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Pompano Pelican
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00090900/00300
 Material Information
Title: Pompano Pelican
Uniform Title: Pompano Pelican
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: Pompano Pelican
Place of Publication: Pompano Beach
Publication Date: 05-18-2012
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Pompano Beach
Coordinates: 26.234722 x -80.125556 ( Place of Publication )
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00090900:00300

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Friday, May 18, 2012 Vol. XX, Issue 20 Wherever you are, read The Pelican @ pompanopelican.com • Send news to siren2415@gmail.com Pompano Beach • Deer eld Beach • Lighthouse Point • Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Wilton Manors • Oakland Park • Hillsboro Beach • The Galt • Palm Aire The P e l i c a n Pelican Oakland Park turns up the heat for culinary destination ‘If Julia Child were alive we’d ask her to come,” says Mayor Anne Sallee By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFOakland Park City commissioners have pared down their shopping list and agreed to buy two properties in the downtown area as part of its proposed ‘Culinary’ destination. Mayor Anne Sallee says it’s been a dream since 2003 when the city created its Community Redevelopment Area, or CRA, where plans are Artist Nzingah Oniwosan, above, has been chosen as the rst artist to showcase her work during the inaugural ArtHall gallery exhibit which starts May 23 at the Community Redevelopment Agencies Business Resource Center, 50 NE 1 St., Pompano Beach. See story on page 15. [Photos courtesy of Nzingah Oniwosan] Despite the dust, the grits are hot and parking is almost back to normalBy Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach It will take more than a little construction to get Charlie Cusanelli to forsake one of his favorite restaurants – Jukebox Diner. As the City of Pompano Beach builds a new parking lot in front of Jukebox Diner, 2771 E. Atlantic Blvd., located in the Harbor Village Shoppes, Bernadette Scollin, Jukebox’s owner, said she’s relying on customers like Cusanelli to keep business afloat during construction. See PARKING on page 5 See CULINARY on page 23By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach A panel reviewing the death of re ghter Bill Elliott while on a training exercise found that Elliott was apparently unconscious as he fell 100 feet from the top of an aerial ladder. It also reports that a roof hook was not secured with the proper mounts and that the department had no guidelines on how to climb the ladder and no requirement for protective equipment. Elliott died Jan. 6 at Fire Station 61 while climbing a new aerial ladder during a training exercise. The ladder In the wake of re ghter’s death, panel suggests safety measures was at a 65 degree angle. Elliott was completing his second climb of the afternoon and wore a ladder belt, but no other protective equipment. No one on the ground was aware that Elliott was falling until they heard a metal-on-metal sound, apparently the ladder belt hook hitting the ladder. Elliott was tumbling backwards, making no sound or visible effort to stop his fall. The panel speculates that Elliott may have suffered an episode of unconsciousness which caused him to fall backwards striking his head. He did not grab for his roof hook, but See PANEL on page 3 Ray Collier’s long history in Deer eld Beach will be notedBy Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach President Lyndon B. Johnson appointed Ray Collier this city’s postmaster in 1964. At the time he was one of the youngest postmasters in the country. His was one of the last presidential appointments. Next month, the Deer eld Beach native will be recognized as the city’s See COLLIER on page 4

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2 The PelicanFriday, May 18, 2012 SightingsA community calendar of Broward County. Email events to siren2415@gmail. com By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFLauderdale-By-The-Sea Town commissioners have agreed to a proposed charter amendment that would extend the terms of future mayors to eight years. Currently, mayors can serve three consecutive two-year terms. The charter change would call for two terms of four years, but the change will have to be approved by the voters. Two residents spoke in favor of the proposed amendment. Resident Edmund Malkoon said he favored putting it on the ballot but wasn’t sure what the rush was to do it this Town may change mayor’s term to four years November. “You could put it on in 2014, and that would have accomplished it,” he said. Resident Diana Kugler was for the change, adding the current mayor’s term should be extended another two years. “Two years is a tough amount of time,” Kugler said. “One year is spent getting revved up and going, and then it’s time to campaign again. We have been fortunate to have Mayor Minnet on the commission,” she said. The Charter Review Board has recommended the proposal be put on the November ballot. See MAYOR on page 12 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeerfield Beach – Cookers of succulent BBQ stand to win big bucks at the Deerfield Beach Chamber of Commerce Pig Out on Saturday, May 26. The annual feast of pork, beef, chicken and brisket will be held in Sullivan Park, just behind the chamber building, and is offering cash to those whose BBQ is judged the best. There is also a People’s Choice Trophy for the cook receiving the most votes from the public. The day is designed for family fun according to Chamber Executive Director Larry DeVille and has been priced accordingly. Tickets are $10 each or four for $30. Parking is free at the vacant lot next to the Two Georges The Pig Out: nger-lickin,’ foot-stomping good food and music in Deer eld BeachRestaurant, or at a discount in the city parking garage on A1A. The price of admission buys a sampling of barbequed meats prepared by both backyard cooks and professional grill meisters. The pros stand to win $750 for their culinary efforts as well as $250 for the best BBQ in any of the four meat categories. The backyard grillers can compete by offering two of the four meats and the prize for the one judged the best is $250. Laville says both categories are still open. Last year about 20 contestants fired up their grills. Mike Wargo, whose crew of six calling themselves the “Beach Bums Barbecuuuuueeee” won the People’s Choice Award last year with their pork butts and beef brisket, says he is looking forward to cooking for his community again this year. Wargo and his team arrive at Sullivan Park around 6 p.m. See PIG OUT on page 11 5-18 – Free jazz concert during Mother’s Day JazzBy-The-Sea from 1 to 4 p.m. at El Prado Park, 4500 El Mar Drive, Lauderdale-By-TheSea.See SIGHTINGS on page 11

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The Pelican 3 Friday, May 18, 2012 during his fall, the hook was dislodged. The panel concluded that the roof hook was not secured with the proper mounts but instead with mounts designed for a larger diameter, lighter pike pole. Fourteen re ghters were interviewed by the panel composed of Asst. Chief Dave Downey from Miami-Dade Fire Rescue, Dept. Chief Jim St. Pierre from Palm Beach County Fire Rescue, Div. Chief Michael Hohl from Pompano Fire Rescue and John Mealer, Pompano Beach risk manager. Three other re ghters climbed the ladder that day with no incidents. The panel recommended that the department implement a mechanism for securing the roof hook and any other piece of equipment attached to the aerial ladder and that the securing device be designed speci cally for what it is securing. It did not suggest that the roof hook’s improper mount was responsible in any way for the accident. Also recommended was the implementation of a standard operating procedure for aerial ladder operations, i.e. minimum climbing angles, minimum equipment and a procedure for operations. Equipment, it was noted, should include helmet, gloves, safety shoes and a harness. Reportedly, Elliott was wearing a harness. Additionally, the panel urges the industry create a fall-arrest system for its aerial ladders, perhaps a cable that adjusts with the extension of the ladder and permits multiple climbers. For the immediate need, the use of a hands free, fall-arrest rope was suggested. Elliott’s death in the line of duty was the rst for the city. This investigation was conducted by the Pompano Fire Rescue Department. Pompano Beach Public Information Of cer Sandra King said three other agencies have investigated Elliott’s death: the State Fire Marshal, the Broward Sheriff’s Of ce and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, a federal probe that King said was very extensive. King did not know if the ndings of any of these studies had been released. PanelContinued from page 1Advertise with The Pelican! 954-783-8700!

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4 The PelicanFriday, May 18, 2012 Advertise with The Pelican Today! 954-783-8700 of cial historian, a position he has held for more than 25 years and that he inherited from the late Emily Dietrich. In his younger days, Collier was active in the Broward County Historical Commission and encouraged the commission’s executive director Helen Landers to hold two Pioneer Days events here. At one point, when the city was much smaller, Collier knew everyone’s address or PO Box number. Later, he led walking tours of the Deer eld Beach Cemetery pointing out the headstones of the city’s pioneers and recalling their contributions to the community. Now his health is failing said Amie Kay Tanner, also a native of the city and lifelong neighbor of Collier. “He loved Deer eld Beach and lived all his life on or near SE 1 Street where he was born and worked,” Tanner said. “He would do anything to bring Deer eld Beach the recognition he felt it deserved. He’s a fount of information and a wonderful Southern gentleman.” Collier, 74, will likely be honored at the rst commission meeting in June. That month is also Deer eld’s birthday month. It was incorporated on June 25, 1925 and by next year Tanner would like to see June declared the city’s of cial History Month.Hillsboro Canal project may encroach on landscaping and docksDeer eld Beach – A Hillsboro Canal project being undertaken by the South Florida Water Management District will be explained to residents of west Deer eld Beach at a meeting Wednesday, May 30, 6-8 p.m. at the BSO Substation on Powerline Road. The District plans a twoyear stabilization project beginning next year at this time that consists of shoring up the banks and dredging the channel. According to the SFWMD website, a buildup of sediment is limiting water ow in the canal which feeds into the Intracoastal Waterway and that presents a potential ood hazard. The work will be done along a 7.6 mile section from Military Trail to three miles west of State Road 441. Properties along the canal include a district rightofway that in some cases contains structures, docks, trees and fences, some of which have been permitted, some of which are not. The stabilization project will requires some of these obstructions to be removed. Carole Morris is the district’s Broward County representative. She can be reached at 954-452-4814, ext.4987.Sunday alcohol sales get initial OKDeer eld Beach – First reading of a law that would allow the sale of alcohol on Sundays beginning at 7 a.m. was approved this week by CollierContinued from page 1 See ALCOHOL on page 16

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The Pelican 5 Friday, May 18, 2012 “We have fantastic local people who are really helping us get through here,” said Scollin, who estimated she’s lost 50 percent of her business since construction began in April. During construction, free parking is available directly behind Harbor Village. Cusanelli said he eats at the restaurant three or four times a week. “Why not? The food is good. We missed them for the six years they were gone,” he said. Jukebox Diner closed after Hurricane Wilma in 2005 and recently reopened at this location. Other shop owners are remaining open during the construction. Ritchie Siegrist, owner of The Record Rack, said at first he saw a big drop in business but thinks things have stabilized for the most part now that his customers are aware of what’s going on. He says he’s probably doing a little better than most of his neighbors because he’s in a bit of a niche business – selling new and used vinyl records and CD’s. “There’s only a few of us around that are doing it,” he said. “I’ll be happy when its finished,” said Stuart Waldron, owner of Stonehenge Estate Buyers. Waldron said he’s had friends drive buy who thought he and the other businesses were closed. “We’re still here,” he said. But despite the inconvenience, Waldron said he’s happy the city began construction when business was already slow instead of during a busier time of year. Horacio Danovich, engineer in charge of the parking redevelopment says the city may provide 75 to 77 temporary spaces at the east end of the parking lot as early as next week. “The sooner the weather cooperates the better,” said Danovich, who estimates the $1.6 million parking lot will be finished around Thanksgiving. When it’s ready for the first car, there will be 126 spaces plus nine for motorcycles; 20 more than before. “I think, at the end of the day, they’re going to have a great place,” he said. In addition to the parking lots, some businesses at Harbor Village are sporting new faades. Adriane Esteban, Community Redevelopment Agency, or CRA, project manager, said $1.2 million of the $1.6 million in facade improvements is being funded by a CRA grant. The other $400,000 is being paid for by property owners in the shopping center. She said officials are hoping the faade work will be done by the end of the year. ParkingContinued from page 1 Two Jukebox Diner customers enjoy breakfast as a construction crew works on the new parking lot. [Photo by Anne Siren]

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6 The PelicanFriday, May 18, 2012 Deer eld Beach, Pompano Beach, Lighthouse Point, LauderdaleBy-The-Sea, Wilton Manors and Oakland ParkWilton Manors • Oakland Park • Hillsboro Beach The Pompano Pelican is published weekly on FridaysStreet Address: 1500-A E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, FL 33060 Telephone: 954-783-8700 • Fax: 954-783-0093Letters to the Editor are encouraged and accepted for print if signed, although a writer’s name will be withheld on request; letters must also include a daytime telephone number. Advertising rates are available upon request. Subscription rate is $31.80 including tax for one year’s delivery in Greater Pompano Beach; $95.40/per year including tax for others in the United States; call 954-783-8700 for rates abroad. The Pelican is a nonpartisan newspaper and reserves the right to decline advertising. Copyright 2012. Reproduction of this publication in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission of the publisher. The Pelican is a member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, Deer eld Beach Chamber and the LBTS Chamber. The Pelican is a state certi ed woman-owned minority business. The Pelican is delivered to businesses, libraries, schools, of ces, hospitals, news racks and single family homes. All advertising and copy is published at the sole discretion of the publisher. We welcome your critiques and ideas concerning this publication. Anne Siren, publisherExecutive Assistant: Mary Hudson Graphics: Rachel Ramirez Windsheimer Bookkeeper: John White Classi eds: Fran Shelby Contributing Writers: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Judy Wilson, Malcolm McClintock, Judy Vik, Michael d’Oliveira Account Executives: Paul Shroads, Carolyn Mann, Bill Heaton, Bill Fox Special Of ce Assistant: Cathy Siren ESTABLISHED 1993 • Volume XX, Issue 20Founding Editor and PublisherAnne Hanby Siren Letters & OpinionsThe Pelican wants to know what you think. Send your thoughts on local, state and national issues to siren2415@gmail.com Correction and clari cationIn last week’s issue of The Pelican [May 11], the following statement was incorrectly attributed to Barbara Boynton in a story regarding the Transportation Oriented Corridor, or TOC, in Pompano Beach. Boynton did not say “RMA has hired people from outside the community to promote the TOC. It’s [the plan for the corridor] designed not to get our input. Our community is not involved in CRA meetings.” The statement was said by another person at the same meeting. The Pelican regrets the error. Boynton told The Pelican that she “ . is not part of any group.” She added, “It does not bother me whom the city hires and where they live, as long as they are fair and honest to every person. Yes, it would be nice to see more of the community involvement in the CRA meetings. Also, it would be helpful if more people get involved in their community. In today’s economy, you see many people traveling from city to city to work. And if it takes nding better quali ed people from outside, I am for that.”Hurricane preparedness Then & Now: WaterBy Cynthia SipulaSPECIAL TO THE PELICANAfter a storm, you may nd you don’t have anything coming out of the tap. Even if you do, you should not drink it until you know for certain it has been declared safe by water management of cials. Assume there is a boil water order in place for the rst 72 hours after a hurricane, even if you have not heard of one. Decades ago Floridians were told to store drinking water before a hurricane, but how much was enough? No one seemed to know. Today’s guides are more speci c. Most sources recommend fourteen gallons of water per person and at least two gallons per pet. It does not all have to be bottled water, either. While bottled is certainly the safest water, it could get expensive, especially if you have a large family. Have you ever asked yourself what they did before bottled water? They used to tell people to store water in clean bottles and cooking utensils. You can use soda bottles. The way to prepare a soda bottle is to ll it up partway with water and add one teaspoon of unscented bleach. Shake it around a bit, pour it out, and rinse thoroughly before lling the container with water to be stored. In more recent decades, we have been advised to make ice in every clean container we can nd, even Ziplock bags, lling in every available spot in the freezer with water long before the storm approaches so there is time for everything to freeze. Having the freezer full of ice when the power goes out will keep foods safe longer, too. If you don’t feel like drinking it, that bagged water can also be used for brushing teeth or freshening up. Take note, however. We now know that milk jugs do not make good water containers. They are prone to leakage. Worse yet, it is impossible to completely disinfect a milk jug, and the bacteria that remains in the plastic could make you very sick. Anyone who has lived through two hurricanes or more has probably heard this advice. Clean your bathtub thoroughly; then disinfect with bleach. Rinse thoroughly. Use sealant around the drain. Now ll the bathtub with water. This was how most people provided water for their families after hurricanes in decades past. Some of the more recent hurricane specials on TV have mentioned that old practice, but they no longer recommend that you drink it; they say that tub water should only be for ushing and personal hygiene. Why don’t we hear about that ritual any more? Probably it’s because the tub may end up being the safest place to stay in the event of ferocious winds and the destruction of the rest of your home. If there are several bathtubs in your home, it would still be possible to designate one for water while leaving the other one(s) for refuge. Another possibility is to buy the large Rubbermaid storage containers with lids and ll them with water for your upcoming hygiene needs. The lids keep out falling debris. The problem is that once they’re full, they will be too heavy to move. The tub is looking better all the time. These recipes for clean water have been around for years. It’s the kind of advice that is easily forgotten in the hustle-bustle of storm preparation, so it would be wise to keep a copy of it in the box with the hurricane supplies. While you’re at it, you might want to include a clean cloth to use as a lter, sealed in a plastic bag, and a dropper for the bleach. See Water on this pageWaterContinued from this pageOn Sunday, May 13, the Governor’s Hurricane Conference comes to town reminding us of the critical role that local government plays in protecting its residents during emergencies. Broward County’s Hurricane Preparedness website contains a wealth of information useful before, during and after the storm. Check out the Hurricane Guide as well as the A-Z Guide that includes more than 60 topics, from airports and animals to water and windows. Questions? Call the Broward County Call Center at 3-1-1 or 954-831-4000.Hurricane season begins June 1 Family Success Centers assist those in needIf you or someone you know is in need of rental, mortgage and utility assistance, visit the Family Success Centers website and learn how to qualify or call 954-357-6367. Family Success Centers are a one-stop source of social services information, referrals and programs that assist individuals with building a stronger, healthier and self-suf cient family unit. The Friends of the Wilton Manors Library will hold its Annual Meeting on Thursday, May 24, 2012 in the Richard C. Sullivan Public Library of Wilton Manors at 500 NE 26th Street. Refreshments will be served beginning at 6:30 p.m. Meeting is open to Friends members as well as interested public citizens. Call Paul Kuta at 954566-9019.Friends to meet in Wilton ManorsBook discussion of Pearl Buck’s the Good Earth May 21 at 2 p.m. at the Galt Ocean Mile Library, 3403 Galt Ocean Drive, Fort Lauderdale. Fortune cookies served. 954-537-2877. The Good Earth at Galt Library

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The Pelican 7 Friday, May 18, 2012 By Beth Aseere SPECIAL TO THE PELICANPompano Beach This month, Pompano Beach High School’s Drama students performed their rst military play, Bury the Dead a 1936 expressionist anti-war drama by the American Playwright Irwin Shaw. It dramatizes the refusal of six dead soldiers during an unspeci ed war, who represent a cross section of American society, to be buried. Each soldier rises from the grave to express his anguish, the futility of war and his refusal to become part of the Students, audience react to Pompano production of Bury The Dead“glorious past” to the woman who has survived him. “I was worried when I rst picked this play that we would lose the audience around the second couple scene. Audiences do not love talking scenes. But all six couples performed and the audience got quieter and quieter with each one. This means they were really into what they were seeing,” said Drama Teacher Julia Perlowski. And the play had its impact on the student performers. “I feel like people who die before their time have a lot that they would like to say and do. However, they cannot, said senior actor, Julien Melo. “The part of Henry Levy gave me the chance to put myself into someone’s shoes and speak up for the things they have missed out on. I took on my character and tried my best to actually feel like my life had been taken from my body, and I had no say. I felt like I was the voice that stands up for a cause among millions. The whole play has taught me to never take anything for granted. The simple things in life could potentially be the things you Senior Caleb Campbell as fallen solider and Senior Bobby Adkins as captain of the soldiers.See BURY THE DEAD on page 14

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8 The PelicanFriday, May 18, 2012 Business matters The Pelican takes a look at local business owners. Call The Pelican to nd out how you can tell your story here because business matters. 954-783-8700. Briefs By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFTo be a success in a major boating community for 50 years speaks for itself, but that’s not enough for Jerry Johnson who says, “We hope we’re of value to our clients everyday.” Pompano Beach Marine Center, 701 S. Federal Hwy., is well known for its quality products and good service with offshore sport fishing mariners. Currently, this landmark business holds the honor of being the largest selling dealer of Grady-White boats in the country for the fifth time.Pompano Beach Marine Center, a third generation family business, celebrates 50 years of success The family heads out for a day on the water. Left to right are Jill, Jerry, June, Cole, Jon, Brock, Beth. [Photo courtesy of Po mpano Beach Marine Center]Jerry’s son, John, a third generation member in this business, is the sales manager. He says, “Like Dad before me, I started as a kid, swabbing floors and washing boats. I still do it from time to time. My wife, Beth, and I have started what we suspect will be the fourth generation to work in this family business. Our son Brock, who is five, thinks of boats as play toys. He’s already in love with the business. And our baby, Cole, is just four months old. He thinks our boat is his rocking chair.” Jerry’s daughter, Jill, manages the parts department. Totally tuned into the business, she says, “I have a fully stocked marine store that is constantly busy with boaters and other dealers. We have many customers who do the fixing themselves. They shop here because they will find every part they might need. We offer parts and accessories for Grady-White boats and Yamaha outboards. We also stock Johnson and Evinrude outboards.” Jerry oversees the entire operation. He sat down to talk about his inventory and the company history. “In the beginning, we carried many See MARINE CENTER on page 9Food trucks to park in Lighthouse PointLighthouse Point – A free event organized by Lighthouse Point Cultural Arts Committee and Chamber of Commerce members takes place May 27 from 5 to 9 p.m. at Frank McDonough Park, 3500 NE 27 Ave., Lighthouse Point. South Florida’s famous food trucks, BC Tacos, Dog Eat Dog, Sugar Yummy Mama and more will provide tasty favorites. The event will include dancing to DJ Joe Balistreri’s music. There will also be balloons, face-painting and a magic show by Strawberry the Clown for the kids.Mad Hatter’s Tea Luncheon Deerfield Beach – The Democratic Women’s Club of Northeast Broward will honor State Senator Nan Rich as Democratic Woman of the Year on Saturday, May 19 at 11:30 a.m. The event takes place at the Hilton Deerfield Beach/Boca Raton, 100 Fairway Drive, Deerfield Beach. The event will take place during the club’s annual Mad Hatter’s Tea Party. Tickets are $40 For reservations, email maggie_davidson@comcast.net or call 954-942-8711.

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The Pelican 9 Friday, May 18, 2012 manufacturers, but now we are exclusively Grady-White because we’re sold on the quality, craftsmanship and boat experience owners of GradyWhites rave about. Grady-White produces 27 models. We stock the largest inventory in the country. “We have the Freedom Series Dual Consoles, Center Consoles, Walk-around Cabins and Express Cabins. Prices range from $40,000 to $500,000. We sell a good cross section of all of the styles. And we have an inventory of pre-owned boats, most of which have been traded in for newer models. After 32 years of carrying GradyWhite, we are one of the largest dealers in the country with returning customers. We have clients who are now on their fourth and fifth Grady-White boats.” Wayne Newton is one of those clients who is on his seventh Grady-White boat. Newton says, “Jerry Johnson and the family have a dealership second to none. “I’ve been a customer since 1988. We do business on a handshake. Pompano Beach Marine Center has helped me purchase new craft, sold old ones, refurbished some and serviced them all. They’re the best.” Dan and Cecilia Dunlavey feel the same way. Dan says, “They’re a four-star operation as far as we’re concerned. I’m on my second Grady-White, a 28-ft. S that we named the CE-Dan IV [pronounced: sea Dan] after ourselves. I’ve known Jerry since 1969. His family business is really all family and friendly service is what they deliver. I just repowered my boat so that it will be more efficient and quieter. Trained and certified technicians work the service department which specializes in Yamaha engines. Asked what boaters should do to maintain their boats, Jerry explains, “Frequency of service depends on how often a craft is used. Like a car, each craft comes with instructions including service requirements. Our full service department will take care of every need from winterizing your engine to helping you maintain your trailer and electronics. We’ll keep your boat in the water with high quality workmanship and affordable service. We also do long term storage and specific hurricane storage. This business is my life and I love being here because of my hardworking team.” His wife, June, who has been by his side for 46 years, says, “My involvement here is less than Jerry’s and our children’s, but I have helped with tournaments over the years and worked public relations from time to time. My sister, Jody Jordan is the company office manager. Right now, Jody and I are helping the others set up our Customer Appreciation Weekend which will be June 9 and 10. We’re having an open house. There will be games and representatives from a variety of manufacturers and venders, and of course a boat show of GradyWhite models.” Jerry continues, “My parents, Ted and Monica Johnson, now deceased, opened the business in May of 1962. We were on the Intracoastal Waterway then. In 1969 we opened this location and we ran both locations until 1981 when we closed the first location to focus our business right here.” Pompano Beach Marine Center is a big supporter of the community. They’ve been actively involved and financially supportive of the Make-A-Wish tournament, local fishing rodeos, Fourth of July fireworks, the Veterans’ Multi-Purpose Center, Veterans of Foreign Wars, Boy Scouts of America, and many smaller organizations that seek donations and prizes for raffles and tournaments. Jody says, “We’re very proud to have helped raise the funds for the Geoff Bodine Olympic Bob Sled team which won the bronze, silver and gold medals at the Salt Lake City 2002 Olympics. And we support and cheer for the many charities that have fishing tournaments.” Asked if they ever get on the water themselves, June smiles and says, “Frequently. We have a 30-foot GradyWhite 306 model which we use for cruising, fishing and participating in tournaments. The kids do the fishing. Jerry and I like cruising.” The Pelican congratulates you and wishes you another 50 successful years.Marine CenterContinued from page 8 When you advertise with The Pelican you advertise to the world online. pompanopelican.com

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10 The PelicanFriday, May 18, 2012 Making a DifferencePhyllis J. Neuberger wants your suggestions about people who are making a difference. Call 954-7838700. BriefsBy Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFThe Original Florida Follies is a unique group of talented men and women between 60 and 90-plus years young who performed seven Broadway-style extravaganzas this year, enabling them to raise and donate $100,000 to two important children’s charities. Cathy Dooley, well known New York and Florida producer/director heads up this, 501(c)(3) non-profit organization which she launched 12 years ago. In that short time these talented and energetic men and women have raised and donated over a half million dollars to children’s charities which Dooley says, “is what we are all about.” The much-overworked word ‘amazing’ accurately describes this large group of talented people who rehearse year ‘round to provide a stand up and cheer show for Broward and Palm Beach theater-goers. And every single person involved is a volunteer including the up front talent and the behind the scenes talent. It takes all of them to make it work. Dooley says, “This year we decided to give cash donations to two major children’s charities in lieu of the Follies clothing give-aways of the past two years. The recipients this year are Children’s Diagnostic and Treatment The Original Florida Follies team sings, dances and entertains to raise and donate $100,000 to children Cathy Dooley, producer and director of the Original Florida Follies, is shown here presenting a check to Susan M Widmayer, executive director of Children’s Diagnostic and Treatment Center in Fort Lauderdale. Also pictured are Stephanie Clayton, CDTC, Dr. Ana Calderon, CDTC, Dr. Susan Widmayer and Doug Gorab, Follies. [Photos courtesy of The Follies]Center, or CDTC in Fort Lauderdale, and Family Central which serves Dade, Broward and Palm Beach counties. We’re thrilled to help them do what they do, and they are very appreciative for our help.”About Children’s Diagnostic and Treatment CenterExecutive Director of CDTC, Susan M. Widmayer says, “The wonderful Follies has given us the single, largest donation we have ever received. We will be using the money to send as many children as we can to summer camp. This will be the first time in their lives to have a camp experience. Many will need proper clothing and medicine. We feel this donation will improve the quality of life for hundreds of children.” CDTC is a not-for-profit organization that serves more than 10,000 children with special health needs, including HIV, in Broward County. CDTC provides comprehensive prevention, intervention and treatment services within a medical home environment. It is a nationally recognized “Center of Excellence,” offering a unique system of care for infants, children and youth with chronic illnesses, disabilities and developmental delays. All medical care and social services are provided regardless of each family’s ability to pay. About Family CentralCEO Barbara Weinstein calls the donation from The Follies, “A gift from heaven,” adding “We work with several thousand child care centers serving over 100,000 children in Broward, Dade and Palm Beach See FOLLIES on page 13 Tribute to Armed ForcesPompano Beach – The First Presbyterian Church, the Pink Church, hosts a pre-Memorial Day, May 19, concert program at 7 p.m. to honor all servicemen and women. The performance will include Corelli Concerto Grosso, Vivaldi Concerto Grosso and Grieg’s Holberg Suite. The church is located at 2331 NE 26 Ave., Pompano Beach. Donations will be taken at the door. Call 954-941-2308.Wounded Warriors fundraiserPompano Beach – As Memorial Day nears, locals have a unique opportunity to assist Veterans who have returned home. Many of these soldiers have experienced physical and/or emotional wounds that they will bear throughout their lives. The event which includes lunch, takes place May 23 at 12:30 p.m. at the Lighthouse Point Yacht Club, 2701 NE 42 St., Lighthouse Point. Cost is $15 for lunch. To donate to the fundraiser, make checks payable to The Wounded Warriors Project. The event is sponsored by The Light Magazine & Backus Turner and the Yacht Club. Call 954942-7244. Blood drivePompano Beach – A Memorial Day Weekend Blood Drive will be held from Friday, May 25 to Monday, May 28 at the Community Blood Center, 926 E. Sample Road Pompano Beach. Friday: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Saturday, 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. and Monday from 1 to 8 p.m. Call 954-283-1198.

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The Pelican 11 Friday, May 18, 2012 Oakland Park – A city-wide yard sale is set from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, May 19, at Jaco Pastorius Park, 4000 N. Dixie Hwy. Vendors are responsible for providing their own tables, chairs and tents and any other items needed to display their goods. No food or beverages will be allowed to be sold in the yard sale area. Cost for a single outdoor space is $20 for city residents and $40 for non-residents. Charge for each additional space is $15 for residents and $20 for non-residents. For more information, call the Parks and Leisure Services department at 954-630-4500. Save on auto insuranceOakland Park – An AARP Driver Safety Class is scheduled from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Wednesday, May 23, at the Collins Center, 3900 NE Third Ave., Oakland Park. Participants must be 55 or older. Those who successfully complete the course will be provided with a certificate for their auto insurance agency. Most agencies allow for a discount on auto insurance premiums for up to three years. Cost is $12 for AARP members and $14 for non-AARP members. Bring a bagged lunch. Call Cynthia Jackson at 954739-2673 to sign up. Yard sale, driving classes set for Oakland Park on Friday and cook throughout the night, tending their grills for 24 hours. Wargo urges all aficionados of smoked pork, brisket, chicken and ribs to “come out and lick your fingers” at this event which is one of the Chamber’s major fundraisers. Another returning competitor is Team JJC’s-BBQ, four-year veterans of the event. JJC’s has won the “best ribs” category twice and Team Captain Joe “T-Bone” Carlson says they are looking for even greater glory this year. “At one point we thought of passing on this year’s Pig Out,” Carlson said. “But when the word got out to our friends and teammates they were sad. So we are in this and going to try our best.” Carlson doesn’t discuss his winning rib recipe, he does give one hint: “awesome sauce.” In addition to food, the day, which beings at 11 a.m., offers continuous music from Shadow Creek, the Andrew Morris Band and Kaleidoscope; activities for kids, vendors selling everything from jewelry to spices, the Chamber’s liquid refreshment booth selling beer, wine, soda and water, margaritas shaken up from the Baja Caf, planter’s punch blended at The Two Georges, hamburgers from Gimme’ a Burger, and for dessert, chocolatedipped banana delights. Sullivan Park is located at the Intracoastal Waterway and Hillsboro Boulevard. Pig Out hours are 11 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. Tickets can be purchased online at www.deerfieldchamber. com or at the Chamber office, 1601 E. Hillsboro Boulevard. Pig OutContinued from page 2 See SIGHTINGS on page 16 SightingsContinued from page 25-19 – Gold Coast Youth Orchestra concert from 7 to 9 p.m. at First Presbyterian Church, 2331 NE 26 Ave, Pompano Beach, 5-19 – Pony rides at Sand & Spurs Equestrian Park, 1600 NE 5 Ave., Pompano Beach, from 9 to 11:30 a.m. Cost is $3 per ride. 954-7864507.

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12 The PelicanFriday, May 18, 2012 Voters approved the current term limits in 2008. Commissioner Stuart Dodd said he didn’t realize at the time the cost of elections is so high, about $12,000 for a position that only pays $12,000. “It’s an enormous amount of work putting a campaign together,” Dodd said. Commissioner Mark Brown said he wants to hear public MayorContinued from page 2comments on the proposed ordinance at upcoming meetings. He said he’s trying to decide if the change should take effect in 2014 or apply to the current mayor’s term. “The rest is simple. Put it on the ballot and let the people decide,” Brown said. Minnet stayed out of the discussion and did not vote on the matter. Town Attorney Susan Trevarthen said any change wouldn’t be retroactive. The amendment could call for four-year terms to be effective in 2014, 2016 or whatever the commission directs. Commissioners will vote on first reading of the new ordinances on May 22. If passed, the second reading will be at a special meeting at 7 p.m. June 5. The county Supervisor of Elections must receive items for the November ballot by June 8. In other business, commissioners agreed to postpone discussion of schematic drawings for East Commercial Boulevard improvements from May 22 to June 12.Pompano Republican Club meetsPompano Beach – The Pompano Beach Republican Club will meet Thursday, May 24 at 7 p.m. at the Emma Lou Olson Community Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach. Richard DeNapoli, chairman of the Broward Republican Executive Committee, will install newly-elected club officers Carolyn Mann, president; Al Shalhoub, vice president; Linda Russo, secretary; Peter Rutledge, treasurer and Lorena Balharry, assistant treasurer. DeNapoli will also report on the status of Victory 2012. Team Romney Broward Co-Chair Bob Wolfe will discuss the presidential campaign in Broward County. Call 954786-7536. Refreshments will be served. Unity in the Community of Pompano Beach is seeking volunteers to help plan next year’s Family Fun Day event. The group will meet Mon., May 21, 6 p.m. at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St. There will be an international potluck dinner and discussion of committees needed to plan the event. The meeting is open to the public. Call Ron at 954-709-5894.Group seeks volunteers for Fun Day

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The Pelican 13 Friday, May 18, 2012 Counties. We’re deciding now on how best to use the funds to provide the greatest impact on our children. We desperately need transportation to reach the children so we are thinking of buying a van which would enable us to transport food, clothing, books and toys. We can also transport staff members who will provide activities for the children. What a wonderful way this would be to service these low-income children in day care.” Mary Monahan, Family Center community affairs coordinator, came to The Follies rehearsal to accept the donation. She reiterated the agency’s need for a new transFolliesContinued from page 10port van. She is shown in the photo with Lois Cangelosi, Follies associate producer and Cathy Dooley, Follies founder, director and producer. The Amazing Follies ‘girls’ were on hand for a rehearsal so they were able to see where the money raised from their dancing feet was going. Family Central is a comprehensive not-for-profit family support organization offering specialized services and programs to help families and to give their children a competitive start in life. The organization’s programs are directed primarily toward economically disadvantaged families in the tri-county area. At-risk children and their families living at or below the poverty line receive family support services and programs emphasizing literacy, Mary Monahan, Family Central community affairs coordinator, accepts the donation to the agency from Cathy Dooley, Follies founder, director and producer. Assistant Producer Lois Cangelosi is at the right. The Follies girls took time from their rehearsal to get in the picture.school readiness and healthy families. Last year Family Central provided support and educational services to over 130,000 South Florida families. Thank you, Original Florida Follies for your talent, entertainment and generosity to the children in-need all around us.

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14 The PelicanFriday, May 18, 2012 miss most, so cherish them. Cherish every hour, every minute, every second, because no one knows for sure when it will be your last.” “It felt as if I were actually a very frustrated soldier who had never got a weapon out of the whole time he joined the army. I was given only the task of burying other soldiers in horrible conditions that were just completely unsanitary to say the least. It gave me a glimpse of what it may have been like in one of the past wars, “ said Nicholas Parrish. ”I learned about some of the hardships that widows and spouses had to endure when their loved one was away at war, or had fallen in the line of duty. Also I learned how the death of a spouse can cause the widow to abuse substances such as alcohol because that person’s death was too much for them to handle. “ One audience member got up and never returned to his seat in the middle of the play. He had lived on a military base and remembered seeing the black cars drive up to homes to deliver the news of their loved one that didn’t make it. He didn’t want everyone to see him crying. Bury The DeadContinued from page 7Above Sarah Hasle and Nicholas Parrish, right, Julien Melo. The Pelican Call us! 954-783-8700

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The Pelican 15 Friday, May 18, 2012 By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach Nzingah Oniwosan is a poet, painter, pianist, dancer, writer and jewelry designer. And as far back as she remembers, she’s looked for ways to express herself. “I don’t ever recall not being an artist. It’s something that always was,” said Oniwosan. Born and raised in South Florida and now living in Fort Lauderdale, Oniwosan considers herself lucky that her Haitian-born parents encouraged her talents from an early age. Pompano Beach’s ArtHall gallery combines aesthetics and enterprise She feels even luckier that she’s been able to make a living at her passion. “I’m able to do a lot of work as a teaching artist. That allows me to get contracts with different schools. I couldn’t wish for anything more,” she said. “I take it for granted but when I talk to my friends, I’m reminded that not everyone gets to make a living at what they love to do.” As a painter, Oniwosan creates portraits, self-portraits and sometimes, when hired by a city or private organization, uses the street as her canvas. “I’m inspired by people. I play around with realism and abstraction, but most of my work is pastel work. But I Nzingah Oniwosan with one of her paintings. Oniwosan will be the rst artist to showcase her work during ArtHall on May 23.See ARTHALL on page 20

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16 The PelicanFriday, May 18, 2012 Pompano Beach Women and mothers took top billing during the month of May at the Jan Moran Collier City Learning Library with a pre-Mother’s Day Pretty In Pink Tea. The salute to all women in the community was hosted by Friends of the Library. The event featured students reciting poetry, refreshments, a guest speaker and a souvenir teacup as a gift to all guests. Pictured are Debra Floyd, Library Branch Manager, Jan Moran Collier City Learning Library; Rebecca Johnson, President, Friends of the Jan Moran Collier City Learning Library; Ms. Jessie Brown, Guest Speaker and Author; First Lady Ophelia Sanders, Ph.D, Macedonia Baptist Church Collier City, and Rhonda Jefferson, Staff of the Jan Moran Collier City Learning Library, and event coordinator.Pretty in Pink for Maythe commission. Second reading is set for June 5. Commissioner Ben Preston continues to oppose the amendment to the current code which prohibits alcohol sales until noon on Sunday. Commissioner Joe Miller said he is still testing public opinion. While he received many calls in favor of the change, Miller said he is waiting for the public’s input at the second reading of the ordinance before making his nal vote. In previous discussions, three commissioners on the veperson board has favored the ordinance. Beach High School. Although the school has both magnet and International Baccalaureate programs, the area outside the grounds is anything put prestigious. “I am ashamed at the garbage thrown there and the lack of landscaping,” Preston said. The commissioner said he hopes to challenge the community’s pride to make improvements and has met with city staff for ideas and at this point is “ Commissioner wants to encourage GED students; improve blighted 15 StreetDeer eld Beach Commissioner Ben Preston has two initiatives he wants to go forward. One is a support system for students who earn a GED which would recognize them at a public ceremony and then offer them apprenticeship jobs at local businesses. “We need to get these kids off the streets,” Preston said. He is hoping there will be Community Block Grant funds available for his program. Preston’s other current concern is the condition of SW 15 Street from Dixie Highway west to Deer eld AlcoholContinued from page 45-19 – Flotilla 37 of the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary will hold free vessel safety checks each day until May 25 at Pioneer Park Boat Ramp, 217 NE 5 Ave., Deer eld Beach. Safety checks start at 9 a.m. 954-755-4581. 5-19 – Fire Station 102 open house from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at 1441 SW 11 Way, Deer eld Beach. Tour the station, meet re rescue personnel, paint a re truck and meet Sparky the Fire Prevention Dog. 954-5713081. 5-19 – Island City Canoe Race at 10 a.m. at Colohatchee Park Boat Ramp, 1975 NE 15 Ave., Wilton Manors. Free food and refreshments served after. 954-390-2130. SightingsContinued from page 11 See SIGHTINGS on page 30

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The Pelican 17 Friday, May 18, 2012 By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach The Pompano Beach High School Interact Club has contributed to causes before, but the club’s officers said their latest has been the most rewarding. Recently, Interact, which is associated with the Rotary Club of Pompano Beach, donated $1,000 to fund four Interact, Pompano Beach Rotary donate over $30,000 for cleft palate surgeriescleft palate surgeries, costing $250 each, in the Philippines. “It’s an opportunity to change lives in a very drastic way. $250 is not a lot of money to change a life,” said Ted Hasle, Rotary Club member and Interact sponsor. In the past, Interact has donated razors and other supplies to American servicemen and women and the survivors of the disaster in Japan. “This is more satisfying,” said Kevin Minxha, Interact copresident. “For me, it’s just changing the life of a child,” said Sarah Hasle, co-president of Interact and Ted Hasle’s daughter. Interact’s $1,000 donation is in addition to the over $30,000 Rotary collected from its own members and members of the community. The money raised was sent to the International Children’s Surgical Foundation, or See CLEFT PALATE on page 18 Interact Club members Kevin Minxha, Anita Tharayil and Arah Hasle were honored by Pompano Beach Rotary Club members for the $1,000 Interact raised to pay for cleft palate surgeries in the Phillippines. Also pictured are Jerry Meehan, Ted Hasle and Jeff Williams. [Staff Photo]

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18 The Pelican Friday, May 18, 2012 Cleft palateContinued from page 17ICSF, founded by Dr. Geoff Williams, a plastic surgeon. Joe Usman, the Rotary Club member who suggested the club raise money for cleft palate’s, estimated that the money raised by Rotary paid for 100 surgeries. “When they’re really young, obviously they don’t fully understand the before and after. But boy, their parents sure do,” said Kartchner. “The mothers, they’re almost overwhelmed. They’re brought to tears.” Kartchner added that the reactions of young men who go through the surgery may be the most profound and lifechanging. “They almost look at it like, ‘Wow,’ is that really me? Now I can go find a girl to marry.’ It just changes their outlook on life and its pretty amazing.” According to the Centers for Disease Control, or CDC, a cleft palate or a cleft lip are birth defects that occur when a baby’s mouth or lips do not form properly during pregnancy, leaving a gap between the nose and upper lip. Children with the condition face problems with feeding and talking. They can also experience dental problems, ear infections, hearing loss and social stigmas. The CDC estimates that 4,437 babies in the United States are born with either a cleft lip or palate each year. Babies born in the United States receive immediate surgery to correct the problem. In less developed nations, like the Philippines, many children are not as lucky. To learnmore about cleft palate’s or to donate, visit www.icsfoundation.org or call Rotary at 954-818-4504.Pompano Beach’s Mt. Calvary turns 110 years Pompano Beach The oldest church in Pompano celebrated its 110th anniversary on May 17. Mount Calvary Baptist Church, 800 NW 8 Ave., observed the milestone with fun and fellowship. Events included opening night with The Inspirational Choir and Game night featuring “Are You Smarter Than the Pastor?” An old-fashioned picnic and bake-off topped off the festivities. The Rev. Anthony Burrell is the Pastor.The Rev. Anthony Burrell Each year, children around the world are born with cleft lips or cleft palates, a condition that causes health problems and can lead to social stigmas. This child, wearing a hospital band, prepares to take advantage of surgery that will change his appearance and health. [Photo courtesy of Rotary Club of Pompano Beach]

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The Pelican 19 Friday, May 18, 2012 Oceans 234 234 N. Ocean Blvd. Deer eld Beach 954-428-2539 www.oceans234.comBy Malcolm McClintockPELICAN STAFF“We will be celebrating our 10th anniversary this year,” says Danielle Williams, the statuesque co-owner and operations director of Oceans 234. “And after all this time, we continue to garner many accolades for the high quality of our food and, of course, our amazing view.” Widowed at a young age, Williams enjoyed the support of her in-laws Lois and Joe Pallaria in creating this iconic Deerfield Beach eatery. With great dedication and attention to detail, this hard-working entrepreneur turned what used to be a Ranch House Restaurant into one of the premier dining hot-spots in Deerfield Beach. Located directly on the sand near the pier, this ideally situated trattoria welcomes guests for casual midday repasts, lively happy hours and elegant evening gettogethers. “We are known for our fresh seafood but we also serve fantastic meats, salads and pasta dishes,” says the energetic restaurateur who also operates the Whale Raw Bar in Parkland and sits on the board of directors of the Deerfield Beach Chamber of Commerce. “Our Executive Chef Victor Bravo is excellent. He is very professional and creative in the kitchen. We really have a wonderful team.” Indeed, Chef Bravo has earned his stripes in many of the best restaurants in South Florida and brings his unique Oceans 234 continues tradition of superlative seafood on Deer eld’s sunny shores gastronomic insights to the menu. “One of my favorite dishes is the pulled pork nachos. They are perfect for peoplewatching by the beach,” says the friendly culinary artiste who has been at the helm of Ocean 234’s kitchen for over a year. “But our fish dishes such as the pistachio Mahi Mahi or the shrimp crusted snapper are definitely our biggest sellers. We’ve also added a few new options like the tropical grilled swordfish.” Other tasty maritime treats include appetizers such as crispy calamari, citrus sesame seared tuna, garlic clams, the highly addictive Asian-inspired Firecracker shrimp, sumptuous jumbo lump crab cakes and all the usual suspects from the well-stocked raw bar. “We also offer amazing sushi. See OCEANS 234 on page 31The popular Poached Pear Salad features Chardonnay macerated pears with mesclun and endive topped with purple onion, crumbled goat cheese and tangy balsamic vinaigrette. [Photos by Malcolm McClintock]

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20 The Pelican Friday, May 18, 2012 can’t say I have a favorite. All of the things I do are for me.” Beginning Wednesday, May 23, some of Oniwosan’s work will be on display during the inaugural opening of ArtHall, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Community Resource Center’s Business Resource Center, or BRC, 50 NE 1 St., Pompano Beach. The BRC leases office space to businesses, offers business loans and assists with job placement. Susan Kores, program director at the BRC, sees ArtHall as a way to combine business and art. “This is kind of a first attempt. This way, we get the word out about us and actually get people in here,” said Kores. Ultimately, she says, the goal is to make Pompano one of Broward’s artistic destinations. “It will take a few years, but we’ll get there.” Oniwosan’s work will occupy the BRC through June ArtHallContinued from page 3Nzingah Oniwosan with two of her paintings.18 when it will be removed to make way for ArtHall’s next featured artist. That opening reception is June 20 from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the BRC. Visit www.facebook.com/ ArtHallPompano for more on ArtHall. Visit www.nzingah. com to view more of Nzingah Oniwosan’s art work. Send The Pelican your shing news to mdpelican@yahoo.com

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22 The Pelican Friday, May 18, 2012 By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFDeerfield Beach Frank Congemi enjoys beach tennis – from a distance. Congemi, a Deerfield Beach resident and retirement planning advisor who has never played a game of beach tennis in his life, is the title sponsor of the 2012 Frank Congemi Beach Tennis World Cup in Deerfield, May 19 and 20. Congemi said a lack of support in the inaugural tournament in 2009 led him to sponsor it; a role he’s fulfilled ever since. “There wasn’t a lot of interest in sponsoring anything because businesses were pressed. So I guess I stepped up to the plate,” he said. “It’s a great family sport” and “a way to diversify the beach.” The tournament will be held north of the Deerfield Beach International Fishing Pier, 200 NE 21 Ave., from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on both days. Organized by the International Federation of Beach Tennis, or IFBT, the tournament is one of many around the world – including Australia, Spain, Finland, Mexico, South Africa, Argentina – that culminates in the IBTF world championship in Italy in July. Beach tennis, a combination of volleyball and traditional tennis, is played on a beach or other sandy surface on a court the size of a standard 2012 Frank Congemi Beach Tennis World Cup set for May 19, 20 in Deer eld Beachvolleyball one. It’s played with smaller rackets than tennis, known as paddle bats, and with a softer ball but scored the same as tennis. But the ball can’t touch the ground. “It’s like watching a tennis match,” said Adrienne Cerra, president of the IFBT in the United States and vice president of the American, Canadian and Caribbean areas. Spectators who attend can watch amateurs, intermediate and pro level players slug it out during men’s and women’s doubles, mixed doubles, singles and juniors; all of them playing for their piece of the $2,000 in prize money given out during the tournament. The tournament is free to the public. Based internationally out of Italy, the IFBT’s official American home is in Deerfield Beach. “It’s just such a great beach town. It’s kind of become a sports mecca,” said Cerra about Deerfield, who credits local hotels with helping to sponsor the tournament and for making out-of-town players feel welcome. And much like soccer, Cerra said beach tennis is popular around the world but still struggling to find an audience in America. “In the U.S. it’s kind of new. That’s my job, to build it,” she said. Visit www.mybeachtennis. net for more information about the tournament.Free blood pressure and glucose checksPompano Beach – The Pompano Beach Fire Rescue Department will be providing free blood pressure checks and glucose screenings from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the following Pompano locations: Monday, May 21 at the Walmart Neighborhood Market, 1199 S. Federal Hwy.; Wednesday May 23, Festival Flea Market, 2900 W. Sample Road; Friday May 25, Lowes, 1851 N. Federal Hwy.Tell The Pelican about your special event 954-783-8700

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The Pelican 23 Friday, May 18, 2012 focused on a culinary destination. “A culinary destination is far more than restaurants,” she adds. “It has everything to do with food. We are looking at cooking schools, permanent fresh markets, boutique hotels, cooking supplies, gourmet shops, wines and more. The destination would encourage people from all over the country to visit us, learn about cooking and talk with chefs. If Julia Child were alive, we would ask her to come. It’s not a new idea. It works in other cities.” She adds that the destination will encourage other culinaryrelated businesses to buy and build in Oakland Park once the CRA is in place. Since the onset, the city has had access to funds from the county, about $5 million, to buy land for the destination. “It’s the best time to buy,” Sallee says, “and if the area is developed, the loan from the county becomes a grant which means there is no repayment.” Last week at a special meeting the commission agreed to purchase of the Schnell property, 1220 NE 37 St. for $320,000, and the Perez property at 1110 NE 34 Ct. for $767,500. Ray Lubomski, community development director, said some minor contamination has been found on the Schnell parcel. Resident Bill Sears said he hated to see the city buy property where there is contamination. The clean up should be the responsibility of the property owner, not the city Sears said. “What’s the big rush?” resident Marilyn Shaw asked. “It’s like a big snowball is rolling over you guys. Grant money isn’t free. If you’re going to make wise decisions, you shouldn’t be railroaded.” But Siegi Constantine, executive director of Main Street supports the buy. “This is an important parcel. It’s a core property for the northern area,” she said. “We’re making strategic decisions on which (properties) are necessary to fulfill our goals,” Commissioner Shari McCartney said. She urged commissioners to focus on the return on investment. Commissioner John Adornato said the message many businesses have been getting is that Oakland Park is closed to business, a message Adornato isn’t buying. “We’re on the upswing, a slow upswing, but the time is ripe. I’m getting calls from businesses that want to come to Oakland Park.” “Businesses and Realtors are watching us. We need to send a message that we are committed to what we started years ago,” Sallee added. City Manager John Stunson explained that the Schnell land would be kept as is until it’s needed for parking or development. Commissioners Boisvenue and McCartney against the Schnell purchase. The Perez property was the only one of three offered for sale in the Squires Plaza area. The city is expected to demolish the building at the site and install walkways and other improvements to NE 34 Court. “This one is key. This is in the center of Dixie Highway renovations,” McCartney said. Sallee noted that this is an important intersection and was once the city’s main thoroughfare. The vote was 4-1, Boisvenue dissenting.Offers rejectedCommissioners voted against buying several properties for reasons of price. White Hat, LLC, with properties at 3400 NE 11 Ave. and 3401 N. Dixie Highway, was not willing to meet the city’s latest offer of $268,000 minus cost of remediation. Commissioners also voted unanimously against buying the Bsama, LLC property at 3407 N. Dixie Highway. The property owner wanted $895,000. They voted against purchasing the Sikes properties at 3450, 3484 and 3498 NE 12 Ave. being offered for $1.625 million. “This one disappoints me. I like the location, but we’d be out of pocket a significant amount of money,” McCartney said. Commissioners rejected the Diamond property at 4081 NE 5 Ave. for use as a neighborhood pocket park. The owner wanted $72,000, and the city’s offer was $55,000. Stunson suggested that staff look for alternative sites for a neighborhood park and include the funding in the city’s Community Improvement Plan, or CIP, as a future project. Commissioners agreed to include several construction projects in the application for the county’s Redevelopment Capital Program funds: $325,000 for earthwork and drainage to stabilize a parking area at Jaco Pastorius Park; $500,000 for the 12th Avenue enhancement project which to stabilize street ends at Northeast 34 Street, Northeast 35 St and Northeast 37 Street 12th Avenue enhancement and $300,000 to improve sidewalks and create a plaza for a central market at Oakland Station. CulinaryContinued from page 1 Tell The Pelican about your special event 954-783-8700

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24 The Pelican Friday, May 18, 2012 WORSHIP DIRECTORY: Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad. Rev. Hyvenson Joseph By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeerfield Beach Today is a happy day at Deerfield Beach Elementary School. Because students and their families collected close to 4,000 pop tops from aluminum cans, 700 kids are enjoying a party hosted by McDonalds. On the menu, of course, Happy Meals. This year’s “Project with a Purpose” was coordinated by art teacher Suzanne Devine Clark who placed five-gallon collection in each classroom. The theme this year is “Go Green” Reduce, Reuse and Recycle” making the Tab-aThon Contest was a perfect fit. Deer eld Beach Elementary School students tops in McDonalds’ Pop-a-thon Deer eld Beach Elementary School second graders Raina Clark, front, and Emily Panton with the 393 lbs of pop-tabs collected by their school.Of the 63 elementary schools in the tri-county area, students at Deerfield Beach Elementary collected 393 pounds of pop tops, the purest form of aluminum on an aluminum can. It was a feat for the school which has only 700 students and which this year, according to Clark, has suffered some sad times. Today is not one of them. ‘”We are excited,” said Clark. “This is a perfect way to end our year.” The second place school collected 290 pounds of tabs. Decorated bins are back in the classrooms already, and a new collection for next has started, Clark said. One million pop tops provide enough energy to lodge 25 families at Miami’s Ronald McDonald House for one night. The Pelican • 954-783-8700

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The Pelican 25 Friday, May 18, 2012 SOLUTION ON PAGE 27 Lighthouse Point The Lighthouse Point Library teamed up again with Trinity Christian School for its Third Annual Drop Everything and Read event on Thursday, May 10, 2012 at Trinity Christian School. Pastor Dennis Redstone of Trinity Church opened the event with a prayer and Kindergarten teacher, Kimberley Terry, led a group of her students in a reading of a classroom created acrostic poem. Lighthouse Point Library Director Christy Keyes introduced the first guest speaker, Lighthouse Point Mayor Fred Schorr. Mayor Schorr read a book about the Drop Everything and Read program and got the students excited to read. Past Lighthouse Point Library Directory Doreen Gauthier followed with Aesop’s Fable The Tortoise and the Hare. The final guest reader was Debbie Gibson, founder of Signs of Excellence, a sign language interpreting service company. After a brief introduction of sign language, she signed alongside Ms. Terry as she read The Little Engine that Could. It was a wonderful hour of reading! Mayor Fred Schorr reads to a group of Trinity Christian School students.Story time with Lighthouse Point mayorTell The Pelican about your special event, program or accomplishments 954-783-8700

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26 The Pelican Friday, May 18, 2012 Classi eds Call 954-545-0013 HELP WANTEDSTYLISTS & ASS’T SALON MGRS Now Hiring! FL COSM. LICENSE REQ’D. Bonus Opportunities, FREE Adv Edu, 401K, Health Bene ts, Paid Time Off & MORE! Call Melissa at 912-322-1242 or visit careersbyhaircuttery. com. EOE. 5-25 NATIONAL PARKING OPERATOR Seeking An Operational Supervisor And Parking Enforcement Of cer To Join A Team Of Professionals Serving A Local Municipality. EOE. Call 954763-4806. 5-25 DIESEL / REFRIGERATION Truck Mechanic – We Have Immediate Openings For Diesel Mechanics In Pompano Beach. We Provide Excellent Pay & Bene ts. We Require A Minimum 2 Years Experience. Your Own Tools, Good Driving & Work History. CDL Driver License Would Be Helpful But Is Not Required. Apply In Person At Salem NationaLease/ Freight Liner Of ce % Atlantic Truck Center. 2840 Center Point Circle Pompano Beach Fla 33064 Or Apply Online www.salemleasing.com To Set Up Interview With The Manager Please Call 1-800709-2536. EOE. 5-25 LOCAL PEST CONTROL CO Looking For Quality Sales/Service Tech. Must Be Dependable, Team Player, Good Drivers License & People Skills. Will Train Right Person. ALSO Of ce Assistant – Computer – People & Phone Skills Needed. Fax Resume 954418-3982. 6-1 SEEKING EMPLOYMENTNURSE ASSISTANT – Care For The Sick And Elderly. Drive – Non Smoker. Over 15 Years Experience. References Available. 973-519-1362. CAREGIVER / COMPANION Caucasian Woman With 25 Yrs Exp. To Assist & Care For Your Loved Ones. Days / Eves / Nights. References Available. 954-482-5494. 5-18 MALE CNA / HHA / SR. COMPANION. Broward Area. Former EMT. All Certi cations / Compassionate, References. Call Ron 954-232-2832. AVAILABLE NOW!! 5-18 HHA CNA CERTIFIED – 15 Years Exp. Level 2 – Background Check – References Available. Will Provide TLC For Your Loved One. Call 954-8267341. HHA SEEKING WEEKEND Position – Days Or Nights Willing To Live In / Out. References. Own Car – Reliable!! 20 Yrs Experience. 786-333-6437. 5-25 CERTIFIED NURSING ASST – Seeking Job To Take Care Of Sick / Elderly Day Or Night. 10 Yrs Experience. References Available. 786-3558006. 5-18 SERVICES DANNY BOY ELECTRIC – Lic & Insured. Lic. #EC13004811. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. 24/Hr Service. 954-290-1443. Beat Any Written Estimate. Sr, Discount. 6-1 CALL BRENDAN THE HANDYMAN – Construction & Repairs – Carpentry – Plumbing – Roo ng – Masonry – Windows – Painting – Decking – Tile. FREE Estimates! 954773-6134 – Emergency Calls. WATSON PAINTING & Waterproofing Co. Interior / Exterior Painting, Replace Baseboards, Removal Of Wallpaper. Res / Comm. Pressure Clean Roofs / Decks. Lic / Ins. 954-650-0488. 6-1 HANDYMAN – PAINTING – CARPENTRY – Pressure Cleaning. Decks! Everything Around The House. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. Call 561-350-3781. 6-8 MOORE PLUMBING PLUMBING SERVICES – Big Jobs – Small Jobs. We Do It All. Remodeling & Repairs. Lic. & Insured. C.C. Accepted. Call 954-772-4600. 5-25 HONEST HANDYMAN – HOME & BUILDING Maintenance/ Improvements. No Job Too Small. Fast Friendly Service. Reasonable Rates. Local Resident/ Homeowner. Call Today For Your FREE Upfront Quote. No Deposit Required. 754-366-1915. 5-18 GOT JUNK? DUMP TRUCK – CLEANUPS Trees/ Landscape, Yard Fill. Paint/ Pressure Wash/ Roofs/Home Repairs – Welding, Etc. Dave 954-818-9538. 6-1 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIESNew GREEN technology. New defroster control saves energy in home refrigerators, commercial chillers. Patented. All optical. Simple mfg. Strategic partners needed..www.NewAvionics.Com. 954-568-1991. C MUSICIANS WANTEDThe American Legion Symphonic Band is now accepting new members for the 2011-2012 season. College age to “seasoned seniors” are welcome. Rehearsals are held on Wed. evenings at American Legion Post 142 in Pompano. Percussionists, oboe, bassoon, trombone and euphonium players are especially needed. If you enjoy “making music,” call Jim McGonigal, Music Director at 954647-0700 for more info.REAL ESTATE SERVICEREAL ESTATE SELLING OR BUYING – Relocation Specialist. 18 Years Experience. English, French, Spanish, Greek. Yvette Gaussen – YES WE CAN REALTY – 954-6147773 Or 954-773-8340. 5-25 ROOMS FOR RENTPOMPANO PVT ROOM & Bath! $500 Per Month. Includes Utilities – Cable – Internet. Walking Distance To Shopping. Call 954-793-1363. 5-18 HOMES FOR RENTPOMPANO COTTAGE STYLE HOUSE – 2 / 1 Pool – Large Fenced Yard. $1050 Month. 510 NE 35 Street. Call Darci 954-7833723. 6-1 REAL ESTATE WANTEDI BUY HOUSES!! CASH!! AS IS! QUICK CLOSE! ANY AREA – ANY CONDITION! NO EQUITY OK. CALL NOW 954-914-2355. 7-20 CONDOS FOR SALEPOMPANO BEACH – DIRECT OCEAN VIEW!! 2/2 AT THE BREAKERS! $275,000. Call Juliana At Barclay’s For Details. 1-305766-4420. FORT LAUDERDALE – BAYVIEW Deep Waterfront – Gorgeous 2/2 Furnished – Completely Remodeled. Over 1400 Sq Ft. Dockage Available. Move Right In. Colleen Majeski – Balistreri Realty – 754-235-1208. 5-18 CONDOS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH – 1 Block To Ocean!! 1 / 1 Fully Equipped. Hurricane Windows / Doors. 2 Flat Screens, DVD, WIFI, Pool, BBQ, Laundry. $850 Month + Electric Monthly Thru December. 954-540-9724. DEERFIELD BEACH 2/2 CONDO – Corner Unit, Pool. $800. Good Credit Required. No Pets Or Realtors. 631-8853342. 5-25 POMPANO BEACH LARGE 2 / 2 With Den. All Renovated! Pool – Mile From Beach! W /D – Small Pet OK! $1,300 Month Yearly. Available May 1st. 561-703-6545 Or 754-2643289. 5-25 Rent it!Pelican classi ed ads work for you. Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad today for next Friday. Rent it!Pelican classi ed ads work for you. Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad today for next Friday.Rent it!Pelican classi ed ads work for you. Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad today for next Friday.

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The Pelican 27 Friday, May 18, 2012 Classi eds Call 954-545-0013 APTS FOR RENTDEERFIELD/POMPANO BEACH 1 BR & 2 BR APTS FOR RENT. Remodeled, Paint, Tile, Etc. Washer / Dryer On Site. Pool. Pet Friendly. George 954-809-5030. 6-1 POMPANO BEACH 1 BEDROOMS AND EFFICIENCY Apts. Fully Furnished With Kitchen, Cable, Internet, Pool, Laundry. 500’ To The Beach. Weekly – Monthly – Yearly. 954-2948483 Or 248-736-1533, 6-8 POMPANO BEACH – 3/ 2 $1025 – NE 1/1 $675 2 /1 $950 – Townhouse 2/1.5 $1095. ALL FREE WATER. RENT + $70 Application Moves – U – In. 954-781-6299. 5-25 POMPANO BEACH / ATLANTIC / FEDERAL – Ef ciency $175 Weekly. No Security Deposit. Includes Cable, Electric, Internet. FREE Washer / Dryer. No Drug Record – No Evictions. 954-7090694. 5-18 POMPANO BEACH 900’ TO Beach – 1/1 Furn. Includes Cable TV. $850 Month. Efficiency Furn. $700 Mo. Includes Utilities & Cable. 954-785-5837. 5-25 POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 Bedroom From $495. Easy Move-in. 1/2 OFF DEPOSIT. Remodeled. Great Location. 954-783-1088 For More Info. GOLDEN ACRES DEVELOPMENT is the best value for apartment rental in the city of Pompano Beach. Newly renovated kitchen cabinets, new appliances, energy saving HVAC wall units, 24-hr maintenance, playgrounds and daycare. Rentals starting at $500. Section 8 Voucher holders are welcome to apply. Please contact Helen Mitchell at 954-972-1444. Domestic farm workers will be given priority in renting available units. STUDIO / EFFICIENCYPOMPANO BEAUTIFUL Parliament House Studio – Ocean View! Unfurnished. Pool, Spa, Gym. 24 Hr Security. $750 Mo Yrly Lease. Call 954678-7868. 5-18 COMMERCIAL FOR RENT-SALEPOMPANO COMMERCIAL OFFICE Spaces Available. Ranging From As Low As $500 To $700 Depending On Square Footage. Please Call Darci At 954-7833723. 5-18 DEERFIELD BEACH – Retail Of ce Warehouse – 700 Sq Ft With Loft. A/C, Bathroom. $575 Per Month. Call For More Info 561-654-1331 Or 561-9985681. 6-1 NEWLY EQUIPPED LOW RENT Shop Space – Ideal For Bakery – Pizza – Wings – Crepes – Etc. Corner New – 12 Avenue & 34 Court, Oakland Park. Indoor / Outdoor Patio Sitting. 954-563-3533. 5-25 DOCK FOR RENT60 FT DOCK – THE COVE MARINA – 50 AMP / H20 Included. $1,200 Month – Price Negotiable Depending On Boat Size. Restaurant & Fuel On Premises. 954-9140053. a.j.barsotti@comcast. net 5-25 POMPANO BEACH DOCK – Wide Canal – No Wake Area!! Whips!! Quiet Canal. Call 954946-3301. 5-18 COVE – DOCK FOR RENT!! 60 FT. Water, Electric. No Fixed Bridges. Nice Location. $350 Mo. 954-429-9347 Or Call Cell 954-288-9651. 5-18 GARAGE SALESMAY 20 10AM – 4PM – INDOOR FLEA MARKET AT Pompano Civic Center! 70+ Booths, Food Trucks, FREE Goodie Bags For 1st 100 Guests. 3rd Sunday Each Month. 1801 NE 6 St. 954-785-7475. 5-18MISC. FOR SALEUSED BEAUTY Equipment Warehouse Closing!! All Must Go!!. Low Low Prices. Call For More Information! Boca Raton – Nick 954-415-4937. 5-25 Sell it!Pelican classi ed ads work for you. Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad today for next Friday. Rent it!Pelican classi ed ads work for you. Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad today for next Friday. Memorial Day, May 28

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28 The Pelican Friday, May 18, 2012 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFF Oakland Park City commissioners unanimously agreed Wednesday to rename the city’s canoe/kayak launch at Northeast 12 Terrace and Northeast 30 Court the “J. Dewey Hawkins Landing” in honor of the city’s first mayor. The request was made by the Oakland Park Historical Society whose president, Marcia Norris, wrote in the application that Hawkins was “the first and longest serving mayor and, sadly, there is nothing in the city named for him.” In 1925, when the area was incorporated as Floranada, Hawkins was elected to the Oakland Park of cials honor city’s founding mayor with kayak launch city commission. He became mayor at the incorporation of Oakland Park in 1929. He served as mayor until 1947 when he stepped aside. He ran again in 1949 and served until 1955, when he retired due to ill health. Hawkins died in November 1958. He was born on his family’s farm in Suwanee County, Florida, Dec. 17, 1899. He and his wife, Ruby, and baby daughter, Jo Mildred, moved to South Florida in January 1922, where he plotted out a farm tract on Floranada Road and built a home in the 4000 block of Dixie Highway. During the land boom, his interests expanded to include real estate and expansion of his farmland. He was the first in the area to raise Brahman cattle. During the Depression, he directed owners of a grocery store to provide food to the needy and send him the bills. He never revealed that he picked up the tab. Hawkins donated the land for the American Legion Hall and Masonic Lodge. “This makes my heart very happy,” Mayor Anne Sallee said when the resolution passed. “He contributed a great amount to our city.” In other business, commissioners selected JMW Construction Co. as the most responsive and responsible bidder for the Northwest 39 Street Greenway Project. The bid was for $809,964 with $750,000 covered by a grant from the Florida Department of Transportation.See MAYOR on page 29

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The Pelican 29 Friday, May 18, 2012 Advertise 954-783-8700 The project consists of establishing a greenway corridor along Northwest 39 Street. Major components are improvements along the banks of the C-13 canal between Northwest 21 and Northwest 29 Avenues, construction of pedestrian and bike paths with pedestrian-friendly lighting, landscaping and signage. Commissioners also approved hiring Calvin Giordano & Associates for construction engineering inspection services to certify the Greenway project. The contract is for $60,000.MayorContinued from page 28

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30 The Pelican Friday, May 18, 2012 Capt. RJ Boyle is an experienced angler in South Florida. His studio is located in Lighthouse Point. Call 954-420-5001. RJ Boyle RJ BOYLE STUDIOSAs I watched the weigh-in at the Saltwater Shootout on Saturday, I could not believe how many of them said that they caught so many fish during the fishing hours that it hurt their chances of winning the most. Obviously, when you hook a sailfish during a non-sailfish tournament, guys know it’s eating into their fishing time. It really feels odd to get a bite on the line, hook a fish and when you realize it’s a sailfish, get upset. What? The minute I first see the sail come out of the water, I get excited. It’s hard and unnatural not to get excited when you see the sailfish. It’s so funny to hear guys surprised that there were so many sailfish hooked. Let’s think about this for a minute. There are 120 boats chumming with sardines and Don’t be afraid to chum up the waters chum blocks as hard as they can for eight hours. You think that might have something to do with it? On a normal weekend fishing day, plenty of people fish but do they really go all out like they do in tournaments? I say no, but maybe they should. I can tell you that excess chumming never hurts. It only helps. Everything is attracted to the chum and eventually swims its way to the boat, so don’t be afraid to take plenty of chum along on the next outing. Tight Lines! 5-19 – Wii Gaming for ages 9 to 12 at the Northwest Branch Library, 580 NW 3 Ave., Pompano Beach, from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. 954-7862186. 5-19 – Chess Club meets from 10:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Pompano Beach Library, 1213 E. Atlantic Blvd. 954786-2181. 5-20 – Cellist Matthew Allen performs at 4 p.m. at Trinity Lutheran Church, 11 SW 11 St., Fort Lauderdale. Call 954-463-2450. 5-21 – Preschool Storytime at 10:30 a.m. at the Richard C. Sullivan Public Library, 500 NE 26 St., Wilton Manors. Ages 2 to 5. 954-390-2195. 5-22 – Card party held by the Does Drove 142 from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Pompano Beach Elks Lodge 700 NE 10 St. Cost is $4. 561-479-2002. SightingsContinued from page 16

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The Pelican 31 Friday, May 18, 2012 It’s extremely fresh and we have very talented chefs to make it,” says Bravo. “And we always prepare it with an Oceans 234 twist. For Oceans 234Continued from page 19The always satisfying Citrus Sesame Seared Tuna dissimulates a mouthwatering Yuzu drenched wakami salad with Daikon sprouts. example, we actually use real crab in our rolls rather than the imitation type and our big Seafood Dynamite roll comes with conch and scallops.” For meat aficionados, Oceans 234 serves up grilled Rosemary infused NY strip steak, smoked Kansas City baby-back ribs, roasted apple pork loin and the always popular 8 oz filet mignon with asparagus and Yukon mash. At lunchtime, a plethora of satisfying sandwiches such as the Black Angus burger, the Mediterranean chicken baguette, the Jerked dolphin and the smoked pork Panini make a tantalizing appearance. For salad enthusiasts, the Cobb, Caesar and Poached Pear are all must-try classics. “Personally, I love the Waldorf with grilled shrimp, apples, bleu cheese, walnuts and balsamic vinaigrette,” says the healthconscious Williams. “Every day we offer different salad, fish and entre specials along with freshly prepared soups such as our famous Clam Chowder,” adds Chef Bravo. “In fact, everything is made fresh in house. From vinaigrettes to sauces to desserts – all is homemade,” asserts the conscientious Executive Chef. “Speaking of desserts, we have an outstanding key lime pie, chocolate lava cake, apple crisp and even a delicious flan.” Oceans 234 is also known for tasty drinks, especially the delectable Mojitos. Happy Hour is from 3-7 pm. Beers start at $3, wines by the glass at $6 and bottles at $26. Lunch sandwiches are about $10, appetizers $10 to $15 while most large entres are in the $20-$30 range. There is also an impressive la carte brunch with free mimosa on Sundays. The kitchen is open from 11:30 a.m. to 10 p.m. on weekdays and 11:30 p.m. on weekends. The bar is open 11:30 a.m. to 2 a.m. on Fridays and 3 a.m. on Saturdays. Be sure to catch live music on the weekends and check out the website at www. oceans234.com for event updates and special discounts. Enjoy.The homemade key lime pie is the perfect conclusion to an outing at Oceans 234.

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32 The Pelican Friday, May 18, 2012 By Malcolm McClintockPELICAN STAFF“This project has taken us six weeks to complete. It has been a lot of work but well worth it as the kids are really proud of their achievements,” says McNab Elementary veteran teacher Andria Ammons. For the past 25 years, Ammons, a National Board Certified Teacher, has taught kindergarten, first, second, and third grades. She holds a Master’s Degree in Educational Leadership and has been the First Grade Team Leader for the last three years. She was the Teacher of the Year in 2004 and has been awarded over thirty-five grants for her classrooms. In fact, she was awarded four grants by the Broward Education Foundation for the 2011-12 school year to help improve student achievement through special projects. She also received a grant from the Broward County Council of Mathematics for interactive math games for her students. As an impact disseminator, Ammons trains other teachers in Broward County on how to use her Web Page web.mac. com/missammonswebpage1. One of the most impressive grants received was from the Science Book Publishers which enabled each student in her first grade class to publish a nonfiction book about animals. Students selected a book from the school Media Center and then researched their animal by reading his or her library books and using laptops to connect to the internet to find additional facts and details. They created their nonfiction stories about mammals, ocean animals, amphibians, reptiles, insects or birds. The books were published using the company website at www.studentstreasures.com The students used the writing process of pre-writing, draft, revise, and edit. To learn about text features, each pupil labeled a picture in his or her book. The published books have a hard cover, the author’s picture, teacher’s name, and school’s name on the front. On the bind of the book, it has the title of the book and student’s last name. The first copy cost about $9 per student and extras can be ordered at will for approximately $20. “I am so proud of my students. They have all published a book in first grade!” says an enthusiastic Ammons. “We were also able to integrate several subject areas such as science, reading, research and writing.” In addition, the kids were featured on the morning announcement show at McNab Elementary where they each introduced themselves and read the title of their books. Phillip Zacharoudis read his published book called The African Egg-Eating Snake to the entire school. As it was career day, organized by the Gifted program teacher Erin Ryan, the students were also dressed in their future desired occupations. “This is a meaningful experience that I am sure he or she will always remember. Who knows? I may have inspired someone to become a future writer or author. I really love being a teacher!” says Ammons.McNab Elementary 1st grade teacher Andria Ammons poses with her classroom of newly published authors who proudly show off their literary masterpieces. [Staff photo by Malcolm McClintock]African Egg-Eating Snake worms its way into McNab creative writing project Who knows? I may have inspired someone to become a future writer or author. I really love being a teacher!Ammons

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The Pelican 33 Friday, May 18, 2012 STOP HERE STOP HERE STOP HERE

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36 The Pelican Friday, May 18, 2012



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Friday, May 18, 2012 Vol. XX, Issue 20 Wherever you are, read The Pelican @ pompanopelican.com Send news to siren2415@gmail.com Pompano Beach Deer eld Beach Lighthouse Point Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Wilton Manors Oakland Park Hillsboro Beach The Galt Palm Aire The Pelican Pelican Oakland Park turns up the heat for culinary destination If Julia Child were alive wed ask her to come, says Mayor Anne Sallee By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFOakland Park City commissioners have pared down their shopping list and agreed to buy two properties in the downtown area as part of its proposed Culinary destination. Mayor Anne Sallee says its been a dream since 2003 when the city created its Community Redevelopment Area, or CRA, where plans are Artist Nzingah Oniwosan, above, has been chosen as the rst artist to showcase her work during the inaugural ArtHall gallery exhibit which starts May 23 at the Community Redevelopment Agencies Business Resource Center, 50 NE 1 St., Pompano Beach. See story on page 15. [Photos courtesy of Nzingah Oniwosan] Despite the dust, the grits are hot and parking is almost back to normalBy Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach It will take more than a little construction to get Charlie Cusanelli to forsake one of his favorite restaurants Jukebox Diner. As the City of Pompano Beach builds a new parking lot in front of Jukebox Diner, 2771 E. Atlantic Blvd., located in the Harbor Village Shoppes, Bernadette Scollin, Jukeboxs owner, said shes relying on customers like Cusanelli to keep business afloat during construction. See PARKING on page 5 See CULINARY on page 23By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach A panel reviewing the death of re ghter Bill Elliott while on a training exercise found that Elliott was apparently unconscious as he fell 100 feet from the top of an aerial ladder. It also reports that a roof hook was not secured with the proper mounts and that the department had no guidelines on how to climb the ladder and no requirement for protective equipment. Elliott died Jan. 6 at Fire Station 61 while climbing a new aerial ladder during a training exercise. The ladder In the wake of re ghters death, panel suggests safety measures was at a 65 degree angle. Elliott was completing his second climb of the afternoon and wore a ladder belt, but no other protective equipment. No one on the ground was aware that Elliott was falling until they heard a metal-on-metal sound, apparently the ladder belt hook hitting the ladder. Elliott was tumbling backwards, making no sound or visible effort to stop his fall. The panel speculates that Elliott may have suffered an episode of unconsciousness which caused him to fall backwards striking his head. He did not grab for his roof hook, but See PANEL on page 3 Ray Colliers long history in Deer eld Beach will be notedBy Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach President Lyndon B. Johnson appointed Ray Collier this citys postmaster in 1964. At the time he was one of the youngest postmasters in the country. His was one of the last presidential appointments. Next month, the Deer eld Beach native will be recognized as the citys See COLLIER on page 4

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2 The PelicanFriday, May 18, 2012 SightingsA community calendar of Broward County. Email events to siren2415@gmail. com By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFLauderdale-By-The-Sea Town commissioners have agreed to a proposed charter amendment that would extend the terms of future mayors to eight years. Currently, mayors can serve three consecutive two-year terms. The charter change would call for two terms of four years, but the change will have to be approved by the voters. Two residents spoke in favor of the proposed amendment. Resident Edmund Malkoon said he favored putting it on the ballot but wasnt sure what the rush was to do it this Town may change mayors term to four years November. You could put it on in 2014, and that would have accomplished it, he said. Resident Diana Kugler was for the change, adding the current mayors term should be extended another two years. Two years is a tough amount of time, Kugler said. One year is spent getting revved up and going, and then its time to campaign again. We have been fortunate to have Mayor Minnet on the commission, she said. The Charter Review Board has recommended the proposal be put on the November ballot. See MAYOR on page 12 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeerfield Beach Cookers of succulent BBQ stand to win big bucks at the Deerfield Beach Chamber of Commerce Pig Out on Saturday, May 26. The annual feast of pork, beef, chicken and brisket will be held in Sullivan Park, just behind the chamber building, and is offering cash to those whose BBQ is judged the best. There is also a Peoples Choice Trophy for the cook receiving the most votes from the public. The day is designed for family fun according to Chamber Executive Director Larry DeVille and has been priced accordingly. Tickets are $10 each or four for $30. Parking is free at the vacant lot next to the Two Georges The Pig Out: nger-lickin, foot-stomping good food and music in Deer eld BeachRestaurant, or at a discount in the city parking garage on A1A. The price of admission buys a sampling of barbequed meats prepared by both backyard cooks and professional grill meisters. The pros stand to win $750 for their culinary efforts as well as $250 for the best BBQ in any of the four meat categories. The backyard grillers can compete by offering two of the four meats and the prize for the one judged the best is $250. Laville says both categories are still open. Last year about 20 contestants fired up their grills. Mike Wargo, whose crew of six calling themselves the Beach Bums Barbecuuuuueeee won the Peoples Choice Award last year with their pork butts and beef brisket, says he is looking forward to cooking for his community again this year. Wargo and his team arrive at Sullivan Park around 6 p.m. See PIG OUT on page 11 5-18 Free jazz concert during Mothers Day JazzBy-The-Sea from 1 to 4 p.m. at El Prado Park, 4500 El Mar Drive, Lauderdale-By-TheSea.See SIGHTINGS on page 11

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The Pelican 3 Friday, May 18, 2012 during his fall, the hook was dislodged. The panel concluded that the roof hook was not secured with the proper mounts but instead with mounts designed for a larger diameter, lighter pike pole. Fourteen re ghters were interviewed by the panel composed of Asst. Chief Dave Downey from Miami-Dade Fire Rescue, Dept. Chief Jim St. Pierre from Palm Beach County Fire Rescue, Div. Chief Michael Hohl from Pompano Fire Rescue and John Mealer, Pompano Beach risk manager. Three other re ghters climbed the ladder that day with no incidents. The panel recommended that the department implement a mechanism for securing the roof hook and any other piece of equipment attached to the aerial ladder and that the securing device be designed speci cally for what it is securing. It did not suggest that the roof hooks improper mount was responsible in any way for the accident. Also recommended was the implementation of a standard operating procedure for aerial ladder operations, i.e. minimum climbing angles, minimum equipment and a procedure for operations. Equipment, it was noted, should include helmet, gloves, safety shoes and a harness. Reportedly, Elliott was wearing a harness. Additionally, the panel urges the industry create a fall-arrest system for its aerial ladders, perhaps a cable that adjusts with the extension of the ladder and permits multiple climbers. For the immediate need, the use of a hands free, fall-arrest rope was suggested. Elliotts death in the line of duty was the rst for the city. This investigation was conducted by the Pompano Fire Rescue Department. Pompano Beach Public Information Of cer Sandra King said three other agencies have investigated Elliotts death: the State Fire Marshal, the Broward Sheriffs Of ce and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, a federal probe that King said was very extensive. King did not know if the ndings of any of these studies had been released. PanelContinued from page 1Advertise with The Pelican! 954-783-8700!

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4 The PelicanFriday, May 18, 2012 Advertise with The Pelican Today! 954-783-8700of cial historian, a position he has held for more than 25 years and that he inherited from the late Emily Dietrich. In his younger days, Collier was active in the Broward County Historical Commission and encouraged the commissions executive director Helen Landers to hold two Pioneer Days events here. At one point, when the city was much smaller, Collier knew everyones address or PO Box number. Later, he led walking tours of the Deer eld Beach Cemetery pointing out the headstones of the citys pioneers and recalling their contributions to the community. Now his health is failing said Amie Kay Tanner, also a native of the city and lifelong neighbor of Collier. He loved Deer eld Beach and lived all his life on or near SE 1 Street where he was born and worked, Tanner said. He would do anything to bring Deer eld Beach the recognition he felt it deserved. Hes a fount of information and a wonderful Southern gentleman. Collier, 74, will likely be honored at the rst commission meeting in June. That month is also Deer elds birthday month. It was incorporated on June 25, 1925 and by next year Tanner would like to see June declared the citys of cial History Month.Hillsboro Canal project may encroach on landscaping and docksDeer eld Beach A Hillsboro Canal project being undertaken by the South Florida Water Management District will be explained to residents of west Deer eld Beach at a meeting Wednesday, May 30, 6-8 p.m. at the BSO Substation on Powerline Road. The District plans a twoyear stabilization project beginning next year at this time that consists of shoring up the banks and dredging the channel. According to the SFWMD website, a buildup of sediment is limiting water ow in the canal which feeds into the Intracoastal Waterway and that presents a potential ood hazard. The work will be done along a 7.6 mile section from Military Trail to three miles west of State Road 441. Properties along the canal include a district rightofway that in some cases contains structures, docks, trees and fences, some of which have been permitted, some of which are not. The stabilization project will requires some of these obstructions to be removed. Carole Morris is the districts Broward County representative. She can be reached at 954-452-4814, ext.4987.Sunday alcohol sales get initial OKDeer eld Beach First reading of a law that would allow the sale of alcohol on Sundays beginning at 7 a.m. was approved this week by CollierContinued from page 1 See ALCOHOL on page 16

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The Pelican 5 Friday, May 18, 2012 We have fantastic local people who are really helping us get through here, said Scollin, who estimated shes lost 50 percent of her business since construction began in April. During construction, free parking is available directly behind Harbor Village. Cusanelli said he eats at the restaurant three or four times a week. Why not? The food is good. We missed them for the six years they were gone, he said. Jukebox Diner closed after Hurricane Wilma in 2005 and recently reopened at this location. Other shop owners are remaining open during the construction. Ritchie Siegrist, owner of The Record Rack, said at first he saw a big drop in business but thinks things have stabilized for the most part now that his customers are aware of whats going on. He says hes probably doing a little better than most of his neighbors because hes in a bit of a niche business selling new and used vinyl records and CDs. Theres only a few of us around that are doing it, he said. Ill be happy when its finished, said Stuart Waldron, owner of Stonehenge Estate Buyers. Waldron said hes had friends drive buy who thought he and the other businesses were closed. Were still here, he said. But despite the inconvenience, Waldron said hes happy the city began construction when business was already slow instead of during a busier time of year. Horacio Danovich, engineer in charge of the parking redevelopment says the city may provide 75 to 77 temporary spaces at the east end of the parking lot as early as next week. The sooner the weather cooperates the better, said Danovich, who estimates the $1.6 million parking lot will be finished around Thanksgiving. When its ready for the first car, there will be 126 spaces plus nine for motorcycles; 20 more than before. I think, at the end of the day, theyre going to have a great place, he said. In addition to the parking lots, some businesses at Harbor Village are sporting new faades. Adriane Esteban, Community Redevelopment Agency, or CRA, project manager, said $1.2 million of the $1.6 million in facade improvements is being funded by a CRA grant. The other $400,000 is being paid for by property owners in the shopping center. She said officials are hoping the faade work will be done by the end of the year. ParkingContinued from page 1 Two Jukebox Diner customers enjoy breakfast as a construction crew works on the new parking lot. [Photo by Anne Siren]

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6 The PelicanFriday, May 18, 2012 Deer eld Beach, Pompano Beach, Lighthouse Point, LauderdaleBy-The-Sea, Wilton Manors and Oakland ParkWilton Manors Oakland Park Hillsboro Beach The Pompano Pelican is published weekly on FridaysStreet Address: 1500-A E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, FL 33060 Telephone: 954-783-8700 Fax: 954-783-0093Letters to the Editor are encouraged and accepted for print if signed, although a writers name will be withheld on request; letters must also include a daytime telephone number. Advertising rates are available upon request. Subscription rate is $31.80 including tax for one years delivery in Greater Pompano Beach; $95.40/per year including tax for others in the United States; call 954-783-8700 for rates abroad. The Pelican is a nonpartisan newspaper and reserves the right to decline advertising. Copyright 2012. Reproduction of this publication in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission of the publisher. The Pelican is a member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, Deer eld Beach Chamber and the LBTS Chamber. The Pelican is a state certi ed woman-owned minority business. The Pelican is delivered to businesses, libraries, schools, of ces, hospitals, news racks and single family homes. All advertising and copy is published at the sole discretion of the publisher. We welcome your critiques and ideas concerning this publication. Anne Siren, publisherExecutive Assistant: Mary Hudson Graphics: Rachel Ramirez Windsheimer Bookkeeper: John White Classi eds: Fran Shelby Contributing Writers: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Judy Wilson, Malcolm McClintock, Judy Vik, Michael dOliveira Account Executives: Paul Shroads, Carolyn Mann, Bill Heaton, Bill Fox Special Of ce Assistant: Cathy Siren ESTABLISHED 1993 Volume XX, Issue 20Founding Editor and PublisherAnne Hanby Siren Letters & OpinionsThe Pelican wants to know what you think. Send your thoughts on local, state and national issues to siren2415@gmail.com Correction and clari cationIn last weeks issue of The Pelican [May 11], the following statement was incorrectly attributed to Barbara Boynton in a story regarding the Transportation Oriented Corridor, or TOC, in Pompano Beach. Boynton did not say RMA has hired people from outside the community to promote the TOC. Its [the plan for the corridor] designed not to get our input. Our community is not involved in CRA meetings. The statement was said by another person at the same meeting. The Pelican regrets the error. Boynton told The Pelican that she . is not part of any group. She added, It does not bother me whom the city hires and where they live, as long as they are fair and honest to every person. Yes, it would be nice to see more of the community involvement in the CRA meetings. Also, it would be helpful if more people get involved in their community. In todays economy, you see many people traveling from city to city to work. And if it takes nding better quali ed people from outside, I am for that.Hurricane preparedness Then & Now: WaterBy Cynthia SipulaSPECIAL TO THE PELICANAfter a storm, you may nd you dont have anything coming out of the tap. Even if you do, you should not drink it until you know for certain it has been declared safe by water management of cials. Assume there is a boil water order in place for the rst 72 hours after a hurricane, even if you have not heard of one. Decades ago Floridians were told to store drinking water before a hurricane, but how much was enough? No one seemed to know. Todays guides are more speci c. Most sources recommend fourteen gallons of water per person and at least two gallons per pet. It does not all have to be bottled water, either. While bottled is certainly the safest water, it could get expensive, especially if you have a large family. Have you ever asked yourself what they did before bottled water? They used to tell people to store water in clean bottles and cooking utensils. You can use soda bottles. The way to prepare a soda bottle is to ll it up partway with water and add one teaspoon of unscented bleach. Shake it around a bit, pour it out, and rinse thoroughly before lling the container with water to be stored. In more recent decades, we have been advised to make ice in every clean container we can nd, even Ziplock bags, lling in every available spot in the freezer with water long before the storm approaches so there is time for everything to freeze. Having the freezer full of ice when the power goes out will keep foods safe longer, too. If you dont feel like drinking it, that bagged water can also be used for brushing teeth or freshening up. Take note, however. We now know that milk jugs do not make good water containers. They are prone to leakage. Worse yet, it is impossible to completely disinfect a milk jug, and the bacteria that remains in the plastic could make you very sick. Anyone who has lived through two hurricanes or more has probably heard this advice. Clean your bathtub thoroughly; then disinfect with bleach. Rinse thoroughly. Use sealant around the drain. Now ll the bathtub with water. This was how most people provided water for their families after hurricanes in decades past. Some of the more recent hurricane specials on TV have mentioned that old practice, but they no longer recommend that you drink it; they say that tub water should only be for ushing and personal hygiene. Why dont we hear about that ritual any more? Probably its because the tub may end up being the safest place to stay in the event of ferocious winds and the destruction of the rest of your home. If there are several bathtubs in your home, it would still be possible to designate one for water while leaving the other one(s) for refuge. Another possibility is to buy the large Rubbermaid storage containers with lids and ll them with water for your upcoming hygiene needs. The lids keep out falling debris. The problem is that once theyre full, they will be too heavy to move. The tub is looking better all the time. These recipes for clean water have been around for years. Its the kind of advice that is easily forgotten in the hustle-bustle of storm preparation, so it would be wise to keep a copy of it in the box with the hurricane supplies. While youre at it, you might want to include a clean cloth to use as a lter, sealed in a plastic bag, and a dropper for the bleach. See Water on this pageWaterContinued from this pageOn Sunday, May 13, the Governors Hurricane Conference comes to town reminding us of the critical role that local government plays in protecting its residents during emergencies. Broward Countys Hurricane Preparedness website contains a wealth of information useful before, during and after the storm. Check out the Hurricane Guide as well as the A-Z Guide that includes more than 60 topics, from airports and animals to water and windows. Questions? Call the Broward County Call Center at 3-1-1 or 954-831-4000.Hurricane season begins June 1 Family Success Centers assist those in needIf you or someone you know is in need of rental, mortgage and utility assistance, visit the Family Success Centers website and learn how to qualify or call 954-357-6367. Family Success Centers are a one-stop source of social services information, referrals and programs that assist individuals with building a stronger, healthier and self-suf cient family unit. The Friends of the Wilton Manors Library will hold its Annual Meeting on Thursday, May 24, 2012 in the Richard C. Sullivan Public Library of Wilton Manors at 500 NE 26th Street. Refreshments will be served beginning at 6:30 p.m. Meeting is open to Friends members as well as interested public citizens. Call Paul Kuta at 954566-9019.Friends to meet in Wilton ManorsBook discussion of Pearl Bucks the Good Earth May 21 at 2 p.m. at the Galt Ocean Mile Library, 3403 Galt Ocean Drive, Fort Lauderdale. Fortune cookies served. 954-537-2877. The Good Earth at Galt Library

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The Pelican 7 Friday, May 18, 2012 By Beth Aseere SPECIAL TO THE PELICANPompano Beach This month, Pompano Beach High Schools Drama students performed their rst military play, Bury the Dead a 1936 expressionist anti-war drama by the American Playwright Irwin Shaw. It dramatizes the refusal of six dead soldiers during an unspeci ed war, who represent a cross section of American society, to be buried. Each soldier rises from the grave to express his anguish, the futility of war and his refusal to become part of the Students, audience react to Pompano production of Bury The Deadglorious past to the woman who has survived him. I was worried when I rst picked this play that we would lose the audience around the second couple scene. Audiences do not love talking scenes. But all six couples performed and the audience got quieter and quieter with each one. This means they were really into what they were seeing, said Drama Teacher Julia Perlowski. And the play had its impact on the student performers. I feel like people who die before their time have a lot that they would like to say and do. However, they cannot, said senior actor, Julien Melo. The part of Henry Levy gave me the chance to put myself into someones shoes and speak up for the things they have missed out on. I took on my character and tried my best to actually feel like my life had been taken from my body, and I had no say. I felt like I was the voice that stands up for a cause among millions. The whole play has taught me to never take anything for granted. The simple things in life could potentially be the things you Senior Caleb Campbell as fallen solider and Senior Bobby Adkins as captain of the soldiers.See BURY THE DEAD on page 14

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8 The PelicanFriday, May 18, 2012 Business matters The Pelican takes a look at local business owners. Call The Pelican to nd out how you can tell your story here because business matters. 954-783-8700. Briefs By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFTo be a success in a major boating community for 50 years speaks for itself, but thats not enough for Jerry Johnson who says, We hope were of value to our clients everyday. Pompano Beach Marine Center, 701 S. Federal Hwy., is well known for its quality products and good service with offshore sport fishing mariners. Currently, this landmark business holds the honor of being the largest selling dealer of Grady-White boats in the country for the fifth time.Pompano Beach Marine Center, a third generation family business, celebrates 50 years of success The family heads out for a day on the water. Left to right are Jill, Jerry, June, Cole, Jon, Brock, Beth. [Photo courtesy of Pompano Beach Marine Center]Jerrys son, John, a third generation member in this business, is the sales manager. He says, Like Dad before me, I started as a kid, swabbing floors and washing boats. I still do it from time to time. My wife, Beth, and I have started what we suspect will be the fourth generation to work in this family business. Our son Brock, who is five, thinks of boats as play toys. Hes already in love with the business. And our baby, Cole, is just four months old. He thinks our boat is his rocking chair. Jerrys daughter, Jill, manages the parts department. Totally tuned into the business, she says, I have a fully stocked marine store that is constantly busy with boaters and other dealers. We have many customers who do the fixing themselves. They shop here because they will find every part they might need. We offer parts and accessories for Grady-White boats and Yamaha outboards. We also stock Johnson and Evinrude outboards. Jerry oversees the entire operation. He sat down to talk about his inventory and the company history. In the beginning, we carried many See MARINE CENTER on page 9Food trucks to park in Lighthouse PointLighthouse Point A free event organized by Lighthouse Point Cultural Arts Committee and Chamber of Commerce members takes place May 27 from 5 to 9 p.m. at Frank McDonough Park, 3500 NE 27 Ave., Lighthouse Point. South Floridas famous food trucks, BC Tacos, Dog Eat Dog, Sugar Yummy Mama and more will provide tasty favorites. The event will include dancing to DJ Joe Balistreris music. There will also be balloons, face-painting and a magic show by Strawberry the Clown for the kids.Mad Hatters Tea Luncheon Deerfield Beach The Democratic Womens Club of Northeast Broward will honor State Senator Nan Rich as Democratic Woman of the Year on Saturday, May 19 at 11:30 a.m. The event takes place at the Hilton Deerfield Beach/Boca Raton, 100 Fairway Drive, Deerfield Beach. The event will take place during the clubs annual Mad Hatters Tea Party. Tickets are $40 For reservations, email maggie_davidson@comcast.net or call 954-942-8711.

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The Pelican 9 Friday, May 18, 2012 manufacturers, but now we are exclusively Grady-White because were sold on the quality, craftsmanship and boat experience owners of GradyWhites rave about. Grady-White produces 27 models. We stock the largest inventory in the country. We have the Freedom Series Dual Consoles, Center Consoles, Walk-around Cabins and Express Cabins. Prices range from $40,000 to $500,000. We sell a good cross section of all of the styles. And we have an inventory of pre-owned boats, most of which have been traded in for newer models. After 32 years of carrying GradyWhite, we are one of the largest dealers in the country with returning customers. We have clients who are now on their fourth and fifth Grady-White boats. Wayne Newton is one of those clients who is on his seventh Grady-White boat. Newton says, Jerry Johnson and the family have a dealership second to none. Ive been a customer since 1988. We do business on a handshake. Pompano Beach Marine Center has helped me purchase new craft, sold old ones, refurbished some and serviced them all. Theyre the best. Dan and Cecilia Dunlavey feel the same way. Dan says, Theyre a four-star operation as far as were concerned. Im on my second Grady-White, a 28-ft. S that we named the CE-Dan IV [pronounced: sea Dan] after ourselves. Ive known Jerry since 1969. His family business is really all family and friendly service is what they deliver. I just repowered my boat so that it will be more efficient and quieter. Trained and certified technicians work the service department which specializes in Yamaha engines. Asked what boaters should do to maintain their boats, Jerry explains, Frequency of service depends on how often a craft is used. Like a car, each craft comes with instructions including service requirements. Our full service department will take care of every need from winterizing your engine to helping you maintain your trailer and electronics. Well keep your boat in the water with high quality workmanship and affordable service. We also do long term storage and specific hurricane storage. This business is my life and I love being here because of my hardworking team. His wife, June, who has been by his side for 46 years, says, My involvement here is less than Jerrys and our childrens, but I have helped with tournaments over the years and worked public relations from time to time. My sister, Jody Jordan is the company office manager. Right now, Jody and I are helping the others set up our Customer Appreciation Weekend which will be June 9 and 10. Were having an open house. There will be games and representatives from a variety of manufacturers and venders, and of course a boat show of GradyWhite models. Jerry continues, My parents, Ted and Monica Johnson, now deceased, opened the business in May of 1962. We were on the Intracoastal Waterway then. In 1969 we opened this location and we ran both locations until 1981 when we closed the first location to focus our business right here. Pompano Beach Marine Center is a big supporter of the community. Theyve been actively involved and financially supportive of the Make-A-Wish tournament, local fishing rodeos, Fourth of July fireworks, the Veterans Multi-Purpose Center, Veterans of Foreign Wars, Boy Scouts of America, and many smaller organizations that seek donations and prizes for raffles and tournaments. Jody says, Were very proud to have helped raise the funds for the Geoff Bodine Olympic Bob Sled team which won the bronze, silver and gold medals at the Salt Lake City 2002 Olympics. And we support and cheer for the many charities that have fishing tournaments. Asked if they ever get on the water themselves, June smiles and says, Frequently. We have a 30-foot GradyWhite 306 model which we use for cruising, fishing and participating in tournaments. The kids do the fishing. Jerry and I like cruising. The Pelican congratulates you and wishes you another 50 successful years.Marine CenterContinued from page 8 When you advertise with The Pelican you advertise to the world online. pompanopelican.com

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10 The PelicanFriday, May 18, 2012 Making a DifferencePhyllis J. Neuberger wants your suggestions about people who are making a difference. Call 954-7838700. BriefsBy Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFThe Original Florida Follies is a unique group of talented men and women between 60 and 90-plus years young who performed seven Broadway-style extravaganzas this year, enabling them to raise and donate $100,000 to two important childrens charities. Cathy Dooley, well known New York and Florida producer/director heads up this, 501(c)(3) non-profit organization which she launched 12 years ago. In that short time these talented and energetic men and women have raised and donated over a half million dollars to childrens charities which Dooley says, is what we are all about. The much-overworked word amazing accurately describes this large group of talented people who rehearse year round to provide a stand up and cheer show for Broward and Palm Beach theater-goers. And every single person involved is a volunteer including the up front talent and the behind the scenes talent. It takes all of them to make it work. Dooley says, This year we decided to give cash donations to two major childrens charities in lieu of the Follies clothing give-aways of the past two years. The recipients this year are Childrens Diagnostic and Treatment The Original Florida Follies team sings, dances and entertains to raise and donate $100,000 to children Cathy Dooley, producer and director of the Original Florida Follies, is shown here presenting a check to Susan M Widmayer, executive director of Childrens Diagnostic and Treatment Center in Fort Lauderdale. Also pictured are Stephanie Clayton, CDTC, Dr. Ana Calderon, CDTC, Dr. Susan Widmayer and Doug Gorab, Follies. [Photos courtesy of The Follies]Center, or CDTC in Fort Lauderdale, and Family Central which serves Dade, Broward and Palm Beach counties. Were thrilled to help them do what they do, and they are very appreciative for our help.About Childrens Diagnostic and Treatment CenterExecutive Director of CDTC, Susan M. Widmayer says, The wonderful Follies has given us the single, largest donation we have ever received. We will be using the money to send as many children as we can to summer camp. This will be the first time in their lives to have a camp experience. Many will need proper clothing and medicine. We feel this donation will improve the quality of life for hundreds of children. CDTC is a not-for-profit organization that serves more than 10,000 children with special health needs, including HIV, in Broward County. CDTC provides comprehensive prevention, intervention and treatment services within a medical home environment. It is a nationally recognized Center of Excellence, offering a unique system of care for infants, children and youth with chronic illnesses, disabilities and developmental delays. All medical care and social services are provided regardless of each familys ability to pay. About Family CentralCEO Barbara Weinstein calls the donation from The Follies, A gift from heaven, adding We work with several thousand child care centers serving over 100,000 children in Broward, Dade and Palm Beach See FOLLIES on page 13 Tribute to Armed ForcesPompano Beach The First Presbyterian Church, the Pink Church, hosts a pre-Memorial Day, May 19, concert program at 7 p.m. to honor all servicemen and women. The performance will include Corelli Concerto Grosso, Vivaldi Concerto Grosso and Griegs Holberg Suite. The church is located at 2331 NE 26 Ave., Pompano Beach. Donations will be taken at the door. Call 954-941-2308.Wounded Warriors fundraiserPompano Beach As Memorial Day nears, locals have a unique opportunity to assist Veterans who have returned home. Many of these soldiers have experienced physical and/or emotional wounds that they will bear throughout their lives. The event which includes lunch, takes place May 23 at 12:30 p.m. at the Lighthouse Point Yacht Club, 2701 NE 42 St., Lighthouse Point. Cost is $15 for lunch. To donate to the fundraiser, make checks payable to The Wounded Warriors Project. The event is sponsored by The Light Magazine & Backus Turner and the Yacht Club. Call 954942-7244. Blood drivePompano Beach A Memorial Day Weekend Blood Drive will be held from Friday, May 25 to Monday, May 28 at the Community Blood Center, 926 E. Sample Road Pompano Beach. Friday: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Saturday, 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. and Monday from 1 to 8 p.m. Call 954-283-1198.

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The Pelican 11 Friday, May 18, 2012 Oakland Park A city-wide yard sale is set from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, May 19, at Jaco Pastorius Park, 4000 N. Dixie Hwy. Vendors are responsible for providing their own tables, chairs and tents and any other items needed to display their goods. No food or beverages will be allowed to be sold in the yard sale area. Cost for a single outdoor space is $20 for city residents and $40 for non-residents. Charge for each additional space is $15 for residents and $20 for non-residents. For more information, call the Parks and Leisure Services department at 954-630-4500. Save on auto insuranceOakland Park An AARP Driver Safety Class is scheduled from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Wednesday, May 23, at the Collins Center, 3900 NE Third Ave., Oakland Park. Participants must be 55 or older. Those who successfully complete the course will be provided with a certificate for their auto insurance agency. Most agencies allow for a discount on auto insurance premiums for up to three years. Cost is $12 for AARP members and $14 for non-AARP members. Bring a bagged lunch. Call Cynthia Jackson at 954739-2673 to sign up. Yard sale, driving classes set for Oakland Park on Friday and cook throughout the night, tending their grills for 24 hours. Wargo urges all aficionados of smoked pork, brisket, chicken and ribs to come out and lick your fingers at this event which is one of the Chambers major fundraisers. Another returning competitor is Team JJCs-BBQ, four-year veterans of the event. JJCs has won the best ribs category twice and Team Captain Joe T-Bone Carlson says they are looking for even greater glory this year. At one point we thought of passing on this years Pig Out, Carlson said. But when the word got out to our friends and teammates they were sad. So we are in this and going to try our best. Carlson doesnt discuss his winning rib recipe, he does give one hint: awesome sauce. In addition to food, the day, which beings at 11 a.m., offers continuous music from Shadow Creek, the Andrew Morris Band and Kaleidoscope; activities for kids, vendors selling everything from jewelry to spices, the Chambers liquid refreshment booth selling beer, wine, soda and water, margaritas shaken up from the Baja Caf, planters punch blended at The Two Georges, hamburgers from Gimme a Burger, and for dessert, chocolatedipped banana delights. Sullivan Park is located at the Intracoastal Waterway and Hillsboro Boulevard. Pig Out hours are 11 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. Tickets can be purchased online at www.deerfieldchamber. com or at the Chamber office, 1601 E. Hillsboro Boulevard. Pig OutContinued from page 2 See SIGHTINGS on page 16 SightingsContinued from page 25-19 Gold Coast Youth Orchestra concert from 7 to 9 p.m. at First Presbyterian Church, 2331 NE 26 Ave, Pompano Beach, 5-19 Pony rides at Sand & Spurs Equestrian Park, 1600 NE 5 Ave., Pompano Beach, from 9 to 11:30 a.m. Cost is $3 per ride. 954-7864507.

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12 The PelicanFriday, May 18, 2012 Voters approved the current term limits in 2008. Commissioner Stuart Dodd said he didnt realize at the time the cost of elections is so high, about $12,000 for a position that only pays $12,000. Its an enormous amount of work putting a campaign together, Dodd said. Commissioner Mark Brown said he wants to hear public MayorContinued from page 2comments on the proposed ordinance at upcoming meetings. He said hes trying to decide if the change should take effect in 2014 or apply to the current mayors term. The rest is simple. Put it on the ballot and let the people decide, Brown said. Minnet stayed out of the discussion and did not vote on the matter. Town Attorney Susan Trevarthen said any change wouldnt be retroactive. The amendment could call for four-year terms to be effective in 2014, 2016 or whatever the commission directs. Commissioners will vote on first reading of the new ordinances on May 22. If passed, the second reading will be at a special meeting at 7 p.m. June 5. The county Supervisor of Elections must receive items for the November ballot by June 8. In other business, commissioners agreed to postpone discussion of schematic drawings for East Commercial Boulevard improvements from May 22 to June 12.Pompano Republican Club meetsPompano Beach The Pompano Beach Republican Club will meet Thursday, May 24 at 7 p.m. at the Emma Lou Olson Community Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach. Richard DeNapoli, chairman of the Broward Republican Executive Committee, will install newly-elected club officers Carolyn Mann, president; Al Shalhoub, vice president; Linda Russo, secretary; Peter Rutledge, treasurer and Lorena Balharry, assistant treasurer. DeNapoli will also report on the status of Victory 2012. Team Romney Broward Co-Chair Bob Wolfe will discuss the presidential campaign in Broward County. Call 954786-7536. Refreshments will be served. Unity in the Community of Pompano Beach is seeking volunteers to help plan next years Family Fun Day event. The group will meet Mon., May 21, 6 p.m. at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St. There will be an international potluck dinner and discussion of committees needed to plan the event. The meeting is open to the public. Call Ron at 954-709-5894.Group seeks volunteers for Fun Day

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The Pelican 13 Friday, May 18, 2012 Counties. Were deciding now on how best to use the funds to provide the greatest impact on our children. We desperately need transportation to reach the children so we are thinking of buying a van which would enable us to transport food, clothing, books and toys. We can also transport staff members who will provide activities for the children. What a wonderful way this would be to service these low-income children in day care. Mary Monahan, Family Center community affairs coordinator, came to The Follies rehearsal to accept the donation. She reiterated the agencys need for a new transFolliesContinued from page 10port van. She is shown in the photo with Lois Cangelosi, Follies associate producer and Cathy Dooley, Follies founder, director and producer. The Amazing Follies girls were on hand for a rehearsal so they were able to see where the money raised from their dancing feet was going. Family Central is a comprehensive not-for-profit family support organization offering specialized services and programs to help families and to give their children a competitive start in life. The organizations programs are directed primarily toward economically disadvantaged families in the tri-county area. At-risk children and their families living at or below the poverty line receive family support services and programs emphasizing literacy, Mary Monahan, Family Central community affairs coordinator, accepts the donation to the agency from Cathy Dooley, Follies founder, director and producer. Assistant Producer Lois Cangelosi is at the right. The Follies girls took time from their rehearsal to get in the picture.school readiness and healthy families. Last year Family Central provided support and educational services to over 130,000 South Florida families. Thank you, Original Florida Follies for your talent, entertainment and generosity to the children in-need all around us.

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14 The PelicanFriday, May 18, 2012 miss most, so cherish them. Cherish every hour, every minute, every second, because no one knows for sure when it will be your last. It felt as if I were actually a very frustrated soldier who had never got a weapon out of the whole time he joined the army. I was given only the task of burying other soldiers in horrible conditions that were just completely unsanitary to say the least. It gave me a glimpse of what it may have been like in one of the past wars, said Nicholas Parrish. I learned about some of the hardships that widows and spouses had to endure when their loved one was away at war, or had fallen in the line of duty. Also I learned how the death of a spouse can cause the widow to abuse substances such as alcohol because that persons death was too much for them to handle. One audience member got up and never returned to his seat in the middle of the play. He had lived on a military base and remembered seeing the black cars drive up to homes to deliver the news of their loved one that didnt make it. He didnt want everyone to see him crying. Bury The DeadContinued from page 7Above Sarah Hasle and Nicholas Parrish, right, Julien Melo. The Pelican Call us! 954-783-8700

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The Pelican 15 Friday, May 18, 2012 By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach Nzingah Oniwosan is a poet, painter, pianist, dancer, writer and jewelry designer. And as far back as she remembers, shes looked for ways to express herself. I dont ever recall not being an artist. Its something that always was, said Oniwosan. Born and raised in South Florida and now living in Fort Lauderdale, Oniwosan considers herself lucky that her Haitian-born parents encouraged her talents from an early age. Pompano Beachs ArtHall gallery combines aesthetics and enterprise She feels even luckier that shes been able to make a living at her passion. Im able to do a lot of work as a teaching artist. That allows me to get contracts with different schools. I couldnt wish for anything more, she said. I take it for granted but when I talk to my friends, Im reminded that not everyone gets to make a living at what they love to do. As a painter, Oniwosan creates portraits, self-portraits and sometimes, when hired by a city or private organization, uses the street as her canvas. Im inspired by people. I play around with realism and abstraction, but most of my work is pastel work. But I Nzingah Oniwosan with one of her paintings. Oniwosan will be the rst artist to showcase her work during ArtHall on May 23.See ARTHALL on page 20

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16 The PelicanFriday, May 18, 2012 Pompano Beach Women and mothers took top billing during the month of May at the Jan Moran Collier City Learning Library with a pre-Mothers Day Pretty In Pink Tea. The salute to all women in the community was hosted by Friends of the Library. The event featured students reciting poetry, refreshments, a guest speaker and a souvenir teacup as a gift to all guests. Pictured are Debra Floyd, Library Branch Manager, Jan Moran Collier City Learning Library; Rebecca Johnson, President, Friends of the Jan Moran Collier City Learning Library; Ms. Jessie Brown, Guest Speaker and Author; First Lady Ophelia Sanders, Ph.D, Macedonia Baptist Church Collier City, and Rhonda Jefferson, Staff of the Jan Moran Collier City Learning Library, and event coordinator.Pretty in Pink for Maythe commission. Second reading is set for June 5. Commissioner Ben Preston continues to oppose the amendment to the current code which prohibits alcohol sales until noon on Sunday. Commissioner Joe Miller said he is still testing public opinion. While he received many calls in favor of the change, Miller said he is waiting for the publics input at the second reading of the ordinance before making his nal vote. In previous discussions, three commissioners on the veperson board has favored the ordinance. Beach High School. Although the school has both magnet and International Baccalaureate programs, the area outside the grounds is anything put prestigious. I am ashamed at the garbage thrown there and the lack of landscaping, Preston said. The commissioner said he hopes to challenge the communitys pride to make improvements and has met with city staff for ideas and at this point is Commissioner wants to encourage GED students; improve blighted 15 StreetDeer eld BeachCommissioner Ben Preston has two initiatives he wants to go forward. One is a support system for students who earn a GED which would recognize them at a public ceremony and then offer them apprenticeship jobs at local businesses. We need to get these kids off the streets, Preston said. He is hoping there will be Community Block Grant funds available for his program. Prestons other current concern is the condition of SW 15 Street from Dixie Highway west to Deer eld AlcoholContinued from page 45-19 Flotilla 37 of the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary will hold free vessel safety checks each day until May 25 at Pioneer Park Boat Ramp, 217 NE 5 Ave., Deer eld Beach. Safety checks start at 9 a.m. 954-755-4581. 5-19 Fire Station 102 open house from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at 1441 SW 11 Way, Deer eld Beach. Tour the station, meet re rescue personnel, paint a re truck and meet Sparky the Fire Prevention Dog. 954-5713081. 5-19 Island City Canoe Race at 10 a.m. at Colohatchee Park Boat Ramp, 1975 NE 15 Ave., Wilton Manors. Free food and refreshments served after. 954-390-2130. SightingsContinued from page 11 See SIGHTINGS on page 30

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The Pelican 17 Friday, May 18, 2012 By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach The Pompano Beach High School Interact Club has contributed to causes before, but the clubs officers said their latest has been the most rewarding. Recently, Interact, which is associated with the Rotary Club of Pompano Beach, donated $1,000 to fund four Interact, Pompano Beach Rotary donate over $30,000 for cleft palate surgeriescleft palate surgeries, costing $250 each, in the Philippines. Its an opportunity to change lives in a very drastic way. $250 is not a lot of money to change a life, said Ted Hasle, Rotary Club member and Interact sponsor. In the past, Interact has donated razors and other supplies to American servicemen and women and the survivors of the disaster in Japan. This is more satisfying, said Kevin Minxha, Interact copresident. For me, its just changing the life of a child, said Sarah Hasle, co-president of Interact and Ted Hasles daughter. Interacts $1,000 donation is in addition to the over $30,000 Rotary collected from its own members and members of the community. The money raised was sent to the International Childrens Surgical Foundation, or See CLEFT PALATE on page 18 Interact Club members Kevin Minxha, Anita Tharayil and Arah Hasle were honored by Pompano Beach Rotary Club members for the $1,000 Interact raised to pay for cleft palate surgeries in the Phillippines. Also pictured are Jerry Meehan, Ted Hasle and Jeff Williams. [Staff Photo]

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18 The Pelican Friday, May 18, 2012 Cleft palateContinued from page 17ICSF, founded by Dr. Geoff Williams, a plastic surgeon. Joe Usman, the Rotary Club member who suggested the club raise money for cleft palates, estimated that the money raised by Rotary paid for 100 surgeries. When theyre really young, obviously they dont fully understand the before and after. But boy, their parents sure do, said Kartchner. The mothers, theyre almost overwhelmed. Theyre brought to tears. Kartchner added that the reactions of young men who go through the surgery may be the most profound and lifechanging. They almost look at it like, Wow, is that really me? Now I can go find a girl to marry. It just changes their outlook on life and its pretty amazing. According to the Centers for Disease Control, or CDC, a cleft palate or a cleft lip are birth defects that occur when a babys mouth or lips do not form properly during pregnancy, leaving a gap between the nose and upper lip. Children with the condition face problems with feeding and talking. They can also experience dental problems, ear infections, hearing loss and social stigmas. The CDC estimates that 4,437 babies in the United States are born with either a cleft lip or palate each year. Babies born in the United States receive immediate surgery to correct the problem. In less developed nations, like the Philippines, many children are not as lucky. To learnmore about cleft palates or to donate, visit www.icsfoundation.org or call Rotary at 954-818-4504.Pompano Beachs Mt. Calvary turns 110 years Pompano Beach The oldest church in Pompano celebrated its 110th anniversary on May 17. Mount Calvary Baptist Church, 800 NW 8 Ave., observed the milestone with fun and fellowship. Events included opening night with The Inspirational Choir and Game night featuring Are You Smarter Than the Pastor? An old-fashioned picnic and bake-off topped off the festivities. The Rev. Anthony Burrell is the Pastor.The Rev. Anthony Burrell Each year, children around the world are born with cleft lips or cleft palates, a condition that causes health problems and can lead to social stigmas. This child, wearing a hospital band, prepares to take advantage of surgery that will change his appearance and health. [Photo courtesy of Rotary Club of Pompano Beach]

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The Pelican 19 Friday, May 18, 2012 Oceans 234 234 N. Ocean Blvd. Deer eld Beach 954-428-2539 www.oceans234.comBy Malcolm McClintockPELICAN STAFFWe will be celebrating our 10th anniversary this year, says Danielle Williams, the statuesque co-owner and operations director of Oceans 234. And after all this time, we continue to garner many accolades for the high quality of our food and, of course, our amazing view. Widowed at a young age, Williams enjoyed the support of her in-laws Lois and Joe Pallaria in creating this iconic Deerfield Beach eatery. With great dedication and attention to detail, this hard-working entrepreneur turned what used to be a Ranch House Restaurant into one of the premier dining hot-spots in Deerfield Beach. Located directly on the sand near the pier, this ideally situated trattoria welcomes guests for casual midday repasts, lively happy hours and elegant evening gettogethers. We are known for our fresh seafood but we also serve fantastic meats, salads and pasta dishes, says the energetic restaurateur who also operates the Whale Raw Bar in Parkland and sits on the board of directors of the Deerfield Beach Chamber of Commerce. Our Executive Chef Victor Bravo is excellent. He is very professional and creative in the kitchen. We really have a wonderful team. Indeed, Chef Bravo has earned his stripes in many of the best restaurants in South Florida and brings his unique Oceans 234 continues tradition of superlative seafood on Deer elds sunny shores gastronomic insights to the menu. One of my favorite dishes is the pulled pork nachos. They are perfect for peoplewatching by the beach, says the friendly culinary artiste who has been at the helm of Ocean 234s kitchen for over a year. But our fish dishes such as the pistachio Mahi Mahi or the shrimp crusted snapper are definitely our biggest sellers. Weve also added a few new options like the tropical grilled swordfish. Other tasty maritime treats include appetizers such as crispy calamari, citrus sesame seared tuna, garlic clams, the highly addictive Asian-inspired Firecracker shrimp, sumptuous jumbo lump crab cakes and all the usual suspects from the well-stocked raw bar. We also offer amazing sushi. See OCEANS 234 on page 31The popular Poached Pear Salad features Chardonnay macerated pears with mesclun and endive topped with purple onion, crumbled goat cheese and tangy balsamic vinaigrette. [Photos by Malcolm McClintock]

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20 The Pelican Friday, May 18, 2012 cant say I have a favorite. All of the things I do are for me. Beginning Wednesday, May 23, some of Oniwosans work will be on display during the inaugural opening of ArtHall, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Community Resource Centers Business Resource Center, or BRC, 50 NE 1 St., Pompano Beach. The BRC leases office space to businesses, offers business loans and assists with job placement. Susan Kores, program director at the BRC, sees ArtHall as a way to combine business and art. This is kind of a first attempt. This way, we get the word out about us and actually get people in here, said Kores. Ultimately, she says, the goal is to make Pompano one of Browards artistic destinations. It will take a few years, but well get there. Oniwosans work will occupy the BRC through June ArtHallContinued from page 3Nzingah Oniwosan with two of her paintings.18 when it will be removed to make way for ArtHalls next featured artist. That opening reception is June 20 from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the BRC. Visit www.facebook.com/ ArtHallPompano for more on ArtHall. Visit www.nzingah. com to view more of Nzingah Oniwosans art work. Send The Pelican your shing news to mdpelican@yahoo.com

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22 The Pelican Friday, May 18, 2012 By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFDeerfield Beach Frank Congemi enjoys beach tennis from a distance. Congemi, a Deerfield Beach resident and retirement planning advisor who has never played a game of beach tennis in his life, is the title sponsor of the 2012 Frank Congemi Beach Tennis World Cup in Deerfield, May 19 and 20. Congemi said a lack of support in the inaugural tournament in 2009 led him to sponsor it; a role hes fulfilled ever since. There wasnt a lot of interest in sponsoring anything because businesses were pressed. So I guess I stepped up to the plate, he said. Its a great family sport and a way to diversify the beach. The tournament will be held north of the Deerfield Beach International Fishing Pier, 200 NE 21 Ave., from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on both days. Organized by the International Federation of Beach Tennis, or IFBT, the tournament is one of many around the world including Australia, Spain, Finland, Mexico, South Africa, Argentina that culminates in the IBTF world championship in Italy in July. Beach tennis, a combination of volleyball and traditional tennis, is played on a beach or other sandy surface on a court the size of a standard 2012 Frank Congemi Beach Tennis World Cup set for May 19, 20 in Deer eld Beachvolleyball one. Its played with smaller rackets than tennis, known as paddle bats, and with a softer ball but scored the same as tennis. But the ball cant touch the ground. Its like watching a tennis match, said Adrienne Cerra, president of the IFBT in the United States and vice president of the American, Canadian and Caribbean areas. Spectators who attend can watch amateurs, intermediate and pro level players slug it out during mens and womens doubles, mixed doubles, singles and juniors; all of them playing for their piece of the $2,000 in prize money given out during the tournament. The tournament is free to the public. Based internationally out of Italy, the IFBTs official American home is in Deerfield Beach. Its just such a great beach town. Its kind of become a sports mecca, said Cerra about Deerfield, who credits local hotels with helping to sponsor the tournament and for making out-of-town players feel welcome. And much like soccer, Cerra said beach tennis is popular around the world but still struggling to find an audience in America. In the U.S. its kind of new. Thats my job, to build it, she said. Visit www.mybeachtennis. net for more information about the tournament.Free blood pressure and glucose checksPompano Beach The Pompano Beach Fire Rescue Department will be providing free blood pressure checks and glucose screenings from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the following Pompano locations: Monday, May 21 at the Walmart Neighborhood Market, 1199 S. Federal Hwy.; Wednesday May 23, Festival Flea Market, 2900 W. Sample Road; Friday May 25, Lowes, 1851 N. Federal Hwy.Tell The Pelican about your special event 954-783-8700

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The Pelican 23 Friday, May 18, 2012 focused on a culinary destination. A culinary destination is far more than restaurants, she adds. It has everything to do with food. We are looking at cooking schools, permanent fresh markets, boutique hotels, cooking supplies, gourmet shops, wines and more. The destination would encourage people from all over the country to visit us, learn about cooking and talk with chefs. If Julia Child were alive, we would ask her to come. Its not a new idea. It works in other cities. She adds that the destination will encourage other culinaryrelated businesses to buy and build in Oakland Park once the CRA is in place. Since the onset, the city has had access to funds from the county, about $5 million, to buy land for the destination. Its the best time to buy, Sallee says, and if the area is developed, the loan from the county becomes a grant which means there is no repayment. Last week at a special meeting the commission agreed to purchase of the Schnell property, 1220 NE 37 St. for $320,000, and the Perez property at 1110 NE 34 Ct. for $767,500. Ray Lubomski, community development director, said some minor contamination has been found on the Schnell parcel. Resident Bill Sears said he hated to see the city buy property where there is contamination. The clean up should be the responsibility of the property owner, not the city Sears said. Whats the big rush? resident Marilyn Shaw asked. Its like a big snowball is rolling over you guys. Grant money isnt free. If youre going to make wise decisions, you shouldnt be railroaded. But Siegi Constantine, executive director of Main Street supports the buy. This is an important parcel. Its a core property for the northern area, she said. Were making strategic decisions on which (properties) are necessary to fulfill our goals, Commissioner Shari McCartney said. She urged commissioners to focus on the return on investment. Commissioner John Adornato said the message many businesses have been getting is that Oakland Park is closed to business, a message Adornato isnt buying. Were on the upswing, a slow upswing, but the time is ripe. Im getting calls from businesses that want to come to Oakland Park. Businesses and Realtors are watching us. We need to send a message that we are committed to what we started years ago, Sallee added. City Manager John Stunson explained that the Schnell land would be kept as is until its needed for parking or development. Commissioners Boisvenue and McCartney against the Schnell purchase. The Perez property was the only one of three offered for sale in the Squires Plaza area. The city is expected to demolish the building at the site and install walkways and other improvements to NE 34 Court. This one is key. This is in the center of Dixie Highway renovations, McCartney said. Sallee noted that this is an important intersection and was once the citys main thoroughfare. The vote was 4-1, Boisvenue dissenting.Offers rejectedCommissioners voted against buying several properties for reasons of price. White Hat, LLC, with properties at 3400 NE 11 Ave. and 3401 N. Dixie Highway, was not willing to meet the citys latest offer of $268,000 minus cost of remediation. Commissioners also voted unanimously against buying the Bsama, LLC property at 3407 N. Dixie Highway. The property owner wanted $895,000. They voted against purchasing the Sikes properties at 3450, 3484 and 3498 NE 12 Ave. being offered for $1.625 million. This one disappoints me. I like the location, but wed be out of pocket a significant amount of money, McCartney said. Commissioners rejected the Diamond property at 4081 NE 5 Ave. for use as a neighborhood pocket park. The owner wanted $72,000, and the citys offer was $55,000. Stunson suggested that staff look for alternative sites for a neighborhood park and include the funding in the citys Community Improvement Plan, or CIP, as a future project. Commissioners agreed to include several construction projects in the application for the countys Redevelopment Capital Program funds: $325,000 for earthwork and drainage to stabilize a parking area at Jaco Pastorius Park; $500,000 for the 12th Avenue enhancement project which to stabilize street ends at Northeast 34 Street, Northeast 35 St and Northeast 37 Street 12th Avenue enhancement and $300,000 to improve sidewalks and create a plaza for a central market at Oakland Station. CulinaryContinued from page 1 Tell The Pelican about your special event 954-783-8700

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24 The Pelican Friday, May 18, 2012 WORSHIP DIRECTORY: Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad. Rev. Hyvenson Joseph By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeerfield Beach Today is a happy day at Deerfield Beach Elementary School. Because students and their families collected close to 4,000 pop tops from aluminum cans, 700 kids are enjoying a party hosted by McDonalds. On the menu, of course, Happy Meals. This years Project with a Purpose was coordinated by art teacher Suzanne Devine Clark who placed five-gallon collection in each classroom. The theme this year is Go Green Reduce, Reuse and Recycle making the Tab-aThon Contest was a perfect fit. Deer eld Beach Elementary School students tops in McDonalds Pop-a-thon Deer eld Beach Elementary School second graders Raina Clark, front, and Emily Panton with the 393 lbs of pop-tabs collected by their school.Of the 63 elementary schools in the tri-county area, students at Deerfield Beach Elementary collected 393 pounds of pop tops, the purest form of aluminum on an aluminum can. It was a feat for the school which has only 700 students and which this year, according to Clark, has suffered some sad times. Today is not one of them. We are excited, said Clark. This is a perfect way to end our year. The second place school collected 290 pounds of tabs. Decorated bins are back in the classrooms already, and a new collection for next has started, Clark said. One million pop tops provide enough energy to lodge 25 families at Miamis Ronald McDonald House for one night. The Pelican 954-783-8700

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The Pelican 25 Friday, May 18, 2012 SOLUTION ON PAGE 27 Lighthouse Point The Lighthouse Point Library teamed up again with Trinity Christian School for its Third Annual Drop Everything and Read event on Thursday, May 10, 2012 at Trinity Christian School. Pastor Dennis Redstone of Trinity Church opened the event with a prayer and Kindergarten teacher, Kimberley Terry, led a group of her students in a reading of a classroom created acrostic poem. Lighthouse Point Library Director Christy Keyes introduced the first guest speaker, Lighthouse Point Mayor Fred Schorr. Mayor Schorr read a book about the Drop Everything and Read program and got the students excited to read. Past Lighthouse Point Library Directory Doreen Gauthier followed with Aesops Fable The Tortoise and the Hare. The final guest reader was Debbie Gibson, founder of Signs of Excellence, a sign language interpreting service company. After a brief introduction of sign language, she signed alongside Ms. Terry as she read The Little Engine that Could. It was a wonderful hour of reading!Mayor Fred Schorr reads to a group of Trinity Christian School students.Story time with Lighthouse Point mayorTell The Pelican about your special event, program or accomplishments 954-783-8700

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26 The Pelican Friday, May 18, 2012 Classi edsCall 954-545-0013 HELP WANTEDSTYLISTS & ASST SALON MGRS Now Hiring! FL COSM. LICENSE REQD. Bonus Opportunities, FREE Adv Edu, 401K, Health Bene ts, Paid Time Off & MORE! Call Melissa at 912-322-1242 or visit careersbyhaircuttery. com. EOE. 5-25 NATIONAL PARKING OPERATOR Seeking An Operational Supervisor And Parking Enforcement Of cer To Join A Team Of Professionals Serving A Local Municipality. EOE. Call 954763-4806. 5-25 DIESEL / REFRIGERATION Truck Mechanic We Have Immediate Openings For Diesel Mechanics In Pompano Beach. We Provide Excellent Pay & Bene ts. We Require A Minimum 2 Years Experience. Your Own Tools, Good Driving & Work History. CDL Driver License Would Be Helpful But Is Not Required. Apply In Person At Salem NationaLease/ Freight Liner Of ce % Atlantic Truck Center. 2840 Center Point Circle Pompano Beach Fla 33064 Or Apply Online www.salemleasing.com. To Set Up Interview With The Manager Please Call 1-800709-2536. EOE. 5-25 LOCAL PEST CONTROL CO Looking For Quality Sales/Service Tech. Must Be Dependable, Team Player, Good Drivers License & People Skills. Will Train Right Person. ALSO Of ce Assistant Computer People & Phone Skills Needed. Fax Resume 954418-3982. 6-1 SEEKING EMPLOYMENTNURSE ASSISTANT Care For The Sick And Elderly. Drive Non Smoker. Over 15 Years Experience. References Available. 973-519-1362. CAREGIVER / COMPANION Caucasian Woman With 25 Yrs Exp. To Assist & Care For Your Loved Ones. Days / Eves / Nights. References Available. 954-482-5494. 5-18 MALE CNA / HHA / SR. COMPANION. Broward Area. Former EMT. All Certi cations / Compassionate, References. Call Ron 954-232-2832. AVAILABLE NOW!! 5-18 HHA CNA CERTIFIED 15 Years Exp. Level 2 Background Check References Available. Will Provide TLC For Your Loved One. Call 954-8267341. HHA SEEKING WEEKEND Position Days Or Nights Willing To Live In / Out. References. Own Car Reliable!! 20 Yrs Experience. 786-333-6437. 5-25 CERTIFIED NURSING ASST Seeking Job To Take Care Of Sick / Elderly Day Or Night. 10 Yrs Experience. References Available. 786-3558006. 5-18 SERVICES DANNY BOY ELECTRIC Lic & Insured. Lic. #EC13004811. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. 24/Hr Service. 954-290-1443. Beat Any Written Estimate. Sr, Discount. 6-1 CALL BRENDAN THE HANDYMAN Construction & Repairs Carpentry Plumbing Roo ng Masonry Windows Painting Decking Tile. FREE Estimates! 954773-6134 Emergency Calls. WATSON PAINTING & Waterproofing Co. Interior / Exterior Painting, Replace Baseboards, Removal Of Wallpaper. Res / Comm. Pressure Clean Roofs / Decks. Lic / Ins. 954-650-0488. 6-1 HANDYMAN PAINTING CARPENTRY Pressure Cleaning. Decks! Everything Around The House. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. Call 561-350-3781. 6-8 MOORE PLUMBING PLUMBING SERVICES Big Jobs Small Jobs. We Do It All. Remodeling & Repairs. Lic. & Insured. C.C. Accepted. Call 954-772-4600. 5-25 HONEST HANDYMAN HOME & BUILDING Maintenance/ Improvements. No Job Too Small. Fast Friendly Service. Reasonable Rates. Local Resident/ Homeowner. Call Today For Your FREE Upfront Quote. No Deposit Required. 754-366-1915. 5-18 GOT JUNK? DUMP TRUCK CLEANUPS Trees/ Landscape, Yard Fill. Paint/ Pressure Wash/ Roofs/Home Repairs Welding, Etc. Dave 954-818-9538. 6-1 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIESNew GREEN technology. New defroster control saves energy in home refrigerators, commercial chillers. Patented. All optical. Simple mfg. Strategic partners needed..www.NewAvionics.Com. 954-568-1991. C MUSICIANS WANTEDThe American Legion Symphonic Band is now accepting new members for the 2011-2012 season. College age to seasoned seniors are welcome. Rehearsals are held on Wed. evenings at American Legion Post 142 in Pompano. Percussionists, oboe, bassoon, trombone and euphonium players are especially needed. If you enjoy making music, call Jim McGonigal, Music Director at 954647-0700 for more info.REAL ESTATE SERVICEREAL ESTATE SELLING OR BUYING Relocation Specialist. 18 Years Experience. English, French, Spanish, Greek. Yvette Gaussen YES WE CAN REALTY 954-6147773 Or 954-773-8340. 5-25 ROOMS FOR RENTPOMPANO PVT ROOM & Bath! $500 Per Month. Includes Utilities Cable Internet. Walking Distance To Shopping. Call 954-793-1363. 5-18 HOMES FOR RENTPOMPANO COTTAGE STYLE HOUSE 2 / 1 Pool Large Fenced Yard. $1050 Month. 510 NE 35 Street. Call Darci 954-7833723. 6-1 REAL ESTATE WANTEDI BUY HOUSES!! CASH!! AS IS! QUICK CLOSE! ANY AREA ANY CONDITION! NO EQUITY OK. CALL NOW 954-914-2355. 7-20 CONDOS FOR SALEPOMPANO BEACH DIRECT OCEAN VIEW!! 2/2 AT THE BREAKERS! $275,000. Call Juliana At Barclays For Details. 1-305766-4420. FORT LAUDERDALE BAYVIEW Deep Waterfront Gorgeous 2/2 Furnished Completely Remodeled. Over 1400 Sq Ft. Dockage Available. Move Right In. Colleen Majeski Balistreri Realty 754-235-1208. 5-18 CONDOS FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH 1 Block To Ocean!! 1 / 1 Fully Equipped. Hurricane Windows / Doors. 2 Flat Screens, DVD, WIFI, Pool, BBQ, Laundry. $850 Month + Electric Monthly Thru December. 954-540-9724. DEERFIELD BEACH 2/2 CONDO Corner Unit, Pool. $800. Good Credit Required. No Pets Or Realtors. 631-8853342. 5-25 POMPANO BEACH LARGE 2 / 2 With Den. All Renovated! Pool Mile From Beach! W /D Small Pet OK! $1,300 Month Yearly. Available May 1st. 561-703-6545 Or 754-2643289. 5-25 Rent it!Pelican classi ed ads work for you. Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad today for next Friday. Rent it!Pelican classi ed ads work for you. Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad today for next Friday.Rent it!Pelican classi ed ads work for you. Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad today for next Friday.

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The Pelican 27 Friday, May 18, 2012 Classi edsCall 954-545-0013 APTS FOR RENTDEERFIELD/POMPANO BEACH 1 BR & 2 BR APTS FOR RENT. Remodeled, Paint, Tile, Etc. Washer / Dryer On Site. Pool. Pet Friendly. George 954-809-5030. 6-1 POMPANO BEACH 1 BEDROOMS AND EFFICIENCY Apts. Fully Furnished With Kitchen, Cable, Internet, Pool, Laundry. 500 To The Beach. Weekly Monthly Yearly. 954-2948483 Or 248-736-1533, 6-8 POMPANO BEACH 3/ 2 $1025 NE 1/1 $675 2 /1 $950 Townhouse 2/1.5 $1095. ALL FREE WATER. RENT + $70 Application Moves U In. 954-781-6299. 5-25 POMPANO BEACH / ATLANTIC / FEDERAL Ef ciency $175 Weekly. No Security Deposit. Includes Cable, Electric, Internet. FREE Washer / Dryer. No Drug Record No Evictions. 954-7090694. 5-18 POMPANO BEACH 900 TO Beach 1/1 Furn. Includes Cable TV. $850 Month. Efficiency Furn. $700 Mo. Includes Utilities & Cable. 954-785-5837. 5-25 POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 Bedroom From $495. Easy Move-in. 1/2 OFF DEPOSIT. Remodeled. Great Location. 954-783-1088 For More Info. GOLDEN ACRES DEVELOPMENT is the best value for apartment rental in the city of Pompano Beach. Newly renovated kitchen cabinets, new appliances, energy saving HVAC wall units, 24-hr maintenance, playgrounds and daycare. Rentals starting at $500. Section 8 Voucher holders are welcome to apply. Please contact Helen Mitchell at 954-972-1444. Domestic farm workers will be given priority in renting available units. STUDIO / EFFICIENCYPOMPANO BEAUTIFUL Parliament House Studio Ocean View! Unfurnished. Pool, Spa, Gym. 24 Hr Security. $750 Mo Yrly Lease. Call 954678-7868. 5-18 COMMERCIAL FOR RENT-SALEPOMPANO COMMERCIAL OFFICE Spaces Available. Ranging From As Low As $500 To $700 Depending On Square Footage. Please Call Darci At 954-7833723. 5-18 DEERFIELD BEACH Retail Of ce Warehouse 700 Sq Ft With Loft. A/C, Bathroom. $575 Per Month. Call For More Info 561-654-1331 Or 561-9985681. 6-1 NEWLY EQUIPPED LOW RENT Shop Space Ideal For Bakery Pizza Wings Crepes Etc. Corner New 12 Avenue & 34 Court, Oakland Park. Indoor / Outdoor Patio Sitting. 954-563-3533. 5-25 DOCK FOR RENT60 FT DOCK THE COVE MARINA 50 AMP / H20 Included. $1,200 Month Price Negotiable Depending On Boat Size. Restaurant & Fuel On Premises. 954-9140053. a.j.barsotti@comcast. net. 5-25 POMP ANO BEACH DOCK Wide Canal No Wake Area!! Whips!! Quiet Canal. Call 954946-3301. 5-18 COVE DOCK FOR RENT!! 60 FT. Water, Electric. No Fixed Bridges. Nice Location. $350 Mo. 954-429-9347 Or Call Cell 954-288-9651. 5-18 GARAGE SALESMAY 20 10AM 4PM INDOOR FLEA MARKET AT Pompano Civic Center! 70+ Booths, Food Trucks, FREE Goodie Bags For 1st 100 Guests. 3rd Sunday Each Month. 1801 NE 6 St. 954-785-7475. 5-18MISC. FOR SALEUSED BEAUTY Equipment Warehouse Closing!! All Must Go!!. Low Low Prices. Call For More Information! Boca Raton Nick 954-415-4937. 5-25 Sell it!Pelican classi ed ads work for you. Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad today for next Friday. Rent it!Pelican classi ed ads work for you. Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad today for next Friday.Memorial Day, May 28

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28 The Pelican Friday, May 18, 2012 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFF Oakland Park City commissioners unanimously agreed Wednesday to rename the citys canoe/kayak launch at Northeast 12 Terrace and Northeast 30 Court the J. Dewey Hawkins Landing in honor of the citys first mayor. The request was made by the Oakland Park Historical Society whose president, Marcia Norris, wrote in the application that Hawkins was the first and longest serving mayor and, sadly, there is nothing in the city named for him. In 1925, when the area was incorporated as Floranada, Hawkins was elected to the Oakland Park of cials honor citys founding mayor with kayak launch city commission. He became mayor at the incorporation of Oakland Park in 1929. He served as mayor until 1947 when he stepped aside. He ran again in 1949 and served until 1955, when he retired due to ill health. Hawkins died in November 1958. He was born on his familys farm in Suwanee County, Florida, Dec. 17, 1899. He and his wife, Ruby, and baby daughter, Jo Mildred, moved to South Florida in January 1922, where he plotted out a farm tract on Floranada Road and built a home in the 4000 block of Dixie Highway. During the land boom, his interests expanded to include real estate and expansion of his farmland. He was the first in the area to raise Brahman cattle. During the Depression, he directed owners of a grocery store to provide food to the needy and send him the bills. He never revealed that he picked up the tab. Hawkins donated the land for the American Legion Hall and Masonic Lodge. This makes my heart very happy, Mayor Anne Sallee said when the resolution passed. He contributed a great amount to our city. In other business, commissioners selected JMW Construction Co. as the most responsive and responsible bidder for the Northwest 39 Street Greenway Project. The bid was for $809,964 with $750,000 covered by a grant from the Florida Department of Transportation.See MAYOR on page 29

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The Pelican 29 Friday, May 18, 2012 Advertise 954-783-8700 The project consists of establishing a greenway corridor along Northwest 39 Street. Major components are improvements along the banks of the C-13 canal between Northwest 21 and Northwest 29 Avenues, construction of pedestrian and bike paths with pedestrian-friendly lighting, landscaping and signage. Commissioners also approved hiring Calvin Giordano & Associates for construction engineering inspection services to certify the Greenway project. The contract is for $60,000.MayorContinued from page 28

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30 The Pelican Friday, May 18, 2012 Capt. RJ Boyle is an experienced angler in South Florida. His studio is located in Lighthouse Point. Call 954-420-5001. RJ Boyle RJ BOYLE STUDIOSAs I watched the weigh-in at the Saltwater Shootout on Saturday, I could not believe how many of them said that they caught so many fish during the fishing hours that it hurt their chances of winning the most. Obviously, when you hook a sailfish during a non-sailfish tournament, guys know its eating into their fishing time. It really feels odd to get a bite on the line, hook a fish and when you realize its a sailfish, get upset. What? The minute I first see the sail come out of the water, I get excited. Its hard and unnatural not to get excited when you see the sailfish. Its so funny to hear guys surprised that there were so many sailfish hooked. Lets think about this for a minute. There are 120 boats chumming with sardines and Dont be afraid to chum up the waters chum blocks as hard as they can for eight hours. You think that might have something to do with it? On a normal weekend fishing day, plenty of people fish but do they really go all out like they do in tournaments? I say no, but maybe they should. I can tell you that excess chumming never hurts. It only helps. Everything is attracted to the chum and eventually swims its way to the boat, so dont be afraid to take plenty of chum along on the next outing. Tight Lines! 5-19 Wii Gaming for ages 9 to 12 at the Northwest Branch Library, 580 NW 3 Ave., Pompano Beach, from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. 954-7862186. 5-19 Chess Club meets from 10:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Pompano Beach Library, 1213 E. Atlantic Blvd. 954786-2181. 5-20 Cellist Matthew Allen performs at 4 p.m. at Trinity Lutheran Church, 11 SW 11 St., Fort Lauderdale. Call 954-463-2450. 5-21 Preschool Storytime at 10:30 a.m. at the Richard C. Sullivan Public Library, 500 NE 26 St., Wilton Manors. Ages 2 to 5. 954-390-2195. 5-22 Card party held by the Does Drove 142 from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Pompano Beach Elks Lodge 700 NE 10 St. Cost is $4. 561-479-2002. SightingsContinued from page 16

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The Pelican 31 Friday, May 18, 2012 Its extremely fresh and we have very talented chefs to make it, says Bravo. And we always prepare it with an Oceans 234 twist. For Oceans 234Continued from page 19The always satisfying Citrus Sesame Seared Tuna dissimulates a mouthwatering Yuzu drenched wakami salad with Daikon sprouts. example, we actually use real crab in our rolls rather than the imitation type and our big Seafood Dynamite roll comes with conch and scallops. For meat aficionados, Oceans 234 serves up grilled Rosemary infused NY strip steak, smoked Kansas City baby-back ribs, roasted apple pork loin and the always popular 8 oz filet mignon with asparagus and Yukon mash. At lunchtime, a plethora of satisfying sandwiches such as the Black Angus burger, the Mediterranean chicken baguette, the Jerked dolphin and the smoked pork Panini make a tantalizing appearance. For salad enthusiasts, the Cobb, Caesar and Poached Pear are all must-try classics. Personally, I love the Waldorf with grilled shrimp, apples, bleu cheese, walnuts and balsamic vinaigrette, says the healthconscious Williams. Every day we offer different salad, fish and entre specials along with freshly prepared soups such as our famous Clam Chowder, adds Chef Bravo. In fact, everything is made fresh in house. From vinaigrettes to sauces to desserts all is homemade, asserts the conscientious Executive Chef. Speaking of desserts, we have an outstanding key lime pie, chocolate lava cake, apple crisp and even a delicious flan. Oceans 234 is also known for tasty drinks, especially the delectable Mojitos. Happy Hour is from 3-7 pm. Beers start at $3, wines by the glass at $6 and bottles at $26. Lunch sandwiches are about $10, appetizers $10 to $15 while most large entres are in the $20-$30 range. There is also an impressive la carte brunch with free mimosa on Sundays. The kitchen is open from 11:30 a.m. to 10 p.m. on weekdays and 11:30 p.m. on weekends. The bar is open 11:30 a.m. to 2 a.m. on Fridays and 3 a.m. on Saturdays. Be sure to catch live music on the weekends and check out the website at www. oceans234.com for event updates and special discounts. Enjoy.The homemade key lime pie is the perfect conclusion to an outing at Oceans 234.

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32 The Pelican Friday, May 18, 2012 By Malcolm McClintockPELICAN STAFFThis project has taken us six weeks to complete. It has been a lot of work but well worth it as the kids are really proud of their achievements, says McNab Elementary veteran teacher Andria Ammons. For the past 25 years, Ammons, a National Board Certified Teacher, has taught kindergarten, first, second, and third grades. She holds a Masters Degree in Educational Leadership and has been the First Grade Team Leader for the last three years. She was the Teacher of the Year in 2004 and has been awarded over thirty-five grants for her classrooms. In fact, she was awarded four grants by the Broward Education Foundation for the 2011-12 school year to help improve student achievement through special projects. She also received a grant from the Broward County Council of Mathematics for interactive math games for her students. As an impact disseminator, Ammons trains other teachers in Broward County on how to use her Web Page web.mac. com/missammonswebpage1. One of the most impressive grants received was from the Science Book Publishers which enabled each student in her first grade class to publish a nonfiction book about animals. Students selected a book from the school Media Center and then researched their animal by reading his or her library books and using laptops to connect to the internet to find additional facts and details. They created their nonfiction stories about mammals, ocean animals, amphibians, reptiles, insects or birds. The books were published using the company website at www.studentstreasures.com. The students used the writing process of pre-writing, draft, revise, and edit. To learn about text features, each pupil labeled a picture in his or her book. The published books have a hard cover, the authors picture, teachers name, and schools name on the front. On the bind of the book, it has the title of the book and students last name. The first copy cost about $9 per student and extras can be ordered at will for approximately $20. I am so proud of my students. They have all published a book in first grade! says an enthusiastic Ammons. We were also able to integrate several subject areas such as science, reading, research and writing. In addition, the kids were featured on the morning announcement show at McNab Elementary where they each introduced themselves and read the title of their books. Phillip Zacharoudis read his published book called The African Egg-Eating Snake to the entire school. As it was career day, organized by the Gifted program teacher Erin Ryan, the students were also dressed in their future desired occupations. This is a meaningful experience that I am sure he or she will always remember. Who knows? I may have inspired someone to become a future writer or author. I really love being a teacher! says Ammons.McNab Elementary 1st grade teacher Andria Ammons poses with her classroom of newly published authors who proudly show off their literary masterpieces. [Staff photo by Malcolm McClintock]African Egg-Eating Snake worms its way into McNab creative writing project Who knows? I may have inspired someone to become a future writer or author. I really love being a teacher!Ammons

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The Pelican 33 Friday, May 18, 2012 STOP HERE STOP HERE STOP HERE

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