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Pompano Pelican
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00090900/00293
 Material Information
Title: Pompano Pelican
Uniform Title: Pompano Pelican
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: Pompano Pelican
Place of Publication: Pompano Beach
Publication Date: 03-30-2012
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Pompano Beach
Coordinates: 26.234722 x -80.125556 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00090900:00293

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Friday, March 30, 2012 Vol. XX, Issue 13 Call 954-783-8700 to Advertise Email: siren2415@gmail.com Pompano Beach Deer eld Beach Lighthouse Point Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Wilton Manors Oakland Park Hillsboro Beach The Galt Palm Aire The Pelican Pelican By Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach Andy Buglione, Boy Scout leader and veteran of World War II and Korea, is preparing the ceremonies for Memorial Day in Pompano Beach. He needs help, and hes earned it with his own dedication to country and community. Buglione, 85, returned from Korea in 1954 to his home in Long Island, his wife Kay and their two children. Four years later, Buglione moved his family to Pompano Beach where he worked for the Broward Sheriffs Of ce as an auto mechanic. In 1968, he started a Boy Scout Troop at St. Colemans Roman Catholic Church. He became a Scout in 1935 and was close to completing Vet from WWII, Korea needs help to make Memorial Day events a successSee MEMORIAL DAY on page 15 Renown storytellers coming April 14 to entertain and educateFolk musicians to join stageBy Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach Storytelling is alive and well primarily because of Connie Regan-Blake, said a host on Good Morning America, and Saturday, April 14 in Constitution Park, festival-goers will hear this renowned storyteller and a dozen others spin their tales. The citys rst Storytelling Festival is the brainchild of resident Henry Gould who lived near Jonesboro, TN for a time and was enthralled by the International Storytelling Convention held there each October. That was my introduction to storytelling, and I loved it, Gould said. Its so beautiful there in the heart of the Blue Ridge Mountains and, you know, growing up we listened to stories on the radio. Now, when Tell me a story See STORIES on page 14Connie ReganBlake is one of Americas most celebrated storytellers. Entertaining audiences in 47 states and 16 countries, she brings the wisdom, humor and drama of stories to main stage concert halls, libraries and into the corporate world. Blake will be in Deer eld Beach April 14 at Constitution Park. New incentive program gets underway this summerBy Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach Recycling will become an even smarter choice later this year when the city initiates an incentive program that will give residential recyclers bonus coupons and store discounts for their efforts to keep the planet greener. With the help of a new eet of specially designed trucks, the amount of recyclables collected at each home will be measured, and coupons redeemable at local businesses, will be awarded. This is payback driven, said Assistant Director of Environmental Services Chad Grecsek. It supports local businesses, and it encourages people to recycle more which brings in more revenue for the city. Recycling will not be mandatory, but there will be no reason not to [do it]. Grecsek said the city will issue a request for proposal soon for a private partner to market and run the rewards program. That partner will also be City raising the ante for those who recycle See RECYCLE on page 7 No arrest in pedestrians death creating a protestDark streets also an issueBy Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach Friends and family of Thetus Fleming Jr., killed while crossing Hillsboro Boulevard on Feb. 17, want the man driving the pickup that struck Fleming charged with a crime. To date, the Broward See NO ARREST on page 24

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2 The PelicanFriday, March 30, 2012 Pompano Beach Representatives of the Northeast High School InVenTeam will speak at the next meeting of the Cresthaven Civic Association. The group meets at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, April 12, at the Pompano Beach Moose Club, 3321 NE 6 Terrace. The InVenTeam received a grant from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology to create an emergency water ltration system. For more information on the meeting, email CresthavenNews@aol.com. High school students discuss MIT grant Public will help choose new brand and sloganBy Judy VikPELICAN STAFFLauderdale-By-TheSea Town commissioners and the public got their rst look this week at a proposed brand to help market the towns commercial districts. It incorporates the theme unwind and depicts a pelican perched on an Adirondack chair with the words, Relaxyoure here. Lauderdale-By-The-Sea.Chill, youre in Lauderdale-By-The-Sea!Andy Royston, creative director of the Tangled Spider Design Group said, People come here to unwind and feel happy. This is not a complicated place. Its a relaxing place. Royston said inspiration came from some of the locals the pelicans at the beach. They live here, make their homes here, and pelicans can be cute, he said. His group also discovered buildings in town that suggest a bygone era and that gave rise to the Adirondack chair. Its like a promise to people, Royston said. Stop and relax and take it all in. The chair is the epitome of summer relaxation. Read a book with not a care in the world. He explained the brand components could be used in different ways, on posters or signs. The pelican and chairs could be different colors. And the pelican can move around on the design. Hes not going to y away. Hes at home here. Hell wander around and make a bit of a nuisance of himself, Royston quipped. Another possibility presented by his group used colorful building blocks that included images of star sh or the sun. A welcome sign could be a patchwork quilt of blocks featuring a turtle, waves, palm tree and star sh. A third idea was nostalgic picture postcards, creating the idea of old school, seaside fun. Slogans under consideration are, using the initials LBTS: Lets Be Thoroughly Spoiled, Living by the Sunshine, Lazing beneath the Sun, Light Balms the Soul. All suggestions are on the towns website, lbts.gov under monkeysurvey.com and are on Channel 78. Residents and business people are invited to make comments on the three themes: chair and pelican, blocks or postcard. The Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Chamber of Commerce is sending an email blast to its members for their opinions, as See CHILL on page 29

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The Pelican 3 Friday, March 30, 2012 SightingsA community calendar of East Broward County. Please email information to siren2415@gmail.com By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFWilton Manors For years, Bill Wetzel was a cancer survivor. But at the American Cancer Societys 2012 Relay For Life Wilton Manors, he will be one of those remembered who lost his struggle with the disease.Wilton Manors Relay For Life set for June 1, 2Wetzel, former Wilton Manors parks and recreation director, died on Feb. 4, 2011, leaving behind a wife and two children. He took his nal breath 20 years after being diagnosed with testicular cancer. He really understood he was on borrowed time and really lived. There were periods of time, two to threeyear spans, where he t a lot of life in, said Jim Wetzel, Bills brother. According to the National Cancer Institute, 8,290 men were diagnosed with testicular cancer in 2011 and 350 died. First diagnosed at age 26, Jim Wetzel said his brother went through multiple bouts of chemotherapy, surgeries and alternative treatments. Eventually, says Jim, the cancer spread to his brothers spine, paralyzing him and causing both kidneys to fail. But through it all, he says he never heard his brother complain. He was constantly upbeat. I dont know how he did it. He inspired my daughter to do Relay For Life, said Jim. Billy was always a good uncle. He really provided a very strong role model for my children. He compared his brother to a championship boxer. He went through hurdle after hurdle. He would just keep getting up.See RELAY on page 32 Easter Services BaptistFirst Baptist Church of Pompano Beach, 138 NE 1 St., 954-745-6100 4-1 Palm Sunday: Jesus, the Lion of Judah, a praise and worship service, 9:30 to 11 a.m. 4-6 Good Friday: Jesus, the Lamb of God Communion service, 7 p.m. 4-8 Easter Sunday: Jesus, our Risen King, a resurrection celebration, 9:30 and 11 a.m.CatholicSaint Henry Catholic Church, 1500 S. Andrews Ave., Pompano Beach, 954-785-2450 4-2 Mass and confessions, 8 a.m. and 12 p.m. 4-3 Mass, 8 and 10:30 a.m. 4-4 Mass and confessions, 8 a.m. and 12 p.m. 4-5 Holy Thursday: Mass of the Lords Supper, 7 p.m. 4-6 Good Friday: Liturgy of the Word: Passion of the Christ, Veneration of His Cross and Holy Communion, 3 p.m. 4-7 Holy Saturday: Easter Vigil See SIGHTINGS on page 5

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4 The PelicanFriday, March 30, 2012 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFOakland Park Now were just setting the rules of the game, a city of cial assured residents at a recent community meeting on a proposed mixed-use overlay district for a portion of Commercial Boulevard. The big issues are density and height, Harris Hamid, director of Engineering and Community Development, told a standing-room only crowd at the municipal building. City commissioners have postponed until April 4 discussion of the new district which will be designed to spur revitalization of East Commercial Boulevard Public skeptical about new mixed-use zoning for Commercial Blvd.on the north side between North Andrews Avenue and Northeast 6 Avenue. The area is currently a mix of single-family homes, commercial, of ce and retail. Rick Buckeye, senior planner, said a study approved in 2010 and concerns of the business and property owners need to be considered in the redesign. The new zoning would advocate a living/work environment, he said. When the area is rezoned, any single-family homes built prior to Jan. 1, 2012 could remain. Prohibited businesses include schools, fast food restaurants, drive-thrus and auto-related businesses. Day nurseries and childcare businesses would be permitted. The Planning and Zoning Board has approved the land use amendment creating the overlay district, but wants 20 dwelling units per acre while developers are hoping for 27 units per acre. The board supports three-story buildings, while developers have asked for ve stories. Twenty units per acre result in about 190 units; 27 units per acre allows for 220 to 230 units. According to an economic analysis the city commissioned, three-story buildings would be pro table but would need to be a combination of retail, of ce and residential [mixed use]. The overlay zoning district would de ne what could be built in the area and provide incentives to the developer. Several residents spoke against the proposed plans. Even three stories would take our privacy away and will affect our schools, a woman in the audience said. We dont want to look at hi-rises. I have a pool in my yard, and I dont want people [in a nearby hi-rise]watching my children play. We want a limit to heights. Id like to see a community of stores, said Michelle Fistel, a resident since 1978. I dont want to see buildings, buildings, buildings that all look alike. I dont want to see apartments or buildings more than two stories. Ive lived here 42 years, and Im against this 120 percent, said Joe Bowman, a general contractor. Who are we enticing? Where did this start? This is insane. The whole thing is insane. We dont want a concrete jungle built in our residential See COMMERCIAL on page 5

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The Pelican 5 Friday, March 30, 2012 The City of Pompano Beach Community Redevelopment Agency, or CRA, invites the community to a presentation and discussion by the development team from the rst ranked proposal on the development of the eight acre parcel located along Pompano Beach Boulevard and referred to as the Pier Site. The meeting is planned for April 12 at 5 p.m. at the E. Pat Larkins Center, 520 Hammondville Road/MLK Blvd. Pier development presentation, April 12 neighborhoods, resident Bill Sears said. I dont want to see concrete silos down the street. Don Lampasone, a developer-general contractor said, You need some plantings, some palm trees and incentives to improve and make it more of a vibrant area. My suggestion is to stay on this track. That area someday will get developed. I think everyone will agree this area can be improved. Horace McHugh, assistant city manager, said the city could sit back and do nothing. Instead, they have tasked planners to come up with concepts. We realize we have to strike a balance between property owners and residential owners, he said. Whatever we do, were trying to create rules so a developer can build a product where everyone wins, Hamid said. He assured the audience the proposed ordinance will not take property by eminent domain. Hamid will take the residents comments to the commission at the April 4 meeting and present a draft ordinance. If passed, the rezoning effort would start. Were not ramming it down the throats of anyone, he said. CommercialContinued from page 4SightingsContinued from page 3begins, 7:45 p.m. 4-8 Easter Sunday: Mass, 8, 10 and 11:30 a.m.Episcopal St. Nicholas Episcopal Church, 1111 E. Sample Road, 954-942-5887. 4-2 Morning prayer, 8 a.m.; Eucharist at St. Laurence Chapel, 11:30 a.m.; evening prayer; 5 p.m. 4-3 Morning prayer, 8 a.m.; evening prayer, 5 p.m.; Eucharist, 7 p.m. 4-4 Morning prayer, 8 a.m.; evening prayer, 5 p.m.; Tenebrae, 7 p.m. 4-5 Maundy Thursday: morning prayer, 8 a.m.; Eucharist with healing and foot washing, 10 a.m.; evening prayer, 5 p.m.; all parish Eucharist with foot washing, 6 p.m. 7:30 p.m. to 9 a.m. All night prayer See SIGHTINGS on page 14

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6 The PelicanFriday, March 30, 2012 Deer eld Beach, Pompano Beach, Lighthouse Point, LauderdaleBy-The-Sea, Wilton Manors and Oakland ParkWilton Manors Oakland Park Hillsboro Beach The Pompano Pelican is published weekly on FridaysStreet Address: 1500-A E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, FL 33060 Telephone: 954-783-8700 Fax: 954-783-0093Letters to the Editor are encouraged and accepted for print if signed, although a writers name will be withheld on request; letters must also include a daytime telephone number. Advertising rates are available upon request. Subscription rate is $31.80 including tax for one years delivery in Greater Pompano Beach; $95.40/per year including tax for others in the United States; call 954-783-8700 for rates abroad. The Pelican is a nonpartisan newspaper and reserves the right to decline advertising. Copyright 2011. Reproduction of this publication in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission of the publisher. The Pelican is a member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, Deer eld Beach Chamber and the LBTS Chamber. The Pelican is a state certi ed woman-owned minority business. The Pelican is delivered to businesses, libraries, schools, of ces, hospitals, news racks and single family homes. All advertising and copy is published at the sole discretion of the publisher. We welcome your critiques and ideas concerning this publication. Anne Siren, publisherExecutive Assistant: Mary Hudson Graphics: Rachel Ramirez Windsheimer Bookkeeper: John White Classi eds: Fran Shelby Contributing Writers: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Judy Wilson, Malcolm McClintock, Judy Vik, Michael dOliveira Account Executives: Paul Shroads, Carolyn Mann, Bill Heaton, Bill Fox Special Of ce Assistant: Cathy Siren ESTABLISHED 1993 Volume XX, Issue 13 Founding Editor and PublisherAnne Hanby Siren Letters & OpinionsBy Linda PappPELICAN READEREd. Note: Thank you to reader, Linda Papp of Shelton, CT., who took time to share the good work of her mother-in-law, a Pompano Beach resident. We hope this inspires other readers to share their stories or nd their own ways to make our communities even better than they already are. Her volunteer work has touched hundreds of hearts and warmed an equal amount of bodies As a young boy, I can remember my mom doing her needlework while watching television. And I thought, Wow, how can she do that without even looking at what shes doing? But she did and never missed a stitch. That was my husband Roberts rst impression of his moms crocheting. It left such a lasting effect on him that he wanted others to know how many people she has touched through her years of giving. So he asked me to write a story for him. When I met Ethel Papp in 1966 she had already been crocheting and knitting for many years. She was only 45 years old at the time. Today she is 90 and still crocheting her heart away. When her husband passed away several years ago, she felt the need to help others. So she lled her days, volunteering at the Hospice that was once so helpful to her own family needs. She helped the patients and their families in any way she could, comforting them, bringing them something to eat, or drink, or sometimes she would just sit silently beside her patients bedside. One year, she began doing needlepoint and made enough ornaments to ll the ward Christmas tree. Another year she was nominated and received the Hospice Volunteer of the Year Award, and was honored at a luncheon where she was presented a plaque of appreciation. These days you will nd Ethel sitting in her favorite chair in her living room, knitting or crocheting lap robes. She has made them for Hospice patients, childrens cancer wards, the veteran hospital, her church choir at St. Elizabeth Church of Hungary and a boys orphanage, not to mention just about every member of our family. When you ask her why she does it, she will simply say she feels like she is giving a little something back. It makes her feel good to give to others in need. Ethels lap robes stretch around the world, from a boys orphanage in the Caribbean, to across the ocean. She has even sent a bunch of them to her family in Connecticut. People in Sweden, Germany, Poland and Hungary enjoy the comfort of her robes. She has made over 300 lap robes and hasnt stopped yet. As long as she has a supply of yarn and her vision is good, shell continue to produce her lap robes to warm the hearts of others. So if you think youre too old, or not good enough to make a difference in this world, think of Ethel, sitting in her favorite chair in her living room, making her lap robes, and still making a difference in her own little way. Who knows how many people she has made smile with a little gift made from the heart. And those little gifts will continue to touch someones life forever.Ethel Papp Egg-cellent hunts set for Deer eld kids of all agesDeer eld Beach City staffers are hiding 20,500 plastic Easter eggs next week, seeding the citys three egg hunts with candy and prizes. The rst egg hunt, designed for kids age 10 and older, takes place Thursday, Apr. 5, 8 to 10 p.m. at Constitution Park where 7,500 eggs will be hidden and then found with the help of ashlights. Refreshments will be served. The park is at 2841 W. Hillsboro Boulevard. Participants should bring their own lights. On Friday, Apr. 6, the Egg Stravaganza will be held at Westside Park for kids ages 10 and under. Children will be divided into three age categories as they search for the 5,000 eggs, 6 to 8 p.m. Westside Park is at 445 SW 2 Street. The annual Egg Run will be held Saturday, Apr. 7, 10 a.m. until noon at the Deer eld Beach Middle School Athletic Complex, 501 SE 6 Avenue. Children, ages 10 and under, will be divided into age groups as they search for 8,000 eggs containing candy and prizes. Sponsors needed for Seafood Festival Bounce Horse DerbyPompano Beach Wanna help a great local charity and at the same time promote your business and have more fun than a barrel of monkeys? Then sign up ASAP to be a sponsor and compete in the inaugural Pompano Beach Seafood Festival Bounce Horse Derby on the beach Saturday, April 21. Pompano Has Heart, Inc., the disaster-relief charity that raises money and commodities to help those in need both locally and abroad, is hosting its rst bounce horse race and what better venue then in front of thousands of people at the Pompano Beach Seafood Festival. For a $200 donation to Pompano Has Heart, sponsors will get to have their jockey compete in the 40 foot grueling stretch course on the sand that will take place in front of the Community Stage at 4 p.m.. In the event more than six sponsors enter the race, there will be elimination heats held before the nale. In the event of rain the race will be held same time that Sunday. First Place prizes for the winning sponsor of the race is a free one-year membership to the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce ($300 value), the coveted Derby Trophy Cup, local merchant gift certi cates and the bragging rights of all South Florida for one year. You must be age 18 or older to compete and be in good medical and physical shape for this special endeavor. For complete rules and guidelines or to sign up as a sponsor for the Seafood Festival Bounce Horse Derby please email Pompano Has Heart President, Steven Wolf, at pompanohasheart@gmail.com or call 954-654-3757. Pompano Has Heart, Inc, is a 501C-3 Non-Pro t Corporation.

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The Pelican 7 Friday, March 30, 2012 required to adopt a local charity. Residents will be furnished rolling carts where they can place recyclables from newspapers to aluminum cans to almost all householdproduct containers. Called single-stream recycling, it is already in place but not everyone is aware that paper, glass and plastics can be placed together in the small yellow or blue recycling containers now in use. When the large rolling carts are available, the expectation is that recyclable collections will increase by 30 to 50 percent. The goal is to pick up garbage less frequently, Grecsek said. In this city, recycling has been the mission of Cheryl Miller since 1992 and she has grown the current program into a model for the county. This city was the rst to single-stream. It is the rst to have a drop-off center for batteries, paint, electronics, light bulbs, oil, CDs, metal and plastics, shoes, large cardboard pieces, and is he only one with a bin for that ever-present packaging material styrofoam. Miller has educated the community so well that its recycling efforts earn big nancial rewards. Last year, a $1.5 million grant from the Resource Recovery Board will be used to buy the big rolling carts. Miller raises the level of awareness by holding neighborhood contests, by handing out small gifts, made of course from recycling materials, to residents who RecycleContinued from page 1recycle and by being present at local fairs and festivals. This year, her departments oat won rst prize in the Founders Day Parade. The new program awaits delivery of seven one-armed bandits purchased for $1.6 million. Like the trucks that now collect garbage, a device will lift the recycling container and dump it. The driver wont have to get out of the truck which makes the whole process safer and more ef cient and saves time and energy. Deer eld residents are already getting the Cadillac of solid-waste service, Grecsek said. Bulk waste and recyclables are collected once a week; garbage twice a week. Theres been no rate increase since 2007. There is no thought of privatizing this department Grecsek said. The city has invested in a new building, the Central Campus at 401 SW 4 Street, and in new equipment. We have no interest in outsourcing. We fear it would cost us in the service residents receive. Eager to initiate the incentive program that makes recycling a no-brainer, Grecsek said, Its indeed a game-changer. On Founders Day, the city created its own oat made of all recycled materials. The sloagn was, Recycling is a Breeze.

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8 The PelicanFriday, March 30, 2012 Business matters The Pelican takes a look at local business owners. Call The Pelican to nd out how you can tell your story here because business matters. 954-783-8700.See THE VILLAGES on page 16Briefs By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFAn off-season special makes it inexpensive and easy to visit this idyllic retirement community in Central Florida and enjoy the amenities of The Villages at the same time. Your hosts, Kevin and Audrey Sullivan explain. Our Lifestyle Preview Plan, invites visitors to a four to ten night vacation. Check out this self contained retirement community with homes, priced from $130,000 to one million. Stay in a beautiful, fully equipped two or three bedroom villa with bicycles and golf carts included. Enjoy complimentary golf, tennis, fitness and recreational activities, trolley and boat tours on man-made lakes stocked with fish. And thats not all. For those who want to cook at home, there are many handy grocery stores. And when its time to dine out, choose from 80 available restaurants. For entertainment, enjoy a variety of movies and discounts in our variety of signature stores. Theres even a shuttle to the Orlando International Airport. With a laugh Kevin says, If this sounds like I like The Villages, I do. Not only are my wife and I sales and marketing representatives of The Villages, we play in this active community with its many easy to arrange amenities. The Villages came into being 42 years ago as a start up community on farm land in Central Florida. It was Visit The Villages with a preview package and enjoy a vacation at the same time while theresuch a success that it grew into the self contained city of 88,000 residents that it now is. Its located about one hour Northwest of Orlando and three miles east of the turnpike. About 150 two and three bedroom villas are available to sample this easy lifestyle which has already captured the hearts of so many residents. The average age is around 65. Residents must be 55, but in the case of couples, one mate may be under 55. There are also long time and new residents in their 80s. Asked why they advertise The Villages in South Florida, Kevin says, Many of our residents are from Pompano Beach and other bustling cities. They choose us because this is easy living with endless activities to pursue just minutes away. Our main transportation is a golf cart which can take you to every destination along specially constructed trails. Our residents said Say goodbye to heavy traf c and join the golf cart people who tool around in energy saving golf carts. [Photos courtesy of The Villages] Business After Hours at Flip Flops, April 18Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Chamber will host its Business to Business event at Flip Flops Dockside Eatery April 18 from 5:30 to 8 p.m. Members and non-members are invited to bring business cards and enjoy 2-4-1 beer, wine and mixed drinks along with nger food and a live music on the water. Cover charge is $5 for members and $7 for non-members. Flip Flops is located at 3051 NE 32 Ave., Fort Lauderdale. Call 954-776-1000. The Lighthouse Point Library will hold its semi-annual book sale March 29 to 31 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily at Dixon Ahl Hall, 2220 NE 38 Street. Gently used books, DVDs, VHS tapes, and CDs will be available for purchase. Prices range from 25 cents for paperback books to $5 for hardcover books and $1 to $3 for DVDs and CDs. On Saturday, March 31 from 1 to 4 p.m., $1 will get you as many books as you can t in a plastic bag (we provide). All proceeds bene t the library. Donations of books, DVDs and CDs for the sale may be dropped off at the library during regular business hours.Book sale at LHP Library

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The Pelican 9 Friday, March 30, 2012 Must present coupon Exp. 4/6/12

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10 The PelicanFriday, March 30, 2012 Making a DifferencePhyllis J. Neuberger wants your suggestions about people who are making a difference. Call 954-7838700. Briefs Interact supports National Kick Butts DayDeer eld Beach Interact Club students at Deer eld Beach High School still have a few $50 gift bags to give to smokers who agree to give up their cigarettes for a day. The clubs effort is part of its campus-wide initiative that encourages students not to smoke or to quit. It is also tied in with National Kick Butts Day which was Wednesday, Mar. 21. Young people all over the country asked their friends and neighbors to give up one pack of cigarettes and stop smoking for the day. According to the Kick Butts website, the tobacco industry spends $1 million every hour to recruit kids as replacement smokers for the 400,000 Americans who die each year. At the school, club members have placed signs around the campus urging students to stop smoking. According to Interact Club advisor Frank Pizzo, none of his 38 club members smoke. The gift bag, provided by the Broward County Health Department, contains items to encourage exercise a t-shirt, pedometer, water bottle, etc. Anyone interested in kicking butts for a day can call Pizzo at 954-6504903.By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFThe Pelican gets many letters and emails. Recently one arrived starting out like this: I am a 21 year old college student, born and raised in Pompano Beach. I was born with only two fingers on my left hand and a shorter right arm. Doctors told me it would be of little use, but I proved them wrong. Ruden, a handsome young man, arrived at the paper for this interview bursting with energy and enthusiasm to tell us his story. How he dealt with his handicap, which had made him self-conscious and pretty much of a shy loner, is well worth sharing. My struggle began when I decided I wanted to be a drummer. With only two fingers on one hand it was a challenge. My dad solved the problem by suggesting I wear a leather glove which could keep the stick in place between my two fingers. What a wonderful solution this turned out to be. A glove has become very important to me. I never remove the glove without replacing it because it gave me the confidence I needed to progress in life. Before becoming a drummer, Ruden says he was a real target for bullies. I was shy, kept to myself and stayed with my small group of friends who accepted me, but couldnt protect me. Chris Ruden, college student, says we have to make a difference for ourselves to overcome adversityIt was tough, but it was a growing up experience. Becoming a drummer in Pompano Beach High School drum line stimulated him to alter the way people saw him. I learned that by projecting a positive image, I gained acceptance and changed from being a follower to becoming a leader, using my own experience to help others take on their adversities. He continued. Break dancing was my next challenge. I took a few classes at a dance studio and then taught myself. I use both hands and can do some really cool stuff. This moved me into fitness which is now not only my passion, but also the source of my income. His high school activities included drumming, hip-hop dancing and creating his own dance group, NBA, or No Boundaries Aloud. He earned a Bright Futures Scholarship and other scholarships and now attends Florida Atlantic University, or FAU, where he will soon graduate with a degree in Exercise Science. My high school anatomy teacher, Dr. Singkornrat, was my source of inspiration. She opened my eyes as to what I could do in the health field. And health is now my passion and livelihood. At 19, he was diagnosed with type one diabetes. He decided to deal with that challenge by becoming a personal trainer. His goal was to motivate others to overcome their problems. He struggles every day to keep a positive See RUDEN on page 13Chris Ruden, personal trainer, works with David Helblum, 11, who is dealing with Cerebral Palsy. [Photos courtesy of EMagen] We are The Pelican What can we do for you? 954-783-8700

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The Pelican 11 Friday, March 30, 2012

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12 The PelicanFriday, March 30, 2012 Man shot dead after attacks on local familyPompano Beach A man who was acting irrationally and threatening a mother and her two small children in the front yard of their Pompano Beach home Sunday evening was shot and killed by the childrens father. Broward Sheriffs Of ce homicide detectives are investigating the fatal shooting. Shortly before 5:30 p.m., BSO deputies responded to 3030 NE 2 Ave. following a 911 call regarding a person shot. Witnesses told deputies they saw the man swinging a piece of wood at a woman and her two children shortly after they walked out the front door of their residence. At about the same time the mother was trying to protect her 3-year-old son and 5-yearold daughter, her husband, Emiliano Arellano, drove up with his two brothers. Emiliano and his brothers tried to stop the assailant. Emiliano said the man became very agitated when he told him he was going to call the police. When the man turned his aggression toward Emilianos daughter, Emiliano pulled his semi-automatic handgun and red one shot, striking the suspect in the chest. The same bullet hit Emilianos brother, Pablo Arellano. The unidenti ed suspect died at the scene. A family member drove Pablo to North Broward Medical Center for treatment. Pablo is expected to recover. BSO homicide and crime scene detectives responded to the scene to investigate the deadly encounter. Homicide investigators interviewed everyone involved as well as witnesses while crime scene detectives documented the scene and collected evidence. Detectives also took Emiliano to the Public Safety Building for questioning and to record his statement. He was very cooperative on scene and during questioning. The suspect who died was later identi ed as Ciriaco Estrada, 47, The investigation continues. Sunday morning in Deer eld Beach. Around 10 a.m., as Sunday morning mass was letting out at St. Ambrose Catholic Church, Mary Sczepanski, 88, got into her 2007 Buick Century, which was backed-in to a disabled parking space on the northeast corner of the parking lot. Sczepanski accidentally placed the car in reverse, accelerated and struck a curb stop. Apparently startled, she accelerated over the curb stop and onto the sidewalk, still in reverse, unaware a pedestrian was there. The car struck Luciana Porto, 66, of Deer eld Beach and came to rest a short distance away. Broward Sheriff Fire Rescue Deer eld Beach Units responded and transported the victim to North Broward Medical Center where she was pronounced dead shortly after arrival. The driver of the car and a witness were evaluated on the scene by paramedics but Police mattersCOMPILED BY ANNE SIRENWoman killed by fellow church member after struck by carDeer eld Beach A woman leaving church was killed after she was struck by a fellow churchgoers car did not require transport to the hospital. Detectives do not believe alcohol or medications were a factor in this crash. The investigation continues and charges, if any, will be pending completion of the traf c homicide investigation.By Judy VikPELICAN STAFF Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Commissioners considered two parking redesigns for East Commercial Boulevard between the Intracoastal Waterway and Seagrape Boulevard this week and favored the one with angled parking, improved intersections and a recovery zone making reentry onto to the boulevard safer. Downside of the proposal is a required approval from the Florida Department of Transportation that could add Parking proposal would bring major change to LBTS business districtmonths to the project timeline. The area is now pretty stark with not a lot of landscaping or shade, Hugh Johnson, landscape architect with Architectural Alliance, told commissioners. He analyzed existing conditions and found unsafe conditions at crosswalks, parking lots with a lot of asphalt and small sidewalks and little landscaping or shade at retail businesses. Our goal is to improve the appearance of the street and the parking areas and design an entry feature, Johnson said. We were asked to create a streetscape that encourages pedestrians to visit the area and to differentiate LBTS from Fort Lauderdale on the west side of the bridge, he said. When you come over the bridge, you should feel like youre in a completely different place, like you have entered a seaside village. You are here. The recon guration of parking areas allows for wider pedestrian sidewalks, pedestrian plazas, outdoor dining, landscaping/shade, site furniture and signage, he added. Drainage and resurfacing need to be addressed in all four parking lots. Most of the parking spaces are less than the nine feet the code requires and that would be corrected. The plan also calls for pedestrian mid-block crosswalks perhaps equipped with LED lighting that goes on when a pedestrian enters the crosswalk. Commissioner Stuart Dodd suggested providing a road so drivers could pull into angled parking spaces and then drive forward to get out. Johnson said that could be considered. See PARKING on page 14

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The Pelican 13 Friday, March 30, 2012 outlook, achieve his own fitness goals and professionally help others do the same. Amanda Flores says, Working out with Chris is very challenging and hard, but he does explain the value of each exercise and in the end its worth it. Annie-Mai Hurmemaa calls Chris Great. She says, Im very visual so Chris has to do an exercise himself to show me how it works and he tells me where that exercise will benefit me. Hes helped me tone up my body nicely. Chris credits his brother, Michael for always being protective and encouraging to me. My parents have been too. It helps to get positive energy from ones family. Im RudenContinued from page 10getting close to graduation and hope to attend graduate school with a major in kinesiology to increase my knowledge of body mechanics. This will help me be more secure in knowing what my clients can attain. I have learned that by fixing the body, one actually helps fix the mind. They are so closely connected. I see this every day in my current career as a personal trainer. Ones self image is both mental and physical. Chris calls his business as a personal trainer Adapt Wellness. He can be reached at 954-588-3981or adaptwellness@gmail.com Thank you for your inspirational example of how to deal with adversities, Chris Ruden. Chris Ruden, shows off one of his cool break dance routines.

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14 The PelicanFriday, March 30, 2012 I watch sports on TV, I turn off the sound and get the commentary on radio instead. They have to describe what is going on Locally, Gould discovered storytelling at the Caldwell Theatre in Boca Raton. He became so intent on bringing it to Deer eld Beach, he approached Judi Standich, chair of the Deer eld Beach Cultural Committee and asked, Outside of the art festival and a few concerts, what do we do here for culture? According to Gould when she heard his idea Standich said, Go for it. His notion was also endorsed by Caren Neile, who produces and cohosts WRLNs The Public Storyteller every Sunday. It is Neile who has enlisted the prestigious lineup of storytellers that includes Regan-Blake, Mij Byram, Lucia Gonzalez and Shana Banana. Regan-Blake comes to town after performing this month in Yosemite, Australia and New Zealand. She annually performs at all the nations top storytelling festivals relating her stories woven from both her Irish heritage and her Appalachian roots. She is regularly credited with creating the renaissance in storytelling as was mentioned on the morning TV show. South Floridas own Mij Byram started her dramatic career on the family landing. Her mom brought the popcorn. Her brothers and sisters were a captive audience. Today she says, One good story always leads to another point of view, another adventure, another angle, another voice, another song, another place, another time Shana Banana Smith is also local and gained fame telling childrens stories, as well as singing and writing songs which have been likened to the sounds of Joni Mitchell, Joan Armatrading and Cassandra Wilson. She will spin yarns and sing at the Deer eld festival. Other storytelling highlights include an amateur storytellers swap minutedialogues from anyone who wishes to step up, adult ghost stories and a session by Gail Rosen on Telling Our Own Stories. Michael Stock, co-host of The Public Storyteller will be master of ceremonies. Folk entertainment booker Jim Higgins has recruited musicians to play at the festival that include Spider John Koerner, acclaimed American folk and country blues musician. Others on the program are Big Brass Bed, Kuyayky, the Patty & Frank Trio, Ellen & Gary Bukstel. Food and soft drinks will be sold by local restaurateurs. The event begins at noon and concludes at 10 p.m. in the Arboretum at Constitution Park, 2841 W. Hillsboro Boulevard. This will be an incredible venue, Gould said, and will introduce many people to the arboretum. Thanks to the support of major sponsors, JM Family, SE Toyota, Frank Congemi and the Deer eld Beach Kiwanis Club, there is no charge for admission.StoriesContinued from page 1 Commissioner Chris Vincent said he liked the fact the plan eliminates vehicular traf c where there are pedestrians. Designers said they will provide cost estimates in early May. Johnson also presented an alternate scheme which kept parallel parking on both sides of Commercial Boulevard, increased the width of bike lanes and recon gured the parking lot to provide for 140 parking spaces, 13 more than currently. Fifteen-foot sidewalks would accommodate outdoor dining. A is nice, but B is a game changer, Vice Mayor Scot Sasser said of the two proposals. He liked Dodds idea for adding a way for drivers to pull forward to get out of their space on Commercial. ParkingContinued from page 12SightingsContinued from page 5 vigil. 4-6 Good Friday: morning prayer, 9 a.m.; public procession with Stations of the Cross, 3 to 4 p.m.; Good Friday service with Adoration of the Cross, 4 p.m.; Good Friday service with Adoration of the Cross, 7 p.m. 4-7 See SIGHTINGS on page 15

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The Pelican 15 Friday, March 30, 2012 Advertise with The Pelican 954.783.8700 his Eagle Scout project when his father died. Buglione joined the U.S. Army shortly afterwards. After his discharge from the Army, Buglione became active in the American Legion and the VFW. In 2011, Buglione was named Legionnaire of the Year for Florida. But Scouting never left his heart. Today he is the Scout Commissioner of the Lighthouse District for Boy Scouts of America. His Scout troop today consists of Boy Scouts with special needs. Now Buglione has some needs of his own, and he is counting on the community to step up to help him and others honor all Veterans on May 28. The interest in Memorial Day is getting lower and lower every year, says Buglione. We are losing Veterans and losing people who come out to watch the parade. The ceremonies include services at Westview Cemetery and Pompano Beach Cemetery. Bugliones Boy Scouts prepare for the day by placing ags on graves of all Veterans in Pompano Beach. During the late morning of Memorial Day, the parade begins at Atlantic Boulevard and Northeeast 23 Avenue. To make the day a success, Buglione needs participants in the parade, volunteers to help plan the events and sponsors to underwrite some of the costs. To join Buglione and other veterans in the planning, volunteers are asked to attend a meeting on April 4 at the Veterans of Foreign Wars, or VFW, 243 S. Dixie Highway, Pompano Beach at 7 p.m. The event and parade are open to all groups that want to participate. There are no costs to become involved. Marching bands, clubs, church groups and others are encouraged to attend. Memorial DayContinued from page 1 SightingsContinued from page 14 Holy Saturday: morning prayer, 8 a.m.; service with meditation 9 a.m.; Great Vigil of Easter and Celebration of the Eucharist, 7:30 p.m. 4-8 Resurrection Sunday: Son Rise celebration 6 a.m.; Eucharist celebration of the Resurrection, 10 a.m., 1 p.m. and 7 p.m.PresbyterianFirst Presbyterian Church, 2331 NE 26 Ave., Pompano Beach, 954-9412308 4-1 Palm Sunday Concert: 4 p.m., Choral favorites for Lent: selections by J.S. Bach, G.F. Handel. 4-1 Palm Sunday Procession of Palms: 9:30 and 11 a.m. 4-5 Maundy Thursday: Service and Communion, 7 p.m. 4-6 Good Friday: Service and prayers, 12 p.m. 4-8 Easter Sunday: Service, 9:30 and 11:15 a.m. United Church of Christ, 2501 NE 30 St., Fort Lauderdale, 954-563-4271. Last Supper re-enactment at 7 p.m. on Maunday Thursday. A $10 donation is asked but not requiredSee SIGHTINGS on page 17

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16 The PelicanFriday, March 30, 2012 Now Online www.pompanopelican.comgoodbye to long lines of cars and heavy traffic. Instead, they hop in their golf cart for a short ride to golf courses, tennis courts, grocery stores or a friends house for cocktails. Our carts take us to golf, church, doctors, shopping, entertainment and each other. Bill and Sherry Fox call The Villages Disney for adults because he says, We fell in love with the lifestyle and everything The Villages has to offer. As a golfer imagine, my pleasure at having 48 golf courses to choose fromall inside this city. Sherry likes to water ski. Shes a member of the Water Ski Club and skis on our lake every chance she gets. We went up on a preview package and Kevin was greatno pressure, no sales pitch, just good information. After two years we purchased our dream home. Kevin walked us through every step of the way. Ginny and Kris Smith also visited in June of 2010. Kris writes, We signed up for a five day vacation, but after three days, we knew we wanted to move to The Villages. This May we will become residents. Sign up for a Preview Package. Youll be glad you did. Call 352-516-4842 or email kevin.sullivan@thevillages.com. The VillagesContinued from page 8 Lifestyles at The Villages include using bicycles or golf carts for transportation.

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The Pelican 17 Friday, March 30, 2012 By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach The Mets gave up just one run in the first inning but couldnt stop the six more scored by the Phillies in the 7 to 2 loss Monday night. The Mets and Phillies, part of Pompano Baseballs Pony Division which includes 13 and 14-year-olds, squared-off at the Four Fields complex. With two outs, including one strikeout, Mets pitcher Chris Swan was close to closing out the top of the first inning when the Phillies Tyler Krinkie hit a blooper to right field for a single. Once on base, Krinkie stole second, third and home plate before the Mets got their third out. Sharp infielding by the Pony Division Phillies beat Mets 7 to 2Phillies ended the inning 1-23, leaving the Mets scoreless. After giving up two base hits to the Phillies, Swan answered back with two strikeouts. But the Phillies Logan Rataiczak knockedin both base runners with a double, giving the Phillies three runs before the top of the inning ended. At the bottom of the second inning, Swan helped his own cause with a triple that scored two runs and brought the Mets to within one run of tying the game. But a strikeout and double play by the Phillies kept them in the lead. The Phillies tried to expand their lead in the third but were denied. The Mets were equally unsuccessful in their scoring efforts; both teams caught runners trying to steal. Defense dominated on both sides again in the fourth inning and kept both teams scoreless again. But the fifth inning saw the Phillies get back on the scoreboard when Mason Kemp, after a small pitchers battle, knocked-in two more runs; he later stole home, adding another run to the tally before the inning ended. The Mets threatened to score, getting men on second, but the Phillies defense shut them down again. Thanks to multiple strikeouts by Mets pitcher Blaise Marks, two, and Phillies pitcher Anthony Blasko, three, both teams were kept scoreless in the sixth inning. The seventh and last inning saw the Phillies get their last run off with a hit by Anthony Blasko which knocked-in Bobby Blaski from third base. The Mets were unable to respond, making the final score 7 to 2. SightingsContinued from page 15 Art, Music, Film & Theatre4-1 Cirque Dreams: Pop Goes The Rock, 2 p.m. at Seminole Hard Rock Hotel and Casino Hollywood, 1 Seminole Way, Hollywood. Tickets are $24, $39, $54, $69. Event runs through April 8. Visit www. hardrocklivehollywoodfl.com or 1-800-745-3000. 4-7 Actor and comedian Leslie Jordan, from the television show Will & Grace, will be performing at Parker Playhouse, 707 NE 8 St. in Fort Lauderdale, at 8 p.m. Tickets are $40 to $50. Visit www.parkerplayhouse.com or 954-462-0222.See SIGHTINGS on page 22

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18 The Pelican Friday, March 30, 2012 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFMargate This course is in better shape than it has been in years, said Jack Shoenfelt, owner of Oriole Golf Club. He credits his golf superintendent, Gary Fisher, and his staff for improving the 40-year-old fairways and greens which makes the semiprivate club a great golfing value. The course, designed by Bill Dietch, is distinguished by its challenging par 3s, seven water holes and a few large bunkers. The strength of the course is its par 3s, Shoenfelt said. Two of them are especially interesting: on the front nine, the number seven hole is 195 yards off the championship tee, uphill Oriole Golf Club offers great golf at great prices and lots of fun into the wind with a huge bunker guarding the green. On the back nine, the 14th hole is a short par 3, just 140 yards, but the green is small and protected by two monster bunkers. The club stays busy by offering daily tournaments, attractive discounts for frequent players and by keeping the rates moderate both for members and guests. Membership fees have not risen in 12 years. We may have the lowest rates around its a real value. Our regulars keep us going. Some See ORIOLE on page 19ADVERTISEMENTThe club offers a driving range with grass tees, a practice putting green and a pro shop with friendly staff and quality lines such as Titliest, Callaway, Taylor-Made and Foot-Joy. The Pelican! What can we do for you? 954.783.8700

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The Pelican 19 Friday, March 30, 2012 If you cannot locate a Pelican in your city or town, Call 954 .783.8700 Horses for Heroes Charity Golf Tournament Inverrary Country Club, 3840 Inverrary Blvd., Lauderhill, hosts the 3rd Annual Horses for Heroes Charity Golf Tournament on Saturday, April 14. Proceeds benefit Bit-By-Bit Therapeutic Riding Center, which offers free treatment to disabled American veterans using the healing power of the horse. Appearances are expected from the Miami Heat Dancers, local and national sports figures, and Colonel Danny McKnight who was depicted in the full length feature film Black Hawk Down. Entry fee includes cart, sleeve of balls, goody bag, and buffet lunch. For complete tournament information call Mike Brady at 954-707-2287 of them play every day, Shoenfelt said. For those who play two consecutive days, the Mulligan Rate second day rate is steeply discounted. Currently Oriole is offering a $5 discount for weekend play if the golfer plays a weekday round. Weve always been known as a busy golf course, Shoenfelt said. And it was always the least expensive to play, only now it is in much better shape. To keep pace with private clubs that are going public, Shoenfelts team is continually dressing up the place. The grill, with a water view overlooking the course, is now offering daily lunch specials and an expanded menu. The lounge is open until the last person leaves, he said. Wednesdays are particularly popular as they are 99 cent burger days. Chef Robin Edwardss pies and soups have become legendary. In summer, the club holds three junior golf camps with amazingly low tuition: As low as $40 for the week. To supplement the camp, Oriole holds its annual December Pro-Am Benefiting Junior Golf that also makes camp scholarships available. One of the clubs more popular leagues for both men and women began this week on Monday night. It is open to the public. Debbie Douma coordinates it and can be reached at 954-972-8140. Shoenfelt also operates the nine-hole Margate Executive Course on W. Margate Boulevard across from the entrance to Oriole. That par 30 course is a great place for the beginning golfer, the senior golfer or the accomplished golfers looking to improve their short games, he said. For the very youngest golfers, an annual Pee Wee Tournament for ages five through 12 is held every August. Many of the kids who play in the Pee Wee event are experiencing tournament golf for the first time. The tournament is followed by a pizza party for the kids. Green fees at the Executive Course for those who walk are as low as $6. Oriole employs PGA Head Pro, Todd Norman, and golf instructor, George Monteil, to give lessons, handle the golf shop and the junior clinics. The club offers a driving range with grass tees, a practice putting green and a pro shop with friendly staff and quality lines such as Titliest, Callaway, TaylorMade and Foot-Joy. Tucked away in the Oriole Gardens condo community, Oriole Golf Club is a haven for golfers who want an active club life as well as good rounds of golf.Some tee off at ve years ScoreboardPompano Beach Womens Golf Assn.March 27A Class 1st Georgie Wright. . . . . . 32 B Class 1st Brenda Joy . . . .32.5 C Class 1st Helen Meili . . . . . 25.5 2nd Patti VanZandt . . . 30.5 D Class 1st Lucille Rispoli . . . . . 30.5 2nd Bea Haley. . . 31Pompano Beach Mens Golf Assn.March 281st Bob Dann, Art Gatesy, Joe Osborne, Don Ingram . 53 2nd Ed Gormley, Don Mann, Sam Chuck, Bob Broderick . . 54 3rd John Pihl, Lance Naiman, Scott Feinman, Paul Dauzickas . 54 4th Bernie Kelley, Dick Steffen, Ernie Palinchik (b/d), Gerry Gearity . . 54 Ties broken by scorecard tiebreak, back nine rst, then last 6 holes. Closest to pin . . . .Gilles Cote Pompano Beach Womens 9 hole League March 27Eliminate Holes 1 &9: Class A 1st Carol Metevier . . . . 36 2nd Jeannine Lesburt . . . 37 3rd Susana Rust . . . 41 Class B: 1st Marlene Williams . . . 43 2nd Harriet Fisher, Judy Quinn . . 47 OrioleContinued from page 18

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20 The Pelican Friday, March 30, 2012 By Malcolm McClintockPELICAN STAFFJukebox Diner 2773 East Atlantic Blvd. Pompano Beach, 954-960-5882Located at the foot of the Atlantic Boulevard Bridge, just steps from the Intracoastal, the Jukebox Diner is the kind of cozy eatery that regular customers visit several times a week. This clean, brightly colored and airy spot features posters of all the top musical icons and, of course, a fully loaded free jukebox that offers a great selection from the past 50 years. We had our restaurant for many years on A1A near the Hillsboro inlet, says coowner Bernadette Scollin. But Hurricane Wilma destroyed it in 2005. Finally, seven years later, Scollin and her business partner Linda Herr are back in business at a great new location near the water. We had so many loyal customers that we had no choice but to re-open here in Pompano. We even managed to reunite our whole original kitchen staff. We offer great food for breakfast, lunch and dinner, says Scollin as she brings out a signature omelette of spinach, feta and tomato served with a side order of highly seasoned crushed potatoes. Our home fries are very special. We created this unique recipe. People just love our omelettes, especially the spinach and feta one. So we Pompano Beachs Jukebox Diner offers up tasty comfort food, friendly service and, of course, fantastic tunes The popular spinach, feta and tomato omelette with avorful homefries is a must-try at the Jukebox diner. [Staff photos] Co-owners Linda Herr and Bernadette Scollin show off their famous Pear Walnut Chicken Salad and the juicy signature lb. Jukebox burger with sauted mushrooms, onions and crumbled bacon smothered by melted cheddar and Swiss cheeses.See JUKEBOX on page 26

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The Pelican 21 Friday, March 30, 2012

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22 The Pelican Friday, March 30, 2012 ADVERTISING? ITS PART OF DOING BUSINESS. CALL US. 954-783-8700. SightingsContinued from page 17 4-10 Liza Minnelli will be performing at Seminole Hard Rock Casino, 1 Seminole Way in Hollywood, at 8 p.m. Tickets are $49, $59, $69 and $79. Visit www. seminolehardrockhollywood. com or 1-800-745-3000. 4-14 & 20 Curtain Call Playhouse presents And Then There Were None, a murder mystery at 8 p.m. at the Herb Skolnick Center, 800 SW 36 Ave., Pompano Beach. 954784-0768. 4-18 Art-By-The-Sea, a monthly art series will take place from 7 to 9 p.m. at Friedt Family Fellowship Hall, 4433 Bougainvillea Drive, Lauderdale-By-TheSea. 954-594-0444 4-25 Elvis Costello and The Imposters perform at 7 p.m. at Seminole Hard Rock Casino, 1 Seminole Way in Hollywood. Tickets are $49, $69 and $89. Call 1-800-7453000. 4-27 & 28 Deerfield Beach Wine and Food Festival at Quiet Waters Park, 401 South Powerline Road, Deerfield Beach. VIP and regular tickets available. Cost varies by activity. Call 561338-7594. 4-27 Actor and comedian Billy Gardell from the television show Mike & Molly, performs at Seminole Hard Rock Hotel and Casino Hollywood, 1 Seminole Way, Hollywood, at 8 p.m. Tickets are $49, $59 and $69. Visit www. hardrocklivehollywoodfl.com or 1-800-745-3000.Business & Bargains4-14 Wilton Manors Yard Sale, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive. Free to the public. To become a vendor call 954390-2130. 4-16 Pompano Beach Business Resource Center See SIGHTINGS on page 25

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The Pelican 23 Friday, March 30, 2012 What impelled the founder to start the business? Solid Rock Realty was created out of her strong desire to make positive changes in the industry, for consumers as well as agents. The concept of Solid Rock Realty is to create a paradigm shift in the way consumers are served by maintaining only the most highly educated and trained agents, eliminating all the real estate secrets and empowering the client to be part of the entire real estate process of selling, buying, or investing. Who helped her? It would be impossible to point out all the individuals who helped Christina Henley launch Solid Rock Realty. However, her dearest friend Kate Major was certainly the lead person in helping Christina take her vision and ideas and putting them on paper to create a business model that is currently being realized today.Describe some of the greatest moments? First, let me say that we look forward to many more to come. To date, some of our greatest moments have come from the day to day interactions we have in seeing people meet and exceed their expectations for the buying and selling process. Additionally, many great moments have happened during or after our monthly education event series Save the American Dream. So many have given feedback about how they are more at ease that their future real estate related decisions will be better informed decisions because of what they have learned. Wine and Light hors d oeuvres are served. THEY ARE ALWAYS FREE OF CHARGE AND FREE OF SOLICITATION!What is the service? A knowledge and information source of all things real estate for the purpose of buying, selling or investing in the greater Ft. Lauderdale area.Has this business contributed to the community in some way? We offer a real estate business that consistently delivers concierge style customer service while empowering each and every client to make the best possible decision regarding some of the largest investments in their life. They want to be an integral part of the process discussing strategy and to know it will be implemented effectively. To meet todays consumers desires and demands for a more knowledgeable and experienced consultant who is fully aware of the challenges of the ever changing real estate market, Solid Rock Realtys professional real estate consultants commit to rigorous training and coaching weekly, sometimes daily. Also, todays consumer wants transparency. In an attempt meet this need, we invite our clients to come to our office and see everything exactly as we see it, thereby eliminating the mystery.How has the service changed or expanded? The real estate climate is always changing. As an example we are seeing more families under distress because of the increasing number of delinquent and underwater mortgages. In an attempt to help those families, our agents have earned the Certified Distressed Property Expert designation. This gives a working knowledge of the entire situation and all options available to homeowners today. We come beside them to walk through the process with them by providing the information and help they need to make informed decisions and get on the road to recovery. Technology is also a large part of properly serving todays consumer. Every agent at Solid Rock Realty is highly trained and efficient in maximizing all technology available in our industry to better serve our clients. The Solid Rock Realty office is equipped with all the latest, greatest technology. We offer our location for various meetings and gatherings that benefit the greater community. If you have a need please feel free to contact us to see if we can be of service to you in this way.How can we reach you with questions? I welcome anyone to stop at our office and meet with us face to face at 2044 NE 36 Street, Lighthouse Point. We can also be reached at Christina@solidrockrealty. net, facebook at facebook. com/christinahenley; twitter at twitter.com/relst8lady; linked-in atlinkedin.com/in/ solidrockrealty. Your call is always welcome at 954-290-2772. New location of Solid Rock Realty is at The Gateway Centre of Lighthouse Point at the corner of Sample Road and Federal Highway.Christina Henley founded Solid Rock Realty in 2003.Full house at Save the American Dream kick-off event with Lori Parrish, Broward County Property Appraiser ADVERTISEMENT

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24 The Pelican Friday, March 30, 2012 Sheriffs Office has given out little information on the case saying it is under investigation. Fleming, 22, had been visiting his friend David Cody at Codys grandmothers home in Allwood Park that Saturday and according to Cody had asked him for a ride home. Cody said he left his grandmothers without Fleming and at 11:20 p.m., while heading south across Hillsboro Boulevard in the 200 block, Fleming was struck by a 1999 Dodge pickup truck allegedly driven by David Calderilla Alcocer, 20, of Coconut Creek. Fleming lived in Deerfield Beach at Stanley Terrace. His mother Theresa Walker and father Thetus Fleming also live in Deerfield Beach. According to the police report, Alcocer left the scene of the accident but returned 30 minutes later and gave BSO a statement. A witness, waiting for the signal light at the intersection of Hillsboro and Martin Luther King Blvd. (MLK), saw that Fleming had been hit and called police. Cody, a community activist, said he feels guilty that he did not give his friend a ride and has taken up the cause for Flemings parents. Not only does Cody want to see justice done, he is renewing a longstanding request for pedestrian/motorist safety precautions at the MLK intersection. It is very dark there, Cody said. And there are no turn signals. An added risk for Fleming was that he was wearing the uniform black jeans and black shirt, Cody said. To bring attention to Flemings death and the dangerous intersection, Cody has organized a protest for this afternoon (Friday), 6 p.m. in front of Advanced Auto Parks, 286 W. Hillsboro Blvd. An impromptu protest last week brought out 30 friends and relatives of Fleming. Cody expects many more people will attend this weeks protest which will end, he said, at BSO Headquarters. Cody said an internet search produced information that Alcocer was driving on a suspended license and had warrants out for his arrest (The Pelican could not verify these accusations). Leaving the scene of an accident is a first degree felony in Florida. While Cody and others including City Commissioner Ben Preston have petitioned the city to improve safety conditions along the Hillsboro/MLK corridor, the intersection is under the jurisdiction of the Florida Department of Transportation. Preston wrote to FDOT Dec. 27 pointing out the unsafe conditions at the intersection and received a response on Jan. 12 that said a detailed safety review was being performed. This issue is not something the city is able to deal with, Preston said. Even when people die, you have to go through the studies. If it were up to me, Id make changes. FDOT had agreed to install one safety upgrade, yellow truncated domes at the intersection that help people with poor vision feel the difference in the pavement and realize they are in the street. Cody is charging that city officials got in the way of that project, but Charlie DeBrusco, director of environmental services, says that is not so. DeBrusco said the MLK intersection meets the requirements of the American Disabilities Act, while 13 others governed by FDOT, do not. He favors a study of the area beginning at Dixie Highway to determine what improvements are needed. I have a problem with just arbitrarily picking this location. We are not required to have the truncated domes there, and there are 13 other intersections not up to ADA standards. We need to resolve all the issues first. DeBrusco said that after Fleming was killed, he looked at the area and saw people crossing Hillsboro Blvd. at several locations including at a supermarket at NW 2 Avenue. We need a complete traffic safety study there, he said.No arrestContinued from page 1

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The Pelican 25 Friday, March 30, 2012 Advertise with The Pelican. 954.783.8700 Surprisingly Entertaining!By Becky Masterman EDITOR AND AUTHOR (TUC-SON, AZ USA)Fear of Flying in the Age of Terrorism (Kindle Edition) Full disclosure: Im not afraid of flying. But the author is an acquaintance of mine so I gamely downloaded this to my kindle and intended to read it on a flight to Austin. However, once begun, I found I could not skim it as I intended. The writing is so lively and the pacing so perfect, not a sentence is padded. Plus I kept finding information that intrigued me and advice for conquering fears that went beyond those involved with worrying about falling out of the sky. Who knew there was an app for discovering where turbulence exists at any moment? McCord explains how you can use this app to not only decide whether to fly, but how long the bumps may last once youre in the air. And thats just one useful piece of information. This concise book manages to pack in lists of web sites you can visit, and helpful summaries at the end of each chapter if you need to review. Upon finishing it (savoring it) I immediately downloaded the book to a friends computer because she IS afraid of flying. Im sure shell get even more out of it than I did. Read this. Give it as a gift. Theyll thank you. Also, from now on I think Ill keep my shoes on during the flight.People are talking about . Bookshosts a free business networking event from 5:30 to 7 p.m. at its office, 50 NE 1 St. Light refreshments will be served. 954-586-1111.Books & Seminars3-29 The Lighthouse Point Library holds its semi-annual book sale through march 31 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily at Dixon Ahl Hall, 2220 NE 38 St., Lighthouse Point. Used books, DVDs, VHS tapes, and CDs will be available for purchase. Prices range from 25 cents for paperback books to $5 for hardcover books and $1 to $3 for DVDs and CDs. On Saturday, March 31 from 1 pm to 4 pm, $1 will get buyers as many books as they can fit in a plastic bag. All proceeds benefit the library. 3-31 Juan Riera speaks on Pirates Treasure and Shipwrecks of South Florida at the next History at High Noon presentation from noon to 1 p.m. at the Old SightingsContinued from page 22 See SIGHTINGS on page 28

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26 The Pelican Friday, March 30, 2012 had no choice but to put it on the new menu, says the perpetually smiling Herr. The nice thing is that we serve breakfast all day long so people can order it whenever they want. Other tantalizing breakfast creations include the Banana Fosters French Toast, the Irish Benedict with corned beef hash, the blueberry pancakes, the New York Steak & eggs or the classic eggs any style with bacon, ham or sausage. To get the ball rolling at lunchtime, the Jukebox diner serves up a great array of appetizers such as soups, homemade chili, Paul McCartney chicken wings, nachos, potato skins and even fried zucchini. There is also a host of healthy salad options such as the sliced steak with blue cheese, red onions and roasted peppers or the incredibly popular Pear Walnut grilled chicken salad with feta cheese and cranberries. Both are delightful with zesty balsamic vinaigrette. Along with quiches and classic cold sandwiches such as club or roast beef, the Jukebox delivers mouthwatering hot favorites like Philly Cheesesteak, barbecue Pork, Spicy Ranch Grilled Chicken and blackened Mahi Mahi. Personally, my favorite is the Jukebox burger, says Herr about the juicy signature lb. patty with sauted mushrooms, onions and crumbled bacon smothered in melted cheddar and Swiss cheeses. But we have a whole bunch of other great burgers are as well. For a hearty dinner, the melodious diner delivers timeless homestyle favorites such as meatloaf, country fried steak, roast turkey, pasta marinara with grilled shrimp, roasted chicken and even chopped sirloin. And for those with a sweet tooth, the Jukebox prepares decadent desserts such as Sinatras New York, New York cheesecake, the Brownie McGees waffle with hot fudge and vanilla ice cream or the colossal banana split. We also make the most authentic milkshakes thick and rich just like in the old days. says Scollin with complete confidence. Big breakfast dishes start at $6.25, lunch plates at $7 and dinner platters at $9. Daily lunch specials are written on the board including the soup and sandwich or quiche. The Jukebox also offers pleasant wines for $4 a glass or bottled beer for $3. There is also ample free parking. The quality of the food and the customer service are outstanding. On top of that, the prices are very reasonable, says local resident and frequent visitor Michael Summers. The local community has been tremendously supportive, says Scollin. We are truly excited about being back in business!Malcolm McClintock holds an MBA and has lived in Thailand, Spain, France, Mexico, Canada and the US where he has developed a deep appreciation for world gastronomy. JukeboxContinued from page 20 Cream cheese stuffed French Toast with fresh strawberries can usually be found on the specials board.

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The Pelican 27 Friday, March 30, 2012 People are talking about . Publix in Pompano Beach Atlantic Boulevard Publix set to open March 31Pompano Beach With nearly all the shelves stocked, Publix executives took time on Wednesday to treat Pompano Beachs movers and shakers to lunch and a tour of their newest store, 2511 E. Atlantic Blvd., before it opens to the public tomorrow at 7 a.m. The new store replaces the former Publix, built in 1967, and eclipses its predecessors size by about 20,000 sq. ft. The Atlantic Boulevard Publix is 56,000 sq. ft., has its own liquor store, 254-space multi-level parking garage and a variety of specialty food stations not found in many smaller Publix locations. Bill Fauerbach, vice president of retail operations for the Miami Division, credited the city and the Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce with helping Publix open its newest location a month earlier than expected. Mayor Lamar Fisher credited the Community Redevelopment Agency and city staff with brining the new store online less than a year after the old one closed. I cant wait until Saturday, said Alan price, district manager, who worked as store manager of the previous location from 1989 to 1993. Visit www.Publix.com for more.Publix District Manager Alan Price, Broward County Commissioner Chip LaMarca, Dan Hobby, executive director of the Sample-McDougald House Preservation Society, and Dodie Keith-Lazowick, Sample-McDougald board Publix District Manager Alan Price, Broward County Commissioner Chip LaMarca, Pompano Beach Mayor Lamar Fisher, Publix Vice President of Miami Retail Operations Bill Fauerbach and Publix Media and Community Relations Spokeswoman Kimberly Reynolds. [Photos by Michael dOliveira] Colonel Wiley Thompson III, Broward Sheriffs Ofce, and Major William Knowles, head of the Broward Sheriffs Of ce in Pompano Beach. City of cials and Publix executives of cially cut the ribbon on Pompanos newest grocery store. Pompano Chamber President/CEO Ric Greem, Assistant Store Manager Christina Oney and Store Manager Keith Critelli.

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28 The Pelican Friday, March 30, 2012 WORSHIP DIRECTORY: Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad. Rev. Hyvenson Joseph Easter Sunrise services at the beachPompano Beach -An Easter Sunrise Service sponsored by the Pompano Beach Kiwanis Club will be held on Sunday, April 8 at 6:45 a.m. at the Pompano Pier Parking Lot. Seating will be provided and all are welcome to attend. The guest speaker is Pastor Brad Jones of City Church Pompano. Music will be provided by Bob Terch, First Baptist Church of Pompano Beach. School Museum, 232 NE 2 St., Deerfield Beach. The free lecture is sponsored by the Deerfield Beach Historical Society.Clubs & Civic Groups 4-5 Broward Sierra Club meets at 7:30 p.m. at Fern Forest Nature Center, 201 Lyons Rd. S., Coconut Creek. Guest speaker is Michele Williams, director of the Southeast Region of the Florida Public Archaeology Network at Florida Atlantic University. She will speak about the history of the New River in Fort Lauderdale. legalbarb2@yahoo.com or 954-946-7359. 4-9 & 16 Gold Coast Toastmasters Club meets from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Dennys, 3151 NW 9 Ave., Fort Lauderdale. The club meets on the second and third Monday of the month. 954895-3555 or 954-782-9951.Festivals & Events3-30 The St. Coleman Parishs Mens Club Fish Fry takes place from 5:30 to 9 p.m. at St. Coleman, 1200 S. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. Cost is $8 for adults and $5 for kids. Visit www. stcmc.org or call 954-9423533. 4-20 The 28th Annual Pompano Beach Seafood Festival will take place April 20 through 22 at the far east end of Atlantic Boulevard in Pompano Beach. There will be food, entertainment and games. Cost is $12 per adult and children 10 and under are free. The festival starts on Friday at 5 p.m. to 10 p.m., Saturday 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. and Sunday 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Call 954-941-2940.For the Kids3-30 & 31 At 7 p.m. the Sol Children Theatre, 3333 N. Federal Hwy. in Boca Raton, will be putting on a production of The Commedia Aladdin: a magic carpet ride to a happy ending! Both nights are at 7 p.m. The zany antics of Sols popular resident commedia troupe includes bumbling, scheming, incorrigible improvisations and very physical comedy. Early reservations are recommended. Tickets are $12 and include refreshments. Visit www.solchildren.org or call 561-447-8829. 3-31 Every Saturday and Sunday Quiet Waters Park, 401 South Powerline Road, Deerfield Beach, hosts Splash Adventure from 9:30 a.m. to 5:20 p.m. Event runs until April 29. 954-357-5100. 3-31 Eggstravaganza takes place from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. at St. Clement Church, 225 NW 29 Ave., Wilton Manors. Peter Cottontail will be on hand to take pictures SightingsContinued from page 25 See SIGHTINGS on page 33

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The Pelican 29 Friday, March 30, 2012 Advertise with The Pelican 954-783-8700 well. This is everyones decision. Its everyones town, said Mayor Roseann Minnet. She urged residents to weigh in. The matter will be brought back to the commission April 10. Commissioner Mark Brown asked if the team was open to other slogan ideas. Andrew Hillier, company president, said yes, although the one presented was one of about 10 considered. Brown noted that Pompano Beach is using pelicans with moving wings in their beach redevelopment plan. Pompano is moving in on the pelicans, he said. We have seen the Pompano pelicans, as well, Hillier said. Unlike this one, unfortunately it doesnt have a personality. Vice Mayor Scot Sasser said the block design had the most versatility. Commissioner Chris Vincent said he could see endless products, such as a dice game with blocks, T-shirts and beach towels. They could make this town stand out as a beachside community. It looks really nice, but its important to put the shing pier on there, and some type of sh and some cocktail drinks. Pelicans live on the pier. They dont live on chairs, said Spiro Marchelos, a shing pier owner. Patrick Pointu said he would vote for none of what was presented. Tourists remember the pier, the sun, palm trees, the beach not the chairs, he said. John Boutin, general manager of the Windjammer Resort, liked the concept and said the colors are great. The pelican is wonderful as a draw, bringing out imagination in all of us, he said, but he wouldnt suggest naming it. The image is special to each person. Relaxation is a common theme.ChillContinued from page 2 Images intended to brand the image of Lauderdale-By-The-Sea as a relaxing spot on the ocean where a good book can replace a stuffed briefcase. Discussions will be continued at the April commission meeting. The concepts presented this month were from Andy Royston, creative director of the Tangled Spider Design Group. [Photo courtesy of the Town of Lauderdale-By-The-Sea.]

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30 The Pelican Friday, March 30, 2012 The Pelican 954-783-8700 Classi edsCall 954-545-0013 HELP WANTEDPT OR FT YOUR CHOICE Be An AVON Independent Sales Representative AND YOUR Own Boss. $10 To Start! Call 954-729-0750. 4-6 BOOKKEEPERWITH EXPERIENCE IN Accounts Payable & Accounts Receivable. Must Possess Excellent Organizational & Computer Skills. PT Position 25 Hrs Per Week. Please E-mail Resume To tdjrpapa@yahoo. com. 4-6 LOCAL PEST CONTROL CO Looking For Quality Sales/Service Tech. Must Be Dependable, Team Player, Good Drivers License & People Skills. Will Train Right Person. ALSO Of ce Assistant Computer People & Phone Skills Needed. Fax Resume 954418-3982. 4-6 SEEKING EMPLOYMENT CAM LIC PROP MGR Seeks PT Position. Experience In Hi-Rise Condos And Low Rise. Hours Flexible. Call Bill 954366-4627. 3-30 PIANO PLAYER Dinner Music, Private Parties. 50 Years Experience. Sinatra Music. Auditions Anytime. Call 954-533-5961 Or charlesanthonyalbert@yahoo. com. 3-30 HONEST MALE WITH Reference Seeking Position As A CAREGIVER. Call Chris 954-290-7344. 3-30 I AM SEEKING A Clerical Position Basic Computer Skills. Bilingual Spanish English Part-time. Prefer Pompano Ft Laud Area. 954-942-8111SERVICES DANNY BOY ELECTRIC Lic & Insured. Lic. #EC13004811. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. 24/Hr Service. 954-290-1443. Beat Any Written Estimate. Sr, Discount. 4-6 DROPS OF SHINE Cleaning Services. Quality BEST Prices! Houses Apartments Move-In / Out. Vacation Homes & More. FREE Estimates! 954729-3713 561-948-5575. LOOKING TO STAY With Elderly Individual Or Children Weekends Only. Please Call After 6pm 754-245-8999. REPAIRS RESTRETCH & INSTALLATION Of Carpet. Call Mike 954-675-3810. 3-30 CARPET CLEANING 2 Rooms $59!! ACTUAL PRICE!! No GIMMICKS!! CALL 954-784-8199. 4-20 GINGERS HOUSEKEEPING 20 YEARS EXP. (Licensed) References Available. Honest & Reliable Love To Clean Windows! Help Organize No Problem. FREE Estimates! 954-200-4266. 3-30 HANDYMAN PAINTING CARPENTRY Pressure Cleaning. Decks! Everything Around The House. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. Call 561-350-3781. 4-13 MOORE PLUMBING PLUMBING SERVICES Big Jobs Small Jobs. We Do It All. Remodeling & Repairs. Lic. & Insured. C.C. Accepted. Call 954-772-4600. 3-30 HONEST HANDYMAN HOME & BUILDING Maintenance/Improvements. No Job Too Small. Fast Friendly Service. Reasonable Rates. Local Resident/Homeowner. Call Today For Your FREE Upfront Quote. No Deposit Required. 754-366-1915. GOT JUNK? DUMP TRUCK CLEANUPS Trees/ Landscape, Yard Fill. Paint/ Pressure Wash/ Roofs/Home Repairs Welding, Etc. Dave 954-818-9538. 4-6 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIESNew GREEN technology. New defroster control saves energy in home refrigerators, commercial chillers. Patented. All optical. Simple mfg. Strategic partners needed..www.NewAvionics.Com. 954-568-1991. C MUSICIANS WANTEDThe American Legion Symphonic Band is now accepting new members for the 2012-2013 season. College age to seasoned seniors are welcome. Rehearsals are held on Wed. evenings at American Legion Post 142 in Pompano. Percussionists, euphonium and clarinet players are especially needed. If you enjoy making music, call Jim McGonigal, Music Director at 954-647-0700 for more info.DEEP WATER VILLA DOCKPOMPANO BEACH 2/2 2 BLOCKS BEACH 1700 SQ FT. Screened Fla Room. Private Yard. W/D. 4 Park. No Fixed Bridges. Community Pool. Deeded Dock.. 2 Blocks Beach. $265,000. Coldwell Banker Barbara Call 954629-1324. 4-13 STUDIOS / EFFICIENCIESPOMPANO BEACH BOCA RATON ATLANTIC / FEDERAL Efficiency $175 Weekly. No Security Deposit. Includes Cable, Electric, Internet. FREE Washer / Dryer. No Drug Record No Evictions. 954-709-0694. CO-OP SALESPOMPANO BEACH 1/1 On Water, Dockage Available At Your Door. $59,500. Coldwell Banker Barbara 954-6291324. REAL ESTATE WANTEDI BUY HOUSES!! CASH!! AS IS! QUICK CLOSE! ANY AREA ANY CONDITION! NO EQUITY OK. CALL NOW 954-914-2355. CONDOS FOR SALEFREE BOAT DOCK!! TWO PETS, Two Cars, Two Tennis Courts, Gorgeous Renovated Townhouse, 2 Bedroom, 2.5 Baths, Great Water Views, Resort Style Garden Condo, Just One High, Federal Highway Fixed Bridge To Lake Santa Barbara. $299,000. See Tour: www.circlepix.com/ XGWJKE. Nancy And Cindy Pedicord, Realtors: Balistr eri Realty 954-868-6517. CONDO FOR SALE OR RENT Over 55 Community. Unfurnished Leisureville 2 / bd., 1 / Ba. Clubhouse, Golf, Swimming And More. Rent $700 / Mo. Purchase For $47,000 OBO. Call 954-7836403. 3-30 DEERFIELD BEACH 2/2 Completely Redone. Granite Kitchen, New Cabinets. S.S. Appliances. 20 Porcelain Tile Floors. Travistine Stone Baths. Freshly Painted. 1st Floor. Less Than A Mile To Beach. $84,900. Call 631-873-8715. 4-6 LAUDERDALE BY THE SEA Furnished 1/1.5 Condo $115,000. Heated Pool. Ocean Access. On Canal. 1481 S Ocean Blvd. Apt 228. Call 586-549-5223. CONDOS FOR RENTDEERFIELD BEACH 2/2 CONDO Corner Unit, Pool. $800 $825. Good Credit Required. No Pets Or Realtors. 631-885-3342. LAUDERDALE BY THE SEA Near Sea Watch Restaurant 1 Bedroom Den 2 Bath. CHA, Pool, W / D, End Unit. $1100 Per Month Yearly. 1st / Last / Security. No Pets / N / S. 954-942-5642. 4-6 LAUDERDALE BY THE SEA Furnished 2/2 Pool Near Beach Shops & Restaurants. Enjoy Beach Living. $875 Month From April To October. Owner 413-244-2807. 3-30 POMPANO FURNISHED BEACH CONDO 2/2 Lovely Views Of Ocean Pool & Lighthouse From Balcony & All Rooms Modern! $1,295 Month Yearly. Available JUNE! 954-785-7571 Or 954649-4373. POMPANO BEACH 55+ Community. Renovated 2/1 With Sunroom Ground Floor / On Golf Course. Beautifully Furnished 1 Year +. Excellent References. $900 Month. 917544-0771. POMPANO BEACH LARGE 2 / 2 With Den. All Renovated! Pool Mile From Beach! W /D Small Pet OK! $1,300 Month Yearly. Available May 1st. 561-703-6545 Or 754-2643289. 4-13 OCEANFRONTBYTHE MONTH Pompano Beach Club Newly Renovated Furnished 1 / 1 Unobstructed Southern View Of Ocean & Intracoastal 24th Floor Clubhouse Bar Restaurant 2 Pools. $1,100 Per Month. Audrey 570-246-9240 Cell Or E-mail Audrey@chantre. com. APTS FOR RENTDEERFIELD/POMPANO BEACH 1 BR & 2 BR APTS FOR RENT. Remodeled, Paint, Tile, Etc. W & D On Site. Pool. Pet Friendly. Call George 954-809-5030. POMPANO 1/1 & 2/1 E OF FEDERAL Tiled. 10 Overhang. Walk To Everything. Park At Your Door. 954-2546325. POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 BEDROOMS Fully FurnishedEf ciency With Kitchen, Fully Furnished. Cable, Internet, Pool, Laundry. 500 To The Beach. Weekly Monthly Yearly. 954-2948483 Or 248-736-1533, 4-13 LARGE OPEN BRIGHT FIRST FLOOR CORNER SMALL YARD Small Pet OK All Tile Floors Just Painted Off A1A North Of Atlantic Pool Coin Laundry WIFI Cable Water Included $1075 Month --Large Ef ciency Apartment Available Same Bldg. Includes All Plus Elec. Full Kitchen Corner Unit. $850 Lease Required April 1 Special One Week FREE!! Owner Agent 954-608-7368. 412 Sunset Drive Pompano. 4-6 POMPANO BEACH 2 / 1 Near Federal Shops & School. No Pets. Also 1 / 1 On Beach. Please Call 954-7814072. 3-30 The Pelican 954-783-8700

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The Pelican 31 Friday, March 30, 2012 Classi edsCall 954-545-0013 Get to know your local Merchants The Pelican Classi eds can save you time and money! 954-783-8700! POMPANO BEACH 1/1 SW. C/A $750 2/1 $925 3/2 $1025 NE 2/1 $950 Townhouse 2/1.5 $1095. ALL FREE WATER. Rent + $70 Application Moves U In. 954-781-6299. 4-6 POMPANO BEACH 1/1 FURNISHED Includes TV $850 Month Yearly 1st / Last / Security. EFFICIENCY $750 Month Yearly Includes Direct TV + $50 Electric Allowance. 954-785-5837. POMPANO MCNAB RD & NE 18 AVENUE 1 & 2 Bedrooms Furnished/ Unfurnished. $695 $950 And Up. Pool, Tile Floors. Central A/C. 954-6102327. 3-30 POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 Bedroom From $495. Easy Movein. 1/2 OFF DEPOSIT. Remodeled. Great Location. 954-783-1088 For More Info. 5-11 LUXURY BEACH PADS FOR RENT! Pompano Grand Opening: FREE 32 Flat Screen HDTV! Newly Renovated in 2012 One Bedrooms & Studio Apts., 75 Yards From Private Beach Access, Eastern Exposure. New Kitchens & Baths, Granite Counter Tops, Central Air, Pool, Laundry, Dedicated Parking, Near Pier & Downtown. All Bills Paid! Includes Water, Electric, Premium Cable TV And WIFI. Furnished Or Unfurnished. Short Or Long Stays. No Utility Deposits. Small Pets Welcome. Only 9x, 8x, 7 Left! Pax Properties 888-729-4948 Or 954-603-8857. Photos At www.beachpads.net 3-30 COMMERCIAL FOR RENT-SALEPOMPANO COMMERCIAL OFFICE Spaces Available. Ranging From As Low As $500 To $700 Depending On Square Footage. Please Call Darci At 954783-3723. 4-20 DEERFIELD BEACH Retail Of ce Warehouse 700 Sq Ft With Loft. A/C, Bathroom. $575 Per Month. Call For More Info 561-654-1331 Or 561-9985681. 4-6FURNITUREBEDSETS King $180 Queen $130 Full $110 Twin $90. 5 Pc. Bedroom Set $399. Frames $39. 954-465-6498. 4-6 DOCK FOR RENT 60 FT DOCK THE COVE MARINA 50 AMP / H20 Included. $1,200 Month Price Negotiable Depending On Boat Size. Restaurant & Fuel On Premises. 954-9140053. a.j.barsotti@comcast. net. 3-30 PIANO LESSONSPIANO LESSONS AT YOUR HOME Classical Pop Jazz. 30 Years In Northeast Area. Call 954-938-3194. 4-6 The Pelican 954-783-8700 The Pelican 954-783-8700

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32 The Pelican Friday, March 30, 2012 Along with ghting his own disease, Bill also used some of his precious time to help others ght their battle. In 2008, he was a part of Wilton Manors rst Relay For Life event. He was always involved with something like that. He always wore his Livestrong [bracelet], said Jim. This year, the citys Relay For Life takes place June 1 and 2 at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive. The event, starting at 6 p.m. on the rst day, is an 18hour fundraising event where members of participating teams take turns walking nonstop around a designated track for the duration of the event; money raised is donated to the American Cancer Society. Alexandra Rousseau, community representative for the American Cancer Society, said this years goal is to raise $35,000. Were trying to grow the number of teams as well, she said. Along with a Survivors Lap, which celebrates individuals who are in remission RelayContinued from page 3or have beaten their cancer, Relay For Life also includes the Luminaria ceremony, which honors and remembers those who are ghting cancer and those who have died. To donate or start a team, visit www.relayforlife.org/ wmop or call 954-564-0880.

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The Pelican 33 Friday, March 30, 2012 Capt. RJ Boyle is an experienced angler in South Florida. His studio is located in Lighthouse Point. Call 954-420-5001. By RJ BoyleRJ BOYLE STUDIOSI went to Texas last week to give a seminar on swordfishing. We had put a seminar on last year at the same time and it was a huge success, so we decided to give it another shot. This years event, which benefited Everyday Heroes, was even better but its not the seminar that I want to tell you RJ Boyles heaping haul of sword sh off the Texas coastabout its the fishing. After the seminar, we hopped on my buddys boat, the Booby Trap, and headed offshore 90 miles in pursuit of a broadbill swordfish. What a trip it was. In a day and a half of fishing we caught 21 swordfish, five of which were over 200 lbs. The first day we caught 11 swords in the daytime. To my knowledge, that is by far the record for the most swords ever caught during daylight hours in one day. The second half-day we caught seven swords by noon. We added three swords at night, bringing the tally to 21 swords in a day-and-a-half. Of the 18 swordfish caught during the day, 14 were caught on a hand crank reel; an 80w Shimano. We trolled around an LP1200 electric reel to find the fish. Once we found it we were able to drop the hand crank reel. We hooked two double headers which ended up being the four biggest fish of the trip. I fought a swordfish on the Tiagra 80w for almost two hours; that would have been the Texas state record but I got tired of holding the rod while we were catching the other fish. So I sat the rod in the gunwale for five minutes which is not legal by IGFA rules, so we disqualified the fish. The fish we caught was just under 400 lbs. and we let it go. All said it was the trip of a lifetime and I thank God for letting me experience all of the things he has given me. I am truly lucky. Stay tight RJ Boyle and crew after their haul of 21 sword sh. [Photo courtesy of RJ Boyle] and there will be an egg hunt, bounce house and concession stand. This event will be for children newborn through 5th Grade. 954-390-2130. 3-31 Spring Fling takes place from 9:30 a.m. to noon at 1701 NE 8 St., Pompano Beach, and features a visit by the Easter Bunny, fun activities with My Favorite DJ, Bella the Clown, a bounce house and more. Cost is $2 per child or two canned goods per child. All canned food collected is to be donated to located food banks. 954-7864111. 4-7 Pony Rides from 9 to 11:30 a.m. at Sand & Spurs Equestrian Park, 1600 NE 5 Ave., Pompano Beach. Cost is $3 per ride. 954-786-4507. 4-15 Junior Bass Tournament, Quiet Waters Park, 401 South Powerline Road, Deerfield Beach. The tournament beings at sunrise and goes until 1 p.m. Ages 12 to 17. 954-357-8816.Green Markets3-31 Pompano Beach Green Market at the corner of West Atlantic Boulevard and North Dixie Highway from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Fresh vegetables, crafts, plants, food SightingsContinued from page 28 See SIGHTINGS on page 34

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34 The Pelican Friday, March 30, 2012 It was a family affair at Josephs Bakery on March 19, St. Josephs Day. Long lines of people lined up for the traditional Zeppole. The Saints Day recalls a famine in Sicily. Italians prayed to St. Joseph, foster father to the baby Jesus, to end the hunger. The famine ended and since then special foods are prepared with the Zeppole pastry as the dessert to recall the miracle. Pictured are Joseph Teresi Jr., Mariano Teresi, Father Michael Lynch, St. Ambrose Catholic Church and Joseph Teresi, III of Josephs Bakery, Josephs Bakery is located in Deer eld Beach at 788 South Federal Highway. Call 954-571-7747. St. Joseph remembered in Deer eld Beach SightingsContinued from page 28and music are available. 954292-8040. 3-31 Wilton Manors Green Market at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. fresh produce, baked goods and more. 954-5315363. Health & Safety4-14 Free Car Seat Safety Check from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. at Pompano Beach Fire-Rescue Station 24, 2001 NE 10 St. Technicians will check and see if car seats are properly installed. Appointment required. 954786-4510.Outdoor Events4-12 Florida Trail Association members, Mike and Lynn Thompson, will present an account of their hike in New Zealand at 7:30 p.m. at Fern Forest Nature Center, 201 Lyons Road S., Coconut Creek. 954-6094727.Recreation & Leisure4-2 Ping Pong Night from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Cost is $1. All ages can participate. 954-390-2130.Service & Charity3-31 The 17th Annual WIN Charity Golf Tournament will be held at 1 p.m. at Boca Greens Country Club, 19642 Trophy Drive, Boca Raton. The event benefits WIN, Women In Network, an organization that seeks to promote the success and advancement of women professionally and politically. Visit www.womeninnetwork. com or call 954-463-9005, ext: 641.SundaysPancake Breakfast Every third Sunday of the month, the St. Elizabeths of Hungry Parish hosts a pancake breakfast at 3331 NE 10 Terrace, Pompano Beach. The breakfast is from 7:30 a.m. to noon and benefits the Parish and cafeteria maintenance. 954-263 8415.Mondays3-26 Ping Pong Nights Every Monday from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Ping Pong Nights is held at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. The cost is $1. All ages can participate. 954-390-2130.

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The Pelican 35 Friday, March 30, 2012 Small Miracles concertFort Lauderdale Floridas Singing Sons Boychoir, under the direction of Craig Denison, presents Performing Small Miracles on Sunday, April 15 at 4 p.m. at The Sanctuary, Second Presbyterian Church,; 1400 N. Federal Hwy in Fort Lauderdale. Tickets $10 for adults and $6 for children under 12. For tickets or more information, please call 954-563-2697 or visit www.singingsons.org.

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36 The Pelican Friday, March 30, 2012



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Friday, March 30, 2012 Vol. XX, Issue 13 Call 954-783-8700 to Advertise Email: siren2415@gmail.com Pompano Beach • Deer eld Beach • Lighthouse Point • Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Wilton Manors • Oakland Park • Hillsboro Beach • The Galt • Palm Aire The P e l i c a n Pelican By Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach Andy Buglione, Boy Scout leader and veteran of World War II and Korea, is preparing the ceremonies for Memorial Day in Pompano Beach. He needs help, and he’s earned it with his own dedication to country and community. Buglione, 85, returned from Korea in 1954 to his home in Long Island, his wife Kay and their two children. Four years later, Buglione moved his family to Pompano Beach where he worked for the Broward Sheriff’s Of ce as an auto mechanic. In 1968, he started a Boy Scout Troop at St. Coleman’s Roman Catholic Church. He became a Scout in 1935 and was close to completing Vet from WWII, Korea needs help to make Memorial Day events a successSee MEMORIAL DAY on page 15 Renown storytellers coming April 14 to entertain and educateFolk musicians to join stageBy Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach “Storytelling is alive and well primarily because of Connie Regan-Blake,” said a host on “Good Morning America,” and Saturday, April 14 in Constitution Park, festival-goers will hear this renowned storyteller and a dozen others spin their tales. The city’s rst Storytelling Festival is the brainchild of resident Henry Gould who lived near Jonesboro, TN for a time and was enthralled by the International Storytelling Convention held there each October. “That was my introduction to storytelling, and I loved it,” Gould said. “It’s so beautiful there in the heart of the Blue Ridge Mountains and, you know, growing up we listened to stories on the radio. Now, when Tell me a story See STORIES on page 14 Connie ReganBlake is one of America’s most celebrated storytellers. Entertaining audiences in 47 states and 16 countries, she brings the wisdom, humor and drama of stories to main stage concert halls, libraries and into the corporate world. Blake will be in Deer eld Beach April 14 at Constitution Park. New incentive program gets underway this summerBy Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach Recycling will become an even smarter choice later this year when the city initiates an incentive program that will give residential recyclers bonus coupons and store discounts for their efforts to keep the planet greener. With the help of a new eet of specially designed trucks, the amount of recyclables collected at each home will be measured, and coupons redeemable at local businesses, will be awarded. “This is payback driven,” said Assistant Director of Environmental Services Chad Grecsek. “It supports local businesses, and it encourages people to recycle more which brings in more revenue for the city. Recycling will not be mandatory, but there will be no reason not to [do it].” Grecsek said the city will issue a request for proposal soon for a private partner to market and run the rewards program. That partner will also be City raising the ante for those who recycle See RECYCLE on page 7 No arrest in pedestrian’s death creating a protestDark streets also an issueBy Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach Friends and family of Thetus Fleming Jr., killed while crossing Hillsboro Boulevard on Feb. 17, want the man driving the pickup that struck Fleming charged with a crime. To date, the Broward See NO ARREST on page 24

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2 The PelicanFriday, March 30, 2012 Pompano Beach – Representatives of the Northeast High School InVenTeam will speak at the next meeting of the Cresthaven Civic Association. The group meets at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, April 12, at the Pompano Beach Moose Club, 3321 NE 6 Terrace. The InVenTeam received a grant from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology to create an emergency water ltration system. For more information on the meeting, email CresthavenNews@aol.com. High school students discuss MIT grant Public will help choose new brand and sloganBy Judy VikPELICAN STAFFLauderdale-By-TheSea Town commissioners and the public got their rst look this week at a proposed brand to help market the town’s commercial districts. It incorporates the theme “unwind” and depicts a pelican perched on an Adirondack chair with the words, “Relaxyou’re here. Lauderdale-By-The-Sea.”Chill, you’re in Lauderdale-By-The-Sea!Andy Royston, creative director of the Tangled Spider Design Group said, “People come here to unwind and feel happy. This is not a complicated place. It’s a relaxing place.” Royston said inspiration came from some of the “locals” the pelicans at the beach. “They live here, make their homes here, and pelicans can be cute,” he said. His group also discovered buildings in town that suggest a bygone era and that gave rise to the Adirondack chair. “It’s like a promise to people,” Royston said. “Stop and relax and take it all in. The chair is the epitome of summer relaxation. Read a book with not a care in the world.” He explained the brand components could be used in different ways, on posters or signs. The pelican and chairs could be different colors. And the pelican can move around on the design. “He’s not going to y away. He’s at home here. He’ll wander around and make a bit of a nuisance of himself,” Royston quipped. Another possibility presented by his group used colorful building blocks that included images of star sh or the sun. A welcome sign could be a patchwork quilt of blocks featuring a turtle, waves, palm tree and star sh. A third idea was nostalgic picture postcards, creating the idea of old school, seaside fun. Slogans under consideration are, using the initials LBTS: Let’s Be Thoroughly Spoiled, Living by the Sunshine, Lazing beneath the Sun, Light Balms the Soul. All suggestions are on the town’s website, lbts .gov under monkeysurvey.com and are on Channel 78. Residents and business people are invited to make comments on the three themes: chair and pelican, blocks or postcard. The Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Chamber of Commerce is sending an email blast to its members for their opinions, as See CHILL on page 29

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The Pelican 3 Friday, March 30, 2012 SightingsA community calendar of East Broward County. Please email information to siren2415@gmail.com By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFWilton Manors – For years, Bill Wetzel was a cancer survivor. But at the American Cancer Society’s 2012 Relay For Life Wilton Manors, he will be one of those remembered who lost his struggle with the disease.Wilton Manors Relay For Life set for June 1, 2Wetzel, former Wilton Manors parks and recreation director, died on Feb. 4, 2011, leaving behind a wife and two children. He took his nal breath 20 years after being diagnosed with testicular cancer. “He really understood he was on borrowed time and really lived. There were periods of time, two to threeyear spans, where he t a lot of life in,” said Jim Wetzel, Bill’s brother. According to the National Cancer Institute, 8,290 men were diagnosed with testicular cancer in 2011 and 350 died. First diagnosed at age 26, Jim Wetzel said his brother went through multiple bouts of chemotherapy, surgeries and alternative treatments. Eventually, says Jim, the cancer spread to his brother’s spine, paralyzing him and causing both kidneys to fail. But through it all, he says he never heard his brother complain. “He was constantly upbeat. I don’t know how he did it. He inspired my daughter to do Relay For Life,” said Jim. “Billy was always a good uncle. He really provided a very strong role model for my children.” He compared his brother to a championship boxer. “He went through hurdle after hurdle. He would just keep getting up.”See RELAY on page 32 Easter Services BaptistFirst Baptist Church of Pompano Beach 138 NE 1 St., 954-745-6100 4-1 – Palm Sunday: Jesus, the Lion of Judah, a praise and worship service, 9:30 to 11 a.m. 4-6 – Good Friday : Jesus, the Lamb of God Communion service, 7 p.m. 4-8 – Easter Sunday: Jesus, our Risen King, a resurrection celebration, 9:30 and 11 a.m.CatholicSaint Henry Catholic Churc h, 1500 S. Andrews Ave., Pompano Beach, 954-785-2450 4-2 – Mass and confessions, 8 a.m. and 12 p.m. 4-3 – Mass, 8 and 10:30 a.m. 4-4 – Mass and confessions, 8 a.m. and 12 p.m. 4-5 – Holy Thursday: Mass of the Lord’s Supper, 7 p.m. 4-6 – Good Friday: Liturgy of the Word: Passion of the Christ, Veneration of His Cross and Holy Communion, 3 p.m. 4-7 – Holy Saturday: Easter Vigil See SIGHTINGS on page 5

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4 The PelicanFriday, March 30, 2012 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFOakland Park “Now we’re just setting the rules of the game,” a city of cial assured residents at a recent community meeting on a proposed mixed-use overlay district for a portion of Commercial Boulevard. The big issues are density and height, Harris Hamid, director of Engineering and Community Development, told a standing-room only crowd at the municipal building. City commissioners have postponed until April 4 discussion of the new district which will be designed to spur revitalization of East Commercial Boulevard Public skeptical about new mixed-use zoning for Commercial Blvd.on the north side between North Andrews Avenue and Northeast 6 Avenue. The area is currently a mix of single-family homes, commercial, of ce and retail. Rick Buckeye, senior planner, said a study approved in 2010 and concerns of the business and property owners need to be considered in the redesign. “The new zoning would advocate a living/work environment,” he said. “When the area is rezoned, any single-family homes built prior to Jan. 1, 2012 could remain.” Prohibited businesses include schools, fast food restaurants, drive-thrus and auto-related businesses. Day nurseries and childcare businesses would be permitted. The Planning and Zoning Board has approved the land use amendment creating the overlay district, but wants 20 dwelling units per acre while developers are hoping for 27 units per acre. The board supports three-story buildings, while developers have asked for ve stories. Twenty units per acre result in about 190 units; 27 units per acre allows for 220 to 230 units. According to an economic analysis the city commissioned, three-story buildings would be pro table but would need to be a combination of retail, of ce and residential [mixed use]. The overlay zoning district would de ne what could be built in the area and provide incentives to the developer. Several residents spoke against the proposed plans. “Even three stories would take our privacy away and will affect our schools,” a woman in the audience said. “We don’t want to look at hi-rises. I have a pool in my yard, and I don’t want people [in a nearby hi-rise]watching my children play. We want a limit to heights.” “I’d like to see a community of stores,” said Michelle Fistel, a resident since 1978. “I don’t want to see buildings, buildings, buildings that all look alike. I don’t want to see apartments or buildings more than two stories.” “I’ve lived here 42 years, and I’m against this 120 percent,” said Joe Bowman, a general contractor. “Who are we enticing? Where did this start? This is insane. The whole thing is insane.” “We don’t want a concrete jungle built in our residential See COMMERCIAL on page 5

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The Pelican 5 Friday, March 30, 2012 The City of Pompano Beach Community Redevelopment Agency, or CRA, invites the community to a presentation and discussion by the development team from the rst ranked proposal on the development of the eight acre parcel located along Pompano Beach Boulevard and referred to as the Pier Site. The meeting is planned for April 12 at 5 p.m. at the E. Pat Larkins Center, 520 Hammondville Road/MLK Blvd. Pier development presentation, April 12 neighborhoods,” resident Bill Sears said. “I don’t want to see concrete silos down the street.” Don Lampasone, a developer-general contractor said, “You need some plantings, some palm trees and incentives to improve and make it more of a vibrant area. My suggestion is to stay on this track. That area someday will get developed. I think everyone will agree this area can be improved.” Horace McHugh, assistant city manager, said the city could sit back and do nothing. Instead, they have tasked planners to come up with concepts. “We realize we have to strike a balance between property owners and residential owners,” he said. “Whatever we do, we’re trying to create rules so a developer can build a product where everyone wins,” Hamid said. He assured the audience the proposed ordinance will not take property by eminent domain. Hamid will take the residents’ comments to the commission at the April 4 meeting and present a draft ordinance. If passed, the rezoning effort would start. ‘We’re not ramming it down the throats of anyone,” he said. CommercialContinued from page 4SightingsContinued from page 3begins, 7:45 p.m. 4-8 – Easter Sunday: Mass, 8, 10 and 11:30 a.m.Episcopal St. Nicholas Episcopal Church 1111 E. Sample Road, 954-942-5887. 4-2 – Morning prayer, 8 a.m.; Eucharist at St. Laurence Chapel, 11:30 a.m.; evening prayer; 5 p.m. 4-3 – Morning prayer, 8 a.m.; evening prayer, 5 p.m.; Eucharist, 7 p.m. 4-4 Morning prayer, 8 a.m.; evening prayer, 5 p.m.; Tenebrae, 7 p.m. 4-5 – Maundy Thursday: morning prayer, 8 a.m.; Eucharist with healing and foot washing, 10 a.m.; evening prayer, 5 p.m.; all parish Eucharist with foot washing, 6 p.m. 7:30 p.m. to 9 a.m. All night prayer See SIGHTINGS on page 14

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6 The PelicanFriday, March 30, 2012 Deer eld Beach, Pompano Beach, Lighthouse Point, LauderdaleBy-The-Sea, Wilton Manors and Oakland ParkWilton Manors • Oakland Park • Hillsboro Beach The Pompano Pelican is published weekly on FridaysStreet Address: 1500-A E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, FL 33060 Telephone: 954-783-8700 • Fax: 954-783-0093Letters to the Editor are encouraged and accepted for print if signed, although a writer’s name will be withheld on request; letters must also include a daytime telephone number. Advertising rates are available upon request. Subscription rate is $31.80 including tax for one year’s delivery in Greater Pompano Beach; $95.40/per year including tax for others in the United States; call 954-783-8700 for rates abroad. The Pelican is a nonpartisan newspaper and reserves the right to decline advertising. Copyright 2011. Reproduction of this publication in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission of the publisher. The Pelican is a member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, Deer eld Beach Chamber and the LBTS Chamber. The Pelican is a state certi ed woman-owned minority business. The Pelican is delivered to businesses, libraries, schools, of ces, hospitals, news racks and single family homes. All advertising and copy is published at the sole discretion of the publisher. We welcome your critiques and ideas concerning this publication. Anne Siren, publisherExecutive Assistant: Mary Hudson Graphics: Rachel Ramirez Windsheimer Bookkeeper: John White Classi eds: Fran Shelby Contributing Writers: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Judy Wilson, Malcolm McClintock, Judy Vik, Michael d’Oliveira Account Executives: Paul Shroads, Carolyn Mann, Bill Heaton, Bill Fox Special Of ce Assistant: Cathy Siren ESTABLISHED 1993 • Volume XX, Issue 13 Founding Editor and PublisherAnne Hanby Siren Letters & OpinionsBy Linda PappPELICAN READEREd. Note: Thank you to reader, Linda Papp of Shelton, CT., who took time to share the good work of her mother-in-law, a Pompano Beach resident. We hope this inspires other readers to share their stories or nd their own ways to make our communities even better than they already are. Her volunteer work has touched hundreds of hearts and warmed an equal amount of bodies “As a young boy, I can remember my mom doing her needlework while watching television. And I thought, ‘Wow, how can she do that without even looking at what she’s doing?’ But she did and never missed a stitch.” That was my husband Robert’s rst impression of his mom’s crocheting. It left such a lasting effect on him that he wanted others to know how many people she has touched through her years of giving. So he asked me to write a story for him. When I met Ethel Papp in 1966 she had already been crocheting and knitting for many years. She was only 45 years old at the time. Today she is 90 and still crocheting her heart away. When her husband passed away several years ago, she felt the need to help others. So she lled her days, volunteering at the Hospice that was once so helpful to her own family needs. She helped the patients and their families in any way she could, comforting them, bringing them something to eat, or drink, or sometimes she would just sit silently beside her patient’s bedside. One year, she began doing needlepoint and made enough ornaments to ll the ward Christmas tree. Another year she was nominated and received the Hospice Volunteer of the Year Award, and was honored at a luncheon where she was presented a plaque of appreciation. These days you will nd Ethel sitting in her favorite chair in her living room, knitting or crocheting lap robes. She has made them for Hospice patients, children’s cancer wards, the veteran hospital, her church choir at St. Elizabeth Church of Hungary and a boys orphanage, not to mention just about every member of our family. When you ask her why she does it, she will simply say she feels like she is giving a little something back. It makes her feel good to give to others in need. Ethel’s lap robes stretch around the world, from a boys orphanage in the Caribbean, to across the ocean. She has even sent a bunch of them to her family in Connecticut. People in Sweden, Germany, Poland and Hungary enjoy the comfort of her robes. She has made over 300 lap robes and hasn’t stopped yet. As long as she has a supply of yarn and her vision is good, she’ll continue to produce her lap robes to warm the hearts of others. So if you think you’re too old, or not good enough to make a difference in this world, think of Ethel, sitting in her favorite chair in her living room, making her lap robes, and still making a difference in her own little way. Who knows how many people she has made smile with a little gift made from the heart. And those little gifts will continue to touch someone’s life forever.Ethel Papp Egg-cellent hunts set for Deer eld kids of all agesDeer eld Beach – City staffers are hiding 20,500 plastic Easter eggs next week, “seeding” the city’s three egg hunts with candy and prizes. The rst egg hunt, designed for kids age 10 and older, takes place Thursday, Apr. 5, 8 to 10 p.m. at Constitution Park where 7,500 eggs will be hidden and then found with the help of ashlights. Refreshments will be served. The park is at 2841 W. Hillsboro Boulevard. Participants should bring their own lights. On Friday, Apr. 6, the Egg Stravaganza will be held at Westside Park for kids ages 10 and under. Children will be divided into three age categories as they search for the 5,000 eggs, 6 to 8 p.m. Westside Park is at 445 SW 2 Street. The annual Egg Run will be held Saturday, Apr. 7, 10 a.m. until noon at the Deer eld Beach Middle School Athletic Complex, 501 SE 6 Avenue. Children, ages 10 and under, will be divided into age groups as they search for 8,000 eggs containing candy and prizes. Sponsors needed for Seafood Festival Bounce Horse DerbyPompano Beach Wanna help a great local charity and at the same time promote your business and have more fun than a barrel of monkeys? Then sign up ASAP to be a sponsor and compete in the inaugural Pompano Beach Seafood Festival Bounce Horse Derby on the beach Saturday, April 21. Pompano Has Heart, Inc., the disaster-relief charity that raises money and commodities to help those in need both locally and abroad, is hosting its rst bounce horse race and what better venue then in front of thousands of people at the Pompano Beach Seafood Festival. For a $200 donation to Pompano Has Heart, sponsors will get to have their “jockey” compete in the 40 foot grueling stretch course on the sand that will take place in front of the Community Stage at 4 p.m.. In the event more than six sponsors enter the race, there will be elimination heats held before the nale. In the event of rain the race will be held same time that Sunday. First Place prizes for the winning sponsor of the race is a free one-year membership to the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce ($300 value), the coveted Derby Trophy Cup, local merchant gift certi cates and the bragging rights of all South Florida for one year. You must be age 18 or older to compete and be in good medical and physical shape for this special endeavor. For complete rules and guidelines or to sign up as a sponsor for the Seafood Festival Bounce Horse Derby please email Pompano Has Heart President, Steven Wolf, at pompanohasheart@gmail.com or call 954-654-3757. Pompano Has Heart, Inc, is a 501C-3 Non-Pro t Corporation.

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The Pelican 7 Friday, March 30, 2012 required to adopt a local charity. Residents will be furnished rolling carts where they can place recyclables from newspapers to aluminum cans to almost all householdproduct containers. Called single-stream recycling, it is already in place but not everyone is aware that paper, glass and plastics can be placed together in the small yellow or blue recycling containers now in use. When the large rolling carts are available, the expectation is that recyclable collections will increase by 30 to 50 percent. “The goal is to pick up garbage less frequently,” Grecsek said. In this city, recycling has been the mission of Cheryl Miller since 1992 and she has grown the current program into a model for the county. This city was the rst to single-stream. It is the rst to have a drop-off center for batteries, paint, electronics, light bulbs, oil, CDs, metal and plastics, shoes, large cardboard pieces, and is he only one with a bin for that ever-present packaging material – styrofoam. Miller has educated the community so well that its recycling efforts earn big nancial rewards. Last year, a $1.5 million grant from the Resource Recovery Board will be used to buy the big rolling carts. Miller raises the level of awareness by holding neighborhood contests, by handing out small gifts, made of course from recycling materials, to residents who RecycleContinued from page 1recycle and by being present at local fairs and festivals. This year, her department’s oat won rst prize in the Founders’ Day Parade. The new program awaits delivery of seven “one-armed bandits” purchased for $1.6 million. Like the trucks that now collect garbage, a device will lift the recycling container and dump it. The driver won’t have to get out of the truck which makes the whole process safer and more ef cient and saves time and energy. Deer eld residents are already getting the “Cadillac” of solid-waste service, Grecsek said. Bulk waste and recyclables are collected once a week; garbage twice a week. There’s been no rate increase since 2007. There is no thought of privatizing this department Grecsek said. “The city has invested in a new building, the Central Campus at 401 SW 4 Street, and in new equipment. We have no interest in outsourcing. We fear it would cost us in the service residents receive.” Eager to initiate the incentive program that makes recycling a no-brainer, Grecsek said, ”It’s indeed a game-changer.” On Founders’ Day, the city created its own oat made of all recycled materials. The sloagn was, Recycling is a Breeze.

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8 The PelicanFriday, March 30, 2012 Business matters The Pelican takes a look at local business owners. Call The Pelican to nd out how you can tell your story here because business matters. 954-783-8700.See THE VILLAGES on page 16Briefs By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFAn off-season special makes it inexpensive and easy to visit this idyllic retirement community in Central Florida and enjoy the amenities of The Villages at the same time. Your hosts, Kevin and Audrey Sullivan explain. “Our Lifestyle Preview Plan, invites visitors to a four to ten night vacation. Check out this self contained retirement community with homes, priced from $130,000 to one million. Stay in a beautiful, fully equipped two or three bedroom villa with bicycles and golf carts included. Enjoy complimentary golf, tennis, fitness and recreational activities, trolley and boat tours on man-made lakes stocked with fish. And that’s not all. “For those who want to cook at home, there are many handy grocery stores. And when it’s time to dine out, choose from 80 available restaurants. For entertainment, enjoy a variety of movies and discounts in our variety of signature stores. There’s even a shuttle to the Orlando International Airport.” With a laugh Kevin says, “If this sounds like I like The Villages, I do. Not only are my wife and I sales and marketing representatives of The Villages, we play in this active community with its many easy to arrange amenities.” The Villages came into being 42 years ago as a start up community on farm land in Central Florida. It was Visit The Villages with a preview package and enjoy a vacation at the same time while theresuch a success that it grew into the self contained city of 88,000 residents that it now is. It’s located about one hour Northwest of Orlando and three miles east of the turnpike. About 150 two and three bedroom villas are available to sample this easy lifestyle which has already captured the hearts of so many residents. The average age is around 65. Residents must be 55, but in the case of couples, one mate may be under 55. There are also long time and new residents in their 80s. Asked why they advertise The Villages in South Florida, Kevin says, “Many of our residents are from Pompano Beach and other bustling cities. They choose us because this is easy living with endless activities to pursue just minutes away. Our main transportation is a golf cart which can take you to every destination along specially constructed trails. Our residents said Say goodbye to heavy traf c and join the golf cart people who tool around in energy saving golf carts. [Photos courtesy of The Villages] Business ‘After Hours’ at Flip Flops, April 18Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Chamber will host its Business to Business event at Flip Flops Dockside Eatery April 18 from 5:30 to 8 p.m. Members and non-members are invited to bring business cards and enjoy 2-4-1 beer, wine and mixed drinks along with nger food and a live music on the water. Cover charge is $5 for members and $7 for non-members. Flip Flops is located at 3051 NE 32 Ave., Fort Lauderdale. Call 954-776-1000. The Lighthouse Point Library will hold its semi-annual book sale March 29 to 31 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily at Dixon Ahl Hall, 2220 NE 38 Street. Gently used books, DVDs, VHS tapes, and CDs will be available for purchase. Prices range from 25 cents for paperback books to $5 for hardcover books and $1 to $3 for DVDs and CDs. On Saturday, March 31 from 1 to 4 p.m., $1 will get you as many books as you can t in a plastic bag (we provide). All proceeds bene t the library. Donations of books, DVDs and CDs for the sale may be dropped off at the library during regular business hours.Book sale at LHP Library

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The Pelican 9 Friday, March 30, 2012 Must present coupon • Exp. 4/6/12

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10 The PelicanFriday, March 30, 2012 Making a DifferencePhyllis J. Neuberger wants your suggestions about people who are making a difference. Call 954-7838700. Briefs Interact supports National Kick Butts DayDeer eld Beach – Interact Club students at Deer eld Beach High School still have a few $50 gift bags to give to smokers who agree to give up their cigarettes for a day. The club’s effort is part of its campus-wide initiative that encourages students not to smoke or to quit. It is also tied in with National Kick Butts Day which was Wednesday, Mar. 21. Young people all over the country asked their friends and neighbors to give up one pack of cigarettes and stop smoking for the day. According to the Kick Butts website, the tobacco industry spends $1 million every hour to recruit kids as replacement smokers for the 400,000 Americans who die each year. At the school, club members have placed signs around the campus urging students to stop smoking. According to Interact Club advisor Frank Pizzo, none of his 38 club members smoke. The gift bag, provided by the Broward County Health Department, contains items to encourage exercise a t-shirt, pedometer, water bottle, etc. Anyone interested in “kicking butts” for a day can call Pizzo at 954-6504903.By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFThe Pelican gets many letters and emails. Recently one arrived starting out like this: “I am a 21 year old college student, born and raised in Pompano Beach. I was born with only two fingers on my left hand and a shorter right arm. Doctors told me it would be of little use, but I proved them wrong.” Ruden, a handsome young man, arrived at the paper for this interview bursting with energy and enthusiasm to tell us his story. How he dealt with his handicap, which had made him self-conscious and pretty much of a shy loner, is well worth sharing. “My struggle began when I decided I wanted to be a drummer. With only two fingers on one hand it was a challenge. My dad solved the problem by suggesting I wear a leather glove which could keep the stick in place between my two fingers. What a wonderful solution this turned out to be. A glove has become very important to me. I never remove the glove without replacing it because it gave me the confidence I needed to progress in life.” Before becoming a drummer, Ruden says he was a real target for bullies. “I was shy, kept to myself and stayed with my small group of friends who accepted me, but couldn’t protect me. Chris Ruden, college student, says we have to make a difference for ourselves to overcome adversityIt was tough, but it was a growing up experience.” Becoming a drummer in Pompano Beach High School drum line stimulated him to alter the way people saw him. “I learned that by projecting a positive image, I gained acceptance and changed from being a follower to becoming a leader, using my own experience to help others take on their adversities.” He continued. “Break dancing was my next challenge. I took a few classes at a dance studio and then taught myself. I use both hands and can do some really cool stuff. This moved me into fitness which is now not only my passion, but also the source of my income.” His high school activities included drumming, hip-hop dancing and creating his own dance group, NBA, or No Boundaries Aloud. He earned a Bright Futures Scholarship and other scholarships and now attends Florida Atlantic University, or FAU, where he will soon graduate with a degree in Exercise Science. “My high school anatomy teacher, Dr. Singkornrat, was my source of inspiration. She opened my eyes as to what I could do in the health field. And health is now my passion and livelihood.” At 19, he was diagnosed with type one diabetes. He decided to deal with that challenge by becoming a personal trainer. His goal was to motivate others to overcome their problems. He struggles every day to keep a positive See RUDEN on page 13Chris Ruden, personal trainer, works with David Helblum, 11, who is dealing with Cerebral Palsy. [Photos courtesy of EMagen] We are The Pelican What can we do for you? 954-783-8700

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12 The PelicanFriday, March 30, 2012 Man shot dead after attacks on local familyPompano Beach A man who was acting irrationally and threatening a mother and her two small children in the front yard of their Pompano Beach home Sunday evening was shot and killed by the children’s father. Broward Sheriff’s Of ce homicide detectives are investigating the fatal shooting. Shortly before 5:30 p.m., BSO deputies responded to 3030 NE 2 Ave. following a 911 call regarding a person shot. Witnesses told deputies they saw the man swinging a piece of wood at a woman and her two children shortly after they walked out the front door of their residence. At about the same time the mother was trying to protect her 3-year-old son and 5-yearold daughter, her husband, Emiliano Arellano, drove up with his two brothers. Emiliano and his brothers tried to stop the assailant. Emiliano said the man became very agitated when he told him he was going to call the police. When the man turned his aggression toward Emiliano’s daughter, Emiliano pulled his semi-automatic handgun and red one shot, striking the suspect in the chest. The same bullet hit Emiliano’s brother, Pablo Arellano. The unidenti ed suspect died at the scene. A family member drove Pablo to North Broward Medical Center for treatment. Pablo is expected to recover. BSO homicide and crime scene detectives responded to the scene to investigate the deadly encounter. Homicide investigators interviewed everyone involved as well as witnesses while crime scene detectives documented the scene and collected evidence. Detectives also took Emiliano to the Public Safety Building for questioning and to record his statement. He was very cooperative on scene and during questioning. The suspect who died was later identi ed as Ciriaco Estrada, 47, The investigation continues. Sunday morning in Deer eld Beach. Around 10 a.m., as Sunday morning mass was letting out at St. Ambrose Catholic Church, Mary Sczepanski, 88, got into her 2007 Buick Century, which was backed-in to a disabled parking space on the northeast corner of the parking lot. Sczepanski accidentally placed the car in reverse, accelerated and struck a curb stop. Apparently startled, she accelerated over the curb stop and onto the sidewalk, still in reverse, unaware a pedestrian was there. The car struck Luciana Porto, 66, of Deer eld Beach and came to rest a short distance away. Broward Sheriff Fire Rescue Deer eld Beach Units responded and transported the victim to North Broward Medical Center where she was pronounced dead shortly after arrival. The driver of the car and a witness were evaluated on the scene by paramedics but Police mattersCOMPILED BY ANNE SIRENWoman killed by fellow church member after struck by carDeer eld Beach A woman leaving church was killed after she was struck by a fellow churchgoer’s car did not require transport to the hospital. Detectives do not believe alcohol or medications were a factor in this crash. The investigation continues and charges, if any, will be pending completion of the traf c homicide investigation.By Judy VikPELICAN STAFF Lauderdale-By-The-Sea – Commissioners considered two parking redesigns for East Commercial Boulevard between the Intracoastal Waterway and Seagrape Boulevard this week and favored the one with angled parking, improved intersections and a recovery zone making reentry onto to the boulevard safer. Downside of the proposal is a required approval from the Florida Department of Transportation that could add Parking proposal would bring major change to LBTS business districtmonths to the project timeline. “The area is now pretty stark with not a lot of landscaping or shade,” Hugh Johnson, landscape architect with Architectural Alliance, told commissioners. He analyzed existing conditions and found unsafe conditions at crosswalks, parking lots with a lot of asphalt and small sidewalks and little landscaping or shade at retail businesses. “Our goal is to improve the appearance of the street and the parking areas and design an entry feature,” Johnson said. “We were asked to create a streetscape that encourages pedestrians to visit the area and to differentiate LBTS from Fort Lauderdale on the west side of the bridge,” he said. “When you come over the bridge, you should feel like you’re in a completely different place, like you have entered a seaside village. You are here.” The recon guration of parking areas allows for wider pedestrian sidewalks, pedestrian plazas, outdoor dining, landscaping/shade, site furniture and signage, he added. Drainage and resurfacing need to be addressed in all four parking lots. Most of the parking spaces are less than the nine feet the code requires and that would be corrected. The plan also calls for pedestrian mid-block crosswalks perhaps equipped with LED lighting that goes on when a pedestrian enters the crosswalk. Commissioner Stuart Dodd suggested providing a road so drivers could pull into angled parking spaces and then drive forward to get out. Johnson said that could be considered. See PARKING on page 14

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The Pelican 13 Friday, March 30, 2012 outlook, achieve his own fitness goals and professionally help others do the same. Amanda Flores says, “Working out with Chris is very challenging and hard, but he does explain the value of each exercise and in the end it’s worth it. Annie-Mai Hurmemaa calls Chris “Great.” She says, “I’m very visual so Chris has to do an exercise himself to show me how it works and he tells me where that exercise will benefit me. He’s helped me tone up my body nicely.” Chris credits his brother, Michael for always being “protective and encouraging to me. My parents have been too. It helps to get positive energy from one’s family. I’m RudenContinued from page 10getting close to graduation and hope to attend graduate school with a major in kinesiology to increase my knowledge of body mechanics. This will help me be more secure in knowing what my clients can attain. I have learned that by fixing the body, one actually helps fix the mind. They are so closely connected. I see this every day in my current career as a personal trainer. One’s self image is both mental and physical.” Chris calls his business as a personal trainer “Adapt Wellness.” He can be reached at 954-588-3981or adaptwellness@gmail.com Thank you for your inspirational example of how to deal with adversities, Chris Ruden. Chris Ruden, shows off one of his ‘cool’ break dance routines.

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14 The PelicanFriday, March 30, 2012 I watch sports on TV, I turn off the sound and get the commentary on radio instead. They have to describe what is going on…” Locally, Gould discovered storytelling at the Caldwell Theatre in Boca Raton. He became so intent on bringing it to Deer eld Beach, he approached Judi Standich, chair of the Deer eld Beach Cultural Committee and asked, “Outside of the art festival and a few concerts, what do we do here for culture?” According to Gould when she heard his idea Standich said, “Go for it.” His notion was also endorsed by Caren Neile, who produces and cohosts WRLN’s “The Public Storyteller” every Sunday. It is Neile who has enlisted the prestigious lineup of storytellers that includes Regan-Blake, Mij Byram, Lucia Gonzalez and Shana Banana. Regan-Blake comes to town after performing this month in Yosemite, Australia and New Zealand. She annually performs at all the nation’s top storytelling festivals relating her stories woven from both her Irish heritage and her Appalachian roots. She is regularly credited with creating the renaissance in storytelling as was mentioned on the morning TV show. South Florida’s own Mij Byram started her dramatic career on the family landing. Her mom brought the popcorn. Her brothers and sisters were a captive audience. Today she says, “One good story always leads to another point of view, another adventure, another angle, another voice, another song, another place, another time…” Shana “Banana” Smith is also local and gained fame telling children’s stories, as well as singing and writing songs which have been likened to the sounds of Joni Mitchell, Joan Armatrading and Cassandra Wilson. She will spin yarns and sing at the Deer eld festival. Other storytelling highlights include an amateur storytellers’ swap –10 minutedialogues from anyone who wishes to step up, adult ghost stories and a session by Gail Rosen on “Telling Our Own Stories. Michael Stock, co-host of “The Public Storyteller” will be master of ceremonies. Folk entertainment booker Jim Higgins has recruited musicians to play at the festival that include “Spider” John Koerner, acclaimed American folk and country blues musician. Others on the program are Big Brass Bed, Kuyayky, the Patty & Frank Trio, Ellen & Gary Bukstel. Food and soft drinks will be sold by local restaurateurs. The event begins at noon and concludes at 10 p.m. in the Arboretum at Constitution Park, 2841 W. Hillsboro Boulevard. “This will be an incredible venue,” Gould said, “and will introduce many people to the arboretum.” Thanks to the support of major sponsors, JM Family, SE Toyota, Frank Congemi and the Deer eld Beach Kiwanis Club, there is no charge for admission.StoriesContinued from page 1 Commissioner Chris Vincent said he liked the fact the plan eliminates vehicular traf c where there are pedestrians. Designers said they will provide cost estimates in early May. Johnson also presented an alternate scheme which kept parallel parking on both sides of Commercial Boulevard, increased the width of bike lanes and recon gured the parking lot to provide for 140 parking spaces, 13 more than currently. Fifteen-foot sidewalks would accommodate outdoor dining. “A is nice, but B is a game changer,” Vice Mayor Scot Sasser said of the two proposals. He liked Dodd’s idea for adding a way for drivers to pull forward to get out of their space on Commercial. ParkingContinued from page 12SightingsContinued from page 5 vigil. 4-6 – Good Friday: morning prayer, 9 a.m.; public procession with Stations of the Cross, 3 to 4 p.m.; Good Friday service with Adoration of the Cross, 4 p.m.; Good Friday service with Adoration of the Cross, 7 p.m. 4-7 See SIGHTINGS on page 15

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The Pelican 15 Friday, March 30, 2012 Advertise with The Pelican 954.783.8700 his Eagle Scout project when his father died. Buglione joined the U.S. Army shortly afterwards. After his discharge from the Army, Buglione became active in the American Legion and the VFW. In 2011, Buglione was named Legionnaire of the Year for Florida. But Scouting never left his heart. Today he is the Scout Commissioner of the Lighthouse District for Boy Scouts of America. His Scout troop today consists of Boy Scouts with special needs. Now Buglione has some needs of his own, and he is counting on the community to step up to help him and others honor all Veterans on May 28. “The interest in Memorial Day is getting lower and lower every year,” says Buglione. “We are losing Veterans and losing people who come out to watch the parade.” The ceremonies include services at Westview Cemetery and Pompano Beach Cemetery. Buglione’s Boy Scouts prepare for the day by placing ags on graves of all Veterans in Pompano Beach. During the late morning of Memorial Day, the parade begins at Atlantic Boulevard and Northeeast 23 Avenue. To make the day a success, Buglione needs participants in the parade, volunteers to help plan the events and sponsors to underwrite some of the costs. To join Buglione and other veterans in the planning, volunteers are asked to attend a meeting on April 4 at the Veterans of Foreign Wars, or VFW, 243 S. Dixie Highway, Pompano Beach at 7 p.m. The event and parade are open to all groups that want to participate. There are no costs to become involved. Marching bands, clubs, church groups and others are encouraged to attend. Memorial DayContinued from page 1 SightingsContinued from page 14– Holy Saturday: morning prayer, 8 a.m.; service with meditation 9 a.m.; Great Vigil of Easter and Celebration of the Eucharist, 7:30 p.m. 4-8 – Resurrection Sunday: “Son Rise” celebration 6 a.m.; Eucharist celebration of the Resurrection, 10 a.m., 1 p.m. and 7 p.m.PresbyterianFirst Presbyterian Church, 2331 NE 26 Ave., Pompano Beach, 954-9412308 4-1 – Palm Sunday Concert: 4 p.m., Choral favorites for Lent: selections by J.S. Bach, G.F. Handel. 4-1 – Palm Sunday Procession of Palms: 9:30 and 11 a.m. 4-5 – Maundy Thursday: Service and Communion, 7 p.m. 4-6 – Good Friday: Service and prayers, 12 p.m. 4-8 – Easter Sunday: Service, 9:30 and 11:15 a.m. United Church of Christ, 2501 NE 30 St ., Fort Lauderdale, 954-563-4271. Last Supper re-enactment at 7 p.m. on Maunday Thursday. A $10 donation is asked but not requiredSee SIGHTINGS on page 17

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16 The PelicanFriday, March 30, 2012 Now Online • www.pompanopelican.com goodbye to long lines of cars and heavy traffic. Instead, they hop in their golf cart for a short ride to golf courses, tennis courts, grocery stores or a friend’s house for cocktails. Our carts take us to golf, church, doctors, shopping, entertainment and each other.” Bill and Sherry Fox call The Villages ‘Disney for adults’ because he says, “We fell in love with the lifestyle and everything The Villages has to offer. As a golfer imagine, my pleasure at having 48 golf courses to choose from—all inside this city. Sherry likes to water ski. She’s a member of the Water Ski Club and skis on our lake every chance she gets. We went up on a preview package and Kevin was great—no pressure, no sales pitch, just good information. After two years we purchased our dream home. Kevin walked us through every step of the way.” Ginny and Kris Smith also visited in June of 2010. Kris writes, “We signed up for a five day vacation, but after three days, we knew we wanted to move to The Villages. This May we will become residents. “Sign up for a Preview Package. You’ll be glad you did.” Call 352-516-4842 or email kevin.sullivan@thevillages.com. The VillagesContinued from page 8 Lifestyles at The Villages include using bicycles or golf carts for transportation.

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The Pelican 17 Friday, March 30, 2012 By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach – The Mets gave up just one run in the first inning but couldn’t stop the six more scored by the Phillies in the 7 to 2 loss Monday night. The Mets and Phillies, part of Pompano Baseball’s Pony Division which includes 13 and 14-year-olds, squared-off at the Four Fields complex. With two outs, including one strikeout, Mets pitcher Chris Swan was close to closing out the top of the first inning when the Phillies Tyler Krinkie hit a blooper to right field for a single. Once on base, Krinkie stole second, third and home plate before the Mets got their third out. Sharp infielding by the Pony Division Phillies beat Mets 7 to 2Phillies ended the inning 1-23, leaving the Mets scoreless. After giving up two base hits to the Phillies, Swan answered back with two strikeouts. But the Phillies Logan Rataiczak knockedin both base runners with a double, giving the Phillies three runs before the top of the inning ended. At the bottom of the second inning, Swan helped his own cause with a triple that scored two runs and brought the Mets to within one run of tying the game. But a strikeout and double play by the Phillies kept them in the lead. The Phillies tried to expand their lead in the third but were denied. The Mets were equally unsuccessful in their scoring efforts; both teams caught runners trying to steal. Defense dominated on both sides again in the fourth inning and kept both teams scoreless again. But the fifth inning saw the Phillies get back on the scoreboard when Mason Kemp, after a small pitchers battle, knocked-in two more runs; he later stole home, adding another run to the tally before the inning ended. The Mets threatened to score, getting men on second, but the Phillies defense shut them down again. Thanks to multiple strikeouts by Mets pitcher Blaise Marks, two, and Phillies pitcher Anthony Blasko, three, both teams were kept scoreless in the sixth inning. The seventh and last inning saw the Phillies get their last run off with a hit by Anthony Blasko which knocked-in Bobby Blaski from third base. The Mets were unable to respond, making the final score 7 to 2. SightingsContinued from page 15 Art, Music, Film & Theatre4-1 – Cirque Dreams: Pop Goes The Rock, 2 p.m. at Seminole Hard Rock Hotel and Casino Hollywood, 1 Seminole Way, Hollywood. Tickets are $24, $39, $54, $69. Event runs through April 8. Visit www. hardrocklivehollywoodfl.com or 1-800-745-3000. 4-7 – Actor and comedian Leslie Jordan from the television show Will & Grace, will be performing at Parker Playhouse, 707 NE 8 St. in Fort Lauderdale, at 8 p.m. Tickets are $40 to $50. Visit www.parkerplayhouse.com or 954-462-0222.See SIGHTINGS on page 22

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18 The Pelican Friday, March 30, 2012 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFMargate – “This course is in better shape than it has been in years,” said Jack Shoenfelt, owner of Oriole Golf Club. He credits his golf superintendent, Gary Fisher, and his staff for improving the 40-year-old fairways and greens which makes the semiprivate club a great golfing value. The course, designed by Bill Dietch, is distinguished by its challenging par 3’s, seven water holes and a few large bunkers. “The strength of the course is its par 3’s, Shoenfelt said. “Two of them are especially interesting: on the front nine, the number seven hole is 195 yards off the championship tee, uphill Oriole Golf Club offers great golf at great prices and lots of fun into the wind with a huge bunker guarding the green. On the back nine, the 14th hole is a short par 3, just 140 yards, but the green is small and protected by two monster bunkers.” The club stays busy by offering daily tournaments, attractive discounts for frequent players and by keeping the rates moderate both for members and guests. Membership fees have not risen in 12 years. “We may have the lowest rates around… it’s a real value. Our regulars keep us going. Some See ORIOLE on page 19ADVERTISEMENTThe club offers a driving range with grass tees, a practice putting green and a pro shop with friendly staff and quality lines such as Titliest, Callaway, Taylor-Made and Foot-Joy. The Pelican! What can we do for you? 954.783.8700

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The Pelican 19 Friday, March 30, 2012 If you cannot locate a Pelican in your city or town, Call 954 .783.8700 Horses for Heroes Charity Golf Tournament Inverrary Country Club, 3840 Inverrary Blvd., Lauderhill, hosts the 3rd Annual Horses for Heroes Charity Golf Tournament on Saturday, April 14. Proceeds benefit Bit-By-Bit Therapeutic Riding Center, which offers free treatment to disabled American veterans using the healing power of the horse. Appearances are expected from the Miami Heat Dancers, local and national sports figures, and Colonel Danny McKnight who was depicted in the full length feature film “Black Hawk Down.” Entry fee includes cart, sleeve of balls, goody bag, and buffet lunch. For complete tournament information call Mike Brady at 954-707-2287 of them play every day,” Shoenfelt said. For those who play two consecutive days, the “Mulligan Rate” second day rate is steeply discounted. Currently Oriole is offering a $5 discount for weekend play if the golfer plays a weekday round. “We’ve always been known as a busy golf course,” Shoenfelt said. “And it was always the least expensive to play, only now it is in much better shape.” To keep pace with private clubs that are going public, Shoenfelt’s team is continually “dressing up” the place. The grill, with a water view overlooking the course, is now offering daily lunch specials and an expanded menu. The lounge is open until “the last person leaves,” he said. Wednesdays are particularly popular as they are 99 cent burger days. Chef Robin Edwards’s pies and soups have become legendary. In summer, the club holds three junior golf camps with amazingly low tuition: As low as $40 for the week. To supplement the camp, Oriole holds its annual December Pro-Am Benefiting Junior Golf that also makes camp scholarships available. One of the club’s more popular leagues for both men and women began this week on Monday night. It is open to the public. Debbie Douma coordinates it and can be reached at 954-972-8140. Shoenfelt also operates the nine-hole Margate Executive Course on W. Margate Boulevard across from the entrance to Oriole. That par 30 course is a great place for the beginning golfer, the senior golfer or the accomplished golfers looking to improve their short games, he said. For the very youngest golfers, an annual Pee Wee Tournament for ages five through 12 is held every August. Many of the kids who play in the Pee Wee event are experiencing tournament golf for the first time. The tournament is followed by a pizza party for the kids. Green fees at the Executive Course for those who walk are as low as $6. Oriole employs PGA Head Pro, Todd Norman, and golf instructor, George Monteil, to give lessons, handle the golf shop and the junior clinics. The club offers a driving range with grass tees, a practice putting green and a pro shop with friendly staff and quality lines such as Titliest, Callaway, TaylorMade and Foot-Joy. Tucked away in the Oriole Gardens condo community, Oriole Golf Club is a haven for golfers who want an active club life as well as good rounds of golf.Some tee off at ve years ScoreboardPompano Beach Women’s Golf Assn.March 27A Class 1st Georgie Wright. . . . . . 32 B Class 1st Brenda Joy . . . .32.5 C Class 1st Helen Meili . . . . . 25.5 2nd Patti VanZandt . . . 30.5 D Class 1st Lucille Rispoli . . . . . 30.5 2nd Bea Haley. . . 31Pompano Beach Men’s Golf Assn.March 281st Bob Dann, Art Gatesy, Joe Osborne, Don Ingram . 53 2nd Ed Gormley, Don Mann, Sam Chuck, Bob Broderick . . 54 3rd John Pihl, Lance Naiman, Scott Feinman, Paul Dauzickas . 54 4th Bernie Kelley, Dick Steffen, Ernie Palinchik (b/d), Gerry Gearity . . 54 Ties broken by scorecard tiebreak, back nine rst, then last 6 holes. Closest to pin . . . .Gilles Cote’ Pompano Beach Women’s 9 hole League March 27Eliminate Holes 1 &9: Class A 1st Carol Metevier . . . . 36 2nd Jeannine Lesburt . . . 37 3rd Susana Rust . . . 41 Class B: 1st Marlene Williams . . . 43 2nd Harriet Fisher, Judy Quinn . . 47 OrioleContinued from page 18

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20 The Pelican Friday, March 30, 2012 By Malcolm McClintockPELICAN STAFFJukebox Diner 2773 East Atlantic Blvd. Pompano Beach, 954-960-5882Located at the foot of the Atlantic Boulevard Bridge, just steps from the Intracoastal, the Jukebox Diner is the kind of cozy eatery that regular customers visit several times a week. This clean, brightly colored and airy spot features posters of all the top musical icons and, of course, a fully loaded free jukebox that offers a great selection from the past 50 years. “We had our restaurant for many years on A1A near the Hillsboro inlet,” says coowner Bernadette Scollin. “But Hurricane Wilma destroyed it in 2005.” Finally, seven years later, Scollin and her business partner Linda Herr are back in business at a great new location near the water. “We had so many loyal customers that we had no choice but to re-open here in Pompano. We even managed to reunite our whole original kitchen staff.” “We offer great food for breakfast, lunch and dinner,” says Scollin as she brings out a signature omelette of spinach, feta and tomato served with a side order of highly seasoned crushed potatoes. “Our home fries are very special. We created this unique recipe.” “People just love our omelettes, especially the spinach and feta one. So we Pompano Beach’s Jukebox Diner offers up tasty comfort food, friendly service and, of course, fantastic tunes The popular spinach, feta and tomato omelette with avorful homefries is a must-try at the Jukebox diner. [Staff photos] Co-owners Linda Herr and Bernadette Scollin show off their famous Pear Walnut Chicken Salad and the juicy signature lb. Jukebox burger with sauted mushrooms, onions and crumbled bacon smothered by melted cheddar and Swiss cheeses.See JUKEBOX on page 26

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The Pelican 21 Friday, March 30, 2012

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22 The Pelican Friday, March 30, 2012 ADVERTISING? IT’S PART OF DOING BUSINESS. CALL US. 954-783-8700. SightingsContinued from page 17 4-10 – Liza Minnelli will be performing at Seminole Hard Rock Casino, 1 Seminole Way in Hollywood, at 8 p.m. Tickets are $49, $59, $69 and $79. Visit www. seminolehardrockhollywood. com or 1-800-745-3000. 4-14 & 20 – Curtain Call Playhouse presents And Then There Were None, a murder mystery at 8 p.m. at the Herb Skolnick Center, 800 SW 36 Ave., Pompano Beach. 954784-0768. 4-18 – Art-By-The-Sea a monthly art series will take place from 7 to 9 p.m. at Friedt Family Fellowship Hall, 4433 Bougainvillea Drive, Lauderdale-By-TheSea. 954-594-0444 4-25 – Elvis Costello and The Imposters perform at 7 p.m. at Seminole Hard Rock Casino, 1 Seminole Way in Hollywood. Tickets are $49, $69 and $89. Call 1-800-7453000. 4-27 & 28 – Deerfield Beach Wine and Food Festival at Quiet Waters Park, 401 South Powerline Road, Deerfield Beach. VIP and regular tickets available. Cost varies by activity. Call 561338-7594. 4-27 – Actor and comedian Billy Gardell from the television show Mike & Molly, performs at Seminole Hard Rock Hotel and Casino Hollywood, 1 Seminole Way, Hollywood, at 8 p.m. Tickets are $49, $59 and $69. Visit www. hardrocklivehollywoodfl.com or 1-800-745-3000.Business & Bargains4-14 – Wilton Manors Yard Sale 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive. Free to the public. To become a vendor call 954390-2130. 4-16 – Pompano Beach Business Resource Center See SIGHTINGS on page 25

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The Pelican 23 Friday, March 30, 2012 What impelled the founder to start the business? Solid Rock Realty was created out of her strong desire to make positive changes in the industry, for consumers as well as agents. The concept of Solid Rock Realty is to create a paradigm shift in the way consumers are served by maintaining only the most highly educated and trained agents, eliminating all the “real estate secrets” and empowering the client to be part of the entire real estate process of selling, buying, or investing. Who helped her? It would be impossible to point out all the individuals who helped Christina Henley launch Solid Rock Realty. However, her dearest friend Kate Major was certainly the lead person in helping Christina take her vision and ideas and putting them on paper to create a business model that is currently being realized today.Describe some of the greatest moments? First, let me say that we look forward to many more to come. To date, some of our greatest moments have come from the day to day interactions we have in seeing people meet and exceed their expectations for the buying and selling process. Additionally, many great moments have happened during or after our monthly education event series “Save the American Dream.” So many have given feedback about how they are more at ease that their future real estate related decisions will be better informed decisions because of what they have learned. Wine and Light hors d’ oeuvres are served. THEY ARE ALWAYS FREE OF CHARGE AND FREE OF SOLICITATION!What is the service? A knowledge and information source of all things real estate for the purpose of buying, selling or investing in the greater Ft. Lauderdale area.Has this business contributed to the community in some way? We offer a real estate business that consistently delivers concierge style customer service while empowering each and every client to make the best possible decision regarding some of the largest investments in their life. They want to be an integral part of the process discussing strategy and to know it will be implemented effectively. To meet today’s consumers’ desires and demands for a more knowledgeable and experienced consultant who is fully aware of the challenges of the ever changing real estate market, Solid Rock Realty’s “professional real estate consultants” commit to rigorous training and coaching weekly, sometimes daily. Also, today’s consumer wants transparency. In an attempt meet this need, we invite our clients to come to our office and see everything exactly as we see it, thereby eliminating the mystery.How has the service changed or expanded? The real estate climate is always changing. As an example we are seeing more families under distress because of the increasing number of delinquent and underwater mortgages. In an attempt to help those families, our agents have earned the Certified Distressed Property Expert designation. This gives a working knowledge of the entire situation and all options available to homeowners today. We come beside them to walk through the process with them by providing the information and help they need to make informed decisions and get on the road to recovery. Technology is also a large part of properly serving today’s consumer. Every agent at Solid Rock Realty is highly trained and efficient in maximizing all technology available in our industry to better serve our clients. The Solid Rock Realty office is equipped with all the latest, greatest technology. We offer our location for various meetings and gatherings that benefit the greater community. If you have a need please feel free to contact us to see if we can be of service to you in this way.How can we reach you with questions? I welcome anyone to stop at our office and meet with us face to face at 2044 NE 36 Street, Lighthouse Point. We can also be reached at Christina@solidrockrealty. net, facebook at facebook. com/christinahenley; twitter at twitter.com/relst8lady; linked-in atlinkedin.com/in/ solidrockrealty. Your call is always welcome at 954-290-2772. New location of Solid Rock Realty is at The Gateway Centre of Lighthouse Point at the corner of Sample Road and Federal Highway.Christina Henley founded Solid Rock Realty in 2003.Full house at Save the American Dream kick-off event with Lori Parrish, Broward County Property Appraiser ADVERTISEMENT

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24 The Pelican Friday, March 30, 2012 Sheriff’s Office has given out little information on the case saying it is under investigation. Fleming, 22, had been visiting his friend David Cody at Cody’s grandmother’s home in Allwood Park that Saturday and according to Cody had asked him for a ride home. Cody said he left his grandmother’s without Fleming and at 11:20 p.m., while heading south across Hillsboro Boulevard in the 200 block, Fleming was struck by a 1999 Dodge pickup truck allegedly driven by David Calderilla Alcocer, 20, of Coconut Creek. Fleming lived in Deerfield Beach at Stanley Terrace. His mother Theresa Walker and father Thetus Fleming also live in Deerfield Beach. According to the police report, Alcocer left the scene of the accident but returned 30 minutes later and gave BSO a statement. A witness, waiting for the signal light at the intersection of Hillsboro and Martin Luther King Blvd. (MLK), saw that Fleming had been hit and called police. Cody, a community activist, said he feels guilty that he did not give his friend a ride and has taken up the cause for Fleming’s parents. Not only does Cody want to see justice done, he is renewing a longstanding request for pedestrian/motorist safety precautions at the MLK intersection. “It is very dark there,” Cody said. “And there are no turn signals.” An added risk for Fleming was that he was wearing “the uniform – black jeans and black shirt,” Cody said. To bring attention to Fleming’s death and the dangerous intersection, Cody has organized a protest for this afternoon (Friday), 6 p.m. in front of Advanced Auto Parks, 286 W. Hillsboro Blvd. An impromptu protest last week brought out 30 friends and relatives of Fleming. Cody expects many more people will attend this week’s protest which will end, he said, at BSO Headquarters. Cody said an internet search produced information that Alcocer was driving on a suspended license and had warrants out for his arrest (The Pelican could not verify these accusations). Leaving the scene of an accident is a first degree felony in Florida. While Cody and others including City Commissioner Ben Preston have petitioned the city to improve safety conditions along the Hillsboro/MLK corridor, the intersection is under the jurisdiction of the Florida Department of Transportation. Preston wrote to FDOT Dec. 27 pointing out the unsafe conditions at the intersection and received a response on Jan. 12 that said a detailed safety review was being performed. “This issue is not something the city is able to deal with,” Preston said. “Even when people die, you have to go through the studies. If it were up to me, I’d make changes.” FDOT had agreed to install one safety upgrade, yellow truncated domes at the intersection that help people with poor vision feel the difference in the pavement and realize they are in the street. Cody is charging that city officials got in the way of that project, but Charlie DeBrusco, director of environmental services, says that is not so. DeBrusco said the MLK intersection meets the requirements of the American Disabilities Act, while 13 others governed by FDOT, do not. He favors a study of the area beginning at Dixie Highway to determine what improvements are needed. “I have a problem with just arbitrarily picking this location. We are not required to have the truncated domes there, and there are 13 other intersections not up to ADA standards. We need to resolve all the issues first.” DeBrusco said that after Fleming was killed, he looked at the area and saw people crossing Hillsboro Blvd. at several locations including at a supermarket at NW 2 Avenue. “We need a complete traffic safety study there,” he said.No arrestContinued from page 1

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The Pelican 25 Friday, March 30, 2012 Advertise with The Pelican. 954.783.8700 Surprisingly Entertaining!By Becky Masterman “EDITOR AND AUTHOR” (TUC-SON, AZ USA)Fear of Flying in the Age of Terrorism (Kindle Edition) Full disclosure: I’m not afraid of flying. But the author is an acquaintance of mine so I gamely downloaded this to my kindle and intended to read it on a flight to Austin. However, once begun, I found I could not skim it as I intended. The writing is so lively and the pacing so perfect, not a sentence is padded. Plus I kept finding information that intrigued me and advice for conquering fears that went beyond those involved with worrying about falling out of the sky. Who knew there was an app for discovering where turbulence exists at any moment? McCord explains how you can use this app to not only decide whether to fly, but how long the bumps may last once you’re in the air. And that’s just one useful piece of information. This concise book manages to pack in lists of web sites you can visit, and helpful summaries at the end of each chapter if you need to review. Upon finishing it (savoring it) I immediately downloaded the book to a friend’s computer because she IS afraid of flying. I’m sure she’ll get even more out of it than I did. Read this. Give it as a gift. They’ll thank you. Also, from now on I think I’ll keep my shoes on during the flight. People are talking about . Bookshosts a free business networking event from 5:30 to 7 p.m. at its office, 50 NE 1 St. Light refreshments will be served. 954-5861111.Books & Seminars3-29 – The Lighthouse Point Library holds its semi-annual book sale through march 31 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily at Dixon Ahl Hall, 2220 NE 38 St., Lighthouse Point. Used books, DVDs, VHS tapes, and CDs will be available for purchase. Prices range from 25 cents for paperback books to $5 for hardcover books and $1 to $3 for DVDs and CDs. On Saturday, March 31 from 1 pm to 4 pm, $1 will get buyers as many books as they can fit in a plastic bag. All proceeds benefit the library. 3-31 – Juan Riera speaks on “Pirate’s Treasure and Shipwrecks of South Florida” at the next History at High Noon presentation from noon to 1 p.m. at the Old SightingsContinued from page 22 See SIGHTINGS on page 28

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26 The Pelican Friday, March 30, 2012 had no choice but to put it on the new menu,” says the perpetually smiling Herr. “The nice thing is that we serve breakfast all day long so people can order it whenever they want.” Other tantalizing breakfast creations include the Banana Fosters French Toast, the Irish Benedict with corned beef hash, the blueberry pancakes, the New York Steak & eggs or the classic eggs any style with bacon, ham or sausage. To get the ball rolling at lunchtime, the Jukebox diner serves up a great array of appetizers such as soups, homemade chili, “Paul McCartney” chicken wings, nachos, potato skins and even fried zucchini. There is also a host of healthy salad options such as the sliced steak with blue cheese, red onions and roasted peppers or the incredibly popular Pear Walnut grilled chicken salad with feta cheese and cranberries. Both are delightful with zesty balsamic vinaigrette. Along with quiches and classic cold sandwiches such as club or roast beef, the Jukebox delivers mouthwatering hot favorites like Philly Cheesesteak, barbecue Pork, Spicy Ranch Grilled Chicken and blackened Mahi Mahi. “Personally, my favorite is the Jukebox burger,” says Herr about the juicy signature lb. patty with sauted mushrooms, onions and crumbled bacon smothered in melted cheddar and Swiss cheeses. “But we have a whole bunch of other great burgers are as well.” For a hearty dinner, the melodious diner delivers timeless homestyle favorites such as meatloaf, country fried steak, roast turkey, pasta marinara with grilled shrimp, roasted chicken and even chopped sirloin. And for those with a sweet tooth, the Jukebox prepares decadent desserts such as Sinatra’s New York, New York cheesecake, the Brownie McGee’s waffle with hot fudge and vanilla ice cream or the colossal banana split. “We also make the most authentic milkshakes thick and rich just like in the old days.” says Scollin with complete confidence. Big breakfast dishes start at $6.25, lunch plates at $7 and dinner platters at $9. Daily lunch specials are written on the board including the soup and sandwich or quiche. The Jukebox also offers pleasant wines for $4 a glass or bottled beer for $3. There is also ample free parking. “The quality of the food and the customer service are outstanding. On top of that, the prices are very reasonable,” says local resident and frequent visitor Michael Summers. “The local community has been tremendously supportive,” says Scollin. “We are truly excited about being back in business!”Malcolm McClintock holds an MBA and has lived in Thailand, Spain, France, Mexico, Canada and the US where he has developed a deep appreciation for world gastronomy. JukeboxContinued from page 20 Cream cheese stuffed French Toast with fresh strawberries can usually be found on the specials board.

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The Pelican 27 Friday, March 30, 2012 People are talking about . Publix in Pompano Beach Atlantic Boulevard Publix set to open March 31Pompano Beach – With nearly all the shelves stocked, Publix executives took time on Wednesday to treat Pompano Beach’s movers and shakers to lunch and a tour of their newest store, 2511 E. Atlantic Blvd., before it opens to the public tomorrow at 7 a.m. The new store replaces the former Publix, built in 1967, and eclipses its predecessor’s size by about 20,000 sq. ft. The Atlantic Boulevard Publix is 56,000 sq. ft., has its own liquor store, 254-space multi-level parking garage and a variety of specialty food stations not found in many smaller Publix locations. Bill Fauerbach, vice president of retail operations for the Miami Division, credited the city and the Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce with helping Publix open its newest location a month earlier than expected. Mayor Lamar Fisher credited the Community Redevelopment Agency and city staff with brining the new store online less than a year after the old one closed. “I can’t wait until Saturday,” said Alan price, district manager, who worked as store manager of the previous location from 1989 to 1993. Visit www.Publix.com for more.Publix District Manager Alan Price, Broward County Commissioner Chip LaMarca, Dan Hobby, executive director of the Sample-McDougald House Preservation Society, and Dodie Keith-Lazowick, Sample-McDougald board Publix District Manager Alan Price, Broward County Commissioner Chip LaMarca, Pompano Beach Mayor Lamar Fisher, Publix Vice President of Miami Retail Operations Bill Fauerbach and Publix Media and Community Relations Spokeswoman Kimberly Reynolds. [Photos by Michael d’Oliveira] Colonel Wiley Thompson III, Broward Sheriff’s Of ce, and Major William Knowles, head of the Broward Sheriff’s Of ce in Pompano Beach. City of cials and Publix executives of cially cut the ribbon on Pompano’s newest grocery store. Pompano Chamber President/CEO Ric Greem, Assistant Store Manager Christina Oney and Store Manager Keith Critelli.

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28 The Pelican Friday, March 30, 2012 WORSHIP DIRECTORY: Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad. Rev. Hyvenson Joseph Easter Sunrise services at the beachPompano Beach -An Easter Sunrise Service sponsored by the Pompano Beach Kiwanis Club will be held on Sunday, April 8 at 6:45 a.m. at the Pompano Pier Parking Lot. Seating will be provided and all are welcome to attend. The guest speaker is Pastor Brad Jones of City Church Pompano. Music will be provided by Bob Terch, First Baptist Church of Pompano Beach. School Museum, 232 NE 2 St., Deerfield Beach. The free lecture is sponsored by the Deerfield Beach Historical Society.Clubs & Civic Groups 4-5 – Broward Sierra Club meets at 7:30 p.m at Fern Forest Nature Center, 201 Lyons Rd. S., Coconut Creek. Guest speaker is Michele Williams, director of the Southeast Region of the Florida Public Archaeology Network at Florida Atlantic University. She will speak about the history of the New River in Fort Lauderdale. legalbarb2@yahoo.com or 954-946-7359. 4-9 & 16 – Gold Coast Toastmasters Club meets from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Denny’s, 3151 NW 9 Ave., Fort Lauderdale. The club meets on the second and third Monday of the month. 954895-3555 or 954-782-9951.Festivals & Events3-30 – The St. Coleman Parish’s Men’s Club Fish Fry takes place from 5:30 to 9 p.m. at St. Coleman, 1200 S. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. Cost is $8 for adults and $5 for kids. Visit www. stcmc.org or call 954-9423533. 4-20 – The 28th Annual Pompano Beach Seafood Festival will take place April 20 through 22 at the far east end of Atlantic Boulevard in Pompano Beach. There will be food, entertainment and games. Cost is $12 per adult and children 10 and under are free. The festival starts on Friday at 5 p.m. to 10 p.m., Saturday 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. and Sunday 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Call 954-941-2940.For the Kids3-30 & 31 – At 7 p.m. the Sol Children Theatre, 3333 N. Federal Hwy. in Boca Raton, will be putting on a production of “The Commedia Aladdin: a magic carpet ride to a happy ending!” Both nights are at 7 p.m. “The zany antics of Sol’s popular resident commedia troupe includes bumbling, scheming, incorrigible improvisations and very physical comedy.” Early reservations are recommended. Tickets are $12 and include refreshments. Visit www.solchildren.org or call 561-447-8829. 3-31 – Every Saturday and Sunday Quiet Waters Park, 401 South Powerline Road, Deerfield Beach, hosts Splash Adventure from 9:30 a.m. to 5:20 p.m. Event runs until April 29. 954-357-5100. 3-31 – Eggstravaganza takes place from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. at St. Clement Church, 225 NW 29 Ave., Wilton Manors. Peter Cottontail will be on hand to take pictures SightingsContinued from page 25 See SIGHTINGS on page 33

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The Pelican 29 Friday, March 30, 2012 Advertise with The Pelican 954-783-8700 well. “This is everyone’s decision. It’s everyone’s town,” said Mayor Roseann Minnet. She urged residents to weigh in. The matter will be brought back to the commission April 10. Commissioner Mark Brown asked if the team was open to other slogan ideas. Andrew Hillier, company president, said yes, although the one presented was one of about 10 considered. Brown noted that Pompano Beach is using pelicans with moving wings in their beach redevelopment plan. “Pompano is moving in on the pelicans,” he said. “We have seen the Pompano pelicans, as well,” Hillier said. “Unlike this one, unfortunately it doesn’t have a personality.” Vice Mayor Scot Sasser said the block design had the most versatility. Commissioner Chris Vincent said he could see endless products, such as a dice game with blocks, T-shirts and beach towels. “They could make this town stand out as a beachside community.” “It looks really nice, but it’s important to put the shing pier on there, and some type of sh and some cocktail drinks. Pelicans live on the pier. They don’t live on chairs,” said Spiro Marchelos, a shing pier owner. Patrick Pointu said he would vote for none of what was presented. “Tourists remember the pier, the sun, palm trees, the beach not the chairs,” he said. John Boutin, general manager of the Windjammer Resort, liked the concept and said the colors are great. “The pelican is wonderful as a draw, bringing out imagination in all of us,” he said, but he wouldn’t suggest naming it. “The image is special to each person. Relaxation is a common theme.”ChillContinued from page 2 Images intended to brand the image of Lauderdale-By-The-Sea as a relaxing spot on the ocean where a good book can replace a stuffed briefcase. Discussions will be continued at the April commission meeting. The concepts presented this month were from Andy Royston, creative director of the Tangled Spider Design Group. [Photo courtesy of the Town of Lauderdale-By-The-Sea.]

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30 The Pelican Friday, March 30, 2012 The Pelican 954-783-8700 Classi eds Call 954-545-0013 HELP WANTEDPT OR FT YOUR CHOICE – Be An AVON Independent Sales Representative AND YOUR Own Boss. $10 To Start! Call 954-729-0750. 4-6 BOOKKEEPERWITH EXPERIENCE IN Accounts Payable & Accounts Receivable. Must Possess Excellent Organizational & Computer Skills. PT Position 25 Hrs Per Week. Please E-mail Resume To tdjrpapa@yahoo. com 4-6 LOCAL PEST CONTROL CO Looking For Quality Sales/Service Tech. Must Be Dependable, Team Player, Good Drivers License & People Skills. Will Train Right Person. ALSO Of ce Assistant – Computer – People & Phone Skills Needed. Fax Resume 954418-3982. 4-6 SEEKING EMPLOYMENT CAM LIC PROP MGR – Seeks PT Position. Experience In Hi-Rise Condos And Low Rise. Hours Flexible. Call Bill 954366-4627. 3-30 PIANO PLAYER – Dinner Music, Private Parties. 50 Years Experience. Sinatra Music. Auditions Anytime. Call 954-533-5961 Or charlesanthonyalbert@yahoo. com 3-30 HONEST MALE WITH Reference Seeking Position As A CAREGIVER. Call Chris 954-290-7344. 3-30 I AM SEEKING A Clerical Position – Basic Computer Skills. Bilingual Spanish – English – Part-time. Prefer Pompano Ft Laud Area. 954-942-8111SERVICES DANNY BOY ELECTRIC – Lic & Insured. Lic. #EC13004811. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. 24/Hr Service. 954-290-1443. Beat Any Written Estimate. Sr, Discount. 4-6 DROPS OF SHINE Cleaning Services. Quality – BEST Prices! Houses – Apartments – Move-In / Out. Vacation Homes & More. FREE Estimates! 954729-3713 – 561-948-5575. LOOKING TO STAY With Elderly Individual Or Children Weekends Only. Please Call After 6pm – 754-245-8999. REPAIRS – RESTRETCH & INSTALLATION Of Carpet. Call Mike 954-675-3810. 3-30 CARPET CLEANING – 2 Rooms $59!! ACTUAL PRICE!! No GIMMICKS!! CALL 954-784-8199. 4-20 GINGERS HOUSEKEEPING – 20 YEARS EXP. (Licensed) References Available. Honest & Reliable – Love To Clean Windows! Help Organize No Problem. FREE Estimates! 954-200-4266. 3-30 HANDYMAN – PAINTING – CARPENTRY – Pressure Cleaning. Decks! Everything Around The House. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. Call 561-350-3781. 4-13 MOORE PLUMBING PLUMBING SERVICES – Big Jobs – Small Jobs. We Do It All. Remodeling & Repairs. Lic. & Insured. C.C. Accepted. Call 954-772-4600. 3-30 HONEST HANDYMAN – HOME & BUILDING Maintenance/Improvements. No Job Too Small. Fast Friendly Service. Reasonable Rates. Local Resident/Homeowner. Call Today For Your FREE Upfront Quote. No Deposit Required. 754-366-1915. GOT JUNK? DUMP TRUCK – CLEANUPS Trees/ Landscape, Yard Fill. Paint/ Pressure Wash/ Roofs/Home Repairs – Welding, Etc. Dave 954-818-9538. 4-6 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIESNew GREEN technology. New defroster control saves energy in home refrigerators, commercial chillers. Patented. All optical. Simple mfg. Strategic partners needed..www.NewAvionics.Com. 954-568-1991. C MUSICIANS WANTEDThe American Legion Symphonic Band is now accepting new members for the 2012-2013 season. College age to “seasoned seniors” are welcome. Rehearsals are held on Wed. evenings at American Legion Post 142 in Pompano. Percussionists, euphonium and clarinet players are especially needed. If you enjoy “making music,” call Jim McGonigal, Music Director at 954-647-0700 for more info.DEEP WATER VILLA – DOCKPOMPANO BEACH 2/2 – 2 BLOCKS BEACH 1700 SQ FT. Screened Fla Room. Private Yard. W/D. 4 Park. No Fixed Bridges. Community Pool. Deeded Dock.. 2 Blocks Beach. $265,000. Coldwell Banker – Barbara Call 954629-1324. 4-13 STUDIO’S / EFFICIENCIESPOMPANO BEACH – BOCA RATON – ATLANTIC / FEDERAL Efficiency $175 Weekly. No Security Deposit. Includes Cable, Electric, Internet. FREE Washer / Dryer. No Drug Record – No Evictions. 954-709-0694. CO-OP SALESPOMPANO BEACH 1/1 On Water, Dockage Available At Your Door. $59,500. Coldwell Banker – Barbara – 954-6291324. REAL ESTATE WANTEDI BUY HOUSES!! CASH!! AS IS! QUICK CLOSE! ANY AREA – ANY CONDITION! NO EQUITY OK. CALL NOW 954-914-2355. CONDOS FOR SALEFREE BOAT DOCK!! TWO PETS, Two Cars, Two Tennis Courts, Gorgeous Renovated Townhouse, 2 Bedroom, 2.5 Baths, Great Water Views, Resort Style Garden Condo, Just One High, Federal Highway Fixed Bridge To Lake Santa Barbara. $299,000. See Tour: www.circlepix.com/ XGWJKE Nancy And Cindy Pedicord, Realtors: Balistreri Realty – 954-868-6517. CONDO FOR SALE OR RENT – Over 55 Community. Unfurnished Leisureville 2 / bd., 1 / Ba. Clubhouse, Golf, Swimming And More. Rent $700 / Mo. Purchase For $47,000 OBO. Call 954-7836403. 3-30 DEERFIELD BEACH 2/2 Completely Redone. Granite Kitchen, New Cabinets. S.S. Appliances. 20” Porcelain Tile Floors. Travistine Stone Baths. Freshly Painted. 1st Floor. Less Than A Mile To Beach. $84,900. Call 631-873-8715. 4-6 LAUDERDALE BY THE SEA – Furnished 1/1.5 Condo $115,000. Heated Pool. Ocean Access. On Canal. 1481 S Ocean Blvd. Apt 228. Call 586-549-5223. CONDOS FOR RENTDEERFIELD BEACH 2/2 CONDO – Corner Unit, Pool. $800 $825. Good Credit Required. No Pets Or Realtors. 631-885-3342. LAUDERDALE BY THE SEA – Near Sea Watch Restaurant – 1 Bedroom – Den – 2 Bath. CHA, Pool, W / D, End Unit. $1100 Per Month Yearly. 1st / Last / Security. No Pets / N / S. 954-942-5642. 4-6 LAUDERDALE BY THE SEA – Furnished 2/2 – Pool – Near Beach – Shops & Restaurants. Enjoy Beach Living. $875 Month From April To October. Owner 413-244-2807. 3-30 POMPANO FURNISHED BEACH CONDO – 2/2 – Lovely Views Of Ocean – Pool & Lighthouse From Balcony & All Rooms – Modern! $1,295 Month Yearly. Available JUNE! 954-785-7571 Or 954649-4373. POMPANO BEACH – 55+ Community. Renovated 2/1 With Sunroom – Ground Floor / On Golf Course. Beautifully Furnished – 1 Year +. Excellent References. $900 Month. 917544-0771. POMPANO BEACH LARGE 2 / 2 With Den. All Renovated! Pool – Mile From Beach! W /D – Small Pet OK! $1,300 Month Yearly. Available May 1st. 561-703-6545 Or 754-2643289. 4-13 OCEANFRONTBYTHE – MONTH – Pompano Beach Club – Newly Renovated Furnished 1 / 1 – Unobstructed Southern View Of Ocean & Intracoastal – 24th Floor – Clubhouse – Bar – Restaurant – 2 Pools. $1,100 Per Month. Audrey 570-246-9240 Cell Or E-mail Audrey@chantre. com APTS FOR RENTDEERFIELD/POMPANO BEACH 1 BR & 2 BR APTS FOR RENT. Remodeled, Paint, Tile, Etc. W & D On Site. Pool. Pet Friendly. Call George 954-809-5030. POMPANO 1/1 & 2/1 – E OF FEDERAL – Tiled. 10’ Overhang. Walk To Everything. Park At Your Door. 954-2546325. POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 BEDROOMS – Fully Furnished…Ef ciency With Kitchen, Fully Furnished. Cable, Internet, Pool, Laundry. 500’ To The Beach. Weekly – Monthly – Yearly. 954-2948483 Or 248-736-1533, 4-13 LARGE OPEN – BRIGHT – FIRST FLOOR CORNER – SMALL YARD – Small Pet OK – All Tile Floors – Just Painted – Off A1A – North Of Atlantic Pool – Coin Laundry – WIFI – Cable – Water Included $1075 Month --Large Ef ciency Apartment Available Same Bldg. Includes All Plus Elec. – Full Kitchen – Corner Unit. $850 – Lease Required – April 1 Special One Week FREE!! Owner Agent 954-608-7368. 412 Sunset Drive Pompano. 4-6 POMPANO BEACH 2 / 1 – Near Federal – Shops & School. No Pets. Also 1 / 1 On Beach. Please Call 954-7814072. 3-30 The Pelican 954-783-8700

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The Pelican 31 Friday, March 30, 2012 Classi eds Call 954-545-0013 Get to know your local Merchants The Pelican Classi eds can save you time and money! 954-783-8700! POMPANO BEACH 1/1 SW. C/A $750 – 2/1 $925 – 3/2 $1025 NE 2/1 $950 – Townhouse 2/1.5 $1095. ALL FREE WATER. Rent + $70 Application Moves – U – In. 954-781-6299. 4-6 POMPANO BEACH 1/1 FURNISHED – Includes TV $850 Month Yearly – 1st / Last / Security. EFFICIENCY $750 Month Yearly Includes Direct TV + $50 Electric Allowance. 954-785-5837. POMPANO MCNAB RD & NE 18 AVENUE – 1 & 2 Bedrooms Furnished/ Unfurnished. $695 $950 And Up. Pool, Tile Floors. Central A/C. 954-6102327. 3-30 POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 Bedroom From $495. Easy Movein. 1/2 OFF DEPOSIT. Remodeled. Great Location. 954-783-1088 For More Info. 5-11 LUXURY BEACH PADS FOR RENT! Pompano Grand Opening: FREE 32” Flat Screen HDTV! Newly Renovated in 2012 One – Bedrooms & Studio Apts., 75 Yards From Private Beach Access, Eastern Exposure. New Kitchens & Baths, Granite Counter Tops, Central Air, Pool, Laundry, Dedicated Parking, Near Pier & Downtown. All Bills Paid! Includes Water, Electric, Premium Cable TV And WIFI. Furnished Or Unfurnished. Short Or Long Stays. No Utility Deposits. Small Pets Welcome. Only 9x, 8x, 7 Left! Pax Properties – 888-729-4948 Or 954-603-8857. Photos At www.beachpads.net 3-30 COMMERCIAL FOR RENT-SALEPOMPANO COMMERCIAL OFFICE Spaces Available. Ranging From As Low As $500 To $700 Depending On Square Footage. Please Call Darci At 954783-3723. 4-20 DEERFIELD BEACH – Retail Of ce Warehouse – 700 Sq Ft With Loft. A/C, Bathroom. $575 Per Month. Call For More Info 561-654-1331 Or 561-9985681. 4-6FURNITUREBEDSETS – King $180 – Queen $130 – Full $110 – Twin $90. 5 Pc. Bedroom Set $399. Frames $39. 954-465-6498. 4-6 DOCK FOR RENT 60 FT DOCK – THE COVE MARINA – 50 AMP / H20 Included. $1,200 Month – Price Negotiable Depending On Boat Size. Restaurant & Fuel On Premises. 954-9140053. a.j.barsotti@comcast. net 3-30 PIANO LESSONSPIANO LESSONS AT YOUR HOME – Classical – Pop – Jazz. 30 Years In Northeast Area. Call 954-938-3194. 4-6 The Pelican 954-783-8700 The Pelican 954-783-8700

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32 The Pelican Friday, March 30, 2012 Along with ghting his own disease, Bill also used some of his precious time to help others ght their battle. In 2008, he was a part of Wilton Manors’ rst Relay For Life event. “He was always involved with something like that. He always wore his Livestrong [bracelet],” said Jim. This year, the city’s Relay For Life takes place June 1 and 2 at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive. The event, starting at 6 p.m. on the rst day, is an 18hour fundraising event where members of participating teams take turns walking nonstop around a designated track for the duration of the event; money raised is donated to the American Cancer Society. Alexandra Rousseau, community representative for the American Cancer Society, said this year’s goal is to raise $35,000. “We’re trying to grow the number of teams as well,” she said. Along with a Survivors Lap, which celebrates individuals who are in remission RelayContinued from page 3or have beaten their cancer, Relay For Life also includes the Luminaria ceremony, which honors and remembers those who are ghting cancer and those who have died. To donate or start a team, visit www.relayforlife.org/ wmop or call 954-564-0880.

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The Pelican 33 Friday, March 30, 2012 Capt. RJ Boyle is an experienced angler in South Florida. His studio is located in Lighthouse Point. Call 954-420-5001. By RJ BoyleRJ BOYLE STUDIOSI went to Texas last week to give a seminar on swordfishing. We had put a seminar on last year at the same time and it was a huge success, so we decided to give it another shot. This year’s event, which benefited Everyday Heroes, was even better but it’s not the seminar that I want to tell you RJ Boyle’s heaping haul of sword sh off the Texas coastabout – it’s the fishing. After the seminar, we hopped on my buddy’s boat, the Booby Trap and headed offshore 90 miles in pursuit of a broadbill swordfish. What a trip it was. In a day and a half of fishing we caught 21 swordfish, five of which were over 200 lbs. The first day we caught 11 swords in the daytime. To my knowledge, that is by far the record for the most swords ever caught during daylight hours in one day. The second half-day we caught seven swords by noon. We added three swords at night, bringing the tally to 21 swords in a day-and-a-half. Of the 18 swordfish caught during the day, 14 were caught on a hand crank reel; an 80w Shimano. We trolled around an LP1200 electric reel to find the fish. Once we found it we were able to drop the hand crank reel. We hooked two double headers which ended up being the four biggest fish of the trip. I fought a swordfish on the Tiagra 80w for almost two hours; that would have been the Texas state record but I got tired of holding the rod while we were catching the other fish. So I sat the rod in the gunwale for five minutes which is not legal by IGFA rules, so we disqualified the fish. The fish we caught was just under 400 lbs. and we let it go. All said it was the trip of a lifetime and I thank God for letting me experience all of the things he has given me. I am truly lucky. Stay tight RJ Boyle and crew after their haul of 21 sword sh. [Photo courtesy of RJ Boyle] and there will be an egg hunt, bounce house and concession stand. This event will be for children newborn through 5th Grade. 954-390-2130. 3-31 Spring Fling takes place from 9:30 a.m. to noon at 1701 NE 8 St., Pompano Beach, and features a visit by the Easter Bunny, fun activities with My Favorite DJ, Bella the Clown, a bounce house and more. Cost is $2 per child or two canned goods per child. All canned food collected is to be donated to located food banks. 954-7864111. 4-7 – Pony Rides from 9 to 11:30 a.m. at Sand & Spurs Equestrian Park, 1600 NE 5 Ave., Pompano Beach. Cost is $3 per ride. 954-786-4507. 4-15 – Junior Bass Tournament, Quiet Waters Park, 401 South Powerline Road, Deerfield Beach. The tournament beings at sunrise and goes until 1 p.m. Ages 12 to 17. 954-357-8816.Green Markets3-31 – Pompano Beach Green Market at the corner of West Atlantic Boulevard and North Dixie Highway from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Fresh vegetables, crafts, plants, food SightingsContinued from page 28 See SIGHTINGS on page 34

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34 The Pelican Friday, March 30, 2012 It was a family affair at Joseph’s Bakery on March 19, St. Joseph’s Day. Long lines of people lined up for the traditional Zeppole. The Saint’s Day recalls a famine in Sicily. Italians prayed to St. Joseph, foster father to the baby Jesus, to end the hunger. The famine ended and since then special foods are prepared with the Zeppole pastry as the dessert to recall the miracle. Pictured are Joseph Teresi Jr., Mariano Teresi, Father Michael Lynch, St. Ambrose Catholic Church and Joseph Teresi, III of Joseph’s Bakery, Joseph’s Bakery is located in Deer eld Beach at 788 South Federal Highway. Call 954-571-7747. St. Joseph remembered in Deer eld Beach SightingsContinued from page 28and music are available. 954292-8040. 3-31 – Wilton Manors Green Market at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. fresh produce, baked goods and more. 954-5315363. Health & Safety4-14 – Free Car Seat Safety Check from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. at Pompano Beach Fire-Rescue Station 24, 2001 NE 10 St. Technicians will check and see if car seats are properly installed. Appointment required. 954786-4510.Outdoor Events4-12 – Florida Trail Association members Mike and Lynn Thompson, will present an account of their hike in New Zealand at 7:30 p.m. at Fern Forest Nature Center, 201 Lyons Road S., Coconut Creek. 954-6094727.Recreation & Leisure4-2 – Ping Pong Night from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Cost is $1. All ages can participate. 954-390-2130.Service & Charity3-31 – The 17th Annual WIN Charity Golf Tournament will be held at 1 p.m. at Boca Greens Country Club, 19642 Trophy Drive, Boca Raton. The event benefits WIN, Women In Network, an organization that seeks to promote the success and advancement of women professionally and politically. Visit www.womeninnetwork. com or call 954-463-9005, ext: 641.SundaysPancake Breakfast – Every third Sunday of the month, the St. Elizabeth’s of Hungry Parish hosts a pancake breakfast at 3331 NE 10 Terrace, Pompano Beach. The breakfast is from 7:30 a.m. to noon and benefits the Parish and cafeteria maintenance. 954-263 8415.Mondays3-26 – Ping Pong Nights – Every Monday from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Ping Pong Nights is held at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. The cost is $1. All ages can participate. 954-390-2130.

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The Pelican 35 Friday, March 30, 2012 “Small Miracles” concertFort Lauderdale Florida’s Singing Sons Boychoir, under the direction of Craig Denison, presents Performing Small Miracles on Sunday, April 15 at 4 p.m. at The Sanctuary, Second Presbyterian Church,; 1400 N. Federal Hwy in Fort Lauderdale. Tickets $10 for adults and $6 for children under 12. For tickets or more information, please call 954-563-2697 or visit www.singingsons.org.

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36 The Pelican Friday, March 30, 2012