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Pompano Pelican
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00090900/00294
 Material Information
Title: Pompano Pelican
Uniform Title: Pompano Pelican
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: Pompano Pelican
Place of Publication: Pompano Beach
Publication Date: 04-06-2012
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Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Pompano Beach
Coordinates: 26.234722 x -80.125556 ( Place of Publication )
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00090900:00294

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Friday, April 6, 2012 Vol. XX, Issue 14 Call 954-783-8700 to Advertise Email: siren2415@gmail.com Pompano Beach • Deer eld Beach • Lighthouse Point • Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Wilton Manors • Oakland Park • Hillsboro Beach • The Galt • Palm Aire The P e l i c a n Pelican Beach town plans a cleanup and a cookout for its rst Earth Day celebration By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFHillsboro Beach Earth Day, April 22, has been a national effort to “green up” the planet since 1970, but in this coastal town, Earth Day 2012 it will be the rst public awareness of that day and marked by beach and A1A cleanups and a party at town hall. See EARTH DAY on page 5 Architects chosen to design civic campus libraryBy Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach The much anticipated new Broward County Neighborhood Library got closer to the drawing board this month after commissioners approved a $1 million agreement with Silva Architects to design the project. The library and “possible” cultural center will be built on the city’s civic campus, an 11.5-acre lot located adjacent to Pompano Beach City Hall. Design of the campus itself is included in the contract. The 25,000 to 30,000-sq. ft. library may include a second oor to be used as a cultural center or there could be a stand-alone building to house theater See LIBRARY on page 12 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach Accused of being “disruptive” and causing “inef ciencies” at the Deer eld Beach Housing Authority, Commissioner Caryl Berner faces removal from the authority’s board. Prompted by Mayor Peggy Noland, who said she has received three letters Commission will scrutinize performance of DBHA board from board members complaining of Berner’s conduct, the city commission Tuesday agreed to go forward with removing Berner from the board. Required is a resolution from the commission, followed by a hearing. Berner said she would defend herself. “No way am I going to resign,” she said. See BOARD on page 7By Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach Last Saturday was a classically hot Florida morning when re trucks lined Fire Station No. 61. But the heat did not deter city and county of cials who joined relatives and friends of Fire ghter Bill Elliot, who died on Jan. 6 when he fell 100 feet during a training exercise at this station. Elliot, 49, was the rst city re ghter to die in the line of duty. As people found their ways through the crowd to folding chairs, they passed a large draped monument that would soon be unveiled to reveal the station’s new name, William J. Elliot, Fire Station 61. Mayor Lamar Fisher proclaimed the day as William J. Elliot Day in Pompano Beach. Fisher was followed by County Commissioner Chip LaMarca who read a similar Fire Station 61 in Pompano Beach was dedicated to the memory and life of Pompano Beach Fire ghter William J. Elliot on March 31. Pictured are Pompano Beach Mayor Lamar Fisher, Commissioner Woodrow Poitier, Commissioner Rex Hardin, Commissioner Barry Dockswell, Vice Ma yor George Brummer, Broward County Commissioner Chip LaMarca. Eliiot’s mother Joanne stands with her daughter, Mary Beth. Elliot’s brother John stands behind his sister. [Photo courtesy of the City of Pompano Beach]Fire ghter Bill Elliot remembered and honoredproclamation for the entire county. Mayor Fisher presented an American ag to Elliot’s mother, Joanne Elliot, announcing that the ag that had own over the Capitol. The ag had been sent to the family from Congressman Allen West who appeared in person to offer his condolences and shake hands with family members. Joanne Elliot, 82, said, “There is no love like a mother for her child. Bill carried a smile on his face See ELLIOT on page 25

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2 The PelicanFriday, April 6, 2012 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFLauderdale-By-The-Sea – After hearing an engineer’s presentation on two possible designs for improvements to Bougainvilla Drive, commissioners chose to focus on drainage issues and rejected a plan that included a walkway in the middle of the road and changes to existing parking spaces. The town has retained Flynn Engineering to prepare plans for drainage improvements and street beauti cation along a two-Drainage and parking are the topics for Bougainvilla DriveLauderdale-By-The-Sea – The Easter bunny is expected to make an appearance during Easter By-The-Sea festivities starting at 9 a.m. Saturday, April 7, on Town Hall grounds and in Jarvis Hall, 4505 Ocean Drive, Lauderdale-By-The-Sea. Easter egg hunts are planned for children three and under, four to seven and eight and up. There will be a bonnet contest for children 12 and under and 13 and older. For more information, call 954-640-4200. Egg hunt bonnet contest slated for April 7block section of Bougainvilla stretching from Pine Avenue on the north to the re station on the south. Currently the area has 242 parking spaces, but many don’t meet the town requirement of 9-feet by 18-feet, Jay Flynn said, and others overlap property lines. His design team presented two concepts for the area to the commission March 27. In Scheme A, the swale is reduced from 10 feet to six feet. A traf c circle is added at Bougainvilla and Washingtonia. Trees are brought to the end of paving for a perception of a narrow road. This plan maintains existing back out parking and keeps the sidewalk on both sides of the right of way. In Scheme C, angled parking replaces back out parking on both sides of the road. The sidewalk and paved swale are eliminated and a median sidewalk with landscaping and lighting is added down the center of the road with parallel parking along the side. Residents said Scheme C resulted in too much lost parking in front of their properties and condo residents said those parking spots were deeded to the owners. Defending the concept, Flynn said, “We feel this is safer, taking [pedestrians] away from back out traf c.” In order to undertake Scheme C, Town Manager Connie Hoffmann said the town would need legal agreements with every property owner and legal agreements between some property owners. “It would take years to work out,” she said. “We knew this was dif cult as far as beauti cation,” Hoffmann said. “It will take lots of one-on-one discussions with property owners.” As a result, Flynn said Scheme A is the option.” Neighbors will have to buy in on the plan, since some will lose parking spaces and some will gain space. Some proposed landscaping is on private property, and some owners have said they don’t want it. Budget for the proposed project is $800,000. The only area where See TOPICS on page 14

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The Pelican 3 Friday, April 6, 2012 Oakland Park The City of Oakland Park and the Polynesian Cultural Association will host the 8th Annual Polynesian Cultural Festival at Jaco Pastorius Park, 4000 N. Dixie Highway, from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Sunday, April 15. The entertainment will include re dancers, exotic hula dancers and Polynesian drums. Polynesian Island food and exotic refreshments will be available, as well as many authentic South Paci c arts and crafts. Call 954-938-9010 for more details.Polynesian festival, April 15Oakland Park The Oakland Park Fire ghters Benevolent Association and the Oakland Park Kiwanis Club will sponsor a Spring Egg Hunt from 10 a.m. to noon Saturday, April 7, at Royal Palm Park, 1701 NW 38 St./Park Lane West. Admission and parking are free for this family event. Call 954-630-4550 for information. Fire ghters to hide eggs, 4/7 Chief goes after activist pushing for arrest in Fleming hitand-runBy Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach Friends of hit-and-run victim Thetus Fleming Jr. were chided Tuesday night by Police Chief Pete Sudler for spreading critical and erroneous information about the tragedy and subsequent BSO investigation. Fleming, 22, was struck and killed Feb. 17 as he crossed W. Hillsboro Boulevard heading to his home in Stanley Terrace. The driver of the vehicle, David Alcocer, left the scene but returned 30 minutes later and gave police a statement. So far, no arrest has been made. Community activist David Cody said his information shows Alcocer was driving on a suspended license and last week he organized a street protest calling for Alcocer’s arrest. But Chief Sudler said there are protocols that mandate the investigation being undertaken by the BSO Traf c Homicide Unit. Those procedures take a lot of time, Sudler said, and once an arrest is made time tables kick in with the state attorney’s of ce that could require the case to be led within 21 days. “Jumping to conclusions, putting the handcuffs on prematurely, is not in the best interest of the victim,” the chief said. He called the “irresponsible information” being disseminated through blogs and emails “the second crime that has been committed,” and said he took personally Cody’s statement that if the victims had been two white girls or an old lady, Alcocer would be in jail. “Trying to make this racial See CHIEF on page 24

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4 The PelicanFriday, April 6, 2012 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFHillsboro Beach Coastal Systems International’s recommendations for beach protection and nourishment will be discussed at a workshop April 12, 6 p.m. at town hall, 1210 Hillsboro Mile. The CSI report was made public last month but this will be the rst open discussion of it. “This is the place where people can come and share their ideas [about beach restoration],” Commissioner Claire Schubert said. “That is really the point… to have dialogue. I encourage a representative from each condominium to attend.” Schubert said he also expected an ad hoc committee formed recently to explore accounting rm, Severn Trent, reported receiving $1.5 million from the Federal Emergency Management Agency, or FEMA, “a piece of the amount applied for.” Mayor Dan Dodge said he believes the town is eligible for $1 million from the state and $2 million from FEMA because of hurricane damage to the beaches. Also, he said, there is a new grant possibility stemming from damage caused by Hurricane Frances that could return additional money to the town.Workshop will focus on beach restoration beach erosion prevention to express their opinions. The CSI report presented options for preserving the town’s north beach which suffers from severe erosion. But the report concluded that with the prevention methods currently allowed, the beach will always need more sand. This week, Commissioner Jim Lambert said he would be unable to attend the workshop but suggested the town begin “stashing money” for future beach nourishment. Also this week, the town’s By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFWilton Manors Although the proposed Planned Unit Development, or PUD, will apply to the whole city if approved, some residents are already honing in how it could be used regarding a possible new apartment complex development at the Center for Spiritual Living, 1550 NE 26 St. At their Tuesday meeting, commissioners unanimously passed the PUD, which encompasses development regulations, including building heights as well as setbacks and landscaping requirements. The commission will have to vote on the PUD a second time, April 10 at 7 p.m. at PUD could be rst round in ght against apartments city hall, 2020 Wilton Drive, before the PUD will become law. Mayor Gary Resnick called the PUD a “sword and a shield” which would attract desired growth and at the same time protect the city from unwanted development. “This is an incredibly important development tool. This gives us a lot of power and control.” But some see the PUD as more of a sword aimed right at their neighborhood. Residents say the proposed apartment complex, which would include 115 apartment and townhouse-style units, is too dense for the four-acre property; city officials are still See PUD on page 19

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The Pelican 5 Friday, April 6, 2012 Earth Day was the brainchild of Wisconsin senator Gaylord Nelson who recruited U.S. Rep. Pete McCloskey, to his cause. The rst Earth Day had such impact that it is credited with the creation of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the passage of clean air, clean water and endangered species acts. Here, City Commissioner Claire Schubert and her chairperson for volunteers, Holly Ward, head up the effort. Volunteers willing to tidy up the beach will meet at 9:30 a.m. will meet at town hall and be taken by bus to four areas where there is the most debris. In those same areas, the bike/pedestrian lane on A1A will be cleared of refuse. The community bus will make continuous circuits bringing residents to town hall, to the beach and back to their homes. “We are encouraging everyone to help clean our beaches, if only for a little while,” Schubert said. Those that do will receive a blue, ”Earth Day, Hillsboro Beach” t-shirt. The areas chosen for cleanup are those where the beach raker dumps material collected from paying customers onto vacant or nonpaying properties covering it with sand. The buried debris often resurfaces due to wind Earth DayContinued from page 1 and waves. The day will also be used to encourage residents who are not yet committed to the town’s recycling program to sign on, as well as reward those that already do. Beginning at noon, Ray the DJ will spin his tunes and barbecue cooks will serve up hamburgers, veggie burgers and hot dogs. Representatives from Keep Broward Beautiful, Deer eld Fire Rescue and Waste Management, the town’s solid waste hauler, will be on hand. Bike owners will be given a complimentary bike safety inspection and bocce ball teams will hold a tournament. For the kids, there will be a face painter. Parking will be available in the vacant lot next to town hall, but attendees are encouraged to be eco-friendly and ride the bus. “This will be rst of many Earth Day celebrations here,” Schubert predicted.By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFOakland Park – City commissioners agreed to postpone until June more discussion on the mixed-use overlay district for a portion of Commercial Boulevard. The vote was 3-1 at Wednesday’s meeting to continue until June 20 the rst reading of an ordinance approving a text amendment to the land development code to create the new district. Commissioner Suzanne Boisvenue dissented and Commissioner Shari McCartney abstained from the vote. The new district is intended to spur revitalization of East Commercial Boulevard on the north side between North Andrews Avenue and Northeast 6 Changed overlay ordinance off the agenda Avenue. With the current B-1 zoning, if lots were combined, a ve-story building could now be built with the required setback, Harris Hamid, director of engineering and community development, explained. After a meeting with residents, the proposed ordinance was changed to limit heights to three stories, increase the rear setback to 20 feet and to drop base density to 10 units per acre, Hamid said. With some incentives, density could be increased to 20 units per acre. Single-lane drive-through facilities would now be allowed. Staff recommended the revised ordinance go to the planning & zoning board for a public hearing at its May 7 meeting and then come back to the commission June 20. See OVERLAY on page 34

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6 The PelicanFriday, April 6, 2012 The Pelican . What can we do for you?Email your opinions to siren2415@gmail.com Deer eld Beach, Pompano Beach, Lighthouse Point, LauderdaleBy-The-Sea, Wilton Manors and Oakland ParkWilton Manors • Oakland Park • Hillsboro Beach The Pompano Pelican is published weekly on FridaysStreet Address: 1500-A E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, FL 33060 Telephone: 954-783-8700 • Fax: 954-783-0093Letters to the Editor are encouraged and accepted for print if signed, although a writer’s name will be withheld on request; letters must also include a daytime telephone number. Advertising rates are available upon request. Subscription rate is $31.80 including tax for one year’s delivery in Greater Pompano Beach; $95.40/per year including tax for others in the United States; call 954-783-8700 for rates abroad. The Pelican is a nonpartisan newspaper and reserves the right to decline advertising. Copyright 2012. Reproduction of this publication in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission of the publisher. The Pelican is a member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, Deer eld Beach Chamber and the LBTS Chamber. The Pelican is a state certi ed woman-owned minority business. The Pelican is delivered to businesses, libraries, schools, of ces, hospitals, news racks and single family homes. All advertising and copy is published at the sole discretion of the publisher. We welcome your critiques and ideas concerning this publication. Anne Siren, publisherExecutive Assistant: Mary Hudson Graphics: Rachel Ramirez Windsheimer Bookkeeper: John White Classi eds: Fran Shelby Contributing Writers: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Judy Wilson, Malcolm McClintock, Judy Vik, Michael d’Oliveira Account Executives: Paul Shroads, Carolyn Mann, Bill Heaton, Bill Fox Special Of ce Assistant: Cathy Siren ESTABLISHED 1993 • Volume XX, Issue 14 Founding Editor and PublisherAnne Hanby Siren Letters & OpinionsPassover, Festival of FreedomBy Rabbi David MarkTHE JEWISH CENTER AT TEMPLE SHOLOMOf all Jewish holidays, Passover’s theme is the most universal: the message of freedom. Way back in 1400 BCE, during the reign of the mighty Pharaoh Ramses II [or perhaps his son, Merneptah], an invisible God reached out of the heavens and into human history. “Let My people go!” ordered His prophet, the shepherd Moses, and, shocked and demoralized by ten plagues which had af icted his country, his cattle, and his people, Ramses had no choice but to comply, according to the biblical Book of Exodus. Today, this message continues to resonate, whether among the people of Syria and Egypt, whose corrupt governments oppress them, or in numerous nations worldwide, where uncounted millions of human beings yearn for the very freedoms which we Americans take for granted: freedom to speak out, freedom to assemble peacefully to petition the government for a redress of grievances, freedom of worship, freedom from want, and freedom from fear. As the presidential campaign continues, we should take a moment to re ect that, despite its acrimony, the campaign represents our democratic system at its best. In the words of Irish-American Al Smith [1873-1944], the rst Catholic candidate for the presidency, “the only cure for democracy is more democracy.” For the seven-day [eight, outside of Israel] period of the holiday, observant Jews refrain from eating leavened foods, and instead eat foods based on matzah, the grain of which has been mixed with water and baked before eighteen minutes have passed, in remembrance of the speed in which the Israelites departed Egypt during the Exodus. Passover is a home-based holiday, and it may be the single festival most responsible for “keeping Jews Jewish.” Many Jews attend temple services on the High Holy Days, but it is estimated that a full 80 percent will attend a seder [Hebrew, “order”] meal, the special feast which this year falls on Friday and Saturday evenings. It is a dinner full of ritual, in which the participants partake of four cups of wine, to represent the four promises God made to our ancestors: “I took you out of Egypt; I saved you from Pharaoh’s wrath; I liberated you from slavery; I took you to be My special people.” It is a repast full of symbolism: while singing and chanting prayers and songs from the Hagadah, [Hebrew, “the Telling”], we eat horseradish, the “bitter herb” which reminds us of the bitterness of slavery, and dip green parsley, the symbol of springtime, into salt water, to remind of the bitter tears of slavery, while we recline at the table in the attitude of free people. Indeed, the seder is the earliest audio-visual learning experience known to humankind. Outside of Florida, where we enjoy perpetual spring, Passover marks the beginning of the springtime harvest season. Accordingly, the temple service during this time includes a prayer for dew, representing both God’s visible grace upon the earth, and the gentle rain which sustains the standing barley. May Passover 2012 bring blessings of peace and freedom for all.Multi-family and commercial buildings now eligible for rebatesNow, Conservation Pays for Everyone. The Broward Water Partnership rebate program is expanding to include multi-family housing, not-for-pro ts, and commercial buildings. The Partnership is offering rebates of up to $100 each for the replacement of toilets that use more than 1.6 gallons of water per ush, or gpf, with high-ef ciency toilets that use 1.28 gpf or less. Jennifer Jurado, director of Broward County Natural Resources Planning & management division, pointed out that expanding this program moves the community closer to the goal of saving 30 million gallons of water per day. “The $100 rebate can offset the full purchase price of high-ef ciency toilets and customers will immediately save money on their next water bill while saving water. By upgrading the plumbing in our existing buildings and residences we can delay the development of new water supplies and help keep water rates low.” Residential homeowners can receive up to two rebates. The total number of rebates available to commercial and multi-family establishments is determined on a case-by-case basis. Some applicants may also qualify to receive free, low ow faucet aerators and showerheads. Water-ef cient pre-rinse spray valves for commercial kitchens are also available and can reduce water consumption by as much as 70 percent delivering a tremendous savings. All participants must be pre-approved and other restrictions apply. Supplies are limited so act now and start saving! Visit www.ConservationPays.com to determine if you are eligible or call 1800-270-9794 for more information.Would not take much money to light up dark intersectionTo the Editor, How does one put a price on a human life? Thetus Fleming, 22, was killed in a hit and run accident near the intersection of Hillsboro and MLK boulevards. Anyone who travels that route will have to admit that the lighting in the evening hours is substandard at best. A left turn signal was denied by the Florida Department of Transportation. Why didn’t the city pursue the second alternative which was to increase the lighting at that intersection? Lack of funding is not an acceptable response when someone has been killed. When the Community Redevelopment Agency, or CRA, nished the Cove Shopping Center, they neglected to provide the outlets on the poles for lighting the complex for the holidays. They had to purchase a generator that has as its sole purpose the lighting of a Christmas tree. More important than a human life? There are Florida Power and Light poles at the MLK intersection and the requirement for additional lighting would be adding transformers and lights. The cost for such a project would be anywhere from $3,000 to $5,000. Where should the money come from for the transformers and lights at MLK? The city is assessing users of electricity a 10 percent public service tax which should generate $4.9 million by the end of the scal year. This tax was to be used to reduce the millage by 1 mill and that required revenues of just $4,622,065. Don’t tell the taxpayers, that a human life in the City of Deer eld is not worth an expenditure of $3,000 to $5,000 to light up that intersection like a Christmas tree. Jean Robb Deer eld Beach Dear Mr. Haley and U.S. Coast Guard, I would like to go on record as being strongly in support of saving the Hillsboro Lighthouse Light that has been and still is a beacon of safety for mariners and pilots on very dangerous waters. The information I have gathered indicates that the turtles are not being interrupted in their journey back into the sea in this area, and even if they were, I and many others, value human life over future turtles in one small patch of sand. Florida is bordered by the ocean with turtle protected sand all up and down its coastline. I often wonder what the dimming of all the lights on the shoreline, so as not to confuse the turtles, has done to crime statistics. The big diamond has cast its beam on troubled and dangerous waters for many years and is a much visited and treasured piece of local history. Let’s not send it into oblivion.Thank you. Phyllis J. NeubergerAnd by the way, human safety trumps turtles for this reader Ed. Note: Phyllis J. Neuberger is a Pelican staff writer.

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The Pelican 7 Friday, April 6, 2012 Noland appointed Berner to the board two years ago on a 3-2 vote of the commission, Marty Popelsky and Joe Miller, dissenting. This week, Berner said her problems with the board began only after Noland named three new members, Joan Maurice, Sally Potter and Michael Weiss. “I will defend myself and my personality,” she said. According to the mayor, complaints about Berner range from her being “disruptive on almost every subject,” to “constantly harassing the staff … taking time from the business of the housing authority.” The complainants said Berner asked for her own of ce, wanted her Kiwanis Club dues paid by the authority and for the board to order t-shirts for its members. In her defense, Berner said former authority director Pam Davis had given her of ce space. “I do work there,” Berner said. “I take my role differently from the others. Do you want someone who does real work, or someone who just sits on a board?” Discussing the issue Tuesday night, City Commissioner Joe Miller said, “I was correct two years ago. The housing authority is in a crucial time. Who would be attracted to this board knowing it is in disharmony?” The authority’s long time executive director, Pam Davis, left her post Jan. 31 to take a job in Gainesville, after a series of attacks by blogger Chaz Stevens who sat on the board brie y. Stevens, a Noland appointee, resigned under re from other board members for his published comments about Davis and authority business. Currently, the of ce is being managed by Rinaldo Bennett, who directs the Affordable Housing Operations. Bennett took over Mar. 20 after Interim Director Ruchelle Hobbs went on leave. As the commission agreed to proceed with Berner’s removal procedure, City Commissioner Ben Preston had words of caution. “If what is being said is valid, then the person should not be there . but we are obligated to nd the truth and make sure what we do is built on a measure of truth.” Popelsky cautioned that care should be taken with board appointments. “Don’t appoint if you are unsure,” he said. BoardContinued from page 1 Chamber preparing super anniversary edition of Community GuideBy Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach – A new book is coming out soon in this city from the Pompano Beach Chamber, and savvy business owners are lining up to take advantage of it as a marketing tool. The 2012 Community Guide and Business Directory will also commemorate the 70th Anniversary of the chamber, and there will be some interesting history detailing its genesis. Ric Green, Chamber CEO, says the chamber was rst organized by the Pompano Beach Rotary Club and articles of incorporation were led with the state in October of 1942. Green adds that this book is not just for business owners. “Residents and tourists will nd valuable information about the city, businesses, hotels, spots to visit, restaurants, golf courses, boating, shing and more. For all intents and purposes, it’s See CHAMBER on page 28

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8 The PelicanFriday, April 6, 2012 Business matters The Pelican takes a look at local business owners. Call The Pelican to nd out how you can tell your story here because business matters. 954-783-8700. By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFDr. Kasra Behfar, podiatric medicine-surgery, has offices at 50 NE 26 Ave. in Pompano Beach and a second in Coral Springs, dividing his week to see patients between both offices. His extensive training includes Harvard Medical School, New England Deaconess Hospital and Joslin Diabetes Center. He’s on staff at Holy Cross Medical Center, Coral Springs Medical Center and University Hospital. After 16 years in dealing with foot problems, nothing should surprise Dr. Behfar, but he admits the current escalating heel heights on fashionistas’ shoes amazes him. He says, “These very high heels and shoes with pointed, narrow shoe box toes bring women to my office in agony with problems such as bunions, hammer toes, bone spurs, ingrown toe nails, and painful corns and calluses. If bone deformity has developed, then surgery is the only option for correction.” Iris Jacobs, Coral Springs, has had two successful foot surgeries performed by Dr. Behfar and says, “His bedside manner is great. He listens to you and answers your questions. His follow through is fantastic. He called me post surgery to see how I was and when I came in for office visits after, he insisted on seeing me even though my insurance coverage specified just two visits.” This doctor stresses getting one’s feet measured in length and width. “Younger people know better and are Dr. Kasra N. Behfar, podiatrist and surgeon, stresses the importance of normal and diabetic foot careless vain about shoe size. Their mothers and grandmothers are my patients often because they wore smaller shoes than what they needed. How foolish and painful vanity can be,” He says, sighing. Asked what kind of shoes his wife, Azita, wears to dress up affairs, he laughs and says, “She is forced to wear properly fitted and sized shoes Dr. Kasra N. Behfar sees regular patients in his of ce at two locations Pompano Beach and Coral Springs. He has been practicing podiatric medicine and surgery for 16 years, handling all of the problems that occur in foot and ankle care. He is also a diabetic foot specialist. despite her having resisted me initially. She has begun to appreciate this lifestyle change. For special occasions, she wears an open toe shoe with no higher than a inch heel for no more than an hour. Otherwise, she’s in sandals or sneakers like much of the younger generation. We have See BEHFAR on page 15Volunteers chosen for city boardsOakland Park – Commissioners in Oakland Park made several appointments to advisory boards at Wednesday’s meeting. Richard Day and Katie Freeman were named to ll vacancies on the Beauti cation Advisory Board. Loren Walkington and Samuel Boyd were named to replace Gary Lanham and John Parker on the beauti cation board due to their missing four meetings. Mayor Anne Sallee was named as the city’s representative to the Broward League of Cities. Vice Mayor John Adornato was selected as rst alternate and Commissioner Shari McCartney, second alternate. J.J. Schmidt was named to the Charter Review Board.Buy a Sample McDougald House BrickThe Sample McDougald House Preservation Society, 450 NE 10 St. in Pompano Beach, is selling bricks to raise money for the historic site. Those who buy a brick can engrave it with up to three lines, 18 characters per line, and include a symbol. One line is $60, two lines is $70 and three lines is $80. The cost of a symbol is $10. Make all checks payable to the Sample McDougald House Preservation Society. Call 954-786-4047.

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The Pelican 9 Friday, April 6, 2012

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10 The PelicanFriday, April 6, 2012 Shop your local merchants. 954-783-8700 Making a DifferencePhyllis J. Neuberger wants your suggestions about people who are making a difference. Call 954-7838700. BriefsBy Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFF“We are proud to reach this milestone in our company’s history,” says Daryl G. Byrd, president and CEO of iBERIABANK Corporation. We appreciate the opportunity NASDAQ has afforded us to celebrate this signi cant event in the prestigious epicenter of the nancial sector.” In addition to ringing the bell to open the NASDAQ market, Byrd said, “To honor our 125th anniversary we are giving away brand new iPad 3’s at each branch bank.” Jean M. McIntyre, vice president and branch manager at 990 N. Federal Highway in Pompano Beach, says, “ Our iPad 3 will be raf ed off on April 30. You don’t need to have an account to register for the raf e. Just stop in, ll out an entry ticket, have a cookie and then hope lady luck smiles at you.” Michael Pastorino, branch manager of the Wilton Manors iBERIA BANK at 2465 Wilton Drive also has a brand new iPad 3 to raf e off on the same day. Just stop in to register. “Some lucky person will win this raf e and it could be you,” Michael says. On March 12, the actual iBERIABANK anniversary date, all branches had cupcakes in the lobby for all visitors. McIntyre even hand delivered cupcakes to a few clients Yard Sale to Bene t The Florida Humane SocietyA yard sale to benefit the “no kill” Florida Humane Society will be held Saturday, April 14 from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the shelter located at 3870 North Powerline Road, Pompano Beach, Northeast corner of Sample and Powerline, next to the Citco car wash. Donations are being accepted Thursday through Sunday for special arrangements call 954 785 2165. To celebrate the bank’s 125th anniversary, Branch Manager Michael Pastorino pumped $10 of gas into the tank of Krishan Manners, president/CEO of Wilton Manors Main Street, at the Texaco station on Wilton Drive. [Photos courtesy of Michael Pastorino and Jean McIntyre]until she ran out. The celebration continued. On March 14, these managers of the Pompano Beach and Wilton Manors branches delivered acts of kindness to random car owners who pulled into gas stations to ll up. McIntyre says, “I chose fellow Rotarian Dan Gordon’s Causeway Chevron Station on Federal and pumped $10 worth of gas into each car that pulled up until my $125 was used up. It was a lot of fun. People were oored and asked, “What’s the catch?” In this economic climate they were all most appreciative. One lady said, “I’ve never heard of a bank giving anything away since the free toaster era which was long ago.” Meanwhile to the south, Pastorino was pumping gas into random cars at the Texaco station on Wilton Drive. “People were shocked,” he says with a grin. “Some said, ‘I never heard of such a thing.’ One woman said, ‘Now, that’s an unexpected treat. It meant a lot to people. And they were excited to learn about the chance to win the raf e for the newest iPad 3. All they have to do is stop in to register. We’ll be drawing the winner’s name on April 30.” Random acts of kindness are nothing new to iBERIABANK branch managers. “We’re encouraged to be involved in the neighborhood and we are,” says McIntyre who often buys coffee and doughnuts for those waiting in line with her when she stops for coffee. “Our management encourages us to do ‘Hand shake touches with the community,’ and we do.” In Pompano Beach, McIntyre and her staff are active in the Chamber of Commerce, Rotary and Kiwanis clubs. McIntyre is chair of the Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce and See IBERIABANK on page 14iBERIABANK celebrates its 125th anniversary with random acts of kindness, NASDAQ bell ringing Save on Prescription DrugsBroward County residents, regardless of age, income or existing health coverage, can get a free NACo Prescription Drug Discount Card. The card, offered by the Broward County Community Partnerships Division, can be used to save money on prescription drugs at participating corporate and independent pharmacies. The card can also be used to save on certain pet prescriptions. Cards can be picked up at many Broward County government facilities including libraries, parks and transit facilities. For more, visit www.broward.org/HumanServices or call 954-357-5385.

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The Pelican 11 Friday, April 6, 2012 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach –The “Show and Tell” at Tuesday’s commission meeting featured photographs of snakes and a story about bad-smelling mulch and ooded backyards told by the homeowners whose property abuts the Deer eld Beach Country Club. James Bene eld, 532 NW 3 Way, said snakes have been part of his life for years because of debris dumped on the golf course. He routinely checks his bed for the reptiles, he said, while showing photos of truck loads of dirt, or what he called “a dump back there.” His neighbor Gail Battle, 633 NW 3 Way, said mulch piled close to her home “smells like a stable” and has caused her to suffer allergies. She said a tractor-trailer brought the mulch in and the odor permeates the communities of Commonwealth and Allwood Homes. After residents complained about the mulch pile, it was spread Battle said and now causes standing water in their backyards. Naomi Gayle, 643 NW 3 Way, blamed the city for the situation. “You enforce the ordinances,” she told the commission. “When we call for code enforcement, nothing Country club’s mulch, dirt piles causing neighbors griefSee GRIEF on page 24

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12 The PelicanFriday, April 6, 2012 Advertise Your Restaurant in The Pelican for coverage in nine North Broward cities. Call 954-783-8700. and other performances. Broward County commissioners have approved $7.2 million in funding for the design and construction of the library. In addition, the county will fund $3.8 million for its furnishings. While building the library requires an interlocal agreement between the city and the county, the civic campus, which extends from the railroad tracks to Cypress Road, is a Community Redevelopment Agency, or CRA, project. A cultural center within or near the library was not in the original scope of the project but the idea evolved later during several public input sessions. Now architectural designs could present one of two possibilities: either a second oor to accommodate the center or a free-standing cultural building. Vice Mayor George Brummer has been the strongest advocate of a cultural center. “I’m pushing for a separate building,” he said. And Brummer says he wants a third building that could be used as a convention center. He is also in favor of a parking garage at the southern end of the property. “I don’t think this should be decided by cost,” he added. “We need a legitimate theater with dressing rooms, lights and storage space with standard theater seating.” All costs not associated with the library would be borne by the city although Brummer suggested that there are people who could underwrite some of the expense. And if Brummer could have his way, he would call for “bold designs. I want people to like it or hate it,” the vice mayor said. A major part of the library design will be based on Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, or LEED. Now required for all government buildings, the library designers are shooting for the LEED gold standard, one of the higher levels of sustainable construction. Tammy Good, civil engineer for the city, explained that the library will have LED lighting, lights that turn off when the room is empty and temperature sensors. Good says the architects earn points with each installation of an environmentally positive xture, and that includes providing bicycle racks at the building to encourage green transportation. The present library, located at 1213 East Atlantic Blvd., would close with the opening of the new one. Ground breaking for the library is expected to take place in the early fall of 2013. LibraryContinued from page 1 Representative Gwyn Clarke-Reed to give 2012 legislative wrap up Pompano Beach Democratic Women’s Club will meet April 18 at 7 p.m. at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach. State Representative Gwyn ClarkeReed will discuss the most recent Florida legislative session. In addition, Broward Democratic Party Area Leader Lee Feldman will give a presentation of the major components of the Affordable Care Act and their importance to health care in the United States. The meeting is free and open to the public. Call 954-942-8711.

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The Pelican 13 Friday, April 6, 2012 Bailey Woodruff Title Company, Inc. offers 125 Years of combined title experience By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN WRITER“We prepare all closing documentation for buying, selling and re nancing real estate,” explains Mary Ste proud owner of Bailey Woodruff Title Company at 665 SE 10 St. in Deer eld Beach. “In this particular market, determining correct ownership is hugely important and we are experts at doing this. This is what we do and the only thing we do so Realtors, banks and mortgage companies rely on our expertise.” Ste adds, “We, as a team, have worked together for the past 15 to 16 years for a large insurance underwriter. Three years ago, we decided to open our own business and keep it personalized in a world that becomes more impersonal every day. Our clients dial in and speak to a real live person who will know what to do and will nd the answer.” This personalized service is very much appreciated. Karen Hammett of Howard Grace Mortgage & Associates says, “They stand out for me because they are so accommodating to our clients’ time schedules and needs. I did business with Mary in her previous job and respected Staff members Amy Wahl, Jay Yeskel, Stephanie Sylvester, Gaby Buery, Millie Linhares, Lorna Tritt, Sarah Parker, and Bailey Woodruff Title owner Mary Ste with her little dog, Miles.Bailey Woodruff Title Company, Inc., 665 SE 10 St., Deer eld Beach 954-571-7919her ability, so it was easy to support her new business. I think Bailey Woodruff is unique in its service and their prices are competitive.” This title company has clients from all over the world, but the involved properties are all local in the tri-county, South Florida area. “We have visitors from everywhere and they often impulsively choose a piece of Florida paradise and especially now when prices are so moderate,” Ste says with a bright smile. She continues, “We are very, very busy because it is the season and those visitors who fall in love with South Florida and choose to buy in are here right now. While we are not heavily involved in the foreclosure market, we do negotiate many short sales successfully in a relatively short period of time. However, I would estimate that 85 percent of our business is a normal, old fashioned transaction involving local residential properties..” Asked if she sees an improvement in our economy, she responds, “We see prices slowly increasing and mortgage money becoming more available. It is common knowledge that the real estate market goes up and down. We remain positive that the current situation is improving and good times are just around the corner.” Mary Ste who hails from England, is just like many Floridians who chose to be here for the weather and the casual lifestyle. Although she has traveled Europe and Canada, she settled down right here with husband, Roger 20 years ago. An animated, high energy woman, Ste belongs to and is active in the British American Chamber of Commerce as well as in the Deer eld Beach, Lighthouse Point and Pompano Beach chambers. And then, there’s the Brazilian Business Club, the Lighthouse Point Yacht Club and its Ladies Cub. She admits between time with husband Roger, their dog Miles, her business and her community involvement her life is a revolving door with breakfasts, lunches and after hour meetings. In her own charming English accent, she concludes, “A reliable title company is essential to the buying and selling of property. Here, at Bailey Woodruff Title Co., Inc. we offer good old fashioned service, care and consideration for the client and the client’s client and it pays off. Our edgling company was among the top ve closing of ces in Broward County according to Data Trace, an independent company that tracks business.” Call 954-571-7919 for further information.Advertisement

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14 The PelicanFriday, April 6, 2012 The Pelican 954-783-8700 iBeriaContinued from page 10 president-elect for Kiwanis. In Wilton Manors, Pastorino is active in the Wilton Manors Main Street group which he serves as treasurer. And this successful bank continues to grow. On March 19, iBERIABANK announced agreement to acquire Florida Gulf Bancorp, Inc. and will signi cantly increase its presence in Lee County, Florida. iBERIABANK corporation was established in 1887. Its predecessors started the company with one branch in New iberia, Louisiana. Today at 11.8 billion in assets and over 2,500 associates, iBERIABANK corporation is a nancial holding company with 263 combined of ces in 12 states including 173 bank branch of ces. The Pelican loves businesses with heart Jean McIntyre, left, with a lucky lady, pumped $10 of free gas into the tanks of those who drove up to Dan Gordon’s Chevron station in Pompano Beach until her $125 was used up.. and iBERIABANK certainly quali es. Thank you for your commitments and generosity to the people of Pompano Beach and Wilton Manors. there is not a problem with beauti cation is at a proposed round-about at Washingtonian Hoffmann noted where improving drainage is the issue. Flynn said his design would handle 10 inches of rain in one day. “This is being way over thought and over designed,” Commissioner Mark Brown said. “The only problem is ooding. It’s a river when it rains.” Brown said the designers shouldn’t touch parking. “Make sure it’s legal, but don’t attempt to re-design parking. I’m sure they need all they have. Maybe update landscaping. Keep the sidewalks. Lots of people walk there.” Brown said he has mixed feelings about the roundabout, where there is already a fourway stop. He suggested just adding landscaping. Flynn said the designers were tasked with xing the drainage and beauti cation. Fixing the drainage is simple, he said. “If you want to beautify it, it takes the neighborhood buying in.” Commissioner Stuart Dodd said that xing the drainage required a new swale and asked if lower landscaping and lighting could be installed. Vice Mayor Scot Sasser said there were too many unanswered questions on the issues. He suggested a special meeting. Condo resident Ann Rhinesmith said she’s excited about the plans, citing lighting as her big concern. She said residents in her condo are all for improved landscaping. She suggested adding a crosswalk at Publix. “To have to cross a street to get to an island, that’s insane,” said one female resident. “We have a lot of old people.” “Forget Scheme C,” a 25-year resident urged. “It’s a total disaster, an absolute nightmare…it’s a delusion of grandeur.” TopicsContinued from page 2

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The Pelican 15 Friday, April 6, 2012 two sons, so it looks like I’m spared future fights with a daughter.” He gets many medical referrals for diabetic patients who must take special care of their feet to keep them. “With two years of special training in diabetic limb salvage at New England Deaconess Hospital, connected to Harvard Medical School, prevention is the mainstay of our therapy,” he says. “The bad news is that complications such as food wounds, gangrene and amputation are all too real and can lead to death. The good news is that all of these possibilities are preventable.” He suggests: “If blood sugars are controlled, other physical problems can be avoided. Do a daily, careful inspection of each foot including between toes. The first sign of anything different like scabbing, oozing, redness, swelling signals a visit to the podiatrist. “Never walk barefoot to prevent all possible traumas to the foot. Wear properly fitted shoes If there are deformities, therapeutic footwear is now readily available. Seek immediate treatment for any open sores. Treatment consists of various techniques including cleansing of wounds, removal of dead tissue, special dressings and other modalities.” Dr. Behfar also treats fractures and sprains of the foot and ankle. Foot surgeries are all done in hospitals. Leo Spaschover, Lauderdale-By-The-Sea, has been a patient for at least seven years and calls Dr. Behfar “an excellent podiatrist. I got a foot condition while abroad which was misdiagnosed by an orthopedist. When I returned, Dr. Behfar immediately identified my problem and helped me.” For further information or an appointment, call 954782-7071 in Pompano Beach or 954-726-9255 in Coral Springs. BehfarContinued from page 8 See SIGHTINGS on page 16SightingsA community calendar of East Broward County. Please email information to siren2415@gmail.comArt, Music, Film & Theatre4-14 – And Then There Were None [A Murder Mystery] will be performed by the Curtain Call Playhouse at 8 p.m. at the Herb Skolnick Center, 800 SW 36 Ave., Pompano Beach. Tickets are $23 for adults, $10 for students. The play also runs on April 20 and 21 at 8 p.m. and at 2 p.m. on April 15 and 22. 954-784-0768. 4-18 – Art-By-The-Sea, a monthly art series will take place from 7 to 9 p.m. at Friedt Family Fellowship Hall, 4433 Bougainvillea Drive, Lauderdale-By-TheSea. 954-594-0444. 4-20 – The last Island City Art Walk of the season takes place from 7 to 10 p.m. along Wilton Drive in Wilton Manors. Over 40 local artists show

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16 The Pelican Friday, April 6, 2012Advertise with The Pelican 954.783.8700 Kids day off? Bring them to Deer eld Beach to learn about Sea Turtles todayDeer eld Beach – This Friday, April 6, just in time for a scheduled day off for Broward Schools, the City of Deer eld Beach is hosting an Environmental Education Workshop focused on sea turtles—their nesting habits, the different species that nest on Deer eld Beach, and how to minimize human impact on these fascinating sea creatures. The workshop will be held at the North Beach Pavilion, located north of the International Fishing Pier on the east side of A1A. Metered parking is available in the north beach pavilion parking lot. The presentation will begin at 10:30 a.m. and will last approximately one hour. Coffee and donuts will be served. All ages welcome. Call 954-480-4407 for more information. For the latest news on City of Deer eld Beach events, sign up for E-Subscriptions at www. Deer eld-Beach.com/ esubscriptions. Now Online • www.pompanopelican.com SightingsContinued from page 15off their works in Wilton Drive’s cafes, boutiques, restaurants and other businesses. 4-27 & 28 – Deerfield Beach Wine and Food Festival at Quiet Waters Park, 401 South Powerline Road, Deerfield Beach. VIP and regular tickets available. Cost varies by activity. Visit www.DeerfieldBeachWineAndFoodFestival.com or 561-338-7594.Food & Bargains4-14 – Wilton Manors Yard Sale, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive. Free to the public. To become a vendor call 954-390-2130. 4-15 – The Benevolent Patriotic Order of DOES Drove 142 holds a pancake breakfast from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. at the Elks lodge, 700 N.E. 10 St., Pompano Beach. Cost is $5 for adults and $2.50 for children. 954-587-1121. 4-21 – Oakland Park Yard Sale, 7 a.m. to 12 p.m. at Jaco Pastorius Park, 4000 N. Dixie Hwy. Free to the public. To become a vendor call 954630-4500.See SIGHTINGS on page 32

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The Pelican 17 Friday, April 6, 2012 By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFPOMPANO BEACH With a 13-point lead in the second quarter, it looked as if the Blanche Ely High School boys basketball team was on the verge of running away with their game against St. Benedict’s. But a third quarter turnaround by St. Benedict’s led to a 67-61 loss by Ely to the New Jersey school on March 29 in the first round of ESPN National High School Invitational, played in Ely basketball team falls 67-61 in ESPN National High School InvitationalBethesda, Maryland. Ely went into the game less than a month after its 78-46 state championship victory over Oak Ridge on March 3. St. Benedict’s dominated early on with seven unanswered points before Ely got on board with a point scored off the foul line. After that, with the help of a three-pointer by shooting guard Dallas Cameron and a dunk up the middle by power forward Clide Geffrard, Ely steadily marched back from the deficit to take the largest lead of the game – 38-25. But after the Tigers reached their zenith, St. Benedict’s slowly climbed its way back, never letting Ely get ahead of them by more than 10 points. Then, with 1:43 left in the third quarter, St. Benedict’s shooting guard Melvin Johnson dropped in a threepointer, making the score 48-46, and giving the Gray Bees their first lead since the beginning of the game. Unfortunately for Ely, it was the last lead change of the game. The Tigers were close to tying it up, coming within one or two points multiple times, but couldn’t overcome St. Benedict’s defense in the second half. “We lost concentration in the second half. Actually, the third quarter. We just started making mental mistakes,” said Head Coach Melvin Randall. “It was one mistake after another, after another.” St. Benedict’s went on to face Findlay Prep of Nevada but lost 65-55. Oak Hill, of Virginia, took home the top tournament’s top honors. Ely ends the season with a 30-3 record and is ranked #20 in the ESPN POWERADE FAB 50 national rankings. Asked about next year’s team, Randall responded, “I wouldn’t use the term rebuilding. It’s going to be a reloading year.”

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18 The Pelican Friday, April 6, 2012 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDEERFIEL D BEACH Hillsboro Pines, the 30-year-old golf course within the confines of Century Village East, has been transformed and the credit goes to two South Florida entrepreneurs who saw its potential and made the changes needed to bring in a new generation of golfers. Randy Bast and Rob Smith now head up the ownership group. They have both owned and successfully operated businesses of all types. In 2010, after posting nearly a $400,000 loss in ‘09, Bast brought in his long-time friend Smith to help him turn the course around. They hired golf course superintendent Steve Adams from Boca’s prestigious Broken Sound County Club who transitioned the course, Hillsboro Pines: Not your granddaddy’s golf course anymoreimproved its condition and lengthened some holes. They bought a new fleet of golf carts, renovated the pro shop and added the 19th Hole Bar & Grill, a full-service restaurant offering breakfast and lunch, beers on tap, wine and eight TVs for sports fans. “The course is in the best shape it has been in 30 years,” said President and General Manager Rob Smith. “I’d put the condition of our greens up against any in Broward County.” The course is a par 62, 4,177 yards from the blue tees, and considered a challenge for even the scratch golfer. Smith calls it “true” yardage. All the holes were re-measured and every yard accounted for he says. Distance was increased on holes 2 and 9, 17 and 18, with 9 and 18 the longest on the course. The most challenging hole is probably the 12th which is bordered by water the length of the 290-yard fairway, and the tee box is positioned so that the golfer must drive the lake. For those with an aversion to water, the front nine is dry but has a respectable number of bunkers. Because it is a ‘sportssized’ course, a round of golf, including lunch, can be played in four hours, Smith said. Since the improvements at Hillsboro Pines, play there is up by 23 percent, he added. In season, he had over 250 league players. By far the most popular events at the club are the Night Golf tournaments held several times a year. The most recent one on March 23 was a sellout and now the course is hosting private Night Golf events for companies as corporate team-building functions. The challenge is to play in the dark with everything aglow: the balls, the fairways lit by glow sticks, the flagsticks wrapped in blinking lights, and even the players adorned with accessories that glow. Nighttime golf, according to Smith, puts the novice and scratch golfer on even terms and makes the game fun for everyone. In fact, the first event was won by two 10-year old-boys and their fathers. With the season winding down, Smith is offering a “pretty incredible” deal for summer golfers at Hillsboro Pines. He calls it “free golf.” Summer Memberships run from May 1 through September 30 for only $149, $129 if purchased by Apr. 15. The only cost is the $10 cart rental. The public can expect a dramatic drop in rates also, Smith said, and he institutes a price match policy in the summer that honors any green w/cart fees on an 18-hole course in a 30-mile radius. And the deals at Hillsboro A golfer lines up his putt on one of Hillsboro Pines’ courses. Golfers at Hillsboro Pines can take in the sun, water and lush landscapes.See PINES on page 32 Advertisement

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The Pelican 19 Friday, April 6, 2012 PUDContinued from page 4months away from approving or disapproving the development. Martin Nixon, president of East Neighborhood Association, or ENA, said building height should be linked to the size of the parcel. Under the proposed PUD, buildings can’t be higher than five-stories or 60 ft. “We’re talking about a five-story building in a neighborhood with only a three-story building,” said Bruce Connolly, ENA board member, referring to the Olivewood Condominium, located adjacent to Spiritual Living. Connolly asked that a PUD moratorium be put in place. John Fiore, vice president of ENA and former city mayor, said the PUD as written threatens his neighborhood’s quality of life. “There’s too much flexibility in these ordinances,” he said. But not everyone is wary of the PUD. “I live in that neighborhood and I want this,” said Carl Lenser. “I think it’s more of an issue of not in my backyard,” he said, referring to those against it. “If you want to keep it a small town than have no new development,” said business owner Joe Pallant. Resident Laura Comer suggested commissioners listen to what their constituents want. “When you all ran for your positions you said you were going to represent us.” Referring to the proposed apartments and similar projects, Vice Mayor Tom Green said the PUD was good for the city if large developments were built in areas adjacent to the railroad tracks and along Oakland Park Boulevard. “But across from houses? No.” Commissioners passed the PUD with a change to the review process. Originally, if developers received approval from the city, but later changed more than 10 percent of their floor plan, they would have to have it reviewed again. “Pretty much everything, except the color of the building, is going to have to come back,” said Heidi Shafran, community development services department director. “If we’re going to make that big of a change I want to see it,” said Commissioner Scott Newton, who pushed for the reduction.

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20 The Pelican Friday, April 6, 2012 Eddie Jones, former NBA player, gives back with basketball camp Heavenly Pizza cooks Easter dinner for communityPompano Beach Phil Kasees, owner of Heavenly Pizza [the Church in a Pizzeria], 2647 E. Atlantic Blvd. in Pompano Beach, is opening for an Easter/ Passover dinner this Sunday starting at noon. Kasees says he plans to serve the meal throughout the day. The doors will be open to anyone who is in need or does not have a place to go on Easter/Passover. Visitors to Pompano Beach are also welcome. There is no charge for the meal. Kasees will also lead the regularly scheduled Sunday Bible Study starting at 4 p.m. All are welcome to attend. See JONES on page 28By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFPOMPANO BEACH When former NBA player Eddie Jones looks at the kids participating in his annual basketball camp, he sees the possibility that a few of them might follow in his footsteps. On March 30, about 120 children and teenagers participated in Jones’ basketball camp at the Boys & Girls Club’s Pompano Beach gymnasium, located in the Thomas D. Stephanis Club. Jones, a former Blanche Ely High School student who graduated from Temple University in 1994, used his basketball skills to get a scholarship and eventually launch himself into a 14-year NBA career. “You can use basketball scholarships and athletic sports to get a great education,” said Jones, who played for five NBA teams, including the Miami Heat and Los Angeles Lakers, from 1994 to 2008. Originally, Jones sponsored the camp at Blanche Ely but moved it to the Boys & Girls Club a few years ago. “I was actually with the Lakers when I first started doing it,” said Jones. “I just want these kids to learn the game.” But long before he ever stepped foot onto a pro basketball court, Jones learned the game in the same gym he now supports. One of those who taught him, Greg Jones, now serves as director of Thomas D. Stephanis Boys & Girls Club. “Greg was my coach when I was a kid,” said Eddie Jones. “I give money every year to keep this camp going. This thing’s going to keep going and some of these kids are going to eventually give back.” But Greg Jones says Eddie Jones’ commitment to the Boys & Girls Club isn’t just about basketball. Along with sponsoring the camp, Jones has paid for air conditioning and bleacher renovations as well as Christmas parties and trees for families during the holidays. “It goes beyond basketball. He talks to kids about life and making the right decisions, staying on a positive track,” said Greg Jones. And with the advent of social media sites like Facebook and rising childhood obesity rates, Greg Jones says children

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The Pelican 21 Friday, April 6, 2012 By Malcolm McClintockPELICAN STAFFOld World Sausage 1384 S. Federal Hwy. 1 block north of McNab Road Pompano Beach 954-942-2004“ My grandfather was the founder of the world famous Hebrew National Foods company,” says friendly sausage specialist Steve Chase, a transplanted New-Yorker who is bringing his particular brand of expertise to the longest-standing meat shop in Florida. “I come from a long line of sausage makers and it is truly a passion for me to make innovative, avorful and healthy NY deli style meat products.” In 2011, Chase purchased Old World Sausage Factory and immediately assembled an impressive team of European sausage makers led by Dutch master butcher Remon Under new ownership, Pompano Beach’s Old World Sausage delivers even better meat products than ever before A popular lunch special, the Hungarian Goulash [left] is loaded with avorful slow-simmered beef chunks and vegetables slathered over tender egg noodles. Old World Sausage also serves up such novel favorites as Cilantro sausage, smoked chicken Apple sausage, slow-cooked roast beef and tangy German-style potato salad [above]. [Photos by Malcolm McClintock]See OLD WORLD on page 22 Hemelrijk. “We pride ourselves on making the best and most consistent Old World and New World style meats that we know customers will truly love,” the Amsterdam-born Hemelrijk said. “And we use nothing but pure muscle meat with no llers or by-products.” Their only goal is to produce the best-tasting, highest quality, premium natural & organic meats with no arti cial preservatives, nitrites or nitrates. Just about everything in the shop is gluten free, msg

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22 The Pelican Friday, April 6, 2012 free, dairy free, wheat free, soy free and packed in natural collagen casings. Old World Sausage Factory prides itself on only buying from meat suppliers who use antibiotic and hormonefree vegetarian feed and who seek out free range, grass fed animals whenever possible. “When people visit us, they know they will get the best meat products available. And since we have our own smokers, you can be guaranteed that everything is made from scratch on the premises,” says Chase. “I am very excited to be able to control the production from start to nish. This way I know that every single item will be of the highest quality possible.” The main attraction is, of course, the huge selection of tasty sausages. Spicy garlic bratwurst, Hungarian smoked Kielbasa, Hot and Mild Italian, Lemon Chicken Spinach, Spicy Lamb Merguez, Polish Garlic, Chorizo, Andouille, English Bangers, Knackwurst, Wieners, Frankfurters and novel creations like Apple Chicken, Mango-Pear Chicken, Turkey and Jalapeo style sausages are just a few of the seemingly unending options. But Old World Sausage Factory is also quite adept at preparing a host of other favorites to suit every palate. “We have many ready-toeat specialties such as juicy rotisserie chicken, matzo ball chicken soup, veal schnitzel, cabbage rolls, Hungarian Goulash and homemade chili,” says Chase. “Our Executive Chef Georgie has over 26 years working in the top Delis. He also makes great salads such as tuna, white sh, shrimp and our famous Cherry Walnut Chicken salad.” Of course, this quaint deli specializes in tantalizing sandwich meats such as hot pastrami, corned beef, roast beef, old world ham, kosher bologna, beef brisket, turkey and just about every other specialty imaginable that can be put between two slices of bread. Some lunch specials include handcrafted mild Italian sausage with all the xins’ or two New York City hot dogs with soda for $4.99. To-go frozen entres begin at $5.99. Most sausages are between $2.99 and $4.99 per lb while cold cuts and cheeses start at $3.49 per lb. Be sure to call ahead for large orders, catering or special requests such as duck liver mousse, country pt or rabbit pt as Old World prepares its meats in small batches. “We sell out quickly because we don’t freeze our meats. We make products you can’t nd in the big grocery stores and we do so at very reasonable prices,” adds Chase. Remember to Old WorldContinued from page 21 What it’s all about? A classic all beef hot-dog with sauerkraut and hot mustard [left] and an ultra-lean, fully dressed, award-winning Bison dog [right].give the Bison hot-dogs a try “I have won awards for my Bison dogs,” says Chase who has worked with celebrities selling this avorful, low-fat meat. “They are truly outstanding.” Visit www.owsausage.com.

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The Pelican 23 Friday, April 6, 2012 Visit The Pelican online at pompanopelican.com. Let us know how we can help cover the news of your city. We Mean Business! 954-783-8700 By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFPOMPANO BEACH Without her MacBook Pro, Erin Saley doesn’t know how she would get through her classes. But thanks to a $1,000 scholarship from the Pompano Beach High School Booster Club, she doesn’t have to find out. Through fundraising efforts like its upcoming golf tournament – May 5, 8 a.m. at the Pompano Beach Municipal Golf Course, 1101 N. Federal Hwy. – the Booster Club helps students pay for computers, books and a lot of the other extra expenses of a college education. Saley, a freshman at the University of Florida in Gainesville studying applied Golf tournament helps students afford college extrasphysiology and kinesiology, graduated from Pompano Beach High School last year. Upon graduating, the Booster Club gave her a $1,000 scholarship, which she spent on the MacBook. “I bring it to all my classes to take notes on. And our campus has [wireless internet] all over so I use it everywhere,” said Saley. “Without it, I’d be lost.” She says the MacBook has put her ahead in school and allowed her to take the $1,000 she would have spent on the computer and put it towards other expenses like groceries. “It’s expensive up here,” said Saley. Denise Schuler, spokeswoman for the Booster Club, said scholarships are given to students with a certain grade point average who have been accepted into a college or university. Students must also volunteer with the Booster Club for 100 hours or more. The student’s mother, father or legal guardian must also be a member of the Booster Club. Once the scholarship is given, a maximum of $1,000, the student can spend it at his or her discretion. Tom Shahan’s son received a $500 scholarship and used it to buy a laptop computer. “He spent his on a laptop because you can’t get by without [one],” said Shahan. With golfers, sponsorships and donations, Schuler estimates this year’s tournament will raise between $8,000 and $10,000 and attract 70 to 80 golfers. Along with the tournament prizes, participants will also have the chance to win raffle prizes that include spa packages, paddle boarding lessons, restaurant gift certificates and more. The cost per golfer is $100. Sponsorship opportunities are also available. To sign up for the tournament, call 954-8062717.

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24 The Pelican Friday, April 6, 2012 is ignorant, disrespectful and baseless,” Sudler said. “It is not a black and white issue. BSO is doing their job . they will present their findings to the state attorney’s office who will say if charges are to be filed.”Dixie Flyover construction closes 2 Street intersectionDeerfield Beach The Dixie Highway Flyover opens to traffic Tuesday, April 10, connecting this city and Boca Raton, but a road closure in the area could cause other delays. From that date until May 4, the intersection of NE 2 Street and NE 2 Avenue will be under construction. Users of the tennis center in Pioneer Park may park on 2nd Street or east of the playground. The main entrance on the west side will be closed. Access to businesses along NE 2 Avenue will be maintained. The four-lane flyover with bike lanes and sidewalks is a $39.5 million project funded by federal stimulus money. It spans the Hillsboro Canal, Florida East Coast Railroad tracks, NE 2 Street and 2 Avenue and N. River Avenue.Mayor favors end to Sunday alcohol sales banDeerfield Beach Mayor Peggy Noland wants the city to get on board with others that are lifting bans on the Sunday morning sale of alcohol. She said Tuesday night she has been approached by the managers of Publix and Winn-Dixie as well as restaurant owners asking that the law prohibiting the sale of alcohol until noon be amended. Potential customers, they say, are going outside the city to purchase beer and restaurateurs say their customers should be allowed to order a mimosa for Sunday brunch. Three of her constituents favored letting the ordinance stand. “People can deal with the inconvenience,” said Commissioner Ben Preston. Commissioners Joe Miller and Marty Popelsky agreed. Only Vice Mayor Bill Ganz took the mayor’s position saying, “It’s legislation of morality.” Ganz pointed out that alcohol sales are allowed until 3 a.m. six days a week. “The only justification [for the Sunday ban] is religious,” he said. In the end, Miller suggested they delay the matter to give time for people to “weigh in.”ChiefContinued from page 3 happens. That’s a city problem, not a golf course problem.” Gayle also said a fence separating their yards from the golf course is “horribly kept” and the weeds grow into “our backyards. “I would take no money to have the grass mowed and to use weed killer,” Gayle said. She also suggested a swale to control the flooding caused by the mulched ground. Issues between the golf course owners and the residents have been ongoing for years according to the speakers. City Commissioner GriefContinued from page 11 Ben Preston called it “a complicated and incompatible situation . I have talked to the country club and asked them to resolve these issues. But they haven’t. They are not good neighbors. It is a mess.” Battle also called the club owners “terrible neighbors… They have received favors (in the past) and don’t keep their word.” Gayle said in her 33 years in the neighborhood, there “has always been a situation. You have to give us support,” she told the commission. Mayor Peggy Noland asked where the dirt piles were coming from and told the residents, “I guarantee you this was news to me. Something will be happening.” Calls from The Pelican to the Deerfield Beach Country Club were unanswered at press time.

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The Pelican 25 Friday, April 6, 2012 throughout his life.” Then she thanked her cardiologist, Dr. Alan L. Niederman, who played a significant part in her life shortly after she received the news of her son’s death. Pompano Beach Division Chief Michael Hohl, recalls what happened. “I was the person who ElliotContinued from page 1informed the family of the accident. I was there at North Broward Medical Center when Joanne arrived,” he said. Later when the only thing left was to return home, Hohl spoke to each member. When he spoke to Joanne, he asked if she were OK. She responded words that were symptomatic of a heart attack. “We immediately took her into the hospital where she began receiving help,” he said. In less than 12 hours, Joanne grey dog, Dingy. Dingy had attended his master’s funeral in January at Calvary Chapel in Fort Lauderdale where during the service he hopped up on a table to sniff Elliot’s boots and helmet. At the dedication on Saturday, Dingy made his presence known when he barked with approval during the mayor’s proclamation. Dingy also got a big laugh when he left a loving mark on the shrubs under the monument bearing his master’s name. was transferred to Holy Cross where Dr. Niederman was on staff. “The next week, she was at the funeral,” said Hohl. “Nothing short of a miracle.” While doctors recommended that she not attend her son’s funeral, she overruled their decisions and attended with her cardiologist at her side. He was also was present on this day and Joanne thanked him publicly for his help. Bill Elliot’s sister, MaryBeth Williams, and Elliot’s brother, John, a Boca Raton firefighter, accompanied their mother. Williams announced that a scholarship in honor of her brother has been established through the Broward Education Foundation to “help students “accomplish their goals and follow their dreams.” Fire Chief Harry Small remembered Elliot as “the kind of person you want working with you. I was privileged to have him as a friend.” And a very special friend of the late Bill Elliot was also on hand this day, his mixed-breed Chris Flores, Kaitlyn Fox and Alisha Edison with Deer eld Beach Elementary teacher, Mary-Beth William, sister of Bill Elliot. Williams announced the establishment of a scholarship fund in honor of her brother.

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26 The Pelican Friday, April 6, 2012

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The Pelican 27 Friday, April 6, 2012 By Malcolm McClintockPELICAN STAFF“We heard her practicing in the lobby and thought to ourselves, ‘Wow, she is amazing. Maybe she could give us a private concert.” said Anna Tserkezis, a Leisure Towers condo resident. Clearly impressed by the talent level of this beautiful young viola player, Anna and building manager Deena Palmer hastily put out dozens of folding chairs in the common room. A mere hour later, 15-year-old Marena Salerno Collins was strolling into a surprisingly crowded room. Apparently, word had spread throughout the Viola prodigy gives impromptu concert at Lauderdale-By-The-Sea condobuilding that a young talent would be showcasing her musical gifts. Visiting Lauderdale-ByThe-Sea with her mother, Rhonda, Marena was in town to spend a few days with her grandfather Remo Salerno – a long time resident of the area who splits his time between his South Florida and Michigan homes. “I am so proud of her,” says the senior Salerno who has been actively involved in supporting his granddaughter’s musical aspirations since she was barely six years old. For those wondering about the difference between a Marena Salerno Collins impresses the audience with her mastery of the physically demanding viola. [Photos by Malcolm McClintock]viola and a violin, the former is slightly bigger, requires a shorter, sturdier bow and players read for it in Alto Clef while violinists read in Treble Clef. Additionally, the viola produces a deeper, richer sound and requires more physical strength to wield. After introducing herself as a musically inclined teenager from Jackson Hole, Wyoming, the gregarious young musician launched into a thunderous rendition of a Bach Allemande. At the conclusion, Marena informed the impressed audience that she was equally comfortable playing five other instruments including the bassoon, saxophone and, of course, the violin. “But my favorite thing to do is to play different places around Jackson Hole with my friend who is a guitarist. We have a really cool band,” says the gifted artist. She then lightened the mood See VIOLA on page 35

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28 The Pelican Friday, April 6, 2012 WORSHIP DIRECTORY: Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad. Rev. Hyvenson Joseph JonesContinued from page 20and teenagers are dealing with more challenges than ever before. “Some things are harder now, as far as peer pressure, than years ago,” said Jones. “But places like the Boys & Girls Club can help them beat the odds,” he said. “We try to get them involved.” For more on the Boys & Girls Club, visit www.bgcbc. org or call 954-941-2697.ChamberContinued from page 7Advertise in The Pelican 954-783-8700!a resource guide for anyone living in or visiting Pompano Beach and the greater area.” This year the Anniversary Guide is being published by Atlantic Communications Group, Inc., award-winning publishers located in Philadelphia. Expected to be off the presses in mid-summer, the full-color guide will be distributed all year to hotels and businesses. The guide will also be available for purchase at the chamber of ce, 2200 East Atlantic Blvd. Along with information on chamber events and the bene ts of chamber membership, the 2012-2013 edition will include a complete Business Directory with an alphabetical listing of all chamber member rms; a Buyers’ Guide with all member rms by business classi cation; an Advertisers’ Index with page location and web address of all advertisers; plus a full-color editorial section featuring the bene ts of living and working in the Greater Pompano Beach area; and nally a full-color map of the Chamber’s service area. “We’re really excited about this, and I’m personally delighted to be working with Atlantic Communications and their outstanding sales, design and production team. Atlantic has been creating high-quality custom image books, maps and directories for over 25 years and their reputation for excellence that’s second to none. We’re proud to be working with the best in the business,” Green said. The feeling is mutual, according to Hayden M. Wilbur, Atlantic CEO. “Atlantic welcomes the chance to promote the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, and communicate who you are and what you offer in a format you’ll be proud to distribute,” said Wilbur, Atlantic CEO. “This is a valuable marketing tool. We encourage every chamber member to support this effort to get your message out there. Take advantage of our new 3 for 1 offer in print, online and on the online map.” Chamber and non-chamber members can advertise in the guide, but members will purchase ads at discounted prices. Green believes that this marketing tool will have a strong impact on both small and large corporations and add to a stronger business climate. As the city’s chamber leader, Green’s goals are focused on prosperity. And the more businesses that sign up for the guide, the more valuable this publication becomes. “There’s only a couple of months for business owners to sign up for the book. We are just getting started with it, but time passes so quickly, it will be over before you know it, so we recommend businesses move quickly,” Green says. For more information on the publication, please contact Alan Wrobel, Advertising Manager at directory@pompanobeachchamber.com

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The Pelican 29 Friday, April 6, 2012 Lighthouse Point – Curves members of Lighthouse Point recently donated over 1,200 pounds of food to the Blessings Food Pantry, 210 NE 3 St., Pompano Beach. The food collection efforts took place during March. Members brought in food when they came in for their workouts and new members joining in the month of March had the one time service fee waived with their donation of a bag of groceries. “While we work to improve the lives of women in the northeast Broward County area through Curves, we also feel it is important to reach out to others in our community,” said Gail Bamman, owner of Curves of Lighthouse Point. “It’s apparent to us that the Blessings Food Pantry cares about the lives and the health of the people in our community. We are proud to be able to partner with them to help the North Broward county area.” According to Bamman, one of Curves of Lighthouse Point’s goals is to foster community involvement through charitable efforts. “Curves has always been dedicated to improving someone’s life – through weight loss or a charitable initiative. It’s exciting to be able to give both,” said Bamman. Curves’ program consists of 30 minutes of exercise three times a week, during which participants work all major muscle groups and receive a great cardio workout. It includes all five components of a complete exercise program: warm-up, strength training, cardio, cool down, and stretching. To help Curves’ donation efforts, or to become a member contact Gail Bamman at 954-783-2900.About CurvesCurves works every major muscle group with strength training, cardio and stretching in every 30 minute workout. Gary Heavin and his wife Diane are considered the innovators of the express fitness phenomenon that has made exercise available to more than four million women worldwide. With more than 10,000 locations in dozens of countries, Curves is the world’s largest fitness franchise. Visit www.curves. com.Curves of Lighthouse Point helps stock Blessings Food Pantry Gail Bamman and Vicki Pierini prepare to box up 1,200 pounds of food to be donated to Blessings Food Pantry in Pompano Beach. [Staff photo]

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30 The Pelican Friday, April 6, 2012 Classi eds Call 954-545-0013 ••• Business Card Directory ••• HELP WANTEDPT OR FT YOUR CHOICE – Be An AVON Independent Sales Representative AND YOUR Own Boss. $10 To Start! Call 954-729-0750. 4-6 CHRIST CHURCH PRESCHOOL Looking For Part – Time Teacher For Ages Six – Weeks To 5 Years Of Age. Call Cindy At 954-943-7776. 4-6 BOOKKEEPERWITH EXPERIENCE IN Accounts Payable & Accounts Receivable. Must Possess Excellent Organizational & Computer Skills. PT Position 25 Hrs Per Week. Please Email Resume To tdjrpapa@ yahoo.com LOCAL PEST CONTROL CO Looking For Quality Sales/Service Tech. Must Be Dependable, Team Player, Good Drivers License & People Skills. Will Train Right Person. ALSO Of ce Assistant – Computer – People & Phone Skills Needed. Fax Resume 954-418-3982. SEEKING EMPLOYMENTI AM SEEKING A Clerical Position – Basic Computer Skills. Bilingual Spanish – English – Part-time. Prefer Pompano Ft Laud Area. 954-942-8111. SERVICES CARPET CLEANING – 2 Rooms $59!! ACTUAL PRICE!! No GIMMICKS!! CALL 954-784-8199. DANNY BOY ELECTRIC – Lic & Insured. Lic. #EC13004811. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. 24/Hr Service. 954-290-1443. Beat Any Written Estimate. Sr, Discount. 4-6 GINGERS HOUSEKEEPING – 20 YEARS EXP. (Licensed) References Available. Honest & Reliable – Love To Clean Windows! Help Organize No Problem. FREE Estimates! 954-200-4266. 4-6 HAMWAY POOL SERVICE – Once – A Month Service $39 – Includes All Chemicals. Weekly Service Also Available – 20 Years Exp. Call 954-9795548. 4-27 DAVIDSON’S ROOFING – SPECIALIZING In ReRoo ng – Repairs – Siding –Pressure Cleaning – Painting – Gutters – Windows – Licensed And Insured. 954-726-4912. HANDYMAN – PAINTING – CARPENTRY – Pressure Cleaning. Decks! Everything Around The House. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. Call 561-350-3781. MOORE PLUMBING PLUMBING SERVICES – Big Jobs – Small Jobs. We Do It All. Remodeling & Repairs. Lic. & Insured. C.C. Accepted. Call 954-772-4600. 4-27 HONEST HANDYMAN – HOME & BUILDING Maintenance/Improvements. No Job Too Small. Fast Friendly Service. Reasonable Rates. Local Resident/Homeowner. Call Today For Your FREE Upfront Quote. No Deposit Required. 754-366-1915. 4-6 GOT JUNK? DUMP TRUCK – CLEANUPS Trees/ Landscape, Yard Fill. Paint/ Pressure Wash/ Roofs/Home Repairs – Welding, Etc. Dave 954-818-9538. 4-6 CEMETERY PLOTS2 CASKETS – VAULTS & GRAVES – Garden Of Love Section – Forest Lawn North. Moving Must Sell. Call Ron For Information 954-7813381. 4-6 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIESNew GREEN technology. New defroster control saves energy in home refrigerators, commercial chillers. Patented. All optical. Simple mfg. Strategic partners needed..www.NewAvionics.Com. 954-568-1991. C EARN BIG!! FAST GROWING ON-LINE CO Ranked Top 400 World Wide. Join Our Wealth Building Team Today. Mike 954-6573171. 4-6 MUSICIANS WANTEDThe American Legion Symphonic Band is now accepting new members for the 2011-2012 season. College age to “seasoned seniors” are welcome. Rehearsals are held on Wed. evenings at American Legion Post 142 in Pompano. Percussionists, euphonium and clarinet players are especially needed. If you enjoy “making music,” call Jim McGonigal, Music Director at 954-647-0700 for more info.DEEP WATER VILLA – DOCKPOMPANO BEACH 2/2 – 2 BLOCKS BEACH 1700 SQ FT. Screened Fla Room. Private Yard. W/D. 4 Park. No Fixed Bridges. Community Pool. Deeded Dock.. 2 Blocks Beach. $265,000. Coldwell Banker – Barbara Call 954629-1324. 4-13 STUDIO’S / EFFICIENCIES POMPANO BEACH – BOCA RATON – ATLANTIC / FEDERAL Efficiency $175 Weekly. No Security Deposit. Includes Cable, Electric, Internet. FREE Washer / Dryer. No Drug Record – No Evictions. 954-709-0694. 4-6 OUT OF AREA NORTH WILDWOOD N.J. – SEASON 1/1 Apartment. 2 Blocks From Beach. A/C / Cable. $5500. Call 954-7086708. 4-13 CO-OP SALESPOMPANO BEACH 1/1 On Water, Dockage Available At Your Door. $59,500. Coldwell Banker – Barbara – 954-6291324. 4-13 REAL ESTATE WANTEDI BUY HOUSES!! CASH!! AS IS! QUICK CLOSE! ANY AREA – ANY CONDITION! NO EQUITY OK. CALL NOW 954-914-2355. 4-20 CONDOS FOR SALEPOMPANO BEACH – DIRECT OCEAN VIEW!! 2/2 AT THE BREAKERS! $275,000. Call Juliana At Barclay’s For Details. 1-305-766-4420. POMPANO BEACH – ISLAND CLUB Updated 2/2 – 1st Floor Unit With Dock –Up To 28’ Boat. $155K. Mirsky Realty Group – Susan 954-732-2038. 4-1

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The Pelican 31 Friday, April 6, 2012 POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 BEDROOMS – Fully Furnished… Efficiency With Kitchen, Fully Furnished. Cable, Internet, Pool, Laundry. 500’ To The Beach. Weekly – Monthly – Yearly. 954-294-8483 Or 248-736-1533, 4-13 POMPANO BEACH 1/1 FURNISHED – Includes TV $850 Month Yearly – 1st / Last / Security. EFFICIENCY $750 Month Yearly Includes Direct TV + $50 Electric Allowance. 954785-5837. LARGE OPEN – BRIGHT – FIRST FLOOR CORNER – SMALL YARD – Small Pet OK – All Tile Floors – Just Painted – Off A1A – North Of Atlantic Pool – Coin Laundry – WIFI – Cable – Water Included $995 Month ---Large Ef ciency Apartment Available Same Bldg. Includes All Plus Elec. – Full Kitchen – Corner Unit. $650 – Lease Required – April 1 Special One Week FREE!! Owner Agent 954-608-7368. 412 Sunset Drive Pompano. FORT LAUDERDALE SINGLE 1/1 CLEAN Apt. – Summer Tennant – Las Olas On The Beach. $600 Month. May 28 – Oct 28. 954-306-3946. LIGHTHOUSE POINT – DUPLEX 2/2 –Clean – Newly Painted – New Appliances. Great Neighborhood. Reasonable! Call 954-873-2732. 4-6 POMPANO BEACH 1/1 SW. C/A $750 – 2/1 $925 – 3/2 $1025 NE 2/1 $950 – Townhouse 2/1.5 $1095. ALL FREE WATER. Rent + $70 Application Moves – U – In. 954-781-6299. 4-6 POMPANO MCNAB RD & NE 18 AVENUE – 1 & 2 Bedrooms Furnished/ Unfurnished. $695 $950 And Up. Pool, Tile Floors. Central A/C. 954610-2327. 4-13 POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 Bedroom From $495. Easy Move-in. 1/2 OFF DEPOSIT. Remodeled. Great Location. 954-783-1088 For More Info. 5-11 Classi eds Call 954-545-0013 DEERFIELD BEACH 2/2 Completely Redone. Granite Kitchen, New Cabinets. S.S. Appliances. 20” Porcelain Tile Floors. Travistine Stone Baths. Freshly Painted. 1st Floor. Less Than A Mile To Beach. $84,900. Call 631-873-8715. 4-6 CONDOS FOR RENTDEERFIELD BEACH 2/2 CONDO – Corner Unit, Pool. $800 $825. Good Credit Required. No Pets Or Realtors. 631-885-3342. LAUDERDALE BY THE SEA – Near Sea Watch Restaurant – 1 Bedroom – Den – 2 Bath. CHA, Pool, W / D, End Unit. $1100 Per Month Yearly. 1st / Last / Security. No Pets / N / S. 954-942-5642. 4-6 LAUDERDALE BY THE SEA – Furnished 2/2 – Pool – Near Beach – Shops & Restaurants. Enjoy Beach Living. $875 Month From April To October. Owner 413-244-2807. 4-6 POMPANO BEACH – 55+ Community. Renovated 2/1 With Sunroom – Ground Floor / On Golf Course. Beautifully Furnished – 1 Year +. Excellent References. $900 Month. 917-544-0771. POMPANO BEACH LARGE 2 / 2 With Den. All Renovated! Pool – Mile From Beach! W /D – Small Pet OK! $1,300 Month Yearly. Available May 1st. 561-703-6545 Or 754-264-3289. OCEANFRONTBYTHE – MONTH – Pompano Beach Club – Newly Renovated Furnished 1 / 1 – Unobstructed Southern View Of Ocean & Intracoastal – 24th Floor – Clubhouse – Bar – Restaurant – 2 Pools. $1,100 Per Month. Audrey 570246-9240 Cell Or E-mail Audrey@ chantre.com POMPANO BEACH CONDO – Cypress Bend – 1285 Sq Ft. Newly Renovated. $1175 Per Month. Call John 413-562-3976APTS FOR RENTDEERFIELD/POMPANO BEACH 1 BR & 2 BR APTS FOR RENT. Remodeled, Paint, Tile, Etc. W & D On Site. Pool. Pet Friendly. Call George 954-809-5030. 4-6 POMPANO 1/1 & 2/1 – E OF FEDERAL – Tiled. 10’ Overhang. Walk To Everything. Park At Your Door. 954-254-6325. 4-6 LUXURY BEACH PADS FOR RENT! Pompano Grand Opening: Security Deposit As Low As $199 For Quali ed Applicants. FREE 32” Flat Screen HDTV! Newly Renovated in 2012 One – Bedrooms & Studio Apts., 75 Yards From Private Beach Access, Eastern Exposure. New Kitchens & Baths, Granite Counter Tops, Central Air, Pool, Laundry, Dedicated Parking, Near Pier & Downtown. All Bills Paid! Includes Water, Electric, Premium Cable TV And WIFI. Furnished Or Unfurnished. Short Or Long Stays. No Utility Deposits. Small Pets Welcome. Only 7 Left! Pax Properties – 888-7294948 Or 954-603-8857. Photos At www. beachpads.net 4-27 COMMERCIAL FOR RENT-SALEPOMPANO COMMERCIAL OFFICE Spaces Available. Ranging From As Low As $500 To $700 Depending On Square Footage. Please Call Darci At 954-7833723. 4-20 DEERFIELD BEACH – Retail Of ce Warehouse – 700 Sq Ft With Loft. A/C, Bathroom. $575 Per Month. Call For More Info 561-654-1331 Or 561-9985681. 4-6 FURNITUREBEDSETS – King $180 – Queen $130 – Full $110 – Twin $90. 5 Pc. Bedroom Set $399. Frames $39. 954465-6498. 4-6 DOCK FOR RENT60 FT DOCK – THE COVE MARINA – 50 AMP / H20 Included. $1,200 Month – Price Negotiable Depending On Boat Size. Restaurant & Fuel On Premises. 954-914-0053. a.j.barsotti@ comcast.net PIANO LESSONSPIANO LESSONS AT YOUR HOME – Classical – Pop – Jazz. 30 Years In Northeast Area. Call 954-938-3194. MISC FOR SALECAR TOP CARRIER (Thule) Model Atlantis 1600…16 Cu Ft. 74x36”…39 Lbs. $375. Lighthouse Point 954-7849915. 4-6 GARAGE SALESLIGHTHOUSE POINT Saturday April 7th 8am-1pm. NE 50 St. E On NE 49 St To NE 23 Avenue Left To NE 50 St. Follow Signs.

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32 The Pelican Friday, April 6, 2012 Capt. RJ Boyle is an experienced angler in South Florida. His studio is located in Lighthouse Point. Call 954-420-5001. RJ BoyleRJ BOYLE STUDIOSBe sure to gear up this week for wahoo. As the full moon approaches this weekend, many anglers will be getting their boats ready to do some wahoo trolling. Some guys will pull out the high-speed lures and zip around from 200 to 300 ft. of water. Others will be trolling the Yozuri Bonitos or Magnum Plugs. If I were trolling this weekend, I would try to go for both. When fishing the highspeed lures, anglers really cover a lot of ground which often results is big hauls. Look for the right clues and make it a wahoo weekendI always look for a current edge or a color change. These breaks in temperature and color are usually where the wahoo are feeding. If the current or color change occurs in the 200 to 300 feet range, you better watch out. Once we find the fish with the high-speed lures, we will change over to double-hooked ballyhoos and slow trolling plug lures. Usually you will mark some baitfish on the screen in the areas where you are getting bites. We actually rig ballyhoos for wahoo fishing at the store. They are made with two triple strength hooks and heavier wire. One bit of advice is to remember when fighting a wahoo on the troll, keep the boat moving ahead. Wahoos have a tendency to start shaking their heads once they get near the boat. If you stop the boat, at some point the wahoo will lurch ahead towards the boat and the hooks can fall out. Lastly, if you happen to catch a wahoo be careful when putting him in the boat. They have some serious teeth that can really do some damage. Good luck this weekend. Pines just keep coming. Golf instructor Robert Klapka gives $8 clinics and the pro shop holds continuous close-outs on clothing and equipment. With the annual fee for platinum golfers just $1,995, Smith says, memberships at Hillsboro Pines have doubled in the last two years. In addition, Smith opens the course for charity tournaments, junior golfers and for training rounds for local high schools. The next charity event April 21 benefits St. Jude’s Children’s Hospital. Cost of the four-man scramble with shotgun start is $75 and includes a Bloody Mary before play and a steak dinner afterward. The 19th Hole is open sunrise to sunset with a moderately–priced menu of breakfast items, appetizers, burgers, sandwiches, salads, pizzas and a pie of the day. Orders can be faxed or called in. The golf course is accessed through the Century Village East Gatehouse on Hillsboro Boulevard, just west of Military Trail. Call 954-4211188. PinesContinued from page 18SightingsContinued from page 16Clubs & Civic Groups 4-5 – Broward Sierra Club meets at 7:30 p.m. at Fern Forest Nature Center, 201 Lyons Rd. S., Coconut Creek. Guest speaker is Michele Williams, director of the Southeast Region of the Florida Public Archaeology Network at Florida Atlantic University. 954-946-7359. 4-18 – The Deerfield Beach Historical Society hosts History at High Noon from noon to 1 p.m. at Deerfield Beach City Hall, 150 NE 2 Ave. 954-429-0378.

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The Pelican 33 Friday, April 6, 2012 SPECIAL TO THE PELICANSouth Florida women will tackle fishing skills at the South Florida “Ladies, Let’s Go Fishing!” seminar offered specifically for women. The weekend conservationminded seminar, held in conjunction with support from the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, or FWC, emphasizes hands-on skills with techniques such as releasing, knot tying, dehooking, bait rigging, spin casting, gaffing grapefruits, cast netting, trailer backing, boat handling and more. The Women’s Fishing University is scheduled for April 20-22 at the I.T. Parker Community Center in Dania Beach. Women will have the chance to learn, practice and participate in the surrounding South Florida waters. Activities launch Friday Seminar planned for women anglers April 20night with a networking meet and greet starting at 6 p.m. On Saturday, classroom presentations begin at 8 a.m., with beginner and advanced sessions on topics including fishing basics and conservation including a presentation by the FWC and lunch provided by Pollo Tropical. Other fishing classes include Offshore/Captains Tony Digiulian, Inshore/Capt. Lou Volpe, Basics/Lee Lavery and Fly/Jim Anson. A “Dress for Fishing Success” fashion show is held at lunch, followed by handson skill practice where ladies learn the art of fishing directly from the Pros. Sunday, the ladies board charter boats at approximately 7 a.m. for an optional half day fishing trip followed by a filet demonstration. In prior years some ladies experienced releasing sailfish on their first fishing endeavor the equivalent of a getting a hole in one on the first swing. Featured on national network television and more, the series is held in conjunction with the FWC through the Sport Fish Restoration Program, with major partners including Mercury Outboards, Ranger, Silver Airways, Minn Kota, Humminbird, FishHound.com and Magic Tilt Trailers. Registration starts at $99 for the first 20 to sign up, then $135 after. Registration includes instruction, use of equipment, hands-on training, networking reception and fundraisers, meals, goody bags and more. The Sunday Fishing Adventure, with tackle and bait provided, is additional. No equipment or experience is necessary. Membership is not required; however there is a South Florida chapter available to continue the fishing fun. Call LLGF, at 954475-9068, fax 954474-7299, email: fish@ ladiesletsgofishing.com. Call The Pelican 954-783-8700

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34 The Pelican Friday, April 6, 2012 OverlayContinued from page 5“The reason for the overlay option is to allow density and to make it attractive,” City Manager John Stunson said. Commissioner Jed Shank said residents have expressed concerns about the plan, its origin and how it was prioritized. He wants to proceed cautiously and supported the proposed ordinance going back to the P&Z board. Shank said his parameters are he wants no more than three stories and no more than 20 units per acre. He wants no one forced out of their home and no public funds going to relocate power lines. He said he appreciates the additional review. Boisvenue said residents would like more code enforcement in the area. “I don’t know why we aren’t more pro-active over there,” she said. She suggested looking for grants for facades. She said residents who live behind the proposed district have come to Boisvenue in tears asking why they’re being ignored and complaining about what they will be looking at. Vice Mayor John Adornato noted that mixed-used projects are successful in other areas, predicting that property values in the area would go up with the new district. Nancy Spear said the neighbors don’t want it and don’t want to pay for it. “But if this goes forward, add a stipulation that Oakland Park residents be hired to do the building,” she suggested. “How would you feel if someone could look at you in your backyard?” Lloyd Estates resident Gerda Kendall asked. “I feel it’s an invasion of privacy.” willing to tidy up the beach

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The Pelican 35 Friday, April 6, 2012 by playing “The Wizard’s Walk,” a great fiddle favorite from American folk musician and composer Jay Ungar. After several more Ungar classics and a host of soulful classical renditions, the remarkably mature Marena Salerno Collins thanked the school age children could learn to play the violin if learning steps were small enough and if the instrument was scaled down to fit their body. Suzuki believed that every child, if properly taught, was capable of a high level of musical achievement. After observing the dramatic, confident movements of Marena on the viola and her easygoing ViolaContinued from page 27delighted crowd and gave special praise to her mother and grandfather for their unwavering support over the years. “Although she is only in grade 10, she is already first chair in the All-State Orchestra. Essentially, she is the top violist in Wyoming,” says clearly proud parent and former school teacher, Rhonda, who stresses the fact that Marena gravitated towards music of her own volition. “I brought her to many live concerts as a child and one day she said, ‘mom, I want to play like them.’” Over the years, Marena was mentored by several inspiring teachers who practiced the Suzuki movement a method of teaching music conceived by Japanese violinist Shin’ichi Suzuki that emerged in the mid-20th century. The central belief of Suzuki, based on his language acquisition theory, is that all people are capable of learning from their environment. The essential components of his method spring from the desire to create the “right environment” for learning music. He also believed that this positive environment would also help to foster character in students. He reasoned that if children have the skill to acquire their mother tongue, then they have the necessary ability to become proficient on a musical instrument. He pioneered the idea that pre-Viola virtuoso Marena Salerno Collins takes a few minutes to pose with 93year-old LBTS resident Grace Arioli. approach to conversing with a room full of adults, there is certainly great merit to this particular teaching method. Marena and her mom will be heading back to Wyoming shortly but promised to return for Christmas. Maybe the residents of Lauderdale-ByThe-Sea will get another melodious gift this upcoming Yuletide season.

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36 The Pelican Friday, April 6, 2012



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Friday, April 6, 2012 Vol. XX, Issue 14 Call 954-783-8700 to Advertise Email: siren2415@gmail.com Pompano Beach Deer eld Beach Lighthouse Point Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Wilton Manors Oakland Park Hillsboro Beach The Galt Palm Aire The Pelican Pelican Beach town plans a cleanup and a cookout for its rst Earth Day celebration By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFHillsboro Beach Earth Day, April 22, has been a national effort to green up the planet since 1970, but in this coastal town, Earth Day 2012 it will be the rst public awareness of that day and marked by beach and A1A cleanups and a party at town hall. See EARTH DAY on page 5 Architects chosen to design civic campus libraryBy Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach The much anticipated new Broward County Neighborhood Library got closer to the drawing board this month after commissioners approved a $1 million agreement with Silva Architects to design the project. The library and possible cultural center will be built on the citys civic campus, an 11.5-acre lot located adjacent to Pompano Beach City Hall. Design of the campus itself is included in the contract. The 25,000 to 30,000-sq. ft. library may include a second oor to be used as a cultural center or there could be a stand-alone building to house theater See LIBRARY on page 12 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach Accused of being disruptive and causing inef ciencies at the Deer eld Beach Housing Authority, Commissioner Caryl Berner faces removal from the authoritys board. Prompted by Mayor Peggy Noland, who said she has received three letters Commission will scrutinize performance of DBHA board from board members complaining of Berners conduct, the city commission Tuesday agreed to go forward with removing Berner from the board. Required is a resolution from the commission, followed by a hearing. Berner said she would defend herself. No way am I going to resign, she said. See BOARD on page 7By Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach Last Saturday was a classically hot Florida morning when re trucks lined Fire Station No. 61. But the heat did not deter city and county of cials who joined relatives and friends of Fire ghter Bill Elliot, who died on Jan. 6 when he fell 100 feet during a training exercise at this station. Elliot, 49, was the rst city re ghter to die in the line of duty. As people found their ways through the crowd to folding chairs, they passed a large draped monument that would soon be unveiled to reveal the stations new name, William J. Elliot, Fire Station 61. Mayor Lamar Fisher proclaimed the day as William J. Elliot Day in Pompano Beach. Fisher was followed by County Commissioner Chip LaMarca who read a similar Fire Station 61 in Pompano Beach was dedicated to the memory and life of Pompano Beach Fire ghter William J. Elliot on March 31. Pictured are Pompano Beach Mayor Lamar Fisher, Commissioner Woodrow Poitier, Commissioner Rex Hardin, Commissioner Barry Dockswell, Vice Ma yor George Brummer, Broward County Commissioner Chip LaMarca. Eliiots mother Joanne stands with her daughter, Mary Beth. Elliots brother John stands behind his sister. [Photo courtesy of the City of Pompano Beach]Fire ghter Bill Elliot remembered and honoredproclamation for the entire county. Mayor Fisher presented an American ag to Elliots mother, Joanne Elliot, announcing that the ag that had own over the Capitol. The ag had been sent to the family from Congressman Allen West who appeared in person to offer his condolences and shake hands with family members. Joanne Elliot, 82, said, There is no love like a mother for her child. Bill carried a smile on his face See ELLIOT on page 25

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2 The PelicanFriday, April 6, 2012 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFLauderdale-By-The-Sea After hearing an engineers presentation on two possible designs for improvements to Bougainvilla Drive, commissioners chose to focus on drainage issues and rejected a plan that included a walkway in the middle of the road and changes to existing parking spaces. The town has retained Flynn Engineering to prepare plans for drainage improvements and street beauti cation along a two-Drainage and parking are the topics for Bougainvilla DriveLauderdale-By-The-Sea The Easter bunny is expected to make an appearance during Easter By-The-Sea festivities starting at 9 a.m. Saturday, April 7, on Town Hall grounds and in Jarvis Hall, 4505 Ocean Drive, Lauderdale-By-The-Sea. Easter egg hunts are planned for children three and under, four to seven and eight and up. There will be a bonnet contest for children 12 and under and 13 and older. For more information, call 954-640-4200. Egg hunt bonnet contest slated for April 7block section of Bougainvilla stretching from Pine Avenue on the north to the re station on the south. Currently the area has 242 parking spaces, but many dont meet the town requirement of 9-feet by 18-feet, Jay Flynn said, and others overlap property lines. His design team presented two concepts for the area to the commission March 27. In Scheme A, the swale is reduced from 10 feet to six feet. A traf c circle is added at Bougainvilla and Washingtonia. Trees are brought to the end of paving for a perception of a narrow road. This plan maintains existing back out parking and keeps the sidewalk on both sides of the right of way. In Scheme C, angled parking replaces back out parking on both sides of the road. The sidewalk and paved swale are eliminated and a median sidewalk with landscaping and lighting is added down the center of the road with parallel parking along the side. Residents said Scheme C resulted in too much lost parking in front of their properties and condo residents said those parking spots were deeded to the owners. Defending the concept, Flynn said, We feel this is safer, taking [pedestrians] away from back out traf c. In order to undertake Scheme C, Town Manager Connie Hoffmann said the town would need legal agreements with every property owner and legal agreements between some property owners. It would take years to work out, she said. We knew this was dif cult as far as beauti cation, Hoffmann said. It will take lots of one-on-one discussions with property owners. As a result, Flynn said Scheme A is the option. Neighbors will have to buy in on the plan, since some will lose parking spaces and some will gain space. Some proposed landscaping is on private property, and some owners have said they dont want it. Budget for the proposed project is $800,000. The only area where See TOPICS on page 14

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The Pelican 3 Friday, April 6, 2012 Oakland Park The City of Oakland Park and the Polynesian Cultural Association will host the 8th Annual Polynesian Cultural Festival at Jaco Pastorius Park, 4000 N. Dixie Highway, from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Sunday, April 15. The entertainment will include re dancers, exotic hula dancers and Polynesian drums. Polynesian Island food and exotic refreshments will be available, as well as many authentic South Paci c arts and crafts. Call 954-938-9010 for more details.Polynesian festival, April 15Oakland Park The Oakland Park Fire ghters Benevolent Association and the Oakland Park Kiwanis Club will sponsor a Spring Egg Hunt from 10 a.m. to noon Saturday, April 7, at Royal Palm Park, 1701 NW 38 St./Park Lane West. Admission and parking are free for this family event. Call 954-630-4550 for information. Fire ghters to hide eggs, 4/7 Chief goes after activist pushing for arrest in Fleming hitand-runBy Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach Friends of hit-and-run victim Thetus Fleming Jr. were chided Tuesday night by Police Chief Pete Sudler for spreading critical and erroneous information about the tragedy and subsequent BSO investigation. Fleming, 22, was struck and killed Feb. 17 as he crossed W. Hillsboro Boulevard heading to his home in Stanley Terrace. The driver of the vehicle, David Alcocer, left the scene but returned 30 minutes later and gave police a statement. So far, no arrest has been made. Community activist David Cody said his information shows Alcocer was driving on a suspended license and last week he organized a street protest calling for Alcocers arrest. But Chief Sudler said there are protocols that mandate the investigation being undertaken by the BSO Traf c Homicide Unit. Those procedures take a lot of time, Sudler said, and once an arrest is made time tables kick in with the state attorneys of ce that could require the case to be led within 21 days. Jumping to conclusions, putting the handcuffs on prematurely, is not in the best interest of the victim, the chief said. He called the irresponsible information being disseminated through blogs and emails the second crime that has been committed, and said he took personally Codys statement that if the victims had been two white girls or an old lady, Alcocer would be in jail. Trying to make this racial See CHIEF on page 24

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4 The PelicanFriday, April 6, 2012 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFHillsboro Beach Coastal Systems Internationals recommendations for beach protection and nourishment will be discussed at a workshop April 12, 6 p.m. at town hall, 1210 Hillsboro Mile. The CSI report was made public last month but this will be the rst open discussion of it. This is the place where people can come and share their ideas [about beach restoration], Commissioner Claire Schubert said. That is really the point to have dialogue. I encourage a representative from each condominium to attend. Schubert said he also expected an ad hoc committee formed recently to explore accounting rm, Severn Trent, reported receiving $1.5 million from the Federal Emergency Management Agency, or FEMA, a piece of the amount applied for. Mayor Dan Dodge said he believes the town is eligible for $1 million from the state and $2 million from FEMA because of hurricane damage to the beaches. Also, he said, there is a new grant possibility stemming from damage caused by Hurricane Frances that could return additional money to the town.Workshop will focus on beach restoration beach erosion prevention to express their opinions. The CSI report presented options for preserving the towns north beach which suffers from severe erosion. But the report concluded that with the prevention methods currently allowed, the beach will always need more sand. This week, Commissioner Jim Lambert said he would be unable to attend the workshop but suggested the town begin stashing money for future beach nourishment. Also this week, the towns By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFWilton Manors Although the proposed Planned Unit Development, or PUD, will apply to the whole city if approved, some residents are already honing in how it could be used regarding a possible new apartment complex development at the Center for Spiritual Living, 1550 NE 26 St. At their Tuesday meeting, commissioners unanimously passed the PUD, which encompasses development regulations, including building heights as well as setbacks and landscaping requirements. The commission will have to vote on the PUD a second time, April 10 at 7 p.m. at PUD could be rst round in ght against apartments city hall, 2020 Wilton Drive, before the PUD will become law. Mayor Gary Resnick called the PUD a sword and a shield which would attract desired growth and at the same time protect the city from unwanted development. This is an incredibly important development tool. This gives us a lot of power and control. But some see the PUD as more of a sword aimed right at their neighborhood. Residents say the proposed apartment complex, which would include 115 apartment and townhouse-style units, is too dense for the four-acre property; city officials are still See PUD on page 19

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The Pelican 5 Friday, April 6, 2012 Earth Day was the brainchild of Wisconsin senator Gaylord Nelson who recruited U.S. Rep. Pete McCloskey, to his cause. The rst Earth Day had such impact that it is credited with the creation of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the passage of clean air, clean water and endangered species acts. Here, City Commissioner Claire Schubert and her chairperson for volunteers, Holly Ward, head up the effort. Volunteers willing to tidy up the beach will meet at 9:30 a.m. will meet at town hall and be taken by bus to four areas where there is the most debris. In those same areas, the bike/pedestrian lane on A1A will be cleared of refuse. The community bus will make continuous circuits bringing residents to town hall, to the beach and back to their homes. We are encouraging everyone to help clean our beaches, if only for a little while, Schubert said. Those that do will receive a blue, Earth Day, Hillsboro Beach t-shirt. The areas chosen for cleanup are those where the beach raker dumps material collected from paying customers onto vacant or nonpaying properties covering it with sand. The buried debris often resurfaces due to wind Earth DayContinued from page 1 and waves. The day will also be used to encourage residents who are not yet committed to the towns recycling program to sign on, as well as reward those that already do. Beginning at noon, Ray the DJ will spin his tunes and barbecue cooks will serve up hamburgers, veggie burgers and hot dogs. Representatives from Keep Broward Beautiful, Deer eld Fire Rescue and Waste Management, the towns solid waste hauler, will be on hand. Bike owners will be given a complimentary bike safety inspection and bocce ball teams will hold a tournament. For the kids, there will be a face painter. Parking will be available in the vacant lot next to town hall, but attendees are encouraged to be eco-friendly and ride the bus. This will be rst of many Earth Day celebrations here, Schubert predicted.By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFOakland Park City commissioners agreed to postpone until June more discussion on the mixed-use overlay district for a portion of Commercial Boulevard. The vote was 3-1 at Wednesdays meeting to continue until June 20 the rst reading of an ordinance approving a text amendment to the land development code to create the new district. Commissioner Suzanne Boisvenue dissented and Commissioner Shari McCartney abstained from the vote. The new district is intended to spur revitalization of East Commercial Boulevard on the north side between North Andrews Avenue and Northeast 6 Changed overlay ordinance off the agenda Avenue. With the current B-1 zoning, if lots were combined, a ve-story building could now be built with the required setback, Harris Hamid, director of engineering and community development, explained. After a meeting with residents, the proposed ordinance was changed to limit heights to three stories, increase the rear setback to 20 feet and to drop base density to 10 units per acre, Hamid said. With some incentives, density could be increased to 20 units per acre. Single-lane drive-through facilities would now be allowed. Staff recommended the revised ordinance go to the planning & zoning board for a public hearing at its May 7 meeting and then come back to the commission June 20. See OVERLAY on page 34

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6 The PelicanFriday, April 6, 2012 The Pelican . What can we do for you?Email your opinions to siren2415@gmail.com Deer eld Beach, Pompano Beach, Lighthouse Point, LauderdaleBy-The-Sea, Wilton Manors and Oakland ParkWilton Manors Oakland Park Hillsboro Beach The Pompano Pelican is published weekly on FridaysStreet Address: 1500-A E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, FL 33060 Telephone: 954-783-8700 Fax: 954-783-0093Letters to the Editor are encouraged and accepted for print if signed, although a writers name will be withheld on request; letters must also include a daytime telephone number. Advertising rates are available upon request. Subscription rate is $31.80 including tax for one years delivery in Greater Pompano Beach; $95.40/per year including tax for others in the United States; call 954-783-8700 for rates abroad. The Pelican is a nonpartisan newspaper and reserves the right to decline advertising. Copyright 2012. Reproduction of this publication in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission of the publisher. The Pelican is a member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, Deer eld Beach Chamber and the LBTS Chamber. The Pelican is a state certi ed woman-owned minority business. The Pelican is delivered to businesses, libraries, schools, of ces, hospitals, news racks and single family homes. All advertising and copy is published at the sole discretion of the publisher. We welcome your critiques and ideas concerning this publication. Anne Siren, publisherExecutive Assistant: Mary Hudson Graphics: Rachel Ramirez Windsheimer Bookkeeper: John White Classi eds: Fran Shelby Contributing Writers: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Judy Wilson, Malcolm McClintock, Judy Vik, Michael dOliveira Account Executives: Paul Shroads, Carolyn Mann, Bill Heaton, Bill Fox Special Of ce Assistant: Cathy Siren ESTABLISHED 1993 Volume XX, Issue 14 Founding Editor and PublisherAnne Hanby Siren Letters & OpinionsPassover, Festival of FreedomBy Rabbi David MarkTHE JEWISH CENTER AT TEMPLE SHOLOMOf all Jewish holidays, Passovers theme is the most universal: the message of freedom. Way back in 1400 BCE, during the reign of the mighty Pharaoh Ramses II [or perhaps his son, Merneptah], an invisible God reached out of the heavens and into human history. Let My people go! ordered His prophet, the shepherd Moses, and, shocked and demoralized by ten plagues which had af icted his country, his cattle, and his people, Ramses had no choice but to comply, according to the biblical Book of Exodus. Today, this message continues to resonate, whether among the people of Syria and Egypt, whose corrupt governments oppress them, or in numerous nations worldwide, where uncounted millions of human beings yearn for the very freedoms which we Americans take for granted: freedom to speak out, freedom to assemble peacefully to petition the government for a redress of grievances, freedom of worship, freedom from want, and freedom from fear. As the presidential campaign continues, we should take a moment to re ect that, despite its acrimony, the campaign represents our democratic system at its best. In the words of Irish-American Al Smith [1873-1944], the rst Catholic candidate for the presidency, the only cure for democracy is more democracy. For the seven-day [eight, outside of Israel] period of the holiday, observant Jews refrain from eating leavened foods, and instead eat foods based on matzah, the grain of which has been mixed with water and baked before eighteen minutes have passed, in remembrance of the speed in which the Israelites departed Egypt during the Exodus. Passover is a home-based holiday, and it may be the single festival most responsible for keeping Jews Jewish. Many Jews attend temple services on the High Holy Days, but it is estimated that a full 80 percent will attend a seder [Hebrew, order] meal, the special feast which this year falls on Friday and Saturday evenings. It is a dinner full of ritual, in which the participants partake of four cups of wine, to represent the four promises God made to our ancestors: I took you out of Egypt; I saved you from Pharaohs wrath; I liberated you from slavery; I took you to be My special people. It is a repast full of symbolism: while singing and chanting prayers and songs from the Hagadah, [Hebrew, the Telling], we eat horseradish, the bitter herb which reminds us of the bitterness of slavery, and dip green parsley, the symbol of springtime, into salt water, to remind of the bitter tears of slavery, while we recline at the table in the attitude of free people. Indeed, the seder is the earliest audio-visual learning experience known to humankind. Outside of Florida, where we enjoy perpetual spring, Passover marks the beginning of the springtime harvest season. Accordingly, the temple service during this time includes a prayer for dew, representing both Gods visible grace upon the earth, and the gentle rain which sustains the standing barley. May Passover 2012 bring blessings of peace and freedom for all.Multi-family and commercial buildings now eligible for rebatesNow, Conservation Pays for Everyone. The Broward Water Partnership rebate program is expanding to include multi-family housing, not-for-pro ts, and commercial buildings. The Partnership is offering rebates of up to $100 each for the replacement of toilets that use more than 1.6 gallons of water per ush, or gpf, with high-ef ciency toilets that use 1.28 gpf or less. Jennifer Jurado, director of Broward County Natural Resources Planning & management division, pointed out that expanding this program moves the community closer to the goal of saving 30 million gallons of water per day. The $100 rebate can offset the full purchase price of high-ef ciency toilets and customers will immediately save money on their next water bill while saving water. By upgrading the plumbing in our existing buildings and residences we can delay the development of new water supplies and help keep water rates low. Residential homeowners can receive up to two rebates. The total number of rebates available to commercial and multi-family establishments is determined on a case-by-case basis. Some applicants may also qualify to receive free, lowow faucet aerators and showerheads. Water-ef cient pre-rinse spray valves for commercial kitchens are also available and can reduce water consumption by as much as 70 percent delivering a tremendous savings. All participants must be pre-approved and other restrictions apply. Supplies are limited so act now and start saving! Visit www.ConservationPays.com to determine if you are eligible or call 1800-270-9794 for more information.Would not take much money to light up dark intersectionTo the Editor, How does one put a price on a human life? Thetus Fleming, 22, was killed in a hit and run accident near the intersection of Hillsboro and MLK boulevards. Anyone who travels that route will have to admit that the lighting in the evening hours is substandard at best. A left turn signal was denied by the Florida Department of Transportation. Why didnt the city pursue the second alternative which was to increase the lighting at that intersection? Lack of funding is not an acceptable response when someone has been killed. When the Community Redevelopment Agency, or CRA, nished the Cove Shopping Center, they neglected to provide the outlets on the poles for lighting the complex for the holidays. They had to purchase a generator that has as its sole purpose the lighting of a Christmas tree. More important than a human life? There are Florida Power and Light poles at the MLK intersection and the requirement for additional lighting would be adding transformers and lights. The cost for such a project would be anywhere from $3,000 to $5,000. Where should the money come from for the transformers and lights at MLK? The city is assessing users of electricity a 10 percent public service tax which should generate $4.9 million by the end of the scal year. This tax was to be used to reduce the millage by 1 mill and that required revenues of just $4,622,065. Dont tell the taxpayers, that a human life in the City of Deer eld is not worth an expenditure of $3,000 to $5,000 to light up that intersection like a Christmas tree. Jean Robb Deer eld Beach Dear Mr. Haley and U.S. Coast Guard, I would like to go on record as being strongly in support of saving the Hillsboro Lighthouse Light that has been and still is a beacon of safety for mariners and pilots on very dangerous waters. The information I have gathered indicates that the turtles are not being interrupted in their journey back into the sea in this area, and even if they were, I and many others, value human life over future turtles in one small patch of sand. Florida is bordered by the ocean with turtle protected sand all up and down its coastline. I often wonder what the dimming of all the lights on the shoreline, so as not to confuse the turtles, has done to crime statistics. The big diamond has cast its beam on troubled and dangerous waters for many years and is a much visited and treasured piece of local history. Lets not send it into oblivion.Thank you. Phyllis J. NeubergerAnd by the way, human safety trumps turtles for this reader Ed. Note: Phyllis J. Neuberger is a Pelican staff writer.

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The Pelican 7 Friday, April 6, 2012 Noland appointed Berner to the board two years ago on a 3-2 vote of the commission, Marty Popelsky and Joe Miller, dissenting. This week, Berner said her problems with the board began only after Noland named three new members, Joan Maurice, Sally Potter and Michael Weiss. I will defend myself and my personality, she said. According to the mayor, complaints about Berner range from her being disruptive on almost every subject, to constantly harassing the staff taking time from the business of the housing authority. The complainants said Berner asked for her own of ce, wanted her Kiwanis Club dues paid by the authority and for the board to order t-shirts for its members. In her defense, Berner said former authority director Pam Davis had given her of ce space. I do work there, Berner said. I take my role differently from the others. Do you want someone who does real work, or someone who just sits on a board? Discussing the issue Tuesday night, City Commissioner Joe Miller said, I was correct two years ago. The housing authority is in a crucial time. Who would be attracted to this board knowing it is in disharmony? The authoritys long time executive director, Pam Davis, left her post Jan. 31 to take a job in Gainesville, after a series of attacks by blogger Chaz Stevens who sat on the board brie y. Stevens, a Noland appointee, resigned under re from other board members for his published comments about Davis and authority business. Currently, the of ce is being managed by Rinaldo Bennett, who directs the Affordable Housing Operations. Bennett took over Mar. 20 after Interim Director Ruchelle Hobbs went on leave. As the commission agreed to proceed with Berners removal procedure, City Commissioner Ben Preston had words of caution. If what is being said is valid, then the person should not be there . but we are obligated to nd the truth and make sure what we do is built on a measure of truth. Popelsky cautioned that care should be taken with board appointments. Dont appoint if you are unsure, he said. BoardContinued from page 1 Chamber preparing super anniversary edition of Community GuideBy Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach A new book is coming out soon in this city from the Pompano Beach Chamber, and savvy business owners are lining up to take advantage of it as a marketing tool. The 2012 Community Guide and Business Directory will also commemorate the 70th Anniversary of the chamber, and there will be some interesting history detailing its genesis. Ric Green, Chamber CEO, says the chamber was rst organized by the Pompano Beach Rotary Club and articles of incorporation were led with the state in October of 1942. Green adds that this book is not just for business owners. Residents and tourists will nd valuable information about the city, businesses, hotels, spots to visit, restaurants, golf courses, boating, shing and more. For all intents and purposes, its See CHAMBER on page 28

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8 The PelicanFriday, April 6, 2012 Business matters The Pelican takes a look at local business owners. Call The Pelican to nd out how you can tell your story here because business matters. 954-783-8700. By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFDr. Kasra Behfar, podiatric medicine-surgery, has offices at 50 NE 26 Ave. in Pompano Beach and a second in Coral Springs, dividing his week to see patients between both offices. His extensive training includes Harvard Medical School, New England Deaconess Hospital and Joslin Diabetes Center. Hes on staff at Holy Cross Medical Center, Coral Springs Medical Center and University Hospital. After 16 years in dealing with foot problems, nothing should surprise Dr. Behfar, but he admits the current escalating heel heights on fashionistas shoes amazes him. He says, These very high heels and shoes with pointed, narrow shoe box toes bring women to my office in agony with problems such as bunions, hammer toes, bone spurs, ingrown toe nails, and painful corns and calluses. If bone deformity has developed, then surgery is the only option for correction. Iris Jacobs, Coral Springs, has had two successful foot surgeries performed by Dr. Behfar and says, His bedside manner is great. He listens to you and answers your questions. His follow through is fantastic. He called me post surgery to see how I was and when I came in for office visits after, he insisted on seeing me even though my insurance coverage specified just two visits. This doctor stresses getting ones feet measured in length and width. Younger people know better and are Dr. Kasra N. Behfar, podiatrist and surgeon, stresses the importance of normal and diabetic foot careless vain about shoe size. Their mothers and grandmothers are my patients often because they wore smaller shoes than what they needed. How foolish and painful vanity can be, He says, sighing. Asked what kind of shoes his wife, Azita, wears to dress up affairs, he laughs and says, She is forced to wear properly fitted and sized shoes Dr. Kasra N. Behfar sees regular patients in his of ce at two locations Pompano Beach and Coral Springs. He has been practicing podiatric medicine and surgery for 16 years, handling all of the problems that occur in foot and ankle care. He is also a diabetic foot specialist. despite her having resisted me initially. She has begun to appreciate this lifestyle change. For special occasions, she wears an open toe shoe with no higher than a inch heel for no more than an hour. Otherwise, shes in sandals or sneakers like much of the younger generation. We have See BEHFAR on page 15Volunteers chosen for city boardsOakland Park Commissioners in Oakland Park made several appointments to advisory boards at Wednesdays meeting. Richard Day and Katie Freeman were named to ll vacancies on the Beauti cation Advisory Board. Loren Walkington and Samuel Boyd were named to replace Gary Lanham and John Parker on the beauti cation board due to their missing four meetings. Mayor Anne Sallee was named as the citys representative to the Broward League of Cities. Vice Mayor John Adornato was selected as rst alternate and Commissioner Shari McCartney, second alternate. J.J. Schmidt was named to the Charter Review Board.Buy a Sample McDougald House BrickThe Sample McDougald House Preservation Society, 450 NE 10 St. in Pompano Beach, is selling bricks to raise money for the historic site. Those who buy a brick can engrave it with up to three lines, 18 characters per line, and include a symbol. One line is $60, two lines is $70 and three lines is $80. The cost of a symbol is $10. Make all checks payable to the Sample McDougald House Preservation Society. Call 954-786-4047.

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The Pelican 9 Friday, April 6, 2012

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10 The PelicanFriday, April 6, 2012 Shop your local merchants. 954-783-8700 Making a DifferencePhyllis J. Neuberger wants your suggestions about people who are making a difference. Call 954-7838700. BriefsBy Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFWe are proud to reach this milestone in our companys history, says Daryl G. Byrd, president and CEO of iBERIABANK Corporation. We appreciate the opportunity NASDAQ has afforded us to celebrate this signi cant event in the prestigious epicenter of the nancial sector. In addition to ringing the bell to open the NASDAQ market, Byrd said, To honor our 125th anniversary we are giving away brand new iPad 3s at each branch bank. Jean M. McIntyre, vice president and branch manager at 990 N. Federal Highway in Pompano Beach, says, Our iPad 3 will be raf ed off on April 30. You dont need to have an account to register for the raf e. Just stop in, ll out an entry ticket, have a cookie and then hope lady luck smiles at you. Michael Pastorino, branch manager of the Wilton Manors iBERIA BANK at 2465 Wilton Drive also has a brand new iPad 3 to raf e off on the same day. Just stop in to register. Some lucky person will win this raf e and it could be you, Michael says. On March 12, the actual iBERIABANK anniversary date, all branches had cupcakes in the lobby for all visitors. McIntyre even hand delivered cupcakes to a few clients Yard Sale to Bene t The Florida Humane SocietyA yard sale to benefit the no kill Florida Humane Society will be held Saturday, April 14 from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the shelter located at 3870 North Powerline Road, Pompano Beach, Northeast corner of Sample and Powerline, next to the Citco car wash. Donations are being accepted Thursday through Sunday for special arrangements call 954 785 2165. To celebrate the banks 125th anniversary, Branch Manager Michael Pastorino pumped $10 of gas into the tank of Krishan Manners, president/CEO of Wilton Manors Main Street, at the Texaco station on Wilton Drive. [Photos courtesy of Michael Pastorino and Jean McIntyre]until she ran out. The celebration continued. On March 14, these managers of the Pompano Beach and Wilton Manors branches delivered acts of kindness to random car owners who pulled into gas stations to ll up. McIntyre says, I chose fellow Rotarian Dan Gordons Causeway Chevron Station on Federal and pumped $10 worth of gas into each car that pulled up until my $125 was used up. It was a lot of fun. People were oored and asked, Whats the catch? In this economic climate they were all most appreciative. One lady said, Ive never heard of a bank giving anything away since the free toaster era which was long ago. Meanwhile to the south, Pastorino was pumping gas into random cars at the Texaco station on Wilton Drive. People were shocked, he says with a grin. Some said, I never heard of such a thing. One woman said, Now, thats an unexpected treat. It meant a lot to people. And they were excited to learn about the chance to win the raf e for the newest iPad 3. All they have to do is stop in to register. Well be drawing the winners name on April 30. Random acts of kindness are nothing new to iBERIABANK branch managers. Were encouraged to be involved in the neighborhood and we are, says McIntyre who often buys coffee and doughnuts for those waiting in line with her when she stops for coffee. Our management encourages us to do Hand shake touches with the community, and we do. In Pompano Beach, McIntyre and her staff are active in the Chamber of Commerce, Rotary and Kiwanis clubs. McIntyre is chair of the Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce and See IBERIABANK on page 14iBERIABANK celebrates its 125th anniversary with random acts of kindness, NASDAQ bell ringing Save on Prescription DrugsBroward County residents, regardless of age, income or existing health coverage, can get a free NACo Prescription Drug Discount Card. The card, offered by the Broward County Community Partnerships Division, can be used to save money on prescription drugs at participating corporate and independent pharmacies. The card can also be used to save on certain pet prescriptions. Cards can be picked up at many Broward County government facilities including libraries, parks and transit facilities. For more, visit www.broward.org/HumanServices or call 954-357-5385.

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The Pelican 11 Friday, April 6, 2012 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach The Show and Tell at Tuesdays commission meeting featured photographs of snakes and a story about bad-smelling mulch and ooded backyards told by the homeowners whose property abuts the Deer eld Beach Country Club. James Bene eld, 532 NW 3 Way, said snakes have been part of his life for years because of debris dumped on the golf course. He routinely checks his bed for the reptiles, he said, while showing photos of truck loads of dirt, or what he called a dump back there. His neighbor Gail Battle, 633 NW 3 Way, said mulch piled close to her home smells like a stable and has caused her to suffer allergies. She said a tractor-trailer brought the mulch in and the odor permeates the communities of Commonwealth and Allwood Homes. After residents complained about the mulch pile, it was spread Battle said and now causes standing water in their backyards. Naomi Gayle, 643 NW 3 Way, blamed the city for the situation. You enforce the ordinances, she told the commission. When we call for code enforcement, nothing Country clubs mulch, dirt piles causing neighbors griefSee GRIEF on page 24

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12 The PelicanFriday, April 6, 2012 Advertise Your Restaurant in The Pelican for coverage in nine North Broward cities. Call 954-783-8700. and other performances. Broward County commissioners have approved $7.2 million in funding for the design and construction of the library. In addition, the county will fund $3.8 million for its furnishings. While building the library requires an interlocal agreement between the city and the county, the civic campus, which extends from the railroad tracks to Cypress Road, is a Community Redevelopment Agency, or CRA, project. A cultural center within or near the library was not in the original scope of the project but the idea evolved later during several public input sessions. Now architectural designs could present one of two possibilities: either a second oor to accommodate the center or a free-standing cultural building. Vice Mayor George Brummer has been the strongest advocate of a cultural center. Im pushing for a separate building, he said. And Brummer says he wants a third building that could be used as a convention center. He is also in favor of a parking garage at the southern end of the property. I dont think this should be decided by cost, he added. We need a legitimate theater with dressing rooms, lights and storage space with standard theater seating. All costs not associated with the library would be borne by the city although Brummer suggested that there are people who could underwrite some of the expense. And if Brummer could have his way, he would call for bold designs. I want people to like it or hate it, the vice mayor said. A major part of the library design will be based on Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, or LEED. Now required for all government buildings, the library designers are shooting for the LEED gold standard, one of the higher levels of sustainable construction. Tammy Good, civil engineer for the city, explained that the library will have LED lighting, lights that turn off when the room is empty and temperature sensors. Good says the architects earn points with each installation of an environmentally positive xture, and that includes providing bicycle racks at the building to encourage green transportation. The present library, located at 1213 East Atlantic Blvd., would close with the opening of the new one. Ground breaking for the library is expected to take place in the early fall of 2013. LibraryContinued from page 1 Representative Gwyn Clarke-Reed to give 2012 legislative wrap up Pompano Beach Democratic Womens Club will meet April 18 at 7 p.m. at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach. State Representative Gwyn ClarkeReed will discuss the most recent Florida legislative session. In addition, Broward Democratic Party Area Leader Lee Feldman will give a presentation of the major components of the Affordable Care Act and their importance to health care in the United States. The meeting is free and open to the public. Call 954-942-8711.

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The Pelican 13 Friday, April 6, 2012 Bailey Woodruff Title Company, Inc. offers 125 Years of combined title experience By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN WRITERWe prepare all closing documentation for buying, selling and re nancing real estate, explains Mary Ste proud owner of Bailey Woodruff Title Company at 665 SE 10 St. in Deer eld Beach. In this particular market, determining correct ownership is hugely important and we are experts at doing this. This is what we do and the only thing we do so Realtors, banks and mortgage companies rely on our expertise. Ste adds, We, as a team, have worked together for the past 15 to 16 years for a large insurance underwriter. Three years ago, we decided to open our own business and keep it personalized in a world that becomes more impersonal every day. Our clients dial in and speak to a real live person who will know what to do and will nd the answer. This personalized service is very much appreciated. Karen Hammett of Howard Grace Mortgage & Associates says, They stand out for me because they are so accommodating to our clients time schedules and needs. I did business with Mary in her previous job and respected Staff members Amy Wahl, Jay Yeskel, Stephanie Sylvester, Gaby Buery, Millie Linhares, Lorna Tritt, Sarah Parker, and Bailey Woodruff Title owner Mary Ste with her little dog, Miles.Bailey Woodruff Title Company, Inc., 665 SE 10 St., Deer eld Beach 954-571-7919her ability, so it was easy to support her new business. I think Bailey Woodruff is unique in its service and their prices are competitive. This title company has clients from all over the world, but the involved properties are all local in the tri-county, South Florida area. We have visitors from everywhere and they often impulsively choose a piece of Florida paradise and especially now when prices are so moderate, Ste says with a bright smile. She continues, We are very, very busy because it is the season and those visitors who fall in love with South Florida and choose to buy in are here right now. While we are not heavily involved in the foreclosure market, we do negotiate many short sales successfully in a relatively short period of time. However, I would estimate that 85 percent of our business is a normal, old fashioned transaction involving local residential properties.. Asked if she sees an improvement in our economy, she responds, We see prices slowly increasing and mortgage money becoming more available. It is common knowledge that the real estate market goes up and down. We remain positive that the current situation is improving and good times are just around the corner. Mary Ste who hails from England, is just like many Floridians who chose to be here for the weather and the casual lifestyle. Although she has traveled Europe and Canada, she settled down right here with husband, Roger 20 years ago. An animated, high energy woman, Ste belongs to and is active in the British American Chamber of Commerce as well as in the Deer eld Beach, Lighthouse Point and Pompano Beach chambers. And then, theres the Brazilian Business Club, the Lighthouse Point Yacht Club and its Ladies Cub. She admits between time with husband Roger, their dog Miles, her business and her community involvement her life is a revolving door with breakfasts, lunches and after hour meetings. In her own charming English accent, she concludes, A reliable title company is essential to the buying and selling of property. Here, at Bailey Woodruff Title Co., Inc. we offer good old fashioned service, care and consideration for the client and the clients client and it pays off. Our edgling company was among the top ve closing of ces in Broward County according to Data Trace, an independent company that tracks business. Call 954-571-7919 for further information.Advertisement

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14 The PelicanFriday, April 6, 2012 The Pelican 954-783-8700 iBeriaContinued from page 10 president-elect for Kiwanis. In Wilton Manors, Pastorino is active in the Wilton Manors Main Street group which he serves as treasurer. And this successful bank continues to grow. On March 19, iBERIABANK announced agreement to acquire Florida Gulf Bancorp, Inc. and will signi cantly increase its presence in Lee County, Florida. iBERIABANK corporation was established in 1887. Its predecessors started the company with one branch in New iberia, Louisiana. Today at 11.8 billion in assets and over 2,500 associates, iBERIABANK corporation is a nancial holding company with 263 combined of ces in 12 states including 173 bank branch of ces. The Pelican loves businesses with heart Jean McIntyre, left, with a lucky lady, pumped $10 of free gas into the tanks of those who drove up to Dan Gordons Chevron station in Pompano Beach until her $125 was used up.. and iBERIABANK certainly quali es. Thank you for your commitments and generosity to the people of Pompano Beach and Wilton Manors. there is not a problem with beauti cation is at a proposed round-about at Washingtonian Hoffmann noted where improving drainage is the issue. Flynn said his design would handle 10 inches of rain in one day. This is being way over thought and over designed, Commissioner Mark Brown said. The only problem is ooding. Its a river when it rains. Brown said the designers shouldnt touch parking. Make sure its legal, but dont attempt to re-design parking. Im sure they need all they have. Maybe update landscaping. Keep the sidewalks. Lots of people walk there. Brown said he has mixed feelings about the roundabout, where there is already a fourway stop. He suggested just adding landscaping. Flynn said the designers were tasked with xing the drainage and beauti cation. Fixing the drainage is simple, he said. If you want to beautify it, it takes the neighborhood buying in. Commissioner Stuart Dodd said that xing the drainage required a new swale and asked if lower landscaping and lighting could be installed. Vice Mayor Scot Sasser said there were too many unanswered questions on the issues. He suggested a special meeting. Condo resident Ann Rhinesmith said shes excited about the plans, citing lighting as her big concern. She said residents in her condo are all for improved landscaping. She suggested adding a crosswalk at Publix. To have to cross a street to get to an island, thats insane, said one female resident. We have a lot of old people. Forget Scheme C, a 25-year resident urged. Its a total disaster, an absolute nightmareits a delusion of grandeur. TopicsContinued from page 2

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The Pelican 15 Friday, April 6, 2012 two sons, so it looks like Im spared future fights with a daughter. He gets many medical referrals for diabetic patients who must take special care of their feet to keep them. With two years of special training in diabetic limb salvage at New England Deaconess Hospital, connected to Harvard Medical School, prevention is the mainstay of our therapy, he says. The bad news is that complications such as food wounds, gangrene and amputation are all too real and can lead to death. The good news is that all of these possibilities are preventable. He suggests: If blood sugars are controlled, other physical problems can be avoided. Do a daily, careful inspection of each foot including between toes. The first sign of anything different like scabbing, oozing, redness, swelling signals a visit to the podiatrist. Never walk barefoot to prevent all possible traumas to the foot. Wear properly fitted shoes If there are deformities, therapeutic footwear is now readily available. Seek immediate treatment for any open sores. Treatment consists of various techniques including cleansing of wounds, removal of dead tissue, special dressings and other modalities. Dr. Behfar also treats fractures and sprains of the foot and ankle. Foot surgeries are all done in hospitals. Leo Spaschover, Lauderdale-By-The-Sea, has been a patient for at least seven years and calls Dr. Behfar an excellent podiatrist. I got a foot condition while abroad which was misdiagnosed by an orthopedist. When I returned, Dr. Behfar immediately identified my problem and helped me. For further information or an appointment, call 954782-7071 in Pompano Beach or 954-726-9255 in Coral Springs. BehfarContinued from page 8 See SIGHTINGS on page 16SightingsA community calendar of East Broward County. Please email information to siren2415@gmail.comArt, Music, Film & Theatre4-14 And Then There Were None [A Murder Mystery] will be performed by the Curtain Call Playhouse at 8 p.m. at the Herb Skolnick Center, 800 SW 36 Ave., Pompano Beach. Tickets are $23 for adults, $10 for students. The play also runs on April 20 and 21 at 8 p.m. and at 2 p.m. on April 15 and 22. 954-784-0768. 4-18 Art-By-The-Sea, a monthly art series will take place from 7 to 9 p.m. at Friedt Family Fellowship Hall, 4433 Bougainvillea Drive, Lauderdale-By-TheSea. 954-594-0444. 4-20 The last Island City Art Walk of the season takes place from 7 to 10 p.m. along Wilton Drive in Wilton Manors. Over 40 local artists show

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16 The Pelican Friday, April 6, 2012Advertise with The Pelican 954.783.8700 Kids day off? Bring them to Deer eld Beach to learn about Sea Turtles todayDeer eld Beach This Friday, April 6, just in time for a scheduled day off for Broward Schools, the City of Deer eld Beach is hosting an Environmental Education Workshop focused on sea turtlestheir nesting habits, the different species that nest on Deer eld Beach, and how to minimize human impact on these fascinating sea creatures. The workshop will be held at the North Beach Pavilion, located north of the International Fishing Pier on the east side of A1A. Metered parking is available in the north beach pavilion parking lot. The presentation will begin at 10:30 a.m. and will last approximately one hour. Coffee and donuts will be served. All ages welcome. Call 954-480-4407 for more information. For the latest news on City of Deer eld Beach events, sign up for E-Subscriptions at www. Deer eld-Beach.com/ esubscriptions. Now Online www.pompanopelican.com SightingsContinued from page 15off their works in Wilton Drives cafes, boutiques, restaurants and other businesses. 4-27 & 28 Deerfield Beach Wine and Food Festival at Quiet Waters Park, 401 South Powerline Road, Deerfield Beach. VIP and regular tickets available. Cost varies by activity. Visit www.DeerfieldBeachWineAndFoodFestival.com or 561-338-7594.Food & Bargains4-14 Wilton Manors Yard Sale, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive. Free to the public. To become a vendor call 954-390-2130. 4-15 The Benevolent Patriotic Order of DOES Drove 142 holds a pancake breakfast from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. at the Elks lodge, 700 N.E. 10 St., Pompano Beach. Cost is $5 for adults and $2.50 for children. 954-587-1121. 4-21 Oakland Park Yard Sale, 7 a.m. to 12 p.m. at Jaco Pastorius Park, 4000 N. Dixie Hwy. Free to the public. To become a vendor call 954630-4500.See SIGHTINGS on page 32

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The Pelican 17 Friday, April 6, 2012 By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFPOMPANO BEACH With a 13-point lead in the second quarter, it looked as if the Blanche Ely High School boys basketball team was on the verge of running away with their game against St. Benedicts. But a third quarter turnaround by St. Benedicts led to a 67-61 loss by Ely to the New Jersey school on March 29 in the first round of ESPN National High School Invitational, played in Ely basketball team falls 67-61 in ESPN National High School InvitationalBethesda, Maryland. Ely went into the game less than a month after its 78-46 state championship victory over Oak Ridge on March 3. St. Benedicts dominated early on with seven unanswered points before Ely got on board with a point scored off the foul line. After that, with the help of a three-pointer by shooting guard Dallas Cameron and a dunk up the middle by power forward Clide Geffrard, Ely steadily marched back from the deficit to take the largest lead of the game 38-25. But after the Tigers reached their zenith, St. Benedicts slowly climbed its way back, never letting Ely get ahead of them by more than 10 points. Then, with 1:43 left in the third quarter, St. Benedicts shooting guard Melvin Johnson dropped in a threepointer, making the score 48-46, and giving the Gray Bees their first lead since the beginning of the game. Unfortunately for Ely, it was the last lead change of the game. The Tigers were close to tying it up, coming within one or two points multiple times, but couldnt overcome St. Benedicts defense in the second half. We lost concentration in the second half. Actually, the third quarter. We just started making mental mistakes, said Head Coach Melvin Randall. It was one mistake after another, after another. St. Benedicts went on to face Findlay Prep of Nevada but lost 65-55. Oak Hill, of Virginia, took home the top tournaments top honors. Ely ends the season with a 30-3 record and is ranked #20 in the ESPN POWERADE FAB 50 national rankings. Asked about next years team, Randall responded, I wouldnt use the term rebuilding. Its going to be a reloading year.

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18 The Pelican Friday, April 6, 2012 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDEERFIEL D BEACH Hillsboro Pines, the 30-year-old golf course within the confines of Century Village East, has been transformed and the credit goes to two South Florida entrepreneurs who saw its potential and made the changes needed to bring in a new generation of golfers. Randy Bast and Rob Smith now head up the ownership group. They have both owned and successfully operated businesses of all types. In 2010, after posting nearly a $400,000 loss in Bast brought in his long-time friend Smith to help him turn the course around. They hired golf course superintendent Steve Adams from Bocas prestigious Broken Sound County Club who transitioned the course, Hillsboro Pines: Not your granddaddys golf course anymoreimproved its condition and lengthened some holes. They bought a new fleet of golf carts, renovated the pro shop and added the 19th Hole Bar & Grill, a full-service restaurant offering breakfast and lunch, beers on tap, wine and eight TVs for sports fans. The course is in the best shape it has been in 30 years, said President and General Manager Rob Smith. Id put the condition of our greens up against any in Broward County. The course is a par 62, 4,177 yards from the blue tees, and considered a challenge for even the scratch golfer. Smith calls it true yardage. All the holes were re-measured and every yard accounted for he says. Distance was increased on holes 2 and 9, 17 and 18, with 9 and 18 the longest on the course. The most challenging hole is probably the 12th which is bordered by water the length of the 290-yard fairway, and the tee box is positioned so that the golfer must drive the lake. For those with an aversion to water, the front nine is dry but has a respectable number of bunkers. Because it is a sportssized course, a round of golf, including lunch, can be played in four hours, Smith said. Since the improvements at Hillsboro Pines, play there is up by 23 percent, he added. In season, he had over 250 league players. By far the most popular events at the club are the Night Golf tournaments held several times a year. The most recent one on March 23 was a sellout and now the course is hosting private Night Golf events for companies as corporate team-building functions. The challenge is to play in the dark with everything aglow: the balls, the fairways lit by glow sticks, the flagsticks wrapped in blinking lights, and even the players adorned with accessories that glow. Nighttime golf, according to Smith, puts the novice and scratch golfer on even terms and makes the game fun for everyone. In fact, the first event was won by two 10-year old-boys and their fathers. With the season winding down, Smith is offering a pretty incredible deal for summer golfers at Hillsboro Pines. He calls it free golf. Summer Memberships run from May 1 through September 30 for only $149, $129 if purchased by Apr. 15. The only cost is the $10 cart rental. The public can expect a dramatic drop in rates also, Smith said, and he institutes a price match policy in the summer that honors any green w/cart fees on an 18-hole course in a 30-mile radius. And the deals at Hillsboro A golfer lines up his putt on one of Hillsboro Pines courses. Golfers at Hillsboro Pines can take in the sun, water and lush landscapes.See PINES on page 32 Advertisement

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The Pelican 19 Friday, April 6, 2012 PUDContinued from page 4months away from approving or disapproving the development. Martin Nixon, president of East Neighborhood Association, or ENA, said building height should be linked to the size of the parcel. Under the proposed PUD, buildings cant be higher than five-stories or 60 ft. Were talking about a five-story building in a neighborhood with only a three-story building, said Bruce Connolly, ENA board member, referring to the Olivewood Condominium, located adjacent to Spiritual Living. Connolly asked that a PUD moratorium be put in place. John Fiore, vice president of ENA and former city mayor, said the PUD as written threatens his neighborhoods quality of life. Theres too much flexibility in these ordinances, he said. But not everyone is wary of the PUD. I live in that neighborhood and I want this, said Carl Lenser. I think its more of an issue of not in my backyard, he said, referring to those against it. If you want to keep it a small town than have no new development, said business owner Joe Pallant. Resident Laura Comer suggested commissioners listen to what their constituents want. When you all ran for your positions you said you were going to represent us. Referring to the proposed apartments and similar projects, Vice Mayor Tom Green said the PUD was good for the city if large developments were built in areas adjacent to the railroad tracks and along Oakland Park Boulevard. But across from houses? No. Commissioners passed the PUD with a change to the review process. Originally, if developers received approval from the city, but later changed more than 10 percent of their floor plan, they would have to have it reviewed again. Pretty much everything, except the color of the building, is going to have to come back, said Heidi Shafran, community development services department director. If were going to make that big of a change I want to see it, said Commissioner Scott Newton, who pushed for the reduction.

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20 The Pelican Friday, April 6, 2012 Eddie Jones, former NBA player, gives back with basketball camp Heavenly Pizza cooks Easter dinner for communityPompano Beach Phil Kasees, owner of Heavenly Pizza [the Church in a Pizzeria], 2647 E. Atlantic Blvd. in Pompano Beach, is opening for an Easter/ Passover dinner this Sunday starting at noon. Kasees says he plans to serve the meal throughout the day. The doors will be open to anyone who is in need or does not have a place to go on Easter/Passover. Visitors to Pompano Beach are also welcome. There is no charge for the meal. Kasees will also lead the regularly scheduled Sunday Bible Study starting at 4 p.m. All are welcome to attend. See JONES on page 28By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFPOMPANO BEACH When former NBA player Eddie Jones looks at the kids participating in his annual basketball camp, he sees the possibility that a few of them might follow in his footsteps. On March 30, about 120 children and teenagers participated in Jones basketball camp at the Boys & Girls Clubs Pompano Beach gymnasium, located in the Thomas D. Stephanis Club. Jones, a former Blanche Ely High School student who graduated from Temple University in 1994, used his basketball skills to get a scholarship and eventually launch himself into a 14-year NBA career. You can use basketball scholarships and athletic sports to get a great education, said Jones, who played for five NBA teams, including the Miami Heat and Los Angeles Lakers, from 1994 to 2008. Originally, Jones sponsored the camp at Blanche Ely but moved it to the Boys & Girls Club a few years ago. I was actually with the Lakers when I first started doing it, said Jones. I just want these kids to learn the game. But long before he ever stepped foot onto a pro basketball court, Jones learned the game in the same gym he now supports. One of those who taught him, Greg Jones, now serves as director of Thomas D. Stephanis Boys & Girls Club. Greg was my coach when I was a kid, said Eddie Jones. I give money every year to keep this camp going. This things going to keep going and some of these kids are going to eventually give back. But Greg Jones says Eddie Jones commitment to the Boys & Girls Club isnt just about basketball. Along with sponsoring the camp, Jones has paid for air conditioning and bleacher renovations as well as Christmas parties and trees for families during the holidays. It goes beyond basketball. He talks to kids about life and making the right decisions, staying on a positive track, said Greg Jones. And with the advent of social media sites like Facebook and rising childhood obesity rates, Greg Jones says children

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The Pelican 21 Friday, April 6, 2012 By Malcolm McClintockPELICAN STAFFOld World Sausage 1384 S. Federal Hwy. 1 block north of McNab Road Pompano Beach 954-942-2004My grandfather was the founder of the world famous Hebrew National Foods company, says friendly sausage specialist Steve Chase, a transplanted New-Yorker who is bringing his particular brand of expertise to the longest-standing meat shop in Florida. I come from a long line of sausage makers and it is truly a passion for me to make innovative, avorful and healthy NY deli style meat products. In 2011, Chase purchased Old World Sausage Factory and immediately assembled an impressive team of European sausage makers led by Dutch master butcher Remon Under new ownership, Pompano Beachs Old World Sausage delivers even better meat products than ever before A popular lunch special, the Hungarian Goulash [left] is loaded with avorful slow-simmered beef chunks and vegetables slathered over tender egg noodles. Old World Sausage also serves up such novel favorites as Cilantro sausage, smoked chicken Apple sausage, slow-cooked roast beef and tangy German-style potato salad [above]. [Photos by Malcolm McClintock]See OLD WORLD on page 22 Hemelrijk. We pride ourselves on making the best and most consistent Old World and New World style meats that we know customers will truly love, the Amsterdam-born Hemelrijk said. And we use nothing but pure muscle meat with no llers or by-products. Their only goal is to produce the best-tasting, highest quality, premium natural & organic meats with no arti cial preservatives, nitrites or nitrates. Just about everything in the shop is gluten free, msg

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22 The Pelican Friday, April 6, 2012 free, dairy free, wheat free, soy free and packed in natural collagen casings. Old World Sausage Factory prides itself on only buying from meat suppliers who use antibiotic and hormonefree vegetarian feed and who seek out free range, grass fed animals whenever possible. When people visit us, they know they will get the best meat products available. And since we have our own smokers, you can be guaranteed that everything is made from scratch on the premises, says Chase. I am very excited to be able to control the production from start to nish. This way I know that every single item will be of the highest quality possible. The main attraction is, of course, the huge selection of tasty sausages. Spicy garlic bratwurst, Hungarian smoked Kielbasa, Hot and Mild Italian, Lemon Chicken Spinach, Spicy Lamb Merguez, Polish Garlic, Chorizo, Andouille, English Bangers, Knackwurst, Wieners, Frankfurters and novel creations like Apple Chicken, Mango-Pear Chicken, Turkey and Jalapeo style sausages are just a few of the seemingly unending options. But Old World Sausage Factory is also quite adept at preparing a host of other favorites to suit every palate. We have many ready-toeat specialties such as juicy rotisserie chicken, matzo ball chicken soup, veal schnitzel, cabbage rolls, Hungarian Goulash and homemade chili, says Chase. Our Executive Chef Georgie has over 26 years working in the top Delis. He also makes great salads such as tuna, white sh, shrimp and our famous Cherry Walnut Chicken salad. Of course, this quaint deli specializes in tantalizing sandwich meats such as hot pastrami, corned beef, roast beef, old world ham, kosher bologna, beef brisket, turkey and just about every other specialty imaginable that can be put between two slices of bread. Some lunch specials include handcrafted mild Italian sausage with all the xins or two New York City hot dogs with soda for $4.99. To-go frozen entres begin at $5.99. Most sausages are between $2.99 and $4.99 per lb while cold cuts and cheeses start at $3.49 per lb. Be sure to call ahead for large orders, catering or special requests such as duck liver mousse, country pt or rabbit pt as Old World prepares its meats in small batches. We sell out quickly because we dont freeze our meats. We make products you cant nd in the big grocery stores and we do so at very reasonable prices, adds Chase. Remember to Old WorldContinued from page 21 What its all about? A classic all beef hot-dog with sauerkraut and hot mustard [left] and an ultra-lean, fully dressed, award-winning Bison dog [right].give the Bison hot-dogs a try I have won awards for my Bison dogs, says Chase who has worked with celebrities selling this avorful, low-fat meat. They are truly outstanding. Visit www.owsausage.com.

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The Pelican 23 Friday, April 6, 2012 Visit The Pelican online at pompanopelican.com. Let us know how we can help cover the news of your city. We Mean Business! 954-783-8700 By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFPOMPANO BEACH Without her MacBook Pro, Erin Saley doesnt know how she would get through her classes. But thanks to a $1,000 scholarship from the Pompano Beach High School Booster Club, she doesnt have to find out. Through fundraising efforts like its upcoming golf tournament May 5, 8 a.m. at the Pompano Beach Municipal Golf Course, 1101 N. Federal Hwy. the Booster Club helps students pay for computers, books and a lot of the other extra expenses of a college education. Saley, a freshman at the University of Florida in Gainesville studying applied Golf tournament helps students afford college extrasphysiology and kinesiology, graduated from Pompano Beach High School last year. Upon graduating, the Booster Club gave her a $1,000 scholarship, which she spent on the MacBook. I bring it to all my classes to take notes on. And our campus has [wireless internet] all over so I use it everywhere, said Saley. Without it, Id be lost. She says the MacBook has put her ahead in school and allowed her to take the $1,000 she would have spent on the computer and put it towards other expenses like groceries. Its expensive up here, said Saley. Denise Schuler, spokeswoman for the Booster Club, said scholarships are given to students with a certain grade point average who have been accepted into a college or university. Students must also volunteer with the Booster Club for 100 hours or more. The students mother, father or legal guardian must also be a member of the Booster Club. Once the scholarship is given, a maximum of $1,000, the student can spend it at his or her discretion. Tom Shahans son received a $500 scholarship and used it to buy a laptop computer. He spent his on a laptop because you cant get by without [one], said Shahan. With golfers, sponsorships and donations, Schuler estimates this years tournament will raise between $8,000 and $10,000 and attract 70 to 80 golfers. Along with the tournament prizes, participants will also have the chance to win raffle prizes that include spa packages, paddle boarding lessons, restaurant gift certificates and more. The cost per golfer is $100. Sponsorship opportunities are also available. To sign up for the tournament, call 954-8062717.

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24 The Pelican Friday, April 6, 2012 is ignorant, disrespectful and baseless, Sudler said. It is not a black and white issue. BSO is doing their job . they will present their findings to the state attorneys office who will say if charges are to be filed.Dixie Flyover construction closes 2 Street intersectionDeerfield Beach The Dixie Highway Flyover opens to traffic Tuesday, April 10, connecting this city and Boca Raton, but a road closure in the area could cause other delays. From that date until May 4, the intersection of NE 2 Street and NE 2 Avenue will be under construction. Users of the tennis center in Pioneer Park may park on 2nd Street or east of the playground. The main entrance on the west side will be closed. Access to businesses along NE 2 Avenue will be maintained. The four-lane flyover with bike lanes and sidewalks is a $39.5 million project funded by federal stimulus money. It spans the Hillsboro Canal, Florida East Coast Railroad tracks, NE 2 Street and 2 Avenue and N. River Avenue.Mayor favors end to Sunday alcohol sales banDeerfield Beach Mayor Peggy Noland wants the city to get on board with others that are lifting bans on the Sunday morning sale of alcohol. She said Tuesday night she has been approached by the managers of Publix and Winn-Dixie as well as restaurant owners asking that the law prohibiting the sale of alcohol until noon be amended. Potential customers, they say, are going outside the city to purchase beer and restaurateurs say their customers should be allowed to order a mimosa for Sunday brunch. Three of her constituents favored letting the ordinance stand. People can deal with the inconvenience, said Commissioner Ben Preston. Commissioners Joe Miller and Marty Popelsky agreed. Only Vice Mayor Bill Ganz took the mayors position saying, Its legislation of morality. Ganz pointed out that alcohol sales are allowed until 3 a.m. six days a week. The only justification [for the Sunday ban] is religious, he said. In the end, Miller suggested they delay the matter to give time for people to weigh in.ChiefContinued from page 3 happens. Thats a city problem, not a golf course problem. Gayle also said a fence separating their yards from the golf course is horribly kept and the weeds grow into our backyards. I would take no money to have the grass mowed and to use weed killer, Gayle said. She also suggested a swale to control the flooding caused by the mulched ground. Issues between the golf course owners and the residents have been ongoing for years according to the speakers. City Commissioner GriefContinued from page 11 Ben Preston called it a complicated and incompatible situation . I have talked to the country club and asked them to resolve these issues. But they havent. They are not good neighbors. It is a mess. Battle also called the club owners terrible neighbors They have received favors (in the past) and dont keep their word. Gayle said in her 33 years in the neighborhood, there has always been a situation. You have to give us support, she told the commission. Mayor Peggy Noland asked where the dirt piles were coming from and told the residents, I guarantee you this was news to me. Something will be happening. Calls from The Pelican to the Deerfield Beach Country Club were unanswered at press time.

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The Pelican 25 Friday, April 6, 2012 throughout his life. Then she thanked her cardiologist, Dr. Alan L. Niederman, who played a significant part in her life shortly after she received the news of her sons death. Pompano Beach Division Chief Michael Hohl, recalls what happened. I was the person who ElliotContinued from page 1informed the family of the accident. I was there at North Broward Medical Center when Joanne arrived, he said. Later when the only thing left was to return home, Hohl spoke to each member. When he spoke to Joanne, he asked if she were OK. She responded words that were symptomatic of a heart attack. We immediately took her into the hospital where she began receiving help, he said. In less than 12 hours, Joanne grey dog, Dingy. Dingy had attended his masters funeral in January at Calvary Chapel in Fort Lauderdale where during the service he hopped up on a table to sniff Elliots boots and helmet. At the dedication on Saturday, Dingy made his presence known when he barked with approval during the mayors proclamation. Dingy also got a big laugh when he left a loving mark on the shrubs under the monument bearing his masters name. was transferred to Holy Cross where Dr. Niederman was on staff. The next week, she was at the funeral, said Hohl. Nothing short of a miracle. While doctors recommended that she not attend her sons funeral, she overruled their decisions and attended with her cardiologist at her side. He was also was present on this day and Joanne thanked him publicly for his help. Bill Elliots sister, MaryBeth Williams, and Elliots brother, John, a Boca Raton firefighter, accompanied their mother. Williams announced that a scholarship in honor of her brother has been established through the Broward Education Foundation to help students accomplish their goals and follow their dreams. Fire Chief Harry Small remembered Elliot as the kind of person you want working with you. I was privileged to have him as a friend. And a very special friend of the late Bill Elliot was also on hand this day, his mixed-breed Chris Flores, Kaitlyn Fox and Alisha Edison with Deer eld Beach Elementary teacher, Mary-Beth William, sister of Bill Elliot. Williams announced the establishment of a scholarship fund in honor of her brother.

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26 The Pelican Friday, April 6, 2012

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The Pelican 27 Friday, April 6, 2012 By Malcolm McClintockPELICAN STAFFWe heard her practicing in the lobby and thought to ourselves, Wow, she is amazing. Maybe she could give us a private concert. said Anna Tserkezis, a Leisure Towers condo resident. Clearly impressed by the talent level of this beautiful young viola player, Anna and building manager Deena Palmer hastily put out dozens of folding chairs in the common room. A mere hour later, 15-year-old Marena Salerno Collins was strolling into a surprisingly crowded room. Apparently, word had spread throughout the Viola prodigy gives impromptu concert at Lauderdale-By-The-Sea condobuilding that a young talent would be showcasing her musical gifts. Visiting Lauderdale-ByThe-Sea with her mother, Rhonda, Marena was in town to spend a few days with her grandfather Remo Salerno a long time resident of the area who splits his time between his South Florida and Michigan homes. I am so proud of her, says the senior Salerno who has been actively involved in supporting his granddaughters musical aspirations since she was barely six years old. For those wondering about the difference between a Marena Salerno Collins impresses the audience with her mastery of the physically demanding viola. [Photos by Malcolm McClintock]viola and a violin, the former is slightly bigger, requires a shorter, sturdier bow and players read for it in Alto Clef while violinists read in Treble Clef. Additionally, the viola produces a deeper, richer sound and requires more physical strength to wield. After introducing herself as a musically inclined teenager from Jackson Hole, Wyoming, the gregarious young musician launched into a thunderous rendition of a Bach Allemande. At the conclusion, Marena informed the impressed audience that she was equally comfortable playing five other instruments including the bassoon, saxophone and, of course, the violin. But my favorite thing to do is to play different places around Jackson Hole with my friend who is a guitarist. We have a really cool band, says the gifted artist. She then lightened the mood See VIOLA on page 35

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28 The Pelican Friday, April 6, 2012 WORSHIP DIRECTORY: Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad. Rev. Hyvenson Joseph JonesContinued from page 20and teenagers are dealing with more challenges than ever before. Some things are harder now, as far as peer pressure, than years ago, said Jones. But places like the Boys & Girls Club can help them beat the odds, he said. We try to get them involved. For more on the Boys & Girls Club, visit www.bgcbc. org or call 954-941-2697.ChamberContinued from page 7Advertise in The Pelican 954-783-8700!a resource guide for anyone living in or visiting Pompano Beach and the greater area. This year the Anniversary Guide is being published by Atlantic Communications Group, Inc., award-winning publishers located in Philadelphia. Expected to be off the presses in mid-summer, the full-color guide will be distributed all year to hotels and businesses. The guide will also be available for purchase at the chamber of ce, 2200 East Atlantic Blvd. Along with information on chamber events and the bene ts of chamber membership, the 2012-2013 edition will include a complete Business Directory with an alphabetical listing of all chamber member rms; a Buyers Guide with all member rms by business classi cation; an Advertisers Index with page location and web address of all advertisers; plus a full-color editorial section featuring the bene ts of living and working in the Greater Pompano Beach area; and nally a full-color map of the Chambers service area. Were really excited about this, and Im personally delighted to be working with Atlantic Communications and their outstanding sales, design and production team. Atlantic has been creating high-quality custom image books, maps and directories for over 25 years and their reputation for excellence thats second to none. Were proud to be working with the best in the business, Green said. The feeling is mutual, according to Hayden M. Wilbur, Atlantic CEO. Atlantic welcomes the chance to promote the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, and communicate who you are and what you offer in a format youll be proud to distribute, said Wilbur, Atlantic CEO. This is a valuable marketing tool. We encourage every chamber member to support this effort to get your message out there. Take advantage of our new 3 for 1 offer in print, online and on the online map. Chamber and non-chamber members can advertise in the guide, but members will purchase ads at discounted prices. Green believes that this marketing tool will have a strong impact on both small and large corporations and add to a stronger business climate. As the citys chamber leader, Greens goals are focused on prosperity. And the more businesses that sign up for the guide, the more valuable this publication becomes. Theres only a couple of months for business owners to sign up for the book. We are just getting started with it, but time passes so quickly, it will be over before you know it, so we recommend businesses move quickly, Green says. For more information on the publication, please contact Alan Wrobel, Advertising Manager at directory@pompanobeachchamber.com

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The Pelican 29 Friday, April 6, 2012 Lighthouse Point Curves members of Lighthouse Point recently donated over 1,200 pounds of food to the Blessings Food Pantry, 210 NE 3 St., Pompano Beach. The food collection efforts took place during March. Members brought in food when they came in for their workouts and new members joining in the month of March had the one time service fee waived with their donation of a bag of groceries. While we work to improve the lives of women in the northeast Broward County area through Curves, we also feel it is important to reach out to others in our community, said Gail Bamman, owner of Curves of Lighthouse Point. Its apparent to us that the Blessings Food Pantry cares about the lives and the health of the people in our community. We are proud to be able to partner with them to help the North Broward county area. According to Bamman, one of Curves of Lighthouse Points goals is to foster community involvement through charitable efforts. Curves has always been dedicated to improving someones life through weight loss or a charitable initiative. Its exciting to be able to give both, said Bamman. Curves program consists of 30 minutes of exercise three times a week, during which participants work all major muscle groups and receive a great cardio workout. It includes all five components of a complete exercise program: warm-up, strength training, cardio, cool down, and stretching. To help Curves donation efforts, or to become a member contact Gail Bamman at 954-783-2900.About CurvesCurves works every major muscle group with strength training, cardio and stretching in every 30 minute workout. Gary Heavin and his wife Diane are considered the innovators of the express fitness phenomenon that has made exercise available to more than four million women worldwide. With more than 10,000 locations in dozens of countries, Curves is the worlds largest fitness franchise. Visit www.curves. com.Curves of Lighthouse Point helps stock Blessings Food Pantry Gail Bamman and Vicki Pierini prepare to box up 1,200 pounds of food to be donated to Blessings Food Pantry in Pompano Beach. [Staff photo]

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30 The Pelican Friday, April 6, 2012 Classi edsCall 954-545-0013 Business Card Directory HELP WANTEDPT OR FT YOUR CHOICE Be An AVON Independent Sales Representative AND YOUR Own Boss. $10 To Start! Call 954-729-0750. 4-6 CHRIST CHURCH PRESCHOOL Looking For Part Time Teacher For Ages Six Weeks To 5 Years Of Age. Call Cindy At 954-943-7776. 4-6 BOOKKEEPERWITH EXPERIENCE IN Accounts Payable & Accounts Receivable. Must Possess Excellent Organizational & Computer Skills. PT Position 25 Hrs Per Week. Please Email Resume To tdjrpapa@ yahoo.com. LOCAL PEST CONTROL CO Looking For Quality Sales/Service Tech. Must Be Dependable, Team Player, Good Drivers License & People Skills. Will Train Right Person. ALSO Of ce Assistant Computer People & Phone Skills Needed. Fax Resume 954-418-3982. SEEKING EMPLOYMENTI AM SEEKING A Clerical Position Basic Computer Skills. Bilingual Spanish English Part-time. Prefer Pompano Ft Laud Area. 954-942-8111. SERVICES CARPET CLEANING 2 Rooms $59!! ACTUAL PRICE!! No GIMMICKS!! CALL 954-784-8199. DANNY BOY ELECTRIC Lic & Insured. Lic. #EC13004811. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. 24/Hr Service. 954-290-1443. Beat Any Written Estimate. Sr, Discount. 4-6 GINGERS HOUSEKEEPING 20 YEARS EXP. (Licensed) References Available. Honest & Reliable Love To Clean Windows! Help Organize No Problem. FREE Estimates! 954-200-4266. 4-6 HAMWAY POOL SERVICE Once A Month Service $39 Includes All Chemicals. Weekly Service Also Available 20 Years Exp. Call 954-9795548. 4-27 DAVIDSONS ROOFING SPECIALIZING In ReRoo ng Repairs Siding Pressure Cleaning Painting Gutters Windows Licensed And Insured. 954-726-4912. HANDYMAN PAINTING CARPENTRY Pressure Cleaning. Decks! Everything Around The House. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. Call 561-350-3781. MOORE PLUMBING PLUMBING SERVICES Big Jobs Small Jobs. We Do It All. Remodeling & Repairs. Lic. & Insured. C.C. Accepted. Call 954-772-4600. 4-27 HONEST HANDYMAN HOME & BUILDING Maintenance/Improvements. No Job Too Small. Fast Friendly Service. Reasonable Rates. Local Resident/Homeowner. Call Today For Your FREE Upfront Quote. No Deposit Required. 754-366-1915. 4-6 GOT JUNK? DUMP TRUCK CLEANUPS Trees/ Landscape, Yard Fill. Paint/ Pressure Wash/ Roofs/Home Repairs Welding, Etc. Dave 954-818-9538. 4-6 CEMETERY PLOTS2 CASKETS VAULTS & GRAVES Garden Of Love Section Forest Lawn North. Moving Must Sell. Call Ron For Information 954-7813381. 4-6 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIESNew GREEN technology. New defroster control saves energy in home refrigerators, commercial chillers. Patented. All optical. Simple mfg. Strategic partners needed..www.NewAvionics.Com. 954-568-1991. C EARN BIG!! FAST GROWING ON-LINE CO Ranked Top 400 World Wide. Join Our Wealth Building Team Today. Mike 954-6573171. 4-6 MUSICIANS WANTEDThe American Legion Symphonic Band is now accepting new members for the 2011-2012 season. College age to seasoned seniors are welcome. Rehearsals are held on Wed. evenings at American Legion Post 142 in Pompano. Percussionists, euphonium and clarinet players are especially needed. If you enjoy making music, call Jim McGonigal, Music Director at 954-647-0700 for more info.DEEP WATER VILLA DOCKPOMPANO BEACH 2/2 2 BLOCKS BEACH 1700 SQ FT. Screened Fla Room. Private Yard. W/D. 4 Park. No Fixed Bridges. Community Pool. Deeded Dock.. 2 Blocks Beach. $265,000. Coldwell Banker Barbara Call 954629-1324. 4-13 STUDIOS / EFFICIENCIES POMPANO BEACH BOCA RATON ATLANTIC / FEDERAL Efficiency $175 Weekly. No Security Deposit. Includes Cable, Electric, Internet. FREE Washer / Dryer. No Drug Record No Evictions. 954-709-0694. 4-6 OUT OF AREA NORTH WILDWOOD N.J. SEASON 1/1 Apartment. 2 Blocks From Beach. A/C / Cable. $5500. Call 954-7086708. 4-13 CO-OP SALESPOMPANO BEACH 1/1 On Water, Dockage Available At Your Door. $59,500. Coldwell Banker Barbara 954-6291324. 4-13 REAL ESTATE WANTEDI BUY HOUSES!! CASH!! AS IS! QUICK CLOSE! ANY AREA ANY CONDITION! NO EQUITY OK. CALL NOW 954-914-2355. 4-20 CONDOS FOR SALEPOMPANO BEACH DIRECT OCEAN VIEW!! 2/2 AT THE BREAKERS! $275,000. Call Juliana At Barclays For Details. 1-305-766-4420. POMPANO BEACH ISLAND CLUB Updated 2/2 1st Floor Unit With Dock Up To 28 Boat. $155K. Mirsky Realty Group Susan 954-732-2038. 4-1

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The Pelican 31 Friday, April 6, 2012 POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 BEDROOMS Fully Furnished Efficiency With Kitchen, Fully Furnished. Cable, Internet, Pool, Laundry. 500 To The Beach. Weekly Monthly Yearly. 954-294-8483 Or 248-736-1533, 4-13 POMPANO BEACH 1/1 FURNISHED Includes TV $850 Month Yearly 1st / Last / Security. EFFICIENCY $750 Month Yearly Includes Direct TV + $50 Electric Allowance. 954785-5837. LARGE OPEN BRIGHT FIRST FLOOR CORNER SMALL YARD Small Pet OK All Tile Floors Just Painted Off A1A North Of Atlantic Pool Coin Laundry WIFI Cable Water Included $995 Month ---Large Ef ciency Apartment Available Same Bldg. Includes All Plus Elec. Full Kitchen Corner Unit. $650 Lease Required April 1 Special One Week FREE!! Owner Agent 954-608-7368. 412 Sunset Drive Pompano. FORT LAUDERDALE SINGLE 1/1 CLEAN Apt. Summer Tennant Las Olas On The Beach. $600 Month. May 28 Oct 28. 954-306-3946. LIGHTHOUSE POINT DUPLEX 2/2 Clean Newly Painted New Appliances. Great Neighborhood. Reasonable! Call 954-873-2732. 4-6 POMPANO BEACH 1/1 SW. C/A $750 2/1 $925 3/2 $1025 NE 2/1 $950 Townhouse 2/1.5 $1095. ALL FREE WATER. Rent + $70 Application Moves U In. 954-781-6299. 4-6 POMPANO MCNAB RD & NE 18 AVENUE 1 & 2 Bedrooms Furnished/ Unfurnished. $695 $950 And Up. Pool, Tile Floors. Central A/C. 954610-2327. 4-13 POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 Bedroom From $495. Easy Move-in. 1/2 OFF DEPOSIT. Remodeled. Great Location. 954-783-1088 For More Info. 5-11 Classi edsCall 954-545-0013 DEERFIELD BEACH 2/2 Completely Redone. Granite Kitchen, New Cabinets. S.S. Appliances. 20 Porcelain Tile Floors. Travistine Stone Baths. Freshly Painted. 1st Floor. Less Than A Mile To Beach. $84,900. Call 631-873-8715. 4-6 CONDOS FOR RENTDEERFIELD BEACH 2/2 CONDO Corner Unit, Pool. $800 $825. Good Credit Required. No Pets Or Realtors. 631-885-3342. LAUDERDALE BY THE SEA Near Sea Watch Restaurant 1 Bedroom Den 2 Bath. CHA, Pool, W / D, End Unit. $1100 Per Month Yearly. 1st / Last / Security. No Pets / N / S. 954-942-5642. 4-6 LAUDERDALE BY THE SEA Furnished 2/2 Pool Near Beach Shops & Restaurants. Enjoy Beach Living. $875 Month From April To October. Owner 413-244-2807. 4-6 POMPANO BEACH 55+ Community. Renovated 2/1 With Sunroom Ground Floor / On Golf Course. Beautifully Furnished 1 Year +. Excellent References. $900 Month. 917-544-0771. POMPANO BEACH LARGE 2 / 2 With Den. All Renovated! Pool Mile From Beach! W /D Small Pet OK! $1,300 Month Yearly. Available May 1st. 561-703-6545 Or 754-264-3289. OCEANFRONTBYTHE MONTH Pompano Beach Club Newly Renovated Furnished 1 / 1 Unobstructed Southern View Of Ocean & Intracoastal 24th Floor Clubhouse Bar Restaurant 2 Pools. $1,100 Per Month. Audrey 570246-9240 Cell Or E-mail Audrey@ chantr e.com. POMP ANO BEACH CONDO Cypress Bend 1285 Sq Ft. Newly Renovated. $1175 Per Month. Call John 413-562-3976APTS FOR RENTDEERFIELD/POMPANO BEACH 1 BR & 2 BR APTS FOR RENT. Remodeled, Paint, Tile, Etc. W & D On Site. Pool. Pet Friendly. Call George 954-809-5030. 4-6 POMPANO 1/1 & 2/1 E OF FEDERAL Tiled. 10 Overhang. Walk To Everything. Park At Your Door. 954-254-6325. 4-6 LUXURY BEACH PADS FOR RENT! Pompano Grand Opening: Security Deposit As Low As $199 For Quali ed Applicants. FREE 32 Flat Screen HDTV! Newly Renovated in 2012 One Bedrooms & Studio Apts., 75 Yards From Private Beach Access, Eastern Exposure. New Kitchens & Baths, Granite Counter Tops, Central Air, Pool, Laundry, Dedicated Parking, Near Pier & Downtown. All Bills Paid! Includes Water, Electric, Premium Cable TV And WIFI. Furnished Or Unfurnished. Short Or Long Stays. No Utility Deposits. Small Pets Welcome. Only 7 Left! Pax Properties 888-7294948 Or 954-603-8857. Photos At www. beachpads.net. 4-27 COMMERCIAL FOR RENT-SALEPOMPANO COMMERCIAL OFFICE Spaces Available. Ranging From As Low As $500 To $700 Depending On Square Footage. Please Call Darci At 954-7833723. 4-20 DEERFIELD BEACH Retail Of ce Warehouse 700 Sq Ft With Loft. A/C, Bathroom. $575 Per Month. Call For More Info 561-654-1331 Or 561-9985681. 4-6 FURNITUREBEDSETS King $180 Queen $130 Full $110 Twin $90. 5 Pc. Bedroom Set $399. Frames $39. 954465-6498. 4-6 DOCK FOR RENT60 FT DOCK THE COVE MARINA 50 AMP / H20 Included. $1,200 Month Price Negotiable Depending On Boat Size. Restaurant & Fuel On Premises. 954-914-0053. a.j.barsotti@ comcast.net. PIANO LESSONSPIANO LESSONS AT YOUR HOME Classical Pop Jazz. 30 Years In Northeast Area. Call 954-938-3194. MISC FOR SALECAR TOP CARRIER (Thule) Model Atlantis 1600 Cu Ft. 74x36 Lbs. $375. Lighthouse Point 954-7849915. 4-6 GARAGE SALESLIGHTHOUSE POINT Saturday April 7th 8am-1pm. NE 50 St. E On NE 49 St To NE 23 Avenue Left To NE 50 St. Follow Signs.

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32 The Pelican Friday, April 6, 2012 Capt. RJ Boyle is an experienced angler in South Florida. His studio is located in Lighthouse Point. Call 954-420-5001. RJ BoyleRJ BOYLE STUDIOSBe sure to gear up this week for wahoo. As the full moon approaches this weekend, many anglers will be getting their boats ready to do some wahoo trolling. Some guys will pull out the high-speed lures and zip around from 200 to 300 ft. of water. Others will be trolling the Yozuri Bonitos or Magnum Plugs. If I were trolling this weekend, I would try to go for both. When fishing the highspeed lures, anglers really cover a lot of ground which often results is big hauls. Look for the right clues and make it a wahoo weekendI always look for a current edge or a color change. These breaks in temperature and color are usually where the wahoo are feeding. If the current or color change occurs in the 200 to 300 feet range, you better watch out. Once we find the fish with the high-speed lures, we will change over to double-hooked ballyhoos and slow trolling plug lures. Usually you will mark some baitfish on the screen in the areas where you are getting bites. We actually rig ballyhoos for wahoo fishing at the store. They are made with two triple strength hooks and heavier wire. One bit of advice is to remember when fighting a wahoo on the troll, keep the boat moving ahead. Wahoos have a tendency to start shaking their heads once they get near the boat. If you stop the boat, at some point the wahoo will lurch ahead towards the boat and the hooks can fall out. Lastly, if you happen to catch a wahoo be careful when putting him in the boat. They have some serious teeth that can really do some damage. Good luck this weekend. Pines just keep coming. Golf instructor Robert Klapka gives $8 clinics and the pro shop holds continuous close-outs on clothing and equipment. With the annual fee for platinum golfers just $1,995, Smith says, memberships at Hillsboro Pines have doubled in the last two years. In addition, Smith opens the course for charity tournaments, junior golfers and for training rounds for local high schools. The next charity event April 21 benefits St. Judes Childrens Hospital. Cost of the four-man scramble with shotgun start is $75 and includes a Bloody Mary before play and a steak dinner afterward. The 19th Hole is open sunrise to sunset with a moderatelypriced menu of breakfast items, appetizers, burgers, sandwiches, salads, pizzas and a pie of the day. Orders can be faxed or called in. The golf course is accessed through the Century Village East Gatehouse on Hillsboro Boulevard, just west of Military Trail. Call 954-4211188. PinesContinued from page 18SightingsContinued from page 16Clubs & Civic Groups 4-5 Broward Sierra Club meets at 7:30 p.m. at Fern Forest Nature Center, 201 Lyons Rd. S., Coconut Creek. Guest speaker is Michele Williams, director of the Southeast Region of the Florida Public Archaeology Network at Florida Atlantic University. 954-946-7359. 4-18 The Deerfield Beach Historical Society hosts History at High Noon from noon to 1 p.m. at Deerfield Beach City Hall, 150 NE 2 Ave. 954-429-0378.

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The Pelican 33 Friday, April 6, 2012 SPECIAL TO THE PELICANSouth Florida women will tackle fishing skills at the South Florida Ladies, Lets Go Fishing! seminar offered specifically for women. The weekend conservationminded seminar, held in conjunction with support from the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, or FWC, emphasizes hands-on skills with techniques such as releasing, knot tying, dehooking, bait rigging, spin casting, gaffing grapefruits, cast netting, trailer backing, boat handling and more. The Womens Fishing University is scheduled for April 20-22 at the I.T. Parker Community Center in Dania Beach. Women will have the chance to learn, practice and participate in the surrounding South Florida waters. Activities launch Friday Seminar planned for women anglers April 20night with a networking meet and greet starting at 6 p.m. On Saturday, classroom presentations begin at 8 a.m., with beginner and advanced sessions on topics including fishing basics and conservation including a presentation by the FWC and lunch provided by Pollo Tropical. Other fishing classes include Offshore/Captains Tony Digiulian, Inshore/Capt. Lou Volpe, Basics/Lee Lavery and Fly/Jim Anson. A Dress for Fishing Success fashion show is held at lunch, followed by handson skill practice where ladies learn the art of fishing directly from the Pros. Sunday, the ladies board charter boats at approximately 7 a.m. for an optional half day fishing trip followed by a filet demonstration. In prior years some ladies experienced releasing sailfish on their first fishing endeavor the equivalent of a getting a hole in one on the first swing. Featured on national network television and more, the series is held in conjunction with the FWC through the Sport Fish Restoration Program, with major partners including Mercury Outboards, Ranger, Silver Airways, Minn Kota, Humminbird, FishHound.com and Magic Tilt Trailers. Registration starts at $99 for the first 20 to sign up, then $135 after. Registration includes instruction, use of equipment, hands-on training, networking reception and fundraisers, meals, goody bags and more. The Sunday Fishing Adventure, with tackle and bait provided, is additional. No equipment or experience is necessary. Membership is not required; however there is a South Florida chapter available to continue the fishing fun. Call LLGF, at 954475-9068, fax 954474-7299, email: fish@ ladiesletsgofishing.com. Call The Pelican 954-783-8700

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34 The Pelican Friday, April 6, 2012 OverlayContinued from page 5The reason for the overlay option is to allow density and to make it attractive, City Manager John Stunson said. Commissioner Jed Shank said residents have expressed concerns about the plan, its origin and how it was prioritized. He wants to proceed cautiously and supported the proposed ordinance going back to the P&Z board. Shank said his parameters are he wants no more than three stories and no more than 20 units per acre. He wants no one forced out of their home and no public funds going to relocate power lines. He said he appreciates the additional review. Boisvenue said residents would like more code enforcement in the area. I dont know why we arent more pro-active over there, she said. She suggested looking for grants for facades. She said residents who live behind the proposed district have come to Boisvenue in tears asking why theyre being ignored and complaining about what they will be looking at. Vice Mayor John Adornato noted that mixed-used projects are successful in other areas, predicting that property values in the area would go up with the new district. Nancy Spear said the neighbors dont want it and dont want to pay for it. But if this goes forward, add a stipulation that Oakland Park residents be hired to do the building, she suggested. How would you feel if someone could look at you in your backyard? Lloyd Estates resident Gerda Kendall asked. I feel its an invasion of privacy. willing to tidy up the beach

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The Pelican 35 Friday, April 6, 2012 by playing The Wizards Walk, a great fiddle favorite from American folk musician and composer Jay Ungar. After several more Ungar classics and a host of soulful classical renditions, the remarkably mature Marena Salerno Collins thanked the school age children could learn to play the violin if learning steps were small enough and if the instrument was scaled down to fit their body. Suzuki believed that every child, if properly taught, was capable of a high level of musical achievement. After observing the dramatic, confident movements of Marena on the viola and her easygoing ViolaContinued from page 27delighted crowd and gave special praise to her mother and grandfather for their unwavering support over the years. Although she is only in grade 10, she is already first chair in the All-State Orchestra. Essentially, she is the top violist in Wyoming, says clearly proud parent and former school teacher, Rhonda, who stresses the fact that Marena gravitated towards music of her own volition. I brought her to many live concerts as a child and one day she said, mom, I want to play like them. Over the years, Marena was mentored by several inspiring teachers who practiced the Suzuki movement a method of teaching music conceived by Japanese violinist Shinichi Suzuki that emerged in the mid-20th century. The central belief of Suzuki, based on his language acquisition theory, is that all people are capable of learning from their environment. The essential components of his method spring from the desire to create the right environment for learning music. He also believed that this positive environment would also help to foster character in students. He reasoned that if children have the skill to acquire their mother tongue, then they have the necessary ability to become proficient on a musical instrument. He pioneered the idea that pre-Viola virtuoso Marena Salerno Collins takes a few minutes to pose with 93year-old LBTS resident Grace Arioli. approach to conversing with a room full of adults, there is certainly great merit to this particular teaching method. Marena and her mom will be heading back to Wyoming shortly but promised to return for Christmas. Maybe the residents of Lauderdale-ByThe-Sea will get another melodious gift this upcoming Yuletide season.

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36 The Pelican Friday, April 6, 2012