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Pompano Pelican
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00090900/00295
 Material Information
Title: Pompano Pelican
Uniform Title: Pompano Pelican
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: Pompano Pelican
Place of Publication: Pompano Beach
Publication Date: 04-13-2012
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Pompano Beach
Coordinates: 26.234722 x -80.125556 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00090900:00295

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Friday, April 13, 2012 Vol. XX, Issue 15 Call 954-783-8700 to Advertise Email: siren2415@gmail.com Pompano Beach • Deer eld Beach • Lighthouse Point • Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Wilton Manors • Oakland Park • Hillsboro Beach • The Galt • Palm Aire The P e l i c a n Pelican By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach Every Saturday morning for the past few months, Hib Casselberry could be found at the Green Market where he told those who stopped by how they can help to keep his beloved lighthouse sending out its life-saving beam to mariners and small plane pilots helping them come home safely. Pushing 90, Hib calls himself ‘retired but active’ and he is. “Every Hib Casselberry ghts to keep the light shining from Pompano’s 105-year-old Hillsboro LighthouseSaturday morning I’m up at 6 a.m. I pick up a tent, two card tables, display boards and chairs and by 7:15 I’m at the market, and by 8 a.m. I’m ready to persuade visitors to help our cause,” he explains. His cause is the fate of the famous Hillsboro Lighthouse light to be decided by the Coast Guard on April 22. To sum the controversy up, according to Hib, the turtle environmentalists want the light turned off or dimmed to accommodate the turtles. The Hillsboro Lighthouse Preservation Society, or HLPS, feels that, more important than the turtles, is the safety of the fisherman, boaters and small aircraft pilots who count on the light to guide them home without a loss of life and property. Small aircraft count on the beam to help them on their approach to Boca Raton airport and Pompano Beach Air Park.” He continues. “Our beam is 125-feet above sea level and the light is inside a Fresnel Lens which directs the light See LIGHTHOUSE on page 12 GFS expanding into Lighthouse PointBy Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFLighthouse Point Bulk jars of mayonnaise and 35 new jobs are headed to Lighthouse Point. GFS, or Gordon Food Services Marketplace, is opening a new store sometime this summer at 3260 N. Federal Hwy. With their nearest location in Fort Lauderdale, GFS executives decided North Broward needed one of their stores. See GFS on page 15 Goodyear Blimp tickets to be auctionedBy Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach A ride on the Goodyear Blimp isn’t something that can be purchased. But it is something that that can be won. At the Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce’s Business with a Twist, April 18 from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Goodyear Blimp Base, 1500 NE 5 Ave., Pompano Beach, the Chamber will be holding a live auction to benefit the Chamber and the John Knox Village Foundation. At stake is a ride for two on the Goodyear Blimp. “The only way you can find rides on the Goodyear Blimp is to win them at a charity event,” said Ric Green, president/CEO of the Chamber. Green estimates previous Goodyear Blimp tickets have been auctioned off for between $600 and $3,500. “It all depends how badly people want them,” he said. Along with the auction, there will also be games, rides and food; all of it in commemoration of Frank H. See BLIMP on page 16 Commercial Boulevard designs getting further reviewBy Judy VikPELICAN STAFFLauderdale-By-The-Sea A special workshop session of the LauderdaleBy-The-Sea Town Commission is set for 6 p.m. Monday, April 16, on proposed design concepts for Commercial Boulevard from the Intracoastal Waterway Bridge to Seagrape Drive. Designers recently presented two proposed plans for the area. In one plan, Scheme A, designers kept parallel parking on both sides of Commercial Boulevard. Existing parking lots were reconfigured. In Scheme B, angled parking was suggested off Commercial Boulevard. This plan includes a 9-foot recovery zone, providing enough room for a driver to back out and then go forward in the zone to get back on Commercial.See WORKSHOP on page 24 Janny Raymond, of Oakland Park’s Northeast High School ag football team, runs to her right to avoid her ag being pulled during the annual Girls Flag Football Jamboree at the Miami Dolphins Training Facility in Davie on March 31. See story on page 19. [Photo courtesy of the Miami Dolphins] S e a f o o d F e s t P o m p a n o A p r i l 2 0 2 2 Seafood Fest Pompano April 20-22

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2 The PelicanFriday, April 13, 2012 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach The East Village Uncorked monthly event tonight includes a groundbreaking ceremony at Harbor Village Shopping Plaza at 6 p.m. The event runs until 9 p.m. Harbor Village, between 2600 and 2800 E. Atlantic Boulevard, will undergo improvements to the parking lot and building facades over the next seven months. The main goal of the project, funded in part by the Pompano Beach Community Redevelopment Agency, is to revitalize the area with pedestrian-friendly features and create a pleasant ambiance. Enhancements include widening the existing sidewalk in front of the stores, adding an Harbor Village project moves forward with parking and facade improvementsattractive landscaping pattern with palms and lush ground covers and creating an inviting traffic circulation plan. During construction, all shops and restaurants will remain open and access will remain open. Grants approvedThe East CRA Advisory Committee approved a Mini Merchant Assistance grant of $7,500 to Shive, Inc., owners of Pompano Beverage at 2777 E. Atlantic Blvd. for lighting, new flooring and bathroom improvements. They also approved a Strategic Investment Program grant of $12,480 to Shive Inc. for the property at 2775 E. Atlantic for creation of a cigar and wine bar. Martone Men’s Wear, Inc. received approval for a Mini Merchant Assistance grant of $4,250 for flooring and lighting. Horacio Danovich, CRA engineer, noted that Florida Department of Transportation has nearly completed concrete work on Atlantic Boulevard and are about four weeks ahead of schedule. The board approved a list of 12 additions to the Pompano Beach Boulevard streetscape project pending city commission approval. Total cost is $316,615. In a discussion on synthetic turf, Board members disagreed on whether the material is the right choice for a plaza area. “Synthetic turf in my mind doesn’t belong on the beach,” Barbara Gordon said. “I don’t know if sod is the answer, but See VILLAGE on page 3SightingsA community calendar of East Broward County. Please email information to siren2415@gmail.comArt, Music, Film & Theatre4-14 – And Then There Were None [A Murder Mystery] will be performed by the Curtain Call Playhouse at 8 p.m. at the Herb Skolnick Center, 800 SW 36 Ave., Pompano Beach. Tickets are $23 for adults, $10 for students. The play also runs on April 20 and 21 at 8 p.m. and at 2 p.m. on April 15 and 22. 954-784-0768. 4-18 – Art-By-The-Sea, a monthly art series will take place from 7 to 9 p.m. at Friedt Family Fellowship Hall, 4433 Bougainvillea Drive, Lauderdale-By-TheSea. This month’s program will focus on sculptures and include a short demo of sculpture techniques. Bring a table knife or rag to participate in the hands on portion of the event. 954-594-0444. 4-20 – The last Island City Art Walk of the season takes place from 7 to 10 p.m. along Wilton Drive in Wilton Manors. Over 40 local artists show off their works in Wilton Drive’s cafes, boutiques, restaurants and other businesses. 4-25 – Elvis Costello and The Imposters perform at 7 p.m. at Seminole Hard Rock Casino, 1 Seminole Way in Hollywood. Tickets are $49, $69 and $89. Visit www.seminolehardrockhollywood.com or 1-800-745-3000. 4-27 & 28 – Deerfield Beach Wine and Food Festival at Quiet Waters Park, 401 South Powerline Road, Deerfield Beach. VIP and regular tickets available. Cost varies by activity. Visit www.DeerfieldBeachWineAndFoodFestival.com or 561-338-7594. 4-27 – Actor and comedian Billy Gardell from the television show Mike & Molly, performs at Seminole Hard Rock Hotel and Casino Hollywood, 1 Seminole Way, Hollywood, at 8 p.m. Tickets are $49, $59 and $69. Visit www. hardrocklivehollywoodfl.com or 1-800-745-3000.Food & Bargains4-14 – Wilton Manors Yard Sale, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive. Free to the public. To See SIGHTINGS on page 24

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The Pelican 3 Friday, April 13, 2012 between the two there’s got to be something that’s more natural. There’s something almost sacred about beaches.” Board member Bob Shelley said he felt the opposite. “That area will be trampled on. They have some stuff now [arti cial turf] that looks really, really good. Boca Raton has Little League elds covered with this, and it looks real. I think synthetic is the better choice.” Board chair Jack Rogerson said he doesn’t see grass surviving well in the concert area. “We want something green there, not pavers.” VillageContinued from page 2By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach It took money to build and open the city’s Canine Corner Dog Park and it takes money to keep it maintained and open. To help alleviate the cost to the city, the Dog Pack, a private organization made up of residents, is holding its second annual Canine Corner Golf Outing tomorrow from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Municipal Golf Course, 1101 N. Federal Hwy. “The city budget is not endless and we’re in tough economic times,” said Lisa Hamburg, vice president of the Dog Pack. The tournament comes as the city gets ready to expand and make improvements to the dog park. Robert McCaughan, public works administration director, said one acre of space will be added to the north side of the park probably by the end of the summer. “This proposed area was incorporated in the initial design.” McCaughan said the expanded area will be used for big dogs. Once the new section is open the current big dog area will be closed to allow it to rest. McCaughan said the big Private group helps fund Pompano Beach dog park expansiondogs are “tearing up the turf” and “just like an athletic field” the area needs to be rested from time-to-time; he added that the whole park would probably be opened up for special events. The current entrance/exit will also be divided into separate entrance and exit areas. Opened in June of 2010 at a cost of $105,000, the 2.6-acre park features two sections for small and big dogs, sidewalks, doggie fountains, benches and is located adjacent to the Municipal Golf Course. “It’s wonderful to have a place to go where the dogs can socialize with other dogs. And the best part is the dog owners can get together and meet one another, make friends and network,” said Hamburg, who calls the dog park the “center of all dogdom in Pompano.” According to a study by See EXPANSION on page 15

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4 The PelicanFriday, April 13, 2012 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach Motorists can thank the federal government’s stimulus funding for North Broward’s newest roadway, the Dixie Highway Flyover. Designed to remove traf c snarls at NE 2 Street and NE 2 Avenue, it provides easy access to Palm Beach County. The $39 million span over the Hillsboro Canal and the Florida East Coast Railroad tracks opened Tuesday and Deer eld Beach Mayor Peggy Noland the rst person to of cially drive from the top of the yover to Hillsboro Boulevard. The project has a history that goes back to the late ‘80s when the Florida Department of Transportation drew plans to widen Dixie Highway and proposed the yover. Deer eld Planning Director Jerry Ferguson remembers the rst documented meeting with FDOT concerning the project was in 1990 and although other options were considered the yover was the only one that improved both traf c ow and public safety. Originally, construction was to start in 2000, but FDOT never received funding from the state and kept pushing the project back. When the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act was approved in 2009, the yover was the only “shovel-ready” project in the county. Had stimulus funding not been forthcoming, the next start date for the yover was not until 2015. Ferguson said the city continued to work with FDOT to improve the aesthetics of the span. The initial design called for exposed girders.”It would have looked like an erecter set,” Ferguson said. Now the beams are enclosed. “It is still less then we wanted, but a good compromise,” he said. Still to come are the nishing touches: landscaping, railings, lighting, but those for people who make daily commutes between the counties their federal tax dollars are at work.Dixie Highway Flyover Celebrants: Broward MPO Chair Richard Blattner, Boca Raton Council Member Susan Haynie, State Representative Gwyndolen Clarke-Reed, Broward County Vice Mayor Kristin Jacobs, Deer eld Beach Mayor Peggy Noland, Jerry Ferguson, Deer eld Beach Director of Planning and Development Services, Deer eld Beach City Manager Burgess Hanson, Deer eld Beach Commissioner Ben Preston, Deer eld Beach Commissioner Joe Miller, FDOT District 4 Secretary Jim Wolfe, Broward County Commissioner Chip LaMarca, Deer eld Beach Assistant City Manager Keven Klopp, Deer eld Beach City Commissioner Marty Popelsky.After 25 years of discussion, Dixie Flyover is a reality

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The Pelican 5 Friday, April 13, 2012 By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFWilton Manors City commissioners are going for a trifecta – buying another piece of land to turn three adjoining properties into one parking lot. On Tuesday, commissioners unanimously voted to buy the property at 2524 NE 8 Terrace, located on the north side of Wilton Drive, for $165,555. That makes three connected properties, one owned by Kids In Distress, all along Northeast 8 Terrace, that the city plans to convert into parking. Bob Mays, finance department director, estimates that if all three lots were paved a total about 45 possible new spaces could be created. But added that engineers will have to study the project before the exact number is known. “It all depends on the final design of the parking lot,” said Mays. A final vote on the purchase is scheduled for April 24. Last month, commissioners approved the purchase of an adjacent property for $229,000 and an agreement with Kids In Distress to lease their property for $10 a year per a five-year contract. In exchange, Kids In Distress employees will be able to use up to 20 spaces from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday. At the end of the five years, Kids In Distress can require the city Wilton Manors Commission to buy more land for parkingto purchase the property. If it doesn’t, the city can renew for another five years. To fund parking improvements, the city has borrowed $1.1 million. Along with the three Northeast 8 Terrace properties, the city has paved various public right-of-ways and created more parking in various areas including 10 spots across from the Starbucks on Northeast 26 Street. Spaces were also added along Northeast 7 Avenue, next to the Shoppes of Wilton Manors. But Tommy LaFashia and Maciel Cantelmo, who live in the city and own the XO Gallery on Wilton Drive, said officials should take over Wilton Drive from the Florida Department of Transportation, or FDOT, and spend money turning it into a two-lane street with parking along both sides. “It would be the best thing ever,” said LaFashia. “I call this a ghetto with a highway running through it.” But Cantelmo and LaFashia aren’t the first to call for a Wilton Drive takeover. The idea was proposed three years ago by Main Street, which still supports it. “The biggest hurdle is taking over Wilton Drive’s ownership from the state,” said Krishan Manners, president/CEO of Main Street. Main Street estimates the total cost to convert Wilton Drive into two lanes, including parking spaces, trees, landscaping and other beautification amenities, would be $5 million. According to an FDOT estimate, if converted to two lanes, resurfacing Wilton Drive would cost about See PARKING on page 25

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6 The PelicanFriday, April 13, 2012 Deer eld Beach, Pompano Beach, Lighthouse Point, LauderdaleBy-The-Sea, Wilton Manors and Oakland ParkWilton Manors • Oakland Park • Hillsboro Beach The Pompano Pelican is published weekly on FridaysStreet Address: 1500-A E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, FL 33060 Telephone: 954-783-8700 • Fax: 954-783-0093Letters to the Editor are encouraged and accepted for print if signed, although a writer’s name will be withheld on request; letters must also include a daytime telephone number. Advertising rates are available upon request. Subscription rate is $31.80 including tax for one year’s delivery in Greater Pompano Beach; $95.40/per year including tax for others in the United States; call 954-783-8700 for rates abroad. The Pelican is a nonpartisan newspaper and reserves the right to decline advertising. Copyright 2012. Reproduction of this publication in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission of the publisher. The Pelican is a member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, Deer eld Beach Chamber and the LBTS Chamber. The Pelican is a state certi ed woman-owned minority business. The Pelican is delivered to businesses, libraries, schools, of ces, hospitals, news racks and single family homes. All advertising and copy is published at the sole discretion of the publisher. We welcome your critiques and ideas concerning this publication. Anne Siren, publisherExecutive Assistant: Mary Hudson Graphics: Rachel Ramirez Windsheimer Bookkeeper: John White Classi eds: Fran Shelby Contributing Writers: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Judy Wilson, Malcolm McClintock, Judy Vik, Michael d’Oliveira Account Executives: Paul Shroads, Carolyn Mann, Bill Heaton, Bill Fox Special Of ce Assistant: Cathy Siren ESTABLISHED 1993 • Volume XX, Issue 15 Founding Editor and PublisherAnne Hanby Siren Letters & Opinionsthe city has to rehire and pay back. Instead of being terminated, the employee responsible for this nancial debacle was given a $40,000 raise in salary.”ResponseMike Milanowski, the city’s current director of human resources, had been on-board only two weeks when he reviewed and analyzed the city’s plans for conducting the 2010 layoffs of 80 part-time and 26 full-time city employees. Mr. Milanowski then closely monitored the effectuation of those layoffs. The arbitration brought by the International Union of Painters and Allied Trades or IUPAT, concluded with an arbitrator’s decision and award that upheld the city’s reasoning for the layoffs, upheld the layoff of the 80 parttime employees in their entirety, and upheld the layoff of 25 of the 26 full-time employees who were laid off. Rather than continue the arbitration process and incur considerable additional costs to defend the belief that the city had followed all applicable rules in the layoff of the single employee identi ed by the arbitrator, city Management opted to return that employee without further objection.Input 3“Forty thousand dollar increases in salary seem to be the favorite number. Keven Klopp was hired by Mahaney, as CRA director, with a salary of $80,000. He got an increase of $40,000 when he became the assistant city manager. As CRA director, he also has an Assistant CRA director, and a project manager. And yet other CRA directors will tell you that it is unethical to take any job with the same municipality that you serve as the CRA director.”ResponseMr. Klopp was not given a $40,000 increase for assuming the duties of assistant city manager. He was hired as the city’s CRA director/economic development manager with a salary of $86,000, and received an increase of $14,499 upon accepting the position of acting assistant city manager. When the position transitioned to a permanent status, he received a nal competitive salary of $120,000. His salary in a tri-capacity position is lower than the salaries of many single-capacity Assistant city Managers in similarly-sized cities in South Florida and is $52,000 lower than the salary of the previous assistant city manager under the former city manager. The accusation that Mr. Klopp engaged in unethical and unprofessional behavior in accepting this role is absurd, and is a biased and pathetic effort to defame both Mr. Klopp and the city. Multi-capacity positions are a common practice among local governments. The city Attorney and external auditors have carefully scrutinized Mr. Klopp’s position, and have found no legal, professional or ethical basis on which to discontinue a practice that bene ts the city. Input 4“In the 13 years that I served as Mayor, I had four city managers, none of whom had an assistant. Although our population was smaller, we had our own police and re departments most of the time. Now, 50 percent of our budget is handled by BSO. So why do we have a manager, an assistant city manager, an assistant to the city manager, an executive assistant to the city manager, and an administrative support specialist.”ResponseIn the 1980s, when this resident served as mayor, the city’s population was less than half of what it is today. Today, local government operations have become exponentially much more complicated. Regardless of whether the services are provided internally or by the Broward Sheriff’s Of ce, the city manager is still responsible for overseeing the law enforcement and re rescue service operations for a city of 76,000 residents. Additionally, the team of professionals who work in the city manager’s of ce are essential to ensuring that all aspects of city operations run smoothly. During this city manager’s tenure, several department directors and other senior-level managers either retired or left city service. Those positions were lled at much lower salaries, amounting to a savings in excess of $240,000 per year. One position has been eliminated entirely in the city manager’s of ce. In addition, all city employees whose pay exceeded the maximum of their salary grade were reduced back to the appropriate salary range. In at least one instance, this resulted in a department director’s pay being reduced by more than $16,000. Non-unionized city employees have not received merit or a costof-living increases since 2008.Input 5“According to a recent Pelican article, city wants to squeeze some money from the city employees since the city did not get all of the $1.2 million it originally budgeted, and they plan to hire an attorney to sue the employees. Why? “ResponseThe city Budget for Fiscal Year 2011-12 was predicated on the fact that the pay of all city employees would be reduced by ve percent and that every city employee would be required to pay ten percent of the cost of his/her individual health insurance coverage. Without these economic concessions, the City would not have been able to reduce the millage rate by the one mill it was reduced Deer eld Beach city of cials want to set the record straightSee RECORD on page 7To the editor, The city commission does not routinely issue a formal public response to citizen input made during commission meetings. However, there are times when such input is so outrageous that the commission has no choice but to respond. At the commission meeting on Tuesday, March 20, a former city elected of cial made remarks that necessitate a formal response. We will respond to the defamatory allegations, outright misinformation, and awed conclusions in the order they were presented.Input 1“At the February 21st meeting, the commission made quite a fuss over the retirement of Carl Peter. The truth is, he should have retired three years ago. When Larry Deetjen brought Carl from Michigan, it was with the understanding that Carl would retire after ve years at age 62. Deetjen wasn’t here when Carl reached 62. I called the agreement to the attention of the powers that be, and was told that since the agreement was not in writing, it held no water. How come Burgess Hanson, who was Deetjen’s assistant at the time, didn’t know? Peter wanted to stay until he was 65 so the city could continue paying his health insurance. Although his position and duties were vastly diminished, during those last three years, his salary was not. Whatever happened to honor among thieves?”ResponseThe recruitment and selection process for Carl Peter, P.E., was spearheaded by a former city human resources director and the assistant to the city manager. There were candidates from Illinois, Massachusetts, Florida, etc. An interview panel of department directors and other high-level senior managers recommended Mr. Peter as the best-quali ed applicant for the position of director of public works and environmental services. As to the allegation that Mr. Peter was to retire at age 62, there is simply no evidence of any such agreement either orally or in writing. Mr. Peter recalled no conversation about an expected retirement date, much less an oral or written agreement. Neither does current City Manager Burgess Hanson, who assisted in the competitive recruitment and selection process Mr. Peter’s duties changed considerably throughout his service to the City, but they did not decrease until he helped orchestrate the disestablishment of the Public Works Department as part of the 2011-12 budget. Mr. Peter’s retirement was a known and expected result of this organizational change. Mr. Peter served the city as a dedicated public servant, and does not deserve to be impugned by baseless and unsupported allegations.Input 2“The city lost the mediation over the ring of 106 city employees without regard to the rules and regulations as outlined in the employee’s handbook. Now

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The Pelican 7 Friday, April 13, 2012 effective Oct. 1, 2011. However, because of collective bargaining that was deliberately stalled by the 29 employees represented by a newly formed union of mid-level managers and supervisors, and due to the disavowal of an af rmative rati cation vote on a labor agreement the above-detailed economic concessions could not be implemented on Oct. 1, 2011.Input 6“We were told that the main reason for the merger with BSO was so the city could get out of the pension business. Yet, over a hundred of the re ghters chose to stay in the city’s de ned pension plan. The city will eventually be out of the pension business, but it might take 60 or 70 years to do it. And just why did the merger with BSO have to take place so fast and without public input.”ResponseThere were a number of important reasons for the transition of re/rescue services to the Broward Sheriff’s Of ce, or BSO. Interestingly enough, this resident was actually very supportive of the merger until the IAFF union president, a close family friend, was removed by the Union. While not the only reason, the closure of the Deer eld Beach Fire ghters’ Pension Plan was one of the main reasons in support of the transition to BSO. Nearly half of the re/rescue department’s workforce had the potential to retire within the next ve years. If the plan had remained open, all of the personnel hired to replace the retiring employees would have been in the city re ghters’ pension plan, meaning that the city would have to continue funding the pension plan much further into the future than the time it will now take for the pension plan to expire. The city was advised both by our labor counsel and by attorneys specializing in public-sector pension plans to close the pension plan as soon as possible, thereby limiting entry by new employees into the pension plan. Florida law requires that existing employees in the Pension Plan (even after their transition to the BSO) be allowed to remain in the city’s pension plan until their retirement. The very best the city could do in controlling the cost of the Fire ghters’ pension plan was to close the pension plan to new employees, bene t from the favorable actuarial assumptions that would apply to a “closed” versus “open” pension plan and, in the course of time, eventually have the pension plan expire. The resident [additionally] alleges that the transition to the BSO was to save more than $2 million. A more accurate account of savings would be closed to $1.5 million in the rst year of the contract. While not actually re ected in the city’s budget for scal year 2011-12, the cash savings was earmarked by a consensus of the city commission to be used either to replenish the City’s Fund Balance or hire more BSO deputies. Still another $1.5 million in cost avoidance was produced by the transition to the BSO in fully staf ng one existing re station, opening a new re station along South Powerline Road, and avoiding the purchase of telecommunications equipment that was over twenty ve years old in the city’s former dispatch communications center.ConclusionWe trust that the information and responses to this resident’s input will provide a much more accurate and true understanding of the professionalism, responsiveness, ef ciency and effectiveness with which the city is run by the Deer eld Beach City Commission and city management. Sincerely, Deer eld Beach City Commission RecordContinued from page 6

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8 The PelicanFriday, April 13, 2012 Business matters The Pelican takes a look at local business owners. Call The Pelican to nd out how you can tell your story here because business matters. 954-783-8700. By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFF Get beautiful in this attractive looking and aromatic day spa at 1809 NE 24 street in Lighthouse Point. The Lighthouse Day Spa will relax a person’s mind and body with a massage, facial, manicure and pedicure using some of the most popular Merle Norman products, all made in America. New owner Jason Smith says, “For 80 years, Merle Norman products have been creating a loyal following. The Lighthouse Day Spa the destination for Merle Norman Cosmetics, massages and nails Lighthouse Day Spa’s staff. Sharon Pass-Holt, Margarita Lake, owner Jason Smith, Lisa Avery, Amalfy Mendoza and Andria Knight.We’re thrilled to continue offering the full line of products that are so popular, we re-order them twice a month and ship them free anywhere in the United States.” Smith also welcomes the world renowned Crabtree & Evelyn line of lotions, soaps and Tyler candles to pamper oneself and recreate the spa experience at home. “This line even includes a collection of bath and grooming products for men at affordable prices,” Smith adds. Millie Walsh, owner of nearby Body and Soul Boutique, says, “I was using Merle Norman cosmetics when I got married and then I lost track of them. When this spa opened nine years ago and featured Merle Norman products I was delighted and am now one of those loyal followers. I also use the services. I had a massage this morning. I went in with a back ache and came out free of pain and feeling great.” Lilly Nash is another long time See DAY SPA on page 14Horses and the Handicapped celebrates 30 yearsHorses and the Handicapped, an organization that helps disabled children by using horses as part of a physical therapy program, is celebrating its 30th anniversary with its Picnic in the Park event on April 21 from 12 to 3 p.m. at Vegso Family Arena at Tradewinds Park 3600 W. Sample Rd. in Coconut Creek. The organization will be honoring its founders and donors. There will be musical performances, a silent auction and more. Cost is $35 per person, $60 per couple and $7.50 for children under 12. For more, visit www.hhsfl. org or call 954-974-2007.Oakland Park Earth DayThe City of Oakland Park Parks is holding an Earth Day event tomorrow, April 14, from 8:30 a.m. to noon at Lakeside Sand Pine Preserve, 2820 NW 27 Ave. The event will feature planting of native shrubs and wildflowers, a collection of pine needles to be used as mulch and a tour of the preserve led by Charles Livio, horticulturist. Volunteers include the Kids Ecology Corps and Oakland Park Garden Club. The city will supply water and tools. Volunteers are asked to bring hats, gloves and sunscreen. For more, call 954-630-4511.

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10 The PelicanFriday, April 13, 2012 Shop your local merchants!954-783-8700 Making a DifferencePhyllis J. Neuberger wants your suggestions about people who are making a difference. Call 954-7838700. BriefsBy Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFHere’s a golden opportunity to explore options and ways to build excitement into one’s retirement planning. “We want to re-engage the baby boomers and other retirees to use their talents, experience and knowledge to benefit the world around them,” says Jean Kouch of Impact Broward and program manager of Encore Connect, a brand new project. As a presenter, Kouch is running three-hour workshops in well known local venues to help men and women, 55 and up to plan and enrich the second half of their lives. Asked how she does this, Kouch describes the specifics of the three hour workshops. “We first guide those attending to do a self assessment and evaluation of personal life experiences, including values, skills, interests and dreams. Next, we evaluate this information to find a good match with non-profit organizations in Broward County. There’s a lot of sharing among the groups. That always generates excitement. Some participants realize they want to explore a field that is new to them. Others find volunteer areas which will benefit from their experience and talents. For those who cannot yet afford to volunteer, these workshops have been very helpful in Encore Connect offers free seminars to help those 55 and over re-imagine an exciting, activity lled future Jean Kouch, program manager for Encore Connect, is leading workshops all over Broward County for Baby Boomers and men and women already retired. The goal of the workshops is to help this group include the wide world of volunteer opportunities to help others and themselves as they plan the many years ahead. [Photo courtesy of Encore]pointing to a second career or volunteer opportunity to be explored later.” Kouch has already conducted several workshops and finds that those attending stimulate and interact with each other. She says, “We didn’t realize how effective brainstorming and interaction could be. The second part of the workshop deals with projecting and creating a vision of yourself and what you will be doing three to five years from now. Identify the challenges you might encounter including both negatives and positives. Recognizing the challenges helps one face and deal with them. This may lead a person to taking preparatory classes, such as computer classes which are offered free through Impact Broward and public libraries.” Part three of the workshop matches people to possibilities. She points out that the non-profits are suffering in this economy, too. They are badly in need of qualified volunteers which can eventually lead them to paying jobs. ‘ She names one case in point. “My program coordinator was a volunteer who ended up being hired by Impact Broward. We have many examples of people who, through volunteering, have added skills to their resumes and qualified themselves for a paying job. These workshops are another form of networking. Our groups have been successful because there’s a camaraderie and optimism about finding out what is needed, where it is needed and the value you might add.” Encore connect is new. It is directed at baby boomers in advance of their retirement, veterans as they return home from service, and retired men and women who have not found rewarding ways to spend their freed up schedules. Recently Kouch worked with a veteran who served as a Marine in Vietnam. She says, “He attended a workshop in Willow Wood and was grateful to get a direction to feeling useful and involved outside of his home. He will soon be involved in Davie at Crisis Housing Solutions where he will help See ENCORE on page 13Spin-A-Thon to bene t Kids In DistressThe Marine Industry Cares Foundation is hosting its annual Spin-A-Thon on April 20 from 1 to 7 p.m. at Esplanade Park, 400 SW 2 St., Fort Lauderdale. The Spin-A-Thon is a stationary bike event where individuals and teams raise money through sponsorships. Proceeds from the event benefit Kids In Distress in Wilton Manors, an organization that assists needy children and their families. Registration starts at 12 p.m. There will also be a thank you party for spinners from 6 to 9 p.m. Visit www.marineindustrycares.org for more information.Hospice volunteers neededThe Heartland Hospice Services Friendly Visitor volunteers provide emotional support to terminally ill patients and their caregivers through visits in patient’s homes and in nursing facilities throughout the Broward County area. A small commitment on the part of a volunteer can make a big difference to a hospice patient. For those willing to volunteer, scheduling is flexible. Orientation and training will be provided. Volunteers must be 18 years or older to become part of the program. Call 954-467-7423 for more information.

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12 The PelicanFriday, April 13, 2012 rays to travel horizontally and reaches out 28 miles. We know that the turtles in the sand are not disturbed. However, Art Makenion, an engineer and our president will oversee the closing of the one small hole which could, conceivably, put light on the sand. This is a simple solution.” HLPS President, Art Makenian said, “The light was dim from 1992 to 1999, the years it needed repair, and during that period there were nighttime boating wrecks almost weekly. Hillsboro inlet notoriously has four to six foot seas, and with the reefs, the rocks and the jetty around the inlet, our big diamond light is an important aid for mariners. Except for those few years and blackouts during World War II, our light has been on since March 7, 1907. Beside the aid to navigation, the light has tremendous historical significance which is why we are encouraging the public to rally to save this local treasure.” Charles Brady wrote, “I am writing to share my support for keeping the lighthouse fully operational. As a resident boater and aviator, I have used and continue to use Hillsboro Lighthouse for navigation on the water and in the air. It is an aid that ensures safety for crew and passe gers on board.”Hib Casselberry, living largeHib and his wife, Martha, are charter members of the HLPS, and active volunteers in preservation and education of the lighthouse since 1997. He says, “I’ve been chasing history and legends of Florida lighthouses since 1970.” He was born in Chicago, but transported to Florida as an infant. He enjoys telling his story. “My parents and I motored down Dixie Highway in 1925 to Winter Park, Florida where we had relatives. While LighthouseContinued from page 1there, my mother fell, breaking a few bones and delaying our planned drive further south. Dad planned to sell hardware to the construction industry which was booming. While mother was recovering, they both invested money in property which grew into a small town, named Casselberry after the dominant land owners us. It’s still there 10 miles north of Orlando on U. S. Highway 17 and 92. It’s now as big as Oakland Park and has many Casselberrys in residence.” Hib was educated in Winter Park, a military school, and attended Bradley University in Illinois where he graduated with a degree in building construction. He returned to Florida with his new wife, Martha and in 1965 the Casselberrys became Broward County residents. They settled in to raise their five children. Hib headed up a five-man team in residential design. He describes his career as “an architectural designer and planner, a certified build inspector, and a construction specific writer. He has edited several trade magazines and is well versed in genealogy. Above all, he has dedicated 42 years to the history and preservation of Florida lighthouses.” He was part of the team that persuaded the U.S. Coast Guard to save the existing Frensel Lens and repair it which was less expensive than removing it from the tower and putting in a small beacon with a five-mile reach. He recalls, “David Butler, Harry Cushing and a few others, including me, persuaded E. Clay Shaw, our congressman, to save the light. We did it once and now we must do it again. Hib and his wife, Martha, enjoying the view from atop the Hillsboro Lighthouse. Because we have the strongest light in our Big Diamond, we became the image on the 2003, 37-cent postage stamp. Those stamps sold out to collectors almost immediately.” I hope everyone who reads this story will contact the Coast Guard and demand that our fabulous beacon continues to shine.” Email your opinion about the lighthouse to Andrew. s.haley@uscg.mil or write to Andrew Haley at USCG 7th District, Brickell Plaza Federal Building, 909 SE 1st Ave.

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The Pelican 13 Friday, April 13, 2012 people with mortgage issues. He is not a counselor, but he’ll man the phones and do computer searches for first time home buyers and for those wanting help to remain in their homes. He’s also mentoring homecoming veterans who are transitioning to civilian life.” People, preparing for free time and their options in retirement, are not picturing a rocking chair on the front porch. According to Kouch, this generation approaches retirement with a new attitude. They want to help the community and continue to explore their own personal growth. Lee Zeidman, Palm Aire, volunteers in the Impact Broward office doing whatever needs to be done. She says, “It motivates me. I work half days, four days each week, and it gives me great pleasure to be helping others, and myself in the process. I’ve written a few books for children an adult murder mystery, and one titled How to marry a Jewish Doctor which, by the way, I did.” Sergio Perez lost his job when the company down sized. He says, “After taking a workshop, I got in touch with Impact Broward and EncoreContinued from page 10told them I wanted to explore volunteer opportunities. While I was volunteer interviewing the homeless at outreach centers, my old employer called and hired me back. I learned a lot in my time of unemployment. One thing is certain. I will always make volunteering part of my life plan. I’m doing it now.” John R. Gargotta, president and CEO of Impact Broward, formerly Senior Volunteer Services, says, “Our volunteers are a treasure, generously sharing their wisdom and experience. The Encore Connect program will help us bring baby boomers into the volunteer arena with opportunities that match their interests and experiences and their plans for continued growth in their ‘encore’ stage of life.” A grant of $55,750 from the Community Foundation of Broward to implement the program, Encore Connect, through its Reengage for Good initiative has made these workshops possible. Jean Kouch is a Returned Peace Corps Volunteer with a Master’s degree in International Affairs from Columbia University in New York City. She works for Impact Broward and is also an adjunct professor at Broward College teaching political science. She is the facilitator of the Encore Connect workshops.Impact BrowardImpact Broward has been a senior service agency since the mid-sixties. It offers six programs which are: Foster Grandparents and Dropout Prevention Programs, Retired and Senior Volunteer Program, Senior Companion Program, Respite for Caregivers Program, RSVP Executive Service Corps of Broward County and Encore Connect.Community Foundation of BrowardThis is a public, nonprofit organization with more than 400 charitable and agency endowment funds representing $100 million. It has distributed $50 million to support community solutions over the past 26 years. Current initiatives include Re-Engage for Good campaign to move retiring baby boomers into encore careers for social good, support of arts and cultural programming, education and the Leadership Institute which seeks to ensure Broward is defined by its great nonprofit leadership. Advanced registration required. To register for the April 28 workshop, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Oakland Park Library, 1298 NE 37 St., or the May 17 workshop, 1 to 4 p.m. at the Herb Skolnick Center, 800 SW 36 Ave., Pompano Beach, email encore@impactbroward.org and include the program date in the subject line; write your telephone number and birth year in the body of the e-mail. or call Jean at 954-484-7117, The Pelican. 954.783.8700

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14 The PelicanFriday, April 13, 2012 Advertise with The Pelican Today! 954-783-8700 patroness of this spa and says, “The staff is very professional and accommodating. I’ve always been satisfied with my facials, manicures and pedicures. I like to support small businesses. I liked the former owner and I like Jason. He’s very nice and I feel he will succeed. And yes, I do like Merle Norman products.” Until he bought the spa from its former owner last December, Smith was a floral designer in Canada. “I love Florida and this business. I’m so happy and fortunate to be well received by former clients and new ones every day. In addition to our body pampering treatments and lotions, we offer some very attractive and clever accessories which our clients buy for themselves and as gifts.” The Lindsay Phillips Switch Flops are just one case in point. The Velcro top makes it easy to switch to other colorful choices to match a lady’s mood or fashion. And there are many alternate tops. There’s an attractive locally hand-made line of earrings, necklaces and rings. This modestly priced collection of jewelry has a one of a kind look. Magnabilities necklaces, earrings and bracelets feature interchangeable magnetized disks in a wide variety of colors and patterns. Kameleon collection is another line of attractive rings, necklaces and bracelets with magnetized choices. Blessings bracelets feature synthetic pearls on a metal stretch band and there are earrings to match. Smith says these ‘Blessings’ are often chosen as gifts for the blessings in one’s life. Getting back to the spa’s pampering services, Smith had a few last words. “We have two talented massage therapists always on hand to erase a lady’s stress and pains. Our facials are popular because of the long lasting benefits of the resulting clean, fresh feeling and look of the skin. I’m told that facials enhance the effectiveness of the Merle Norman products. As for the nails, our professional manicures and pedicures include a gentle massage of the hands and legs. I think of this spa as a destination for women and men who want to look and feel good by choosing the products and the services they love.” A menu of prices, services and gift certificates is availDay SpaContinued from page 8able. Open Tuesday to Friday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Saturday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Call 954-946-8200 for more information.

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The Pelican 15 Friday, April 13, 2012 Advertise with The Pelican! 954-783-8700! GFSContinued from page 1“It’s an area that we don’t feel that we’re serving our current customers very well,” said Mark Dempsey, GFS spokesman. “We are planning for a late summer opening right now but we have not released an official date yet.” According to Dempsey, the new store will be run by a staff of 35. Previously, according to an internet search, the location was occupied by Five Star Marine. Dempsey says the new store will be about 15,000 sq. ft. GFS, which sells bulk grocery and restaurant items, is similar to Costco and other wholesale companies but does not charge a membership fee. Dempsey says GFS’ main customers are the “restaurant community as well as the home shopper looking for value.” Lucille Pignataro, president of the Lighthouse Point Chamber of Commerce, said GFS will be a “nice addition” to the community because it won’t compete with any existing small businesses.It also brings new jobs to the area. “That building has been vacant for a very long period of time,” she said. the Dog Pack, Canine Corner is the third busiest park in the city behind the tennis center and the beach. Brian Doyle, president of the group, estimates that 2,000 people a week use the park and about 40 percent of Pompano’s 100,000 residents own one dog or more. Last year, the golf tournament raised a combined $10,000 from golfers and the sale of special engraved bricks that are placed inside the park. This year, Doyle is hoping to raise at least $10,000 from the tournament alone. The cost to enter is $100 and includes breakfast, lunch and the chance to win a brand new automobile from Phil Smith Acura; the player to get a hole-in-one on the 17th ExpansionContinued from page 3hole wins the car. Publix and Dick’s Sporting Goods are also sponsoring the event. There is also a 50/50 ball drop raffle prize. The Pompano Beach Fire Rescue Department will drop golf balls from the top of a 50-ft ladder. The ball that gets closest to the hole or in the whole wins 50 percent of the money raised in the raffle. Doyle said $1,000 in raffle money has already been raised and estimates about $2,000 will be the final tally. Raffle tickets are $10 and can be purchased by anyone, in or out of the tournament. So far, 130 engraved bricks have been placed on site. The cost is $50 for a small one and $100 for a large. To buy a brick, raffle ticket or sign up for the tournament, email Brian Doyle at brian@ pompanodogpark.com or call 954-632-2112.

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16 The PelicanFriday, April 13, 2012 Furman Insurance’s 50th anniversary. The cost is $10 for Chamber members and $15 for non-Chamber members. For more, call 954-941-2940.Bean and Pepper Jamboree returns to Green MarketPompano Beach The Bean and Pepper Jamboree, a tradition started in 1946, is returning to the Green Market, held at the corner of Atlantic Boulevard and Dixie Highway, tomorrow, April 14, from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. In addition to the regular Green Market vendors who sell hand-crafted soaps, fresh flowers, seafood and more, there will be a petting zoo and additional agriculture-related vendors, such as the Broward Beekeepers Association. “When the Bean and Pepper Jamboree was established in the 1940s, after World War II, it was really kind of a community-wide harvest festival marking the end of the agricultural season,” said Dan Hobby, CEO of the Pompano Beach Historical Society board. The Jamboree, which was re-established three years ago, pays homage to the original event and Pompano Beach’s beginnings as an agricultural community. Agriculture was so important to the city’s early history that before Pompano Beach High School students were called the “Golden Tornadoes” they were known as the “Bean Pickers.” For more information, visit www. greenmarketpompano.com or call 954-260-3136.Classic car show at Sample-McDougald HousePompano Beach In the shadow of Pompano’s historic Sample-McDougald House, a classic car show will be held at Centennial Park, 450 NE 10 St., tomorrow, April 14, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. “We’re expecting 50 cars,” said Jerry Bowman, Centennial Celebration Committee board member. “It’s the first of what we hope will be an annual classic car show at BlimpContinued from page 1Sample-McDougald,” he said. While most of the cars at the show will be American autos of yesteryear, all made before 1969, including the Model A and ’57 Chevy, there will also be a few foreign offerings. All cars at the show will meet the guidelines set by the Antique Automobile Club of America. “I think we’ll have a representation of everyone’s favorite,” said Bowman. “One of special interest is a 1915 Ford Model T that was a year before the house was built.” Built in 1916 by Albert Neal Sample, a Pompano pioneer, the house was purchased in 1943 by William D. McDougald, a Deerfield Beach lawman and farmer. Members of the McDougald Family lived in the house for six decades and eventually donated it. Formerly located on Dixie Highway, in 2001 the house was moved to its current location at Centennial Park. The cost is $3 and includes a tour of the Sample-McDougald House. “We’re just hoping everybody will take this opportunity to have a tour of a very interesting, very historic property.” Money raised go towards preserving the Sample-McDougald House. District 4 meetingPompano Beach Dist. 4 Commissioner Woodrow See MEETING on page 34

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The Pelican 17 Friday, April 13, 2012 Readers will nd The Pelican at Lowe’s entrance in Pompano Beach. Call 954-783-8700. By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach When Margie Colarusso’s son needed medical treatment, her private insurer said she didn’t have enough coverage and the charitable organizations she turned to said she had too much coverage to qualify for assistance. So Colarusso, a Coral Springs resident, turned to the Children’s Health Foundation, or CHF, which gave her $2,000 to help pay her Circus Bar’s charity golf tourney bene ts those who fall through the cracksson’s medical bills. Michael Colarusso, 14, suffers from Evans Syndrome, a genetic disorder where a person’s own immune system attacks the red blood cells. Colarusso, who works as an inspector for a petroleum inspection company in Port Everglades, says paying for her son’s treatments would have meant making impossible cuts. “I tried to apply for help but nobody helped me. They’re the only foundation that came forward,” said Colarusso, who added that right now her son is stable but still has to go to the doctor every month. To help CHF help those who fall through the cracks, Circus Sports Bar, 1461 SW 30 Ave., Pompano Beach, will be holding its 15th Annual Charity Golf Tournament tomorrow, April 14, starting at 1 p.m. at Palm Aire Country Club, 2600 Palm Aire Drive North, Pompano Beach; the tournament will be held on the Oaks Course. Wendy Rodriguez, who owns Circus Sports Bar with her husband, said the last few years she’s been directing the proceeds to CHF because it’s a local organization. “It’s just a lot easier to raise money for children and [CHF doesn’t] get the big money like the big charities.” Ralph Rucci, a Realtor who lives in Fort Lauderdale is founder and president of CHF, a 501c(3). He says organization helps children and their families in Broward, Miami-Dade and Palm Beach counties “because that’s where we get most of our donated money.” “We help the working class families that fall through the cracks and maybe make a little too much to qualify for help,” said Rucci. According to Rodriguez, each tournament has averaged about $3,000 in donations. “We usually average about 25 teams but this year I think it might be a little bit bigger.” With the current economy, Rodriguez said she thinks the secret to getting people to keep participating is the price. “Because ours is so cheap, See CIRCUS BAR on page 19

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18 The Pelican Friday, April 13, 2012 Advertisement Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeerfield Beach When Charlie Parton opened the Deerfield Country Club, or DCC, in 1962 he may not have foreseen that one day his nephew Bob would be president of the board of directors. Parton, an executive in New York City, had been a frequent visitor to the area and had fallen in love with Deerfield Beach. When he found the 74 acres on West Hillsboro Boulevard, he decided it was the place for an executive size golf course and country club. The private club soon became Northeast Broward’s social mecca the place to be for elegant dinner parties and lucrative charity events. There was a waiting list for membership. Charlie died in 1966 and his wife Florence ran the club for awhile. In 1968, the members purchased the course and the club. Bob Parton remembers that both Charlie and his dad, Bob Sr., were avid golfers and that as a teenager he caddied for them. His father was also instrumental in development of the country club. Parton took over the reins of the club in 2009, and is now Venerable Deer eld Country Club offers good golf and even better friendships the longest serving president in its history. He thinks he will be “president for life.” Today, the club retains its link to the past: It is still the place in northeast Broward to play a great round of golf surrounded by friends and family. The club’s popularity is due to the fact the 4,500 yard course can be played in three hours for very reasonable fees and for its “amazingly friendly group of members. It’s as much about friends and family as is it about golf,” Parton said. The course is distinguished by its mature shade trees and its challenging layout, designed by William Mitchell. Said Patty Hayes, operations manager, “You have to be a good wedge player to score well here.” The greens, redone in the last three years, are fast Hayes said, and the large trees provide relief from the Florida sun. The length of the course makes it attractive to young golfers, beginning golfers, the ladies and somewhat older players. “You can play a round here and shoot well enough to feel good about yourself,” said Hayes. Chef Edmund Morgan, owner of the Bella Vista Restaurant located inside the club, offered an Easter Sunday brunch that packed the 200-seat dining room. He serves a daily, very reasonably priced lunch, and starting this Tuesday will offer dinner five nights The dinner menu has some interesting selections: Panhandle crab cakes and a flaming Greek cheese served with garlic crustini for appetizers, and an entre menu featuring six seafood items including shrimp scampi, baked cod, garlic shrimp and clams; along with baby back ribs, and three choices of steak. Pasta is always available. In the lounge, it is happy hour, all day, every day. DCC is about to initiate summer golf memberships; $195 April 15 through Sept. 15, which includes green fees, preferred tee times, locker and bag storage, no charge for children under age 16 and unlimited range balls. Summer members are eligible for all club tournaments, the Monday night skins game See GOLF CLUB on page 25 The course is distinguished by its mature shade trees and its challenging layout, designed by William Mitchell.

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The Pelican 19 Friday, April 13, 2012 Ely, Northeast win at Girls Flag Football JamboreeBy Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFDavie When it comes to football, Chelsea Mills says the girls can give just as good as the boys. Mills, a player for Oakland Park’s Northeast High School’s girls flag football team, was one of 400 to participate in the annual Girls Flag Football Jamboree at the Miami Dolphins Training Facility in Davie on March 31. “A lot of people say that girls shouldn’t play football, but we get to show that we do belong and can take part in the game,” said Mills in a press release provided by the Miami Dolphins. “We get to show how we can be hardcore girls.” Started in 1997 with six teams, the Jamboree is a partnership between the Dolphins and the Broward County Athletic Association. Along with Northeast and Blanche Ely, 22 other Broward flag football teams participated in the event. Ely defeated Stanahan 6-0 and Northeast beat Flanagan 7-0. Deerfield Beach High School lost to Pines Charter 18-6. Twan Russell, former Miami Dolphins player and the Dolphins director of youth and community programs, said the girls, in some ways, are better than their male counterparts. “It’s really cool the passion that they bring to it. A lot of the time they haven’t had anyone to explain football to them. It’s a clean slate. You can tell them exactly what to do and they hear you,” said Russell, in an interview with The Pelican In early March, Russell says I think a lot of people play. Most of the tournaments I play in are usually $150 or more,” she said. The Circus Bar tournament is $90 per player. Before the tournament, a breakfast buffet will be served and prizes will be raffled off. Sponsorship opportunities are also available. To register, email Circus Sports Bar at fun@circusbar. com or call 954-973-1483. Circus BarContinued from page 17 See JAMBOREE on page 24

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20 The Pelican Friday, April 13, 2012 Deer eld Kiwanis Club sinks $40,000 into community from restoration to literacy By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeerfield Beach – Within the next few weeks, the aged caboose parked east of the Florida East Coast Railroad at Hillsboro Boulevard will be receiving a facelift. The long neglected railroad car, a symbol of days gone by, will be steam cleaned and painted, its color changed from dinghy red to the original Mandarin orange. Undertaking the task are members of the Deerfield Beach Kiwanis Club. Next on their to-do list is finding someone to move the caboose to a permanent site at the Railroad Museum alongside the Seaboard Airline Railroad on West Hillsboro Blvd. and getting the go-ahead from the Florida Department of Transportation to do so. The caboose was donated to the Historical Society in 2002. Through the years attempts to raise enough money to return it to its original condition failed, as did attempts to move it. Ed Dietrich chairs this project, assisted by Railroad Museum Historian Bill Munsenmaier. Commenting on the color, Dietrich said, “It’s historically correct. This was not a ‘little red caboose.’” Dietrich admitted it will “be a process to get it (the move) okayed, but it is a doable thing.” Believing in collaboration, Dietrich is bringing several organizations into the painting project – Key Clubbers, Kiwanians, railroaders and historians. The caboose project is one way local Kiwanians put to good use the money they raise through the sale of bus bench advertising, sponsoring the Winnie Frazer Memorial Golf Tournament and selling Christmas trees. Last year, they returned $40,000 to the community and contributed to a long list of local needs. Most recently, the club gave the media center at Deerfield Beach Elementary School 127 non-fiction books to replace what had been removed from the shelves because they were either out of date or in poor condition. This “weeding” occurs every five years because the pace of technology makes the books hugely outdated with information about countries that no longer exist, huge computers. Debra Rothberger, the school’s reading coach, said the state is adopting national reading standards that will bring students up to par when it comes to deciphering technical info. “Kids are coming into college not able to read manuals,” she said explaining the need for the informational books. PTA member Shannon Booty got Kiwanis involved in this project which put the school above the required number of books. Next in its quest to improve literacy in local schools, the club will donate pamphlets that explain the US Constitution at a level understood by kids, and for years under the leadership of Dave Gravelle, it has given every third –grader in Deerfield Beach schools, a dictionary. Last year, that was 300 dictionaries. They also bought 100 books for preschoolers at the NE Focal Point. This year, the Kiwanis Club sponsored a new Key Club at Zion Lutheran High School in addition to the club at Deerfield Beach High School and will help pay for 16 Key Clubbers to go to the state convention in Orlando. The club supported Student Government Day at DB City Hall, awarded $7,000 in college scholarships, is a sponsor of the Festival of the Arts, funded Christmas in July for homeless kids, gave See KIWANIS on page 29

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The Pelican 21 Friday, April 13, 2012 Gimme-A-Burger 1200 E. Hillsboro Blvd. Deer eld Beach 954-708-2553 gimmeaburger.comBy Malcolm McClintockPELICAN STAFF“We use nothing but pure 100 percent USDA Certified Prime Black Angus Beef,” says Serhad Oktay, who along with his wife Yasmin, have decided to bring the “high-end casual” dining experience to Deerfield Beach. “It is nearly impossible to find this level of quality at a regular burger place.” Indeed, these experienced Boca Raton restaurateurs have opted to introduce area residents, workers and tourists alike to the increasingly Deer eld Beach’s Gimme-A-Burger serves up mouthwatering, gourmet hamburgers at affordable fast-food prices At under $5, the large 100 percent USDA certi ed Prime Black Angus Beef “Hungry Wolf Burger” is the main attraction at Gimme-A-Burger. Be sure to try the popular sweet potato waf e fries as well. [Photos by Malcolm McClintock] popular trend of gourmet fastcasual. This contemporary culinary concept revolves around serving traditional on-the-go type meals while ensuring a previously unprecedented level of freshness and quality to the primary ingredients. “Many first time guests order our classic single or double stack “Hungry Wolf Burger” which comes with our spicy Howlin’ Wolf sauce,” says Serhad. “But after a few visits, they will try more adventurous options.” For example, the “Wow Burger” is an uplifting mlange of Prime Black Angus beef and spicy dried Turkish sausage. Add gorgonzola cheese and a fried egg if desired. Then slather the whole thing it in an exotic spicy ketchup blend. The result is an entirely novel burger experience that is sure to warrant a repeat visit. “They really have the best food,” says local construction company owner Parviz Marvasti. “This is my third time coming here this week for the Mediterranean burger.” This instant classic showcases a top-of-the-line 6oz. ground beef patty infused with onions, garlic, parsley, herbs and spices. Ensconced between two freshly baked ciabatta bread buns, this burger can be embellished with palate pleasing toppings such as sauted mushrooms, lettuce, tomatoes, caramelized onions and sauces like Tahini or garlic yogurt. Other novel creations include the fresh ground Turkey “Gobbler Burger” with cranberry mayonnaise and the “Buffalo Bill Burger” overflowing with ultra-lean ground Bison meat served medium and accompanied by an array of zesty sauces.See BURGER on page 27

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22 The Pelican Friday, April 13, 2012

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The Pelican 23 Friday, April 13, 2012 Ric GreenAUTO WRITER The 2012 Hyundai Genesis is an automobile that can compete with luxury sedans costing more than $50,000, but starts at $34,200, making it a good choice for drivers who put value before brand recognition. But it also presents a dilemma for the snobby image-conscious South Florida customers who have to get over the Hyundai badge 2012 Hyundai Genesis: a luxury automobile priced righton the deck lid of a car that looks like it’s a MercedesBenz or Lexus. In the past Hyundai had a reputation for its prices over its quality. However with recent success with the Sonata, Elantra, Tucson, Accent and the speedy Genesis coupe, the Korean manufacturer has become known for its classcompetitive, affordable vehicles. The Hyundai Genesis received a mid-cycle refresh for the 2012 model year. It has a new eight-speed transmission, more powerful base V6 engine and new 5.0liter Tau V8 engine, which is available on the new-for-2012 5.0 R-Spec trim. The 2012 Hyundai Genesis I tested was equipped with the 3.8-liter base V-6 that produces 333 horsepower, up from 290 hp, that when pared with a new eight-speed automatic transmission, produces a 19/29 miles-pergallon which is slightly better fuel economy than the 2011 model. Even with minor changes the 2012 Genesis is still an understated attractive sedan. Redesigned are the headlights are the focal point with a curved LED strip that bisects the headlight cluster. The LED is an accent light though, not daytime running lamps like in most luxury cars with LEDs. There are also mild tweaks to the front and rear bumpers and the rear taillights as well, but are insignificant. Hyundai has built its reputation by offering a lot of content and quality for a lower price. The same is true with this large sedan. It’s hard to think of what car competes with the 3.8 trim level’s $34,200 price considering its size. Standard equipment includes 17-inch wheels, the LED-accented headlights, leather upholstery, heated front seats, dual temperature See HYUNDAI on page 33

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24 The Pelican Friday, April 13, 2012 12 former NFL, or National Football League, players, took part in a clinic teaching girls about the basics of the game. “I have guys every year who ask, ‘When’s the girls football clinic?’ That’s always cool when we have former NFL players passing the torch to young women who want to play and are serious about it,” said Russell. Clenner Goodman, Ely’s head coach, and Dave Gray, Northeast’s head coach, agree with Russell and say the competitive spirit is alive and well in their teams. “A lot of the girls take the sport very seriously,” said Goodman, in an interview with The Pelican Northeast plays its last game against Hollywood Hills on April 20. Ely, [6-3], plays its last game against Deerfield, on Saturday at 6:15 p.m. at Blanche Ely High School, 1201 NW 6 Ave., Pompano Beach. JamboreeContinued from page 19 Since the earlier meeting Town Manager Connie Hoffmann said she has met with the designers, and they’ve come up with several modifications of both plans that don’t lose as much parking. Commissioner Mark Brown suggested before spending a lot of money on plans it should be determined if Florida Department of Transportation, or FDOT, would allow the back out parking option. Hoffmann said the town’s traffic consultant has had discussions with FDOT, and the agency would consider the approach provided the town meets guidelines for Transportation Design for Livable Communities.WorkshopContinued from page 1Commissioner Chris Vincent said it was important to hear from businesses now before the town moves forward with designs. Ken Brenner and Charles Dillistin, owners of Interior Digs, objected to Scheme B. Brenner said back out parking is not a wise option, and there are safety issues with access to fire department vehicles blocked from the plaza with the design plan. Hoffmann introduced a new town employee, Bill Cole, who will manage big infrastructure projects, such as those on Commercial Boulevard.Inspection of town’s hotels continueIn her report to commissioners, Hoffmann noted that the town’s code enforcement officer and fire marshal are actively inspecting hotels. They conducted a followup inspection April 4 at the Lauderdale Beachside Hotel, 4660 N. Ocean Drive to see if violations cited in February and March were corrected. Most town code violations on rooms had been corrected, but many exterior violations were still observed, she said. Those violations are scheduled to be heard by the code magistrate April 18 if not corrected before then. The fire marshal said 30 violations at Lauderdale Beach Hotel had not been corrected. He closed the breakfast room and one hotel room for serious violations. He noted the emergency generator was not operating on the day of the re-inspection and gave them until 4:30 that day to repair it, bring in a temporary generator or be closed down entirely. Management did provide an emergency generator. If not corrected, the code magistrate will hear the citations in May. Additional violations have been written up for the Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Resort and Beach Club, 4116 N. Ocean Drive, shut down in March 2011 for a long list of infractions. The latest are for outdoor storage, unsecured pool access and doors. Those violations go before the magistrate April 18. Branding survey Results revealed Commissioners heard the results of an on-line survey on a proposed brand to help market the town’s commercial districts. A design featuring an Adirondack chair and a pelican came in first with 53 votes followed by a colorful building block design, 26 votes, and a nostalgic picture postcard with 12 votes. Commissioners agreed and selected the Addy chair and pelican as their favorite, as well. The brand includes the slogan, “Relax – you’re here. Lauderdale-By-The-Sea.” The designers with Tangled Spider Design Group said they were looking for something clear and simple that would translate easily. become a vendor, call 954390-2130. 4-15 – St. Elizabeth’s of Hungary Parish hosts a pancake breakfast at 3331 NE 10 Terrace, Pompano Beach, from 7:30 a.m. to noon. The breakfast benefits the Parish. 954-263 8415. 4-15 – The Benevolent Patriotic Order of DOES Drove 142 holds a pancake breakfast from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. at the Elks lodge, 700 N.E. 10 St., Pompano Beach. Cost is $5 for adults and $2.50 for children. 954587-1121. 4-21 – Oakland Park Yard Sale, 7 a.m. to 12 SightingsContinued from page 2See SIGHTINGS on page 26

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The Pelican 25 Friday, April 13, 2012 Advertise with The Pelican. 954.783.8700 and the Sunday morning par quota. “If there is a sporting event, there is a tournament here,” said Hayes. In the summer, golfers can tee off at 5:30 p.m. and be in the lounge in plenty of time to recount their round and enjoy the conviviality of the “19th hole.” Even in the height of the season, the club offers a highly attractive rate, $30 for Country ClubContinued from page 1818 holes. The club is a popular choice for charity tournaments. The next event will the 2nd annual Winnie Frazer Memorial hosted by the Deerfield Beach Kiwanis June 9. In fact, almost every week an organization is on the course raising money for charity. Last year’s Fallen Heroes Tournament raised $25,000 for the Broward Sheriff’s Office. The club offers venues for banquets, weddings and all special occasion parties. Summing up the benefits of membership at Deerfield Country Club, Parton says, “It’s a warm, friendly place with a golf course where you can use every club in your bag.” $528,000 and have to be redone every 15 years; that estimates does not include any of the additional beautification features Main Street is proposing. City officials estimate, based on information provided by FDOT, that maintaining Wilton Drive would cost between $75,000 and $85,000 per year. Main ParkingContinued from page 5 street has proposed that the 112 parking spaces created along Wilton Drive would help pay for maintenance. To study possible improvements for Wilton Drive, the city created the Wilton Drive Task Force. Manners, a member, said the Task Force would be presenting a final report to the city on May 8 but declined to provide any details before it was presented to the commission.By Judy VikPELICAN STAFF Oakland Park City commissioners will be asked next week to amend an interlocal agreement with Broward County to reprogram funds to activities that will carry out the city’s downtown redevelopment vision. A balance of $10.2 million remains of an original $13 million provided under the county’s Redevelopment Capital Program (RCP). The RCP agreement expires June 21. Deadline for an amendment application is May 15. Several projects identified earlier as public improvement projects in the RCP agreement have subsequently Oakland Park shifting development funds to buy downtown propertiesbeen completed with funding from other sources in the city’s Capital Improvement Program according to Ray Lubomski, the city’s community and economic development director, so funds can be shifted to land acquisition and construction of public parking. Redevelopment Management Associates (RMA) has recommended in a five-year strategic plan that budgets around $5.8 million for land acquisition. The proposed ILA amendment would call for about $5 million of the remaining $10.2 million in RCP funding. “In meetings with county staff, they suggested we concentrate on land acquisition as a priority,” Lubomski said at a board meeting of the Community Redevelopment Agency on Wednesday. Three parcels are now being targeted for possible purchase in the central downtown area. They are the Squires block at NE 34 Court and Dixie, Sikes Tile on NE 12 Avenue and the Alster/504 property on NE 13 Avenue. Total assessed value of all the properties is $3.258 million. In the northern area, properties being considered are the Totina property on NE 38 Street and the Schnell property on NE 37 St. These properties are assessed at $1.078 million. They would be considered for improving parking lots. If the Sikes and Squire properties were purchased, Chris Brown of RMA said he’s confident the city could pull off a culinary market in those two buildings. At Wednesday’s commission meeting, Lubomski will also ask for authorization to enter into contracts for the purchase of targeted parcels. The city commission and county commission must approve a purchase price that is no more than 10 percent higher than the lower of two appraisals. See DOWNTOWN on page 27

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26 The Pelican Friday, April 13, 2012 On May 5, the American Cancer Society’s Deerfield Beach/Lighthouse Point Relay For Life events begins at 5 p.m. and contiues to 9 a.m. the next day at Quiet Waters Park, 401 S. Powerline Road, Deerfield Beach. Before the Relay, participants will host a p.m. at Jaco Pastorius Park, 4000 N. Dixie Hwy. Free to the public. To become a vendor call 954-630-4500.Books, Speakers, Education, Classes & Seminars4-15 – Ride for Kids takes place from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. starting at Quiet Waters Park, 401 S. Powerline Rd., Deerfield Beach. Motorcyclists help raise money for the Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation’s medical research and family support programs. Cost to ride is a minimum donation of $35 per SightingsContinued from page 24rider. Visit www.pbtfus.org for more. Clubs, Civic Groups, Charity and Volunteers 4-18 – The Deerfield Beach Historical Society hosts History at High Noon from noon to 1 p.m. at Deerfield Beach City Hall, 150 NE 2 Ave. Special guest is Deirdre Dolan Nesline, professional photo organizer. Preserving your History is the topic. 954429-0378. 4-19 – The Cresthaven Neighborhood Watch will meet at 7:30 p.m. at St. Elizabeth Social Hall, 901 NE 33 St., Pompano Beach. The purpose is to discuss what Relay For Life in Deer eld Beachseries of fundraisers to benefit the event. Yard Sale April 28, 8 a.m. to 12 p.m., at Curves of Lighthouse Point, 1847 NE 25 St. Butler House tour April 28, 4 p.m. to 8 p.m., 380 E Hillsboro Blvd., admission is $10. Yoga For Life April 29, 3 p.m. Flight For A Cure May 5, “Shimmy for a Cause” June 3. For more information or to join Relay For Life, call 954420-0084 or 954-304-4248.See SIGHTINGS on page 29

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The Pelican 27 Friday, April 13, 2012 “They have great burgers, hot-dogs and fries. On top of that, the people here are really very nice and helpful,” says area resident Andrea O’Connor. “We marinate the fish for 3 days in a special blend of herbs and spices. It’s all white meat and really soaks up the flavors,” says manager Taher Sad. The same approach is employed with the poultry in order to produce the unbelievably tender and delectable “Chickenmania Sandwich”. For veggie enthusiasts, additional outstanding specialties include the Red Lentil stuffed Pita with lemon infused tomatoes, carrots and parsley or the always flavorsome Falafel sandwich BurgerContinued from page 21 An instant favorite, the “Meaty Flatts” quesadillas feature thin, fresh our tortillas stuffed with spiced ground beef infused with parsley and onions served with a avorful garlic yogurt sauce and an eye-watering Pico de Gallo.loaded with ground chickpeas, garlic, onions, cilantro, herbs and spices topped with homemade Tahini sauce. “Everything we serve is made fresh in-house,” says Yasmin with well-deserved pride. “It’s the only place you can get a complete freshly cooked meal without going through the full sit-down dinner service.” The impeccably clean Gimme-A-Burger also offers up salads loaded with fresh veggies and served with tangy house dressings such as raspberry vinaigrette, honey mustard, balsamic vinaigrette and ranch. For a hearty morning repast that can actually be ordered all day, this welcoming eatery cooks up fresh breakfast sandwiches with eggs, cheese, bacon or turkey sausage. For the truly voracious, “The Timberwolf” unveils a burger, American cheese and hash brown topped with fried eggs. A classic burger starts at $4.95, full meals with drink at $7.95. There is ample free parking and all major cards are accepted. Homemade chili and cheeseburger soup are good choices on chillier evenings. For a sweet ending, “people just love our Cinnamon sugar puffs with ice cream,” says Serhad. “We also make fantastic milkshakes.” And for those with absolutely no time to spare, simply place your order online at www.gimmeaburger. com and swing by to pick it up. Enjoy. Malcolm McClintock holds an MBA and has lived in Thailand, Spain, France, Mexico, Canada and the US where he has developed a deep appreciation for world gastronomy. Vice Chair John Adornato said he is excited about the plans. “I see the opportunity to seize on the inkling of an economic upturn,” he said. Board member Suzanne Boisvenue said the city needs to concentrate on 12th Avenue. She likes the idea of utilizing existing buildings but is not interested in parking lots “all over the place.” DowntownContinued from page 25

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28 The Pelican Friday, April 13, 2012 WORSHIP DIRECTORY: Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad. Rev. Hyvenson Joseph SPECIAL TO THE PELICANCarl Jefferson, Sr. was taught to value education from his youth and was educated through the Brooks County School System in Georgia. His thirst for knowledge inspired him to continue his journey of education in pursuing various degrees at Florida A&M University, Indiana University, Central Missouri University and Florida Atlantic University. He served his country in the United States Army’s 82nd Airborne Division in Ft. Bragg, North Carolina. Carl Jefferson put God first in his life and was a faithful member of the Mt. Calvary Missionary Baptist Church in Pompano Beach, where he served as a deacon and trustee for numerous years. He spread his knowledge and spirit of giving through teaching and coaching at Blanche Ely High School [1957-1970] and Deerfield High School. He was received many accolades and served in many organizations, including Pompano Lodge 409, Saba Temple 186, Pompano Beach Pioneer left a legacy of service Broward County Athletic Association [37 years of service] and over 20 years of service with the City of Pompano Beach. Jefferson was loved and respected as an eminent athletic and lifecoach to the community and the Mitchell Moore Parks & Recreation Center where he coached optimist T-ball and football. Leaving his years of service as a legacy, the Mitchell Moore Center’s field was named in his honor several years ago. His wife, Mary Goins Jefferson and their family, students he coached and taught, and citizens he touched will miss his dedication and his smile.Carl Jefferson, Sr.Youth Choir performs May 6 Pompano Beach -The next installment of the New Presbyterian Church Concert Series will be May 6 at 2 p.m. when the Youth Choir performs at Pompano Beach High School, 600 NE 13 Ave., Pompano Beach. Admission is free but donations are suggested and accepted. The 25-voice Youth Choir from the New Presbyterian Church in Pompano Beach will present their annual Spring Concert directed by John and Lisa Wilson. The choir is comprised of talented and award-winning high school students from many schools in South Florida. Songs will include a wide variety of musical styles, from Classical to Gospel, including Spirituals and Contemporary Christian and excerpts from “Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat.” For more, visit www. newpres.org or call 954-946-4380.

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The Pelican 29 Friday, April 13, 2012 Advertise in The Pelican 954-783-8700 Advertise in The Pelican 954-783-8700! KiwanisContinued from page 24$1,000 to Covenant House. When the Boys Scouts needed money for an event permit, the Kiwanis Club kicked in. When the disc jockey program at the Police Athletic League needed equipment, they purchased it ($5,556). This club sponsors a Little League team, donates to Horse and the Handicapped ($5,000), SOS Children’s Village, the NE Focal Point Cuisine of the Region event, the Historical Society, Pompano Beach-based Vital Flight and, new this year, the Disabled Veterans will one of the recipients of money raised at the Frazer Memorial Golf Tournament June 9. In addition, the club donated $9,134 to miscellaneous charities. Looking beyond their own borders, when fellow Kiwanians in Tuscaloosa, AL needed help following a tornado, the club members sent $1,700 and annually, they give “hands-on” support to the DB Arboretum and the Relay for Life. For all this largesse, the club, just 40 members, gets very little publicity said incoming president Avis Swenson. “We just do things and go along without publicity,” she said. “The main thing is just to do a little something.”SightingsContinued from page 26 is going on Pompano and Cresthaven. Refreshments will be served. 954-786-7536. 4-19 – The Wilton Manors Historical Society meets at 7 p.m. at city hall, 2020 Wilton Drive. 4-24 – A card party will be held by the Benevolent Patriotic Order of DOES Drove 142 from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Pompano Beach Elks Lodge, 700 NE 10 St., Pompano Beach. Cost is $4 and includes desert and coffee. Call 561-479-2002 for reservations.See SIGHTINGS on page 34

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30 The Pelican Friday, April 13, 2012 Classi eds Call 954-545-0013 ••• Business Card Directory ••• HELP WANTEDCHRIST CHURCH PRESCHOOL Looking For Part – Time Teacher For Ages Six – Weeks To 5 Years Of Age. Call Cindy At 954-943-7776. 4-13 LOCAL PEST CONTROL CO Looking For Quality Sales/Service Tech. Must Be Dependable, Team Player, Good Drivers License & People Skills. Will Train Right Person. ALSO Of ce Assistant – Computer – People & Phone Skills Needed. Fax Resume 954418-3982. 5-4 SEEKING EMPLOYMENTI AM SEEKING A Clerical Position – Basic Computer Skills. Bilingual Spanish – English – Part-time. Prefer Pompano Ft Laud Area. 954-942-8111. 4-13 CAREGIVER / NANNY – Professional – 10 Years Exp. In Alzheimer’s, Stroke & Wound Care. Live In / Out. Call 954905-7619. 4-13 WILL RUN ERRANDS – Do Shopping – Doctor Appointments. E Of Dixie Hwy In Pompano. Available Mornings. Call 954-691-7816. SERVICES DANNY BOY ELECTRIC – Lic & Insured. Lic. #EC13004811. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. 24/Hr Service. 954-290-1443. Beat Any Written Estimate. Sr, Discount. 5-4 CALL BRENDAN THE HANDYMAN – Construction & Repairs – Carpentry – Plumbing – Roo ng – Masonry – Windows – Painting – Decking – Tile. FREE Estimates! 954773-6134 – Emergency Calls. CARPET CLEANING – 2 Rooms $59!! ACTUAL PRICE!! No GIMMICKS!! CALL 954-784-8199. 4-20 HAMWAY POOL SERVICE – Once – A Month Service $39 – Includes All Chemicals. Weekly Service Also Available – 20 Years Exp. Call 954-9795548. 4-27 HANDYMAN – PAINTING – CARPENTRY – Pressure Cleaning. Decks! Everything Around The House. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. Call 561-350-3781. 4-13 MOORE PLUMBING PLUMBING SERVICES – Big Jobs – Small Jobs. We Do It All. Remodeling & Repairs. Lic. & Insured. C.C. Accepted. Call 954-772-4600. HONEST HANDYMAN – HOME & BUILDING Maintenance/Improvements. No Job Too Small. Fast Friendly Service. Reasonable Rates. Local Resident/Homeowner. Call Today For Your FREE Upfront Quote. No Deposit Required. 754-366-1915. GOT JUNK? DUMP TRUCK – CLEANUPS Trees/ Landscape, Yard Fill. Paint/ Pressure Wash/ Roofs/Home Repairs – Welding, Etc. Dave 954-818-9538. 5-4 CEMETERY PLOTS2 CASKETS – VAULTS & GRAVES – Garden Of Love Section – Forest Lawn North. Moving Must Sell. Call Ron For Information 954-781-3381. 4-6 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIESNew GREEN technology. New defroster control saves energy in home refrigerators, commercial chillers. Patented. All optical. Simple mfg. Strategic partners needed..www.NewAvionics.Com. 954-568-1991. C EARN BIG!! FAST GROWING ON-LINE CO Ranked Top 400 World Wide. Join Our Wealth Building Team Today. Mike 954-657-3171. ROMANCETIRED OF BEING ALONE – Attractive Senior Lady Would Like Companionship With Tall Gentleman 75 – 80 To Share All The Goodies That Life Still Has To Offer Us. Kathy 954-633-4255. MUSICIANS WANTEDThe American Legion Symphonic Band is now accepting new members for the 2011-2012 season. College age to “seasoned seniors” are welcome. Rehearsals are held on Wed. evenings at American Legion Post 142 in Pompano. Percussionists, euphonium and clarinet players are especially needed. If you enjoy “making music,” call Jim McGonigal, Music Director at 954-647-0700 for more info.DEEP WATER VILLA – DOCKPOMPANO BEACH 2/2 – 2 BLOCKS BEACH 1700 SQ FT. Screened Fla Room. Private Yard. W/D. 4 Park. No Fixed Bridges. Community Pool. Deeded Dock.. 2 Blocks Beach. $265,000. Coldwell Banker – Barbara Call 954629-1324. 4-13 STUDIO’S / EFFICIENCIESPOMPANO BEACH & BOCA RATON – POMPANO BEACH ATLANTIC / FEDERAL Ef ciency $175 Weekly. No Security Deposit. Includes Cable, Electric, Internet. FREE Washer / Dryer. No Drug Record – No Evictions. 954-709-0694. 4-13 OUT OF AREANORTH WILDWOOD N.J. – SEASON 1/1 Apartment. 2 Blocks From Beach. A/C / Cable. $5500. Call 954-7086708. HOMES TO SHARENORTH POMPANO BEACH – Fully Handicapped Accessible. $450 Per Month – Split Utilities. Leave Message!! 954-7857671.CO-OP SALESPOMPANO BEACH 1/1 On Water, Dockage Available At Your Door. $59,500. Coldwell Banker – Barbara – 954-6291324. 4REAL ESTATE WANTEDI BUY HOUSES!! CASH!! AS IS! QUICK CLOSE! ANY AREA – ANY CONDITION! NO EQUITY OK. CALL NOW 954-914-2355. CONDOS FOR SALEPOMPANO BEACH – DIRECT OCEAN VIEW!! 2/2 AT THE BREAKERS! $275,000. Call Juliana At Barclay’s For Details. 1-305-766-4420. POMPANO BEACH – ISLAND CLUB Updated 2/2 – 1st Floor Unit With Dock –Up To 28’ Boat. $155K. Mirsky Realty Group – Susan 954-732-2038. CONDO FOR SALE OR RENT – Over 55 Community. Unfurn. Leisureville. 2 /Bd – 1 Ba. Clubhouse, Golf, Swimming And More. Non-Smoker. Rent $700 / Mo. Purchase For $35,000 OBO. 954-783-6403. 4-13 DEERFIELD BEACH 2/2 Completely Redone. Granite Kitchen, New Cabinets. S.S. Appliances. 20” Porcelain Tile Floors. Travistine Stone Baths. Freshly Painted. 1st Floor. Less Than A Mile To Beach. $84,900. Call 631-873-8715. 4-20 CONDOS FOR RENTDEERFIELD BEACH 2/2 CONDO – Corner Unit, Pool. $800 $825. Good Credit Required. No Pets Or Realtors. 631-885-3342. 4-13

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The Pelican 31 Friday, April 13, 2012 Classi eds Call 954-545-0013 Advertise with The Pelican 954-783-8700 LAUDERDALE BY THE SEA – Furnished 2/2 – Pool – Near Beach – Shops & Restaurants. Enjoy Beach Living. $875 Month From April To October. Owner 413-244-2807. POMPANO BEACH LARGE 2 / 2 With Den. All Renovated! Pool – Mile From Beach! W /D – Small Pet OK! $1,300 Month Yearly. Available May 1st. 561-703-6545 Or 754-2643289. 4-13 POMPANO BEACH CONDO –Cypress Bend – 1285 Sq Ft. Newly Renovated. $1175 Per Month. Call John 413-5623976APTS FOR RENTDEERFIELD/POMPANO BEACH 1 BR & 2 BR APTS FOR RENT. Remodeled, Paint, Tile, Etc. W & D On Site. Pool. Pet Friendly. Call George 954-809-5030. 5-4 POMPANO BEACH 1 BEDROOMS AND EFFICIENCY Apts. Fully Furnished With Kitchen, Cable, Internet, Pool, Laundry. 500’ To The Beach. Weekly – Monthly – Yearly. 954-2948483 Or 248-736-1533, 4-13 POMPANO BEACH 1/1 FURNISHED – Includes TV $850 Month Yearly – 1st / Last / Security. EFFICIENCY $750 Month Yearly Includes Direct TV + $50 Electric Allowance. 954-785-5837. 4-13 LARGE OPEN – BRIGHT – FIRST FLOOR CORNER – SMALL YARD – Small Pet OK – All Tile Floors – Just Painted – Off A1A – North Of Atlantic Pool – Coin Laundry – WIFI – Cable – Water Included $995 Month ---Large Ef ciency Apartment Available Same Bldg. Includes All Plus Elec. – Full Kitchen – Corner Unit. $650 – Lease Required – April 1 Special One Week FREE!! Owner Agent 954-608-7368. 412 Sunset Drive Pompano. POMPANO BEACH 1/1 SW. C/A $750 – 2/1 $925 – 3/2 $1025 NE 2/1 $950 – Townhouse 2/1.5 $1095. ALL FREE WATER. Rent + $70 Application Moves – U – In. 954-781-6299. 4-13 POMPANO MCNAB RD & NE 18 AVENUE – 1 & 2 Bedrooms Furnished/ Unfurnished. $695 $950 And Up. Pool, Tile Floors. Central A/C. 954-6102327. POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 Bedroom From $495. Easy Movein. 1/2 OFF DEPOSIT. Remodeled. Great Location. 954-783-1088 For More Info. 5-11 LUXURY BEACH PADS FOR RENT! Pompano Grand Opening: Security Deposit As Low As $199 For Quali ed Applicants. FREE 32” Flat Screen HDTV! Newly Renovated in 2012 One – Bedrooms & Studio Apts., 75 Yards From Private Beach Access, Eastern Exposure. New Kitchens & Baths, Granite Counter Tops, Central Air, Pool, Laundry, Dedicated Parking, Near Pier & Downtown. All Bills Paid! Includes Water, Electric, Premium Cable TV And WIFI. Furnished Or Unfurnished. Short Or Long Stays. No Utility Deposits. Small Pets Welcome. Only 7 Left! Pax Properties – 888-7294948 Or 954-603-8857. Photos At www.beachpads.net 4-27 COMMERCIAL FOR RENT-SALEPOMPANO COMMERCIAL OFFICE Spaces Available. Ranging From As Low As $500 To $700 Depending On Square Footage. Please Call Darci At 954-7833723. 4-20 DEERFIELD BEACH – Retail Of ce Warehouse – 700 Sq Ft With Loft. A/C, Bathroom. $575 Per Month. Call For More Info 561-654-1331 Or 561-9985681. 5-4 FURNITUREBEDSETS – King $180 – Queen $130 – Full $110 – Twin $90. 5 Pc. Bedroom Set $399. Frames $39. 954-465-6498. 5-4 DOCK FOR RENT60 FT DOCK – THE COVE MARINA – 50 AMP / H20 Included. $1,200 Month – Price Negotiable Depending On Boat Size. Restaurant & Fuel On Premises. 954-9140053. a.j.barsotti@comcast. net 4-27 POMPANO BEACH – ON INTRACOASTAL N.F.B. SAFE NEW DOCK!! Water & Electric Available. Up To 35’…$10 Per Ft. Call 754235-1458.

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32 The Pelican Friday, April 13, 2012 Tell The Pelican about your special event 954-783-8700 U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary offers Safe Boating CourseOn April 28, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., the United States Coast Guard Auxiliary, located in Pompano Beach, is offering an “About Boating Safely” course on April 28 at Imperial Point Medical Center auditorium, 6401 N. Federal Hwy., Fort Lauderdale. All materials and lunch are provided. Cost is $50 per person and includes materials. Contact Tom Nolan at 954942-8108 for registration or more information. History tour of Deer eld Island Park Intracoastal History Tour will be held at Deerfield Island Park, 1720 Deerfield Island Park, from 10 to 11:30 a.m. on April 29. Cost is $5 per person. The event is for ages six and up. A shuttle to the island provided at 1601 E. Hillsboro Blvd. Participants must be at the dock by 9:30 a.m. to catch the shuttle. Call 954-357-5100 to RSVP. This is the final date for this program this season. “The 53.3 acres that make up Deerfield Island Park are full of history. In the early 1930s, the land was labeled Capone Island after gangster Al Capone – even though Capone himself never actually owned it and the area at that time was a peninsula, not an island.”By Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach –This week, an approval to fund some additional items in the Pompano Beach Boulevard Streetscape, raised the ire of one resident. Doug Matthes objected to the city’s agreement to pay nearly $500,000 for more picnic tables and grills at the beach along with pavilion upgrades, bathrooms, synthetic turf, higher quality tables and other items. East CRA redevelopment includes East Atlantic Boulevard renovations, Harbor Village Shopping Center beautification and City agrees to pay for enhancements for beach projectplans for Ocean Boulevard from Atlantic to just north of the pier. That totals close to $10 million and comes from incremental taxes paid within the CRA boundaries. Enhancements for those areas, according to CRA figures, have not been budgeted from TIF funding Matthes contends that the city has already transferred nearly $4.5 million from its general fund to pay for items that had been planned but unfunded. City records indicate that the transfers were closer to $3 million. Matthes charged the Community Redevelopment Agency, or CRA, with being “ . incapable of fiscal responsibility.” Beach resident Keith Meizel agreed that the evening was devoted to “money” for the beach, but there were no accusations from him. “We want higher quality [structures] that will last longer,” he said. “Please appropriate the money.” The question at hand was based on whether the city wanted to move forward with enhancements that were not available in the CRA budget at this time. CRA co-director Kim Breismeister explained that the CRA has stayed within its budget based on the $10 million bond issue that is financed with TIF funding. “When we designed this project, it was very clear that the idea was to design the complete project, including all of the items you are talking about tonight. It is better to have a complete design even if we cannot completely build it out.” Referring to the beach project, Breisemeister continued. “Tonight, we need to know if you want these items now or later. If you want them now, you will have to use general funds.” In a 6-0 vote, the city’s decision was “now.” Other former transfers See BEACH PROJECT on page 33

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The Pelican 33 Friday, April 13, 2012 control, push-button start, keyless entry, Bluetooth and a seven-speaker stereo. Step up to the Premium Package, which adds 18inch wheels, a navigation system with a 7-inch screen, 14-speaker stereo system, moonroof, backup camera and a power adjustable steering wheel pushes the price to $39,000. Add the Technology Package featuring a larger 8-inch navigation system and 17-speaker stereo system along with adaptive cruise control, lane departure HyundaiContinued from page 23 warning, cooled driver’s seat, heated rear seats and high-intensity-discharge xenon headlights and the sticker price tops out at a still attractive MSRP of $43,000. Inside the Genesis I was very impressed with its room, both front and back, with wide front seats and a backseat with 38.6 inches of legroom. Adding to its value, the 2012 Genesis is equipped with eight standard airbags, including seat-mounted side airbags for front and rear passengers. Rear-seat mounted airbags are not the norm for any class of vehicle. Side curtain airbags for both rows are also standard. If you want European styling, lots of room and Pictured above: the 2012 Hyundai Genesis. In the past, Hyundai has been known more for its pricing over quality. comfort, plus a plethora of tech toys, check out the 2012 Genesis, but you will have to keep a straight face when the valet asks if you want it parked up front next to the other luxury cars. to cover additional CRA expenses that had been planned but not budgeted included underground utilities for Atlantic Boulevard, expenses for Pompano Beach Boulevard and a newly planned temporary parking lot at the corner of Ocean and Atlantic Boulevards. “If the city wants to move forward, the city will have to assume some of the costs if the CRA does not have the funds,” she said. Briesemeister added that during the 12-year-existance of the East CRA, property values have continued to rise despite the 2008 setback. She says as the CRA continues redevelopment on the east side of town, businesses will be attracted to the city and property values will continue to rise which will increase funds in the East CRA budget. CRA meetings for the east side are held on the first Thursday of each month at 6 p.m. at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach. Beach project Continued from page 32 We are The Pelican What can we do for you? 954-783-8700

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34 The Pelican Friday, April 13, 2012 MeetingContinued from page 16Poitier will host a quarterly district meeting on April 19 from 6 to 8:30 p.m. at the E. Pat Larkins Center, 520 Hammondville Road/Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd. Poitier wants to hear from residents and answer their questions regarding the city and its departments. Representatives from various city departments will attend the meeting. “We want to basically try and keep people informed as to what’s going on in the district,” said Poitier, who added that he gets questions all the time from residents, ranging from water bills to housing issues. “People come to me with all these questions [and now they] can go directly to [the department representatives] and get your questions answered.” Call 954-786-7823.Wilton Manors Suicide Prevention meetingTo try and prevent future suicides, the City of Wilton Manors is hosting the Suicide Prevention Town Hall Meeting on April 19 at 7 p.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive. Mayor Gary Resnick and mental health professionals will attend to talk about how the community can come together to help lower the number of suicides. For more, call 954-390-2150. 4-24 – The Deerfield Beach Historical Society hosts Preserving your History at 11 a.m. at Jerry’s Artarama, 242 S. Federal Hwy. in the Publix shopping center. There will be guest speakers from the Historical Society, Society of Florida Archivists and a professional photographer and photo organizer. 954-429-0378 4-25 – The North Broward Democratic Club will host Assistant Chief Louie Granteed, of the Hollywood Police Department and candidate for Broward County Sheriff, at 7:30 p.m. at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach. 954-7838232. Festivals, Events & SightingsContinued from page 29Networking4-18 – The LauderdaleBy-The-Sea Chamber of Commerce hosts a networking event at Flip-Flops Dockside Eatery, 3051 NE 32 Ave. in Fort Lauderdale, from 5:30 to 8 p.m. There will be entertainment and two-for-one beer and wine specials. Cost is $5 for members and $7 for non-members. 954-567-1672. 4-20 – The 28th Annual Pompano Beach Seafood Festival will take place April 20 through 22 at the far east end of Atlantic Boulevard in Pompano Beach. There will be food, entertainment and games. Cost is $12 per adult and children 10 and under are free. The festival starts on Friday from 5 p.m. to 10 p.m., Saturday from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. 4-21 – The Friends of the Arboretum are sponsoring the annual Arboretum Plant Sale at Constitution Park, 2841 W Hillsboro Blvd., Deerfield Beach, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Call 954-234-1002.Kids Stuff4-15 – Junior Bass Tournament, Quiet Waters Park, 401 South Powerline Road, Deerfield Beach. The tournament beings at sunrise and goes until 1 p.m. Cost is $75 per child and includes an accompanying adult. Ages 12 to 17. 954-357-8816.Health, Safety & Environment4-14 – Free Car Seat Safety Check from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. at Pompano Beach Fire-Rescue Station 24, 2001 NE 10 St. Technicians will check and see if car seats are properly installed. Appointment required. 954786-4510. 4-14 – Deerfield Beach Residents and business owners can take documents to be shredded at the Recycling Drop-Off Center, 401 SW 4 St., Deerfield Beach, from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. Cost is $10 for one to five boxes or bags and $20 for six to ten boxes or bags. Only checks will be accepted. Paper must be free of plastic and metal but staples and paper clips are acceptable. 954-480-4379. 4-15 – Polynesian Cultural Festival from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. at Jaco Pastorius Park, See SIGHTINGS on page 35

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The Pelican 35 Friday, April 13, 2012 Kindergarten round-up scheduled in Deer eld BeachDeerfield Beach Deerfield Beach Elementary School will hold a Kindergarten RoundUp on May 8, 6 to 7 p.m. in the Media Center. Parents are invited to learn about the school, its curriculum and activities and to meet the staff. To enter kindergarten in the fall, children must be five years old by Sept. 1, 2012. Pre-registration is ongoing at the school office, 7:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday through Friday. Required is an original birth certificate for the child, two proofs of residency, current Florida Immunization Record – including varicella (680 form), and a physical exam form from a Florida doctor. Deerfield Beach Elementary is located at 650 NE 1 St. Call the school at 754-3226100 with questions. An Evening Social With Alice ButlerOn Saturday, April 28, from 4 to 8 p.m., the Deerfield Beach Kiwinis will host “An Evening with Alice Butler,” which Carolyn Morris, executive of the Deerfield Beach Historical Society, will give a short lecture on the life of Alice Butler. Join friends Under the Banyan Tree at The Butler House, 380 East Hillsboro Blvd., Deerfield Beach. Food and refreshment will be offered. Donations are $10 for adults. Children are free. All donations will benefit the American Cancer Society. Call 954-592-3150 teagen@ everythingdeerfieldbeach.com The event is sponsored by The Deerfield Beach Kiwanis and The Deerfield Beach Historical Society. 4000 N. Dixie Hwy., Oakland Park. Polynesian themed entertainment and food. Cost is $5 for adults, children 12 and under are free. Visit www. polynesianculturalassociation. com or 954-938-9010. 5-19 – Flotilla 37 of the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary will hold free vessel safety checks each day from May 19 to May 25 during National Safe Boating Week at Pioneer Park Boat Ramp, 217 NE 5 SightingsContinued from page 26Ave., Deerfield Beach. Safety checks start at 9 a.m. 954755-4581.MondaysEvery Monday from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Ping Pong Nights is held at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. The cost is $1. All ages can participate. 954-3902130. The Gold Coast Toastmasters Club meets on the second and third Monday of the month from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Denny’s, 3151 NW 9 Ave., Fort Lauderdale. 954895-3555 or 954-782-9951.TuesdaysPompano BeachLighthouse Rotary Club meets every Tuesday at 7:30 a.m. at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. 954-972-7178. The American Legion Auxiliary Unit 142 171 SW 2 St., Pompano Beach, has Bingo on Tuesdays at 7 p.m. Food is available from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. 954-942-2448. A Yoga class is available for all levels at Hagen Park 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors, on Tuesday nights from 6:30 to 8 p.m. and Saturday mornings from 10:30 a.m. until noon. The cost is $7. 305-607-3520.WednesdaysWilton Manors Kiwanis Club meets Wednesdays at 6:30 p.m. at 2749 NE 14 Ave., Wilton Manors. 954-5619785. Oakland Park Kiwanis Club meets Wednesdays from 7:30 to 8:30 a.m. at Peter Pan Diner, 1216 E. Oakland Park Blvd., Oakland Park. 954566-9957. Pompano Beach Kiwanis Club meets Wednesdays at noon at the Riverside Grille at the Sands Resort, 125 N. Riverside Drive, Pompano Beach. 954-444-4815. The Greater Pompano Beach Senior Citizens Club meets on the second Wednesday of the month at the Emma Lou Olson Community Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach, at 10 a.m. Activities focus on the general welfare, health, education and security of senior citizens. 954-943-7787.

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36 The Pelican Friday, April 13, 2012



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Friday, April 13, 2012 Vol. XX, Issue 15 Call 954-783-8700 to Advertise Email: siren2415@gmail.com Pompano Beach Deer eld Beach Lighthouse Point Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Wilton Manors Oakland Park Hillsboro Beach The Galt Palm Aire The Pelican Pelican By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach Every Saturday morning for the past few months, Hib Casselberry could be found at the Green Market where he told those who stopped by how they can help to keep his beloved lighthouse sending out its life-saving beam to mariners and small plane pilots helping them come home safely. Pushing 90, Hib calls himself retired but active and he is. Every Hib Casselberry ghts to keep the light shining from Pompanos 105-year-old Hillsboro LighthouseSaturday morning Im up at 6 a.m. I pick up a tent, two card tables, display boards and chairs and by 7:15 Im at the market, and by 8 a.m. Im ready to persuade visitors to help our cause, he explains. His cause is the fate of the famous Hillsboro Lighthouse light to be decided by the Coast Guard on April 22. To sum the controversy up, according to Hib, the turtle environmentalists want the light turned off or dimmed to accommodate the turtles. The Hillsboro Lighthouse Preservation Society, or HLPS, feels that, more important than the turtles, is the safety of the fisherman, boaters and small aircraft pilots who count on the light to guide them home without a loss of life and property. Small aircraft count on the beam to help them on their approach to Boca Raton airport and Pompano Beach Air Park. He continues. Our beam is 125-feet above sea level and the light is inside a Fresnel Lens which directs the light See LIGHTHOUSE on page 12 GFS expanding into Lighthouse PointBy Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFLighthouse Point Bulk jars of mayonnaise and 35 new jobs are headed to Lighthouse Point. GFS, or Gordon Food Services Marketplace, is opening a new store sometime this summer at 3260 N. Federal Hwy. With their nearest location in Fort Lauderdale, GFS executives decided North Broward needed one of their stores. See GFS on page 15 Goodyear Blimp tickets to be auctionedBy Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach A ride on the Goodyear Blimp isnt something that can be purchased. But it is something that that can be won. At the Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerces Business with a Twist, April 18 from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Goodyear Blimp Base, 1500 NE 5 Ave., Pompano Beach, the Chamber will be holding a live auction to benefit the Chamber and the John Knox Village Foundation. At stake is a ride for two on the Goodyear Blimp. The only way you can find rides on the Goodyear Blimp is to win them at a charity event, said Ric Green, president/CEO of the Chamber. Green estimates previous Goodyear Blimp tickets have been auctioned off for between $600 and $3,500. It all depends how badly people want them, he said. Along with the auction, there will also be games, rides and food; all of it in commemoration of Frank H. See BLIMP on page 16 Commercial Boulevard designs getting further reviewBy Judy VikPELICAN STAFFLauderdale-By-The-Sea A special workshop session of the LauderdaleBy-The-Sea Town Commission is set for 6 p.m. Monday, April 16, on proposed design concepts for Commercial Boulevard from the Intracoastal Waterway Bridge to Seagrape Drive. Designers recently presented two proposed plans for the area. In one plan, Scheme A, designers kept parallel parking on both sides of Commercial Boulevard. Existing parking lots were reconfigured. In Scheme B, angled parking was suggested off Commercial Boulevard. This plan includes a 9-foot recovery zone, providing enough room for a driver to back out and then go forward in the zone to get back on Commercial.See WORKSHOP on page 24 Janny Raymond, of Oakland Parks Northeast High School ag football team, runs to her right to avoid her ag being pulled during the annual Girls Flag Football Jamboree at the Miami Dolphins Training Facility in Davie on March 31. See story on page 19. [Photo courtesy of the Miami Dolphins] Seafood Fest Pompano April 20-22 Seafood Fest Pompano April 20-22

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2 The PelicanFriday, April 13, 2012 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach The East Village Uncorked monthly event tonight includes a groundbreaking ceremony at Harbor Village Shopping Plaza at 6 p.m. The event runs until 9 p.m. Harbor Village, between 2600 and 2800 E. Atlantic Boulevard, will undergo improvements to the parking lot and building facades over the next seven months. The main goal of the project, funded in part by the Pompano Beach Community Redevelopment Agency, is to revitalize the area with pedestrian-friendly features and create a pleasant ambiance. Enhancements include widening the existing sidewalk in front of the stores, adding an Harbor Village project moves forward with parking and facade improvementsattractive landscaping pattern with palms and lush ground covers and creating an inviting traffic circulation plan. During construction, all shops and restaurants will remain open and access will remain open. Grants approvedThe East CRA Advisory Committee approved a Mini Merchant Assistance grant of $7,500 to Shive, Inc., owners of Pompano Beverage at 2777 E. Atlantic Blvd. for lighting, new flooring and bathroom improvements. They also approved a Strategic Investment Program grant of $12,480 to Shive Inc. for the property at 2775 E. Atlantic for creation of a cigar and wine bar. Martone Mens Wear, Inc. received approval for a Mini Merchant Assistance grant of $4,250 for flooring and lighting. Horacio Danovich, CRA engineer, noted that Florida Department of Transportation has nearly completed concrete work on Atlantic Boulevard and are about four weeks ahead of schedule. The board approved a list of 12 additions to the Pompano Beach Boulevard streetscape project pending city commission approval. Total cost is $316,615. In a discussion on synthetic turf, Board members disagreed on whether the material is the right choice for a plaza area. Synthetic turf in my mind doesnt belong on the beach, Barbara Gordon said. I dont know if sod is the answer, but See VILLAGE on page 3SightingsA community calendar of East Broward County. Please email information to siren2415@gmail.comArt, Music, Film & Theatre4-14 And Then There Were None [A Murder Mystery] will be performed by the Curtain Call Playhouse at 8 p.m. at the Herb Skolnick Center, 800 SW 36 Ave., Pompano Beach. Tickets are $23 for adults, $10 for students. The play also runs on April 20 and 21 at 8 p.m. and at 2 p.m. on April 15 and 22. 954-784-0768. 4-18 Art-By-The-Sea, a monthly art series will take place from 7 to 9 p.m. at Friedt Family Fellowship Hall, 4433 Bougainvillea Drive, Lauderdale-By-TheSea. This months program will focus on sculptures and include a short demo of sculpture techniques. Bring a table knife or rag to participate in the hands on portion of the event. 954-594-0444. 4-20 The last Island City Art Walk of the season takes place from 7 to 10 p.m. along Wilton Drive in Wilton Manors. Over 40 local artists show off their works in Wilton Drives cafes, boutiques, restaurants and other businesses. 4-25 Elvis Costello and The Imposters perform at 7 p.m. at Seminole Hard Rock Casino, 1 Seminole Way in Hollywood. Tickets are $49, $69 and $89. Visit www.seminolehardrockhollywood.com or 1-800-745-3000. 4-27 & 28 Deerfield Beach Wine and Food Festival at Quiet Waters Park, 401 South Powerline Road, Deerfield Beach. VIP and regular tickets available. Cost varies by activity. Visit www.DeerfieldBeachWineAndFoodFestival.com or 561-338-7594. 4-27 Actor and comedian Billy Gardell from the television show Mike & Molly, performs at Seminole Hard Rock Hotel and Casino Hollywood, 1 Seminole Way, Hollywood, at 8 p.m. Tickets are $49, $59 and $69. Visit www. hardrocklivehollywoodfl.com or 1-800-745-3000.Food & Bargains4-14 Wilton Manors Yard Sale, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive. Free to the public. To See SIGHTINGS on page 24

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The Pelican 3 Friday, April 13, 2012 between the two theres got to be something thats more natural. Theres something almost sacred about beaches. Board member Bob Shelley said he felt the opposite. That area will be trampled on. They have some stuff now [arti cial turf] that looks really, really good. Boca Raton has Little League elds covered with this, and it looks real. I think synthetic is the better choice. Board chair Jack Rogerson said he doesnt see grass surviving well in the concert area. We want something green there, not pavers. VillageContinued from page 2By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach It took money to build and open the citys Canine Corner Dog Park and it takes money to keep it maintained and open. To help alleviate the cost to the city, the Dog Pack, a private organization made up of residents, is holding its second annual Canine Corner Golf Outing tomorrow from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Municipal Golf Course, 1101 N. Federal Hwy. The city budget is not endless and were in tough economic times, said Lisa Hamburg, vice president of the Dog Pack. The tournament comes as the city gets ready to expand and make improvements to the dog park. Robert McCaughan, public works administration director, said one acre of space will be added to the north side of the park probably by the end of the summer. This proposed area was incorporated in the initial design. McCaughan said the expanded area will be used for big dogs. Once the new section is open the current big dog area will be closed to allow it to rest. McCaughan said the big Private group helps fund Pompano Beach dog park expansiondogs are tearing up the turf and just like an athletic field the area needs to be rested from time-to-time; he added that the whole park would probably be opened up for special events. The current entrance/exit will also be divided into separate entrance and exit areas. Opened in June of 2010 at a cost of $105,000, the 2.6-acre park features two sections for small and big dogs, sidewalks, doggie fountains, benches and is located adjacent to the Municipal Golf Course. Its wonderful to have a place to go where the dogs can socialize with other dogs. And the best part is the dog owners can get together and meet one another, make friends and network, said Hamburg, who calls the dog park the center of all dogdom in Pompano. According to a study by See EXPANSION on page 15

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4 The PelicanFriday, April 13, 2012 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld BeachMotorists can thank the federal governments stimulus funding for North Browards newest roadway, the Dixie Highway Flyover. Designed to remove traf c snarls at NE 2 Street and NE 2 Avenue, it provides easy access to Palm Beach County. The $39 million span over the Hillsboro Canal and the Florida East Coast Railroad tracks opened Tuesday and Deer eld Beach Mayor Peggy Noland the rst person to of cially drive from the top of the yover to Hillsboro Boulevard. The project has a history that goes back to the late s when the Florida Department of Transportation drew plans to widen Dixie Highway and proposed the yover. Deer eld Planning Director Jerry Ferguson remembers the rst documented meeting with FDOT concerning the project was in 1990 and although other options were considered the yover was the only one that improved both traf c ow and public safety. Originally, construction was to start in 2000, but FDOT never received funding from the state and kept pushing the project back. When the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act was approved in 2009, the yover was the only shovel-ready project in the county. Had stimulus funding not been forthcoming, the next start date for the yover was not until 2015. Ferguson said the city continued to work with FDOT to improve the aesthetics of the span. The initial design called for exposed girders.It would have looked like an erecter set, Ferguson said. Now the beams are enclosed. It is still less then we wanted, but a good compromise, he said. Still to come are the nishing touches: landscaping, railings, lighting, but those for people who make daily commutes between the counties their federal tax dollars are at work.Dixie Highway Flyover Celebrants: Broward MPO Chair Richard Blattner, Boca Raton Council Member Susan Haynie, State Representative Gwyndolen Clarke-Reed, Broward County Vice Mayor Kristin Jacobs, Deer eld Beach Mayor Peggy Noland, Jerry Ferguson, Deer eld Beach Director of Planning and Development Services, Deer eld Beach City Manager Burgess Hanson, Deer eld Beach Commissioner Ben Preston, Deer eld Beach Commissioner Joe Miller, FDOT District 4 Secretary Jim Wolfe, Broward County Commissioner Chip LaMarca, Deer eld Beach Assistant City Manager Keven Klopp, Deer eld Beach City Commissioner Marty Popelsky.After 25 years of discussion, Dixie Flyover is a reality

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The Pelican 5 Friday, April 13, 2012 By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFWilton Manors City commissioners are going for a trifecta buying another piece of land to turn three adjoining properties into one parking lot. On Tuesday, commissioners unanimously voted to buy the property at 2524 NE 8 Terrace, located on the north side of Wilton Drive, for $165,555. That makes three connected properties, one owned by Kids In Distress, all along Northeast 8 Terrace, that the city plans to convert into parking. Bob Mays, finance department director, estimates that if all three lots were paved a total about 45 possible new spaces could be created. But added that engineers will have to study the project before the exact number is known. It all depends on the final design of the parking lot, said Mays. A final vote on the purchase is scheduled for April 24. Last month, commissioners approved the purchase of an adjacent property for $229,000 and an agreement with Kids In Distress to lease their property for $10 a year per a five-year contract. In exchange, Kids In Distress employees will be able to use up to 20 spaces from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday. At the end of the five years, Kids In Distress can require the city Wilton Manors Commission to buy more land for parkingto purchase the property. If it doesnt, the city can renew for another five years. To fund parking improvements, the city has borrowed $1.1 million. Along with the three Northeast 8 Terrace properties, the city has paved various public right-of-ways and created more parking in various areas including 10 spots across from the Starbucks on Northeast 26 Street. Spaces were also added along Northeast 7 Avenue, next to the Shoppes of Wilton Manors. But Tommy LaFashia and Maciel Cantelmo, who live in the city and own the XO Gallery on Wilton Drive, said officials should take over Wilton Drive from the Florida Department of Transportation, or FDOT, and spend money turning it into a two-lane street with parking along both sides. It would be the best thing ever, said LaFashia. I call this a ghetto with a highway running through it. But Cantelmo and LaFashia arent the first to call for a Wilton Drive takeover. The idea was proposed three years ago by Main Street, which still supports it. The biggest hurdle is taking over Wilton Drives ownership from the state, said Krishan Manners, president/CEO of Main Street. Main Street estimates the total cost to convert Wilton Drive into two lanes, including parking spaces, trees, landscaping and other beautification amenities, would be $5 million. According to an FDOT estimate, if converted to two lanes, resurfacing Wilton Drive would cost about See PARKING on page 25

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6 The PelicanFriday, April 13, 2012 Deer eld Beach, Pompano Beach, Lighthouse Point, LauderdaleBy-The-Sea, Wilton Manors and Oakland ParkWilton Manors Oakland Park Hillsboro Beach The Pompano Pelican is published weekly on FridaysStreet Address: 1500-A E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, FL 33060 Telephone: 954-783-8700 Fax: 954-783-0093Letters to the Editor are encouraged and accepted for print if signed, although a writers name will be withheld on request; letters must also include a daytime telephone number. Advertising rates are available upon request. Subscription rate is $31.80 including tax for one years delivery in Greater Pompano Beach; $95.40/per year including tax for others in the United States; call 954-783-8700 for rates abroad. The Pelican is a nonpartisan newspaper and reserves the right to decline advertising. Copyright 2012. Reproduction of this publication in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission of the publisher. The Pelican is a member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, Deer eld Beach Chamber and the LBTS Chamber. The Pelican is a state certi ed woman-owned minority business. The Pelican is delivered to businesses, libraries, schools, of ces, hospitals, news racks and single family homes. All advertising and copy is published at the sole discretion of the publisher. We welcome your critiques and ideas concerning this publication. Anne Siren, publisherExecutive Assistant: Mary Hudson Graphics: Rachel Ramirez Windsheimer Bookkeeper: John White Classi eds: Fran Shelby Contributing Writers: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Judy Wilson, Malcolm McClintock, Judy Vik, Michael dOliveira Account Executives: Paul Shroads, Carolyn Mann, Bill Heaton, Bill Fox Special Of ce Assistant: Cathy Siren ESTABLISHED 1993 Volume XX, Issue 15 Founding Editor and PublisherAnne Hanby Siren Letters & Opinionsthe city has to rehire and pay back. Instead of being terminated, the employee responsible for this nancial debacle was given a $40,000 raise in salary.ResponseMike Milanowski, the citys current director of human resources, had been on-board only two weeks when he reviewed and analyzed the citys plans for conducting the 2010 layoffs of 80 part-time and 26 full-time city employees. Mr. Milanowski then closely monitored the effectuation of those layoffs. The arbitration brought by the International Union of Painters and Allied Trades or IUPAT, concluded with an arbitrators decision and award that upheld the citys reasoning for the layoffs, upheld the layoff of the 80 parttime employees in their entirety, and upheld the layoff of 25 of the 26 full-time employees who were laid off. Rather than continue the arbitration process and incur considerable additional costs to defend the belief that the city had followed all applicable rules in the layoff of the single employee identi ed by the arbitrator, city Management opted to return that employee without further objection.Input 3Forty thousand dollar increases in salary seem to be the favorite number. Keven Klopp was hired by Mahaney, as CRA director, with a salary of $80,000. He got an increase of $40,000 when he became the assistant city manager. As CRA director, he also has an Assistant CRA director, and a project manager. And yet other CRA directors will tell you that it is unethical to take any job with the same municipality that you serve as the CRA director.ResponseMr. Klopp was not given a $40,000 increase for assuming the duties of assistant city manager. He was hired as the citys CRA director/economic development manager with a salary of $86,000, and received an increase of $14,499 upon accepting the position of acting assistant city manager. When the position transitioned to a permanent status, he received a nal competitive salary of $120,000. His salary in a tri-capacity position is lower than the salaries of many single-capacity Assistant city Managers in similarly-sized cities in South Florida and is $52,000 lower than the salary of the previous assistant city manager under the former city manager. The accusation that Mr. Klopp engaged in unethical and unprofessional behavior in accepting this role is absurd, and is a biased and pathetic effort to defame both Mr. Klopp and the city. Multi-capacity positions are a common practice among local governments. The city Attorney and external auditors have carefully scrutinized Mr. Klopps position, and have found no legal, professional or ethical basis on which to discontinue a practice that bene ts the city. Input 4In the 13 years that I served as Mayor, I had four city managers, none of whom had an assistant. Although our population was smaller, we had our own police and re departments most of the time. Now, 50 percent of our budget is handled by BSO. So why do we have a manager, an assistant city manager, an assistant to the city manager, an executive assistant to the city manager, and an administrative support specialist.ResponseIn the 1980s, when this resident served as mayor, the citys population was less than half of what it is today. Today, local government operations have become exponentially much more complicated. Regardless of whether the services are provided internally or by the Broward Sheriffs Of ce, the city manager is still responsible for overseeing the law enforcement and re rescue service operations for a city of 76,000 residents. Additionally, the team of professionals who work in the city managers of ce are essential to ensuring that all aspects of city operations run smoothly. During this city managers tenure, several department directors and other senior-level managers either retired or left city service. Those positions were lled at much lower salaries, amounting to a savings in excess of $240,000 per year. One position has been eliminated entirely in the city managers of ce. In addition, all city employees whose pay exceeded the maximum of their salary grade were reduced back to the appropriate salary range. In at least one instance, this resulted in a department directors pay being reduced by more than $16,000. Non-unionized city employees have not received merit or a costof-living increases since 2008.Input 5According to a recent Pelican article, city wants to squeeze some money from the city employees since the city did not get all of the $1.2 million it originally budgeted, and they plan to hire an attorney to sue the employees. Why? ResponseThe city Budget for Fiscal Year 2011-12 was predicated on the fact that the pay of all city employees would be reduced by ve percent and that every city employee would be required to pay ten percent of the cost of his/her individual health insurance coverage. Without these economic concessions, the City would not have been able to reduce the millage rate by the one mill it was reduced Deer eld Beach city of cials want to set the record straightSee RECORD on page 7To the editor, The city commission does not routinely issue a formal public response to citizen input made during commission meetings. However, there are times when such input is so outrageous that the commission has no choice but to respond. At the commission meeting on Tuesday, March 20, a former city elected of cial made remarks that necessitate a formal response. We will respond to the defamatory allegations, outright misinformation, and awed conclusions in the order they were presented.Input 1At the February 21st meeting, the commission made quite a fuss over the retirement of Carl Peter. The truth is, he should have retired three years ago. When Larry Deetjen brought Carl from Michigan, it was with the understanding that Carl would retire after ve years at age 62. Deetjen wasnt here when Carl reached 62. I called the agreement to the attention of the powers that be, and was told that since the agreement was not in writing, it held no water. How come Burgess Hanson, who was Deetjens assistant at the time, didnt know? Peter wanted to stay until he was 65 so the city could continue paying his health insurance. Although his position and duties were vastly diminished, during those last three years, his salary was not. Whatever happened to honor among thieves?ResponseThe recruitment and selection process for Carl Peter, P.E., was spearheaded by a former city human resources director and the assistant to the city manager. There were candidates from Illinois, Massachusetts, Florida, etc. An interview panel of department directors and other high-level senior managers recommended Mr. Peter as the best-quali ed applicant for the position of director of public works and environmental services. As to the allegation that Mr. Peter was to retire at age 62, there is simply no evidence of any such agreement either orally or in writing. Mr. Peter recalled no conversation about an expected retirement date, much less an oral or written agreement. Neither does current City Manager Burgess Hanson, who assisted in the competitive recruitment and selection process Mr. Peters duties changed considerably throughout his service to the City, but they did not decrease until he helped orchestrate the disestablishment of the Public Works Department as part of the 2011-12 budget. Mr. Peters retirement was a known and expected result of this organizational change. Mr. Peter served the city as a dedicated public servant, and does not deserve to be impugned by baseless and unsupported allegations.Input 2The city lost the mediation over the ring of 106 city employees without regard to the rules and regulations as outlined in the employees handbook. Now

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The Pelican 7 Friday, April 13, 2012 effective Oct. 1, 2011. However, because of collective bargaining that was deliberately stalled by the 29 employees represented by a newly formed union of mid-level managers and supervisors, and due to the disavowal of an af rmative rati cation vote on a labor agreement the above-detailed economic concessions could not be implemented on Oct. 1, 2011.Input 6We were told that the main reason for the merger with BSO was so the city could get out of the pension business. Yet, over a hundred of the re ghters chose to stay in the citys de ned pension plan. The city will eventually be out of the pension business, but it might take 60 or 70 years to do it. And just why did the merger with BSO have to take place so fast and without public input.ResponseThere were a number of important reasons for the transition of re/rescue services to the Broward Sheriffs Of ce, or BSO. Interestingly enough, this resident was actually very supportive of the merger until the IAFF union president, a close family friend, was removed by the Union. While not the only reason, the closure of the Deer eld Beach Fire ghters Pension Plan was one of the main reasons in support of the transition to BSO. Nearly half of the re/rescue departments workforce had the potential to retire within the next ve years. If the plan had remained open, all of the personnel hired to replace the retiring employees would have been in the city re ghters pension plan, meaning that the city would have to continue funding the pension plan much further into the future than the time it will now take for the pension plan to expire. The city was advised both by our labor counsel and by attorneys specializing in public-sector pension plans to close the pension plan as soon as possible, thereby limiting entry by new employees into the pension plan. Florida law requires that existing employees in the Pension Plan (even after their transition to the BSO) be allowed to remain in the citys pension plan until their retirement. The very best the city could do in controlling the cost of the Fire ghters pension plan was to close the pension plan to new employees, bene t from the favorable actuarial assumptions that would apply to a closed versus open pension plan and, in the course of time, eventually have the pension plan expire. The resident [additionally] alleges that the transition to the BSO was to save more than $2 million. A more accurate account of savings would be closed to $1.5 million in the rst year of the contract. While not actually re ected in the citys budget for scal year 2011-12, the cash savings was earmarked by a consensus of the city commission to be used either to replenish the Citys Fund Balance or hire more BSO deputies. Still another $1.5 million in cost avoidance was produced by the transition to the BSO in fully staf ng one existing re station, opening a new re station along South Powerline Road, and avoiding the purchase of telecommunications equipment that was over twentyve years old in the citys former dispatch communications center.ConclusionWe trust that the information and responses to this residents input will provide a much more accurate and true understanding of the professionalism, responsiveness, ef ciency and effectiveness with which the city is run by the Deer eld Beach City Commission and city management. Sincerely, Deer eld Beach City Commission RecordContinued from page 6

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8 The PelicanFriday, April 13, 2012 Business matters The Pelican takes a look at local business owners. Call The Pelican to nd out how you can tell your story here because business matters. 954-783-8700. By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFF Get beautiful in this attractive looking and aromatic day spa at 1809 NE 24 street in Lighthouse Point. The Lighthouse Day Spa will relax a persons mind and body with a massage, facial, manicure and pedicure using some of the most popular Merle Norman products, all made in America. New owner Jason Smith says, For 80 years, Merle Norman products have been creating a loyal following. The Lighthouse Day Spa the destination for Merle Norman Cosmetics, massages and nails Lighthouse Day Spas staff. Sharon Pass-Holt, Margarita Lake, owner Jason Smith, Lisa Avery, Amalfy Mendoza and Andria Knight.Were thrilled to continue offering the full line of products that are so popular, we re-order them twice a month and ship them free anywhere in the United States. Smith also welcomes the world renowned Crabtree & Evelyn line of lotions, soaps and Tyler candles to pamper oneself and recreate the spa experience at home. This line even includes a collection of bath and grooming products for men at affordable prices, Smith adds. Millie Walsh, owner of nearby Body and Soul Boutique, says, I was using Merle Norman cosmetics when I got married and then I lost track of them. When this spa opened nine years ago and featured Merle Norman products I was delighted and am now one of those loyal followers. I also use the services. I had a massage this morning. I went in with a back ache and came out free of pain and feeling great. Lilly Nash is another long time See DAY SPA on page 14Horses and the Handicapped celebrates 30 yearsHorses and the Handicapped, an organization that helps disabled children by using horses as part of a physical therapy program, is celebrating its 30th anniversary with its Picnic in the Park event on April 21 from 12 to 3 p.m. at Vegso Family Arena at Tradewinds Park 3600 W. Sample Rd. in Coconut Creek. The organization will be honoring its founders and donors. There will be musical performances, a silent auction and more. Cost is $35 per person, $60 per couple and $7.50 for children under 12. For more, visit www.hhsfl. org or call 954-974-2007.Oakland Park Earth DayThe City of Oakland Park Parks is holding an Earth Day event tomorrow, April 14, from 8:30 a.m. to noon at Lakeside Sand Pine Preserve, 2820 NW 27 Ave. The event will feature planting of native shrubs and wildflowers, a collection of pine needles to be used as mulch and a tour of the preserve led by Charles Livio, horticulturist. Volunteers include the Kids Ecology Corps and Oakland Park Garden Club. The city will supply water and tools. Volunteers are asked to bring hats, gloves and sunscreen. For more, call 954-630-4511.

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10 The PelicanFriday, April 13, 2012 Shop your local merchants!954-783-8700 Making a DifferencePhyllis J. Neuberger wants your suggestions about people who are making a difference. Call 954-7838700. BriefsBy Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFHeres a golden opportunity to explore options and ways to build excitement into ones retirement planning. We want to re-engage the baby boomers and other retirees to use their talents, experience and knowledge to benefit the world around them, says Jean Kouch of Impact Broward and program manager of Encore Connect, a brand new project. As a presenter, Kouch is running three-hour workshops in well known local venues to help men and women, 55 and up to plan and enrich the second half of their lives. Asked how she does this, Kouch describes the specifics of the three hour workshops. We first guide those attending to do a self assessment and evaluation of personal life experiences, including values, skills, interests and dreams. Next, we evaluate this information to find a good match with non-profit organizations in Broward County. Theres a lot of sharing among the groups. That always generates excitement. Some participants realize they want to explore a field that is new to them. Others find volunteer areas which will benefit from their experience and talents. For those who cannot yet afford to volunteer, these workshops have been very helpful in Encore Connect offers free seminars to help those 55 and over re-imagine an exciting, activitylled future Jean Kouch, program manager for Encore Connect, is leading workshops all over Broward County for Baby Boomers and men and women already retired. The goal of the workshops is to help this group include the wide world of volunteer opportunities to help others and themselves as they plan the many years ahead. [Photo courtesy of Encore]pointing to a second career or volunteer opportunity to be explored later. Kouch has already conducted several workshops and finds that those attending stimulate and interact with each other. She says, We didnt realize how effective brainstorming and interaction could be. The second part of the workshop deals with projecting and creating a vision of yourself and what you will be doing three to five years from now. Identify the challenges you might encounter including both negatives and positives. Recognizing the challenges helps one face and deal with them. This may lead a person to taking preparatory classes, such as computer classes which are offered free through Impact Broward and public libraries. Part three of the workshop matches people to possibilities. She points out that the non-profits are suffering in this economy, too. They are badly in need of qualified volunteers which can eventually lead them to paying jobs. She names one case in point. My program coordinator was a volunteer who ended up being hired by Impact Broward. We have many examples of people who, through volunteering, have added skills to their resumes and qualified themselves for a paying job. These workshops are another form of networking. Our groups have been successful because theres a camaraderie and optimism about finding out what is needed, where it is needed and the value you might add. Encore connect is new. It is directed at baby boomers in advance of their retirement, veterans as they return home from service, and retired men and women who have not found rewarding ways to spend their freed up schedules. Recently Kouch worked with a veteran who served as a Marine in Vietnam. She says, He attended a workshop in Willow Wood and was grateful to get a direction to feeling useful and involved outside of his home. He will soon be involved in Davie at Crisis Housing Solutions where he will help See ENCORE on page 13Spin-A-Thon to bene t Kids In DistressThe Marine Industry Cares Foundation is hosting its annual Spin-A-Thon on April 20 from 1 to 7 p.m. at Esplanade Park, 400 SW 2 St., Fort Lauderdale. The Spin-A-Thon is a stationary bike event where individuals and teams raise money through sponsorships. Proceeds from the event benefit Kids In Distress in Wilton Manors, an organization that assists needy children and their families. Registration starts at 12 p.m. There will also be a thank you party for spinners from 6 to 9 p.m. Visit www.marineindustrycares.org for more information.Hospice volunteers neededThe Heartland Hospice Services Friendly Visitor volunteers provide emotional support to terminally ill patients and their caregivers through visits in patients homes and in nursing facilities throughout the Broward County area. A small commitment on the part of a volunteer can make a big difference to a hospice patient. For those willing to volunteer, scheduling is flexible. Orientation and training will be provided. Volunteers must be 18 years or older to become part of the program. Call 954-467-7423 for more information.

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12 The PelicanFriday, April 13, 2012 rays to travel horizontally and reaches out 28 miles. We know that the turtles in the sand are not disturbed. However, Art Makenion, an engineer and our president will oversee the closing of the one small hole which could, conceivably, put light on the sand. This is a simple solution. HLPS President, Art Makenian said, The light was dim from 1992 to 1999, the years it needed repair, and during that period there were nighttime boating wrecks almost weekly. Hillsboro inlet notoriously has four to six foot seas, and with the reefs, the rocks and the jetty around the inlet, our big diamond light is an important aid for mariners. Except for those few years and blackouts during World War II, our light has been on since March 7, 1907. Beside the aid to navigation, the light has tremendous historical significance which is why we are encouraging the public to rally to save this local treasure. Charles Brady wrote, I am writing to share my support for keeping the lighthouse fully operational. As a resident boater and aviator, I have used and continue to use Hillsboro Lighthouse for navigation on the water and in the air. It is an aid that ensures safety for crew and passe gers on board.Hib Casselberry, living largeHib and his wife, Martha, are charter members of the HLPS, and active volunteers in preservation and education of the lighthouse since 1997. He says, Ive been chasing history and legends of Florida lighthouses since 1970. He was born in Chicago, but transported to Florida as an infant. He enjoys telling his story. My parents and I motored down Dixie Highway in 1925 to Winter Park, Florida where we had relatives. While LighthouseContinued from page 1there, my mother fell, breaking a few bones and delaying our planned drive further south. Dad planned to sell hardware to the construction industry which was booming. While mother was recovering, they both invested money in property which grew into a small town, named Casselberry after the dominant land owners us. Its still there 10 miles north of Orlando on U. S. Highway 17 and 92. Its now as big as Oakland Park and has many Casselberrys in residence. Hib was educated in Winter Park, a military school, and attended Bradley University in Illinois where he graduated with a degree in building construction. He returned to Florida with his new wife, Martha and in 1965 the Casselberrys became Broward County residents. They settled in to raise their five children. Hib headed up a five-man team in residential design. He describes his career as an architectural designer and planner, a certified build inspector, and a construction specific writer. He has edited several trade magazines and is well versed in genealogy. Above all, he has dedicated 42 years to the history and preservation of Florida lighthouses. He was part of the team that persuaded the U.S. Coast Guard to save the existing Frensel Lens and repair it which was less expensive than removing it from the tower and putting in a small beacon with a five-mile reach. He recalls, David Butler, Harry Cushing and a few others, including me, persuaded E. Clay Shaw, our congressman, to save the light. We did it once and now we must do it again. Hib and his wife, Martha, enjoying the view from atop the Hillsboro Lighthouse. Because we have the strongest light in our Big Diamond, we became the image on the 2003, 37-cent postage stamp. Those stamps sold out to collectors almost immediately. I hope everyone who reads this story will contact the Coast Guard and demand that our fabulous beacon continues to shine. Email your opinion about the lighthouse to Andrew. s.haley@uscg.mil or write to Andrew Haley at USCG 7th District, Brickell Plaza Federal Building, 909 SE 1st Ave.

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The Pelican 13 Friday, April 13, 2012 people with mortgage issues. He is not a counselor, but hell man the phones and do computer searches for first time home buyers and for those wanting help to remain in their homes. Hes also mentoring homecoming veterans who are transitioning to civilian life. People, preparing for free time and their options in retirement, are not picturing a rocking chair on the front porch. According to Kouch, this generation approaches retirement with a new attitude. They want to help the community and continue to explore their own personal growth. Lee Zeidman, Palm Aire, volunteers in the Impact Broward office doing whatever needs to be done. She says, It motivates me. I work half days, four days each week, and it gives me great pleasure to be helping others, and myself in the process. Ive written a few books for children an adult murder mystery, and one titled How to marry a Jewish Doctor which, by the way, I did. Sergio Perez lost his job when the company down sized. He says, After taking a workshop, I got in touch with Impact Broward and EncoreContinued from page 10told them I wanted to explore volunteer opportunities. While I was volunteer interviewing the homeless at outreach centers, my old employer called and hired me back. I learned a lot in my time of unemployment. One thing is certain. I will always make volunteering part of my life plan. Im doing it now. John R. Gargotta, president and CEO of Impact Broward, formerly Senior Volunteer Services, says, Our volunteers are a treasure, generously sharing their wisdom and experience. The Encore Connect program will help us bring baby boomers into the volunteer arena with opportunities that match their interests and experiences and their plans for continued growth in their encore stage of life. A grant of $55,750 from the Community Foundation of Broward to implement the program, Encore Connect, through its Reengage for Good initiative has made these workshops possible. Jean Kouch is a Returned Peace Corps Volunteer with a Masters degree in International Affairs from Columbia University in New York City. She works for Impact Broward and is also an adjunct professor at Broward College teaching political science. She is the facilitator of the Encore Connect workshops.Impact BrowardImpact Broward has been a senior service agency since the mid-sixties. It offers six programs which are: Foster Grandparents and Dropout Prevention Programs, Retired and Senior Volunteer Program, Senior Companion Program, Respite for Caregivers Program, RSVP Executive Service Corps of Broward County and Encore Connect.Community Foundation of BrowardThis is a public, nonprofit organization with more than 400 charitable and agency endowment funds representing $100 million. It has distributed $50 million to support community solutions over the past 26 years. Current initiatives include Re-Engage for Good campaign to move retiring baby boomers into encore careers for social good, support of arts and cultural programming, education and the Leadership Institute which seeks to ensure Broward is defined by its great nonprofit leadership. Advanced registration required. To register for the April 28 workshop, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Oakland Park Library, 1298 NE 37 St., or the May 17 workshop, 1 to 4 p.m. at the Herb Skolnick Center, 800 SW 36 Ave., Pompano Beach, email encore@impactbroward.org and include the program date in the subject line; write your telephone number and birth year in the body of the e-mail. or call Jean at 954-484-7117, The Pelican. 954.783.8700

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14 The PelicanFriday, April 13, 2012 Advertise with The Pelican Today! 954-783-8700 patroness of this spa and says, The staff is very professional and accommodating. Ive always been satisfied with my facials, manicures and pedicures. I like to support small businesses. I liked the former owner and I like Jason. Hes very nice and I feel he will succeed. And yes, I do like Merle Norman products. Until he bought the spa from its former owner last December, Smith was a floral designer in Canada. I love Florida and this business. Im so happy and fortunate to be well received by former clients and new ones every day. In addition to our body pampering treatments and lotions, we offer some very attractive and clever accessories which our clients buy for themselves and as gifts. The Lindsay Phillips Switch Flops are just one case in point. The Velcro top makes it easy to switch to other colorful choices to match a ladys mood or fashion. And there are many alternate tops. Theres an attractive locally hand-made line of earrings, necklaces and rings. This modestly priced collection of jewelry has a one of a kind look. Magnabilities necklaces, earrings and bracelets feature interchangeable magnetized disks in a wide variety of colors and patterns. Kameleon collection is another line of attractive rings, necklaces and bracelets with magnetized choices. Blessings bracelets feature synthetic pearls on a metal stretch band and there are earrings to match. Smith says these Blessings are often chosen as gifts for the blessings in ones life. Getting back to the spas pampering services, Smith had a few last words. We have two talented massage therapists always on hand to erase a ladys stress and pains. Our facials are popular because of the long lasting benefits of the resulting clean, fresh feeling and look of the skin. Im told that facials enhance the effectiveness of the Merle Norman products. As for the nails, our professional manicures and pedicures include a gentle massage of the hands and legs. I think of this spa as a destination for women and men who want to look and feel good by choosing the products and the services they love. A menu of prices, services and gift certificates is availDay SpaContinued from page 8able. Open Tuesday to Friday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Saturday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Call 954-946-8200 for more information.

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The Pelican 15 Friday, April 13, 2012 Advertise with The Pelican! 954-783-8700! GFSContinued from page 1Its an area that we dont feel that were serving our current customers very well, said Mark Dempsey, GFS spokesman. We are planning for a late summer opening right now but we have not released an official date yet. According to Dempsey, the new store will be run by a staff of 35. Previously, according to an internet search, the location was occupied by Five Star Marine. Dempsey says the new store will be about 15,000 sq. ft. GFS, which sells bulk grocery and restaurant items, is similar to Costco and other wholesale companies but does not charge a membership fee. Dempsey says GFS main customers are the restaurant community as well as the home shopper looking for value. Lucille Pignataro, president of the Lighthouse Point Chamber of Commerce, said GFS will be a nice addition to the community because it wont compete with any existing small businesses.It also brings new jobs to the area. That building has been vacant for a very long period of time, she said. the Dog Pack, Canine Corner is the third busiest park in the city behind the tennis center and the beach. Brian Doyle, president of the group, estimates that 2,000 people a week use the park and about 40 percent of Pompanos 100,000 residents own one dog or more. Last year, the golf tournament raised a combined $10,000 from golfers and the sale of special engraved bricks that are placed inside the park. This year, Doyle is hoping to raise at least $10,000 from the tournament alone. The cost to enter is $100 and includes breakfast, lunch and the chance to win a brand new automobile from Phil Smith Acura; the player to get a hole-in-one on the 17th ExpansionContinued from page 3hole wins the car. Publix and Dicks Sporting Goods are also sponsoring the event. There is also a 50/50 ball drop raffle prize. The Pompano Beach Fire Rescue Department will drop golf balls from the top of a 50-ft ladder. The ball that gets closest to the hole or in the whole wins 50 percent of the money raised in the raffle. Doyle said $1,000 in raffle money has already been raised and estimates about $2,000 will be the final tally. Raffle tickets are $10 and can be purchased by anyone, in or out of the tournament. So far, 130 engraved bricks have been placed on site. The cost is $50 for a small one and $100 for a large. To buy a brick, raffle ticket or sign up for the tournament, email Brian Doyle at brian@ pompanodogpark.com or call 954-632-2112.

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16 The PelicanFriday, April 13, 2012 Furman Insurances 50th anniversary. The cost is $10 for Chamber members and $15 for non-Chamber members. For more, call 954-941-2940.Bean and Pepper Jamboree returns to Green MarketPompano Beach The Bean and Pepper Jamboree, a tradition started in 1946, is returning to the Green Market, held at the corner of Atlantic Boulevard and Dixie Highway, tomorrow, April 14, from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. In addition to the regular Green Market vendors who sell hand-crafted soaps, fresh flowers, seafood and more, there will be a petting zoo and additional agriculture-related vendors, such as the Broward Beekeepers Association. When the Bean and Pepper Jamboree was established in the 1940s, after World War II, it was really kind of a community-wide harvest festival marking the end of the agricultural season, said Dan Hobby, CEO of the Pompano Beach Historical Society board. The Jamboree, which was re-established three years ago, pays homage to the original event and Pompano Beachs beginnings as an agricultural community. Agriculture was so important to the citys early history that before Pompano Beach High School students were called the Golden Tornadoes they were known as the Bean Pickers. For more information, visit www. greenmarketpompano.com or call 954-260-3136.Classic car show at Sample-McDougald HousePompano Beach In the shadow of Pompanos historic Sample-McDougald House, a classic car show will be held at Centennial Park, 450 NE 10 St., tomorrow, April 14, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Were expecting 50 cars, said Jerry Bowman, Centennial Celebration Committee board member. Its the first of what we hope will be an annual classic car show at BlimpContinued from page 1Sample-McDougald, he said. While most of the cars at the show will be American autos of yesteryear, all made before 1969, including the Model A and Chevy, there will also be a few foreign offerings. All cars at the show will meet the guidelines set by the Antique Automobile Club of America. I think well have a representation of everyones favorite, said Bowman. One of special interest is a 1915 Ford Model T that was a year before the house was built. Built in 1916 by Albert Neal Sample, a Pompano pioneer, the house was purchased in 1943 by William D. McDougald, a Deerfield Beach lawman and farmer. Members of the McDougald Family lived in the house for six decades and eventually donated it. Formerly located on Dixie Highway, in 2001 the house was moved to its current location at Centennial Park. The cost is $3 and includes a tour of the Sample-McDougald House. Were just hoping everybody will take this opportunity to have a tour of a very interesting, very historic property. Money raised go towards preserving the Sample-McDougald House. District 4 meetingPompano Beach Dist. 4 Commissioner Woodrow See MEETING on page 34

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The Pelican 17 Friday, April 13, 2012 Readers will nd The Pelican at Lowes entrance in Pompano Beach. Call 954-783-8700. By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach When Margie Colarussos son needed medical treatment, her private insurer said she didnt have enough coverage and the charitable organizations she turned to said she had too much coverage to qualify for assistance. So Colarusso, a Coral Springs resident, turned to the Childrens Health Foundation, or CHF, which gave her $2,000 to help pay her Circus Bars charity golf tourney bene ts those who fall through the crackssons medical bills. Michael Colarusso, 14, suffers from Evans Syndrome, a genetic disorder where a persons own immune system attacks the red blood cells. Colarusso, who works as an inspector for a petroleum inspection company in Port Everglades, says paying for her sons treatments would have meant making impossible cuts. I tried to apply for help but nobody helped me. Theyre the only foundation that came forward, said Colarusso, who added that right now her son is stable but still has to go to the doctor every month. To help CHF help those who fall through the cracks, Circus Sports Bar, 1461 SW 30 Ave., Pompano Beach, will be holding its 15th Annual Charity Golf Tournament tomorrow, April 14, starting at 1 p.m. at Palm Aire Country Club, 2600 Palm Aire Drive North, Pompano Beach; the tournament will be held on the Oaks Course. Wendy Rodriguez, who owns Circus Sports Bar with her husband, said the last few years shes been directing the proceeds to CHF because its a local organization. Its just a lot easier to raise money for children and [CHF doesnt] get the big money like the big charities. Ralph Rucci, a Realtor who lives in Fort Lauderdale is founder and president of CHF, a 501c(3). He says organization helps children and their families in Broward, Miami-Dade and Palm Beach counties because thats where we get most of our donated money. We help the working class families that fall through the cracks and maybe make a little too much to qualify for help, said Rucci. According to Rodriguez, each tournament has averaged about $3,000 in donations. We usually average about 25 teams but this year I think it might be a little bit bigger. With the current economy, Rodriguez said she thinks the secret to getting people to keep participating is the price. Because ours is so cheap, See CIRCUS BAR on page 19

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18 The Pelican Friday, April 13, 2012 Advertisement Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeerfield Beach When Charlie Parton opened the Deerfield Country Club, or DCC, in 1962 he may not have foreseen that one day his nephew Bob would be president of the board of directors. Parton, an executive in New York City, had been a frequent visitor to the area and had fallen in love with Deerfield Beach. When he found the 74 acres on West Hillsboro Boulevard, he decided it was the place for an executive size golf course and country club. The private club soon became Northeast Browards social mecca the place to be for elegant dinner parties and lucrative charity events. There was a waiting list for membership. Charlie died in 1966 and his wife Florence ran the club for awhile. In 1968, the members purchased the course and the club. Bob Parton remembers that both Charlie and his dad, Bob Sr., were avid golfers and that as a teenager he caddied for them. His father was also instrumental in development of the country club. Parton took over the reins of the club in 2009, and is now Venerable Deer eld Country Club offers good golf and even better friendships the longest serving president in its history. He thinks he will be president for life. Today, the club retains its link to the past: It is still the place in northeast Broward to play a great round of golf surrounded by friends and family. The clubs popularity is due to the fact the 4,500 yard course can be played in three hours for very reasonable fees and for its amazingly friendly group of members. Its as much about friends and family as is it about golf, Parton said. The course is distinguished by its mature shade trees and its challenging layout, designed by William Mitchell. Said Patty Hayes, operations manager, You have to be a good wedge player to score well here. The greens, redone in the last three years, are fast Hayes said, and the large trees provide relief from the Florida sun. The length of the course makes it attractive to young golfers, beginning golfers, the ladies and somewhat older players. You can play a round here and shoot well enough to feel good about yourself, said Hayes. Chef Edmund Morgan, owner of the Bella Vista Restaurant located inside the club, offered an Easter Sunday brunch that packed the 200-seat dining room. He serves a daily, very reasonably priced lunch, and starting this Tuesday will offer dinner five nights The dinner menu has some interesting selections: Panhandle crab cakes and a flaming Greek cheese served with garlic crustini for appetizers, and an entre menu featuring six seafood items including shrimp scampi, baked cod, garlic shrimp and clams; along with baby back ribs, and three choices of steak. Pasta is always available. In the lounge, it is happy hour, all day, every day. DCC is about to initiate summer golf memberships; $195 April 15 through Sept. 15, which includes green fees, preferred tee times, locker and bag storage, no charge for children under age 16 and unlimited range balls. Summer members are eligible for all club tournaments, the Monday night skins game See GOLF CLUB on page 25 The course is distinguished by its mature shade trees and its challenging layout, designed by William Mitchell.

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The Pelican 19 Friday, April 13, 2012 Ely, Northeast win at Girls Flag Football JamboreeBy Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFDavie When it comes to football, Chelsea Mills says the girls can give just as good as the boys. Mills, a player for Oakland Parks Northeast High Schools girls flag football team, was one of 400 to participate in the annual Girls Flag Football Jamboree at the Miami Dolphins Training Facility in Davie on March 31. A lot of people say that girls shouldnt play football, but we get to show that we do belong and can take part in the game, said Mills in a press release provided by the Miami Dolphins. We get to show how we can be hardcore girls. Started in 1997 with six teams, the Jamboree is a partnership between the Dolphins and the Broward County Athletic Association. Along with Northeast and Blanche Ely, 22 other Broward flag football teams participated in the event. Ely defeated Stanahan 6-0 and Northeast beat Flanagan 7-0. Deerfield Beach High School lost to Pines Charter 18-6. Twan Russell, former Miami Dolphins player and the Dolphins director of youth and community programs, said the girls, in some ways, are better than their male counterparts. Its really cool the passion that they bring to it. A lot of the time they havent had anyone to explain football to them. Its a clean slate. You can tell them exactly what to do and they hear you, said Russell, in an interview with The Pelican In early March, Russell says I think a lot of people play. Most of the tournaments I play in are usually $150 or more, she said. The Circus Bar tournament is $90 per player. Before the tournament, a breakfast buffet will be served and prizes will be raffled off. Sponsorship opportunities are also available. To register, email Circus Sports Bar at fun@circusbar. com or call 954-973-1483. Circus BarContinued from page 17 See JAMBOREE on page 24

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20 The Pelican Friday, April 13, 2012 Deer eld Kiwanis Club sinks $40,000 into community from restoration to literacy By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeerfield Beach Within the next few weeks, the aged caboose parked east of the Florida East Coast Railroad at Hillsboro Boulevard will be receiving a facelift. The long neglected railroad car, a symbol of days gone by, will be steam cleaned and painted, its color changed from dinghy red to the original Mandarin orange. Undertaking the task are members of the Deerfield Beach Kiwanis Club. Next on their to-do list is finding someone to move the caboose to a permanent site at the Railroad Museum alongside the Seaboard Airline Railroad on West Hillsboro Blvd. and getting the go-ahead from the Florida Department of Transportation to do so. The caboose was donated to the Historical Society in 2002. Through the years attempts to raise enough money to return it to its original condition failed, as did attempts to move it. Ed Dietrich chairs this project, assisted by Railroad Museum Historian Bill Munsenmaier. Commenting on the color, Dietrich said, Its historically correct. This was not a little red caboose. Dietrich admitted it will be a process to get it (the move) okayed, but it is a doable thing. Believing in collaboration, Dietrich is bringing several organizations into the painting project Key Clubbers, Kiwanians, railroaders and historians. The caboose project is one way local Kiwanians put to good use the money they raise through the sale of bus bench advertising, sponsoring the Winnie Frazer Memorial Golf Tournament and selling Christmas trees. Last year, they returned $40,000 to the community and contributed to a long list of local needs. Most recently, the club gave the media center at Deerfield Beach Elementary School 127 non-fiction books to replace what had been removed from the shelves because they were either out of date or in poor condition. This weeding occurs every five years because the pace of technology makes the books hugely outdated with information about countries that no longer exist, huge computers. Debra Rothberger, the schools reading coach, said the state is adopting national reading standards that will bring students up to par when it comes to deciphering technical info. Kids are coming into college not able to read manuals, she said explaining the need for the informational books. PTA member Shannon Booty got Kiwanis involved in this project which put the school above the required number of books. Next in its quest to improve literacy in local schools, the club will donate pamphlets that explain the US Constitution at a level understood by kids, and for years under the leadership of Dave Gravelle, it has given every third grader in Deerfield Beach schools, a dictionary. Last year, that was 300 dictionaries. They also bought 100 books for preschoolers at the NE Focal Point. This year, the Kiwanis Club sponsored a new Key Club at Zion Lutheran High School in addition to the club at Deerfield Beach High School and will help pay for 16 Key Clubbers to go to the state convention in Orlando. The club supported Student Government Day at DB City Hall, awarded $7,000 in college scholarships, is a sponsor of the Festival of the Arts, funded Christmas in July for homeless kids, gave See KIWANIS on page 29

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The Pelican 21 Friday, April 13, 2012 Gimme-A-Burger 1200 E. Hillsboro Blvd. Deer eld Beach 954-708-2553 gimmeaburger.comBy Malcolm McClintockPELICAN STAFFWe use nothing but pure 100 percent USDA Certified Prime Black Angus Beef, says Serhad Oktay, who along with his wife Yasmin, have decided to bring the high-end casual dining experience to Deerfield Beach. It is nearly impossible to find this level of quality at a regular burger place. Indeed, these experienced Boca Raton restaurateurs have opted to introduce area residents, workers and tourists alike to the increasingly Deer eld Beachs Gimme-A-Burger serves up mouthwatering, gourmet hamburgers at affordable fast-food prices At under $5, the large 100 percent USDA certi ed Prime Black Angus Beef Hungry Wolf Burger is the main attraction at Gimme-A-Burger. Be sure to try the popular sweet potato waf e fries as well. [Photos by Malcolm McClintock] popular trend of gourmet fastcasual. This contemporary culinary concept revolves around serving traditional on-the-go type meals while ensuring a previously unprecedented level of freshness and quality to the primary ingredients. Many first time guests order our classic single or double stack Hungry Wolf Burger which comes with our spicy Howlin Wolf sauce, says Serhad. But after a few visits, they will try more adventurous options. For example, the Wow Burger is an uplifting mlange of Prime Black Angus beef and spicy dried Turkish sausage. Add gorgonzola cheese and a fried egg if desired. Then slather the whole thing it in an exotic spicy ketchup blend. The result is an entirely novel burger experience that is sure to warrant a repeat visit. They really have the best food, says local construction company owner Parviz Marvasti. This is my third time coming here this week for the Mediterranean burger. This instant classic showcases a top-of-the-line 6oz. ground beef patty infused with onions, garlic, parsley, herbs and spices. Ensconced between two freshly baked ciabatta bread buns, this burger can be embellished with palate pleasing toppings such as sauted mushrooms, lettuce, tomatoes, caramelized onions and sauces like Tahini or garlic yogurt. Other novel creations include the fresh ground Turkey Gobbler Burger with cranberry mayonnaise and the Buffalo Bill Burger overflowing with ultra-lean ground Bison meat served medium and accompanied by an array of zesty sauces.See BURGER on page 27

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22 The Pelican Friday, April 13, 2012

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The Pelican 23 Friday, April 13, 2012 Ric GreenAUTO WRITER The 2012 Hyundai Genesis is an automobile that can compete with luxury sedans costing more than $50,000, but starts at $34,200, making it a good choice for drivers who put value before brand recognition. But it also presents a dilemma for the snobby image-conscious South Florida customers who have to get over the Hyundai badge 2012 Hyundai Genesis: a luxury automobile priced righton the deck lid of a car that looks like its a MercedesBenz or Lexus. In the past Hyundai had a reputation for its prices over its quality. However with recent success with the Sonata, Elantra, Tucson, Accent and the speedy Genesis coupe, the Korean manufacturer has become known for its classcompetitive, affordable vehicles. The Hyundai Genesis received a mid-cycle refresh for the 2012 model year. It has a new eight-speed transmission, more powerful base V6 engine and new 5.0liter Tau V8 engine, which is available on the new-for-2012 5.0 R-Spec trim. The 2012 Hyundai Genesis I tested was equipped with the 3.8-liter base V-6 that produces 333 horsepower up from 290 hp, that when pared with a new eight-speed automatic transmission, produces a 19/29 miles-pergallon which is slightly better fuel economy than the 2011 model. Even with minor changes the 2012 Genesis is still an understated attractive sedan. Redesigned are the headlights are the focal point with a curved LED strip that bisects the headlight cluster The LED is an accent light though, not daytime running lamps like in most luxury cars with LEDs. There are also mild tweaks to the front and rear bumpers and the rear taillights as well, but are insignificant. Hyundai has built its reputation by offering a lot of content and quality for a lower price. The same is true with this large sedan. Its hard to think of what car competes with the 3.8 trim levels $34,200 price considering its size. Standard equipment includes 17-inch wheels, the LED-accented headlights, leather upholstery, heated front seats, dual temperature See HYUNDAI on page 33

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24 The Pelican Friday, April 13, 2012 12 former NFL, or National Football League, players, took part in a clinic teaching girls about the basics of the game. I have guys every year who ask, Whens the girls football clinic? Thats always cool when we have former NFL players passing the torch to young women who want to play and are serious about it, said Russell. Clenner Goodman, Elys head coach, and Dave Gray, Northeasts head coach, agree with Russell and say the competitive spirit is alive and well in their teams. A lot of the girls take the sport very seriously, said Goodman, in an interview with The Pelican Northeast plays its last game against Hollywood Hills on April 20. Ely, [6-3], plays its last game against Deerfield, on Saturday at 6:15 p.m. at Blanche Ely High School, 1201 NW 6 Ave., Pompano Beach. JamboreeContinued from page 19 Since the earlier meeting Town Manager Connie Hoffmann said she has met with the designers, and theyve come up with several modifications of both plans that dont lose as much parking. Commissioner Mark Brown suggested before spending a lot of money on plans it should be determined if Florida Department of Transportation, or FDOT, would allow the back out parking option. Hoffmann said the towns traffic consultant has had discussions with FDOT, and the agency would consider the approach provided the town meets guidelines for Transportation Design for Livable Communities.WorkshopContinued from page 1Commissioner Chris Vincent said it was important to hear from businesses now before the town moves forward with designs. Ken Brenner and Charles Dillistin, owners of Interior Digs, objected to Scheme B. Brenner said back out parking is not a wise option, and there are safety issues with access to fire department vehicles blocked from the plaza with the design plan. Hoffmann introduced a new town employee, Bill Cole, who will manage big infrastructure projects, such as those on Commercial Boulevard.Inspection of towns hotels continueIn her report to commissioners, Hoffmann noted that the towns code enforcement officer and fire marshal are actively inspecting hotels. They conducted a followup inspection April 4 at the Lauderdale Beachside Hotel, 4660 N. Ocean Drive to see if violations cited in February and March were corrected. Most town code violations on rooms had been corrected, but many exterior violations were still observed, she said. Those violations are scheduled to be heard by the code magistrate April 18 if not corrected before then. The fire marshal said 30 violations at Lauderdale Beach Hotel had not been corrected. He closed the breakfast room and one hotel room for serious violations. He noted the emergency generator was not operating on the day of the re-inspection and gave them until 4:30 that day to repair it, bring in a temporary generator or be closed down entirely. Management did provide an emergency generator. If not corrected, the code magistrate will hear the citations in May. Additional violations have been written up for the Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Resort and Beach Club, 4116 N. Ocean Drive, shut down in March 2011 for a long list of infractions. The latest are for outdoor storage, unsecured pool access and doors. Those violations go before the magistrate April 18. Branding survey Results revealed Commissioners heard the results of an on-line survey on a proposed brand to help market the towns commercial districts. A design featuring an Adirondack chair and a pelican came in first with 53 votes followed by a colorful building block design, 26 votes, and a nostalgic picture postcard with 12 votes. Commissioners agreed and selected the Addy chair and pelican as their favorite, as well. The brand includes the slogan, Relax youre here. Lauderdale-By-The-Sea. The designers with Tangled Spider Design Group said they were looking for something clear and simple that would translate easily. become a vendor, call 954390-2130. 4-15 St. Elizabeths of Hungary Parish hosts a pancake breakfast at 3331 NE 10 Terrace, Pompano Beach, from 7:30 a.m. to noon. The breakfast benefits the Parish. 954-263 8415. 4-15 The Benevolent Patriotic Order of DOES Drove 142 holds a pancake breakfast from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. at the Elks lodge, 700 N.E. 10 St., Pompano Beach. Cost is $5 for adults and $2.50 for children. 954587-1121. 4-21 Oakland Park Yard Sale, 7 a.m. to 12 SightingsContinued from page 2See SIGHTINGS on page 26

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The Pelican 25 Friday, April 13, 2012 Advertise with The Pelican. 954.783.8700 and the Sunday morning par quota. If there is a sporting event, there is a tournament here, said Hayes. In the summer, golfers can tee off at 5:30 p.m. and be in the lounge in plenty of time to recount their round and enjoy the conviviality of the th hole. Even in the height of the season, the club offers a highly attractive rate, $30 for Country ClubContinued from page 1818 holes. The club is a popular choice for charity tournaments. The next event will the 2nd annual Winnie Frazer Memorial hosted by the Deerfield Beach Kiwanis June 9. In fact, almost every week an organization is on the course raising money for charity. Last years Fallen Heroes Tournament raised $25,000 for the Broward Sheriffs Office. The club offers venues for banquets, weddings and all special occasion parties. Summing up the benefits of membership at Deerfield Country Club, Parton says, Its a warm, friendly place with a golf course where you can use every club in your bag. $528,000 and have to be redone every 15 years; that estimates does not include any of the additional beautification features Main Street is proposing. City officials estimate, based on information provided by FDOT, that maintaining Wilton Drive would cost between $75,000 and $85,000 per year. Main ParkingContinued from page 5 street has proposed that the 112 parking spaces created along Wilton Drive would help pay for maintenance. To study possible improvements for Wilton Drive, the city created the Wilton Drive Task Force. Manners, a member, said the Task Force would be presenting a final report to the city on May 8 but declined to provide any details before it was presented to the commission.By Judy VikPELICAN STAFF Oakland Park City commissioners will be asked next week to amend an interlocal agreement with Broward County to reprogram funds to activities that will carry out the citys downtown redevelopment vision. A balance of $10.2 million remains of an original $13 million provided under the countys Redevelopment Capital Program (RCP). The RCP agreement expires June 21. Deadline for an amendment application is May 15. Several projects identified earlier as public improvement projects in the RCP agreement have subsequently Oakland Park shifting development funds to buy downtown propertiesbeen completed with funding from other sources in the citys Capital Improvement Program according to Ray Lubomski, the citys community and economic development director, so funds can be shifted to land acquisition and construction of public parking. Redevelopment Management Associates (RMA) has recommended in a five-year strategic plan that budgets around $5.8 million for land acquisition. The proposed ILA amendment would call for about $5 million of the remaining $10.2 million in RCP funding. In meetings with county staff, they suggested we concentrate on land acquisition as a priority, Lubomski said at a board meeting of the Community Redevelopment Agency on Wednesday. Three parcels are now being targeted for possible purchase in the central downtown area. They are the Squires block at NE 34 Court and Dixie, Sikes Tile on NE 12 Avenue and the Alster/504 property on NE 13 Avenue. Total assessed value of all the properties is $3.258 million. In the northern area, properties being considered are the Totina property on NE 38 Street and the Schnell property on NE 37 St. These properties are assessed at $1.078 million. They would be considered for improving parking lots. If the Sikes and Squire properties were purchased, Chris Brown of RMA said hes confident the city could pull off a culinary market in those two buildings. At Wednesdays commission meeting, Lubomski will also ask for authorization to enter into contracts for the purchase of targeted parcels. The city commission and county commission must approve a purchase price that is no more than 10 percent higher than the lower of two appraisals. See DOWNTOWN on page 27

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26 The Pelican Friday, April 13, 2012 On May 5, the American Cancer Societys Deerfield Beach/Lighthouse Point Relay For Life events begins at 5 p.m. and contiues to 9 a.m. the next day at Quiet Waters Park, 401 S. Powerline Road, Deerfield Beach. Before the Relay, participants will host a p.m. at Jaco Pastorius Park, 4000 N. Dixie Hwy. Free to the public. To become a vendor call 954-630-4500.Books, Speakers, Education, Classes & Seminars4-15 Ride for Kids takes place from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. starting at Quiet Waters Park, 401 S. Powerline Rd., Deerfield Beach. Motorcyclists help raise money for the Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundations medical research and family support programs. Cost to ride is a minimum donation of $35 per SightingsContinued from page 24rider. Visit www.pbtfus.org for more. Clubs, Civic Groups, Charity and Volunteers 4-18 The Deerfield Beach Historical Society hosts History at High Noon from noon to 1 p.m. at Deerfield Beach City Hall, 150 NE 2 Ave. Special guest is Deirdre Dolan Nesline, professional photo organizer. Preserving your History is the topic. 954429-0378. 4-19 The Cresthaven Neighborhood Watch will meet at 7:30 p.m. at St. Elizabeth Social Hall, 901 NE 33 St., Pompano Beach. The purpose is to discuss what Relay For Life in Deer eld Beachseries of fundraisers to benefit the event. Yard Sale April 28, 8 a.m. to 12 p.m., at Curves of Lighthouse Point, 1847 NE 25 St. Butler House tour April 28, 4 p.m. to 8 p.m., 380 E Hillsboro Blvd., admission is $10. Yoga For Life April 29, 3 p.m. Flight For A Cure May 5, Shimmy for a Cause June 3. For more information or to join Relay For Life, call 954420-0084 or 954-304-4248.See SIGHTINGS on page 29

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The Pelican 27 Friday, April 13, 2012 They have great burgers, hot-dogs and fries. On top of that, the people here are really very nice and helpful, says area resident Andrea OConnor. We marinate the fish for 3 days in a special blend of herbs and spices. Its all white meat and really soaks up the flavors, says manager Taher Sad. The same approach is employed with the poultry in order to produce the unbelievably tender and delectable Chickenmania Sandwich. For veggie enthusiasts, additional outstanding specialties include the Red Lentil stuffed Pita with lemon infused tomatoes, carrots and parsley or the always flavorsome Falafel sandwich BurgerContinued from page 21 An instant favorite, the Meaty Flatts quesadillas feature thin, fresh our tortillas stuffed with spiced ground beef infused with parsley and onions served with a avorful garlic yogurt sauce and an eye-watering Pico de Gallo.loaded with ground chickpeas, garlic, onions, cilantro, herbs and spices topped with homemade Tahini sauce. Everything we serve is made fresh in-house, says Yasmin with well-deserved pride. Its the only place you can get a complete freshly cooked meal without going through the full sit-down dinner service. The impeccably clean Gimme-A-Burger also offers up salads loaded with fresh veggies and served with tangy house dressings such as raspberry vinaigrette, honey mustard, balsamic vinaigrette and ranch. For a hearty morning repast that can actually be ordered all day, this welcoming eatery cooks up fresh breakfast sandwiches with eggs, cheese, bacon or turkey sausage. For the truly voracious, The Timberwolf unveils a burger, American cheese and hash brown topped with fried eggs. A classic burger starts at $4.95, full meals with drink at $7.95. There is ample free parking and all major cards are accepted. Homemade chili and cheeseburger soup are good choices on chillier evenings. For a sweet ending, people just love our Cinnamon sugar puffs with ice cream, says Serhad. We also make fantastic milkshakes. And for those with absolutely no time to spare, simply place your order online at www.gimmeaburger. com and swing by to pick it up. Enjoy Malcolm McClintock holds an MBA and has lived in Thailand, Spain, France, Mexico, Canada and the US where he has developed a deep appreciation for world gastronomy. Vice Chair John Adornato said he is excited about the plans. I see the opportunity to seize on the inkling of an economic upturn, he said. Board member Suzanne Boisvenue said the city needs to concentrate on 12th Avenue. She likes the idea of utilizing existing buildings but is not interested in parking lots all over the place. DowntownContinued from page 25

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28 The Pelican Friday, April 13, 2012 WORSHIP DIRECTORY: Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad. Rev. Hyvenson Joseph SPECIAL TO THE PELICANCarl Jefferson, Sr. was taught to value education from his youth and was educated through the Brooks County School System in Georgia. His thirst for knowledge inspired him to continue his journey of education in pursuing various degrees at Florida A&M University, Indiana University, Central Missouri University and Florida Atlantic University. He served his country in the United States Armys 82nd Airborne Division in Ft. Bragg, North Carolina. Carl Jefferson put God first in his life and was a faithful member of the Mt. Calvary Missionary Baptist Church in Pompano Beach, where he served as a deacon and trustee for numerous years. He spread his knowledge and spirit of giving through teaching and coaching at Blanche Ely High School [1957-1970] and Deerfield High School. He was received many accolades and served in many organizations, including Pompano Lodge 409, Saba Temple 186, Pompano Beach Pioneer left a legacy of service Broward County Athletic Association [37 years of service] and over 20 years of service with the City of Pompano Beach. Jefferson was loved and respected as an eminent athletic and lifecoach to the community and the Mitchell Moore Parks & Recreation Center where he coached optimist T-ball and football. Leaving his years of service as a legacy, the Mitchell Moore Centers field was named in his honor several years ago. His wife, Mary Goins Jefferson and their family, students he coached and taught, and citizens he touched will miss his dedication and his smile.Carl Jefferson, Sr.Youth Choir performs May 6 Pompano Beach -The next installment of the New Presbyterian Church Concert Series will be May 6 at 2 p.m. when the Youth Choir performs at Pompano Beach High School, 600 NE 13 Ave., Pompano Beach. Admission is free but donations are suggested and accepted. The 25-voice Youth Choir from the New Presbyterian Church in Pompano Beach will present their annual Spring Concert directed by John and Lisa Wilson. The choir is comprised of talented and award-winning high school students from many schools in South Florida. Songs will include a wide variety of musical styles, from Classical to Gospel, including Spirituals and Contemporary Christian and excerpts from Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat. For more, visit www. newpres.org or call 954-946-4380.

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The Pelican 29 Friday, April 13, 2012 Advertise in The Pelican 954-783-8700 Advertise in The Pelican 954-783-8700! KiwanisContinued from page 24$1,000 to Covenant House. When the Boys Scouts needed money for an event permit, the Kiwanis Club kicked in. When the disc jockey program at the Police Athletic League needed equipment, they purchased it ($5,556). This club sponsors a Little League team, donates to Horse and the Handicapped ($5,000), SOS Childrens Village, the NE Focal Point Cuisine of the Region event, the Historical Society, Pompano Beach-based Vital Flight and, new this year, the Disabled Veterans will one of the recipients of money raised at the Frazer Memorial Golf Tournament June 9. In addition, the club donated $9,134 to miscellaneous charities. Looking beyond their own borders, when fellow Kiwanians in Tuscaloosa, AL needed help following a tornado, the club members sent $1,700 and annually, they give hands-on support to the DB Arboretum and the Relay for Life. For all this largesse, the club, just 40 members, gets very little publicity said incoming president Avis Swenson. We just do things and go along without publicity, she said. The main thing is just to do a little something.SightingsContinued from page 26 is going on Pompano and Cresthaven. Refreshments will be served. 954-786-7536. 4-19 The Wilton Manors Historical Society meets at 7 p.m. at city hall, 2020 Wilton Drive. 4-24 A card party will be held by the Benevolent Patriotic Order of DOES Drove 142 from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Pompano Beach Elks Lodge, 700 NE 10 St., Pompano Beach. Cost is $4 and includes desert and coffee. Call 561-479-2002 for reservations.See SIGHTINGS on page 34

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30 The Pelican Friday, April 13, 2012 Classi edsCall 954-545-0013 Business Card Directory HELP WANTEDCHRIST CHURCH PRESCHOOL Looking For Part Time Teacher For Ages Six Weeks To 5 Years Of Age. Call Cindy At 954-943-7776. 4-13 LOCAL PEST CONTROL CO Looking For Quality Sales/Service Tech. Must Be Dependable, Team Player, Good Drivers License & People Skills. Will Train Right Person. ALSO Of ce Assistant Computer People & Phone Skills Needed. Fax Resume 954418-3982. 5-4 SEEKING EMPLOYMENTI AM SEEKING A Clerical Position Basic Computer Skills. Bilingual Spanish English Part-time. Prefer Pompano Ft Laud Area. 954-942-8111. 4-13 CAREGIVER / NANNY Professional 10 Years Exp. In Alzheimers, Stroke & Wound Care. Live In / Out. Call 954905-7619. 4-13 WILL RUN ERRANDS Do Shopping Doctor Appointments. E Of Dixie Hwy In Pompano. Available Mornings. Call 954-691-7816. SERVICES DANNY BOY ELECTRIC Lic & Insured. Lic. #EC13004811. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. 24/Hr Service. 954-290-1443. Beat Any Written Estimate. Sr, Discount. 5-4 CALL BRENDAN THE HANDYMAN Construction & Repairs Carpentry Plumbing Roo ng Masonry Windows Painting Decking Tile. FREE Estimates! 954773-6134 Emergency Calls. CARPET CLEANING 2 Rooms $59!! ACTUAL PRICE!! No GIMMICKS!! CALL 954-784-8199. 4-20 HAMWAY POOL SERVICE Once A Month Service $39 Includes All Chemicals. Weekly Service Also Available 20 Years Exp. Call 954-9795548. 4-27 HANDYMAN PAINTING CARPENTRY Pressure Cleaning. Decks! Everything Around The House. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. Call 561-350-3781. 4-13 MOORE PLUMBING PLUMBING SERVICES Big Jobs Small Jobs. We Do It All. Remodeling & Repairs. Lic. & Insured. C.C. Accepted. Call 954-772-4600. HONEST HANDYMAN HOME & BUILDING Maintenance/Improvements. No Job Too Small. Fast Friendly Service. Reasonable Rates. Local Resident/Homeowner. Call Today For Your FREE Upfront Quote. No Deposit Required. 754-366-1915. GOT JUNK? DUMP TRUCK CLEANUPS Trees/ Landscape, Yard Fill. Paint/ Pressure Wash/ Roofs/Home Repairs Welding, Etc. Dave 954-818-9538. 5-4 CEMETERY PLOTS2 CASKETS VAULTS & GRAVES Garden Of Love Section Forest Lawn North. Moving Must Sell. Call Ron For Information 954-781-3381. 4-6 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIESNew GREEN technology. New defroster control saves energy in home refrigerators, commercial chillers. Patented. All optical. Simple mfg. Strategic partners needed..www.NewAvionics.Com. 954-568-1991. C EARN BIG!! FAST GROWING ON-LINE CO Ranked Top 400 World Wide. Join Our Wealth Building Team Today. Mike 954-657-3171. ROMANCETIRED OF BEING ALONE Attractive Senior Lady Would Like Companionship With Tall Gentleman 75 80 To Share All The Goodies That Life Still Has To Offer Us. Kathy 954-633-4255. MUSICIANS WANTEDThe American Legion Symphonic Band is now accepting new members for the 2011-2012 season. College age to seasoned seniors are welcome. Rehearsals are held on Wed. evenings at American Legion Post 142 in Pompano. Percussionists, euphonium and clarinet players are especially needed. If you enjoy making music, call Jim McGonigal, Music Director at 954-647-0700 for more info.DEEP WATER VILLA DOCKPOMPANO BEACH 2/2 2 BLOCKS BEACH 1700 SQ FT. Screened Fla Room. Private Yard. W/D. 4 Park. No Fixed Bridges. Community Pool. Deeded Dock.. 2 Blocks Beach. $265,000. Coldwell Banker Barbara Call 954629-1324. 4-13 STUDIOS / EFFICIENCIESPOMPANO BEACH & BOCA RATON POMPANO BEACH ATLANTIC / FEDERAL Ef ciency $175 Weekly. No Security Deposit. Includes Cable, Electric, Internet. FREE Washer / Dryer. No Drug Record No Evictions. 954-709-0694. 4-13 OUT OF AREANORTH WILDWOOD N.J. SEASON 1/1 Apartment. 2 Blocks From Beach. A/C / Cable. $5500. Call 954-7086708. HOMES TO SHARENORTH POMPANO BEACH Fully Handicapped Accessible. $450 Per Month Split Utilities. Leave Message!! 954-7857671.CO-OP SALESPOMPANO BEACH 1/1 On Water, Dockage Available At Your Door. $59,500. Coldwell Banker Barbara 954-6291324. 4REAL ESTATE WANTEDI BUY HOUSES!! CASH!! AS IS! QUICK CLOSE! ANY AREA ANY CONDITION! NO EQUITY OK. CALL NOW 954-914-2355. CONDOS FOR SALEPOMPANO BEACH DIRECT OCEAN VIEW!! 2/2 AT THE BREAKERS! $275,000. Call Juliana At Barclays For Details. 1-305-766-4420. POMPANO BEACH ISLAND CLUB Updated 2/2 1st Floor Unit With Dock Up To 28 Boat. $155K. Mirsky Realty Group Susan 954-732-2038. CONDO FOR SALE OR RENT Over 55 Community. Unfurn. Leisureville. 2 /Bd 1 Ba. Clubhouse, Golf, Swimming And More. Non-Smoker. Rent $700 / Mo. Purchase For $35,000 OBO. 954-783-6403. 4-13 DEERFIELD BEACH 2/2 Completely Redone. Granite Kitchen, New Cabinets. S.S. Appliances. 20 Porcelain Tile Floors. Travistine Stone Baths. Freshly Painted. 1st Floor. Less Than A Mile To Beach. $84,900. Call 631-873-8715. 4-20 CONDOS FOR RENTDEERFIELD BEACH 2/2 CONDO Corner Unit, Pool. $800 $825. Good Credit Required. No Pets Or Realtors. 631-885-3342. 4-13

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The Pelican 31 Friday, April 13, 2012 Classi edsCall 954-545-0013 Advertise with The Pelican 954-783-8700 LAUDERDALE BY THE SEA Furnished 2/2 Pool Near Beach Shops & Restaurants. Enjoy Beach Living. $875 Month From April To October. Owner 413-244-2807. POMPANO BEACH LARGE 2 / 2 With Den. All Renovated! Pool Mile From Beach! W /D Small Pet OK! $1,300 Month Yearly. Available May 1st. 561-703-6545 Or 754-2643289. 4-13 POMPANO BEACH CONDO Cypress Bend 1285 Sq Ft. Newly Renovated. $1175 Per Month. Call John 413-5623976APTS FOR RENTDEERFIELD/POMPANO BEACH 1 BR & 2 BR APTS FOR RENT. Remodeled, Paint, Tile, Etc. W & D On Site. Pool. Pet Friendly. Call George 954-809-5030. 5-4 POMPANO BEACH 1 BEDROOMS AND EFFICIENCY Apts. Fully Furnished With Kitchen, Cable, Internet, Pool, Laundry. 500 To The Beach. Weekly Monthly Yearly. 954-2948483 Or 248-736-1533, 4-13 POMPANO BEACH 1/1 FURNISHED Includes TV $850 Month Yearly 1st / Last / Security. EFFICIENCY $750 Month Yearly Includes Direct TV + $50 Electric Allowance. 954-785-5837. 4-13 LARGE OPEN BRIGHT FIRST FLOOR CORNER SMALL YARD Small Pet OK All Tile Floors Just Painted Off A1A North Of Atlantic Pool Coin Laundry WIFI Cable Water Included $995 Month ---Large Ef ciency Apartment Available Same Bldg. Includes All Plus Elec. Full Kitchen Corner Unit. $650 Lease Required April 1 Special One Week FREE!! Owner Agent 954-608-7368. 412 Sunset Drive Pompano. POMPANO BEACH 1/1 SW. C/A $750 2/1 $925 3/2 $1025 NE 2/1 $950 Townhouse 2/1.5 $1095. ALL FREE WATER. Rent + $70 Application Moves U In. 954-781-6299. 4-13 POMPANO MCNAB RD & NE 18 AVENUE 1 & 2 Bedrooms Furnished/ Unfurnished. $695 $950 And Up. Pool, Tile Floors. Central A/C. 954-6102327. POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 Bedroom From $495. Easy Movein. 1/2 OFF DEPOSIT. Remodeled. Great Location. 954-783-1088 For More Info. 5-11 LUXURY BEACH PADS FOR RENT! Pompano Grand Opening: Security Deposit As Low As $199 For Quali ed Applicants. FREE 32 Flat Screen HDTV! Newly Renovated in 2012 One Bedrooms & Studio Apts., 75 Yards From Private Beach Access, Eastern Exposure. New Kitchens & Baths, Granite Counter Tops, Central Air, Pool, Laundry, Dedicated Parking, Near Pier & Downtown. All Bills Paid! Includes Water, Electric, Premium Cable TV And WIFI. Furnished Or Unfurnished. Short Or Long Stays. No Utility Deposits. Small Pets Welcome. Only 7 Left! Pax Properties 888-7294948 Or 954-603-8857. Photos At www.beachpads.net 4-27 COMMERCIAL FOR RENT-SALEPOMPANO COMMERCIAL OFFICE Spaces Available. Ranging From As Low As $500 To $700 Depending On Square Footage. Please Call Darci At 954-7833723. 4-20 DEERFIELD BEACH Retail Of ce Warehouse 700 Sq Ft With Loft. A/C, Bathroom. $575 Per Month. Call For More Info 561-654-1331 Or 561-9985681. 5-4 FURNITUREBEDSETS King $180 Queen $130 Full $110 Twin $90. 5 Pc. Bedroom Set $399. Frames $39. 954-465-6498. 5-4 DOCK FOR RENT60 FT DOCK THE COVE MARINA 50 AMP / H20 Included. $1,200 Month Price Negotiable Depending On Boat Size. Restaurant & Fuel On Premises. 954-9140053. a.j.barsotti@comcast. net. 4-27 POMP ANO BEACH ON INTRACOASTAL N.F.B. SAFE NEW DOCK!! Water & Electric Available. Up To 35$10 Per Ft. Call 754235-1458.

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32 The Pelican Friday, April 13, 2012 Tell The Pelican about your special event 954-783-8700 U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary offers Safe Boating CourseOn April 28, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., the United States Coast Guard Auxiliary, located in Pompano Beach, is offering an About Boating Safely course on April 28 at Imperial Point Medical Center auditorium, 6401 N. Federal Hwy., Fort Lauderdale. All materials and lunch are provided. Cost is $50 per person and includes materials. Contact Tom Nolan at 954942-8108 for registration or more information. History tour of Deer eld Island Park Intracoastal History Tour will be held at Deerfield Island Park, 1720 Deerfield Island Park, from 10 to 11:30 a.m. on April 29. Cost is $5 per person. The event is for ages six and up. A shuttle to the island provided at 1601 E. Hillsboro Blvd. Participants must be at the dock by 9:30 a.m. to catch the shuttle. Call 954-357-5100 to RSVP. This is the final date for this program this season. The 53.3 acres that make up Deerfield Island Park are full of history. In the early 1930s, the land was labeled Capone Island after gangster Al Capone even though Capone himself never actually owned it and the area at that time was a peninsula, not an island.By Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach This week, an approval to fund some additional items in the Pompano Beach Boulevard Streetscape, raised the ire of one resident. Doug Matthes objected to the citys agreement to pay nearly $500,000 for more picnic tables and grills at the beach along with pavilion upgrades, bathrooms, synthetic turf, higher quality tables and other items. East CRA redevelopment includes East Atlantic Boulevard renovations, Harbor Village Shopping Center beautification and City agrees to pay for enhancements for beach projectplans for Ocean Boulevard from Atlantic to just north of the pier. That totals close to $10 million and comes from incremental taxes paid within the CRA boundaries. Enhancements for those areas, according to CRA figures, have not been budgeted from TIF funding Matthes contends that the city has already transferred nearly $4.5 million from its general fund to pay for items that had been planned but unfunded. City records indicate that the transfers were closer to $3 million. Matthes charged the Community Redevelopment Agency, or CRA, with being . incapable of fiscal responsibility. Beach resident Keith Meizel agreed that the evening was devoted to money for the beach, but there were no accusations from him. We want higher quality [structures] that will last longer, he said. Please appropriate the money. The question at hand was based on whether the city wanted to move forward with enhancements that were not available in the CRA budget at this time. CRA co-director Kim Breismeister explained that the CRA has stayed within its budget based on the $10 million bond issue that is financed with TIF funding. When we designed this project, it was very clear that the idea was to design the complete project, including all of the items you are talking about tonight. It is better to have a complete design even if we cannot completely build it out. Referring to the beach project, Breisemeister continued. Tonight, we need to know if you want these items now or later. If you want them now, you will have to use general funds. In a 6-0 vote, the citys decision was now. Other former transfers See BEACH PROJECT on page 33

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The Pelican 33 Friday, April 13, 2012 control, push-button start, keyless entry, Bluetooth and a seven-speaker stereo. Step up to the Premium Package, which adds 18inch wheels, a navigation system with a 7-inch screen, 14-speaker stereo system, moonroof, backup camera and a power adjustable steering wheel pushes the price to $39,000. Add the Technology Package featuring a larger 8-inch navigation system and 17-speaker stereo system along with adaptive cruise control, lane departure HyundaiContinued from page 23 warning, cooled drivers seat, heated rear seats and high-intensity-discharge xenon headlights and the sticker price tops out at a still attractive MSRP of $43,000. Inside the Genesis I was very impressed with its room, both front and back, with wide front seats and a backseat with 38.6 inches of legroom. Adding to its value, the 2012 Genesis is equipped with eight standard airbags, including seat-mounted side airbags for front and rear passengers. Rear-seat mounted airbags are not the norm for any class of vehicle. Side curtain airbags for both rows are also standard. If you want European styling, lots of room and Pictured above: the 2012 Hyundai Genesis. In the past, Hyundai has been known more for its pricing over quality. comfort, plus a plethora of tech toys, check out the 2012 Genesis, but you will have to keep a straight face when the valet asks if you want it parked up front next to the other luxury cars. to cover additional CRA expenses that had been planned but not budgeted included underground utilities for Atlantic Boulevard, expenses for Pompano Beach Boulevard and a newly planned temporary parking lot at the corner of Ocean and Atlantic Boulevards. If the city wants to move forward, the city will have to assume some of the costs if the CRA does not have the funds, she said. Briesemeister added that during the 12-year-existance of the East CRA, property values have continued to rise despite the 2008 setback. She says as the CRA continues redevelopment on the east side of town, businesses will be attracted to the city and property values will continue to rise which will increase funds in the East CRA budget. CRA meetings for the east side are held on the first Thursday of each month at 6 p.m. at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach. Beach project Continued from page 32 We are The Pelican What can we do for you? 954-783-8700

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34 The Pelican Friday, April 13, 2012 MeetingContinued from page 16Poitier will host a quarterly district meeting on April 19 from 6 to 8:30 p.m. at the E. Pat Larkins Center, 520 Hammondville Road/Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd. Poitier wants to hear from residents and answer their questions regarding the city and its departments. Representatives from various city departments will attend the meeting. We want to basically try and keep people informed as to whats going on in the district, said Poitier, who added that he gets questions all the time from residents, ranging from water bills to housing issues. People come to me with all these questions [and now they] can go directly to [the department representatives] and get your questions answered. Call 954-786-7823.Wilton Manors Suicide Prevention meetingTo try and prevent future suicides, the City of Wilton Manors is hosting the Suicide Prevention Town Hall Meeting on April 19 at 7 p.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive. Mayor Gary Resnick and mental health professionals will attend to talk about how the community can come together to help lower the number of suicides. For more, call 954-390-2150. 4-24 The Deerfield Beach Historical Society hosts Preserving your History at 11 a.m. at Jerrys Artarama, 242 S. Federal Hwy. in the Publix shopping center. There will be guest speakers from the Historical Society, Society of Florida Archivists and a professional photographer and photo organizer. 954-429-0378 4-25 The North Broward Democratic Club will host Assistant Chief Louie Granteed, of the Hollywood Police Department and candidate for Broward County Sherif f, at 7:30 p.m. at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach. 954-7838232.Festivals, Events & SightingsContinued from page 29Networking4-18 The LauderdaleBy-The-Sea Chamber of Commerce hosts a networking event at Flip-Flops Dockside Eatery, 3051 NE 32 Ave. in Fort Lauderdale, from 5:30 to 8 p.m. There will be entertainment and two-for-one beer and wine specials. Cost is $5 for members and $7 for non-members. 954-567-1672. 4-20 The 28th Annual Pompano Beach Seafood Festival will take place April 20 through 22 at the far east end of Atlantic Boulevard in Pompano Beach. There will be food, entertainment and games. Cost is $12 per adult and children 10 and under are free. The festival starts on Friday from 5 p.m. to 10 p.m., Saturday from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. 4-21 The Friends of the Arboretum are sponsoring the annual Arboretum Plant Sale at Constitution Park, 2841 W Hillsboro Blvd., Deerfield Beach, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Call 954-234-1002.Kids Stuff4-15 Junior Bass Tournament, Quiet Waters Park, 401 South Powerline Road, Deerfield Beach. The tournament beings at sunrise and goes until 1 p.m. Cost is $75 per child and includes an accompanying adult. Ages 12 to 17. 954-357-8816.Health, Safety & Environment4-14 Free Car Seat Safety Check from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. at Pompano Beach Fire-Rescue Station 24, 2001 NE 10 St. Technicians will check and see if car seats are properly installed. Appointment required. 954786-4510. 4-14 Deerfield Beach Residents and business owners can take documents to be shredded at the Recycling Drop-Off Center, 401 SW 4 St., Deerfield Beach, from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. Cost is $10 for one to five boxes or bags and $20 for six to ten boxes or bags. Only checks will be accepted. Paper must be free of plastic and metal but staples and paper clips are acceptable. 954-480-4379. 4-15 Polynesian Cultural Festival from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. at Jaco Pastorius Park, See SIGHTINGS on page 35

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The Pelican 35 Friday, April 13, 2012 Kindergarten round-up scheduled in Deer eld BeachDeerfield Beach Deerfield Beach Elementary School will hold a Kindergarten RoundUp on May 8, 6 to 7 p.m. in the Media Center. Parents are invited to learn about the school, its curriculum and activities and to meet the staff. To enter kindergarten in the fall, children must be five years old by Sept. 1, 2012. Pre-registration is ongoing at the school office, 7:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday through Friday. Required is an original birth certificate for the child, two proofs of residency, current Florida Immunization Record including varicella (680 form), and a physical exam form from a Florida doctor. Deerfield Beach Elementary is located at 650 NE 1 St. Call the school at 754-3226100 with questions. An Evening Social With Alice ButlerOn Saturday, April 28, from 4 to 8 p.m., the Deerfield Beach Kiwinis will host An Evening with Alice Butler, which Carolyn Morris, executive of the Deerfield Beach Historical Society, will give a short lecture on the life of Alice Butler. Join friends Under the Banyan Tree at The Butler House, 380 East Hillsboro Blvd., Deerfield Beach. Food and refreshment will be offered. Donations are $10 for adults. Children are free. All donations will benefit the American Cancer Society. Call 954-592-3150 teagen@ everythingdeerfieldbeach.com The event is sponsored by The Deerfield Beach Kiwanis and The Deerfield Beach Historical Society. 4000 N. Dixie Hwy., Oakland Park. Polynesian themed entertainment and food. Cost is $5 for adults, children 12 and under are free. Visit www. polynesianculturalassociation. com or 954-938-9010. 5-19 Flotilla 37 of the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary will hold free vessel safety checks each day from May 19 to May 25 during National Safe Boating Week at Pioneer Park Boat Ramp, 217 NE 5 SightingsContinued from page 26Ave., Deerfield Beach. Safety checks start at 9 a.m. 954755-4581.MondaysEvery Monday from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Ping Pong Nights is held at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. The cost is $1. All ages can participate. 954-3902130. The Gold Coast Toastmasters Club meets on the second and third Monday of the month from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Dennys, 3151 NW 9 Ave., Fort Lauderdale. 954895-3555 or 954-782-9951.TuesdaysPompano BeachLighthouse Rotary Club meets every Tuesday at 7:30 a.m. at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. 954-972-7178. The American Legion Auxiliary Unit 142, 171 SW 2 St., Pompano Beach, has Bingo on Tuesdays at 7 p.m. Food is available from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. 954-942-2448. A Yoga class is available for all levels at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors, on Tuesday nights from 6:30 to 8 p.m. and Saturday mornings from 10:30 a.m. until noon. The cost is $7. 305-607-3520.WednesdaysWilton Manors Kiwanis Club meets Wednesdays at 6:30 p.m. at 2749 NE 14 Ave., Wilton Manors. 954-5619785. Oakland Park Kiwanis Club meets Wednesdays from 7:30 to 8:30 a.m. at Peter Pan Diner, 1216 E. Oakland Park Blvd., Oakland Park. 954566-9957. Pompano Beach Kiwanis Club meets Wednesdays at noon at the Riverside Grille at the Sands Resort, 125 N. Riverside Drive, Pompano Beach. 954-444-4815. The Greater Pompano Beach Senior Citizens Club meets on the second Wednesday of the month at the Emma Lou Olson Community Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach, at 10 a.m. Activities focus on the general welfare, health, education and security of senior citizens. 954-943-7787.

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36 The Pelican Friday, April 13, 2012