest in seeing the city eventually tear down the Acapulco Lindo Restaurant, located on Wilton Drive south of the city lots, to build a parking structure. “The whole thing, I think, would be a home run,” said Newton.

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20 The Pelican Friday, May 25, 2012 ShorelineContinued from page 1That’s an overly simplistic explanation of the woes residents living on the north one-mile of Hillsboro Beach have been experiencing for years. The town’s erosion “hotspot” has been renourished multiple times with the same result: continuing erosion. A recent study by coastal engineers of Coastal Systems International concluded that this hotspot could not be controlled by any physical means, i.e. groins or breakwaters both above and underneath the water. Adding sand to the beach at regular intervals is the only solution, CSI said. Not so, replies Rehage. The 27-year-old molecular biologist from the University of Puget Sound got his degree in 2008 and went to work promoting a product which he claims reverses erosion by cleansing the sand and establishing an ecosystem that generates flora and fauna – the organisms that keep beaches running as they should. Rehage, vice president of a company called GreenBeach, was in Hillsboro Beach Saturday along with the firm’s strategist David Stidham to take a look at the beach and discuss its problems with Commissioner Claire Schubert, the town’s beach commissioner. They had been alerted by a Pelican story about CSI’s grim north beach report. Rehage and Stidham had come from Miami where they had met with State Sen. Gwen Margolis and others interested in preserving coastlines. They have been in touch with state officials and the University of Florida’s Dr. Robert Dean, an expert on sea level change. They are at the beginning of their mission to educate public officials on the pollutants that affect the coastlines and how to resolve the situation. Their product, a blend of plant proteins, has no carbon footprint they say, is easy to put on a beach, and has shown some amazing results. The protein cleans the sand, withdraws salt from the water and encourages the growth of sea oats which provide a natural scaffold for sand and a habitat for sea life. The product is placed into a trench dug at the back of the beach at the dune line where it does its magic – cleansing the sand, deleting the salt from the water and encouraging plant growth. Rehage said he can see changes in topography almost immediately as sand offshore becomes clean and settles out of suspension. The product pulls the oils and other pollutants off the sand grains allowing better accretion. “It’s an alternative approach,” Rehage said. “But when you look at the success rate of modern coastal engineers, you see their methods don’t work.” So far the product has been delivered only to private homeowners whose properties are threatened by erosion. In one instance, a user in Cape Cod in danger of losing a home, ended up with 250 feet of new beach within six months. Other pilot projects in New Jersey and in France have also been successful. The representatives of GreenBeach, believe their product, registered as a fertilizer in Massachusetts, would even countermand the scouring effect from the Deerfield Beach groins which are blamed for the north beach erosion. There is a possibility it can desalinate water and make it potable. “We don’t yet know the extent of what it can do,” said GreenBeach president Oscar Plotkin. But he said, the cost is a fraction of current erosion control methods. But the GreenBeach team acknowledges that their attempt to commercialize their product will involve contacting a lot of people who will be skeptical. One of them is Commissioner Schubert who said the town lost considerable money on another pilot project, pressure equalizing modules that were buried in the sand and which were removed so a $6 million nourishment of the north beach could be permitted. Schubert had questions about the cost, the difficulty of putting the product into the sand, and if it would be permitted by the state, federal and local beach regulators. The cost is perhaps as little at $200,000 a mile, Rehage said, and digging a trench is not a problem. Permitting will be the major issue and on that subject. Shubert and Stidham are hopeful, but cannot predict the outcome. Schubert also asked if GreenBeach would absorb some of the cost if – down the roadthe commission agrees to a pilot project. “We are very flexible,” Stidham said. Peter Rehage, vice president of GreenBeach LLC makes a point with Hillsboro Beach City Commissioner Claire Schubert. [Staff photo]

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22 The Pelican Friday, May 25, 2012 grow on it. On June 25, 1925, the city was incorporated to become Deerfield, after the deer that roamed the area. “We did not want to be gobbled up by a little village to the north, called Boca Raton,” Morris says, smiling. “They had their eyes on our beach and wanted us to be part of their city. In 1939, we added the word Beach to our name to attract tourists who were beginning to discover us. Once they did, we became a boom area for both visitors and permanent residents. We now have a population of about 70,000 residents.” She continues. “My family and I are very involved in Kiwanis, Relay for Life and all of the city events. I bring a tent and a table to most of them to enlighten people about our colorful history.” Morris recently put on a wig and wire glasses to become Alice Butler, and did a reenactment of Butler’s life in Deer eld in 1923. Those attending had little trouble imaging Alice, getting up from her wicker chair to get on with her sewing, vacuuming and dusting of all the collectibles in her china closet. Morris smiled and said, “It was a fun fund raiser for Relay for Life, held under the Banyan tree at the house where Alice Butler lived until her death in 1977, at the age of 92. The Deer eld Beach High School Jazz band performed and the event was a big success, raising over $500.” The Deer eld Beach Historical Society has 155 registered members including honorary and inactive. Morris estimates that about 80 are dues paying members, most of whom show up for events and meetings. From September until May, there’s a monthly lecture series, called History at High Noon. Because of severe budget cuts, Morris says that the Society will have to be run by volunteers like herself. “We hope to be open on Saturdays from 12 until 4 p.m. and on other days if we get a good number of volunteers for whom we will provide docent training. This is such an interesting volunteer job.” The Butler House is on the National Registry of Historic Places. Built in 1923, it is lled with original furnishings which make a visitor feel he or she has slipped into the illustrated pages of a favorite old book. The living room with its wicker furniture, the dining room with lace tablecloth, owers and candlesticks and bedroom pieces are all original furnishings chosen by Alice Butler. Next to the breakfast nook is an open area displaying a 1920 vintage sewing machine and vacuum cleaner. Many of the framed pictures on the replace mantle and on the walls are original. Some created by a local artist, Louis Mezian, who paints historical sites and donates half of his commissions to the Society. On June 2, the Historical Society will have its annual dinner and auction at the Deer eld Beach Train Station, built in 1926 and also in the National Registry. Morris says, “We hope to have at least 75 people attending. It will be a catered event with a guest speaker, historian Juan Riera whose subject will be the history of railroads in Florida. We welcome volunteers and guests. Tickets will be $30 per person. At the top of Morris’s wish list is the hope that local businesses and residents will step up to the plate and hit a home run for this important Historical Society. “We have a campaign going right now The Deer eld Beach Historical Society is a non pro t, 501c3, educational organization open to the public for schools, group and individual tours. Founded in 1973 to identify, preserve and maintain historical sites in the Deer eld Beach area, it has placed four local structures in the National Registry: the 1920 Deer eld School, 1923 Butler House, 1926 Deer eld Train Station and 1926 Deer eld Beach Elementary School. The society welcomes artifacts, written data and verbal histories for preservation and accessibility to the public. Tax deductible corporate and professional sponsorships are encouraged and welcomed.called “One hundred for one hundred” which translates into 100 donors of $100 each will go a long way toward helping our nances. We will list all of our sponsors on our web site.” To volunteer or to reserve tickets for the dinner on June 2, call 954-429-0378 or visit www.Deer eld-history.orgAbout the house . View a period vacuum cleaner and an electric sewing machine. ButlerContinued from page 10

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The Pelican 23 Friday, May 25, 2012 MoaveroContinued from page 1came on board as an employee. After the original owners had sold the business to Scott Sutton, Moavero stayed on running the operational part of the business. Recently, Moavero bought the business after Sutton retired and has been running it ever since. Executive Printing & Mailing has a unique niche in the industry because in addition to both traditional and digital printing, they handle complete mailings in house. When questioned why she would take over a business in this slow economy, she said, “If I can make the business successful in this economy, we’ll be flourishing when it finally turns around.” Moavero explains that as a full service shop, they can take a complete concept from design to delivery whether it’s a business card, a magazine, a sign or bulk mailing. “It’s good that way,” she explains. “No one can blame the printer or the mailer or the color or anything because we do it all. Sometimes we may argue among ourselves, but the customer never hears it.” And she adds that it’s the end result that is critical in this business. This 4’10” entrepreneur is always on the go. Ric Green, CEO of the Pompano Beach Chamber explains that it’s Moavero’s “personal tool kit” that makes it all work. “Executive Printing & Mailing is a small company that competes with larger businesses that employ multiple layers of internal structure. Under Leila’s business plan she and her team are able to work effectively and efficiently by rotating and scheduling the work of her team so that machines get maximum usage reducing down time and overhead. Leila is one of those high energy people, who just never stops moving forward. She accomplishes in a day what most business owners struggle to complete in two days.” And Green, like most of Moavero’s admirers has his favorite “short joke” when it comes to this petite giant. He says, “With her energy and drive, if she were taller, she could play for the Heat!” Moavero says the jokes go with the territory, but she laughs them off and puts all that energy into the grander scheme of things. She serves as a board member for Rotary of Pompano Beach, the Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce and the Customer Council of Broward County Bulk Mailers. All of these volunteer board positions keep Moavero’s smiling face throughout the community behind tables in numerous charitable and service events. For this story, The Pelican had to track her down in Omaha where she was visiting her son, Jonathan, an airman, his wife Tina and their new son Derek, four months old. Leila’s younger son, Andrew, graduates high school this year. Ray Doucette, Jr. her partner in life also helps keep the business going. “Winning this year’s award tells me I am going in the right direction,” she says. “This confirms that I am doing what I should be doing.” And to other women who may be thinking about their own business futures, Moavero will be the first one to encourage them. “Go for it,” she says. “People here don’t care if you are a woman. They care if it’s right. They care if it’s on time. They look at the business not the woman. They don’t care if you are short and tell really bad jokes.” Moavero also gives her city a hat’s off when it comes to business. “It’s about Pompano Beach. I love this community. Businesses work with charities. People really seem to care about each other here.” Moavero will be honored next week with other chamber winners throughout the county at the Renaissance Hotel, Plantation. The award ceremony is sponsored by the Broward County Council of Chambers of Commerce. The Pelican congratulates Leila Moavero as this year’s Greater Pompano Beach Small Business Person of the Year. Memorial Day May 28

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24 The Pelican Friday, May 25, 2012 WORSHIP DIRECTORY: Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad. Rev. Hyvenson Joseph By Rabbi David MarkTHE JEWISH CENTER AT TEMPLE SHOLOM Here in mono-seasonal Florida, it may be difficult to envision a springtime festival, but that was certainly the original meaning of Shavuote: a harvest feast thanking God for allowing the earth to bring forth its bounty. This was all the more remarkable, considering the irregular rainfall which Israel received in those days, in contrast to, say, Egypt, where the Nile River rose seasonally and reliably to irrigate the Delta. After the liberation drama of Passover and the leafy color of mid-autumn Sukkot, Shavuote is relatively bare of symbolism. It commemorates the Giving of the Torah, the Five Books of Moses, on Mt. Sinai. Its principal message is that of Torah study—but that is a perpetual commandment, incumbent upon Jews the year round. There is little, therefore, to make Shavuote unique. Its focus is culinary rather than spiritual: Jews customarily eat dairy foods on this holiday, for various reasons. Studying Torah is compared to eating milk and honey, as the Hebrew Bible has it: “Honey and milk are under your tongue” [Song of Songs 4:11]. Another reason is that Torah scholars are traditionally poor, and cannot afford to eat much meat. This is the only holiday on which Shavuote, the Jewish Festival of Weekswe all get to “impersonate” Torah scholars, simply by eating dairy. Finally, we recall that when the Israelites were sojourning in the wilderness and received the Torah at Mt. Sinai, it included the laws for keeping kosher. The Israelites realized that their meat was not kosher, so they ate only dairy foods for a day while they slaughtered cattle in the kosher style and got fresh meat. Reading the Biblical Book of Ruth is an important feature of this holiday. Its themes, those of tribal loyalty, the harvest and romance, are all crucial to the Shavuote festival. Despite being a member of an enemy tribe, Moab, Ruth remains steadfast and stays with her beleaguered mother-in-law, Naomi, even after Ruth’s husband dies. The two bereft women return to Israel during the harvest season, and Ruth becomes a gleaner in the fields in order to gain sustenance. There, she meets Boaz, a distant relative of Naomi’s, who later marries her. God rewards Ruth’s steadfastness by making her the great-grandmother of David, who becomes the mightiest king of Israel and ancestor of Messiah. Commemorating as it does the Giving of the Torah on Mt. Sinai to the Israelites, and from them to the entire world, it is useful to remember its most basic law: “Love your neighbor as yourself.” The rabbis in the Talmud interpreted this to mean that, “If you know what hurts your neighbors, and do nothing to relieve their pain, how can you truly say you love them?” As Shavuote begins this Saturday night, May 26, let us reflect on the Golden Rule, and consider how we may begin the pursuit of peace in our own town, our own neighborhood, and in our hearts. Happy Shavuote If you know what hurts your neighbors, and do nothing to relieve their pain, how can you truly say you love them?Ž

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The Pelican 25 Friday, May 25, 2012 Memorial Day May 28SightingsContinued from page 186-8 – Beach Sounds Concert Series from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Main Beach Parking Lot, 149 SE 2 Ave., Deer eld Beach. Performances by David Shelley and Bluestone. Event is free. 954-480-4429. 6-9 – Deer eld Beach City Shred from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. at the Recycling DropOff Center, 401 SW 4 St. One to ve boxes is $10. Six to ten boxes is $20. Checks only. 954-480-4379. 6-9 – Junior Bass Tournament for ages 12 to 17 at Quiet Waters Park, 401 S. Powerline Road, Deer eld Beach. Cost is $75. 954-9851980. 6-9 – Pompano Beach -Free car seat safety check event from 9 a.m. to noon. Call 954-786-4510 to schedule an appointment. 6-12 – Oakland Park/ Wilton Manors Council Chamber luncheon at 11:30 a.m. at Gallery One Resort Hotel, 2670 E. Sunrise Blvd., Fort Lauderdale. 954-4626000. 6-14 – Broward Shell Club meets at 6:30 p.m. at 6:30 pm. at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach. Beverly Dolezal will present shelling in the Bahamas. 954296-5633.FridaysThe Pompano Beach Rotary Club meets Fridays at 12:15 p.m. at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. 954-786-3274.SaturdaysPony rides are available at Sand & Spurs Equestrian Park, 1600 NE 5 Ave., Pompano Beach, from 9 to 11:30 a.m. Cost is $3 per ride. 954786-4507. The Pompano Beach Kiwanis Club Westside meets the rst and third Saturdays of the month at 8:30 a.m. at the E. Pat Larkins Community Center, 520 MLK Blvd., Pompano Beach. 954-782-8096. The Deer eld Beach West Kiwanis Club meets the second and fourth Saturdays of the month at 9 a.m. at Westside Park, 445 SW 2 St., Deer eld Beach. 954-54-7329883. Kayak rentals are available Saturdays and Sundays at Richardson Historic Park, 1937 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Visit www.AtlanticCoastKayak.com or 954-7810073 for rates. The Wilton Manors Green Market is held every Saturday and Sunday at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. 954-592-0381. The Deer eld Beach West Kiwanis Club meets the second and fourth Saturdays of the month at 9 a.m. at Westside Park, 445 SW 2 St., Deer eld Beach. 954-54-7329883.SundaysSt. Elizabeth’s of Hungary Parish hosts a pancake breakfast at 3331 NE 10 Terrace, Pompano Beach, on every third Sunday of the month from 7:30 a.m. to noon. The breakfast bene ts the Parish. 954-263 8415.MondaysPlay ping-pong from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Cost is $1. All ages can participate. 954-3902130. The Gold Coast Toastmasters Club meets on the second and third Monday of the month from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Denny’s, 3151 NW 9 Ave., Fort Lauderdale. 954895-3555 or 954-782-9951.TuesdaysDeer eld Beach Rotary Club meets every Tuesday at 12 p.m. at the Deer Creek Golf Club, 2801 Deer Creek Country Club Blvd., Deer eld Beach. 954-630-9593. Pompano Beach-Lighthouse Rotary Club meets every Tuesday at 7:30 a.m. at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. 954972-7178. See SIGHTINGS on page 30

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26 The Pelican Friday, May 25, 2012 Classi eds Call 954-545-0013 HELP WANTEDSTYLISTS & ASS’T SALON MGRS Now Hiring! FL COSM. LICENSE REQ’D. Bonus Opportunities, FREE Adv Edu, 401K, Health Bene ts, Paid Time Off & MORE! Call Melissa at 912-322-1242 or visit careersbyhaircuttery. com. EOE. 5-25 NATIONAL PARKING OPERATOR Seeking An Operational Supervisor And Parking Enforcement Of cer To Join A Team Of Professionals Serving A Local Municipality. EOE. Call 954763-4806. 5-25 DIESEL / REFRIGERATION Truck Mechanic – We Have Immediate Openings For Diesel Mechanics In Pompano Beach. We Provide Excellent Pay & Bene ts. We Require A Minimum 2 Years Experience. Your Own Tools, Good Driving & Work History. CDL Driver License Would Be Helpful But Is Not Required. Apply In Person At Salem NationaLease/ Freight Liner Of ce % Atlantic Truck Center. 2840 Center Point Circle Pompano Beach Fla 33064 Or Apply Online www.salemleasing.com To Set Up Interview With The Manager Please Call 1-800709-2536. EOE. 5-25 LOCAL PEST CONTROL CO Looking For Quality Sales/Service Tech. Must Be Dependable, Team Player, Good Drivers License & People Skills. Will Train Right Person. ALSO Of ce Assistant – Computer – People & Phone Skills Needed. Fax Resume 954418-3982. 6-1 SEEKING EMPLOYMENTCAREGIVER / COMPANION Caucasian Woman With 25 Yrs Exp. To Assist & Care For Your Loved Ones. Days / Eves / Nights. References Available. 954-482-5494. 5-25 MALE CNA / HHA / SR. COMPANION. Broward Area. Former EMT. All Certi cations / Compassionate, References. Call Ron 954-232-2832. 5-25 CHILD CARE / NANNY Former Elementary Teacher, Counselor, Nanny – Caring, Patient. Prefer Pompano Area. Full Or Part Time. 954-7885412. 5-25 HHA CNA CERTIFIED – 15 Years Exp. Level 2 – Background Check – References Available. Will Provide TLC For Your Loved One. Call 954-8267341. 5-25 HHA SEEKING WEEKEND Position – Days Or Nights Willing To Live In / Out. References. Own Car – Reliable!! 20 Yrs Experience. 786-333-6437. 5-25 CERTIFIED NURSING ASST – Seeking Job To Take Care Of Sick / Elderly Day Or Night. 10 Yrs Experience. References Available. 786-3558006. 5-25 HOME HEALTH COMPANION – Certified, Experienced, Drives To Errands – Compassionate & Dedicated Worker / Caucasian. Days Wanted. Available Immediately. 561-271-3129 Or 561-908-2104 5-25 SERVICES DANNY BOY ELECTRIC – Lic & Insured. Lic. #EC13004811. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. 24/Hr Service. 954-290-1443. Beat Any Written Estimate. Sr, Discount. 6-1 CALL BRENDAN THE HANDYMAN – Construction & Repairs – Carpentry – Plumbing – Roo ng – Masonry – Windows – Painting – Decking – Tile. FREE Estimates! 954773-6134 – Emergency Calls. WATSON PAINTING & Waterproofing Co. Interior / Exterior Painting, Replace Baseboards, Removal Of Wallpaper. Res / Comm. Pressure Clean Roofs / Decks. Lic / Ins. 954-650-0488. 6-1 HANDYMAN – PAINTING – CARPENTRY – Pressure Cleaning. Decks! Everything Around The House. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. Call 561-350-3781. 6-8 MOORE PLUMBING PLUMBING SERVICES – Big Jobs – Small Jobs. We Do It All. Remodeling & Repairs. Lic. & Insured. C.C. Accepted. Call 954-772-4600. 5-25 HONEST HANDYMAN – HOME & BUILDING Maintenance/Improvements. No Job Too Small. Fast Friendly Service. Reasonable Rates. Local Resident/Homeowner. Call Today For Your FREE Upfront Quote. No Deposit Required. 754-366-1915. 5 GOT JUNK? DUMP TRUCK – CLEANUPS Trees/ Landscape, Yard Fill. Paint/ Pressure Wash/ Roofs/Home Repairs – Welding, Etc. Dave 954-818-9538. 6-1 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIESNew GREEN technology. New defroster control saves energy in home refrigerators, commercial chillers. Patented. All optical. Simple mfg. Strategic partners needed..www.NewAvionics.Com. 954-568-1991. CMUSICIANS WANTEDThe American Legion Symphonic Band is now accepting new members for the 2011-2012 season. College age to “seasoned seniors” are welcome. Rehearsals are held on Wed. evenings at American Legion Post 142 in Pompano. Percussionists, oboe, bassoon, trombone and euphonium players are especially needed. If you enjoy “making music,” call Jim McGonigal, Music Director at 954647-0700 for more info.REAL ESTATE SERVICEREAL ESTATE SELLING OR BUYING – Relocation Specialist. 18 Years Experience. English, French, Spanish, Greek. Yvette Gaussen – YES WE CAN REALTY – 954-6147773 Or 954-773-8340. 5-25 ROOMS FOR RENTPOMPANO PVT ROOM & Bath! $500 Per Month. Includes Utilities – Cable – Internet. Walking Distance To Shopping. Call 954-793-1363. HOMES FOR RENTPOMPANO COTTAGE STYLE HOUSE – 2 / 1 Pool – Large Fenced Yard. $1050 Month. 510 NE 35 Street. Call Darci 954-7833723. 6-1 REAL ESTATE WANTEDI BUY HOUSES!! CASH!! AS IS! QUICK CLOSE! ANY AREA – ANY CONDITION! NO EQUITY OK. CALL NOW 954-914-2355. 7-20CONDOS FOR SALEPOMPANO BEACH – DIRECT OCEAN VIEW!! Pet Friendly! 2/2 AT THE BREAKERS! $269,000. Call Juliana At Barclay’s For Details. 1-305766-4420. 5-25 CONDOS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH – 1 Block To Ocean!! 1 / 1 Fully Equipped. Hurricane Windows / Doors. 2 Flat Screens, DVD, WIFI, Pool, BBQ, Laundry. $850 Month + Electric Monthly Thru December. 954-540-9724. 6-15 DEERFIELD BEACH 2/2 CONDO – Corner Unit, Pool. $800. Good Credit Required. No Pets Or Realtors. 631-8853342. 5-25 POMPANO BEACH LARGE 2 / 2 With Den. All Renovated! Pool – Mile From Beach! W /D – Small Pet OK! $1,300 Month Yearly. Available May 1st. 561-703-6545 Or 754-2643289. 5-25 Memorial Day May 28 Memorial Day May 28 Memorial Day May 28

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The Pelican 27 Friday, May 25, 2012 Classi eds Call 954-545-0013 Memorial Day, May 28 APTS FOR RENTDEERFIELD/POMPANO BEACH 1 BR & 2 BR APTS FOR RENT. Remodeled, Paint, Tile, Etc. Washer / Dryer On Site. Pool. Pet Friendly. George 954-809-5030. 6-1 POMPANO BEACH 1 BEDROOMS AND EFFICIENCY Apts. Fully Furnished With Kitchen, Cable, Internet, Pool, Laundry. 500’ To The Beach. Weekly – Monthly – Yearly. 954-2948483 Or 248-736-1533, 6-15 POMPANO BEACH – 3/ 2 $1025 – NE 1/1 $675 2 /1 $950 – Townhouse 2/1.5 $1095. ALL FREE WATER. RENT + $70 Application Moves – U – In. 954-781-6299. 5-25 POMPANO BEACH / ATLANTIC / FEDERAL – Ef ciency $175 Weekly. No Security Deposit. Includes Cable, Electric, Internet. FREE Washer / Dryer. No Drug Record – No Evictions. 954-7090694. 5-25 POMPANO BEACH 900’ TO Beach – 1/1 Furn. Includes Cable TV. $850 Month. Efficiency Furn. $700 Mo. Includes Utilities & Cable. 954-785-5837. 5-25 POMPANO BEACH 1/1 Newly Renovated Apt. Pool. Pet OK! $700 Per Month Yearly Lease. 1960 NE 48 Street. Call 954857-5207. 6-1 POMPANO BEACH A1A – 1 & 2 Bedrooms, Ef ciencies – Fully Furnished – Includes Utilities, Cable, WIFI, Laundry, Pool, BBQ. 700’ To The Beach. Starting At $269 Per Week. 954-943-3020. 6-15 POMPANO / DEERFIELD 1/1, Central A/C. S.S. Kitchen Appliances. Granite Counters. Tile Floors. W / D Hookup. $800 Per Month & $800 Security Deposit. 954-224-0169. 6-1 POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 Bedroom From $495. Easy Movein. 1/2 OFF DEPOSIT. Remodeled. Great Location. 954-783-1088 For More Info. 7-13 GOLDEN ACRES DEVELOPMENT is the best value for apartment rental in the city of Pompano Beach. Newly renovated kitchen cabinets, new appliances, energy saving HVAC wall units, 24-hr maintenance, playgrounds and daycare. Rentals starting at $500. Section 8 Voucher holders are welcome to apply. Please contact Helen Mitchell at 954-972-1444. Domestic farm workers will be given priority in renting available units. Professionally managed by Nelson & Associates, Inc. COMMERCIAL FOR RENT-SALEPOMPANO COMMERCIAL OFFICE Spaces Available. Ranging From As Low As $500 To $700 Depending On Square Footage. Please Call Darci At 954783-3723. 6-15 DEERFIELD BEACH – Retail Of ce Warehouse – 700 Sq Ft With Loft. A/C, Bathroom. $575 Per Month. Call For More Info 561-654-1331 Or 561-9985681. 6-1 NEWLY EQUIPPED LOW RENT Shop Space – Ideal For Bakery – Pizza – Wings – Crepes – Etc. Corner New – 12 Avenue & 34 Court, Oakland Park. Indoor / Outdoor Patio Sitting. 954-563-3533. 5-25 DOCK FOR RENT60 FT DOCK – THE COVE MARINA – 50 AMP / H20 Included. $1,200 Month – Price Negotiable Depending On Boat Size. Restaurant & Fuel On Premises. 954-9140053. a.j.barsotti@comcast. net 5-25 COVE – DOCK FOR RENT!! 60 FT. Water, Electric. No Fixed Bridges. Nice Location. $350 Mo. 954-429-9347 Or Call Cell 954-288-9651. 5-25 MISC. FOR SALEUSED BEAUTY Equipment Warehouse Closing!! All Must Go!!. Low Low Prices. Call For More Information! Boca Raton – Nick 954-415-4937. 5-25 If you cannot locate a Pelican call 954-783-8700 Memorial Day May 28

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28 The Pelican Friday, May 25, 2012 Pompano Chamber of Commerce celebrates business with ne food and wine Enjoying the ne wines and food are Antonia Fritz and Paula Fritz. Participants enjoyed ne food and wine from restaurants and businesses all over the country. First time participant in the Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce’s Fine Food & Wine event, held this week at the Sheraton Suites Cypress Creek, was Ernie’s Italian Chophouse in Lighthouse Point represented by Mike Capone and Jim Savianeso who are pictured with Carmen McGarry from Hillsboro Beach. Clark Brozowski, Lyn Clark and Michelle Green.Pompano Beach Vendors of fine food, 24 in all, and superior spirits presented the Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce annual food and wine fundraiser held Tuesday night at the Sheraton Suites Cypress Creek. The event filled the atrium, bar and two meeting rooms of the hotel and attracted major sponsors such as Broward College, Ahearn Jasco + Company and Waste Management, Inc. Hundreds of items were donated for silent and live auctions. Ruthie Brookes and Gail Farkas chaired the event. Broward County State Attorney Michael Satz, Maria Schneider, Broward juvenile court division; and Chamber of Commerce Executive Director Ric Green chat at the Fine Food & Wine Festival held this year at the Sheraton Suites Cypress Creek. [Photos by Judy Wilson]Fine Food & Wine Festival celebrates chamber

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30 The Pelican Friday, May 25, 2012 Capt. RJ Boyle is an experienced angler in South Florida. His studio is located in Lighthouse Point. Call 954-420-5001. Joe Usman and Tom DiGiorgio, Jr. purchased the building for $470,000 after Hurricane Wilma, but Usman said the two weren’t able to make any extensive repairs or renovations because of a lack of financing. “We didn’t have any more cash to pump into it,” said Usman. Edward Gallagher, construction project manager, estimates that about 15 to 20 artist studios will be built on the second floor of the Bailey, which was originally three buildings linked together to form one. But before any artists take up residence, Gallagher has to remove years of neglect, damage caused by termites and a lot of additional materials added over the years. “I’m ripping all that stuff out and getting down to the bare bones [and then build it back up]. We’re going to do it until it sparkles,” said Gallagher. The project is expected to take about two years.BaileyContinued from page 4 Bailey Hotel left of the Farmer’s Bank as they looked in the 20s. [Photo courtesy of the Pompano Beach Historical Society]RJ BoylePELICAN STAFFIf you get a chance over the next month to make a trip to Port Lucaya, Bahamas or West End, you need to go. My friends have been bringing me the nicest yellowfin tuna steaks you can imagine. It’s a relatively easy trip. Load your boat with sardine flats and some live bait if you can. The tunas are generally found between 50 and 70 miles offshore of our coast. You will spot the birds and that will be your tell-tale sign that tunas are in the area. Watch them for a while and don’t try to chase them. You will notice that they have a pattern to how they are flying. Most times you can sit in one spot and chunk sardines until they swim right up to you. When that happens every rod on the boat will bend over with a fish anywhere from 30 The yellow n tuna are plentiful in Bahamas countryThe American Legion Auxiliary Unit 142 171 SW 2 St., Pompano Beach, has Bingo on Tuesdays at 7 p.m. Food is available from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. 954-942-2448. A Yoga class for all levels at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors, on Tuesday nights from 6:30 to 8 p.m. and Saturday mornings from 10:30 a.m. until noon. The cost is $7. 305-607-3520. lbs up to 75 lbs. Make sure to bleed the fish out as to keep the meat perfect. Call us at the shop if you are interested in making this fishing trip as we can guide you in the right direction as far as tackle and Bahama island information. 954-420-5002.SightingsContinued from page 25

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The Pelican 31 Friday, May 25, 2012 Advertise in The Pelican 954-783-8700! recommended upholding two of my complaints,” he said. Malkoon has signed a consent order in which he and commission staff stipulate that staff could prove all elements necessary to establish violations of election law by the required burden of proof. He was ned $150 for each of the two violations. An investigator with the Elections Commission found two of the complaints legally suf cient for investigation. In one complaint, found to be correct, Brown alleged that Malkoon, running for a nonpartisan of ce, disclosed his political party af liation and MalkoonContinued from page 1the political party af liation of his opponent in a newspaper ad, effectively campaigning based on party af liation. In response to the complaint, Oliver Parker, Malkoon’s attorney and former LBTS mayor, said it was true Malkoon had run the ad including the fact that he was a registered Republican and Brown a Democrat in apparent violation of Florida law. “However,” he said, “Malkoon, a rst-time candidate didn’t know the law may have prohibited him from mentioning his party af liation or that of his opponent. An act is ‘willful’ in law only when it involves some degree of conscious wrongdoing on the part of the actor.” Parker also argued that prohibiting a candidate seeking a nonpartisan of ce from revealing his political party af liation or that of his opponent’s is an unconstitutional restraint on core political speech in violation of the First Amendment. In another complaint, found to be correct, Brown alleged that Malkoon posted approximately 250 small campaign signs which were marked with an inconspicuous political disclaimer or no disclaimer at all. Parker said that Malkoon purchased the signs from an Orlando rm, and when they arrived, they didn’t have the required disclosure statements. Malkoon called the Florida Division of Elections Hotline for guidance. He was advised he could x a label to the signs with the required disclosure statements. The signs had to be legible. “The fact that the respondent made a good faith attempt to comply with the statute means the violation was not willful,” Parker said, arguing the complaint must be dismissed. The investigator found that Brown’s allegations appear to be correct. “The advertisements [yard signs] lack proper disclaimers.” The investigator did not nd legal suf ciency to support two of Brown’s other complaints. Brown complained about palm cards, distributed outside the polls, without disclaimers for electioneering and for expressed advocacy. The investigator concluded he wasn’t sure a disclaimer of any kind was required on palm cards. He wrote, “A palm card is not included in the de nition of “electioneering communication.” Parker responded that a Malkoon supporter, Cindy Geesey, handed out the palm cards which did not have the required disclosure statement. He said Malkoon and his other supporters had nothing to do with the cards. He said Malkoon did not hand out the cards. Malkoon asked Geesey to stop handing out the cards, and she refused, Parker says. Brown also complained that Malkoon made a false factual statement, with malice, about Brown when he and members of his campaign distributed palm cards which included the statement, “Brown – Liberal Obama supporter.” Brown said that statement violated Florida law, which prohibits candidates from making “false factual statements with malice about an opposing candidate.” Parker argued that Geesey, not Malkoon, made the statement and that Malkoon “is not vicariously liable for the unauthorized acts of his supporters.” Finding the complaint not legally suf cient, the investigator found the statement at issue appeared to be Malkoon’s opinion of his opponent, not necessarily a statement of fact. Brown reported on the Election Commission’s investigator’s ndings during brief commissioner comments at Tuesday’s commission meeting. Malkoon and a supporter objected that the mayor allowed him to do so. Malkoon said he entered into the consent agreement not because he is guilty but because he’s not a rich guy and couldn’t afford to ght the complaints. He said he never knowingly or willfully did anything wrong.

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The Pelican 33 Friday, May 25, 2012 STOP HERE STOP HERE STOP HERE

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Friday, May 25, 2012 Vol. XX, Issue 21 Wherever you are, read The Pelican @ pompanopelican.com Send news to siren2415@gmail.com Pompano Beach Deer eld Beach Lighthouse Point Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Wilton Manors Oakland Park Hillsboro Beach The Galt Palm Aire The Pelican Pelican Candidate ned $300 in failed election bidBy Judy VikPELICAN STAFFLauderdale-By-The-Sea The Florida Elections Commission has found Edmund Malkoon, unsuccessful candidate for Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Town Commission, in violation of state law for actions taken during the campaign. Mark Brown, who beat Malkoon in the Jan. 31 election, filed several complaints against his opponent with the Elections Commission. An initial staff review determined my complaints legally sufficient, and they opened a full staff investigation, Brown said at Tuesdays commission meeting. After hearing Malkoons defense, The commission See MALKOON on page 31 By Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach Something as simple as a well-designed business card is of major importance to this years Small Business Person of the Year. A persons business card creates an impression, and I want that impression to be the best it can be, says Leila Moavero, this years honoree with the Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce. Moaveros destiny in the printing business began in 1979 in San Francisco, but when she left the business to study pre-med at Berkeley, she soon learned that she was missing something. She returned to that printing company and discovered that ink was in her blood, she says. She eventually bought the business, with a partner worked as managing editor of WREN, or Western Real Estate News, the commercial industrial Real Estate Bible to the industry in the Western United States. That was then. Today, Moavero is the owner of Executive Printing & Mailing, 1800 NW 15 Ave. #140, in Pompano Beach. Her history with this business dates back 18 years when she Leila Moavero named Small Business Person of the Year by Pompano Beach Chamber of CommerceSee MOAVERO on page 23 Leila Moavero, owner of Executive Printing & Mailing in Pompano Beach named Small Business Person of the Year. Pain clinics down as tax fraud risesBy Judy VikPELICAN STAFFOakland Park Public safety is the number one priority of government. But policing is a partnership. We cant arrest ourselves out of every situation, Broward Sheriff Al Lamberti said in opening remarks at a recent town hall meeting in Oakland Park. Lamberti introduced a panel of BSO officers from the Oakland Park District, who spoke at the meeting sponsored by the North Andrews Neighborhood Association. The sheriff said the number one problem BSO is seeing is identity theft. The best thing you can do is to shred everything, he said, urging residents to come to one of BSOs monthly shredathons, where up to five boxes of documents can be shredded for free. See FRAUD on page 15 Our vanishing shoreline: Its more about chemistry than mechanicsBy Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFHillsboro Beach Young chemist Peter Rehage sees the beach as a carnival of movement, where water, wind and sand create a surge toward the shore and back out to sea. It is this carnival that is eroding the shoreline at a pace never before seen. But, according to Rehage, it is not the movement that is to blame, its the chemistry pollutants. Dirty sand is causing the shoreline to act unnaturally.See SHORELINE on page 20 Only a short distance from Paris, the endless rows of white crosses on the shores of Normandy are a stark reminder of the gruesome bloodletting that de ned a generation. The Pelican met up with a person whose genesis begins with World War II. See page 11. [Photo by Ernie Gutierrez] Memorial Day May 28

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2 The PelicanFriday, May 25, 2012 SightingsA community calendar of Broward County. Email events to siren2415@gmail. com By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFWilton Manors In future city elections, the withdrawal of a candidate from the race may not automatically sweep his or her opponent into of-Wilton Manors of cials to change rules regarding candidate withdrawalsfice. But before any changes will take effect, commissioners decided to give the idea more thought. On Tuesday, city commissioners tabled an ordinance that would deal with what happens if two candidates are running for same seat, and one of them withdraws from the race after the filing deadline. According to the proposed ordinance, if a candidate withdraws from the race with less than 45 days before the election and only one candidate is left; that person would be automatically elected to office. If more than 45 days remain before election day and a candidate withdraws, the city would reopen the registration for the seat for an additional five days. This year, candidates have between June 4 and June 8 to qualify for the election on Nov. 6. If no candidates sign up to run, the proposed law would allow the commission to appoint someone to serve in the position until the next election. If commissioners are unable to appoint someone, a special election would be held to fill the seat. City Attorney Kerry Ezrol said the proposed change was modeled closely after the citys current procedures for replacing elected officials who die or resign before his or her term expires. Unanimously, commissioners decided to postpone a vote on the issue after Commissioners Scott Newton and Ted Galatis expressed doubts. Newton said he was uncomfortable with the idea of allowing someone to come into a race less than two months before election day after the other candidate had already been campaigning for six months or more. What commitment does somebody have at that point? asked Newton. Galatis said he was worried the change might open the door to someone orchestrating the withdrawal of a candidate and entering the race themselves. Especially considering the salary, joked Vice Mayor Tom Green. According to city staff, the mayor gets an annual salarySee CANDIDATES on page 19 5-25 Wine tasting from 5 to 7 p.m. at Monks Wine & Liquor Cave, 3912 N. Ocean Blvd., Fort Lauderdale. Sample cheese, crackers and wine. 954-561-3423. 5-26 Movie with Popcorn for ages 6 to 9 at the See SIGHTINGS on page 14

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The Pelican 3 Friday, May 25, 2012 By Christopher SirenMUSIC WRITERThis week, the Gold Coast Youth Orchestra tackled the Italian Baroque masters under the baton of Timothy S. Byrns. But not before they paid a grand tribute in honor of Memorial Day. A noble rendition of the Star Spangled Banner in collaboration with the Jr. R.O.T.C of Pompano Beach High School was followed by an arrangement that included signature anthems for each branch of the United States Armed Forces. Veterans in the audience rose to acknowledge Youth Orchestra wows audience with Baroque presentationtheir hymns from the Navy to the U.S. Marines. After such a refined and polished performance, the meatier portion of the program commenced. Keep in mind, this is a training orchestra of young musicians of various backgrounds. But they were masterful. The program included two Orchestral Suites performed in their entirety by the Italian Baroque composers, Archangelo Corelli and Antonio Vivaldi. This youth orchestra possessed the stamina and technical ability to perform these major works of standard orchestral literature with surprising execution. The program continued with Italian composers, including the classic opera favorite, Intermezzo Sinfonica from Cavaliera Rusticana by Pietro Antonio Stefano Mascagni, which served as a thoughtful post-intermission programming idea. Such memorable melodies would stay with anyone new or old to the opera world. Shifting from the Italians to Norways Edvard Grieg, with the Holberg Suite Opus 40, the group demonstrated its ability to change their sound and meet the demands of a more challenging piece that continued through the final Rigaudon movement. While it was clear that this group reflected an accomplished sense of relief at the programs conclusion, this audience begged for more with a standing ovation. Giving in to the steady applause, the orchestra played as See ORCHESTRA on page 12Florida Youth Orchestra performersMusic Review

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4 The PelicanFriday, May 25, 2012 By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach In the heyday of the Bailey Hotel, the Farmers Market bustled with growers loading up FEC trains heading north with cars packed with beans, peppers and other winter vegetables. In those days, the hotel was an anchor in downtown Pompano. It sat next to the Farmers Bank where farmers deposited their growing fortunes. Guests then at the Bailey Hotel were business men and food brokers capitalizing on the good times. The hotel and the bank continue to stand in what is now Historic Old Downtown, but they are showing severe signs of sun, hurricane damage and Pompano Beach of cials have artistic plans for historic Bailey Hotel neglect. But not for long. Baileys future inhabitants will busy themselves with painting, drawing, dance and other artistic pursuits. Pompano Beach officials recently purchased the old hotel, 51 NE 1 St., for $370,000 and plan to use the 12,000 sq. ft. structure as a gathering place for art and culture, with artist studios on the second floor and gallery space and possibly a dance studio below. Built sometime between 1922 and 1924, the Bailey was one business among many, including Pompano Pharmacy, still open directly across the street, Hirshman Shoe Store, a billiard parlor and Downies Jewelers. And like the rest of Pompano, east of Dixie Highway, in the era of segregation, the hotel was for whites only. They didnt have integrated hotels back then, said Dan Hobby, executive director of the Pompano Beach Historical Society. There are so many possibilities, said Sharon McCormick, director of marketing for Redevelopment Management Associates, which manages the Community Redevelopment Agency. McCormick said the concept was inspired by the Bakehouse Art Complex in Miami, a non-profit organization dedicated to attracting artists to South Florida by providing galleries, professional development opportunities and affordable studio space. Susan Kores, program director for the citys Business Resource Center, said the hotel could also include an arts supply store or other complimentary uses. This is really just the beginning, she said.See BAILEY on page 30 Tuesday, May 29 thru Friday, June 1

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The Pelican 5 Friday, May 25, 2012 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeerfield Beach Sand volleyball athlete Ranse Jones Jr. died in 2010 from the complications of a brain aneurysm. He was 34-years-old and a popular member of the American Volleyball Professionals circuit. In November of that year, a major tournament held in Deerfield Beach was named in his honor that raised $30,000 to help offset his medical expenses. This November 8 through 10, the Ranse Jones Classic returns to this beach. The money raised will go to the Ranse Jones Stroke Awareness Fund that will be administered by Broward Health Ranse Jones Fund and Broward North team up to ght the effects of strokesNorth. The partnership was announced Wednesday at the medical centers annual stroke seminar. Money in the fund will be used to educate the public about strokes. Instrumental in getting the two entities together was local businessman John Esposito, who has long been a supporter of beach volleyball in this city and Broward Health Marketing Manager Lyn Clark. Speaking this week at at the seminar was Ranses dad, Bob Jones, of St. Augustine, who showed a tribute video of his son in action. Ranses motto was Live Simple. Play Hard. Said Broward North Community Relations Specialist Victoria Israels, This partnership will provide an ongoing legacy to Ranse. North Broward Health is a comprehensive stroke center lead by interventional neurologist Dr. Ridwon Lin who is licensed to go above and beyond the usual treatment for stroke victims. Two procedures are done there one that coils the aneurysm, the other that vacuums the bleed both produce amazing results, Israels said. Other speakers Wednesday were Dr. Jonathon Harris and Dr. Thomas Hammand. Stroke is the third leading cause of death in this country and the lead cause of long term patient disability. However, with education, it is 80 percent preventable, Israels said.Bob Jones, father of Ranse Jones Jr., chats with John Esposito of Deer eld Beach after announcement of Ranse Jones Stroke Awareness Fund. [Staff photos by Judy Vik]

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6 The PelicanFriday, May 25, 2012 Deer eld Beach, Pompano Beach, Lighthouse Point, LauderdaleBy-The-Sea, Wilton Manors and Oakland ParkWilton Manors Oakland Park Hillsboro Beach The Pompano Pelican is published weekly on FridaysStreet Address: 1500-A E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, FL 33060 Telephone: 954-783-8700 Fax: 954-783-0093Letters to the Editor are encouraged and accepted for print if signed, although a writers name will be withheld on request; letters must also include a daytime telephone number. Advertising rates are available upon request. Subscription rate is $31.80 including tax for one years delivery in Greater Pompano Beach; $95.40/per year including tax for others in the United States; call 954-783-8700 for rates abroad. The Pelican is a nonpartisan newspaper and reserves the right to decline advertising. Copyright 2012. Reproduction of this publication in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission of the publisher. The Pelican is a member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, Deer eld Beach Chamber and the LBTS Chamber. The Pelican is a state certi ed woman-owned minority business. The Pelican is delivered to businesses, libraries, schools, of ces, hospitals, news racks and single family homes. All advertising and copy is published at the sole discretion of the publisher. We welcome your critiques and ideas concerning this publication. Anne Siren, publisherExecutive Assistant: Mary Hudson Graphics: Rachel Ramirez Windsheimer Bookkeeper: John White Classi eds: Fran Shelby Contributing Writers: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Judy Wilson, Malcolm McClintock, Judy Vik, Michael dOliveira Account Executives: Paul Shroads, Carolyn Mann, Bill Heaton, Bill Fox Special Of ce Assistant: Cathy Siren ESTABLISHED 1993 Volume XX, Issue 21 Founding Editor and PublisherAnne Hanby Siren Letters & Opinions The Pelican wants to know what you think. Send your thoughts on local, state and national issues to siren2415@gmail.com Setting the record straightOn May 18, 2012, The Pelican published an article entitled In the Wake of Fire ghters Death, Panel Suggests Safety Measures. This article was about the Pompano Beach Fire Rescue review of the death of Fire ghter Bill Elliott, which occurred during a training exercise on January 6, 2012. Unfortunately, the statements that were made in the article concerning the ndings of the investigative panel were misleading. The conclusion to the report was simply left out. As a result, this article has caused unwanted grief for the family, friends and fellow re ghters and could be misleading to the public. It should be noted that no one from the Fire Department investigative panel was contacted for comment about the report. As a member of the investigative panel, I would like to set the record straight. The Pompano Pelican article stated (the investigation) reports that a roof hook was not secured with the proper mounts and that the department had no guidelines on how to climb the ladder and no requirement for protective equipment. This statement is very misleading and must be clari ed. The fact is that the manufacturer, as well as the Fire Department, provided a comprehensive training program on the full operation of the new ladder truck prior to the truck being placed into service. This training program included instruction on how to climb the ladder and what protective equipment should be worn. These procedures are a standard in the re service and can be found in the manufacturers literature, as well as industry textbooks on aerial ladder operations. In fact, during the ladder climb, each member wore a NFPA Class I harness (ladder belt). The panel was simply recommending that the Fire Department formalize the training that was delivered into a written guideline, such as a Department standard operating procedure. In addition, the statement concerning the roof hook not being secured with the proper mounts is also misleading. It was clear in the investigation that Fire ghter Elliott did not grab the roof hook, but rather unintentionally dislodged the hook with his body during the initial fall. As such, the roof hook was not a factor in the accident. In addition to clarifying the statements made in the article, the conclusion reached by the investigative panel should have been presented. The panel determined that the comprehensive training provided by the manufacturer as well as the Departments Fire Training Division prior to placing the apparatus in service was more than adequate; therefore training was not considered a contributory factor in this accident. The training conducted on January 6, 2012 was not unlike training that occurs everyday in the re service across the country re ghters working to improve their pro ciency. The Fire Department personnel that participated in this training followed proper procedure for aerial operations. This type of accident could not have been predicted. While there are no published reports of accidents similar to this one occurring in the past, there are lessons learned from the results of the investigation that may help prevent similar occurrences in the future. Division Chief Michael Hohl, Pompano Beach Fire Rescue Deerfield Beach History at High Noon lecturer Juan Riera returns to Deerfield Beach to share stories of Floridas railroads at the annual Historical Society dinner and auction Saturday, June 2 at the Deerfield Train Station Museum. Riera, a historian from Miami, is well known for his lectures on pirate wrecks and sunken treasure in South Florida. He lectures at Nova Southeastern Universitys Lifelong Learning classes and has taught at FSU and Texas Tech. He also leads history tours in Florida and around the world. For this lecture, Riera will speak about the influence of Floridas railroad men, Henry Plant and Henry Flagler in the 20th century and how their legacies continue to this day. Everyone forgets how they influence our lives now every day, Riera said this week. Riera will also distribute free tickets to the Gold Coast Railroad Museum during his visit here. The local railroad museum has been reopened after a major refurbishment and this dinner will be its debut. Admission to the dinner/auction is $30 and RSVPs by May 25 would be appreciated. Dress is casual. The Railroad Museum is at 1300 W. Hillsboro Boulevard at the Tri-Rail Station.Historical Society dinner at Railroad Museum focuses on the lasting in uence of Flagler Pompano Beach On Monday, May 28, a small crowd will gather on Southeast 23 Avenue and East Atlantic Boulevard to wave on this citys annual Memorial Day parade. There wont be any Democrats, Republicans, men or women at this parade; they will all be people who have the character and the discipline to say thank you. Some of us will be black. Some of us will be illegal. Some of us will be white, and some of us will not speak English. But when we gather in that hot sun at 11 a.m., we will soon get thirsty, sweaty and hot. When that happens, especially the thirsty part, we will have a small inkling of what it could be like to be a wounded soldier, nearing death and staring up at a blazing sun. Whether we are Christians, Jews, Buddhists, Muslims, Atheists or Tree worshippers, well still be hot. Well feel our tongues swell just a bit, warning us of dehydration possibilities. About that time we will be able to reach into that ice chest and pull out some chilly water. But not those soldiers who happen to be black, white, Jews, illegal . you get it. Right? Of course, you get it. On May 28, Memorial Day, we are just people who are living in this countryliving is the operative word. On this day, we stand wherever we are to say thank you to that whatever or whomever we believe in, and give thanks for those men and women who have died in military service. It doesnt mean that we supported the war that killed him or her; it just means those people really deserve something from us, the living. Memorial Day is a holiday. Even the word holiday has a history of sacredness. It is derived from the Old English, h ligdg which is translated into Holy Day. So wherever you end up on this h ligdg, we hope you take the time to say thanks. And if you dont have any plans, check out Sightings in this paper for Memorial Day events in your city. Well be standing with you hot, sweaty and thirsty. Even if its holy hot on Memorial Day, we hope you show upBy Anne SirenPUBLISHER Memorial Day May 28

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The Pelican 7 Friday, May 25, 2012 Camp offers young sleuths a hands-on experienceLighthouse Point Summer camp for kids in Lighthouse Point will be an interactive experience where youngsters investigate a crime scene, learn to process evidence and get to conduct a mock investigation. CSI: Summer Camp will introduce children in rst through fth grades to biology, chemistry and physics as they study spatters, decomposition rates, contamination, ber analysis and other crime evidence. The camp location is at St. Paul the Apostle Catholic Church, 2700 NE 36 St., beginning Monday, June 11 through Friday, June 15, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Cost is $195 and includes snack but not lunch. Registration is being taken at the Doreen Gauthier Library by Rosemary Wilson, 954-946-6398. The camp is sponsored by the Kids Wealth Institute and the LHP Library. Nan Rich, keynote speaker at Democratic Womens Mad Hatters Tea Party Maggie Davidson and Senator Nan Rich. Jerry Ann Capotosto and Eileen Pangione. Mad Hat winners Wanda Francis, Jennifer Fletcher and Linda Eidinger. [Photos courtesy of the Democratic Womens Club]Tell The Pelican about your special event. 954-783-8700

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8 The PelicanFriday, May 25, 2012 Business matters The Pelican takes a look at local business owners. Call The Pelican to nd out how you can tell your story here because business matters. 954-783-8700. Briefs By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFWere the company that didnt need to take bail-out money because our cars were selling well, even in a bad economy, without tax payers money. says Brian Jewell who has been in the sales division of this dealership for the past four years. This Pompano Ford and Lincoln business, 2741 N. Federal Hwy. has been in this Pompano Beach location since 1974. Owned by Holman Automotive in South New Jersey, it has been connected with the Ford Motor Co. since 1924. As far as Jewell is concerned, the showroom is lled with Ford and Lincoln vehicles that will go up against and often surpass any new car on the road. He says, People who havent driven Fords lately are coming by often these days. They are hearing good reports from friends who own Fords. Many want to buy from an American company. The buzz is good because people want a quality reliable vehicle that performs and thats us. Then he gave The Pelican a run down on 2012 Ford models available in the showroom. The Fiesta is an ideal choice for rst-time buyers, students and those who drive a lot of miles every week. Its our economy car that gets 28 miles per gallon in town and about 38 on the highway. Sales of the Fiesta rise with the price of gas. The Fiesta is priced Brian Jewell is proud of the products offered at Pompano Ford and Lincoln DealershipPompano Ford Salesman, Brian Jewell introduces visitors to all of the 2012 showroom cars on display and is quick to explain the advantages of each. Hes proud to remind them that Ford made it through a bad economy without bailout money because Ford products have always been reliable and desirable. [Photo by Phyllis J. Neuberger]from mid-teens to low 20s. The completely redesigned Focus looks great and gets the same good mileage as the Fiesta, and it offers more room and upgrades. The Focus is priced from high teens to mid 20s. The Fusion is available as a regular vehicle and as a hybrid which means 41 miles per gallon around town. The hybrid runs on battery rst, and as the speed picks up at 45 miles per hour, gas takes over. This is our CRA to meet May 29Deer eld Beach There will be a CRA, Community Redevelopment Agency, meeting Tuesday, May 29 at 6:30 p.m. at City Hall, 150 NE 2nd Avenue, in the Commission Chambers. The meeting was rescheduled from May 8. For more information, visit www.Deer eldBeach.com.See FORD on page 17Memorial Day in Oakland ParkOakland Park A Memorial Day Remembrance ceremony is set for 11 a.m. on Monday, May 28, at the agpole at Jaco Pastorius Park, 4000 N. Dixie Hwy. Representatives of American Legion Post #222 will take part. Call 954-565-6501 for more information.Gourmet on WheelsOakland Park Oakland Park Main Street, in partnership with Big Dog Station, presents Gourmet on Wheels from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday, June 2, at 3148 NE 12 Ave. Food trucks and vendors will be in downtown Oakland Park for an evening of food and live music. For more information, call 754-214-0041 or 954-561-4304.

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The Pelican 9 Friday, May 25, 2012 Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFHillsboro Beach This small town stands to lose $20,000 in outstanding water bills, and according to accountant firm Severn Trent, there has never been a mechanism in place to shut off the water of customers who dont pay their water bills each month. Hillsboro lacks mechanism to turn off unpaid water accountsSaid a town hall spokesperson, We never really had anyone who didnt pay. Developer John Kennelly and his son may be two property owners reluctant to pay the bill. Between them they own five properties, four of them vacant parcels where the last payment received for those addresses was in September of 2010. Four of the properties showed a balance owed as of March of this year. City Clerk June Marie Mark said the meters were pulled on the Kennelly properties last year. Mark said she did not know the names or addresses that Ken Cassel, a Severn Trent representative, referenced at the last town meeting. Cassel urged a resolution be put in place to allow the town to turn off water for non-payment. Mark said no resolution has yet been presented for the towns next commission meeting Tuesday, June 5 but Mayor Dan Dodge said he is confident the commission will address the matter and take appropriate measures. Dodge also said not many property owners are delinquent. Memorial Day May 28

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10 The PelicanFriday, May 25, 2012 Making a DifferencePhyllis J. Neuberger wants your suggestions about people who are making a difference. Call 954-7838700. By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFDeerfield Beach Carolyn Morris is the executive director of the Deerfield Beach Historical Society, or DBHS, located in the Butler House at 380 E. Hillsboro Blvd. in Deerfield Beach. She began her job 5 years ago, not long after moving to the area with husband, Jack, and their two young adult sons. I really knew nothing about Deerfield Beach, nor about the Butler House, she admits, adding, and now Im immersed in the house and the history of this fascinating town. Between budget cuts and the economy, this formerly salaried lady says she is now a volunteer. Now, Im doing the job for love. Of course, I hope things will pick up and that local businesses and residents will once again support this important Butler House and its contents. After all, our society and the house are very valuable historical resources with artifacts and data accessible to the public, school children and future historians. The Pelican learned a lot about Deerfield Beach on this visit. In 1898, the city with 20 settlers, got its first post office. Most of the settlers were farmers who thought the beach was worthless because nothing would Visit Deer eld Historical Society, Butler House, with Carolyn Morris for a nostalgic trip back in time Furnishings at the Butler House, still intact, were used by Alice Butler in her home which was furnished in 1923. Above Carolyn Morris is seated in the parlor. Other rooms showcase the china cabinet [top] and the dining room that offered a view of the gardens. [Photos by Phyllis Neuberger]See BUTLER on page 22Gourmet food trucks keep on serving it up Lighthouse Point The citys Cultural Arts Committee and Lighthouse Point Chamber of Commerce will host the rst Food Truck event and Expo, on Sunday, May 27 between 5 and 9 p.m. at Frank Mc Donough Park, 3500 NE 27 Ave. The event is for guests of all ages. This will be a great event over Memorial Day weekend, and the chamber is glad to partner with the new Cultural Committee to put this together, said Lucille Pignataro, outgoing Lighthouse Point Chamber president The Lighthouse Point Cultural Arts Committee was formed last year by current Commissioner Becky Lysengen to help generate a variety of cultural events in the city. Guests are welcome to enjoy food from South Floridas renowned food trucks, dance to music by Lighthouse Points very own Joe Balistreri, and play fun games said Lysengen. Creative balloons, face-painting and magic fun will be provided by Strawberry the Clown. Visit www.lhpchamber.com Open Mic NightOn June 8, the microphone is open for local talent of all ages. The event takes place from 7 to 11 p.m. at Daily Grind Coffee House and Cafe, 3650 N. Federal Hwy., Lighthouse Point. Call 954-657-8355. Memorial Day May 28

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The Pelican 11 Friday, May 25, 2012 By Malcolm McClintockPELICAN STAFF(May 18th 2012 at Galuppis Restaurant in Pompano Beach, this interview was translated from French) To this day, I do not know who my father was, says a wistful Alain Blatier, a resident of Normandy who was recently in Pompano Beach for his annual pilgrimage to America. My mother is 92 years old and still refuses to tell me the truth. I know something terrible must have happened for her to keep this secret locked up inside her for so long . .Forgotten victims the wretched whispers of war still echo loudly in the hearts of the children who were cheated by war of childhoodBorn in Nazi-occupied France in 1941, at the height of the great con agration, Blatiers mother abandoned him. He spent several years being shuf ed from one safe house to another, one makeshift orphanage to another, one strangers arms to another Finally, long after the guns had gone silent and the res of lunacy has been extinguished did Blatiers mother come looking for him. She later told me that she tried to pretend I had never existed, says the Frenchman. but eventually, she decided to track me down. I was then sent away to a boarding school near Paris until I was an adult, he. says Blatier is the epitome of the forgotten European generation who struggled to de ne normalcy in the post WWII era. Eventually, Blatier enjoyed a successful career as a journalist. He travelled the world writing and reporting for his French employers. From the deepest recesses of See War on page 18 Visiting from Normandy and wearing his Omaha Beach Golf Club shirt, Alain Blatier enjoys a quick bite at the Pompano Beach Municipal Golf Course. [Photo by Malcolm McClintock]

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12 The PelicanFriday, May 25, 2012 Advertise with The Pelican! 954-783-8700 an encore A Field of Gold by Sting. This may have been added to the orchestras repertoire in an effort to reach the not -so-regular chamber orchestra ticket buyer. It turned out to be a very well written arrangement of what is now perhaps considered a popular standard. This chamber orchestra is a gem for all the residents of Pompano Beach and the surrounding areas; we are fortunate to have such talent in our own backyard. I for one look forward to seeing and hearing more of them in the future. The Gold Coast Youth Orchestra is a non-profit organization offering young musicians from middle through undergraduate school an opportunity to study and perform standard chamber orchestral literature. These young musicians attend schools from all over Broward County. For more information about the Gold Coast Youth Orchestra, visit www.gycofl.org or Facebook.Christopher Siren received his BA in music at Southeastern Louisiana University. He is a teacher and performer. His studio is located in Pom pano Beach. He can be reached at 954-9463197.OrchestraContinued from page 3Local grads can walk away with diplomas, LPN and ahead of the game in college Chamber honors Broward teachersBy Judy VikPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach The focus should be on the whole child and not just the FCAT, Broward County School Board Member Robin Bartleman said at a Teacher Appreciation Luncheon last Robin Peters, pre-school principal at Highlands Christian School, with Ginger Alvarez, teacher of the year. [Staff photos by Judy Vik] Roberta Greenberg, teacher of the year at Bright Horizons, with Carol Levin, assistant principal.See TEACHERS on page 13

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The Pelican 13 Friday, May 25, 2012 week. Bartleman was the keynote speaker at a luncheon, sponsored by the Pompano Beach Chamber, at John Knox Village. She said 56 percent of Broward teachers have masters or doctorate degrees. And Broward has the highest number of board-certi ed teachers in the state. The district has received an A grade from the state. Bartleman said the district has plans for numerous reforms, including the conversion of a bus lot on Stirling Road into an automotive service school with training for bus and truck drivers. A military academy is planned at Hollywood Hills High School. Currently, students enrolled in College Academy can attend high school and Broward College simultaneously and wind up with a high school diploma and an AS degree. At Ely High School, students enrolled in the licensed practical nursing program can earn both diplomas and become LPNs. Bartleman urged the audience to become involved as partners with the schools and suggested everyone get involved with neighborhood schools as volunteers. Bartleman said, We give every child a chance to succeed. This is the most important job we have, to educate our youth. We need your expertise, she said. 2012 Teachers of the Year were recognized. They are: Djuna Robinson, Blanche Ely High School; Roberta Greenberg, Bright Horizons; Lisa Dima, Cresthaven Elementary; Marissa Singer-Orr, Charles Drew Elementary; Dana Thomson, Cross Creek School; Johnnie Sloan, Crystal Lake Middle School; Kathleen Rains, Cypress Elementary; Samuel Smith II, Cypress Run Education Center; Also: Sabrina ColstonLeslie, Dave Thomas Education Center; Sarah Hotaling, Deer eld Beach Elementary; Dawn Boothe, Deer eld Beach High School; Catherine Sanghera, Deer eld Beach Middle School; Simone Kent, Deer eld Park Elementary; Giner Alvarez, Highlands Christian Academy; Lisa Webel, Lighthouse Christian School; Zan Davis, Robert Markham Elementary; And: Heather Martin, McNab Elementary; Karen Deleuze, Norcrest Elementary; Junoisier Allen, Palmview Elementary; Mary Mannarino, Park Ridge Elementary; Rhonda Leon, Pompano Beach Elementary; Candace Gregg, Pompano Beach Middle School; Carol Margaret Mackey, Pompano Beach High School; Althean Clarke-Smith, Sanders Park Elementary; and Amy Stender, Tedder Elementary. Rosa Carranza, president of the Parent-Teacher Association at Cresthaven Elementary School, attended the Teacher Appreciation Luncheon with Lisa Dima, Cresthaven Teacher of the Year, and Joshua Kisten, principal.TeachersContinued from page 12

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14 The PelicanFriday, May 25, 2012 Miami In April, the median sales price of singlefamily homes in Broward County was $205,000, up 17 percent compared to April 2011 and 14 percent compared to the previous month, according to the 25,000-member MIAMI Association of REALTORS and the local Multiple Listing Service, or MLS,systems. The median sales price for condominiums increased 17.4 percent to $84,300 compared to a year prior and 14.3 percent compared to the previous month. Broward County condominium prices have increased 15 out of the last 16 months. The median sales prices for non-distressed properties sold in April in Broward were $264,000 for singlefamily homes and $99,750 for condominiums. The average sales price for total single-family homes increased 12 percent, from $256,979 to $287,302. The average sales prices for condominiums rose 10 percent, from $120,689 in April 2011 to $137,173 last month. The average sales prices for non-distressed properties sold in April in Broward were $374,670 for single-family homes and $166,854 for condominiums. Home prices in Broward County are experiencing double-digit appreciation much sooner than expected, which is a very positive sign, said Rick Burch, 2012 president of the Broward County Board of Governors of the MIAMI Association of REALTORS. Homes sales also remain at historically strong levels, which re ects the demand that is driving home prices in our area. Statewide median sales prices in April increased 10.2 percent to $144,350 for condominiums and 16.1 percent to $108,000 for single-family homes, according to data from Florida Realtors Industry Data and Broward County Home Prices Continue to RiseAnalysis department and vendor partner 10K Research and Marketing. The national median existing-home price for all housing types was $177,400 in April, a 10.1 percent increase from April 2011.Broward Housing Inventory Declines 33 PercentThe inventory of residential listings in Broward County over the last year has decreased 30 percent from 15,781 to 11,086. Compared to the previous month, the total inventory of homes dropped four percent. Total housing inventory nationally See HOUSING on page 16Northwest Branch Library, 580 NW 3 Ave., Pompano Beach, from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. 954-786-2186. 5-26 Famous Asian American Professionals presentation from noon to 1 p.m. at the Northwest Branch Library, 580 NW 3 Ave., Pompano Beach, from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. 954-786-2186. 5-28 American Legion Memorial Day in Deer eld Beach : 9:15 a.m., Pineview Cemetery, 400 SW 4 St.; 9:45 a.m., Memorial Cemetery, 380 NE 6 Ave.; 10:30 a.m., International Fishing Pier, 200 NE 21 Ave. The observation at the pier will include a prayer service and a 21 gun salute. 5-28 Patriotic Family Day in Pompano Beach: 9 a.m., Westview Cemetery, 2100 W. Copans Rd.; 11 a.m., Pompano Beach Cemetery, 400 SE 23 Ave. An open house at Pompano Beach American Legion Post 142, 171 SW 2 St., will be held after the ceremonies and feature performances by New Young Patriots and Heavenly Hands. 6-1, 6-2 Used book sale from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Oakland Park Library, 1298 NE 37 St., organized by the Oakland Park Friends of the Library. On June 2 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. 954-630-4370. See SIGHTINGS on page 16SightingsContinued from page 2

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The Pelican 15 Friday, May 25, 2012 Home alertsOne of the biggest crime problems in the city of Oakland Park is residential burglaries. This year BSO has arrested 26 people for breaking into homes, Lt. Al Hubrig, executive officer for the Oakland Park District said. And 80 percent of the arrests were made because someone in the community called us, Hubrig added. The bad guys dont do one crime. They do many crimes. And they go where the crime is easiest. We need to make it so they go elsewhere, he said. You know your neighbors. If something looks suspicious to you, its suspicious to us. If youre unsure, Hubrig advised giving police a call and making note of a cars license number and a description of the suspicious person and his or her clothing. Lt. Linda Canada Stuck reminded residents to lock their vehicles and remove anything of value inside that would attract burglars.Illegal pain clinics bustedPain clinics were once a huge problem in the city. After hundreds of arrests, cities, including Oakland Park, passed stricter laws making it more difficult to open clinics that dispense pain medication. Today only three local pain clinics remain, Debbie Wallace, code investigator, said.Clinics in Broward are downIn 2007, there were four pain clinics in Broward County. Two years later there were 130, Lamberti said. Today there are 57. Oakland Park was ground zero. We dont know why unless it was the location near I-95, he said. Curbing the clinics took legislative changes from Tallahassee and the city commission along with police going undercover to make arrests, he said.Tax return crimes in the spotlightIn the last two years, police have seen an increase in the numbers of false tax returns filed, Sgt. Richard LaCerra said. As a result, BSO put together an operation identifying several tax businesses operating without proper licenses. Hubrig explained how this crime works. People walk into tax business offices prepared to file returns. A person may be expecting a $1,500 rebate, but the unscrupulous business owner can find ways to increase the return to $5,000 since returns are not audited prior to sending the tax rebate checks. The business owner charges $2,000 for filing, and the client goes home with twice the money he thought he was getting But in the end, after the audit, the IRS can charge the taxpayer with filing a false return. Hubrig adds that by the time the IRS acts, the tax business that filed the return will be long gone. One business, opened for only two weeks, had received $1 million in tax returns. Besides being charged with falsifying tax returns, these victims who had written their social security numbers on the forms are vulnerable for identification theft. If you give someone your SS number, Hubrig said, be sure you get some identification from that person.Brushing up on preventionThe Sheriffs office also offers crime prevention programs. Members of a neighborhood response team, led by Deputy Ira Rubinstein, will come to Oakland Park homes and advise residents on how to secure their properties to deter crime. They also offer drowning prevention programs where they teach children how to get to the side of a swimming pool. Thirty-two residents currently volunteer in the local Citizen Observer Patrol program. They patrol neighborhoods and assist with DUI checkpoints and help at the courthouse information desk. Call 954202-3131.FraudContinued from page 1 Broward Sheriff Al Lamberti meets with Oakland Park resident Rocky Fodero following a Town Hall meeting at North Andrews Community Center. [Staff photo by Judy Vik] Memorial Day May 28

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16 The PelicanFriday, May 25, 2012Advertise 954-783-8700! rose 9.5 percent at the end of April but was 20.6 percent below a year ago. The remarkable recovery of the Broward housing market bene ts our community at large, as real estate is an integral part of the economy, said Ernesto Vega, president-elect of the Broward County Board of Governors of the MIAMI Association of REALTORS. Unlike other markets throughout the U.S., demand for housing in Broward County should remain strong long into the future due to both U.S. and international buyers who are increasingly attracted to the local area. In Broward County, single-family home sales increased 6.0 percent, from 1,124 in April 2011 to 1,190 last month. Condominium sales dropped 4.4 percent in April compared to a year earlier, from 1,645 to 1,572. Statewide sales of existing single-family homes totaled 17,544 in April 2012, down 0.7 percent compared to a year ago. Statewide condominium sales totaled 9,765, down 4.9 percent from those sold in April 2011. Nationally, sales of existing single-family homes, townhomes, condominiums, and co-ops increased 3.4 percent from March and were 10 percent higher than they were in April 2011, according to the National Association of Realtors (NAR).Distressed PropertiesIn April, 38 percent of all closed residential sales in Broward County were distressed, including REOs, or Bank-Owned Properties, and short sales, compared to 50 percent in April 2011 and 41 percent the previous month.International Buyers Fuel Cash SalesIn April, cash sales accounted for 64 percent of all residential sales, 40 percent of single-family and 83 percent of condominium closings, in Broward County. Nearly 90 percent of international buyers in South Florida purchase properties all cash. Nationally, all-cash sales fell to 29 percent in April from 32 percent in March and 21 percent in April 2011 re ecting the stronger presence of international buyers in the South Florida real estate market. Note: Statistics in this HousingContinued from page 15 news release may vary depending on reporting dates. Statistics reported by MIAMI are not impacted by NARs rebenchmarking efforts. MIAMI reports exact statistics directly from its MLS system. About the MIAMI Association of REALTORS The MIAMI Association of REALTORS was chartered by the National Association of Realtors in 1920 and is celebrating its 90th year of service to Realtors, the buying and selling public, and the communities in South Florida. Comprised of four organizations, the Residential Association, the Realtors Commercial Alliance, the Broward County Board of Governors, and the International Council, it represents more than 25,000 real estate professionals in all aspects of real estate sales, marketing, and brokerage. It is the largest local association in the National Association of Realtors, and has partnerships with more than 100 international organizations worldwide. MIAMIs of cial website is www.miamire.com.SightingsContinued from page 146-1 Friday Evening Social at Sol Children Theatre, 3333 N. Federal Highway, Boca Raton, from 6 to 8 p.m. Meet the actors, dancers, directors and teachers. 561-447-8829 6-2 & 3 Intergalactic Bead Show & Sale from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center; 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach. Visit www.beadshows.com or call 888-729-6904. 6-2 Gourmet on Wheels from 5 to 9 p.m. on Northeast 12 Avenue, Oakland Park. 754-214-0041. 6-3 Rumplestiltskin auditions from 1 to 3 p.m. at Sol Children Theatre, 3333 N. Federal Highway, Boca Raton. Auditions also on June 5 from 6 to 8 p.m. By appointment only. 561-4478829. 6-4 Preschool Storytime, ages two to ve, from 10:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the Wilton Manors Library, 500 NE 26 St. 954-390-2195. See SIGHTINGS on page 18

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The Pelican 17 Friday, May 25, 2012 premier seller from the low 20s to low 30s. Jim Heidisch just bought a 2012 Fusion that is not a hybrid. He says, Jim Brown from their service department recommended me to Brian Jewell, and I would do the same. Brian was so helpful. Its a great car, and Im very pleased with the mileage. Jewell paused here to talk about loaded features. Loaded means luxury and optional upgrades of which there are many. Many clients are willing to wait the eight to 12 weeks it takes to have us order the exact car they want, in the color they want, with the exact options they choose. And thats what they get direct from the factory. The Taurus is still the agship, full size sedan which continues to be in demand by space lovers who feel more comfortable and safer in a big car. The Crossovers are vehicles that ride like cars but have the space of an SUV. Ford offers three ne crossovers: the Escape, the Edge and the Explorer which are currently the hottest sellers because of look and function. They sit up higher for a better view of the road and are great for a family with sporting gear. The Expedition is great for those who need even more room than the Crossover buyer. Jewell names the F150 as the dealerships mainstay because it can be a work truck or a family vehicle. In June the redesigned 2013 version of the Ford Escape will be in the showroom. The 2013 Fusion will be arriving in early fall. Jewell says Were already writing orders for both.Luxurious LincolnsThe ve luxury Lincolns available run the gamut from mid to full size. Each model has its own selling points and advantages. All models boast heated and air conditioned front seats, back up censors, four-year, or 50,000 miles, bumper to bumper warranty and no charge maintenance for the same period. We hear from customers that our technology is ahead of the rest, Jewell says, adding, The sync enables drivers to answer the phone and use voice activated music players hands free. Although this agency no longer carries the Mercury line, Ken Ringwood has nothing but praise for Brian Jewell, saying I wanted a used, 2008 Mercury Sable Premier in mint condition with low mileage. I searched the Internet for six months, but Brian is the one who found me a perfect car. He was outstanding. He got me the lowest and the best price in the country. Asked what he drives, Jewell replies, I drive a Ford Edge. This crossover is perfect for my family which includes two daughters. I even can throw in a bike if I need to do so. Open Mon. to Fri. 8:30 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Sat. 9 to 6; Sun. 12 to 5. Call 954-7828110 or Jewell on 954-7757017. People who havent driven Fords lately are coming by often these days. They are hearing good reports from Ford owners. Many want to buy American. The buzz is good. People want a quality reliable vehicle that performs and thats us. FordContinued from page 8

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18 The Pelican Friday, May 25, 2012 Africa to bustling MiddleEastern bazaars to the most exotic enclaves of Asia, this solitary man had overcome extraordinary odds to become a seemingly well-adjusted and productive human being. During a short-lived mariage, Blatier produced a lovely daughter who has now given birth to a grandson. Miraculously, the wheel of life never ceases to turn despite the abominations of Man. Blatier is now a member of the Omaha Beach Golf Course, where he plays the game next to the once bloodsoaked cliffs of Northern France. There are so many white crosses nearby We will never forget the sacri ces the Americans and others made for the cause of freedom, he said. My mother once let slip that my biological father was a very important man. says 71-year-old Blatier. But I do not know for which side he fought. Who knows? Maybe I am half German The atrocities of war are a product of all combatants. The scars do not discriminate between who is wrong and who is right, who is guilty and who is innocent. WarContinued from page 11A quaint port near Trouville (Northern France) still conceals many secrets from an abhorrent chapter in human history. [Photo by Ernie Gutierrez] Memorial Day May 28 6-7 Wilton Manors Mayors Business Roundtable Breakfast meets June 7 from 8:30 to 10 a.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive. SightingsContinued from page 16 See SIGHTINGS on page 25

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The Pelican 19 Friday, May 25, 2012 CandidatesContinued from page 2of $8,400 a year plus benefits and commissioners make $7,200 per year plus benefits. In September, commissioners denied themselves a two percent cost of living adjustment. Ezrol advised commissioners that they can vote to allow a remaining candidate to be automatically elected, if his or his opponent exits the campaign, but they have to come up with some kind of mechanism that would deal with the situation if it ever occurred.New parking lots to be pavedCommissioners also approved work paving the citys newly purchased parking lots along Northeast 8 Terrace, between Northeast 26 Street and Wilton Drive. Parking has been a leading issue for the city for years with residents, visitors and business owners regularly complaining that there isnt enough parking available along Wilton Drive. Recently, city commissioners approved the purchase of two properties for a total of about $400,000 and entered into an agreement with Kids In Distress to use that property for parking; all three properties are adjacent to each other and will be paved as one single lot To fund the purchases, the city has borrowed $1.1 million specifically for parking improvements. Chen & Associates, an engineering firm that has done work for the city in the past, has been hired to complete the project and estimates the cost will be about $29,000 and would take up to three months to complete. The estimated number of parking spaces created would be between 38 and 45. At a previous meeting, Commissioner Scott Newton expressed an interest in seeing the city eventually tear down the Acapulco Lindo Restaurant, located on Wilton Drive south of the city lots, to build a parking structure. The whole thing, I think, would be a home run, said Newton.

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20 The Pelican Friday, May 25, 2012 ShorelineContinued from page 1Thats an overly simplistic explanation of the woes residents living on the north one-mile of Hillsboro Beach have been experiencing for years. The towns erosion hotspot has been renourished multiple times with the same result: continuing erosion. A recent study by coastal engineers of Coastal Systems International concluded that this hotspot could not be controlled by any physical means, i.e. groins or breakwaters both above and underneath the water. Adding sand to the beach at regular intervals is the only solution, CSI said. Not so, replies Rehage. The 27-year-old molecular biologist from the University of Puget Sound got his degree in 2008 and went to work promoting a product which he claims reverses erosion by cleansing the sand and establishing an ecosystem that generates flora and fauna the organisms that keep beaches running as they should. Rehage, vice president of a company called GreenBeach, was in Hillsboro Beach Saturday along with the firms strategist David Stidham to take a look at the beach and discuss its problems with Commissioner Claire Schubert, the towns beach commissioner. They had been alerted by a Pelican story about CSIs grim north beach report. Rehage and Stidham had come from Miami where they had met with State Sen. Gwen Margolis and others interested in preserving coastlines. They have been in touch with state officials and the University of Floridas Dr. Robert Dean, an expert on sea level change. They are at the beginning of their mission to educate public officials on the pollutants that affect the coastlines and how to resolve the situation. Their product, a blend of plant proteins, has no carbon footprint they say, is easy to put on a beach, and has shown some amazing results. The protein cleans the sand, withdraws salt from the water and encourages the growth of sea oats which provide a natural scaffold for sand and a habitat for sea life. The product is placed into a trench dug at the back of the beach at the dune line where it does its magic cleansing the sand, deleting the salt from the water and encouraging plant growth. Rehage said he can see changes in topography almost immediately as sand offshore becomes clean and settles out of suspension. The product pulls the oils and other pollutants off the sand grains allowing better accretion. Its an alternative approach, Rehage said. But when you look at the success rate of modern coastal engineers, you see their methods dont work. So far the product has been delivered only to private homeowners whose properties are threatened by erosion. In one instance, a user in Cape Cod in danger of losing a home, ended up with 250 feet of new beach within six months. Other pilot projects in New Jersey and in France have also been successful. The representatives of GreenBeach, believe their product, registered as a fertilizer in Massachusetts, would even countermand the scouring effect from the Deerfield Beach groins which are blamed for the north beach erosion. There is a possibility it can desalinate water and make it potable. We dont yet know the extent of what it can do, said GreenBeach president Oscar Plotkin. But he said, the cost is a fraction of current erosion control methods. But the GreenBeach team acknowledges that their attempt to commercialize their product will involve contacting a lot of people who will be skeptical. One of them is Commissioner Schubert who said the town lost considerable money on another pilot project, pressure equalizing modules that were buried in the sand and which were removed so a $6 million nourishment of the north beach could be permitted. Schubert had questions about the cost, the difficulty of putting the product into the sand, and if it would be permitted by the state, federal and local beach regulators. The cost is perhaps as little at $200,000 a mile, Rehage said, and digging a trench is not a problem. Permitting will be the major issue and on that subject. Shubert and Stidham are hopeful, but cannot predict the outcome. Schubert also asked if GreenBeach would absorb some of the cost if down the roadthe commission agrees to a pilot project. We are very flexible, Stidham said. Peter Rehage, vice president of GreenBeach LLC makes a point with Hillsboro Beach City Commissioner Claire Schubert. [Staff photo]

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The Pelican 21 Friday, May 25, 2012

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22 The Pelican Friday, May 25, 2012 grow on it. On June 25, 1925, the city was incorporated to become Deerfield, after the deer that roamed the area. We did not want to be gobbled up by a little village to the north, called Boca Raton, Morris says, smiling. They had their eyes on our beach and wanted us to be part of their city. In 1939, we added the word Beach to our name to attract tourists who were beginning to discover us. Once they did, we became a boom area for both visitors and permanent residents. We now have a population of about 70,000 residents. She continues. My family and I are very involved in Kiwanis, Relay for Life and all of the city events. I bring a tent and a table to most of them to enlighten people about our colorful history. Morris recently put on a wig and wire glasses to become Alice Butler, and did a reenactment of Butlers life in Deer eld in 1923. Those attending had little trouble imaging Alice, getting up from her wicker chair to get on with her sewing, vacuuming and dusting of all the collectibles in her china closet. Morris smiled and said, It was a fun fund raiser for Relay for Life, held under the Banyan tree at the house where Alice Butler lived until her death in 1977, at the age of 92. The Deer eld Beach High School Jazz band performed and the event was a big success, raising over $500. The Deer eld Beach Historical Society has 155 registered members including honorary and inactive. Morris estimates that about 80 are dues paying members, most of whom show up for events and meetings. From September until May, theres a monthly lecture series, called History at High Noon. Because of severe budget cuts, Morris says that the Society will have to be run by volunteers like herself. We hope to be open on Saturdays from 12 until 4 p.m. and on other days if we get a good number of volunteers for whom we will provide docent training. This is such an interesting volunteer job. The Butler House is on the National Registry of Historic Places. Built in 1923, it is lled with original furnishings which make a visitor feel he or she has slipped into the illustrated pages of a favorite old book. The living room with its wicker furniture, the dining room with lace tablecloth, owers and candlesticks and bedroom pieces are all original furnishings chosen by Alice Butler. Next to the breakfast nook is an open area displaying a 1920 vintage sewing machine and vacuum cleaner. Many of the framed pictures on the replace mantle and on the walls are original. Some created by a local artist, Louis Mezian, who paints historical sites and donates half of his commissions to the Society. On June 2, the Historical Society will have its annual dinner and auction at the Deer eld Beach Train Station, built in 1926 and also in the National Registry. Morris says, We hope to have at least 75 people attending. It will be a catered event with a guest speaker, historian Juan Riera whose subject will be the history of railroads in Florida. We welcome volunteers and guests. Tickets will be $30 per person. At the top of Morriss wish list is the hope that local businesses and residents will step up to the plate and hit a home run for this important Historical Society. We have a campaign going right now The Deer eld Beach Historical Society is a non pro t, 501c3, educational organization open to the public for schools, group and individual tours. Founded in 1973 to identify, preserve and maintain historical sites in the Deer eld Beach area, it has placed four local structures in the National Registry: the 1920 Deer eld School, 1923 Butler House, 1926 Deereld Train Station and 1926 Deer eld Beach Elementary School. The society welcomes artifacts, written data and verbal histories for preservation and accessibility to the public. Tax deductible corporate and professional sponsorships are encouraged and welcomed.called One hundred for one hundred which translates into 100 donors of $100 each will go a long way toward helping our nances. We will list all of our sponsors on our web site. To volunteer or to reserve tickets for the dinner on June 2, call 954-429-0378 or visit www.Deer eld-history.orgAbout the house . View a period vacuum cleaner and an electric sewing machine. ButlerContinued from page 10

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The Pelican 23 Friday, May 25, 2012 MoaveroContinued from page 1came on board as an employee. After the original owners had sold the business to Scott Sutton, Moavero stayed on running the operational part of the business. Recently, Moavero bought the business after Sutton retired and has been running it ever since. Executive Printing & Mailing has a unique niche in the industry because in addition to both traditional and digital printing, they handle complete mailings in house. When questioned why she would take over a business in this slow economy, she said, If I can make the business successful in this economy, well be flourishing when it finally turns around. Moavero explains that as a full service shop, they can take a complete concept from design to delivery whether its a business card, a magazine, a sign or bulk mailing. Its good that way, she explains. No one can blame the printer or the mailer or the color or anything because we do it all. Sometimes we may argue among ourselves, but the customer never hears it. And she adds that its the end result that is critical in this business. This 4 entrepreneur is always on the go. Ric Green, CEO of the Pompano Beach Chamber explains that its Moaveros personal tool kit that makes it all work. Executive Printing & Mailing is a small company that competes with larger businesses that employ multiple layers of internal structure. Under Leilas business plan she and her team are able to work effectively and efficiently by rotating and scheduling the work of her team so that machines get maximum usage reducing down time and overhead. Leila is one of those high energy people, who just never stops moving forward. She accomplishes in a day what most business owners struggle to complete in two days. And Green, like most of Moaveros admirers has his favorite short joke when it comes to this petite giant. He says, With her energy and drive, if she were taller, she could play for the Heat! Moavero says the jokes go with the territory, but she laughs them off and puts all that energy into the grander scheme of things. She serves as a board member for Rotary of Pompano Beach, the Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce and the Customer Council of Broward County Bulk Mailers. All of these volunteer board positions keep Moaveros smiling face throughout the community behind tables in numerous charitable and service events. For this story, The Pelican had to track her down in Omaha where she was visiting her son, Jonathan, an airman, his wife Tina and their new son Derek, four months old. Leilas younger son, Andrew, graduates high school this year. Ray Doucette, Jr. her partner in life also helps keep the business going. Winning this years award tells me I am going in the right direction, she says. This confirms that I am doing what I should be doing. And to other women who may be thinking about their own business futures, Moavero will be the first one to encourage them. Go for it, she says. People here dont care if you are a woman. They care if its right. They care if its on time. They look at the business not the woman. They dont care if you are short and tell really bad jokes. Moavero also gives her city a hats off when it comes to business. Its about Pompano Beach. I love this community. Businesses work with charities. People really seem to care about each other here. Moavero will be honored next week with other chamber winners throughout the county at the Renaissance Hotel, Plantation. The award ceremony is sponsored by the Broward County Council of Chambers of Commerce. The Pelican congratulates Leila Moavero as this years Greater Pompano Beach Small Business Person of the Year. Memorial Day May 28

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24 The Pelican Friday, May 25, 2012 WORSHIP DIRECTORY: Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad. Rev. Hyvenson Joseph By Rabbi David MarkTHE JEWISH CENTER AT TEMPLE SHOLOM Here in mono-seasonal Florida, it may be difficult to envision a springtime festival, but that was certainly the original meaning of Shavuote: a harvest feast thanking God for allowing the earth to bring forth its bounty. This was all the more remarkable, considering the irregular rainfall which Israel received in those days, in contrast to, say, Egypt, where the Nile River rose seasonally and reliably to irrigate the Delta. After the liberation drama of Passover and the leafy color of mid-autumn Sukkot, Shavuote is relatively bare of symbolism. It commemorates the Giving of the Torah, the Five Books of Moses, on Mt. Sinai. Its principal message is that of Torah studybut that is a perpetual commandment, incumbent upon Jews the year round. There is little, therefore, to make Shavuote unique. Its focus is culinary rather than spiritual: Jews customarily eat dairy foods on this holiday, for various reasons. Studying Torah is compared to eating milk and honey, as the Hebrew Bible has it: Honey and milk are under your tongue [Song of Songs 4:11]. Another reason is that Torah scholars are traditionally poor, and cannot afford to eat much meat. This is the only holiday on which Shavuote, the Jewish Festival of Weekswe all get to impersonate Torah scholars, simply by eating dairy. Finally, we recall that when the Israelites were sojourning in the wilderness and received the Torah at Mt. Sinai, it included the laws for keeping kosher. The Israelites realized that their meat was not kosher, so they ate only dairy foods for a day while they slaughtered cattle in the kosher style and got fresh meat. Reading the Biblical Book of Ruth is an important feature of this holiday. Its themes, those of tribal loyalty, the harvest and romance, are all crucial to the Shavuote festival. Despite being a member of an enemy tribe, Moab, Ruth remains steadfast and stays with her beleaguered mother-in-law, Naomi, even after Ruths husband dies. The two bereft women return to Israel during the harvest season, and Ruth becomes a gleaner in the fields in order to gain sustenance. There, she meets Boaz, a distant relative of Naomis, who later marries her. God rewards Ruths steadfastness by making her the great-grandmother of David, who becomes the mightiest king of Israel and ancestor of Messiah. Commemorating as it does the Giving of the Torah on Mt. Sinai to the Israelites, and from them to the entire world, it is useful to remember its most basic law: Love your neighbor as yourself. The rabbis in the Talmud interpreted this to mean that, If you know what hurts your neighbors, and do nothing to relieve their pain, how can you truly say you love them? As Shavuote begins this Saturday night, May 26, let us reflect on the Golden Rule, and consider how we may begin the pursuit of peace in our own town, our own neighborhood, and in our hearts. Happy Shavuote If you know what hurts your neighbors, and do nothing to relieve their pain, how can you truly say you love them?

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The Pelican 25 Friday, May 25, 2012 Memorial Day May 28SightingsContinued from page 186-8 Beach Sounds Concert Series from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Main Beach Parking Lot, 149 SE 2 Ave., Deereld Beach. Performances by David Shelley and Bluestone. Event is free. 954-480-4429. 6-9 Deer eld Beach City Shred from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. at the Recycling DropOff Center, 401 SW 4 St. One to ve boxes is $10. Six to ten boxes is $20. Checks only. 954-480-4379. 6-9 Junior Bass Tournament for ages 12 to 17 at Quiet Waters Park, 401 S. Powerline Road, Deer eld Beach. Cost is $75. 954-9851980. 6-9 Pompano Beach -Free car seat safety check event from 9 a.m. to noon. Call 954-786-4510 to schedule an appointment. 6-12 Oakland Park/ Wilton Manors Council Chamber luncheon at 11:30 a.m. at Gallery One Resort Hotel, 2670 E. Sunrise Blvd., Fort Lauderdale. 954-4626000. 6-14 Broward Shell Club meets at 6:30 p.m. at 6:30 pm. at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach. Beverly Dolezal will present shelling in the Bahamas. 954296-5633.FridaysThe Pompano Beach Rotary Club meets Fridays at 12:15 p.m. at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. 954-786-3274.SaturdaysPony rides are available at Sand & Spurs Equestrian Park, 1600 NE 5 Ave., Pompano Beach, from 9 to 11:30 a.m. Cost is $3 per ride. 954786-4507. The Pompano Beach Kiwanis Club Westside meets the rst and third Saturdays of the month at 8:30 a.m. at the E. Pat Larkins Community Center, 520 MLK Blvd., Pompano Beach. 954-782-8096. The Deer eld Beach West Kiwanis Club meets the second and fourth Saturdays of the month at 9 a.m. at Westside Park, 445 SW 2 St., Deer eld Beach. 954-54-7329883. Kayak rentals are available Saturdays and Sundays at Richardson Historic Park, 1937 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Visit www.AtlanticCoastKayak.com or 954-7810073 for rates. The Wilton Manors Green Market is held every Saturday and Sunday at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. 954-592-0381. The Deer eld Beach West Kiwanis Club meets the second and fourth Saturdays of the month at 9 a.m. at Westside Park, 445 SW 2 St., Deer eld Beach. 954-54-7329883.SundaysSt. Elizabeths of Hungary Parish hosts a pancake breakfast at 3331 NE 10 Terrace, Pompano Beach, on every third Sunday of the month from 7:30 a.m. to noon. The breakfast bene ts the Parish. 954-263 8415.MondaysPlay ping-pong from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Cost is $1. All ages can participate. 954-3902130. The Gold Coast Toastmasters Club meets on the second and third Monday of the month from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Dennys, 3151 NW 9 Ave., Fort Lauderdale. 954895-3555 or 954-782-9951.TuesdaysDeer eld Beach Rotary Club meets every Tuesday at 12 p.m. at the Deer Creek Golf Club, 2801 Deer Creek Country Club Blvd., Deer eld Beach. 954-630-9593. Pompano Beach-Lighthouse Rotary Club meets every Tuesday at 7:30 a.m. at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. 954972-7178. See SIGHTINGS on page 30

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26 The Pelican Friday, May 25, 2012 Classi edsCall 954-545-0013 HELP WANTEDSTYLISTS & ASST SALON MGRS Now Hiring! FL COSM. LICENSE REQD. Bonus Opportunities, FREE Adv Edu, 401K, Health Bene ts, Paid Time Off & MORE! Call Melissa at 912-322-1242 or visit careersbyhaircuttery. com. EOE. 5-25 NATIONAL PARKING OPERATOR Seeking An Operational Supervisor And Parking Enforcement Of cer To Join A Team Of Professionals Serving A Local Municipality. EOE. Call 954763-4806. 5-25 DIESEL / REFRIGERATION Truck Mechanic We Have Immediate Openings For Diesel Mechanics In Pompano Beach. We Provide Excellent Pay & Bene ts. We Require A Minimum 2 Years Experience. Your Own Tools, Good Driving & Work History. CDL Driver License Would Be Helpful But Is Not Required. Apply In Person At Salem NationaLease/ Freight Liner Of ce % Atlantic Truck Center. 2840 Center Point Circle Pompano Beach Fla 33064 Or Apply Online www.salemleasing.com. To Set Up Interview With The Manager Please Call 1-800709-2536. EOE. 5-25 LOCAL PEST CONTROL CO Looking For Quality Sales/Service Tech. Must Be Dependable, Team Player, Good Drivers License & People Skills. Will Train Right Person. ALSO Of ce Assistant Computer People & Phone Skills Needed. Fax Resume 954418-3982. 6-1 SEEKING EMPLOYMENTCAREGIVER / COMPANION Caucasian Woman With 25 Yrs Exp. To Assist & Care For Your Loved Ones. Days / Eves / Nights. References Available. 954-482-5494. 5-25 MALE CNA / HHA / SR. COMPANION. Broward Area. Former EMT. All Certi cations / Compassionate, References. Call Ron 954-232-2832. 5-25 CHILD CARE / NANNY Former Elementary Teacher, Counselor, Nanny Caring, Patient. Prefer Pompano Area. Full Or Part Time. 954-7885412. 5-25 HHA CNA CERTIFIED 15 Years Exp. Level 2 Background Check References Available. Will Provide TLC For Your Loved One. Call 954-8267341. 5-25 HHA SEEKING WEEKEND Position Days Or Nights Willing To Live In / Out. References. Own Car Reliable!! 20 Yrs Experience. 786-333-6437. 5-25 CERTIFIED NURSING ASST Seeking Job To Take Care Of Sick / Elderly Day Or Night. 10 Yrs Experience. References Available. 786-3558006. 5-25 HOME HEALTH COMPANION Certified, Experienced, Drives To Errands Compassionate & Dedicated Worker / Caucasian. Days Wanted. Available Immediately. 561-271-3129 Or 561-908-2104 5-25 SERVICES DANNY BOY ELECTRIC Lic & Insured. Lic. #EC13004811. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. 24/Hr Service. 954-290-1443. Beat Any Written Estimate. Sr, Discount. 6-1 CALL BRENDAN THE HANDYMAN Construction & Repairs Carpentry Plumbing Roo ng Masonry Windows Painting Decking Tile. FREE Estimates! 954773-6134 Emergency Calls. WATSON PAINTING & Waterproofing Co. Interior / Exterior Painting, Replace Baseboards, Removal Of Wallpaper. Res / Comm. Pressure Clean Roofs / Decks. Lic / Ins. 954-650-0488. 6-1 HANDYMAN PAINTING CARPENTRY Pressure Cleaning. Decks! Everything Around The House. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. Call 561-350-3781. 6-8 MOORE PLUMBING PLUMBING SERVICES Big Jobs Small Jobs. We Do It All. Remodeling & Repairs. Lic. & Insured. C.C. Accepted. Call 954-772-4600. 5-25 HONEST HANDYMAN HOME & BUILDING Maintenance/Improvements. No Job Too Small. Fast Friendly Service. Reasonable Rates. Local Resident/Homeowner. Call Today For Your FREE Upfront Quote. No Deposit Required. 754-366-1915. 5 GOT JUNK? DUMP TRUCK CLEANUPS Trees/ Landscape, Yard Fill. Paint/ Pressure Wash/ Roofs/Home Repairs Welding, Etc. Dave 954-818-9538. 6-1 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIESNew GREEN technology. New defroster control saves energy in home refrigerators, commercial chillers. Patented. All optical. Simple mfg. Strategic partners needed..www.NewAvionics.Com. 954-568-1991. CMUSICIANS WANTEDThe American Legion Symphonic Band is now accepting new members for the 2011-2012 season. College age to seasoned seniors are welcome. Rehearsals are held on Wed. evenings at American Legion Post 142 in Pompano. Percussionists, oboe, bassoon, trombone and euphonium players are especially needed. If you enjoy making music, call Jim McGonigal, Music Director at 954647-0700 for more info.REAL ESTATE SERVICEREAL ESTATE SELLING OR BUYING Relocation Specialist. 18 Years Experience. English, French, Spanish, Greek. Yvette Gaussen YES WE CAN REALTY 954-6147773 Or 954-773-8340. 5-25 ROOMS FOR RENTPOMPANO PVT ROOM & Bath! $500 Per Month. Includes Utilities Cable Internet. Walking Distance To Shopping. Call 954-793-1363. HOMES FOR RENTPOMPANO COTTAGE STYLE HOUSE 2 / 1 Pool Large Fenced Yard. $1050 Month. 510 NE 35 Street. Call Darci 954-7833723. 6-1 REAL ESTATE WANTEDI BUY HOUSES!! CASH!! AS IS! QUICK CLOSE! ANY AREA ANY CONDITION! NO EQUITY OK. CALL NOW 954-914-2355. 7-20CONDOS FOR SALEPOMPANO BEACH DIRECT OCEAN VIEW!! Pet Friendly! 2/2 AT THE BREAKERS! $269,000. Call Juliana At Barclays For Details. 1-305766-4420. 5-25 CONDOS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH 1 Block To Ocean!! 1 / 1 Fully Equipped. Hurricane Windows / Doors. 2 Flat Screens, DVD, WIFI, Pool, BBQ, Laundry. $850 Month + Electric Monthly Thru December. 954-540-9724. 6-15 DEERFIELD BEACH 2/2 CONDO Corner Unit, Pool. $800. Good Credit Required. No Pets Or Realtors. 631-8853342. 5-25 POMPANO BEACH LARGE 2 / 2 With Den. All Renovated! Pool Mile From Beach! W /D Small Pet OK! $1,300 Month Yearly. Available May 1st. 561-703-6545 Or 754-2643289. 5-25 Memorial Day May 28 Memorial Day May 28 Memorial Day May 28

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The Pelican 27 Friday, May 25, 2012 Classi edsCall 954-545-0013 Memorial Day, May 28 APTS FOR RENTDEERFIELD/POMPANO BEACH 1 BR & 2 BR APTS FOR RENT. Remodeled, Paint, Tile, Etc. Washer / Dryer On Site. Pool. Pet Friendly. George 954-809-5030. 6-1 POMPANO BEACH 1 BEDROOMS AND EFFICIENCY Apts. Fully Furnished With Kitchen, Cable, Internet, Pool, Laundry. 500 To The Beach. Weekly Monthly Yearly. 954-2948483 Or 248-736-1533, 6-15 POMPANO BEACH 3/ 2 $1025 NE 1/1 $675 2 /1 $950 Townhouse 2/1.5 $1095. ALL FREE WATER. RENT + $70 Application Moves U In. 954-781-6299. 5-25 POMPANO BEACH / ATLANTIC / FEDERAL Ef ciency $175 Weekly. No Security Deposit. Includes Cable, Electric, Internet. FREE Washer / Dryer. No Drug Record No Evictions. 954-7090694. 5-25 POMPANO BEACH 900 TO Beach 1/1 Furn. Includes Cable TV. $850 Month. Efficiency Furn. $700 Mo. Includes Utilities & Cable. 954-785-5837. 5-25 POMPANO BEACH 1/1 Newly Renovated Apt. Pool. Pet OK! $700 Per Month Yearly Lease. 1960 NE 48 Street. Call 954857-5207. 6-1 POMPANO BEACH A1A 1 & 2 Bedrooms, Ef ciencies Fully Furnished Includes Utilities, Cable, WIFI, Laundry, Pool, BBQ. 700 To The Beach. Starting At $269 Per Week. 954-943-3020. 6-15 POMPANO / DEERFIELD 1/1, Central A/C. S.S. Kitchen Appliances. Granite Counters. Tile Floors. W / D Hookup. $800 Per Month & $800 Security Deposit. 954-224-0169. 6-1 POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 Bedroom From $495. Easy Movein. 1/2 OFF DEPOSIT. Remodeled. Great Location. 954-783-1088 For More Info. 7-13 GOLDEN ACRES DEVELOPMENT is the best value for apartment rental in the city of Pompano Beach. Newly renovated kitchen cabinets, new appliances, energy saving HVAC wall units, 24-hr maintenance, playgrounds and daycare. Rentals starting at $500. Section 8 Voucher holders are welcome to apply. Please contact Helen Mitchell at 954-972-1444. Domestic farm workers will be given priority in renting available units. Professionally managed by Nelson & Associates, Inc. COMMERCIAL FOR RENT-SALEPOMPANO COMMERCIAL OFFICE Spaces Available. Ranging From As Low As $500 To $700 Depending On Square Footage. Please Call Darci At 954783-3723. 6-15 DEERFIELD BEACH Retail Of ce Warehouse 700 Sq Ft With Loft. A/C, Bathroom. $575 Per Month. Call For More Info 561-654-1331 Or 561-9985681. 6-1 NEWLY EQUIPPED LOW RENT Shop Space Ideal For Bakery Pizza Wings Crepes Etc. Corner New 12 Avenue & 34 Court, Oakland Park. Indoor / Outdoor Patio Sitting. 954-563-3533. 5-25 DOCK FOR RENT60 FT DOCK THE COVE MARINA 50 AMP / H20 Included. $1,200 Month Price Negotiable Depending On Boat Size. Restaurant & Fuel On Premises. 954-9140053. a.j.barsotti@comcast. net. 5-25 COVE DOCK FOR RENT!! 60 FT Water, Electric. No Fixed Bridges. Nice Location. $350 Mo. 954-429-9347 Or Call Cell 954-288-9651. 5-25 MISC. FOR SALEUSED BEAUTY Equipment Warehouse Closing!! All Must Go!!. Low Low Prices. Call For More Information! Boca Raton Nick 954-415-4937. 5-25 If you cannot locate a Pelican call 954-783-8700 Memorial Day May 28

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28 The Pelican Friday, May 25, 2012 Pompano Chamber of Commerce celebrates business with ne food and wine Enjoying the ne wines and food are Antonia Fritz and Paula Fritz. Participants enjoyed ne food and wine from restaurants and businesses all over the country. First time participant in the Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerces Fine Food & Wine event, held this week at the Sheraton Suites Cypress Creek, was Ernies Italian Chophouse in Lighthouse Point represented by Mike Capone and Jim Savianeso who are pictured with Carmen McGarry from Hillsboro Beach. Clark Brozowski, Lyn Clark and Michelle Green.Pompano Beach Vendors of fine food, 24 in all, and superior spirits presented the Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce annual food and wine fundraiser held Tuesday night at the Sheraton Suites Cypress Creek. The event filled the atrium, bar and two meeting rooms of the hotel and attracted major sponsors such as Broward College, Ahearn Jasco + Company and Waste Management, Inc. Hundreds of items were donated for silent and live auctions. Ruthie Brookes and Gail Farkas chaired the event. Broward County State Attorney Michael Satz, Maria Schneider, Broward juvenile court division; and Chamber of Commerce Executive Director Ric Green chat at the Fine Food & Wine Festival held this year at the Sheraton Suites Cypress Creek. [Photos by Judy Wilson]Fine Food & Wine Festival celebrates chamber

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30 The Pelican Friday, May 25, 2012 Capt. RJ Boyle is an experienced angler in South Florida. His studio is located in Lighthouse Point. Call 954-420-5001. Joe Usman and Tom DiGiorgio, Jr. purchased the building for $470,000 after Hurricane Wilma, but Usman said the two werent able to make any extensive repairs or renovations because of a lack of financing. We didnt have any more cash to pump into it, said Usman. Edward Gallagher, construction project manager, estimates that about 15 to 20 artist studios will be built on the second floor of the Bailey, which was originally three buildings linked together to form one. But before any artists take up residence, Gallagher has to remove years of neglect, damage caused by termites and a lot of additional materials added over the years. Im ripping all that stuff out and getting down to the bare bones [and then build it back up]. Were going to do it until it sparkles, said Gallagher. The project is expected to take about two years.BaileyContinued from page 4 Bailey Hotel left of the Farmers Bank as they looked in the 20s. [Photo courtesy of the Pompano Beach Historical Society]RJ BoylePELICAN STAFFIf you get a chance over the next month to make a trip to Port Lucaya, Bahamas or West End, you need to go. My friends have been bringing me the nicest yellowfin tuna steaks you can imagine. Its a relatively easy trip. Load your boat with sardine flats and some live bait if you can. The tunas are generally found between 50 and 70 miles offshore of our coast. You will spot the birds and that will be your tell-tale sign that tunas are in the area. Watch them for a while and dont try to chase them. You will notice that they have a pattern to how they are flying. Most times you can sit in one spot and chunk sardines until they swim right up to you. When that happens every rod on the boat will bend over with a fish anywhere from 30 The yellow n tuna are plentiful in Bahamas countryThe American Legion Auxiliary Unit 142, 171 SW 2 St., Pompano Beach, has Bingo on Tuesdays at 7 p.m. Food is available from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. 954-942-2448. A Yoga class for all levels at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors, on Tuesday nights from 6:30 to 8 p.m. and Saturday mornings from 10:30 a.m. until noon. The cost is $7. 305-607-3520. lbs up to 75 lbs. Make sure to bleed the fish out as to keep the meat perfect. Call us at the shop if you are interested in making this fishing trip as we can guide you in the right direction as far as tackle and Bahama island information. 954-420-5002.SightingsContinued from page 25

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The Pelican 31 Friday, May 25, 2012 Advertise in The Pelican 954-783-8700! recommended upholding two of my complaints, he said. Malkoon has signed a consent order in which he and commission staff stipulate that staff could prove all elements necessary to establish violations of election law by the required burden of proof. He was ned $150 for each of the two violations. An investigator with the Elections Commission found two of the complaints legally suf cient for investigation. In one complaint, found to be correct, Brown alleged that Malkoon, running for a nonpartisan of ce, disclosed his political party af liation and MalkoonContinued from page 1the political party af liation of his opponent in a newspaper ad, effectively campaigning based on party af liation. In response to the complaint, Oliver Parker, Malkoons attorney and former LBTS mayor, said it was true Malkoon had run the ad including the fact that he was a registered Republican and Brown a Democrat in apparent violation of Florida law. However, he said, Malkoon, a rst-time candidate didnt know the law may have prohibited him from mentioning his party af liation or that of his opponent. An act is willful in law only when it involves some degree of conscious wrongdoing on the part of the actor. Parker also argued that prohibiting a candidate seeking a nonpartisan of ce from revealing his political party af liation or that of his opponents is an unconstitutional restraint on core political speech in violation of the First Amendment. In another complaint, found to be correct, Brown alleged that Malkoon posted approximately 250 small campaign signs which were marked with an inconspicuous political disclaimer or no disclaimer at all. Parker said that Malkoon purchased the signs from an Orlando rm, and when they arrived, they didnt have the required disclosure statements. Malkoon called the Florida Division of Elections Hotline for guidance. He was advised he could x a label to the signs with the required disclosure statements. The signs had to be legible. The fact that the respondent made a good faith attempt to comply with the statute means the violation was not willful, Parker said, arguing the complaint must be dismissed. The investigator found that Browns allegations appear to be correct. The advertisements [yard signs] lack proper disclaimers. The investigator did not nd legal suf ciency to support two of Browns other complaints. Brown complained about palm cards, distributed outside the polls, without disclaimers for electioneering and for expressed advocacy. The investigator concluded he wasnt sure a disclaimer of any kind was required on palm cards. He wrote, A palm card is not included in the de nition of electioneering communication. Parker responded that a Malkoon supporter, Cindy Geesey, handed out the palm cards which did not have the required disclosure statement. He said Malkoon and his other supporters had nothing to do with the cards. He said Malkoon did not hand out the cards. Malkoon asked Geesey to stop handing out the cards, and she refused, Parker says. Brown also complained that Malkoon made a false factual statement, with malice, about Brown when he and members of his campaign distributed palm cards which included the statement, Brown Liberal Obama supporter. Brown said that statement violated Florida law, which prohibits candidates from making false factual statements with malice about an opposing candidate. Parker argued that Geesey, not Malkoon, made the statement and that Malkoon is not vicariously liable for the unauthorized acts of his supporters. Finding the complaint not legally suf cient, the investigator found the statement at issue appeared to be Malkoons opinion of his opponent, not necessarily a statement of fact. Brown reported on the Election Commissions investigators ndings during brief commissioner comments at Tuesdays commission meeting. Malkoon and a supporter objected that the mayor allowed him to do so. Malkoon said he entered into the consent agreement not because he is guilty but because hes not a rich guy and couldnt afford to ght the complaints. He said he never knowingly or willfully did anything wrong.

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The Pelican 33 Friday, May 25, 2012 STOP HERE STOP HERE STOP HERE

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36 The Pelican Friday, May 25, 2012