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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00090900/00292
 Material Information
Title: Pompano Pelican
Uniform Title: Pompano Pelican
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: Pompano Pelican
Place of Publication: Pompano Beach
Publication Date: 03-23-2012
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Pompano Beach
Coordinates: 26.234722 x -80.125556 ( Place of Publication )
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00090900:00292

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Friday, March 23, 2012 Vol. XX, Issue 12 Call 954-783-8700 to Advertise Email: siren2415@gmail.com Pompano Beach Deer eld Beach Lighthouse Point Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Wilton Manors Oakland Park Hillsboro Beach The Galt Palm Aire The Pelican Pelican By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFLauderdale-By-The-Sea A federal regulation requiring every lodging establishment in the United States with a swimming pool or spa to be tted with xed lifts for the handicapped is ludicrous and a ne example of wasteful spending, says one local hotelier. John Boutin, general manager of the Windjammer Resort & Beach Club, used terms like egregious, onerous and dangerous as he spoke to commissioners this week. He explained that Title III of the Americans with Disabilities Act, or ADA, required that by March 15 every lodging establishment in the United States, no matter how small, must install a permanently af xed and independently operated pool lift at each of its pools, kiddie pools, spas or hot tubs. If this alone were not ridiculous enough, the language reads that the lifts must be immediately accessible during pool operation hours, so they cannot be deactivated or covered during hours the pool is open, Boutin said. This means unsupervised operation by anyone, including children, thereby creating a different kind of hazard. We dont even allow plastic oats in the pool because children might hurt themselves or bother others, Boutin said. Can you imagine what they can do with a mechanical, 300-pound remote-Town supports hoteliers with complaints about pool lifts Deadline for ADA accessibility to public pools already passed See POOL ACCESS on page 15By Judy VikPELICAN STAFF Pompano Beach The Pompano Beach Boulevard streetscape project, intended to revitalize and create an oceanfront pedestrian promenade, is moving along on schedule. Things are looking great out there. Weve moved to the east side, and were thrilled at the quality of work the contractor is doing, Paul Kissinger, landscape architect and urban designer on the project, said at this weeks CRA board meeting. But, Kissinger added, sometimes we open a can of worms when we do construction on an existing place. We have done our best to respond to the public and to various advisory boards, but this micromanagement has been expensive and its taking a lot of time. The results are something we can all be proud of, but its expensive. Kissinger then presented the board with a list of 14 recommended additions to the project. He estimated total costs, if all are approved, at $470,000. Included in the costs were decorative walks at Northeast First and Second Streets for pedestrians to reach the beach; laying synthetic turf at the plaza, planned for the Atlantic terminus and Oceanfront Boulevard; additional grills and picnic tables on the sand at the beach; upgrades to present pavilions; new roofs for the bathrooms and ocean rescue buildings and resurfacing of the sidewalks. But other costs within the area came up for questions. Stronger dunes, pelicans in art, wider sidewalks public plaza are all part of the new look at the beach See BEACH on page 12 By Michael dOliveira PELICAN STAFFWilton Manors Its hard to nd a person in this town who doesnt agree that pill mills are an unwanted nuisance that brings nothing but trouble. South Florida has gained the unwanted reputation of housing pill mills where prescriptions and purchases are easy to come by. So easy that South Florida pill mill parking lots are often packed with vehicles bearing tags from other states. Pill mills are often set up under the guise of pain clinics where physicians prescribe and dispense drugs on the same premises. Caught with lax laws regarding these clinics, the city threw its rst punch last April by placing a 270-day moratorium on issuing licenses to new pain clinics. This January, the commission put See PILL MILL LAW on page 4 The Pompano Beach Seafood Festival returns next month with vendors offering tempting spreads of seafood and other entrees. This year, the festival moves north on the beach. See story on page 22. City to take second look at pill mill law

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2 The PelicanFriday, March 23, 2012 SightingsA community calendar of East Broward County. Please email information to siren2415@gmail.com A Canadian tourist drowned Tuesday morning after going on a diving trip off the coast of Pompano Beach. The Broward Sheriffs Of ce Communications Center received the call at around 11 a.m. advising that the boat Aqua View would be arriving on shore with a deceased male onboard. After going for a dive, Bruce Magill, 63, had resurfaced and began swimming toward the boat along with other divers, but he never made it to the vessel. The boat captain and passengers searched the surface of the water and nally located his oating body after about 15 minutes. Upon locating him, he was pulled onto the boat. A physician onboard immediately began cardiopulmonary resuscitation, but Magill was not responsive. Pompano Beach Fire Rescue stood by to transport the patient, but he was pronounced dead on scene. BSO Crime Scene and homicide detectives are investigating, though no foul play is suspected. The medical examiners of ce will perform an autopsy to determine the cause of death. Tourist drowns during dive off Pompano BeachBy Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach Fire has temporarily closed Matt Moores restaurant, Checkers Old Munchen. But thanks to his brother, Bill Sand, Moore and his staff will be serving Fire cant stop Pompano Beach restaurant owner from serving German cuisine, chef will move south soon German spirits and cuisine only two weeks after the ames and smoke did their damage. On March 26 starting at 5 p.m., the menu at Diner by the Sea, 215 E. Commercial Blvd. See FIRE on page 11 Art, Music, Film & Theatre 3-25 The Seven Last Words of Christ, choral version in English, accompanied by a string quartet, Hayden, Op. 51, performed at 6 p.m. at Trinity Cathedral, 464 NE 16 St., Miami. Tickets are $20. 305789-0074. 3-28 The Crests Tommy Maras performs at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach, from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Cost is $14 per ticket. Visit www. thecrests.com or call 954-78641111. 3-30 & 31 At 7 p.m. the Sol Children Theatre, 3333 N. Federal Hwy. in Boca See SIGHTNGS on page 9Checkers Old Munchen employee Kelly Meyers cleans off a beer stein behind the German restaurant. On March 12, an accidental electrical re caused severe damage to the establishment. Owner Matt Moore says he should reopen in three months or less. [Photo by Michael dOliveira]

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The Pelican 3 Friday, March 23, 2012 Pompano Beach pension obligations dip slightly for re, policeBy Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach We call it the lost decade, says Wilton Manors Police Chief Paul OConnell, who serves as chair of the Pompano Beach Fire and Police Pension Board of Trustees. He refers to three events that led to the nations slip into the recent recession: the tech bubble, the Sept. 11 attack on the country and the most recent Wall Street crash, says OConnell, of 2008. And that decade has had a 10-year domino effect in nearly all cities in this country when it comes to funding public pensions. But there may be some hope. Prior to 2001, investment returns were in the double digits, OConnell explains. That accounts for the citys re pension bill at being less than $1 million in 2001 This year, the citys contribution to the re pension is $4,723,578, a gure that represents a decrease from last year of $65,830. In addition the state contributes $732,754. OConnell says things are on a downturn. A large amount of funding for re and police pensions is generated by investments, Dennis Beach, Pompano Beach City Manager said. Earnings keep our payments low. But the lost decade factor, a 10-year period of low or no earnings, has caused government pension contributions to spike. Its an issue that cities all across the country are taking very hard looks at during these times, Beach added. Those cities are also looking at decreased values on properties, and high foreclosure rates that have cut government revenues, making it tough for cities to put a budget in place, maintain services and keep taxes low. The property tax in Pompano Beach is 4.9 mills. Beach estimates that one-half to three-quarters of one mill produces the citys contribution to re pensions.Police pensionsEven though Pompano Beach contracts police services from Broward Sheriffs Of ce, or BSO, the city is still required to contribute to its former police employees who have not yet retired. Of cers who opted to join the BSO pension are not included in this number. The city disbanded its police department in 1999 in favor of contracting with BSO. At that time there were 200 active police of cers who had reached or were close to reaching eligibility for full pensions. Today, 45 of cers remain in the citys police pension plan. While the $4.05 million pension contribution for the former Pompano Beach of cers is written by BSO, that amount was included in the citys $35.7 million annual contract for police services. We are all hurting from the lost decade, said OConnell. Theres no escape from that.

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4 The PelicanFriday, March 23, 2012 a pain clinic law in place to target smaller, privately owned clinics to make sure that pain clinics and small pharmacies operate as such and not as pill mills. Under the law, pain management clinics and pharmacies are prohibited from buying, storing and dispensing more than 5,000 combined unit doses of Schedule II substances per month. Those substances include codeine, morphine, oxycodone, hydrocodone and opium. These businesses are not allowed to have owners, of cers or pharmacists with drug-related criminal convictions within the last 10 years. Additionally, they must accept all forms of payment for non-Schedule II drugs and cannot accept cash as payment for Schedule II drugs or goods associated with Schedule II. They must also have a State of Florida licensed pharmacist physically on premises during all hours of operation, require patients to present a state or federal photo ID, dispense drugs only between 9 a.m. and 7 p.m., prescribe no more than a 72hour supply of Schedule II drugs and keep a record of every customer for up to two years and a monthly summary report of all Schedule II substances dispensed by each pharmacy or clinic must be given to police. Certain facilities that are publically traded, part of tax exempt organizations, have physicians who perform surgical procedures or are af liated with an accredited medical school are exempt from the law. With the new law in place, all clinics must have a license to operate, including those clinics that operated prior to the law. And not everyone is pleased. Fort Lauderdale attorney George Castrataro says the new law goes too far. Castrataro, who categorized the law as arbitrary and capricious, represents Quick Script, 2412 Wilton Drive and The Medicine Shoppe, 1905 N. Andrews Ave. He says the law unfairly targets smaller pharmacy operations. Sam Fawaz, owner of Quick Script, says the restrictions will hurt his business and his customers. I would have to tell some of them goodbye. Thats putting me in a very unfair position. One provision of the law Fawaz disagrees with prohibits him from mailing prescriptions outside city limits. He says some of his patients are outside the city, bed-ridden and have trouble getting to his store on a regular basis. In a Feb. 10 letter to the city, Castrataro wrote that his clients wanted to avoid litigation but that he had planned to seek emergency injunctive relief if no resolution could be found by Feb. 28. Since then, he said hes decided not to le because hes satis ed city of cials are trying to respond to the concerns of his clients. My initial reaction was that it wasnt intentional, said Castrataro. The commissioners in the past have been very reasonable. City Manager Joseph Gallegos said the law is being reviewed and commissioners will probably address the issue again at their March 27 meeting. First license granted under new lawThe rst to apply and receive a license from the city was Fort Lauderdale Pain and Injury, 1907 N. Andrews Ave., which opened seven years ago. This month the commission, with the See PILL MILLS LAW on page 5 Pill mill lawContinued from page 1

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The Pelican 5 Friday, March 23, 2012 Pelican Advertising 954-783-8700 exception of Vice Mayor Tom Green, agreed to grant the license. Green said he didnt think the business was properly located. It might be zoned commercial but there are residents living on both sides. Residents at the Woods Condominium, just south of Fort Lauderdale Pain and Injury, said a few months ago they had problems with the clinics patients using their parking spaces, trashing their property and defecating on it. This is where we live. Not in our neighborhood. We dont want it, said resident Pam Molan. Dr. Mark Richards, owner of Fort Lauderdale Pain and Injury, classi ed as a pain clinic, said, and Molan agreed, that he has since eliminated the problem. Richards blamed the problems on the former physician he had employed who had a following of patients. That problem is long taken care of, he said. Mayor Gary Resnick said that the willingness of Richards to apply for a license shows he is a legitimate business because pill mills just operate until they get caught and then they move on. Police Chief Paul OConnell said the clinic is not even on the radar of suspected pill mill operations. That tells me the corrective action they took is working, he said. Richards, a licensed chiropractor, said a medical doctor will be writing prescriptions on premise. He said his business sees an average of 12 to 15 patients a day and is open from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday to Friday. Commissioner Julie Carson urged residents to call the police if they see any violations. Newton said he was worried about the possibility someone might falsely complain just to shut down the clinic. OConnell said it would take more than just one complaint and that police would investigate before taking action. If any clinic or pharmacy is shut down a public hearing is required within 30 days to determine whether or not it can re-open. Newton said that days is a long time to be shut down if its not your fault. OConnell responded that the law acts as a great motivator for businesses to make sure they are in compliance. I wouldnt want to do anything to jeopardize my license or practice, said Richards. Newton originally wanted to impose conditions but said later the new law should be enough. We just hope you do what you say, he said to Richards. In 2009, Wilton Manors close neighbor, Oakland Park, unanimously passed its own moratorium on new pain clinics. Prior to that, Oakland Park had 23 pain management clinics; up from 18 just a few months earlier. Although Wilton Manors of cials say only one clinic in the city was causing problems, they didnt want to share Oakland Parks reputation.Pill mill lawContinued from page 4

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6 The PelicanFriday, March 23, 2012 Deer eld Beach, Pompano Beach, Lighthouse Point, LauderdaleBy-The-Sea, Wilton Manors and Oakland ParkWilton Manors Oakland Park Hillsboro Beach The Pompano Pelican is published weekly on FridaysStreet Address: 1500-A E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, FL 33060 Telephone: 954-783-8700 Fax: 954-783-0093Letters to the Editor are encouraged and accepted for print if signed, although a writers name will be withheld on request; letters must also include a daytime telephone number. Advertising rates are available upon request. Subscription rate is $31.80 including tax for one years delivery in Greater Pompano Beach; $95.40/per year including tax for others in the United States; call 954-783-8700 for rates abroad. The Pelican is a nonpartisan newspaper and reserves the right to decline advertising. Copyright 2011. Reproduction of this publication in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission of the publisher. The Pelican is a member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, Deer eld Beach Chamber and the LBTS Chamber. The Pelican is a state certi ed woman-owned minority business. The Pelican is delivered to businesses, libraries, schools, of ces, hospitals, news racks and single family homes. All advertising and copy is published at the sole discretion of the publisher. We welcome your critiques and ideas concerning this publication. Anne Siren, publisherExecutive Assistant: Mary Hudson Graphics: Rachel Ramirez Windsheimer Bookkeeper: John White Classi eds: Fran Shelby Contributing Writers: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Judy Wilson, Malcolm McClintock, Judy Vik, Mike dOliveira Account Executives: Paul Shroads, Carolyn Mann, Bill Heaton, Bill Fox Special Of ce Assistant: Cathy Siren ESTABLISHED 1993 Volume XX, Issue 12 Founding Editor and PublisherAnne Hanby Siren Letters & Opinions LettersTo the editor, This letter is composed in response to The Pelicans article addressing the lack of viable solutions for the erosion of Hillsboros North Beach published on Saturday, March 10. With over 500 miles of erosive beaches in the state of Florida at risk of disappearing over the next 10 years, the challenges faced by the Hillsboro community are shared by many other beach communities in Florida. The frustrations are compounded by the fact that the available solutions proposed for coastal erosion seem to be either cost intensive, labor intensive, unsightly or all of the above making almost any choice unappealing. Furthermore, as pointed out in the Hillsboro Beach study conducted by CSI, the intensive process of dealing with any coastal restoration project is exacerbated by the timely and painstakingly high costs of applying for and acquiring city, county, state and federal permitting and approval. Currently, the foundation of coastal theory is formulated from a physical and mechanical perspective; speci cally, the manner in which the cumulative forces of wind, waves, tides and currents govern the movement of sand. Accordingly, the technologies derived from a physical and mechanical study of coastal issues are themselves of a physico-mechanical nature. Jetties and groins, rock walls and revetments commonly re ecting wave energy and redirect currents but ultimately only reformat the look of a shoreline. For all the time and money these structures do not really address coastal erosion and in some areas they enhance it. Paradigm shift may help address chronic issues of beach erosion See PARADIGM on page 7 See LaMarca on page 14 To the editor In these economic times, most cities are trying to save money. Not so with the City of Deer eld Beach. When the city was presented with the prospect of moving the March 2013 city election to coincide with the presidential election in November 2012, the idea was not even favored by a vote of the commission. Cost of the March 2013 election would be $67,000 while a November 6, 2012 would cost less than $20,000. The response from one of the commissioners was a resounding No. Since the proposal was being put forth by the co-founders of the Rescind Unfair Taxes, it had to be a political ploy. What the commission failed to recognize was the suggestion was meant to move only this one election from March to November. This is the rst opportunity the city has had to hold an election that would result in a greater turn-out and save money. The Deer eld Beach charter gives the commission the right to make the change by ordinance. Those newly elected in November would not be installed until March. This is not an unusual concept since the president is elected in November and does not take the oath of of ce until January. The argument put forth claims that an incumbent loser could perpetrate a great deal of mischief as a lame duck. That says a lot about the opinion of the commissioners of the people with whom they serve. What logical reason can there be not to change the date? Is it an attempt to suppress voter turn-out, or are the mayor and the commissioners from Districts 3 and 4 fearful of running on their present records? The choice belongs to the voters. Jean M. RobbThere is still much more for me to do here at homeBy Chip LaMarca BROWARD COUNTY COMMISSIONER As I am sure you have read, for the past few weeks, I have been re ecting on the opportunity to run for Congressional District 22, an opportunity which I did not create, but felt I needed to explore. I am sure you have read the same stories in the newspapers and on the blogs, as well as heard the same comments I have. Now you will hear from me in my own words. As your elected representative on the Broward County Commission, I owe all of those I represent an explanation as to why I considered this opportunity. I had a very clear mission and that was to test the waters for this opportunity. I formed an exploratory committee to ask the people about the viability of my candidacy. I spoke with people whom I respect for good, honest advice; people like Congressman E. Clay Shaw, my Congressman for 26 years. He was very supportive of me and I believe that his support would have evened out the playing eld from any endorsements that had been rolled out in an effort to keep me out of the race. I was encouraged to do this, by many people whom I consider to be looking out for my best interests, which includes my family, friends, supporters, Republicans and Democrats alike. The most encouraging suggestions came from community and business leaders in both Broward and Palm Beach counties. In the end, it was clear that the best thing to do for my political aspirations would be to run for Congress. According to the research, it was certainly within reach. However, the right thing to do for the people of Broward County, for the people of District 4, for everyone who has told me that I am asking the right questions and trying to bring common sense to a process that desperately needs it, is to stay the course at the Broward County Commission. There is still much more for me to do here at home. We have a critical beach renourishment project that will play a part in the success of the travel and tourism industry of Broward County. We have critical infrastructure projects at Port Everglades that will determine where we will fall in the strategic ports initiative both with Tallahassee and Washington, DC.LaMarca City made wrong decision in election date choice, says reader Cover the playground at the beach, this is South Florida!By Anne SirenPUBLISHERHats off to the CRAs fantastic plans for beach renovation: the plaza, the 17-foot wide sidewalks and the dune restoration. But whats the deal about building a wonderful playground on the beach for young children when its not going to be fully shaded? If the city wants to have families come in droves to enjoy the sub-tropical clime, the ocean and the great seafood, then its important that their stay is a safe one. Under the shaded playground, there could be some signage to warn parents about the importance of sunscreen, hats and constant hydration. Tourists are true guests of the city, and failure to warn them of sun and heat hazards would be like failing to tell a house guests theres an angry pit bull in the garage. Theres plenty to do in this city and the surrounding areas, without a tour of a local emergency room where children are seen far too often in the summer. We hope the CRA board thinks a bit more about the critical importance of shade for all people. Palm trees fail in that department, so the tree shade wont work. The CRA should take the sun hazards of this city seriously. Everyone wants the tourists to come back.

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The Pelican 7 Friday, March 23, 2012 On a similar note, beach nourishment projects do not really address coastal erosion either. These recurring undertakings allow that erosion occurs at a given rate and applies sand taken from other environments accordingly. Although these approaches have contributed to an impressive understanding of the physical forces and interactions that form coastal environments, no viable or sustainable or even affordable solutions have been developed. With regard to saltwater intrusion and beach erosion, the fact that coastal issues persist is an indication that coastal engineering is in need of a paradigm shift and there is at least one company that is making an effort to revise their strategy. The coastal solutions rm GreenBeach LLC has emerged with a promising methodology that builds on the physico-mechanical approach to coastal degradation with a fresh perspective that factors in beach biology and chemistry in order to develop strategies that speci cally address beach erosion and coastal degradation. Recent pilots have shown signi cant and repeatable increases in sand accumulation and decreases in saltwater intrusion. Their method of coastal recovery does not rely on the addition of sand or the installation of hard structures but rather the removal of micro-pollutants and a restorative effort to balance pH and salinity within the beach. The technology developed by GreenBeach thus far is designed entirely of naturally available materials including salts, minerals, carbon-based compounds that mimic the nutrient sources available to a beach as well as a variety of common plant seed-derived complexes that stimulate germination. The material complements the natural nutrients available in the beach but also has the unique ability to extract and encapsulate synthetic and crude oils and other assorted micro-pollutants from soil and sand samples. The treatment process is remarkably simple and can be applied to one mile of beach in as little as one day. The GreenBeach digest is applied to the beach along a trench that just reaches groundwater. The trench is then covered and the material is naturally distributed by wave and tidal energy. The beach is immediately safe for use after an application. So as not to shock the system with the addition of even a mild digest the GreenBeach treatment allows for three additions to a beach over a 2 to 5 month period and the treatment plan is exible to accommodate community beach events. Because of the lengthy and costly permitting process GreenBeach has currently extending an offer to cover the expense of a pilot treatment if a community is interested in pursuing a pilot project. The staff can be reached at the address below. info@greenbeachllc.com Peter Rehage ParadigmContinued from page 6

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8 The PelicanFriday, March 23, 2012 Business matters The Pelican takes a look at local business owners. Call The Pelican to nd out how you can tell your story here because business matters. 954-783-8700. By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFMinuteman Press, located at 51 N. Federal Hwy. in Pompano Beach got a new owner in July of 2010 when Gloria Jacaruso took over. With an easy smile, she says, I have had a career in marketing and journalism followed by a hiatus to raise our two children. When they became teenagers, I decided to reenter the business world. I felt this would be a good business, and I was right. In the past year and a half, and in a bad economy, we have managed to triple the business. Shes quick to credit Vikki Edwards for helping her attain this success. She says, Vikki is my graphic, design and customer service special person. Shes been here for 15 years and knows the entire business. The customers love her and so do we. Shes so valuable to our business. We think of ourselves as an extension of each clients business, most of whom are small and appreciative of our guidance in marketing, graphics and writing skills. Minuteman Press may well be the staff every small business needs but cant yet afford. The owner feels that the companys personalized service and knowledge gives them the edge over the big chains and allows them to compete without a problem. Every job is different, Vikki chimes in. A new client may ask us to design and produce an effective Since 1978 Minuteman Press has offered small businesses professional, personalized servicebusiness card. Gloria adds. If they are a start up business, they may need forms, letterheads, envelopes and often a brochure to help them tell their story to the public. We can and do all of these things quickly and professionally for competitive prices. We do postcard mailings, numbered tickets for a raf e, programs and materials for non-pro ts. For example, we just completed a very attractive business directory for the Lighthouse Point Chamber of Commerce. Rene Mahfood, Light Magazine, says she uses Minuteman Press at least twice a week for promotional sheets, small runs of brochures, business cards, posters and more. I nd them to be extremely professional, and cost effective with a quick turn around. Phil Kassees of Heavenly Pizza See MINUTEMAN on page 16 Gloria Jacaruso, owner of Minuteman Press, checks out a graphic designed by Vikki Edwards [seated], an invaluable 15-year employee of the company. Railway Flea Market and Swap MeetThe South Florida Railway Museum of Deer eld Beach, a nonpro t organization, will host its Model Railroad Flea Market and Swap Meet on March 31 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Westside Park Recreation Center, 445 SW 2 St. in Deer eld Beach. For more, call 954-448-8935 or 954-2607013.School Board Redistricting workshopThe Broward County School Board recently appointed a 19-member Redistricting Steering Committee to lead the single board member reapportionment process and create a recommended map with new district boundaries to balance the populations of the seven School Board districts based on 2010 Census data. The rst of three mapping workshops will be held on March 26 at 5:30 p.m. at the McArthur High School auditorium, 6501 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood. For more, visit www.broward.k12. .us/redistricting or call 754-3212480. Briefs

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The Pelican 9 Friday, March 23, 2012 Oakland Park The City of Oakland Park will host an open house to update residents about development of a postdisaster redevelopment plan. The meeting is set from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. Tuesday, March 27, in the ECD Multi-Purpose Room at the Municipal Building, 5399 N. Dixie Highway, Oakland Park. The plan addresses the long-term response and redevelopment of the city if a major disaster should occur. Representatives from the city and the citys consultant, Leigh Robinson Kerr & Associates, Inc., will be available to discuss the plan, answer questions and document comments. Information about development of the plan to date and next steps will be exhibited. For more information, call Leigh Kerr or Kelly Ray at 954-467-6308. Company to discuss disasters and aftermath People are talking about . the Mermaid Tea PartyThe Palm Aire at Coral Keys clubhouse was transformed into an English tearoom complete with lace tablecloths, roses, and silver tea sets early this month. Twenty members of the daily pool exercise group, the Mermaids, enjoyed a wide variety of savory and sweet treats and teas as well as an afternoon of good company. Led by chairperson, Pat Mousseau, the Mermaids shared prized tea cups, serving pieces and teapots as well as contributing delicious treats. Jacky Simmons, Dorthea Wender, and Barbara Hession take a break from the water to enjoy a spot of tea..By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFWilton Manors Those looking for a parking space along Wilton Drives north end will soon have 32 more to choose from. On Tuesday, city commissioners approved the purchase of a residential piece of property, near the corner of Northeast 26 Street and Northeast 8 Terrace for $229,000, with the purpose of creating 32 permanent parking spaces. Commissioners also approved an agreement with Kids In Distress to lease its adjacent piece of property for $10 a year per a ve-year contract. Once the purchase and lease agreement are nalized the city will knock down the house on the residential property and pave both lots. In exchange, Kids In Distress employees will be able to use up to 20 spaces from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday; according to City Manager Joseph City adds 32 parking spaces near Wilton Drive Gallegos, Kids would also be able to use the lot after 7 p.m. for occasional fundraisers or other special events. At the end of ve years, Kids In Distress has the option to require the city to purchase the property at fair market value. If they decide not to require the purchase the city can renew for ve years, said Bob Mays, city nance director. According to city staff, the cost to demolish the house would be about $5,000 and the cost to build a parking lot with meters, striping, gutters and everything required by law is between $150,000 and $180,000. Mays estimated that it would take between 30 and 60 days for the lot to be built. The money would come from the $1 million the city borrowed from SunTrust Bank to pay for parking improvements. Its a little bit of a risk, said Mayor Gary Resnick, referring to the money being spent. City Attorney Kerry Ezrol responded, saying that either the city would have a lease for 10 years or it would own the lot by the end of the agreement. Vice Mayor Tom Green said the situation wasnt ideal but that Wilton Drive desperately needs parking. We talk about parking and when we make some progressSee PARKING on page 32 SightingsContinued from page 2Raton, will be putting on a production of The Commedia Aladdin: a magic carpet ride to a happy ending! Both nights are at 7 p.m. The zany antics of Sols popular resident commedia troupe includes bumbling, scheming, incorrigible improvisations and very physical comedy. Early reservations are recommended. Tickets are $12 and include refreshments. Visit www.solchildren.org or call 561-447-8829. 4-1 Palm Sunday Concert April 1 at 4 p.m., Choral favorites for Lent including selections by J.S. Bach, G.F. Handel and more at The First Presbyterian Church, 2331 NE 26 Ave., See SIGHTINGS on page 15

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10 The PelicanFriday, March 23, 2012 Making a Difference Phyllis J. Neuberger wants your suggestions about people who are making a difference. Call 954-7838700.By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFRita Ackrills enthusiasm for her time spent at Insight for the Blind is as great today as it was when she began to volunteer for Talking Books 30 years ago. She was honored recently at Insights annual volunteer luncheon for her contribution of 13,000 volunteer hours. Ackrill relates how it all began. My husband retired from the United State Air Force in 1972 and we moved from Patterson Air Force Base in Dayton, Ohio to Wilton Manors with our three sons and daughter. A neighbor friend, who was a teacher, knew how much I loved to read. She suggested that I might like to volunteer for Insight for the Blind. I went over for an interview, and although I never quali ed as a narrator, I have been a reviewer for 30 years. The Library of Congress in Washington, D.C. chooses the material they want recorded, and we do it. They are very fussy. Everything must be perfect. Our narrators have to handle the pressure. Many of them have professional backgrounds. As a reviewer, my job is to listen to what the readers have recorded and note any discrepancies in pronunciation or background noises. The mistakes and sounds are then Rita Ackrill of Wilton Manors honored by Insight for the Blind for 30 years of volunteer serviceedited out. There usually is not too much to be changed as our narrators are excellent readers. Our equipment is much better now than it was when I started. Were digital enabling us to produce a better result which makes my job even easier. When her children were in school she volunteered a few times a week. Now that theyre grown and she has more time, shes at Insight for the Blind almost every morning. She says, Were an all volunteer organization and the camaraderie is fabulous. Were all there for one reasonto enhance the lives of those who cant see to make the reading choices that sighted people can. We enjoy giving of ourselves knowing the end result. We get feedback. Letters and phone calls reassure us that our work is well received. Im not alone. Im just one of many dedicated to providing talking books to the visually challenged. We welcome and we need new volunteers. Her main hobbies are reading and doing crossword puzzles. Thank you, Rita Ackrill, for your generosity to this worthy effort. Talking Books is a service of the National Library for the Blind at the Library of Congress in Washington D.C. Last year over 850,000 people got this free service, through the public library system all across the country. New volunteers are always welcome at Insight for the Blind where Talking Books have been produced by volunteers since 1975. For further information, contact Harry Sharp at Insight, Monday through Friday at 954-522-5057. Rita Ackrill was honored by Insight for the Blind for her 30 years of service, and 13,000 volunteer hours as a digital book reviewer. Pictured as she listens for mistakes and background noise in newly narrated recordings. [Photo courtesy of Insight for the Blind]LBTS Commissioners in Lauderdale-By-The-Sea named seven members to a new charter review board at the March 13 commission meeting. Named to the board were Ken Kugler, Sandra Green, Yann Brandt, David Wessels, Susan Delegal, Chuck Clark and Ron Piersante. The board will consider issues town commission identi es and other issues the board identi es and make recommendations to the commission on potential revisions to the town charter. Named to two-year terms on the Fire ghters Pension Trust Fund Board of Trustees were Linda Collins and Robert Polyasko. The board oversees general administration and operation of the volunteer re ghters pension plan.Egg hunt, bonnet contests on for Easter LBTS Easter by the Sea, the annual celebration sponsored by the town of Lauderdale-By-The-Sea, is set from 9 to 10:30 a.m. Saturday, April 7, at Town Hall at 4501 Ocean Drive. Three egg hunts are planned for children in three different age categories. Bring Easter baskets and cameras for photos with the Easter bunny. A bonnet contest will take place immediately after the last egg hunt for children. Prizes will be awarded. Mayor Roseann Minnet is chairing the event. For more information, call 954-640-4200.Board appointments Briefs

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The Pelican 11 Friday, March 23, 2012 The Pelican We Mean Business! in Lauderdale-By-The-Sea, will start offering German fare like bratwurst and wienerschnitzel for dinner; patrons will still be able to enjoy Diner by the Seas dishes for breakfast and lunch. Im going to bring my German beers and wines over there too, said Moore. Not long after the March 12 re at Checkers Old Munchen, 2209 E. Atlantic Blvd., Moore approached his older brother with the idea; a no-brainer for Sand. Hes my brother, and hes family and Ill do what I have to do to support my family, said Sand. Were family and we always help each other out. The re, according to a report by the Pompano Beach Fire Department, was electrical and started in the kitchen; arson has been ruled out. Although there was smoke damage on the walls and parts of the dining room ceiling, the ames were mostly contained to one side of the kitchen. The re department got here pretty quickly, said Moore. Moore says he just had the interior remodeled a year ago. Now, he and his employees are going through the restaurant trying to salvage as much as they can and planning on remodeling again. Moore, who estimates the damage at about $150,000, says his restaurant will be ready to re-open in about three months or possibly sooner. He is planning to manage dinners at Diner by the Sea so he can bring his current clientelle over with his German cuisine. Moore is bringing the crew over to manage the diner at night. I think its very considerate of him. We have a great boss, said Sonja Braun of Checkers. Moore says he would probably be open sooner but for the permitting process. All that takes time. To make the process faster, Pompano of cials recently implemented a new system that will allow permits to be reviewed and corrected online. Moore also sees the situation as a good business move for his brother. Diner by the Sea, Moore says ,will get more exposure when Checkers Old Munchen customers come for a beer or bratwurst. Customers who order off the German menu can get any meal for $10 or less. For Diner by the Sea, call 954-491-0642. FireContinued from page 2 The Pelican 954-783-8700

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12 The PelicanFriday, March 23, 2012 As we move through this project, we need to determine what side of the ledger the costs fall on the city or the CRA, Kim Briesemeister, co-executive director of the CRA, noted. An additional new request for a shade structure over the beachside playground came from the parks and recreation department advisory board, she said. The CRA didnt plan for that, and the design team didnt think it was necessary. Kissinger said a broad range of shade structures is available. Prices can range from $100,000 to $150,000 for a cover out of a catalog to three-quarter of a million dollars or more for a stretched fabric canopy. He said the design team could come back with speci c recommendations and costs. There are probably a lot of opinions [on shade covers], he said. Resident Keith Mizell said the project will be incredible, adding, This is the time to get excited. But not about synthetic turf. To me the beach is a spiritual location. To introduce something arti cial is too jarring, Mizell said. He said the other additions are fantastic and would nish the project. Kissinger said synthetic turf is the most appropriate design solution. We have used it across the Caribbean, he said, describing the product as high quality and low maintenance. Other choices would include sand, pavement or a playground surface. This [the synthetic turf] would keep a clean, elegant look, he said. You dont have to water, fertilize or x it after every festival. From a lifecycle standpoint and look, its the most elegant solution. Board member Barry Dockswell asked Kissinger for clari cation of his remarks about micromanaging the project. What are we doing differently? he wondered. Were having to circle back on decisions made because of public comments to the CRA and commission, Kissinger said. Im pretty good at the consensusbuilding process. We went through the process and then, as we began construction, kept circling back. The wall and dune we have looked at a half dozen times. What do we need to do as the CRA board? Dockswell asked. Get the facts out, and then stand behind whats done, Kissinger said. Dont always circle back unless you feel you didnt get enough information. Its a tight rope to walk. You may have gone in circles with others. If you have gone round and round, it isnt with us. I dont accept See BEACH on page 13BeachContinued from page 1 The present parking lot at the terminus of Atlantic Boulevard will be transformed into a plaza with water features, an open air stage, palms and pelican art [far left]. The pelicans, tted on a pole will rise and fall with the wind. [Photos courtesy of Pompano Beach CRA]

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The Pelican 13 Friday, March 23, 2012 that as an excuse, George Brummer, board member, said. Brummer said the CRA board needs an accounting of what all this costs and where it comes from. He also had a problem with arti cial turf. Were dealing with a natural environment, and we ought to stick with it. Its silly to play baseball or football on arti cial turf. The beach is a natural area, and we should keep it as such. Kissinger said turf and irrigation were in the original plan. He thinks arti cial turf would be better. Dockswell said he has trouble picturing arti cial turf at the beach. Kissinger suggested he visit Harbordale Park or Oswald Park in Fort Lauderdale where the product is used. Kissinger said he has some at his house. Stand 10 feet away, and you have no idea its arti cial. Regarding the proposed shade structure, Dockswell said hes looking for shade, not structure. Its all about the views. Make sure there is enough shade where people congregate, maybe with trees or small auxiliary structures. My concern is with adding shade, not an expensive, artistic statement. Board members need to see the costs of each item, Dockswell said. Brummer said shade is a necessity over the childrens playground area. You cant expect children to be in the sun for three hours. Not to have shade is ridiculous. This is Florida, where the sun is beastly. Its not Cape Cod. He said the advisory board has had its chance to see the proposals. Commissioner Charlotte Burrie asked the board to consider the proposed list of additions, along with prices for each item, at the earliest possible commission meeting. Then we can determine if we have the money, she said. I dont think its rocket science. The motion passed unanimously. Along with the changes, a public art project will consist of several sculpted pelicans, each on a pole. Depending on the wind, the birds wings will lift them in the air. Briesemeister said it isnt yet clear if the city and county will share the cost for art in a public place or how many pelicans there will be. Find out if those pelicans can reproduce, board member Brummer quipped. Board member Rex Hardin asked if they could get input from their advisory boards on the proposed additions. Briesemeister said that could be done. Brummer, who presided over the meeting in the absence of Mayor Lamar Fisher, said the board is being pushed awfully fast on this. The project is expected to be completed this winter. BeachContinued from page 12 Wider sidewalks will accommodate pedestrians out for a stroll. Vehicle parking will be available on the street with dropoff areas for families planning a day at the beach.

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14 The PelicanFriday, March 23, 2012 The Pelican Now Online As you know this role for me has always been about creating jobs and growing our economy. If you read the Sun-Sentinel this week, you saw the good news that we receivedunemployment in Broward County fell from 8.6 percent to 8.3 percent. Broward County is much better off when compared to our neighbors to the north and south as well as overall unemployment for the State. Palm Beach County is at 9.6 percent, Miami-Dade County is at 9.9 percent, and The State of Florida is at 9.6 percent. Broward has certainly positioned itself better as compared to the surrounding counties, but this would not have been possible without the Greater Fort Lauderdale Alliance and the business community that bring new businesses to Broward County, as well as working to retain and support the struggling companies that are already working to employ Broward residents. Just this week I was honored to be named as a cochairman of the Six-Pillars Strategic Planning process for Broward County. The Six Pillars process is being led by the Florida Chamber Foundation at the state level, and is meant to help communities throughout the State of Florida prosper and create high paying jobs by creating a visioning process which looks to a 20-year horizon. Six Pillars will be addressing these topics which have been deemed critical to economic success in the future: talent supply and education, innovation and economic development, infrastructure and growth leadership, business climate and competiveness, civic and governance systems, quality of life and quality of places. In order to become a Six Pillars Community, a community, county or region in Florida must complete a 10-step process focused around the Six Pillars for Floridas Future framework. The framework serves as an organizing force for strategic planning at local, regional and state levels. It provides a means of harnessing fragmented viewpoints into a common and consistent conversation so that thoughtful and productive planning can take place. Broward has also bene ted from 26 consecutive months of tourism growth. The Greater Fort Lauderdale tourism industry continues to surge, fueled by 11.1 million visitors from around the world spending $9.06 billion. However, Broward is still missing one thing that will help set us apart from other destinations. I have met with anyone and everyone in the travel and tourism industry with whom I could get an appointment to re-engage the conversation of creating a true, world-class convention center hotel. Additionally, I have met with leaders in our marine industry, an industry that is critical for the success of our economy. Think about the Boat Show and the economic impact of the worlds largest boat show here in Broward County. These meetings have given me one clear vision. I need to stay the course and continue the important work right here in Broward County. There will be time for other endeavors in the future. However, I have seen rst-hand that the government closest to the people is most effective. So this is where I will continue to serve, and I cannot thank you enough for allowing me to do so. If there is anything that we can do to assist you, please do not hesitate to contact our of ce at 954-357-7004 or by email at clamarca@ broward.org. You can also stay updated by viewing our website www.broward.org/ commission/district4, as well as signup to receive email updates from us. As always, it is an honor to serve you. LaMarcaContinued from page 6

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The Pelican 15 Friday, March 23, 2012 Advertise with The Pelican 954.783.8700 controlled chair? Boutin says this unrealistic requirement will cost each lodging establishment $3,000 to $5,000 per pool or spa. The regulations say a pool lift may not be shared between two pools or a pool and spa in the same location. Boutin asked that if any permits were necessary for lift installation, could the town be as lenient and waive fees. Pat Hodgson, a board director at the Driftwood Beach Club on El Mar Drive, said she has spoken to the ADA, and they dont understand the verbiage of the requirements. They say public pools must comply, but they cant quite tell you who is public and who is not. Now they say timeshares [such as the Driftwood] are public. Previously, they said they were private. She asked for support from the commission to get the deadline for compliance extended or possibly removed. Give us more time to comply or relook at Title III. In an interview, Hodgson said the Driftwood has just completed a major renovation to its hot tub. With these regulations, they will have to take up the brickwork and replace it with concrete. Commissioner Chris Vincent put the issue on the agenda to acknowledge the concern of hoteliers and to seek feedback on how commissioners could show support before the government passes laws that have such consequential impact. Where do we stop? Commissioner Stuart Dodd asked. This is a huge imposition on our tourism industry to try to comply. Is this something that could be a resolution? Town Attorney Susan Trevarthen said the commission could pass a resolution of support for hoteliers. Commissioners directed her to draft a resolution. Mayor Roseann Minnet said she would take the resolution to the Broward League of Cities. She also suggested calls to members of Congress. Boutin said that in the 30 years his family has run the Windjammer Resort, he cant think of one instance where such a lift was needed. He said it would be for the handicapped who have the use of their upper body and feel strong enough to use the pool and swim without the use of their legs, a very small target audience. He said it was ludicrous to force such devices on hoteliers. Pool accessContinued from page 1SightingsContinued from page 9 Pompano Beach. A $10 suggested donation will be taken at the door. Call 954941-2308. 4-14 & 20 Curtain Call Playhouse presents And Then There Were None, a murder mystery at 8 p.m. at the Herb Skolnick Center, 800 SW 36 Ave., Pompano Beach. Books, Speakers, Education, Classes & Seminars 3-29 The Lighthouse Point Library holds its semiannual book sale from March 29 to 31 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily at Dixon Ahl Hall, 2220 NE 38 St., Lighthouse Point. Used books, DVDs, VHS tapes, and CDs will be available for purchase. Prices range from 25 cents for paperback books to $5 for hardcover books and $1 to $3 for DVDs and CDs. On Saturday, March 31 from 1 pm to 4 pm, $1 will get buyers as many books as they can t in a plastic bag. All proceeds bene t the library. Donations of books, DVDs and CDs for the sale may be dropped off at the library. 3-31 Juan Riera speaks on Pirates Treasure and Shipwrecks of South Florida at the next History at High Noon presentation from noon to 1 p.m. at the Old School Museum, 232 NE 2 St., Deer eld Beach. The free lecture is sponsored by the Deer eld Beach Historical Society. Clubs & Civic Groups 3-26 Friendly Toastmasters will meet at 7 p.m. at the Galleria Mall food court, 2414 E. Sunrise Blvd., Fort Lauderdale. 954-7180543.See SIGHTINGS on page 16

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16 The PelicanFriday, March 23, 2012 agrees. Hes been a loyal customer of Minuteman Press since the mid-90s and says, They print my menus, copies, mailing pieces everything I need. They do a great job and on time. The owner is proud of the state of the art equipment. A brand new, black and white high speed digital press can produce booklets, thick les and do high volume copying quickly. She says, We can number, perforate, laminate and score, create presentation folders and covers, programs, proposals, raf e tickets/books, resumes, brochures, yers and booklets. Were a small shop with big capabilities, Gloria adds. We started with a staff of three and now we are a staff of ve, and growing. Continuing, she says, As a family we are very community minded. We live here. We work here and we care about Pompano Beach. We belong to the Chamber of Commerce here and in Lighthouse Point. My husband owns Moore & Co., a CPA rm on Atlantic Boulevard. Im on the board of Florida Singing Sons Boys Choir. Our son, Anthony, 14, is a Singing Son. Our 16year-old daughter, Angelica, is a ballet enthusiast. We sponsor and participate in many church and civic events like Unity in the Community which was a big success. Gloria says they make a point of supporting their customers businesses and even refer them to each other. The company goal is to be the clients resource for its business and personal communication needs. We have invested in the best technology available to keep us competitive. Our Minuteman Press Pompano web site makes it easier for our clients to request estimates, place orders, check proofs and transfer les on line. Our theme is, Your business is our business. When you succeed, we succeed. Stop in or call 954-9424300. Visit our web site at pompano.minutemanpress. com MinutemanContinued from page 8 SightingsContinued from page4-5 Broward Sierra Club meets at 7:30 p.m. at Fern Forest Nature Center, 201 Lyons Rd. S., Coconut Creek. Guest speaker is Michele Williams, director of the Southeast Region of the Florida Public Archaeology Network at Florida Atlantic University. She will speak about the history of the New River in Fort Lauderdale. legalbarb2@yahoo.com or 954-946-7359. 4-9 & 16 Gold Coast Toastmasters Club meets from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Dennys, 3151 NW 9 Ave., Fort Lauderdale. The club meets on the second and third Monday of the month. 954895-3555 or 954-782-9951.Festivals & Events3-30 The St. Coleman Parishs Mens Club Fish Fry takes place from 5:30 to 9 p.m. at St. Coleman, 1200 S. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. Cost is $8 for adults and $5 for kids. Visit www. stcmc.org or call 954-9423533. 4-20 The 28th Annual Pompano Beach Seafood Festival, April 20 through 22 at the far east end of Atlantic Boulevard in Pompano Beach. There will be food, entertainment and games. Cost is $12 per adult and See SIGHTINGS on page 24

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The Pelican 17 Friday, March 23, 2012 Tomorrow, March 24, a rally is planned to keep the Hillsboro Lighthouse light shining as an aid to navigation. The event begins at 1 p.m. and continues until 4 p.m. at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach. Sponsored by the Hillsboro Lighthouse Preservation Society, or HLPS, the public rally is in support of the Hillsboro Lighthouse, and calls on the United States Coast Guard, or USCG, to preserve the status quo with regard to operation of the 105year old landmark. The USCG has sought public and mariner opinion regarding the lighthouses value as a navigational aid, after sea turtle advocate John Carlson and Richard Rally planned to keep lights on at Hillsboro LighthouseSPECIAL TO THE PELICANWhitecloud of Sea Turtle Oversight Protection, or STOP, complained that the light disturbs sea turtles. As a result, the Coast Guard is considering three options: shut down the light completely, obscure portions of the light or maintain the status quo. HLPS President Art Makenian said, The light was dim from 1992 to 1999, and there were nighttime boating wrecks almost weekly. Hillsboro Inlet notoriously has four to six foot seas, and with the reef, rocks and the jetty around the inlet, it is important to have this aid for mariners. USCG LTJG Andrew Haley has said previously that the Coast Guard has sent letters to both the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the National Marine Fisheries Service indicating that the light does not negatively affect the turtles. USCG Sector Miami Command wants further input from the public that illustrates the light is still important to mariners despite the use of global positioning systems. The 142-foot-high iron lighthouse was built in Detroit, Michigan in 1906 by Russell Wheel & Foundry Company and shipped by boat via Lake Erie, Lake Michigan, Illinois and Mississippi Rivers, Gulf of Mexico, & Key West to its present location, where it was reassembled with a 2nd order Fresnel lens manufactured by Barbier Benard et Turenne of Paris, France. First lit on March 7, 1907, the light has survived over 22 tropical storms and hurricanes, shining its beam 28 nautical miles out to sea every 20 seconds, earning it the nickname Big Diamond. With the exception of the years it needed repair, its been on every day since, except for World War II, said Art Makenian, Besides the aid to navigation, the light has tremendous historical significance, which is why we are sponsoring this public rally to give the public a voice in what may happen to one of their local treasures. April 20, 2012 is the deadline for comments to the USCG by mail to: Commander, USCG 7th District, Brickell Plaza Federal Building, 909 SE 1st Ave., Miami, FL, 33131, attn: LTJG Andrew Haley; by phone at: (305) 415-6748; or via email at andrew.s.haley@ uscg.mil.

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18 The Pelican Friday, March 23, 2012 Scoreboard To advertise on this page, call Bill Fox at 954-804-1056 Pompano Beach 9 Hole Womens League Results March 20 Class A: 1st Place: Susana Rust 43 2nd Place: Susan Dimond 44 3rd Place (tie): Kathy Gardner 45, Maureen Hussian 45 and Cathy Olson 45 Class B: 1st Place (tie): Harriet Fisher 48 and Joanne Price 48 2nd Place (tie): Marlene Williams 51 and Eileen Wankmuller 51 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach The most exciting news for local golfers is being generated at the Pompano Municipal Golf Course where construction of 18 holes designed by Greg Norman begins early in April. Norman is reconstructing the Pines, a 6,948-yard, par 72 to a 7,200-yard course with significant changes. The par 4s will be par 5s, golf pro Bob Loring said. The greens are being moved closer to water. When we asked him to maintain the difficulty, he gave us a look that said expect that and more! Having Greg Norman put his signature on this municipal golf course is Construction on Greg Norman-designed golf course to begin in April expected to draw tourists to the area Loring said as well as bring golfers in from all over south Florida. Norman recently completed the Parkland Country Club Golf Course which is getting good reviews. One of the last great rounds to be played on The Pines occurred last week when local golfer Chad Couch birded 11 of the first 15 holes in the Wednesday skins game that attracts the areas top players. Couch shot a 62 and broke the record of 64. With the old Pines soon to be history, that score will become a fixture in the record books. With The Pines closed, golfers will be playing The See NORMAN on page 19A popular walk to the rst tee and a favorite spot for event photographs at the Pompano Beach course, and theres room for the golf carts on the bridge.

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The Pelican 19 Friday, March 23, 2012 If you cannot locate a Pelican in your city or town, Call 954 .783.8700 Palms Course this summer, a somewhat shorter layout nestled within The Pines. The Palms is 6,835 yards from the gold tees and presents plenty of challenges such as at the 6th hole, a par 3 where water nudges the green and railroad ties protect it. At the 16th hole, a par 5 for men, a par 4 for women, golfers must hit 420 yards, usually into the wind. The greens on The Palms are large and rated at midspeed, Loring said. Loring came to Pompano Beach 10 years ago from the Lago Mar Country Club. A baseball player at University of Florida, Loring took up golf comparatively late in life, in NormanContinued from page 18 his 20s, inspired by his sister who played the game for the Hurricanes. Once he took up his clubs, he was hooked, he says. He is a PGA golf professional and director of golf for the City of Pompano Beach. Already one of the more difficult courses in this area, Pompano Beach Municipal is also the busiest. Its 36 holes attract about 500 golfers a day during the winter, or 100,000 a year. So far, Loring said, the numbers are slightly ahead of last year. One of the draws is the fact that this course is one of the very few that allows golfers to walk. And according to Loring, every year he is seeing more walkers. Originally designed by Von Hagge & Devlin, the course offers one thing that is rare in south Florida, no houses or buildings line the fairways. It also provides golfers with a complete practice facility: chipping green, bunker, two putting greens and a driving range. Its all available for the price of a bucket of balls: $6. Equally a fair deal are the green fees, in season $45.50; in summer, $25. Memberships are available that offer rounds for the price of the cart, $17, and a twoweek lead on tee times. Charity events are encouraged. Last year, the NFL Alumni held its prestigious tournament here. Boosters of the citys popular dog park should know that on April 14 a tournament will raise money that supports Canine Corner. In May, PBHS Boosters will hold a fundraising tournament at Pompano Municipal. Weekly tournaments are held for mens and womens golf associations, and there are weekly clinics for junior players. A clinic for the women focuses on different skills every class. Private and groups lessons are available. Another amenity that brings golfers to the course is Galuppis Restaurant and lounge with indoor and outdoor dining and drinking and banquet facilities. The course and restaurant are located at 1101 N. Federal Highway. Golf legend Greg Norman, right, and golf pro Bob Loring.

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20 The Pelican Friday, March 23, 2012 By Malcolm McClintockPELICAN STAFFSubs, Subs, Subs 1563 N. Dixie Hwy. Pompano Beach 954-941-7565Located on Dixie Highway just across the road from the famous Good Year Blimp hangar, Subs, Subs, Subs has been serving filling salads and sandwiches to hungry locals for the past eight years. I worked 28 years at the Red Fox diner and also parttime at Georgies Subs, says owner Janet Weiss. Then when the owners of Georgies decided to retire, I thought it was time for me to branch out on my own. So I bought the business and have been slicing away ever since. Our ham and turkey sub is very popular along with the Italian and, of course, the Club sub, says the friendly sandwich specialist. But we also have several hot subs such as steak & onion, meatball Parmesan, tuna melt, hot Italian and hot Reuben with sauerkraut. All our meats and assorted cold cuts including salami, capicola, pepperoni, corned beef and bologna are sliced to order, says the gregarious Pittsburgh native. I also slice our veggies every morning. By the way, we get our tomatoes fresh from my brothers farm [Whitworth Farms] in Delray Every sub can be enhanced with our secret sauce. I make it myself and it is absolutely delicious, says Weiss about the tangy vinaigrette that adds an exciting burst of flavor to any sandwich. I also make my own delicious bruschetta preparation for our subs and Pompano Beachs Subs, Subs, Subs serves hungry customers gargantuan sandwiches at wallet-friendly prices salads. Of note is the size of a standard large sub. These behemoths can weigh over 2 lbs. and are practically impossible to finish in a single sitting. Of course, this does not prevent Weiss from offering the Hungry Man version which literally doubles the quantity of meats and cheese. Anyone attempting to eat this monster in one fell swoop should probably do so in a hospital waiting room just in case. I make everything myself. The chicken, tuna and crab salad preparations are all made fresh in house, says Weiss as she provides a sample taste of each. Indeed, the three varieties are incredibly creamy and provide the deep, velvety mayonnaise-See SUBS on page 29Loaded with roast beef, ham, turkey, cheese, lettuce, tomato and secret sauce, the eye-popping club sub is a fan favorite. [Photos by Malcolm McClintock]

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The Pelican 21 Friday, March 23, 2012

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22 The Pelican Friday, March 23, 2012 Advertise in The Pelican Pompano Beach Seafood Festival gets slight change of locationBy Michael dOliveira PELICAN STAFFPompano Beach The 28th Annual Pompano Beach Seafood Festival is moving a few hundred feet north. The festival, April 20 through 22, is relocating from its usual location at the end of East Atlantic Boulevard just north to the Pompano Pier, 222 N. Pompano Beach Blvd. John Good, of Good Event Management, who has run the event for the last 16 years and been involved with it since it began, says hes excited about the new location. Theres a lot more room for people to sit in front of the stage [located north of the pier]. The beach is much wider there, said Good. The current construction along East Atlantic Boulevard, including the beach area, is what Good says prompted him to move the event. The new entrance will be at the corner of A1A and Northeast 2 Street. The food area will be located west of the pier while the arts and crafts vendors, community stage and kids zone will be to the south. Good estimates between 120 and 130 arts and crafts vendors and about 36 food vendors will have booths set up. Its very similar to what weve always had, he said. Originally, says Good, the Seafood Festival started as a way to hand out awards for the Pompano Beach Fishing Rodeo, May 16 through 19, but has since evolved. Its grown significantly over the years, he said. One familiar site will be the Seafood World Restaurant and Marketplace booth. Open in Lighthouse Point since 1976, Hugh Ganter, also known as See FESTIVAL on page 23

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The Pelican 23 Friday, March 23, 2012 Papa Huey, has had a booth at the festival every year since it started. As busy as we are, you need to stay in front of the public. We do get a lot of publicity and we get a chance to show our new products, if we have any, said Ganter. But, he says, its not really about the money. Giving back to the community is number one. If, along the way, you make some money, that would be a bonus. Included in Seafood Worlds Seafood Festival menu is stone crabs, raw oysters, raw clams and seafood vinaigrette. We stick to seafood, said Ganter. The festival also acts as a fundraiser for local charities and organizations, including Kiwanis, Rotary, Boy Scouts of America and Blanche Ely High School. Admission is $12 per person. Children 10 and under are free. Hours: Friday from 5 to 10 p.m., Saturday from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. and Sunday 11 FestivalContinued from page 22 a.m. to 8 p.m. Parking is available at the city parking lot directly across from the pier and at the corner of A1A and Northest 2 Street. A free trolley service runs from Bank of America, 2335 E. Atlantic Blvd., and Wells Fargo, 2400 E. Atlantic Blvd., to the festival. Parking at those bank parking lots is free. Visit www.pompanobeach seafoodfestival.com for more. In the March 16 issue of The Pelican it was incorrectly written in the Publix article that the public parking project at Harbor Village in Pompano Beach is a Florida Department of Transportation initiative. The agency overseeing the project is the Community Redevelopment Agency. The Pelican also incorrectly wrote that the new East Atlantic Boulevard Publix store number was 1053. The correct number is 1393. The Pelican regrets the errors. Correction and clari cationVisit The Pelican online at pompanopelican. com. Let us know how we can help cover the news of your city. We Mean Business! 954-783-8700

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24 The Pelican Friday, March 23, 2012 The Pelican! We Mean Business 954-783-8700 By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFDeerfield Beach Like the classic 1962 Beach Boys song, Don Ryan is on his own Surfin Safari of sorts bringing surfing to kids with disabilities. Five years ago, Ryan cofounded Surfers For Autism, or SFA, in Deerfield Beach. The event pairs amateur and professional surfers and children with autism and their families for a day of sand, sun and surf. This years event will take place at the Deerfield Beach Pier, 200 NE 21 Ave., on March 31 starting at 9 a.m.Pro, amatuer surfers bring their sport to disabled childrenBeing a surfer, I wanted to do something special for these kids, said Ryan, president of SFA, who estimates the organization raised $10,000 during its inaugural event. We love this community, this is where it all started, said Ryan, who expects between 6,000 to 8,000 people will attend. We couldnt do it without the support of the community. Since that first surf day, SFA has expanded to other parts of Florida, Puerto Rico, Georgia and New South Wales, Australia. According to Ryan, there are 15 total stops this year. The success of the fundraiser has expanded as well, ranging between $5,000 and $20,000 raised per event. I was so blown away by what weve done, said Ryan, who left his career as an advertising salesman to devote himself to take this to as many kids as we can. Funds raised go to autism research and autism-related home services. Among the amateur and professional surfers volunteering for the event is Delray Beach resident Tim Lane. My very first experience with it, the child made a sound and the mother was crying and I didnt understand. Then she explained he never made a sound before in his life, said Lane. To see their faces is something thats indescribable and if you havent seen it I dont know how to put it into words. And Lanes experience isnt isolated. Kids are saying their first words to their parents because of this . its pretty groundbreaking, said Ryan. Along with the surfing lesson, children and their families also get treated to free lunch, games, toys and entertainment. And surfers will have a chance to test their mettle against one another on April 1 starting at 9 a.m. at the inaugural Pro-Am Surf Contest, sponsored in-part by Island Water Sports, a surf and skate shop in Deerfield Beach. The shop has been a supporter of SFA since the beginning. The winner of each division longboard, womens and junior will each get a new surfboard and split the $5,000 grand prize. All slots for the competition have been filled but sponsorship opportunities are still available. For more, visit www. surfersforautism.org or call 954-427-4929. children 10 and under are free. The festival starts on Friday at 5 p.m. to 10 p.m., Saturday 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. and Sunday 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Visit www.pompanobeachseafoodfestival.com or call 954-941-2940. For the Kids 3-28 Pony Rides from 9 to 11:30 a.m. at Sand & Spurs Equestrian Park, 1600 NE 5 Ave., Pompano Beach. Cost is $3 per ride. 954-786-4507. 3-31 Eggstravaganza takes place from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. at St. Clement Church, 225 NW 29 Ave., Wilton Manors. Peter Cottontail will be on hand to take pictures and there will be an egg hunt, bounce house and concession stand. This event will be for children newborn through 5th Grade. 954-390-2130. 3-31 Spring Fling takes place from 9:30 a.m. to noon at 1701 NE 8 St., Pompano Beach, and features a visit by the Easter Bunny, fun activities with My Favorite DJ, Bella the Clown, a bounce house and more. Cost is $2 per child or two canned goods per child. All canned food collected is to be donated to located food banks. 954-7864111.Government3-27 Pompano Beach City Commission meeting at 7 p.m. at city hall, 100 W. Atlantic Blvd. 3-27 Wilton Manors City Commission meeting at 7 p.m. at city hall, 2020 Wilton Drive. 3-27 Lighthouse Point City Commission meeting at 7:30 p.m. at city hall, 2200 NE 38 St. 3-27 Lauderdale-ByThe-Sea Town Commission meeting at 7 p.m. at Jarvis SightingsContinued from page 16 See SIGHTINGS on page 28

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The Pelican 25 Friday, March 23, 2012 Advertise with The Pelican. 954.783.8700 Florida Heritage Month Events at Broward County Libraries: April 4 Film: Flaglers Train The Florida Keys Over-Sea Railroad, in celebration of the 100th anniversary of Flaglers Florida Keys Railroad, 2 p.m., West Regional Library, 8601 W. Broward Blvd., Plantation (954-382-5860) April 14 Their Story is Our Story, musical/historical production about the founding of Carver Ranches, 2 p.m. Tickets $15 in advance, $20 at door. Seniors/students $10 in advance, $15 at door. Call 954-357-6210 for tickets and information. African-American Research Library and Cultural Center, 2650 Sistrunk Blvd., Fort Lauderdale (954-3576282) April 16 Civil War Monuments and Sites in Florida Book Talk and PowerPoint Presentation with travel writer Roberta Sandler, 1 to 2 p.m., Main Library, 100 S. Andrews Ave., Fort Lauderdale 954-357-7444. April 24 Everglades Artist-in-Residence 2011 Brian Trainor discusses his photography and experiences in the Everglades, 1 p.m., North Regional/Broward College Library, 1100 Coconut Creek Blvd., Coconut Creek 954-201-2600 May 12 The Florida East Coast Railway: For More Than 110 Years, Americas Speedway to Sunshine, an enlightening and enjoyable talk by historian Seth Bramson, 3:30 p.m., Hallandale Beach Library, 300 S. Federal Highway, Hallandale 954-457-1750. Florida Heritage Month Exhibits at Broward County Libraries: Fabluous Forties on the Avenue Exhibit: See a replica of Fort Lauderdales historic Northwest Fifth Avenue from April to October, African-American Research Library and Cultural Center, 2650 Sistrunk Blvd., Fort Lauderdale 954-357-6282 Florida Mystery Writers Book Display, Galt Ocean Mile Reading Center, 3403 Galt Ocean Mile, Fort Lauderdale 954-537-2877. Book Display in Honor of Florida Heritage Month April 1 to 15, Imperial Point Library, 5985 N. Federal Hwy., Fort Lauderdale 954492-1881. Broward Historical Society Sailboat Bend Photographic Exhibit from April 1 May 31, North Lauderdale Saraniero Library, 6901 Kimberly Blvd., North Lauderdale 954-968-3840. Book Display Floridas Past April 1 to 30, North Regional/Broward College Library, 1100 Coconut Creek Blvd., Coconut Creek 954-201-2600 Everglades Photography by Everglades Artist-in-Residence 2011 Brian Trainor April to May, North Regional/Broward College Library, 1100 Coconut Creek Blvd., Coconut Creek (954-2012600. Poster Display Florida Humanities Council Educational Posters on Culture of Native Americans/ Early Florida Settlers AprilMay, Northwest Regional Library, 3151 University Dr., Coral Springs 954-341-3900. Florida Heritage Month Materials Display (April 1-15), Riverland Library, 2710 W. Davie Blvd., Fort Lauderdale 954-791-1085. Model Train Exhibit, courtesy of Florida Citrus Model Train Society, in celebration of the 100th anniversary of Flaglers Florida Keys Railroad. See the exhibit, watch train films and enjoy musical performances. Mon., Wed., Thurs., Fri. and Sat.: 12:30 to 3:30 p.m. Tuesdays: 3:30 to 6:30 p.m. April 21 to May 5), West Regional Library, 8601 W. Broward Blvd., Plantation (954-382-5860).

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26 The Pelican Friday, March 23, 2012 By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach Phillies pitcher Tyler Krinkeys fiveinning effort helped keep the As to three runs, putting the Phillies in the win column Tuesday night with eight runs of their own. The Phillies and As, part of the Pony Division of Pompano Baseball, ages 13 and 14, faced-off at Four Fields Sports Complex. The Phillies struck first with three runs, including a hit to right field by Bobby Blasko that knocked in Krinkey. The As answered back with a double by Stephen Mickull that knocked in two runs. Phillies pitching holds back As bats in 8 to 3 win Phillies pitcher Tyler Krinkey winds up for a pitch against an As batter. Krinkeys pitched helped keep the As to within three runs. Krinkey pitched in all but one inning. [Photos by Michael dOliveira]Thats how you get back in the game, yelled one parent after Mickulls double. The second inning was unproductive, with the first three batters on each team going down 1-2-3. One strikeout by Krinkey and good infield playing on both sides kept would-be hits from materializing. The third inning saw the Phillies ultimately win the game with five runs, surpassing the three runs the As would eventually end the game with. With the bases loaded William Carlson ripped a double to left center field, bringing in all three base runners. Mickull, the As pitcher, was ultimately able to get himself out of the inning by racking up two strikeouts. Unfortunately for the As, they were only able to See PHILLIES on page 33

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The Pelican 27 Friday, March 23, 2012 CAAB serves up Italian at Hagen Park Wilton Manors On March 14, the Wilton Manors Community Affairs Advisory Board, or CAAB, held its rst ever Taste of Italy at the Hagen Park Community Center in Wilton Manors. CAAB members, are given a certain amount of money by the city each year to disperse in the community. But instead of just spending city money, CAAB members decided to hold Taste of Italy and raise more funding for future projects. [Left] Wilton Manors Police Chief Paul OConnell with City Commissioner Scott Newton and his wife, Cindy Newton. [Above] Residents Gary and Rita Silverman, Diane Cline and Doug McClave. [Photos by Michael dOliveira]

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28 The Pelican Friday, March 23, 2012 WORSHIP DIRECTORY: Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad. Rev. Hyvenson Joseph Block, Herbert P. 76, of Deerfield Beach, died March 19, 2012 after a courageous battle with cancer. He was born in Bridgeport, CT and attended the University of Connecticut. He served in the US Army, 1959-60, stationed in Germany with the 4th Armored Division Newspaper. His career for many years centered around publishing; editing trade magazines, managing advertising and promotional campaigns for household products such as Pop Rivets, Molly Bolts, Ammo powder. Later he worked in New York City producing catalogs and coordinating trade shows for a manufacturer of desk top items. He moved to Coral Springs in 1978 and started his own business, Herb Block & Co., selling promotional items and business gifts. An avid reader, Mr. Block enjoyed travel and word games. He loved old buildings, sailing ships, good conversation, fine food and a good vodka. He was a 27-year-member of the Fort Lauderdale Executive Association. He is survived by his long time companion Judy Wilson, children Natalie (Steve) Dixon of Towson, MD., Leigh (Mandi) Block of Lancaster County, PA., grandchildren Kyle and Maija Dixon, Obituariesbrother Stanley Block of Trumbell, Ct., sister Cynthia Shapiro of Boston, MA, nieces and nephews and more friends than he could have imagined. Visitation and memorial service Saturday, March 24 from 4 to 6 p.m. at Kraeer Funeral Home and Cremation Center, 217 E. Hillsboro Boulevard, Deerfield Beach. Donations in his memory to the charity of your choice. Herb Block, editor, entrepreneur Hall, 4501 Ocean Drive. 4-2 State Senator Jeremy Ring will be the guest speaker at the Palm Aire Democratic Club meeting at 7 p.m. at the Herb Skolnick Center,Center, 800 SW 36 Ave., Pompano Beach. Ring will be addressing the 2012 legislative session and other issues and will answer questions. The meeting is open to the public. Light refreshments will be served. 954-975-3772 or 786-877-1644.Green Markets3-14 Pompano Beach Green Marke t at the corner of West Atlantic Boulevard and North Dixie Highway from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Fresh vegetables, crafts, plants, food and music are available. 954292-8040. 3-24 Wilton Manors Green Market at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. fresh produce, baked goods, herbs, spices, doggie treats, pickles, jams, infused vinegars, pasta and more are available. 954-531-5363. Health & Safety4-14 Free Car Seat Safety Check from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. at Pompano Beach Fire-Rescue Station 24, 2001 NE 10 St. Technicians will check and see if car seats are properly installed. Appointments are required. 954-786SightingsContinued from page 24 See SIGHTINGS on page 33

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The Pelican 29 Friday, March 23, 2012 base. And we use absolutely no fillers, adds Weiss with great pride. To complete the healthy tableau, two giant scoops of the satisfying salad preparations are placed onto a bed of fresh cut lettuce and accompanied by a host of delectable veggies such as olives, assorted peppers, cucumbers, tomatoes, onions and pickles. We get very busy at lunch time as people from all walks of life come in for the special which includes a sub, a bag of chips and a drink for $5.75, says Weiss. We also do a lot of business catering events such as high school football games where the SubsContinued from page 20coach will want us to have 200 subs ready to go. Subs, Subs, Subs even has a cork board on the wall with several pictures of newborns and toddlers. When asked about the significance, Weiss responds with a hearty laugh: We get a lot of pregnant moms who get insane cravings for our subs. So when the babies are born, they come back with pictures as a thank you for having helped them through their pregnancies. For special occasions, Subs, Subs, Subs will gladly prepare their sixfoot sub. Loaded with all the desired meats, cheeses and veggies, this specialty requires 48 hours notice and cost $25 a foot. Including taxes, small subs are $6, large ones are $8.50 and obscenely large Hungry Man subs are $12.50. Deluxe salads are $6.75. Creamy potato and macaroni salad side dishes are $1. For a great meal at an affordable price, to dine in or take-out, the impeccably clean Subs, Subs, Subs is a worthwhile stop along Dixie Highway. Enjoy! Malcolm McClintock holds an MBA and has lived in Thailand, Spain, France, Mexico, Canada and the US where he has developed a deep appreciation for world gastronomy. Owner Janet Weiss shows off a ready to go tuna salad made with two mammoth scoops of tuna, fresh lettuce and a variety of tasty veggies such as olives, various peppers, tomatoes and onions. Two mammoth scoops of tuna salad sit atop fresh lettuce and are surrounded by a wealth of tasty veggies such as olives, various peppers, tomatoes and onions.

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30 The Pelican Friday, March 23, 2012 Classi edsCall 954-545-0013 HELP WANTEDPT OR FT YOUR CHOICE Be An AVON Independent Sales Representative AND YOUR Own Boss. $10 To Start! Call 954-729-0750. 4-6 POMPANO BEACH AREA Part-Time Seamstress Wanted. Call 954-941-6493 9am 5pm. 3-23 POMPANO BEACH AREA Driver Housekeeping And Laundry. $10 Per Hour. Call 954-744-6848. 3-23 LOCAL PEST CONTROL CO Looking For Quality Sales/Service Tech. Must Be Dependable, Team Player, Good Drivers License & People Skills. Will Train Right Person. ALSO Of ce Assistant Computer People & Phone Skills Needed. Fax Resume 954418-3982. 4-6 SEEKING EMPLOYMENT CAM LIC PROP MGR Seeks PT Position. Experience In Hi-Rise Condos And Low Rise. Hours Flexible. Call Bill 954366-4627. 3-23 PIANO PLAYER Dinner Music, Private Parties. 50 Years Experience. Sinatra Music. Auditions Anytime. Call 954-533-5961 Or charlesanthonyalbert@yahoo. com. 3-23 EXPERIENCED IN TELEPHONE SALES Have Real Estate License. Seeking FT / PT. Call After 6pm 754245-8999. 3-23 SERVICES DANNY BOY ELECTRIC Lic & Insured. Lic. #EC13004811. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. 24/Hr Service. 954-290-1443. Beat Any Written Estimate. Sr, Discount. 4-6 DROPS OF SHINE Cleaning Services. Quality BEST Prices! Houses Apartments Move-In / Out. Vacation Homes & More. FREE Estimates! 954-729-3713 561-948-5575. 3-30 ALL MY FAMILY MOVING Family Owned And Operated. Licensed. Best Price Guaranty. CALL NOW! Allmyfamilymoving.com. 561-674-3029. 3-23 AMYS TYPING SERVICE Fast, Reliable Typing Service For School, Home, & Small Business Needs. POMPANO Beach Area. Call AMY At 1917-860-1069. 3-23 HANDYMAN PAINTING CARPENTRY Pressure Cleaning. Decks! Everything Around The House. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. Call 561-350-3781. 4-13 MOORE PLUMBING PLUMBING SERVICES Big Jobs Small Jobs. We Do It All. Remodeling & Repairs. Lic. & Insured. C.C. Accepted. Call 954-772-4600. 3-30 HONEST HANDYMAN HOME & BUILDING Maintenance/Improvements. No Job Too Small. Fast Friendly Service. Reasonable Rates. Local Resident/Homeowner. Call Today For Your FREE Upfront Quote. No Deposit Required. 754-366-1915. 323 GOT JUNK? DUMP TRUCK CLEANUPS Trees/ Landscape, Yard Fill. Paint/ Pressure Wash/ Roofs/Home Repairs Welding, Etc. Dave 954-818-9538. 4-6 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIESNew GREEN technology. New defroster control saves energy in home refrigerators, commercial chillers. Patented. All optical. Simple mfg. Strategic partners needed..www.NewAvionics.Com. 954-568-1991. C MUSICIANS WANTEDThe American Legion Symphonic Band is now accepting new members for the 2011-2012 season. College age to seasoned seniors are welcome. Rehearsals are held on Wed. evenings at American Legion Post 142 in Pompano. Percussionists, euphonium and clarinet players are especially needed. If you enjoy making music, call Jim McGonigal, Music Director at 954-647-0700 for more info.DEEP WATER VILLA DOCKPOMPANO BEACH 2/2 2 BLOCKS BEACH 1700 SQ FT. Screened Fla Room. Private Yard. W/D. 4 Park. No Fixed Bridges. Community Pool. Deeded Dock.. 2 Blocks Beach. $265,000. Coldwell Banker Barbara Call 954629-1324. 4-13 HOMES FOR RENTPOMPANO 2/2 Cottage Style House. Large Yard With Fish Pond. $1100 Month Company Bills For Electric & Water. 541 NE 34 St. Darci 954-783-3723. 3-23 CO-OP SALESPOMPANO BEACH 1/1 On Water, Dockage Available At Your Door. $59,500. Coldwell Banker Barbara 954-6291324. 4-13 REAL ESTATE WANTEDI BUY HOUSES!! CASH!! AS IS! QUICK CLOSE! ANY AREA ANY CONDITION! NO EQUITY OK. CALL NOW 954-914-2355. 4-20 VACATION RENTAL MILFORD, PA FURNISHED SMALL Very Private Country Cottage 1 / 1, Stone Fireplace, Hardwood Floors. Walk To Pristine Swimming & Boating Lake. Seasonal By The Month $1,000. Call Audrey 570-2469240 Cell Or E-mail Audrey@ chantr e.com. 3-23 CONDOS FOR SALE FREE BOAT DOCK!! TWO PETS, Two Cars, Two Tennis Courts, Gorgeous Renovated Townhouse, 2 Bedroom, 2.5 Baths, Great Water Views, Resort Style Garden Condo, Just One High, Federal Highway Fixed Bridge To Lake Santa Barbara. $299,000. See Tour: www.circlepix.com/ XGWJKE. Nancy And Cindy Pedicord, Realtors: Balistr eri Realty 954-868-6517. 3-23 DEERFIELD BEACH 2/2 Completely Redone. Granite Kitchen, New Cabinets. S.S. Appliances. 20 Porcelain Tile Floors. Travistine Stone Baths. Freshly Painted. 1st Floor. Less Than A Mile To Beach. $84,900. Call 631-873-8715. 4-6 LAUDERDALE BY THE SEA Furnished 1/1.5 Condo $115,000. Heated Pool. Ocean Access. On Canal. 1481 S Ocean Blvd. Apt 228. Call 586549-5223. 3-30 CONDOS FOR RENTDEERFIELD BEACH 2/2 CONDO Corner Unit, Pool. $800 $825. Good Credit Required. No Pets Or Realtors. 631-885-3342. 3-30 LAUDERDALE BY THE SEA Near Sea Watch Restaurant 1 Bedroom Den 2 Bath. CHA, Pool, W / D, End Unit. $1100 Per Month Yearly. 1st / Last / Security. No Pets / N / S. 954-942-5642. 4-6 LAUDERDALE BY THE SEA Furnished 2/2 Pool Near Beach Shops & Restaurants. Enjoy Beach Living. $875 Month From April To October. Owner 413-244-2807. 3-23 POMPANO FURNISHED BEACH CONDO 2/2 Lovely Views Of Ocean Pool & Lighthouse From Balcony & All Rooms Modern! $1,295 Month Yearly. Available JUNE! 954-785-7571 Or 954707-2448. 3-23 APTS FOR RENT DEERFIELD/POMPANO BEACH 1 BR & 2 BR APTS FOR RENT. Remodeled, Paint, Tile, Etc. W & D On Site. Pool. Pet Friendly. Call George 954-809-5030. 4-6 POMPANO 1/1 & 2/1 E OF FEDERAL Tiled. 10 Overhang. Walk To Everything. Park At Your Door. 954-2546325. 4-6 POMPANO GARDENS $795 1/1 $200 Deposit. Nice Area. Minutes To Beach. Pet OK. Please Call 954-515-2554. 3-16 POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 BEDROOMS Fully FurnishedEf ciency With Kitchen, Fully Furnished. Cable, Internet, Pool, Laundry. 500 To The Beach. Weekly Monthly Yearly. 954-2948483 Or 248-736-1533, 4-13 POMPANO BEACH 1/1 FURNISHED Includes TV $850 Month Yearly 1st / Last / Security. EFFICIENCY $750 Month Yearly Includes Direct TV + $50 Electric Allowance. 954-785-5837. 3-30 POMPANO BEACH 1/1 SW. C/A $750 2/1 $925 NE 2/1 $950 Townhouse 2/1.5 $1095. ALL FREE WATER. Rent + $70 Application Moves U In. 954-781-6299. 3-23 POMPANO MCNAB RD & NE 18 AVENUE 1 & 2 Bedrooms Furnished/ Unfurnished. $695 $950 And Up. Pool, Tile Floors. Central A/C. 954-6102327. 3-30 1 & 2 Bedroom From $495. Easy Move-in. 1/2 OFF DEPOSIT. Remodeled. Great Location. 954783-1088 For More Info. 5-11 LUXURY BEACH PADS FOR RENT! Pompano Grand Opening: FREE 32 Flat Screen HDTV! Newly Renovated in 2012 One Bedrooms & Studio Apts., 75 Yards From Private Beach Access, Eastern Exposure. New Kitchens & Baths, Granite Counter Tops, Central Air, Pool, Laundry, Dedicated Parking, Near Pier & Downtown. All Bills Paid! Includes Water, Electric, Premium Cable TV And WIFI. Furnished Or Unfurnished. Short Or Long Stays. No Utility Deposits. Small Pets Welcome. Only 9x, 8x, 7 Left! Pax Properties 888-729-4948 Or 954-603-8857. Photos At www.beachpads.net 3-30 COMMERCIAL FOR RENT-SALEPOMPANO COMMERCIAL OFFICE Spaces Available. Ranging From As Low As $500 To $700 Depending On Square Footage. Please Call Darci At 954783-3723. 3-23 DEERFIELD BEACH Retail Of ce Warehouse 700 Sq Ft With Loft. A/C, Bathroom. $575 Per Month. Call For More Info 561-654-1331 Or 561-9985681. 4-6 FURNITURE BEDSETS King $180 Queen $130 Full $110 Twin $90. 5 Pc. Bedroom Set $399. Frames $39. 954-465-6498. 4-6 DOCK FOR RENT60 FT DOCK THE COVE MARINA 50 AMP / H20 Included. $1,200 Month Price Negotiable Depending On Boat Size. Restaurant & Fuel On Premises. 954-9140053. a.j.barsotti@comcast. net. 3-30 POMP ANO BEACH DOCK Wide Canal. No Wake Area! Whips. Quiet Canal. Call For Information 954-946-3301. 3-23

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The Pelican 31 Friday, March 23, 2012 Classi edsCall 954-545-0013 Get to know your local Merchants The Pelican Classi eds can save you time and money! 954-783-8700! PIANO LESSONSPIANO LESSONS AT YOUR HOME Classical Pop Jazz. 30 Years In Northeast Area. Call 954-938-3194. 4-6 GARAGE SALESPOMPANO BEACH 901 E MCNAB Rd. March 24 Christ Community Church 7am 1pm. HUGE Youth Sponsored Sale INDOORS!! Electronics / Small Furniture / Jewelry / Kid & Baby / Clothes / Much More!! Concession Breakfast & Lunch. ALL MUST GO!!! 3-23 MISCELLANEOUS 5 PIECE BLACK DRUM SET DRUMS ONLY!!!! $225 OR BEST OFFER!! CALL 954557-8185 FT LAUDERDALE. 3-23

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32 The Pelican Friday, March 23, 2012 Deer eld Beach Call The Pelican 954-783-8700 everyone gets nervous. Mays estimates that it would take ve years, at a minimum occupancy rate of 20 percent, for parking revenues from the lot to pay for the costs of buying and developing it. After 10 years the city will have to renegotiate the lease agreement, if we dont own it already, said Mays. Were looking at this as a long-term relationship. According to the contract, if the city buys the property it can receive credit for the cost of the improvements towards the price of purchase. Resident Paul Kuta and Krishan Manners, president/ CEO of Wilton Manors Main Street, said the additional parking was a good start. Kuta suggested the city should use eminent domain to acquire more property in the city for parking; eminent domain can be used by government entities to force private property owners to sell to the government. In November of last year, the city added 10 parking spaces across from the Starbucks, 1015 NE 26 St., near Five Points. Last month, commissioners also voted to allow businesses to use 30 parking spots at Hagen Park for valet services. Green and Commissioner Ted Galatis called valet one tool to help reduce parking problems along the Drive.ParkingContinued from page 9 People are talking about . 12th Annual Cuisine of the RegionCasa Maya Grill Chef Emilio Dominguez; Olympia Flame Diner Chef Chris McFadden; Hot Tomatoe Owner Tony Bianco; JBs on the Beach Chef Ron Pollack; BTs Oceanfront Chef Grant Collier and Hillsboro Club Chef Jacques NoelDeerfield Beach NE Focal Point CASA, Inc. will host its 12th annual charity event, Cuisine of the Region on Wednesday evening, April 4, 2012 at the Embassy Suites Deerfield Beach Resort & Spa, 950 South Ocean Drive (A1A), Deerfield Beach from 5:30 to 9 p.m. Guests will taste the cuisine of local restaurants, wine purveyors and top off the evening with a variety of desserts. Proceeds from the event benefit NE Focal Point which provides free and low-cost services to children, patients with Alzheimers and other senior services. The event also includes a silent auction with items ranging for vacations to airline tickets. Tickets are $50 in advance and $60 at the door. For ticket information, call 954-480-4460 or email rwilliams@deerfield-beach. com

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The Pelican 33 Friday, March 23, 2012 The Pelican, We Mean Business 954-783-8700 respond to the Phillies with one run, a double to right field by Jon Lutfey which knocked in the second base runner. Krinkey also got two strikeouts. Solid pitching and fielding by both teams, including a double play by the Phillies in the fourth and one by the As in the fifth, made both innings scoreless. In the fifth, the As looked as though they might get a rally going. One player was PhilliesContinued from page 26walked and Blake Reidal stole second base after getting a hit that barely got past Krinkeys glove; Krinkley ended the inning, and any stirrings of an As rally, with a strikeout. The As kept the Phillies scoreless in the sixth inning as Mason Kemp took over for Krinkey as pitcher. The As once again tried to rally, getting two men on base. But two outs at first base and a strike out by Kemp ended their hopes and the game. It was just one of those days. We couldnt catch a break, said As coach Robert Robinson. As player Chris Thomas connects with a pitch in the first inning. Although the As had solid hitting they couldnt capitalize enough to beat the Phillies.4510.Recreation & Leisure3-27 A card party will be held by the Benevolent Patriotic Order of DOES Drove 142 from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Pompano Beach ELKS Lodge, 700 NE 10 St. Event includes desert and coffee. 561-479-2002.Service & Charity3-31 The 17th Annual WIN Charity Golf Tournament will be held at 1 p.m. at Boca Greens Country Club, 19642 Trophy Drive, Boca Raton. The event bene ts WIN, Women In Network, an organization that seeks to promote the success and advancement of women professionally and politically. Visit www.womeninnetwork. com or call 954-463-9005, ext: 641.MondaysPing Pong Nights Every Monday from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Ping Pong Nights is held at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. The cost is $1. All ages can participate. 954-390-2130.TuesdaysPompano Beach-Lighthouse Rotary Club Meets every Tuesday at 7:30 a.m. at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. Call 954-972-7178. Yoga A Yoga class is available for all levels at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors, on Tuesday nights from 6:30 to 8 p.m. and Saturday mornings from 10:30 a.m. until noon. The cost is $7. 305-607-3520. SightingsContinued from page 28 See SIGHTINGS on page 34

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34 The Pelican Friday, March 23, 2012 SightingsContinued from page 33Zonta International meets on the third Tuesday of the month at Duffys Diner, 401 N. Federal Hwy., Deereld Beach, at 11:15 a.m. Zonta International is a classi ed service organization of executives and professionals working together to advance the status of women locally and worldwide through service and advocacy. 561-3922223. Bingo The American Legion Auxiliary Unit 142, 171 SW 2 St., Pompano Beach, has Bingo on Tuesdays at 7 p.m. Food is available from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. 954-9422448.Wednesdays The Greater Pompano Beach Senior Citizens Club meets on the second Wednesday of the month at the Emma Lou Olsen Community Center on NE Sixth Street Pompano Beach at 10 AM. No meetings during the months of July and August). Activities focus on the general welfare, health, education and security of senior citizens. We welcome people of all ages. Fun trips and outings are offered. Call 954-943-7787. Wilton Manors Kiwanis Club Meets every Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. at 2749 NE 14 Ave., Wilton Manors. 954561-9785. Pompano Beach Kiwanis Club Meets Wednesdays at noon at the Riverside Grille at the Sands Resort, 125 N. Riverside Drive, Pompano Beach. 954-444-4815. Alzheimers Caregivers Support Group The NE Focal Point Alzheimers Day Care Center, located at 301 N.W. 2nd Avenue in Deereld Beach, offers a weekly Caregivers Support Group every Wednesday from 10 a.m. to noon. Oakland Park Kiwanis Club Meets every Wednesday from 7:30 to 8:30 a.m. at Peter Pan Diner, 1216 E. Oakland Park Blvd., Oakland Park. 954-566-9957.ThursdaysDeer eld Beach Kiwanis Club Meets at noon every Thursday at the Deer eld Hilton, 100 Fairway Dr. 954242-6083. Oakland Park/Wilton Manors Rotary Club Meets every Thursday from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. at Tequila Sunrise Mexican Grill, 4711 N. Dixie Hwy., Oakland Park. 954-491-6158.FridaysIsland City Art Walk Every third Friday of the month from 7 to 10 p.m., Wilton Manors Wilton Drive is home to the Island City Art Walk. Over 40 local artists show off their works in Wilton Drives cafes, boutiques, restaurants and other businesses. The Art Walk runs until April. Pompano Beach Rotary Club Meets every Friday at 12:15 p.m. at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. Call 954-786-3274.SaturdaysPompano Beach Kiwanis Club Westside Meets the rst and third Saturdays of the month at 8:30 a.m. at the E. Pat Larkin Community Center, 520 MLK Blvd., Pompano Beach. 954-782-8096. Deer eld Beach West Kiwanis Club Meets the second and fourth Saturdays of the month at 9 a.m. at Westside Park, 445 SW 2 St., Deer eld Beach. 954-54-7329883.SundaysPancake Breakfast Every third Sunday of the month, the St. Elizabeths of Hungry Parish hosts a pancake breakfast at 3331 NE 10 Terrace, Pompano Beach. The breakfast is from 7:30 a.m. to noon. Call 954-263 8415.Comedy ShowOn April 20, Galuppis Restaurant, 1103 N. Federal Hwy. in Pompano Beach, will host two comedy shows, 7:30 and 9:30 p.m. Comedians Kenny Rogerson from the FX show Rescue Me and Frank Santorelli from the Sopranos will be performing at both shows. Tickets are $20 per person and a table with eight reserved seats can be purchased for $150.00. Tickets are at www.stcmc.org or 954-553-6147 or 954-4951296. Appliance rebatesBroward County has extended its ENERGY SENSE Business Appliance Rebate Program application deadline from to April 2. There is up to $5,000 left in available rebates to eligible small-to medium-sized businesses that replace an old appliance with a new more energy efficient one. Refrigerators are eligible for between $150 or $250 in rebates and washing machines $150. Purchase must have been made on or after Dec. 17, 2011. Visit broward.org/ gogreen and click on rebate programs or call 954-3577328.

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The Pelican 35 Friday, March 23, 2012 Pompano Beach The Saint Laurence Chapel Day Shelter and its board of directors are teaming up to host a gala to support the homeless Saturday, March 24, at the Marriott North, 6650 N. Andrews Ave., Fort Lauderdale. Theme of the evening is Imagine a Night without a Home Gala. A reception and silent auction begin at 6 p.m., followed at 7 p.m. by an evening of dinner, jazz and dancing. St. Laurence Chapel Shelter, a nonprofit organization, has provided services to the homeless in Broward County for 24 years. During the event, eight people will be recognized as Community Honorees for their work for the homeless. They are Paul Heidemann from St. Gabriel Catholic Church; Catherine Phillips, John Knox Village; William Nicholson and Douglas Lorance, All Saints Episcopal Church; Beth Mattfolk, Saint Gregorys Episcopal Church; The Rev. Earl Henry, Episcopal Church of the Atonement; Erin Proko, Saint Mary Magdalene Episcopal Church and Rob Wyre, Isle Casino Racing. The shelters mission is to provide help and hope in a caring and non-judgmental environment. The shelter is at 1698 Blount Road in Pompano Beach. For more information, visit www.stlaurencechapel.org or contact Fletcher at (954) 972-2958 ext. 27.St. Laurence to host gala

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36 The Pelican Friday, March 23, 2012



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Friday, March 23, 2012 Vol. XX, Issue 12 Call 954-783-8700 to Advertise Email: siren2415@gmail.com Pompano Beach • Deer eld Beach • Lighthouse Point • Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Wilton Manors • Oakland Park • Hillsboro Beach • The Galt • Palm Aire The P e l i c a n Pelican By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFLauderdale-By-The-Sea – A federal regulation requiring every lodging establishment in the United States with a swimming pool or spa to be tted with xed lifts for the handicapped is “ludicrous and a ne example of wasteful spending,” says one local hotelier. John Boutin, general manager of the Windjammer Resort & Beach Club, used terms like “egregious, onerous and dangerous” as he spoke to commissioners this week. He explained that Title III of the Americans with Disabilities Act, or ADA, required that by March 15 every lodging establishment in the United States, no matter how small, must install a permanently af xed and independently operated pool lift at each of its pools, kiddie pools, spas or hot tubs. “If this alone were not ridiculous enough, the language reads that the lifts must be ‘immediately accessible’ during pool operation hours, so they cannot be deactivated or covered during hours the pool is open,” Boutin said. “This means unsupervised operation by anyone, including children, thereby creating a different kind of hazard. We don’t even allow plastic oats in the pool because children might hurt themselves or bother others,” Boutin said. “Can you imagine what they can do with a mechanical, 300-pound remote-Town supports hoteliers with complaints about pool lifts Deadline for ADA accessibility to public pools already passed See POOL ACCESS on page 15By Judy VikPELICAN STAFF Pompano Beach – The Pompano Beach Boulevard streetscape project, intended to revitalize and create an oceanfront pedestrian promenade, is moving along on schedule. “Things are looking great out there. We’ve moved to the east side, and we’re thrilled at the quality of work the contractor is doing,” Paul Kissinger, landscape architect and urban designer on the project, said at this week’s CRA board meeting. “But,” Kissinger added, “sometimes we open a can of worms when we do construction on an existing place. We have done our best to respond to the public and to various advisory boards, but this micromanagement has been expensive and it’s taking a lot of time. The results are something we can all be proud of, but it’s expensive.” Kissinger then presented the board with a list of 14 recommended additions to the project. He estimated total costs, if all are approved, at $470,000. Included in the costs were decorative walks at Northeast First and Second Streets for pedestrians to reach the beach; laying synthetic turf at the plaza, planned for the Atlantic terminus and Oceanfront Boulevard; additional grills and picnic tables on the sand at the beach; upgrades to present pavilions; new roofs for the bathrooms and ocean rescue buildings and resurfacing of the sidewalks. But other costs within the area came up for questions. Stronger dunes, pelicans in art, wider sidewalks public plaza are all part of the new look at the beach See BEACH on page 12 By Michael d’Oliveira PELICAN STAFFWilton Manors – It’s hard to nd a person in this town who doesn’t agree that pill mills are an unwanted nuisance that brings nothing but trouble. South Florida has gained the unwanted reputation of housing pill mills where prescriptions and purchases are easy to come by. So easy that South Florida pill mill parking lots are often packed with vehicles bearing tags from other states. Pill mills are often set up under the guise of pain clinics where physicians prescribe and dispense drugs on the same premises. Caught with lax laws regarding these clinics, the city threw its rst punch last April by placing a 270-day moratorium on issuing licenses to new pain clinics. This January, the commission put See PILL MILL LAW on page 4 The Pompano Beach Seafood Festival returns next month with vendors offering tempting spreads of seafood and other entrees. This year, the festival moves north on the beach. See story on page 22. City to take second look at pill mill law

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2 The PelicanFriday, March 23, 2012 SightingsA community calendar of East Broward County. Please email information to siren2415@gmail.com A Canadian tourist drowned Tuesday morning after going on a diving trip off the coast of Pompano Beach. The Broward Sheriff’s Of ce Communications Center received the call at around 11 a.m. advising that the boat Aqua View would be arriving on shore with a deceased male onboard. After going for a dive, Bruce Magill, 63, had resurfaced and began swimming toward the boat along with other divers, but he never made it to the vessel. The boat captain and passengers searched the surface of the water and nally located his oating body after about 15 minutes. Upon locating him, he was pulled onto the boat. A physician onboard immediately began cardiopulmonary resuscitation, but Magill was not responsive. Pompano Beach Fire Rescue stood by to transport the patient, but he was pronounced dead on scene. BSO Crime Scene and homicide detectives are investigating, though no foul play is suspected. The medical examiner’s of ce will perform an autopsy to determine the cause of death. Tourist drowns during dive off Pompano BeachBy Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach – Fire has temporarily closed Matt Moore’s restaurant, Checkers Old Munchen. But thanks to his brother, Bill Sand, Moore and his staff will be serving Fire can’t stop Pompano Beach restaurant owner from serving German cuisine, chef will move south soon German spirits and cuisine only two weeks after the ames and smoke did their damage. On March 26 starting at 5 p.m., the menu at Diner by the Sea, 215 E. Commercial Blvd. See FIRE on page 11 Art, Music, Film & Theatre 3-25 – The Seven Last Words of Christ, choral version in English, accompanied by a string quartet, Hayden, Op. 51, performed at 6 p.m. at Trinity Cathedral, 464 NE 16 St., Miami. Tickets are $20. 305789-0074. 3-28 – The Crests Tommy Mara’s performs at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach, from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Cost is $14 per ticket. Visit www. thecrests.com or call 954-78641111. 3-30 & 31 – At 7 p.m. the Sol Children Theatre, 3333 N. Federal Hwy. in Boca See SIGHTNGS on page 9Checkers Old Munchen employee Kelly Meyers cleans off a beer stein behind the German restaurant. On March 12, an accidental electrical re caused severe damage to the establishment. Owner Matt Moore says he should reopen in three months or less. [Photo by Michael d’Oliveira]

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The Pelican 3 Friday, March 23, 2012 Pompano Beach pension obligations dip slightly for re, policeBy Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach – “We call it the lost decade,” says Wilton Manors Police Chief Paul O’Connell, who serves as chair of the Pompano Beach Fire and Police Pension Board of Trustees. He refers to three events that led to the nation’s slip into the recent recession: the tech bubble, the Sept. 11 attack on the country and the most recent Wall Street “crash,” says O’Connell, of 2008. And that decade has had a 10-year domino effect in nearly all cities in this country when it comes to funding public pensions. But there may be some hope. Prior to 2001, investment returns were in the double digits, O’Connell explains. That accounts for the city’s re pension bill at being less than $1 million in 2001 This year, the city’s contribution to the re pension is $4,723,578, a gure that represents a decrease from last year of $65,830. In addition the state contributes $732,754. O’Connell says things are on a “downturn.” A large amount of funding for re and police pensions is “generated by investments,” Dennis Beach, Pompano Beach City Manager said. “Earnings keep our payments low.” But the lost decade factor, a 10-year period of low or no earnings, has caused government pension contributions to spike. “It’s an issue that cities all across the country are taking very hard looks at during these times,” Beach added. Those cities are also looking at decreased values on properties, and high foreclosure rates that have cut government revenues, making it tough for cities to put a budget in place, maintain services and keep taxes low. The property tax in Pompano Beach is 4.9 mills. Beach estimates that one-half to three-quarters of one mill produces the city’s contribution to re pensions.Police pensionsEven though Pompano Beach contracts police services from Broward Sheriff’s Of ce, or BSO, the city is still required to contribute to its former police employees who have not yet retired. Of cers who opted to join the BSO pension are not included in this number. The city disbanded its police department in 1999 in favor of contracting with BSO. At that time there were 200 active police of cers who had reached or were close to reaching eligibility for full pensions. Today, 45 of cers remain in the city’s police pension plan. While the $4.05 million pension contribution for the former Pompano Beach of cers is written by BSO, that amount was included in the city’s $35.7 million annual contract for police services. “We are all hurting from the lost decade,” said O’Connell. “There’s no escape from that.”

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4 The PelicanFriday, March 23, 2012 a pain clinic law in place to target smaller, privately owned clinics to make sure that pain clinics and small pharmacies operate as such and not as pill mills. Under the law, pain management clinics and pharmacies are prohibited from buying, storing and dispensing more than 5,000 combined unit doses of Schedule II substances per month. Those substances include codeine, morphine, oxycodone, hydrocodone and opium. These businesses are not allowed to have owners, of cers or pharmacists with drug-related criminal convictions within the last 10 years. Additionally, they must accept all forms of payment for non-Schedule II drugs and cannot accept cash as payment for Schedule II drugs or goods associated with Schedule II. They must also have a State of Florida licensed pharmacist physically on premises during all hours of operation, require patients to present a state or federal photo ID, dispense drugs only between 9 a.m. and 7 p.m., prescribe no more than a 72hour supply of Schedule II drugs and keep a record of every customer for up to two years and a monthly summary report of all Schedule II substances dispensed by each pharmacy or clinic must be given to police. Certain facilities that are publically traded, part of tax exempt organizations, have physicians who perform surgical procedures or are af liated with an accredited medical school are exempt from the law. With the new law in place, all clinics must have a license to operate, including those clinics that operated prior to the law. And not everyone is pleased. Fort Lauderdale attorney George Castrataro says the new law goes too far. Castrataro, who categorized the law as “arbitrary and capricious,” represents Quick Script, 2412 Wilton Drive and The Medicine Shoppe, 1905 N. Andrews Ave. He says the law unfairly targets smaller pharmacy operations. Sam Fawaz, owner of Quick Script, says the restrictions will hurt his business and his customers. “I would have to tell some of them goodbye. That’s putting me in a very unfair position.” One provision of the law Fawaz disagrees with prohibits him from mailing prescriptions outside city limits. He says some of his patients are outside the city, bed-ridden and have trouble getting to his store on a regular basis. In a Feb. 10 letter to the city, Castrataro wrote that his clients wanted to avoid litigation but that he had planned to seek emergency injunctive relief if no resolution could be found by Feb. 28. Since then, he said he’s decided not to le because he’s satis ed city of cials are trying to respond to the concerns of his clients. “My initial reaction was that it wasn’t intentional,” said Castrataro. “The commissioners in the past have been very reasonable.” City Manager Joseph Gallegos said the law is being reviewed and commissioners will probably address the issue again at their March 27 meeting. First license granted under new lawThe rst to apply and receive a license from the city was Fort Lauderdale Pain and Injury, 1907 N. Andrews Ave., which opened seven years ago. This month the commission, with the See PILL MILLS LAW on page 5 Pill mill lawContinued from page 1

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The Pelican 5 Friday, March 23, 2012 Pelican Advertising 954-783-8700 exception of Vice Mayor Tom Green, agreed to grant the license. Green said he didn’t think the business was properly located. “It might be zoned commercial but there are residents living on both sides.” Residents at the Woods Condominium, just south of Fort Lauderdale Pain and Injury, said a few months ago they had problems with the clinic’s patients using their parking spaces, trashing their property and defecating on it. “This is where we live. Not in our neighborhood. We don’t want it,” said resident Pam Molan. Dr. Mark Richards, owner of Fort Lauderdale Pain and Injury, classi ed as a pain clinic, said, and Molan agreed, that he has since eliminated the problem. Richards blamed the problems on the former physician he had employed who “had a following” of patients. “That problem is long taken care of,” he said. Mayor Gary Resnick said that the willingness of Richards to apply for a license shows he is a legitimate business because “pill mills” just operate “until they get caught and then they move on.” Police Chief Paul O’Connell said the clinic is “not even on the radar” of suspected “pill mill” operations. “That tells me the corrective action they took is working,” he said. Richards, a licensed chiropractor, said a medical doctor will be writing prescriptions on premise. He said his business sees an average of 12 to 15 patients a day and is open from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday to Friday. Commissioner Julie Carson urged residents to call the police if they see any violations. Newton said he was worried about the possibility someone might falsely complain just to shut down the clinic. O’Connell said it would take more than just one complaint and that police would investigate before taking action. If any clinic or pharmacy is shut down a public hearing is required within 30 days to determine whether or not it can re-open. Newton said that “30 days is a long time to be shut down if it’s not your fault.” O’Connell responded that the law “acts as a great motivator” for businesses to make sure they are in compliance. “I wouldn’t want to do anything to jeopardize my license or practice,” said Richards. Newton originally wanted to impose conditions but said later the new law should be enough. “We just hope you do what you say,” he said to Richards. In 2009, Wilton Manor’s close neighbor, Oakland Park, unanimously passed its own moratorium on new pain clinics. Prior to that, Oakland Park had 23 pain management clinics; up from 18 just a few months earlier. Although Wilton Manors of cials say only one clinic in the city was causing problems, they didn’t want to share Oakland Park’s reputation.Pill mill lawContinued from page 4

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6 The PelicanFriday, March 23, 2012 Deer eld Beach, Pompano Beach, Lighthouse Point, LauderdaleBy-The-Sea, Wilton Manors and Oakland ParkWilton Manors • Oakland Park • Hillsboro Beach The Pompano Pelican is published weekly on FridaysStreet Address: 1500-A E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, FL 33060 Telephone: 954-783-8700 • Fax: 954-783-0093Letters to the Editor are encouraged and accepted for print if signed, although a writer’s name will be withheld on request; letters must also include a daytime telephone number. Advertising rates are available upon request. Subscription rate is $31.80 including tax for one year’s delivery in Greater Pompano Beach; $95.40/per year including tax for others in the United States; call 954-783-8700 for rates abroad. The Pelican is a nonpartisan newspaper and reserves the right to decline advertising. Copyright 2011. Reproduction of this publication in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission of the publisher. The Pelican is a member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, Deer eld Beach Chamber and the LBTS Chamber. The Pelican is a state certi ed woman-owned minority business. The Pelican is delivered to businesses, libraries, schools, of ces, hospitals, news racks and single family homes. All advertising and copy is published at the sole discretion of the publisher. We welcome your critiques and ideas concerning this publication. Anne Siren, publisherExecutive Assistant: Mary Hudson Graphics: Rachel Ramirez Windsheimer Bookkeeper: John White Classi eds: Fran Shelby Contributing Writers: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Judy Wilson, Malcolm McClintock, Judy Vik, Mike d’Oliveira Account Executives: Paul Shroads, Carolyn Mann, Bill Heaton, Bill Fox Special Of ce Assistant: Cathy Siren ESTABLISHED 1993 • Volume XX, Issue 12 Founding Editor and PublisherAnne Hanby Siren Letters & Opinions LettersTo the editor, This letter is composed in response to The Pelican’s article addressing the lack of viable solutions for the erosion of Hillsboro’s North Beach published on Saturday, March 10. With over 500 miles of erosive beaches in the state of Florida at risk of disappearing over the next 10 years, the challenges faced by the Hillsboro community are shared by many other beach communities in Florida. The frustrations are compounded by the fact that the available solutions proposed for coastal erosion seem to be either cost intensive, labor intensive, unsightly or all of the above making almost any choice unappealing. Furthermore, as pointed out in the Hillsboro Beach study conducted by CSI, the intensive process of dealing with any coastal restoration project is exacerbated by the timely and painstakingly high costs of applying for and acquiring city, county, state and federal permitting and approval. Currently, the foundation of coastal theory is formulated from a physical and mechanical perspective; speci cally, the manner in which the cumulative forces of wind, waves, tides and currents govern the movement of sand. Accordingly, the technologies derived from a physical and mechanical study of coastal issues are themselves of a physico-mechanical nature. Jetties and groins, rock walls and revetments commonly re ecting wave energy and redirect currents but ultimately only reformat the look of a shoreline. For all the time and money these structures do not really address coastal erosion and in some areas they enhance it. Paradigm shift may help address chronic issues of beach erosion See PARADIGM on page 7 See LaMarca on page 14 To the editor In these economic times, most cities are trying to save money. Not so with the City of Deer eld Beach. When the city was presented with the prospect of moving the March 2013 city election to coincide with the presidential election in November 2012, the idea was not even favored by a vote of the commission. Cost of the March 2013 election would be $67,000 while a November 6, 2012 would cost less than $20,000. The response from one of the commissioners was a resounding “No.” Since the proposal was being put forth by the co-founders of the Rescind Unfair Taxes, it had to be a political ploy. What the commission failed to recognize was the suggestion was meant to move only this one election from March to November. This is the rst opportunity the city has had to hold an election that would result in a greater turn-out and save money. The Deer eld Beach charter gives the commission the right to make the change by ordinance. Those newly elected in November would not be installed until March. This is not an unusual concept since the president is elected in November and does not take the oath of of ce until January. The argument put forth claims that an incumbent loser could perpetrate a great deal of mischief as a lame duck. That says a lot about the opinion of the commissioners of the people with whom they serve. What logical reason can there be not to change the date? Is it an attempt to suppress voter turn-out, or are the mayor and the commissioners from Districts 3 and 4 fearful of running on their present records? The choice belongs to the voters. Jean M. RobbThere is still much more for me to do here at homeBy Chip LaMarca BROWARD COUNTY COMMISSIONER As I am sure you have read, for the past few weeks, I have been re ecting on the opportunity to run for Congressional District 22, an opportunity which I did not create, but felt I needed to explore. I am sure you have read the same stories in the newspapers and on the blogs, as well as heard the same comments I have. Now you will hear from me in my own words. As your elected representative on the Broward County Commission, I owe all of those I represent an explanation as to why I considered this opportunity. I had a very clear mission and that was to “test the waters” for this opportunity. I formed an exploratory committee to ask the people about the viability of my candidacy. I spoke with people whom I respect for good, honest advice; people like Congressman E. Clay Shaw, my Congressman for 26 years. He was very supportive of me and I believe that his support would have evened out the playing eld from any endorsements that had been rolled out in an effort to keep me out of the race. I was encouraged to do this, by many people whom I consider to be looking out for my best interests, which includes my family, friends, supporters, Republicans and Democrats alike. The most encouraging suggestions came from community and business leaders in both Broward and Palm Beach counties. In the end, it was clear that the best thing to do for my political aspirations would be to run for Congress. According to the research, it was certainly within reach. However, the right thing to do for the people of Broward County, for the people of District 4, for everyone who has told me that I am asking the right questions and trying to bring common sense to a process that desperately needs it, is to stay the course at the Broward County Commission. There is still much more for me to do here at home. We have a critical beach renourishment project that will play a part in the success of the travel and tourism industry of Broward County. We have critical infrastructure projects at Port Everglades that will determine where we will fall in the strategic ports initiative both with Tallahassee and Washington, DC.LaMarca City made wrong decision in election date choice, says reader Cover the playground at the beach, this is South Florida!By Anne SirenPUBLISHERHat’s off to the CRA’s fantastic plans for beach renovation: the plaza, the 17-foot wide sidewalks and the dune restoration. But what’s the deal about building a wonderful playground on the beach for young children when it’s not going to be fully shaded? If the city wants to have families come in droves to enjoy the sub-tropical clime, the ocean and the great seafood, then it’s important that their stay is a safe one. Under the shaded playground, there could be some signage to warn parents about the importance of sunscreen, hats and constant hydration. Tourists are true guests of the city, and failure to warn them of sun and heat hazards would be like failing to tell a house guests there’s an angry pit bull in the garage. There’s plenty to do in this city and the surrounding areas, without a tour of a local emergency room where children are seen far too often in the summer. We hope the CRA board thinks a bit more about the critical importance of shade for all people. Palm trees fail in that department, so the “tree” shade won’t work. The CRA should take the sun hazards of this city seriously. Everyone wants the tourists to come back.

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The Pelican 7 Friday, March 23, 2012 On a similar note, beach nourishment projects do not really address coastal erosion either. These recurring undertakings allow that erosion occurs at a given rate and applies sand taken from other environments accordingly. Although these approaches have contributed to an impressive understanding of the physical forces and interactions that form coastal environments, no viable or sustainable or even affordable solutions have been developed. With regard to saltwater intrusion and beach erosion, the fact that coastal issues persist is an indication that coastal engineering is in need of a paradigm shift and there is at least one company that is making an effort to revise their strategy. The coastal solutions rm GreenBeach LLC has emerged with a promising methodology that builds on the physico-mechanical approach to coastal degradation with a fresh perspective that factors in beach biology and chemistry in order to develop strategies that speci cally address beach erosion and coastal degradation. Recent pilots have shown signi cant and repeatable increases in sand accumulation and decreases in saltwater intrusion. Their method of coastal recovery does not rely on the addition of sand or the installation of hard structures but rather the removal of micro-pollutants and a restorative effort to balance pH and salinity within the beach. The technology developed by GreenBeach thus far is designed entirely of naturally available materials including salts, minerals, carbon-based compounds that mimic the nutrient sources available to a beach as well as a variety of common plant seed-derived complexes that stimulate germination. The material complements the natural nutrients available in the beach but also has the unique ability to extract and encapsulate synthetic and crude oils and other assorted micro-pollutants from soil and sand samples. The treatment process is remarkably simple and can be applied to one mile of beach in as little as one day. The GreenBeach digest is applied to the beach along a trench that just reaches groundwater. The trench is then covered and the material is naturally distributed by wave and tidal energy. The beach is immediately safe for use after an application. So as not to shock the system with the addition of even a mild digest the GreenBeach treatment allows for three additions to a beach over a 2 to 5 month period and the treatment plan is exible to accommodate community beach events. Because of the lengthy and costly permitting process GreenBeach has currently extending an offer to cover the expense of a pilot treatment if a community is interested in pursuing a pilot project. The staff can be reached at the address below. info@greenbeachllc.com Peter Rehage ParadigmContinued from page 6

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8 The PelicanFriday, March 23, 2012 Business matters The Pelican takes a look at local business owners. Call The Pelican to nd out how you can tell your story here because business matters. 954-783-8700. By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFMinuteman Press, located at 51 N. Federal Hwy. in Pompano Beach got a new owner in July of 2010 when Gloria Jacaruso took over. With an easy smile, she says, “I have had a career in marketing and journalism followed by a hiatus to raise our two children. When they became teenagers, I decided to reenter the business world. I felt this would be a good business, and I was right. In the past year and a half, and in a bad economy, we have managed to triple the business.” She’s quick to credit Vikki Edwards for helping her attain this success. She says, “Vikki is my graphic, design and customer service special person. She’s been here for 15 years and knows the entire business. The customers love her and so do we. She’s so valuable to our business. We think of ourselves as an extension of each client’s business, most of whom are small and appreciative of our guidance in marketing, graphics and writing skills.” Minuteman Press may well be the staff every small business needs but can’t yet afford. The owner feels that the company’s personalized service and knowledge gives them the edge over the big chains and allows them to compete without a problem. “Every job is different,” Vikki chimes in. “A new client may ask us to design and produce an effective Since 1978 Minuteman Press has offered small businesses professional, personalized servicebusiness card.” Gloria adds. “If they are a start up business, they may need forms, letterheads, envelopes and often a brochure to help them tell their story to the public. We can and do all of these things quickly and professionally for competitive prices. We do postcard mailings, numbered tickets for a raf e, programs and materials for non-pro ts. For example, we just completed a very attractive business directory for the Lighthouse Point Chamber of Commerce.” Rene Mahfood, Light Magazine, says she uses Minuteman Press at least twice a week for promotional sheets, small runs of brochures, business cards, posters and more. “I nd them to be extremely professional, and cost effective with a quick turn around.” Phil Kassees of Heavenly Pizza See MINUTEMAN on page 16 Gloria Jacaruso, owner of Minuteman Press, checks out a graphic designed by Vikki Edwards [seated], an invaluable 15-year employee of the company. Railway Flea Market and Swap MeetThe South Florida Railway Museum of Deer eld Beach, a nonpro t organization, will host its Model Railroad Flea Market and Swap Meet on March 31 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Westside Park Recreation Center, 445 SW 2 St. in Deer eld Beach. For more, call 954-448-8935 or 954-2607013.School Board Redistricting workshopThe Broward County School Board recently appointed a 19-member Redistricting Steering Committee to lead the single board member reapportionment process and create a recommended map with new district boundaries to balance the populations of the seven School Board districts based on 2010 Census data. The rst of three mapping workshops will be held on March 26 at 5:30 p.m. at the McArthur High School auditorium, 6501 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood. For more, visit www.broward.k12. .us/redistricting or call 754-3212480. Briefs

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The Pelican 9 Friday, March 23, 2012 Oakland Park – The City of Oakland Park will host an open house to update residents about development of a postdisaster redevelopment plan. The meeting is set from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. Tuesday, March 27, in the ECD Multi-Purpose Room at the Municipal Building, 5399 N. Dixie Highway, Oakland Park. The plan addresses the long-term response and redevelopment of the city if a major disaster should occur. Representatives from the city and the city’s consultant, Leigh Robinson Kerr & Associates, Inc., will be available to discuss the plan, answer questions and document comments. Information about development of the plan to date and next steps will be exhibited. For more information, call Leigh Kerr or Kelly Ray at 954-467-6308. Company to discuss disasters and aftermath People are talking about . the Mermaid Tea Party The Palm Aire at Coral Keys clubhouse was transformed into an English tearoom complete with lace tablecloths, roses, and silver tea sets early this month. Twenty members of the daily pool exercise group, the Mermaids, enjoyed a wide variety of savory and sweet treats and teas as well as an afternoon of good company. Led by chairperson, Pat Mousseau, the Mermaids shared prized tea cups, serving pieces and teapots as well as contributing delicious treats. Jacky Simmons, Dorthea Wender, and Barbara Hession take a break from the water to enjoy a spot of tea..By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFWilton Manors – Those looking for a parking space along Wilton Drive’s north end will soon have 32 more to choose from. On Tuesday, city commissioners approved the purchase of a residential piece of property, near the corner of Northeast 26 Street and Northeast 8 Terrace for $229,000, with the purpose of creating 32 permanent parking spaces. Commissioners also approved an agreement with Kids In Distress to lease its adjacent piece of property for $10 a year per a ve-year contract. Once the purchase and lease agreement are nalized the city will knock down the house on the residential property and pave both lots. In exchange, Kids In Distress employees will be able to use up to 20 spaces from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday; according to City Manager Joseph City adds 32 parking spaces near Wilton Drive Gallegos, Kids would also be able to use the lot after 7 p.m. for occasional fundraisers or other special events. “At the end of ve years, Kids In Distress has the option to require the city to purchase the property at fair market value. If they decide not to require the purchase the city can renew for ve years,” said Bob Mays, city nance director. According to city staff, the cost to demolish the house would be about $5,000 and the cost to build a parking lot with meters, striping, gutters and everything required by law is between $150,000 and $180,000. Mays estimated that it would take between 30 and 60 days for the lot to be built. The money would come from the $1 million the city borrowed from SunTrust Bank to pay for parking improvements. “It’s a little bit of a risk,” said Mayor Gary Resnick, referring to the money being spent. City Attorney Kerry Ezrol responded, saying that either the city would have a lease for 10 years or it would own the lot by the end of the agreement. Vice Mayor Tom Green said the situation wasn’t ideal but that Wilton Drive desperately needs parking. “We talk about parking and when we make some progressSee PARKING on page 32 SightingsContinued from page 2Raton, will be putting on a production of “The Commedia Aladdin: a magic carpet ride to a happy ending!” Both nights are at 7 p.m. “The zany antics of Sol’s popular resident commedia troupe includes bumbling, scheming, incorrigible improvisations and very physical comedy.” Early reservations are recommended. Tickets are $12 and include refreshments. Visit www.solchildren.org or call 561-447-8829. 4-1 – Palm Sunday Concert –April 1 at 4 p.m., Choral favorites for Lent including selections by J.S. Bach, G.F. Handel and more at The First Presbyterian Church, 2331 NE 26 Ave., See SIGHTINGS on page 15

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10 The PelicanFriday, March 23, 2012 Making a Difference Phyllis J. Neuberger wants your suggestions about people who are making a difference. Call 954-7838700.By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFF Rita Ackrill’s enthusiasm for her time spent at Insight for the Blind is as great today as it was when she began to volunteer for Talking Books 30 years ago. She was honored recently at Insight’s annual volunteer luncheon for her contribution of 13,000 volunteer hours. Ackrill relates how it all began. “My husband retired from the United State Air Force in 1972 and we moved from Patterson Air Force Base in Dayton, Ohio to Wilton Manors with our three sons and daughter. A neighbor friend, who was a teacher, knew how much I loved to read. She suggested that I might like to volunteer for Insight for the Blind. I went over for an interview, and although I never quali ed as a narrator, I have been a reviewer for 30 years.” “The Library of Congress in Washington, D.C. chooses the material they want recorded, and we do it. They are very fussy. Everything must be perfect. Our narrators have to handle the pressure. Many of them have professional backgrounds. As a reviewer, my job is to listen to what the readers have recorded and note any discrepancies in pronunciation or background noises. The mistakes and sounds are then Rita Ackrill of Wilton Manors honored by Insight for the Blind for 30 years of volunteer service edited out. There usually is not too much to be changed as our narrators are excellent readers. Our equipment is much better now than it was when I started. We’re digital enabling us to produce a better result which makes my job even easier.” When her children were in school she volunteered a few times a week. Now that they’re grown and she has more time, she’s at Insight for the Blind almost every morning. She says, “We’re an all volunteer organization and the camaraderie is fabulous. We’re all there for one reason—to enhance the lives of those who can’t see to make the reading choices that sighted people can. We enjoy giving of ourselves knowing the end result. We get feedback. Letters and phone calls reassure us that our work is well received. I’m not alone. I’m just one of many dedicated to providing talking books to the visually challenged. We welcome and we need new volunteers.” Her main hobbies are reading and doing crossword puzzles. Thank you, Rita Ackrill, for your generosity to this worthy effort. Talking Books is a service of the National Library for the Blind at the Library of Congress in Washington D.C. Last year over 850,000 people got this free service, through the public library system all across the country. New volunteers are always welcome at Insight for the Blind where Talking Books have been produced by volunteers since 1975. For further information, contact Harry Sharp at Insight, Monday through Friday at 954-522-5057. Rita Ackrill was honored by Insight for the Blind for her 30 years of service, and 13,000 volunteer hours as a digital book reviewer. Pictured as she listens for mistakes and background noise in newly narrated recordings. [Photo courtesy of Insight for the Blind]LBTS – Commissioners in Lauderdale-By-The-Sea named seven members to a new charter review board at the March 13 commission meeting. Named to the board were Ken Kugler, Sandra Green, Yann Brandt, David Wessels, Susan Delegal, Chuck Clark and Ron Piersante. The board will consider issues town commission identi es and other issues the board identi es and make recommendations to the commission on potential revisions to the town charter. Named to two-year terms on the Fire ghters Pension Trust Fund Board of Trustees were Linda Collins and Robert Polyasko. The board oversees general administration and operation of the volunteer re ghters’ pension plan.Egg hunt, bonnet contests on for Easter LBTS – Easter by the Sea, the annual celebration sponsored by the town of Lauderdale-By-The-Sea, is set from 9 to 10:30 a.m. Saturday, April 7, at Town Hall at 4501 Ocean Drive. Three egg hunts are planned for children in three different age categories. Bring Easter baskets and cameras for photos with the Easter bunny. A bonnet contest will take place immediately after the last egg hunt for children. Prizes will be awarded. Mayor Roseann Minnet is chairing the event. For more information, call 954-640-4200.Board appointments Briefs

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The Pelican 11 Friday, March 23, 2012 The Pelican We Mean Business! in Lauderdale-By-The-Sea, will start offering German fare like bratwurst and wienerschnitzel for dinner; patrons will still be able to enjoy Diner by the Sea’s dishes for breakfast and lunch. “I’m going to bring my German beers and wines over there too,” said Moore. Not long after the March 12 re at Checkers Old Munchen, 2209 E. Atlantic Blvd., Moore approached his older brother with the idea; a no-brainer for Sand. “He’s my brother, and he’s family and I’ll do what I have to do to support my family,” said Sand. “We’re family and we always help each other out.” The re, according to a report by the Pompano Beach Fire Department, was electrical and started in the kitchen; arson has been ruled out. Although there was smoke damage on the walls and parts of the dining room ceiling, the ames were mostly contained to one side of the kitchen. “The re department got here pretty quickly,” said Moore. Moore says he just had the interior remodeled a year ago. Now, he and his employees are going through the restaurant trying to salvage as much as they can and planning on remodeling again. Moore, who estimates the damage at about $150,000, says his restaurant will be ready to re-open in about three months or possibly sooner. He is planning to manage dinners at Diner by the Sea so he can bring his current clientelle over with his German cuisine. Moore is bringing the crew over to manage the diner at night. “I think it’s very considerate of him. We have a great boss,” said Sonja Braun of Checkers. Moore says he would probably be open sooner but for the permitting process. “All that takes time.” To make the process faster, Pompano of cials recently implemented a new system that will allow permits to be reviewed and corrected online. Moore also sees the situation as a good business move for his brother. Diner by the Sea, Moore says ,will get more exposure when Checkers Old Munchen customers come for a beer or bratwurst. Customers who order off the German menu can get any meal for $10 or less. For Diner by the Sea, call 954-491-0642. FireContinued from page 2 The Pelican 954-783-8700

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12 The PelicanFriday, March 23, 2012 “As we move through this project, we need to determine what side of the ledger the costs fall on – the city or the CRA,” Kim Briesemeister, co-executive director of the CRA, noted. An additional new request for a shade structure over the beachside playground came from the parks and recreation department advisory board, she said. The CRA didn’t plan for that, and the design team didn’t think it was necessary. Kissinger said a broad range of shade structures is available. Prices can range from $100,000 to $150,000 for a cover out of a catalog to three-quarter of a million dollars or more for a stretched fabric canopy. He said the design team could come back with speci c recommendations and costs. “There are probably a lot of opinions [on shade covers],” he said. Resident Keith Mizell said the project will be incredible, adding, “This is the time to get excited.” But not about synthetic turf. “To me the beach is a spiritual location. To introduce something arti cial is too jarring,” Mizell said. He said the other additions are fantastic and would nish the project. Kissinger said synthetic turf is the most appropriate design solution. “We have used it across the Caribbean,” he said, describing the product as high quality and low maintenance. Other choices would include sand, pavement or a playground surface. “This [the synthetic turf] would keep a clean, elegant look,” he said. “You don’t have to water, fertilize or x it after every festival. From a lifecycle standpoint and look, it’s the most elegant solution.” Board member Barry Dockswell asked Kissinger for clari cation of his remarks about micromanaging the project. “What are we doing differently?” he wondered. “We’re having to circle back on decisions made because of public comments to the CRA and commission,” Kissinger said. “I’m pretty good at the consensusbuilding process. We went through the process and then, as we began construction, kept circling back. The wall and dune we have looked at a half dozen times.” “What do we need to do as the CRA board?” Dockswell asked. “Get the facts out, and then stand behind what’s done,” Kissinger said. “Don’t always circle back unless you feel you didn’t get enough information. It’s a tight rope to walk.” “You may have gone in circles with others. If you have gone round and round, it isn’t with us. I don’t accept See BEACH on page 13BeachContinued from page 1 The present parking lot at the terminus of Atlantic Boulevard will be transformed into a plaza with water features, an open air stage, palms and pelican art [far left]. The pelicans, tted on a pole will rise and fall with the wind. [Photos courtesy of Pompano Beach CRA]

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The Pelican 13 Friday, March 23, 2012 that as an excuse,” George Brummer, board member, said. Brummer said the CRA board needs an accounting of what all this costs and where it comes from. He also had a problem with arti cial turf. “We’re dealing with a natural environment, and we ought to stick with it. It’s silly to play baseball or football on arti cial turf. The beach is a natural area, and we should keep it as such.” Kissinger said turf and irrigation were in the original plan. He thinks arti cial turf would be better. Dockswell said he has trouble picturing arti cial turf at the beach. Kissinger suggested he visit Harbordale Park or Oswald Park in Fort Lauderdale where the product is used. Kissinger said he has some at his house. “Stand 10 feet away, and you have no idea it’s arti cial.” Regarding the proposed shade structure, Dockswell said he’s looking for shade, not structure. “It’s all about the views. Make sure there is enough shade where people congregate, maybe with trees or small auxiliary structures. My concern is with adding shade, not an expensive, artistic statement.” Board members need to see the costs of each item, Dockswell said. Brummer said shade is a necessity over the children’s playground area. “You can’t expect children to be in the sun for three hours. Not to have shade is ridiculous. This is Florida, where the sun is beastly. It’s not Cape Cod.” He said the advisory board has had its chance to see the proposals. Commissioner Charlotte Burrie asked the board to consider the proposed list of additions, along with prices for each item, at the earliest possible commission meeting. “Then we can determine if we have the money,” she said. “I don’t think it’s rocket science.” The motion passed unanimously. Along with the changes, a public art project will consist of several sculpted pelicans, each on a pole. Depending on the wind, the birds’ wings will lift them in the air. Briesemeister said it isn’t yet clear if the city and county will share the cost for art in a public place or how many pelicans there will be. “Find out if those pelicans can reproduce,” board member Brummer quipped. Board member Rex Hardin asked if they could get input from their advisory boards on the proposed additions. Briesemeister said that could be done. Brummer, who presided over the meeting in the absence of Mayor Lamar Fisher, said the board is being pushed awfully fast on this. The project is expected to be completed this winter. BeachContinued from page 12 Wider sidewalks will accommodate pedestrians out for a stroll. Vehicle parking will be available on the street with dropoff areas for families planning a day at the beach.

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14 The PelicanFriday, March 23, 2012 The Pelican • Now Online As you know this role for me has always been about creating jobs and growing our economy. If you read the Sun-Sentinel this week, you saw the good news that we receivedunemployment in Broward County fell from 8.6 percent to 8.3 percent. Broward County is much better off when compared to our neighbors to the north and south as well as overall unemployment for the State. Palm Beach County is at 9.6 percent, Miami-Dade County is at 9.9 percent, and The State of Florida is at 9.6 percent. Broward has certainly positioned itself better as compared to the surrounding counties, but this would not have been possible without the Greater Fort Lauderdale Alliance and the business community that bring new businesses to Broward County, as well as working to retain and support the struggling companies that are already working to employ Broward residents. Just this week I was honored to be named as a cochairman of the Six-Pillars Strategic Planning process for Broward County. The Six Pillars process is being led by the Florida Chamber Foundation at the state level, and is meant to help communities throughout the State of Florida prosper and create high paying jobs by creating a visioning process which looks to a 20-year horizon. Six Pillars will be addressing these topics which have been deemed critical to economic success in the future: talent supply and education, innovation and economic development, infrastructure and growth leadership, business climate and competiveness, civic and governance systems, quality of life and quality of places. In order to become a Six Pillars Community, a community, county or region in Florida must complete a 10-step process focused around the Six Pillars for Florida’s Future framework. The framework serves as an organizing force for strategic planning at local, regional and state levels. It provides a means of harnessing fragmented viewpoints into a common and consistent conversation so that thoughtful and productive planning can take place. Broward has also bene ted from 26 consecutive months of tourism growth. The Greater Fort Lauderdale tourism industry continues to surge, fueled by 11.1 million visitors from around the world spending $9.06 billion. However, Broward is still missing one thing that will help set us apart from other destinations. I have met with anyone and everyone in the travel and tourism industry with whom I could get an appointment to re-engage the conversation of creating a true, world-class convention center hotel. Additionally, I have met with leaders in our marine industry, an industry that is critical for the success of our economy. Think about the Boat Show and the economic impact of the world’s largest boat show here in Broward County. These meetings have given me one clear vision. I need to stay the course and continue the important work right here in Broward County. There will be time for other endeavors in the future. However, I have seen rst-hand that the government closest to the people is most effective. So this is where I will continue to serve, and I cannot thank you enough for allowing me to do so. If there is anything that we can do to assist you, please do not hesitate to contact our of ce at 954-357-7004 or by email at clamarca@ broward.org. You can also stay updated by viewing our website www.broward.org/ commission/district4, as well as signup to receive email updates from us. As always, it is an honor to serve you. LaMarcaContinued from page 6

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The Pelican 15 Friday, March 23, 2012 Advertise with The Pelican 954.783.8700 controlled chair?” Boutin says this unrealistic requirement will cost each lodging establishment $3,000 to $5,000 per pool or spa. The regulations say a pool lift may not be shared between two pools or a pool and spa in the same location. Boutin asked that if any permits were necessary for lift installation, could the town be as lenient and waive fees. Pat Hodgson, a board director at the Driftwood Beach Club on El Mar Drive, said she has spoken to the ADA, “and they don’t understand the verbiage of the requirements. They say public pools must comply, but they can’t quite tell you who is public and who is not. Now they say timeshares [such as the Driftwood] are public. Previously, they said they were private.” She asked for support from the commission to get the deadline for compliance extended or possibly removed. “Give us more time to comply or relook at Title III.” In an interview, Hodgson said the Driftwood has just completed a major renovation to its hot tub. With these regulations, they will have to take up the brickwork and replace it with concrete. Commissioner Chris Vincent put the issue on the agenda to acknowledge the concern of hoteliers and to seek feedback on how commissioners could show support “before the government passes laws that have such consequential impact.” “Where do we stop?” Commissioner Stuart Dodd asked. “This is a huge imposition on our tourism industry to try to comply. Is this something that could be a resolution?” Town Attorney Susan Trevarthen said the commission could pass a resolution of support for hoteliers. Commissioners directed her to draft a resolution. Mayor Roseann Minnet said she would take the resolution to the Broward League of Cities. She also suggested calls to members of Congress. Boutin said that in the 30 years his family has run the Windjammer Resort, he can’t think of one instance where such a lift was needed. He said it would be for “the handicapped who have the use of their upper body and feel strong enough to use the pool and swim without the use of their legs, a very small target audience.” He said it was ludicrous to force such devices on hoteliers. Pool accessContinued from page 1SightingsContinued from page 9 Pompano Beach. A $10 suggested donation will be taken at the door. Call 954941-2308. 4-14 & 20 – Curtain Call Playhouse presents And Then There Were None a murder mystery at 8 p.m. at the Herb Skolnick Center, 800 SW 36 Ave., Pompano Beach. Books, Speakers, Education, Classes & Seminars 3-29 – The Lighthouse Point Library holds its semiannual book sale from March 29 to 31 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily at Dixon Ahl Hall, 2220 NE 38 St., Lighthouse Point. Used books, DVDs, VHS tapes, and CDs will be available for purchase. Prices range from 25 cents for paperback books to $5 for hardcover books and $1 to $3 for DVDs and CDs. On Saturday, March 31 from 1 pm to 4 pm, $1 will get buyers as many books as they can t in a plastic bag. All proceeds bene t the library. Donations of books, DVDs and CDs for the sale may be dropped off at the library. 3-31 – Juan Riera speaks on “Pirate’s Treasure and Shipwrecks of South Florida” at the next History at High Noon presentation from noon to 1 p.m. at the Old School Museum, 232 NE 2 St., Deer eld Beach. The free lecture is sponsored by the Deer eld Beach Historical Society. Clubs & Civic Groups 3-26 – Friendly Toastmasters will meet at 7 p.m. at the Galleria Mall food court, 2414 E. Sunrise Blvd., Fort Lauderdale. 954-7180543.See SIGHTINGS on page 16

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16 The PelicanFriday, March 23, 2012 agrees. He’s been a loyal customer of Minuteman Press since the mid-90s and says, “They print my menus, copies, mailing pieces – everything I need. They do a great job and on time.” The owner is proud of the state of the art equipment. A brand new, black and white high speed digital press can produce booklets, thick les and do high volume copying quickly. She says, “We can number, perforate, laminate and score, create presentation folders and covers, programs, proposals, raf e tickets/books, resumes, brochures, yers and booklets.” “We’re a small shop with big capabilities,“ Gloria adds. “We started with a staff of three and now we are a staff of ve, and growing.” Continuing, she says, “As a family we are very community minded. We live here. We work here and we care about Pompano Beach. We belong to the Chamber of Commerce here and in Lighthouse Point. My husband owns Moore & Co., a CPA rm on Atlantic Boulevard. I’m on the board of Florida Singing Sons Boys Choir. Our son, Anthony, 14, is a Singing Son. Our 16year-old daughter, Angelica, is a ballet enthusiast. We sponsor and participate in many church and civic events like Unity in the Community which was a big success.” Gloria says they make a point of supporting their customers’ businesses and even refer them to each other. The company goal is to be the client’s resource for its business and personal communication needs. “We have invested in the best technology available to keep us competitive. Our Minuteman Press Pompano web site makes it easier for our clients to request estimates, place orders, check proofs and transfer les on line. Our theme is, “Your business is our business. When you succeed, we succeed.” Stop in or call 954-9424300. Visit our web site at pompano.minutemanpress. com MinutemanContinued from page 8 SightingsContinued from page4-5 – Broward Sierra Club meets at 7:30 p.m. at Fern Forest Nature Center, 201 Lyons Rd. S., Coconut Creek. Guest speaker is Michele Williams, director of the Southeast Region of the Florida Public Archaeology Network at Florida Atlantic University. She will speak about the history of the New River in Fort Lauderdale. legalbarb2@yahoo.com or 954-946-7359. 4-9 & 16 – Gold Coast Toastmasters Club meets from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Denny’s, 3151 NW 9 Ave., Fort Lauderdale. The club meets on the second and third Monday of the month. 954895-3555 or 954-782-9951.Festivals & Events3-30 – The St. Coleman Parish’s Men’s Club Fish Fry takes place from 5:30 to 9 p.m. at St. Coleman, 1200 S. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. Cost is $8 for adults and $5 for kids. Visit www. stcmc.org or call 954-9423533. 4-20 – The 28th Annual Pompano Beach Seafood Festival, April 20 through 22 at the far east end of Atlantic Boulevard in Pompano Beach. There will be food, entertainment and games. Cost is $12 per adult and See SIGHTINGS on page 24

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The Pelican 17 Friday, March 23, 2012 Tomorrow, March 24, a rally is planned to keep the Hillsboro Lighthouse light shining as an aid to navigation. The event begins at 1 p.m. and continues until 4 p.m. at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach. Sponsored by the Hillsboro Lighthouse Preservation Society, or HLPS, the public rally is in support of the Hillsboro Lighthouse, and calls on the United States Coast Guard, or USCG, to preserve the status quo with regard to operation of the 105year old landmark. The USCG has sought public and mariner opinion regarding the lighthouse’s value as a navigational aid, after sea turtle advocate John Carlson and Richard Rally planned to keep lights on at Hillsboro LighthouseSPECIAL TO THE PELICANWhitecloud of Sea Turtle Oversight Protection, or STOP, complained that the light disturbs sea turtles. As a result, the Coast Guard is considering three options: shut down the light completely, obscure portions of the light or maintain the status quo. HLPS President Art Makenian said, “The light was dim from 1992 to 1999, and there were nighttime boating wrecks almost weekly. Hillsboro Inlet notoriously has four to six foot seas, and with the reef, rocks and the jetty around the inlet, it is important to have this aid for mariners.” USCG LTJG Andrew Haley has said previously that the Coast Guard has sent letters to both the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the National Marine Fisheries Service indicating that the light does not negatively affect the turtles. USCG Sector Miami Command wants further input from the public that illustrates the light is still important to mariners despite the use of global positioning systems. The 142-foot-high iron lighthouse was built in Detroit, Michigan in 1906 by Russell Wheel & Foundry Company and shipped by boat via Lake Erie, Lake Michigan, Illinois and Mississippi Rivers, Gulf of Mexico, & Key West to its present location, where it was reassembled with a 2nd order Fresnel lens manufactured by Barbier Benard et Turenne of Paris, France. First lit on March 7, 1907, the light has survived over 22 tropical storms and hurricanes, shining its beam 28 nautical miles out to sea every 20 seconds, earning it the nickname Big Diamond. “With the exception of the years it needed repair, it’s been on every day since, except for World War II,” said Art Makenian, “Besides the aid to navigation, the light has tremendous historical significance, which is why we are sponsoring this public rally to give the public a voice in what may happen to one of their local treasures.” April 20, 2012 is the deadline for comments to the USCG by mail to: Commander, USCG 7th District, Brickell Plaza Federal Building, 909 SE 1st Ave., Miami, FL, 33131, attn: LTJG Andrew Haley; by phone at: (305) 415-6748; or via email at andrew.s.haley@ uscg.mil.

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18 The Pelican Friday, March 23, 2012 Scoreboard To advertise on this page, call Bill Fox at 954-804-1056 Pompano Beach 9 Hole Women’s League Results March 20 Class A: 1st Place: Susana Rust 43 2nd Place: Susan Dimond 44 3rd Place (tie): Kathy Gardner 45, Maureen Hussian 45 and Cathy Olson 45 Class B : 1st Place (tie): Harriet Fisher 48 and Joanne Price 48 2nd Place (tie): Marlene Williams 51 and Eileen Wankmuller 51 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach The most exciting news for local golfers is being generated at the Pompano Municipal Golf Course where construction of 18 holes designed by Greg Norman begins early in April. Norman is reconstructing the Pines, a 6,948-yard, par 72 to a 7,200-yard course with significant changes. “The par 4’s will be par 5’s,” golf pro Bob Loring said. “The greens are being moved closer to water. When we asked him to maintain the difficulty, he gave us a look that said ‘expect that and more!’” Having Greg Norman put his signature on this municipal golf course is Construction on Greg Norman-designed golf course to begin in April expected to draw tourists to the area Loring said as well as bring golfers in from all over south Florida. Norman recently completed the Parkland Country Club Golf Course which is getting good reviews. One of the last great rounds to be played on The Pines occurred last week when local golfer Chad Couch birded 11 of the first 15 holes in the Wednesday skins’ game that attracts the area’s top players. Couch shot a 62 and broke the record of 64. With the old Pines soon to be history, that score will become a fixture in the record books. With The Pines closed, golfers will be playing The See NORMAN on page 19A popular walk to the rst tee and a favorite spot for event photographs at the Pompano Beach course, and there’s room for the golf carts on the bridge.

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The Pelican 19 Friday, March 23, 2012 If you cannot locate a Pelican in your city or town, Call 954 .783.8700 Palms Course this summer, a somewhat shorter layout nestled within The Pines. The Palms is 6,835 yards from the gold tees and presents plenty of challenges such as at the 6th hole, a par 3 where water nudges the green and railroad ties protect it. At the 16th hole, a par 5 for men, a par 4 for women, golfers must hit 420 yards, usually into the wind. The greens on The Palms are large and rated at midspeed, Loring said. Loring came to Pompano Beach 10 years ago from the Lago Mar Country Club. A baseball player at University of Florida, Loring took up golf comparatively late in life, in NormanContinued from page 18 his 20s, inspired by his sister who played the game for the Hurricanes. Once he took up his clubs, he was hooked, he says. He is a PGA golf professional and director of golf for the City of Pompano Beach. Already one of the more difficult courses in this area, Pompano Beach Municipal is also the busiest. Its 36 holes attract about 500 golfers a day during the winter, or 100,000 a year. So far, Loring said, the numbers are slightly ahead of last year. One of the draws is the fact that this course is one of the very few that allows golfers to walk. And according to Loring, every year he is seeing more walkers. Originally designed by Von Hagge & Devlin, the course offers one thing that is rare in south Florida, no houses or buildings line the fairways. It also provides golfers with a complete practice facility: chipping green, bunker, two putting greens and a driving range. It’s all available for the price of a bucket of balls: $6. Equally a fair deal are the green fees, in season $45.50; in summer, $25. Memberships are available that offer rounds for the price of the cart, $17, and a twoweek lead on tee times. Charity events are encouraged. Last year, the NFL Alumni held its prestigious tournament here. Boosters of the city’s popular dog park should know that on April 14 a tournament will raise money that supports Canine Corner. In May, PBHS Boosters will hold a fundraising tournament at Pompano Municipal. Weekly tournaments are held for mens and womens golf associations, and there are weekly clinics for junior players. A clinic for the women focuses on different skills every class. Private and groups lessons are available. Another amenity that brings golfers to the course is Galuppi’s Restaurant and lounge with indoor and outdoor dining and drinking and banquet facilities. The course and restaurant are located at 1101 N. Federal Highway. Golf legend Greg Norman, right, and golf pro Bob Loring.

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20 The Pelican Friday, March 23, 2012 By Malcolm McClintockPELICAN STAFFSubs, Subs, Subs 1563 N. Dixie Hwy. Pompano Beach 954-941-7565Located on Dixie Highway just across the road from the famous Good Year Blimp hangar, “Subs, Subs, Subs” has been serving filling salads and sandwiches to hungry locals for the past eight years. “I worked 28 years at the Red Fox diner and also parttime at Georgie’s Subs,” says owner Janet Weiss. “Then when the owners of Georgie’s decided to retire, I thought it was time for me to branch out on my own. So I bought the business and have been slicing away ever since.” “Our ham and turkey sub is very popular along with the Italian and, of course, the Club sub,” says the friendly sandwich specialist. “But we also have several hot subs such as steak & onion, meatball Parmesan, tuna melt, hot Italian and hot Reuben with sauerkraut.” “All our meats and assorted cold cuts including salami, capicola, pepperoni, corned beef and bologna are sliced to order,” says the gregarious Pittsburgh native. “I also slice our veggies every morning. By the way, we get our tomatoes fresh from my brother’s farm [Whitworth Farms] in Delray” “Every sub can be enhanced with our secret sauce. I make it myself and it is absolutely delicious,” says Weiss about the tangy vinaigrette that adds an exciting burst of flavor to any sandwich. “I also make my own delicious bruschetta preparation for our subs and Pompano Beach’s Subs, Subs, Subs serves hungry customers gargantuan sandwiches at wallet-friendly prices salads.” Of note is the size of a standard large sub. These behemoths can weigh over 2 lbs. and are practically impossible to finish in a single sitting. Of course, this does not prevent Weiss from offering the “Hungry Man” version which literally doubles the quantity of meats and cheese. Anyone attempting to eat this monster in one fell swoop should probably do so in a hospital waiting room… just in case. “I make everything myself. The chicken, tuna and crab salad preparations are all made fresh in house,” says Weiss as she provides a sample taste of each. Indeed, the three varieties are incredibly creamy and provide the deep, velvety mayonnaise-See SUBS on page 29Loaded with roast beef, ham, turkey, cheese, lettuce, tomato and secret sauce, the eye-popping club sub is a fan favorite. [Photos by Malcolm McClintock]

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22 The Pelican Friday, March 23, 2012 Advertise in The Pelican Pompano Beach Seafood Festival gets slight change of locationBy Michael d’Oliveira PELICAN STAFFPompano Beach – The 28th Annual Pompano Beach Seafood Festival is moving – a few hundred feet north. The festival, April 20 through 22, is relocating from its usual location at the end of East Atlantic Boulevard just north to the Pompano Pier, 222 N. Pompano Beach Blvd. John Good, of Good Event Management, who has run the event for the last 16 years and been involved with it since it began, says he’s excited about the new location. “There’s a lot more room for people to sit in front of the stage [located north of the pier]. The beach is much wider there,” said Good. The current construction along East Atlantic Boulevard, including the beach area, is what Good says prompted him to move the event. The new entrance will be at the corner of A1A and Northeast 2 Street. The food area will be located west of the pier while the arts and crafts vendors, community stage and kids zone will be to the south. Good estimates between 120 and 130 arts and crafts vendors and about 36 food vendors will have booths set up. “It’s very similar to what we’ve always had,” he said. Originally, says Good, the Seafood Festival started as a way to hand out awards for the Pompano Beach Fishing Rodeo, May 16 through 19, but has since evolved. “Its grown significantly over the years,” he said. One familiar site will be the Seafood World Restaurant and Marketplace booth. Open in Lighthouse Point since 1976, Hugh Ganter, also known as See FESTIVAL on page 23

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The Pelican 23 Friday, March 23, 2012 Papa Huey, has had a booth at the festival every year since it started. “As busy as we are, you need to stay in front of the public. We do get a lot of publicity and we get a chance to show our new products, if we have any,” said Ganter. But, he says, it’s not really about the money. “Giving back to the community is number one. If, along the way, you make some money, that would be a bonus.” Included in Seafood World’s Seafood Festival menu is stone crabs, raw oysters, raw clams and seafood vinaigrette. “We stick to seafood,” said Ganter. The festival also acts as a fundraiser for local charities and organizations, including Kiwanis, Rotary, Boy Scouts of America and Blanche Ely High School. Admission is $12 per person. Children 10 and under are free. Hours: Friday from 5 to 10 p.m., Saturday from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. and Sunday 11 FestivalContinued from page 22 a.m. to 8 p.m. Parking is available at the city parking lot directly across from the pier and at the corner of A1A and Northest 2 Street. A free trolley service runs from Bank of America, 2335 E. Atlantic Blvd., and Wells Fargo, 2400 E. Atlantic Blvd., to the festival. Parking at those bank parking lots is free. Visit www.pompanobeach seafoodfestival.com for more. In the March 16 issue of The Pelican it was incorrectly written in the Publix article that the public parking project at Harbor Village in Pompano Beach is a Florida Department of Transportation initiative. The agency overseeing the project is the Community Redevelopment Agency. The Pelican also incorrectly wrote that the new East Atlantic Boulevard Publix store number was 1053. The correct number is 1393. The Pelican regrets the errors. Correction and clari cationVisit The Pelican online at pompanopelican. com. Let us know how we can help cover the news of your city. We Mean Business! 954-783-8700

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24 The Pelican Friday, March 23, 2012 The Pelican! We Mean Business 954-783-8700 By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFDeerfield Beach – Like the classic 1962 Beach Boys song, Don Ryan is on his own Surfin’ Safari of sorts – bringing surfing to kids with disabilities. Five years ago, Ryan cofounded Surfers For Autism, or SFA, in Deerfield Beach. The event pairs amateur and professional surfers and children with autism and their families for a day of sand, sun and surf. This year’s event will take place at the Deerfield Beach Pier, 200 NE 21 Ave., on March 31 starting at 9 a.m.Pro, amatuer surfers bring their sport to disabled children“Being a surfer, I wanted to do something special for these kids,” said Ryan, president of SFA, who estimates the organization raised $10,000 during its inaugural event. “We love this community, this is where it all started,” said Ryan, who expects between 6,000 to 8,000 people will attend. “We couldn’t do it without the support of the community.” Since that first surf day, SFA has expanded to other parts of Florida, Puerto Rico, Georgia and New South Wales, Australia. According to Ryan, there are 15 total stops this year. The success of the fundraiser has expanded as well, ranging between $5,000 and $20,000 raised per event. “I was so blown away by what we’ve done,” said Ryan, who left his career as an advertising salesman to devote himself to “take this to as many kids as we can.” Funds raised go to autism research and autism-related home services. Among the amateur and professional surfers volunteering for the event is Delray Beach resident Tim Lane. “My very first experience with it, the child made a sound and the mother was crying and I didn’t understand. Then she explained he never made a sound before in his life,” said Lane. “To see their faces is something that’s indescribable and if you haven’t seen it I don’t know how to put it into words.” And Lane’s experience isn’t isolated. “Kids are saying their first words to their parents because of this . it’s pretty groundbreaking,” said Ryan. Along with the surfing lesson, children and their families also get treated to free lunch, games, toys and entertainment. And surfers will have a chance to test their mettle against one another on April 1 starting at 9 a.m. at the inaugural Pro-Am Surf Contest, sponsored in-part by Island Water Sports, a surf and skate shop in Deerfield Beach. The shop has been a supporter of SFA since the beginning. The winner of each division – longboard, women’s and junior – will each get a new surfboard and split the $5,000 grand prize. All slots for the competition have been filled but sponsorship opportunities are still available. For more, visit www. surfersforautism.org or call 954-427-4929. children 10 and under are free. The festival starts on Friday at 5 p.m. to 10 p.m., Saturday 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. and Sunday 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Visit www.pompanobeachseafoodfestival.com or call 954-941-2940. For the Kids 3-28 – Pony Rides from 9 to 11:30 a.m. at Sand & Spurs Equestrian Park, 1600 NE 5 Ave., Pompano Beach. Cost is $3 per ride. 954-786-4507. 3-31 – Eggstravaganza takes place from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. at St. Clement Church, 225 NW 29 Ave., Wilton Manors. Peter Cottontail will be on hand to take pictures and there will be an egg hunt, bounce house and concession stand. This event will be for children newborn through 5th Grade. 954-390-2130. 3-31 Spring Fling takes place from 9:30 a.m. to noon at 1701 NE 8 St., Pompano Beach, and features a visit by the Easter Bunny, fun activities with My Favorite DJ, Bella the Clown, a bounce house and more. Cost is $2 per child or two canned goods per child. All canned food collected is to be donated to located food banks. 954-7864111.Government3-27 – Pompano Beach City Commission meeting at 7 p.m. at city hall, 100 W. Atlantic Blvd. 3-27 – Wilton Manors City Commission meeting at 7 p.m. at city hall, 2020 Wilton Drive. 3-27 – Lighthouse Point City Commission meeting at 7:30 p.m. at city hall, 2200 NE 38 St. 3-27 – Lauderdale-ByThe-Sea Town Commission meeting at 7 p.m. at Jarvis SightingsContinued from page 16 See SIGHTINGS on page 28

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The Pelican 25 Friday, March 23, 2012 Advertise with The Pelican. 954.783.8700 Florida Heritage Month Events at Broward County Libraries: April 4 – Film: Flagler’s Train – The Florida Keys Over-Sea Railroad, in celebration of the 100th anniversary of Flagler’s Florida Keys Railroad, 2 p.m., West Regional Library, 8601 W. Broward Blvd., Plantation (954-382-5860) April 14 – Their Story is Our Story musical/historical production about the founding of Carver Ranches, 2 p.m. Tickets $15 in advance, $20 at door. Seniors/students $10 in advance, $15 at door. Call 954-357-6210 for tickets and information. African-American Research Library and Cultural Center, 2650 Sistrunk Blvd., Fort Lauderdale (954-3576282) April 16 – Civil War Monuments and Sites in Florida Book Talk and PowerPoint Presentation with travel writer Roberta Sandler, 1 to 2 p.m., Main Library, 100 S. Andrews Ave., Fort Lauderdale 954-357-7444. April 24 – Everglades Artist-in-Residence 2011 Brian Trainor discusses his photography and experiences in the Everglades, 1 p.m., North Regional/Broward College Library, 1100 Coconut Creek Blvd., Coconut Creek 954-201-2600 May 12 – The Florida East Coast Railway : For More Than 110 Years, America’s Speedway to Sunshine, an enlightening and enjoyable talk by historian Seth Bramson, 3:30 p.m., Hallandale Beach Library, 300 S. Federal Highway, Hallandale 954-457-1750. Florida Heritage Month Exhibits at Broward County Libraries: • Fabluous Forties on the Avenue Exhibit: See a replica of Fort Lauderdale’s historic Northwest Fifth Avenue from April to October, African-American Research Library and Cultural Center, 2650 Sistrunk Blvd., Fort Lauderdale 954-357-6282 • Florida Mystery Writers Book Display Galt Ocean Mile Reading Center, 3403 Galt Ocean Mile, Fort Lauderdale 954-537-2877. • Book Display in Honor of Florida Heritage Month April 1 to 15, Imperial Point Library, 5985 N. Federal Hwy., Fort Lauderdale 954492-1881. • Broward Historical Society Sailboat Bend Photographic Exhibit from April 1 May 31, North Lauderdale Saraniero Library, 6901 Kimberly Blvd., North Lauderdale 954-968-3840. • Book Display “Florida’s Past” April 1 to 30 North Regional/Broward College Library, 1100 Coconut Creek Blvd., Coconut Creek 954-201-2600 • Everglades Photography by Everglades Artist-in-Residence 2011 Brian Trainor April to May, North Regional/Broward College Library, 1100 Coconut Creek Blvd., Coconut Creek (954-2012600. • Poster Display – Florida Humanities Council Educational Posters on Culture of Native Americans/ Early Florida Settlers AprilMay, Northwest Regional Library, 3151 University Dr., Coral Springs 954-341-3900. • Florida Heritage Month Materials Display (April 1-15), Riverland Library, 2710 W. Davie Blvd., Fort Lauderdale 954-791-1085. • Model Train Exhibit, courtesy of Florida Citrus Model Train Society, in celebration of the 100th anniversary of Flagler’s Florida Keys Railroad. See the exhibit, watch train films and enjoy musical performances. Mon., Wed., Thurs., Fri. and Sat.: 12:30 to 3:30 p.m. Tuesdays: 3:30 to 6:30 p.m. April 21 to May 5), West Regional Library, 8601 W. Broward Blvd., Plantation (954-382-5860).

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26 The Pelican Friday, March 23, 2012 By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach – Phillies pitcher Tyler Krinkey’s fiveinning effort helped keep the As to three runs, putting the Phillies in the win column Tuesday night with eight runs of their own. The Phillies and As, part of the Pony Division of Pompano Baseball, ages 13 and 14, faced-off at Four Fields Sports Complex. The Phillies struck first with three runs, including a hit to right field by Bobby Blasko that knocked in Krinkey. The As answered back with a double by Stephen Mickull that knocked in two runs. Phillies pitching holds back As bats in 8 to 3 win Phillies pitcher Tyler Krinkey winds up for a pitch against an As batter. Krinkey’s pitched helped keep the As to within three runs. Krinkey pitched in all but one inning. [Photos by Michael d’Oliveira]“That’s how you get back in the game,” yelled one parent after Mickull’s double. The second inning was unproductive, with the first three batters on each team going down 1-2-3. One strikeout by Krinkey and good infield playing on both sides kept would-be hits from materializing. The third inning saw the Phillies ultimately win the game with five runs, surpassing the three runs the As would eventually end the game with. With the bases loaded William Carlson ripped a double to left center field, bringing in all three base runners. Mickull, the As pitcher, was ultimately able to get himself out of the inning by racking up two strikeouts. Unfortunately for the As, they were only able to See PHILLIES on page 33

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The Pelican 27 Friday, March 23, 2012 CAAB serves up Italian at Hagen Park Wilton Manors – On March 14, the Wilton Manors Community Affairs Advisory Board, or CAAB, held its rst ever Taste of Italy at the Hagen Park Community Center in Wilton Manors. CAAB members, are given a certain amount of money by the city each year to disperse in the community. But instead of just spending city money, CAAB members decided to hold Taste of Italy and raise more funding for future projects. [Left] Wilton Manors Police Chief Paul O’Connell with City Commissioner Scott Newton and his wife, Cindy Newton. [Above] Residents Gary and Rita Silverman, Diane Cline and Doug McClave. [Photos by Michael d’Oliveira]

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28 The Pelican Friday, March 23, 2012 WORSHIP DIRECTORY: Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad. Rev. Hyvenson Joseph Block, Herbert P. 76, of Deerfield Beach, died March 19, 2012 after a courageous battle with cancer. He was born in Bridgeport, CT and attended the University of Connecticut. He served in the US Army, 1959-60, stationed in Germany with the 4th Armored Division Newspaper. His career for many years centered around publishing; editing trade magazines, managing advertising and promotional campaigns for household products such as “Pop” Rivets, “Molly” Bolts, “Ammo” powder. Later he worked in New York City producing catalogs and coordinating trade shows for a manufacturer of desk top items. He moved to Coral Springs in 1978 and started his own business, Herb Block & Co., selling promotional items and business gifts. An avid reader, Mr. Block enjoyed travel and word games. He loved old buildings, sailing ships, good conversation, fine food and a good vodka. He was a 27-year-member of the Fort Lauderdale Executive Association. He is survived by his long time companion Judy Wilson, children Natalie (Steve) Dixon of Towson, MD., Leigh (Mandi) Block of Lancaster County, PA., grandchildren Kyle and Maija Dixon, Obituariesbrother Stanley Block of Trumbell, Ct., sister Cynthia Shapiro of Boston, MA, nieces and nephews and more friends than he could have imagined. Visitation and memorial service Saturday, March 24 from 4 to 6 p.m. at Kraeer Funeral Home and Cremation Center, 217 E. Hillsboro Boulevard, Deerfield Beach. Donations in his memory to the charity of your choice. Herb Block, editor, entrepreneur Hall, 4501 Ocean Drive. 4-2 – State Senator Jeremy Ring will be the guest speaker at the Palm Aire Democratic Club meeting at 7 p.m. at the Herb Skolnick Center,Center, 800 SW 36 Ave., Pompano Beach. Ring will be addressing the 2012 legislative session and other issues and will answer questions. The meeting is open to the public. Light refreshments will be served. 954-975-3772 or 786-877-1644.Green Markets3-14 – Pompano Beach Green Marke t at the corner of West Atlantic Boulevard and North Dixie Highway from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Fresh vegetables, crafts, plants, food and music are available. 954292-8040. 3-24 – Wilton Manors Green Market at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. fresh produce, baked goods, herbs, spices, doggie treats, pickles, jams, infused vinegars, pasta and more are available. 954-531-5363. Health & Safety4-14 – Free Car Seat Safety Check from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. at Pompano Beach Fire-Rescue Station 24, 2001 NE 10 St. Technicians will check and see if car seats are properly installed. Appointments are required. 954-786SightingsContinued from page 24 See SIGHTINGS on page 33

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The Pelican 29 Friday, March 23, 2012 base. “And we use absolutely no fillers,” adds Weiss with great pride. To complete the healthy tableau, two giant scoops of the satisfying salad preparations are placed onto a bed of fresh cut lettuce and accompanied by a host of delectable veggies such as olives, assorted peppers, cucumbers, tomatoes, onions and pickles. “We get very busy at lunch time as people from all walks of life come in for the special which includes a sub, a bag of chips and a drink for $5.75,” says Weiss. “We also do a lot of business catering events such as high school football games where the SubsContinued from page 20coach will want us to have 200 subs ready to go.” “Subs, Subs, Subs” even has a cork board on the wall with several pictures of newborns and toddlers. When asked about the significance, Weiss responds with a hearty laugh: “We get a lot of pregnant moms who get insane cravings for our subs. So when the babies are born, they come back with pictures as a thank you for having helped them through their pregnancies.” For special occasions, “Subs, Subs, Subs” will gladly prepare their sixfoot sub. Loaded with all the desired meats, cheeses and veggies, this specialty requires 48 hours notice and cost $25 a foot. Including taxes, “small” subs are $6, large ones are $8.50 and obscenely large “Hungry Man” subs are $12.50. Deluxe salads are $6.75. Creamy potato and macaroni salad side dishes are $1. For a great meal at an affordable price, to dine in or take-out, the impeccably clean “Subs, Subs, Subs” is a worthwhile stop along Dixie Highway. Enjoy! Malcolm McClintock holds an MBA and has lived in Thailand, Spain, France, Mexico, Canada and the US where he has developed a deep appreciation for world gastronomy. Owner Janet Weiss shows off a ready to go tuna salad made with two mammoth scoops of tuna, fresh lettuce and a variety of tasty veggies such as olives, various peppers, tomatoes and onions. Two mammoth scoops of tuna salad sit atop fresh lettuce and are surrounded by a wealth of tasty veggies such as olives, various peppers, tomatoes and onions.

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30 The Pelican Friday, March 23, 2012 Classi eds Call 954-545-0013 HELP WANTEDPT OR FT YOUR CHOICE – Be An AVON Independent Sales Representative AND YOUR Own Boss. $10 To Start! Call 954-729-0750. 4-6 POMPANO BEACH AREA – Part-Time Seamstress Wanted. Call 954-941-6493 9am – 5pm. 3-23 POMPANO BEACH AREA – Driver – Housekeeping And Laundry. $10 Per Hour. Call 954-744-6848. 3-23 LOCAL PEST CONTROL CO Looking For Quality Sales/Service Tech. Must Be Dependable, Team Player, Good Drivers License & People Skills. Will Train Right Person. ALSO Of ce Assistant – Computer – People & Phone Skills Needed. Fax Resume 954418-3982. 4-6 SEEKING EMPLOYMENT CAM LIC PROP MGR – Seeks PT Position. Experience In Hi-Rise Condos And Low Rise. Hours Flexible. Call Bill 954366-4627. 3-23 PIANO PLAYER – Dinner Music, Private Parties. 50 Years Experience. Sinatra Music. Auditions Anytime. Call 954-533-5961 Or charlesanthonyalbert@yahoo. com 3-23 EXPERIENCED IN TELEPHONE SALES – Have Real Estate License. Seeking FT / PT. Call After 6pm 754245-8999. 3-23 SERVICES DANNY BOY ELECTRIC – Lic & Insured. Lic. #EC13004811. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. 24/Hr Service. 954-290-1443. Beat Any Written Estimate. Sr, Discount. 4-6 DROPS OF SHINE Cleaning Services. Quality – BEST Prices! Houses – Apartments – Move-In / Out. Vacation Homes & More. FREE Estimates! 954-729-3713 – 561-948-5575. 3-30 ALL MY FAMILY MOVING – Family Owned And Operated. Licensed. Best Price Guaranty. CALL NOW! Allmyfamilymoving.com. 561-674-3029. 3-23 AMY’S TYPING SERVICE – Fast, Reliable Typing Service For School, Home, & Small Business Needs. POMPANO Beach Area. Call AMY At 1917-860-1069. 3-23 HANDYMAN – PAINTING – CARPENTRY – Pressure Cleaning. Decks! Everything Around The House. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. Call 561-350-3781. 4-13 MOORE PLUMBING PLUMBING SERVICES – Big Jobs – Small Jobs. We Do It All. Remodeling & Repairs. Lic. & Insured. C.C. Accepted. Call 954-772-4600. 3-30 HONEST HANDYMAN – HOME & BUILDING Maintenance/Improvements. No Job Too Small. Fast Friendly Service. Reasonable Rates. Local Resident/Homeowner. Call Today For Your FREE Upfront Quote. No Deposit Required. 754-366-1915. 323 GOT JUNK? DUMP TRUCK – CLEANUPS Trees/ Landscape, Yard Fill. Paint/ Pressure Wash/ Roofs/Home Repairs – Welding, Etc. Dave 954-818-9538. 4-6 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIESNew GREEN technology. New defroster control saves energy in home refrigerators, commercial chillers. Patented. All optical. Simple mfg. Strategic partners needed..www.NewAvionics.Com. 954-568-1991. C MUSICIANS WANTEDThe American Legion Symphonic Band is now accepting new members for the 2011-2012 season. College age to “seasoned seniors” are welcome. Rehearsals are held on Wed. evenings at American Legion Post 142 in Pompano. Percussionists, euphonium and clarinet players are especially needed. If you enjoy “making music,” call Jim McGonigal, Music Director at 954-647-0700 for more info.DEEP WATER VILLA – DOCKPOMPANO BEACH 2/2 – 2 BLOCKS BEACH 1700 SQ FT. Screened Fla Room. Private Yard. W/D. 4 Park. No Fixed Bridges. Community Pool. Deeded Dock.. 2 Blocks Beach. $265,000. Coldwell Banker – Barbara Call 954629-1324. 4-13 HOMES FOR RENTPOMPANO 2/2 Cottage Style House. Large Yard With Fish Pond. $1100 Month – Company Bills For Electric & Water. 541 NE 34 St. Darci 954-783-3723. 3-23 CO-OP SALESPOMPANO BEACH 1/1 On Water, Dockage Available At Your Door. $59,500. Coldwell Banker – Barbara – 954-6291324. 4-13 REAL ESTATE WANTEDI BUY HOUSES!! CASH!! AS IS! QUICK CLOSE! ANY AREA – ANY CONDITION! NO EQUITY OK. CALL NOW 954-914-2355. 4-20 VACATION RENTAL MILFORD, PA FURNISHED SMALL Very Private Country Cottage – 1 / 1, Stone Fireplace, Hardwood Floors. Walk To Pristine Swimming & Boating Lake. Seasonal By The Month $1,000. Call Audrey 570-2469240 Cell Or E-mail Audrey@ chantre.com 3-23 CONDOS FOR SALE FREE BOAT DOCK!! TWO PETS, Two Cars, Two Tennis Courts, Gorgeous Renovated Townhouse, 2 Bedroom, 2.5 Baths, Great Water Views, Resort Style Garden Condo, Just One High, Federal Highway Fixed Bridge To Lake Santa Barbara. $299,000. See Tour: www.circlepix.com/ XGWJKE Nancy And Cindy Pedicord, Realtors: Balistreri Realty – 954-868-6517. 3-23 DEERFIELD BEACH 2/2 Completely Redone. Granite Kitchen, New Cabinets. S.S. Appliances. 20” Porcelain Tile Floors. Travistine Stone Baths. Freshly Painted. 1st Floor. Less Than A Mile To Beach. $84,900. Call 631-873-8715. 4-6 LAUDERDALE BY THE SEA – Furnished 1/1.5 Condo $115,000. Heated Pool. Ocean Access. On Canal. 1481 S Ocean Blvd. Apt 228. Call 586549-5223. 3-30 CONDOS FOR RENTDEERFIELD BEACH 2/2 CONDO – Corner Unit, Pool. $800 $825. Good Credit Required. No Pets Or Realtors. 631-885-3342. 3-30 LAUDERDALE BY THE SEA – Near Sea Watch Restaurant – 1 Bedroom – Den – 2 Bath. CHA, Pool, W / D, End Unit. $1100 Per Month Yearly. 1st / Last / Security. No Pets / N / S. 954-942-5642. 4-6 LAUDERDALE BY THE SEA – Furnished 2/2 – Pool – Near Beach – Shops & Restaurants. Enjoy Beach Living. $875 Month From April To October. Owner 413-244-2807. 3-23 POMPANO FURNISHED BEACH CONDO – 2/2 – Lovely Views Of Ocean – Pool & Lighthouse From Balcony & All Rooms – Modern! $1,295 Month Yearly. Available JUNE! 954-785-7571 Or 954707-2448. 3-23 APTS FOR RENT DEERFIELD/POMPANO BEACH 1 BR & 2 BR APTS FOR RENT. Remodeled, Paint, Tile, Etc. W & D On Site. Pool. Pet Friendly. Call George 954-809-5030. 4-6 POMPANO 1/1 & 2/1 – E OF FEDERAL – Tiled. 10’ Overhang. Walk To Everything. Park At Your Door. 954-2546325. 4-6 POMPANO GARDENS $795 – 1/1 $200 Deposit. Nice Area. Minutes To Beach. Pet OK. Please Call 954-515-2554. 3-16 POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 BEDROOMS – Fully Furnished…Ef ciency With Kitchen, Fully Furnished. Cable, Internet, Pool, Laundry. 500’ To The Beach. Weekly – Monthly – Yearly. 954-2948483 Or 248-736-1533, 4-13 POMPANO BEACH 1/1 FURNISHED – Includes TV $850 Month Yearly – 1st / Last / Security. EFFICIENCY $750 Month Yearly Includes Direct TV + $50 Electric Allowance. 954-785-5837. 3-30 POMPANO BEACH 1/1 SW. C/A $750 – 2/1 $925 – NE 2/1 $950 – Townhouse 2/1.5 $1095. ALL FREE WATER. Rent + $70 Application Moves – U – In. 954-781-6299. 3-23 POMPANO MCNAB RD & NE 18 AVENUE – 1 & 2 Bedrooms Furnished/ Unfurnished. $695 $950 And Up. Pool, Tile Floors. Central A/C. 954-6102327. 3-30 1 & 2 Bedroom From $495. Easy Move-in. 1/2 OFF DEPOSIT. Remodeled. Great Location. 954783-1088 For More Info. 5-11 LUXURY BEACH PADS FOR RENT! Pompano Grand Opening: FREE 32” Flat Screen HDTV! Newly Renovated in 2012 One – Bedrooms & Studio Apts., 75 Yards From Private Beach Access, Eastern Exposure. New Kitchens & Baths, Granite Counter Tops, Central Air, Pool, Laundry, Dedicated Parking, Near Pier & Downtown. All Bills Paid! Includes Water, Electric, Premium Cable TV And WIFI. Furnished Or Unfurnished. Short Or Long Stays. No Utility Deposits. Small Pets Welcome. Only 9x, 8x, 7 Left! Pax Properties – 888-729-4948 Or 954-603-8857. Photos At www.beachpads.net 3-30 COMMERCIAL FOR RENT-SALEPOMPANO COMMERCIAL OFFICE Spaces Available. Ranging From As Low As $500 To $700 Depending On Square Footage. Please Call Darci At 954783-3723. 3-23 DEERFIELD BEACH – Retail Of ce Warehouse – 700 Sq Ft With Loft. A/C, Bathroom. $575 Per Month. Call For More Info 561-654-1331 Or 561-9985681. 4-6 FURNITURE BEDSETS – King $180 – Queen $130 – Full $110 – Twin $90. 5 Pc. Bedroom Set $399. Frames $39. 954-465-6498. 4-6 DOCK FOR RENT60 FT DOCK – THE COVE MARINA – 50 AMP / H20 Included. $1,200 Month – Price Negotiable Depending On Boat Size. Restaurant & Fuel On Premises. 954-9140053. a.j.barsotti@comcast. net 3-30 POMPANO BEACH DOCK – Wide Canal. No Wake Area! Whips. Quiet Canal. Call For Information 954-946-3301. 3-23

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The Pelican 31 Friday, March 23, 2012 Classi eds Call 954-545-0013 Get to know your local Merchants The Pelican Classi eds can save you time and money! 954-783-8700! PIANO LESSONSPIANO LESSONS AT YOUR HOME – Classical – Pop – Jazz. 30 Years In Northeast Area. Call 954-938-3194. 4-6 GARAGE SALESPOMPANO BEACH 901 E MCNAB Rd. March 24 – Christ Community Church – 7am – 1pm. HUGE Youth Sponsored Sale INDOORS!! Electronics / Small Furniture / Jewelry / Kid & Baby / Clothes / Much More!! Concession Breakfast & Lunch. ALL MUST GO!!! 3-23 MISCELLANEOUS 5 PIECE BLACK DRUM SET – DRUMS ONLY!!!! $225 OR BEST OFFER!! CALL 954557-8185 FT LAUDERDALE. 3-23

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32 The Pelican Friday, March 23, 2012 Deer eld Beach Call The Pelican 954-783-8700 everyone gets nervous.” Mays estimates that it would take ve years, at a minimum occupancy rate of 20 percent, for parking revenues from the lot to pay for the costs of buying and developing it. After 10 years the city will have to renegotiate the lease agreement, “if we don’t own it already,” said Mays. “We’re looking at this as a long-term relationship.” According to the contract, if the city buys the property it can receive credit for the cost of the improvements towards the price of purchase. Resident Paul Kuta and Krishan Manners, president/ CEO of Wilton Manors Main Street, said the additional parking was a good start. Kuta suggested the city should use eminent domain to acquire more property in the city for parking; eminent domain can be used by government entities to force private property owners to sell to the government. In November of last year, the city added 10 parking spaces across from the Starbucks, 1015 NE 26 St., near Five Points. Last month, commissioners also voted to allow businesses to use 30 parking spots at Hagen Park for valet services. Green and Commissioner Ted Galatis called valet “one tool” to help reduce parking problems along the Drive.ParkingContinued from page 9 People are talking about . 12th Annual Cuisine of the Region Casa Maya Grill Chef Emilio Dominguez; Olympia Flame Diner – Chef Chris McFadden; Hot Tomatoe Owner Tony Bianco; JB’s on the Beach Chef Ron Pollack; BT’s Oceanfront Chef Grant Collier and Hillsboro Club Chef Jacques NoelDeerfield Beach NE Focal Point CASA, Inc. will host its 12th annual charity event, “Cuisine of the Region” on Wednesday evening, April 4, 2012 at the Embassy Suites Deerfield Beach Resort & Spa, 950 South Ocean Drive (A1A), Deerfield Beach from 5:30 to 9 p.m. Guests will taste the cuisine of local restaurants, wine purveyors and top off the evening with a variety of desserts. Proceeds from the event benefit NE Focal Point which provides free and low-cost services to children, patients with Alzheimer’s and other senior services. The event also includes a silent auction with items ranging for vacations to airline tickets. Tickets are $50 in advance and $60 at the door. For ticket information, call 954-480-4460 or email rwilliams@deerfield-beach. com

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The Pelican 33 Friday, March 23, 2012 The Pelican, We Mean Business 954-783-8700 respond to the Phillies with one run, a double to right field by Jon Lutfey which knocked in the second base runner. Krinkey also got two strikeouts. Solid pitching and fielding by both teams, including a double play by the Phillies in the fourth and one by the As in the fifth, made both innings scoreless. In the fifth, the As looked as though they might get a rally going. One player was PhilliesContinued from page 26walked and Blake Reidal stole second base after getting a hit that barely got past Krinkey’s glove; Krinkley ended the inning, and any stirrings of an As rally, with a strikeout. The As kept the Phillies scoreless in the sixth inning as Mason Kemp took over for Krinkey as pitcher. The As once again tried to rally, getting two men on base. But two outs at first base and a strike out by Kemp ended their hopes and the game. “It was just one of those days. We couldn’t catch a break,” said As coach Robert Robinson. As player Chris Thomas connects with a pitch in the first inning. Although the As had solid hitting they couldn’t capitalize enough to beat the Phillies.4510.Recreation & Leisure3-27 – A card party will be held by the Benevolent Patriotic Order of DOES Drove 142 from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Pompano Beach ELKS Lodge, 700 NE 10 St. Event includes desert and coffee. 561-479-2002.Service & Charity3-31 – The 17th Annual WIN Charity Golf Tournament will be held at 1 p.m. at Boca Greens Country Club, 19642 Trophy Drive, Boca Raton. The event bene ts WIN, Women In Network, an organization that seeks to promote the success and advancement of women professionally and politically. Visit www.womeninnetwork. com or call 954-463-9005, ext: 641.MondaysPing Pong Nights – Every Monday from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Ping Pong Nights is held at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. The cost is $1. All ages can participate. 954-390-2130.TuesdaysPompano Beach-Lighthouse Rotary Club – Meets every Tuesday at 7:30 a.m. at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. Call 954-972-7178. Yoga – A Yoga class is available for all levels at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors, on Tuesday nights from 6:30 to 8 p.m. and Saturday mornings from 10:30 a.m. until noon. The cost is $7. 305-607-3520. SightingsContinued from page 28 See SIGHTINGS on page 34

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34 The Pelican Friday, March 23, 2012 SightingsContinued from page 33Zonta International meets on the third Tuesday of the month at Duffy’s Diner, 401 N. Federal Hwy., Deer eld Beach, at 11:15 a.m. Zonta International is a classi ed service organization of executives and professionals working together to advance the status of women locally and worldwide through service and advocacy. 561-3922223. Bingo – The American Legion Auxiliary Unit 142, 171 SW 2 St., Pompano Beach, has Bingo on Tuesdays at 7 p.m. Food is available from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. 954-9422448.Wednesdays The Greater Pompano Beach Senior Citizens Club meets on the second Wednesday of the month at the Emma Lou Olsen Community Center on NE Sixth Street Pompano Beach at 10 AM. No meetings during the months of July and August). Activities focus on the general welfare, health, education and security of senior citizens. We welcome people of all ages. Fun trips and outings are offered. Call 954-943-7787. Wilton Manors Kiwanis Club – Meets every Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. at 2749 NE 14 Ave., Wilton Manors. 954561-9785. Pompano Beach Kiwanis Club – Meets Wednesdays at noon at the Riverside Grille at the Sands Resort, 125 N. Riverside Drive, Pompano Beach. 954-444-4815. Alzheimer’s Caregivers Support Group – The NE Focal Point Alzheimer’s Day Care Center, located at 301 N.W. 2nd Avenue in Deer eld Beach, offers a weekly Caregiver’s Support Group every Wednesday from 10 a.m. to noon. Oakland Park Kiwanis Club – Meets every Wednesday from 7:30 to 8:30 a.m. at Peter Pan Diner, 1216 E. Oakland Park Blvd., Oakland Park. 954-566-9957.ThursdaysDeer eld Beach Kiwanis Club – Meets at noon every Thursday at the Deer eld Hilton, 100 Fairway Dr. 954242-6083. Oakland Park/Wilton Manors Rotary Club – Meets every Thursday from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. at Tequila Sunrise Mexican Grill, 4711 N. Dixie Hwy., Oakland Park. 954-491-6158.FridaysIsland City Art Walk – Every third Friday of the month from 7 to 10 p.m., Wilton Manors’ Wilton Drive is home to the Island City Art Walk. Over 40 local artists show off their works in Wilton Drive’s cafes, boutiques, restaurants and other businesses. The Art Walk runs until April. Pompano Beach Rotary Club – Meets every Friday at 12:15 p.m. at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. Call 954-786-3274.SaturdaysPompano Beach Kiwanis Club Westside – Meets the rst and third Saturdays of the month at 8:30 a.m. at the E. Pat Larkin Community Center, 520 MLK Blvd., Pompano Beach. 954-782-8096. Deer eld Beach West Kiwanis Club – Meets the second and fourth Saturdays of the month at 9 a.m. at Westside Park, 445 SW 2 St., Deer eld Beach. 954-54-7329883.SundaysPancake Breakfast – Every third Sunday of the month, the St. Elizabeth’s of Hungry Parish hosts a pancake breakfast at 3331 NE 10 Terrace, Pompano Beach. The breakfast is from 7:30 a.m. to noon. Call 954-263 8415.Comedy ShowOn April 20, Galuppi’s Restaurant, 1103 N. Federal Hwy. in Pompano Beach, will host two comedy shows, 7:30 and 9:30 p.m. Comedians Kenny Rogerson from the FX show “Rescue Me” and Frank Santorelli from the “Sopranos” will be performing at both shows. Tickets are $20 per person and a table with eight reserved seats can be purchased for $150.00. Tickets are at www.stcmc.org or 954-553-6147 or 954-4951296. Appliance rebatesBroward County has extended its ENERGY SENSE Business Appliance Rebate Program application deadline from to April 2. There is up to $5,000 left in available rebates to eligible small-to medium-sized businesses that replace an old appliance with a new more energy efficient one. Refrigerators are eligible for between $150 or $250 in rebates and washing machines $150. Purchase must have been made on or after Dec. 17, 2011. Visit broward.org/ gogreen and click on rebate programs or call 954-3577328.

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The Pelican 35 Friday, March 23, 2012 Pompano Beach – The Saint Laurence Chapel Day Shelter and its board of directors are teaming up to host a gala to support the homeless Saturday, March 24, at the Marriott North, 6650 N. Andrews Ave., Fort Lauderdale. Theme of the evening is “Imagine a Night without a Home Gala.” A reception and silent auction begin at 6 p.m., followed at 7 p.m. by an evening of dinner, jazz and dancing. St. Laurence Chapel Shelter, a nonprofit organization, has provided services to the homeless in Broward County for 24 years. During the event, eight people will be recognized as “2012 Community Honorees” for their work for the homeless. They are Paul Heidemann from St. Gabriel Catholic Church; Catherine Phillips, John Knox Village; William Nicholson and Douglas Lorance, All Saints Episcopal Church; Beth Mattfolk, Saint Gregory’s Episcopal Church; The Rev. Earl Henry, Episcopal Church of the Atonement; Erin Proko, Saint Mary Magdalene Episcopal Church and Rob Wyre, Isle Casino Racing. The shelter’s mission is to provide help and hope in a caring and non-judgmental environment. The shelter is at 1698 Blount Road in Pompano Beach. For more information, visit www.stlaurencechapel.org or contact Fletcher at (954) 972-2958 ext. 27.St. Laurence to host gala

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36 The Pelican Friday, March 23, 2012