<%BANNER%>
Pompano Pelican
ALL VOLUMES CITATION MAP IT! PDF VIEWER
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00090900/00290
 Material Information
Title: Pompano Pelican
Uniform Title: Pompano Pelican
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: Pompano Pelican
Place of Publication: Pompano Beach
Publication Date: 03-09-2012
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Pompano Beach
Coordinates: 26.234722 x -80.125556 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00090900:00290

Downloads

This item is only available as the following downloads:

( PDF )


Full Text

PAGE 1

Friday, March 9, 2012 Vol. XX, Issue 10 Call 954-783-8700 to Advertise Email: siren2415@gmail.com Pompano Beach Deer eld Beach Lighthouse Point Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Wilton Manors Oakland Park Hillsboro Beach The Galt Palm Aire The Pelican Pelican Pompano Beach incumbents returned to seatsPompano Beach On Jan. 31, three commissioners in Pompano Beach were re-elected by acclamation as none of them faced challengers. On March 20 at noon, Commissioners Barry Dockswell, George Brummer and Rex Hardin will serve additional two-year terms. In addition, commissioners will select one commissioner to serve as vice-mayor for a one-year term. The ceremony will take place at city hall, 100 W. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach. Beach nourishment not a popular idea in sand-rich LBTSBy Judy VikPELICAN STAFFLauderdale-By-The-Sea A proposed multi-million dollar beach nourishment project received mostly negative reviews Monday after the commission heard a county administrator describe the plan. Eric Myers, natural resources administrator for the county, said two sections of the towns beach could be part of a larger nourishment project which will place sand south of Anglins Pier to Terra Mar Street in Fort Lauderdale and north of the Ocean Colony Condominium to Southeast 4 Street in Pompano Beach. Myers said he wanted to take the towns response to the county commission in April. Cost of the revetment is estimated at $38 million if material is pumped from offshore and $45 million if it See SAND on page 12 Town attempts to charge condo residents for bridge repairsBy Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFHillsboro Beach Residents of Island House had a nasty shock recently when they received a letter from the town making them responsible for a costly bridge repair. Former condo president Joe Germano brought their case to the city commission this week asking in essence if the entrance bridge to their condominium was deeded to the town in 1966, how can the 64 unit owners now be liable for the repairs? Germano said gas tax money designated for transportation costs is collected by the town each year. Germano said he understood at one time there was $100,000 set aside to maintain the bridge. Now that the bridge needs repairs, they want to give it back, he said. See BRIDGE on page 15By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFHillsboro Beach The towns north beach, continually scoured of sand, is likely to always be a hot spot ocean engineers told the commission this week. Of seven possible erosionprevention options, only one submerged breakwaters appears to have any value here and obtaining permits for such structures is almost impossible, said Tim Blankenship, Director of Coastal Systems International, or CSI. The town commissioned CSI to study available solutions to the constant loss of sand on the north 5,000 feet of beach. Last year, a $6 million nourishment project placed 340,000 cubic yards of sand there. Today, due to winter winds and tides, none of it is visible. Its still there under the water, said Commissioner Claire Schubert. Some of it will come back this summer. Seeking a solution to the ongoing sand shift, CSI engineers studied seven scenarios: 1. Do nothing. 2. Nourish every four to six years. 3. Modify Deer elds groin system to the north which is blamed for creating the hot spot. 4. Extend the groin system into Hillsboro Beach. 5. Install Tgroins in Hillsboro Beach. 6. Install a breakwater that rises above the surface a short way offshore. 7. Install a submerged breakwater. The results of all the models in the study are contingent on sand from the Boca Raton Inlet continuing to be pumped into the litteral drift which North beach doomed unless sand restoration is ongoing experts saySee HILLSBORO BEACH on page 13 Motor Deputy Mario Potvin, Pompano Beach Broward Sheriffs Of ce, takes some time out to practice for the upcoming Tip-A-Cop fundraiser at Brus Room, 235 S. Federal Hwy. in Pompano Beach, on March 22 from 5 to 9 p.m. Tip-A-Cop bene ts Special Olympics athletes in Broward County. See story on page 2 [Photo by Michael dOliveira]

PAGE 2

2 The PelicanFriday, March 9, 2012 SightingsA community calendar of East Broward County. Please email information to siren2415@gmail.com Building permits go virtual for faster servicePompano Beach Builders anxious to get their plans reviewed may be able to put the shovel in the sand sooner than ever. This month the city began offering e-reviews. Builders can submit their plans to the citys web site which allows different departments to check them simultaneously. Needed revisions will be highlighted and returned electronically. The change also reduces driving time and production costs. A presentation of the e-review took place this week at city hall. For information, call 954-786-4601. By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach Members of the Broward Sheriffs Of ce will soon temporarily trade in their badges for serving trays. On March 22, from 5 to 9 p.m., Brus Room, 235 S. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach, will become the latest restaurant to host Tip-ACop, a fundraiser bene ting Special Olympics athletes in Broward County and the Law Enforcement Torch Run for Special Olympics. Its not just BSO, its pretty much every law enforcement department in Broward County, said Erika Huerta, Pompano BSO road patrol deputy. Its just a way for law enforcement to get together for the Special Olympics. During the event BSO personnel will assist Brus Rooms staff, serving drinks and bringing food orders to tables. And at the end of the meal an envelope is left for customers to leave a tip with 100 percent of the amount going to Special Olympics. We dont take the waiters tips . thats separate, said Huerta. And diners who come out for the event will have a chance to meet those bene ting from it. The athletes will be at the event helping us serve the food, said Huerta. Brus Room has hosted Tip-A-Cop for at least the last 10 years. We do a lot of events where we give back to the community, said Barbara Gobbi, marketing director for Brus Room. That comes from the culture of Brus Room. Weve been really blessed here. We like to pay it Tip-A-Cop at Brus Room on March 22 and help Special Olympic Athletes make it to regional games Art, Music & Theatre3-11 Forbidden Hollywood performance at the Parker Playhouse, 707 NE 8 St., Fort Lauderdale, at 2 and 5 p.m. Tickets are $35. Visit www.parkerplayhouse.com or call 954-462-0222. 3-11 Skolnick Sunday Jazz & Arts Fest from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Skolnick Center at 800 SW 36 Ave., Pompano Beach. The event is free and features live jazz music and giveaways. Call 954-786-4590. 3-17 Sol Children Theatre Troupe performs Rapunzel on Saturdays and Sundays at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. from March 17 through See SIGHTINGS on page 13 Tip-A-Cop on page 11

PAGE 3

The Pelican 3 Friday, March 9, 2012 By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach In the end, it all came down to defense. On March 3, the Blanche Ely Tigers varsity boys basketball team defeated Oak Ridge 78 to 46, winning the Class 7a state championship. Thats all we practiced Blanche Ely Tigers win state basketball championship 78 to 46on, said forward and cocaptain Clide Gifford about defense. The 30-point blow-out was standard fare for the Tigers, who regularly defeated opponents by wide margins and only lost two games all season; the state title brought Elys winning streak to 18 games. The day before, the Tigers beat Saint Petersburg 62 to 29. Theyre extremely wellcoached. They have incredible depth, and they play as a team, said Malcom Spence, assistant principal of athletics. People dont know but all the stars have to align. We were mostly injury free and had won the tough games. Gifford thought the competition would be a little harder but victory was no less sweet, saying he had something similar to tears of joy. I didnt cry though. Co-captain and point Guard Dallas Cameron also credited good defense for their state title. He added teams outside of South Florida werent prepared for their style of defense. They werent used to really seeing the depth, the speed. Cameron said good defense forces teams into a lot of turnovers and brings in easy points. The school and community will be celebrating the Tigers victory, the schools A state rating and the state nish of the schools cheerleader and wrestling teams tomorrow. There will be a parade at 9:30 a.m. followed by a pep rally at 10:30 a.m. with food and music at the schools football stadium at 11:30 a.m. We can balance academics with athletics, said Johnson. Im proud of the students, the community, the teachers, the coaches, all the staff members. The team has been invited to the 2012 ESPN National High School Invitational Basketball Tournament, March 29 to 31 in Maryland.

PAGE 4

4 The PelicanFriday, March 9, 2012 Advertise with The Pelican 954.783.8700 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFLauderdale-By-The-Sea The board of directors of the Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Chamber of Commerce has terminated the employment of Judy Swaggerty, longtime chamber executive director. The decision was nearly unanimous, according to Mark Silver, newly elected board president. The vote was 11 to 1 in favor of asking for Swaggertys resignation. Swaggerty was asked to sign a letter of resignation last Friday. Silver said he didnt believe she has done so. He did not want to go into details of what the letter offered in terms of severance pay. Asked why she was terminated and if any one incident led to the boards decision, Silver said, I believe things happen for a reason. Sometimes people move on and go to another chapter in life. Its all in Gods time. Its what it is. It was a board vote, and directors do the voting. Theyre in control, Silver said. Swaggerty had been chamber executive director since January 2001. Prior to that she had been program manager for LauderdaleBy-The-Sea Main Street organization. Asked about the decision to terminate her, Paul Novak, a board member and former chamber president, said only, The board has spoken. He referred questions to Silver. The chamber is moving in a new direction, Silver said. The board decided to form committees, such as nance, marketing, events and membership, so they can better delegate and keep more organized. At this Thursdays meeting committees were to be formed. Well get ideas and take baby steps to move forward in a positive way. Thats very important, Silver said. Silver, owner of Argenti Designer Jewelers, is taking part in a new ad hoc business group working with the town to plan a Family Fun Week in June. We will do all we can to bring together a brotherhood with the chamber and Connie [Hoffmann, town manager] and Pat Himelberger, Hoffmanns assistant. Pats doing a lot of wonderful work on a great idea, Silver said, referring to the June event. He is attempting to get chamber members involved. Were trying to do something at a time when business is very slow, he said. The chamber board named Malcolm McClintock, a board member, as interim executive director. He is owner of Alabaska, Inc., a restaurant consulting business, and a restaurant review columnist for The Pelican Silver said the board is not looking for a new executive director now. Instead theyre reorganizing and straightening out. Ron Piersante, a chamber volunteer for 14 years, was not happy with the decision to terminate Swaggerty. In his dealings with her, he said, I nd her to be most cooperative and ef cient. Chamber board plans new direction without 10-year veteran leader

PAGE 5

The Pelican 5 Friday, March 9, 2012 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach The city and the union representing mid-level managers are engaged in an impasse hearing today after prolonged negotiations to write employment contracts City and management union at odds; contract in mediationhave failed. The citys chief negotiator, Personnel Director Mike Milanowski, said attempts to obtain an agreement with the Professional Managers and Supervisors Association, or PMSA, began in August of 2010 and quickly went to impasse because the parties were not even close. Sticking points were the citys demand to rollback merit raises, ask employees to take a ve percent decrease in pay and contribute 10 percent to their healthcare plans. The citys other unionized employees have accepted those conditions. A mediation hearing was held Dec. 1 which resulted in a settlement and a rati cation vote Jan. 13 by union members. The city commission approved the contract on Jan. 24. On Jan. 23, the union noti ed Milanowski it could not stand behind the rati cation vote and subsequently it was reversed 22 to 0 leading to todays hearing. Affected are 52 employees in mid-management positions such as facilities manager, eet manager, of ce supervisor, recycling supervisor, parks and recreation managers. Milanowski said annual pay scales range from $50,000 to $85,000. For todays hearing, the city has added another condition to its demands, a further reduction in pay of 15 percent in an attempt to recoup some of the money lost since January. Attorney Brett Schneider will represent the city at the impasse hearing being held at the public works facility. The executive director of the PMSA had been representing local employees Se MANAGEMENT on page 9

PAGE 6

6 The PelicanFriday, March 9, 2012 Deer eld Beach, Pompano Beach, Lighthouse Point, LauderdaleBy-The-Sea, Wilton Manors and Oakland ParkWilton Manors Oakland Park Hillsboro Beach The Pompano Pelican is published weekly on FridaysStreet Address: 1500-A E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, FL 33060 Telephone: 954-783-8700 Fax: 954-783-0093Letters to the Editor are encouraged and accepted for print if signed, although a writers name will be withheld on request; letters must also include a daytime telephone number. Advertising rates are available upon request. Subscription rate is $31.80 including tax for one years delivery in Greater Pompano Beach; $95.40/per year including tax for others in the United States; call 954-783-8700 for rates abroad. The Pelican is a nonpartisan newspaper and reserves the right to decline advertising. Copyright 2011. Reproduction of this publication in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission of the publisher. The Pelican is a member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, Deer eld Beach Chamber and the LBTS Chamber. The Pelican is a state certi ed woman-owned minority business. The Pelican is delivered to businesses, libraries, schools, of ces, hospitals, news racks and single family homes. All advertising and copy is published at the sole discretion of the publisher. We welcome your critiques and ideas concerning this publication. Anne Siren, publisherExecutive Assistant: Mary Hudson Graphics: Rachel Ramirez Windsheimer Bookkeeper: John White Classi eds: Fran Shelby Contributing Writers: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Judy Wilson, Malcolm McClintock, Judy Vik, Mike dOliveira Account Executives: Paul Shroads, Carolyn Mann, Bill Heaton, Bill Fox Special Of ce Assistant: Cathy Siren ESTABLISHED 1993 Volume XX, Issue 10 Founding Editor and PublisherAnne Hanby Siren Letters & Opinions Bike lanes offer insane alternatives for cyclists on Federal HighwayU.S.1 and Copans Road, a truck makes a right hand turn forcing cyclists to change lanes.The photograph above depicts Federal Highway where a bicycle path has been routed across traf c to allow vehicles to pass to the right for a right-hand turn. Tricky business for vehicle and cyclist. With this maneuver, the bike path puts the cyclist between two vehicle pathways: the car moving ahead and the car turning. While the idea of having cyclists weave through traf c appears to be an insane idea, it is legal. According to the U.S. Department of Transportation, cyclists have a right to travel on all roads with the exception of turnpikes and Interstate Highways. This month is bicycle safety month, and its a good time for drivers to reconsider their habits at the wheel. Now is the time to remove all distractions from our driving so that we can control the wheel, remembering that we cannot control the cyclists. The phones need to be off-limits along with make-up applications, iPads, arguments with passengers or anything else that distracts us at the wheel. And for the cyclists, there are laws. Here are some. A cyclist on a roadway must ride on the side reserved for his direction of travel. Riding in the opposite direction, so as to face oncoming traf c, doubles the risk of collision with a motor vehicle and is a contributing factor in about 15 percent of bicycle-motor vehicle crashes. A bicycle operated between sunset and sunrise must be equipped with a lamp on the front exhibiting a white light visible from 500 feet to the front and both a red re ector and a lamp on the rear exhibiting a red light visible from 600 feet to the rear. Over half of fatal bicycle crashes in Florida occur after sunset, even though most cycling is done during daylight hours. A bicycle rider or passenger under 16 years of age must wear a bicycle helmet that is properly tted, fastened securely and meets a nationally recognized standard. Head injuries account for about one-third of hospital emergency room visits for bicycle-related injuries. The role model effect of adults is an important factor in enhancing helmet wearing by youth. Bicyclists must use a xed, regular seat for riding. A bicycle may not be used to carry more persons at one time than the number for which it is designed or equipped. An adult bicyclist may carry a child in a backpack or sling, child seat or trailer designed to carry children. A bicyclist may not allow a passenger to remain in a child seat or carrier when not in immediate control of the bicycle. At least one hand must be kept on the handlebars while riding. Every bicycle must be equipped with a brake or brakes which allow the rider to stop within 25 feet from a speed of 10 miles per hour on dry, level, clean pavement. Message: We need to get there without killing each otherWe must share the road, like it or not Lauderdale-By-The Sea commissioners should rethink their take on beach re-nourishmentOn Tuesday, when Lauderdale-By-The-Sea commissioners turned their backs on beach re-nourishment, placing cost over value, we think they erred. Re-nourishing our beaches is an expensive and troubling headache. Months of dust, heavy trucks and piles of sand will be offensive to beach goers, tourists and hoteliers. The federally-funded project, expected to be in the millions with some costs sustained by the state and county, will leave about 12.5 percent of the bill to rest on the shoulders of the taxpayers who live in this small tourist mecca. We believe they should go ahead and write the check for a much larger cause--that cause being the future viability of tourism here for generations yet to come. It wont be fun, and it really isnt fair. Its not fair mainly because earlier pioneers and later real estate moguls traded the future of the beach for immediate wealth. We all rue the day that Florida beaches were fair game for builders. But now, the idea of fair rests on the shoulders of town and city leaders who will not promulgate this problem. Florida beaches will need re-nourishment for as long as we live on them, and thats the tough pill to swallow. But this is about nature itself as well as the nature of man. Commissioner Stuart Dodd offered some thoughts this week to his colleagues.I dont think we can bury our heads in the sand, Dodd said. What if we needed the sand? They are our neighbors.Erosion is the enemy of Florida beaches. It is an enemy as real as a platoon of soldiers determined to ruin us. Erosion will swallow our beaches wherever it occurs, and when that sand has washed away, the enemy will seek more of the shore. Dodds words are wise. We hope the rest of the commission will open up their ears and rethink the critical importance of re-nourishment for their beach and for this towns future.Message: We must stand together to face the common enemy especially before it turns on us.

PAGE 7

The Pelican 7 Friday, March 9, 2012 COURTESY OF TEMPLE SHOLOMPompano Beach With a military junta ruling Egypt, the bloodbath in Syria, and Irans nuclear sabre-rattling, how safe can it be for Israel these days? Indeed, what can American Jews do to assist our Israeli brothers and sisters? We can become well-acquainted with the background and politics of the area. Join Rabbi David Mark as he describes a brief history of Israels founding, the philosophy of Zionism, and the strange amalgam of secularism, religion, and nationalism which comprise the political and sociological makeup of the Jewish State. The group will examine different aspects of Modern Israel through news sources, websites and organizations dealing with the Middle East, from all points on the political spectrum, left, right, and centrist. If not we, then who? And if not now, when? The series is free and open to the public on Wednesday nights in the Temple Sholom, 132 SE 11 Ave., Pompano Beach, Bet Midrash/Chapel at 7:30 p.m. The series continues through April 18. Call 954-942-6410. New adult discussion group on the Middle East By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach After giving up 8 runs in the rst inning, the Cardinals battled their way back in three innings of baseball to beat the Giants in a squeaker, 16 to 15. This was the season opener for the two teams, played on Saturday at Kester Park. In a game mostly determined by runs scored on stealing home base, the lead changed hands three times. Tyler Cissone, #9, gave the Giants their rst stirrings of life, knocking in Kevin Wright, #4, from second base for the games rst run; earlier, Wright stole second after he was walked. But the Cardinals responded immediately, racking up eight runs of their own, including two runs from a triple hit by Timmy Dorn, #6, who later brought himself in for a run by stealing home on a pitch that got past Giants catcher. After a tied 8 to 8 rst inning, the Giants tacked on three more runs in the second inning but gave up ve to the Cardinals in the bottom of the inning. Dorn gave a verbatim performance in the second inning, stealing home base again after hitting another triple, which drove in two runs; Dorn stole home and tied the game up with the Cardinals getting in two more runs after and taking the lead 13 to 11. But the Giants werent done and scored four more at the top of the third inning, forcing the Cardinals to score or lose. But, after getting four more runs off solid base hits, the Cardinals Nicholas Cardinals beat Giants in opening day of Pompano Baseball at Kester ParkSee CARDINALS on page 18

PAGE 8

8 The PelicanFriday, March 9, 2012 Briefs Making a Difference Phyllis J. Neuberger wants your suggestions about people who are making a difference. Call 954-7838700.By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFWhen The Pelican arrived at Dr. Laura Evatts dental suite of of ces, on the third oor of the 4800 NE 20 Terrace medical building just off Federal Highway, in Fort Lauderdale, a uffy white dog barked his greeting. He was on a leash held rmly by a smiling Dr. Evatt who gently handed the leash and dog over to her of ce manager so that this interview would not be interrupted. She said, I just picked up that little bundle of energy earlier today from a family that could no longer afford to take care of him. Hes pretty neglected so as soon as this interview is over Im taking him to the vet to be examined and treated. I think I have found a home for him. One of our associates in the building fell in love with him, and offered to adopt, bless Sachin Mayi pro les 101 abandoned dogs rescued by Dr. Laura Evatt who has since rescued 100 moreher. This is not an unusual event in Dr. Evatts life. One of her patients, author Sachin Mayi wrote, There seem to be many saints for animals these days. Dr. Evatt stands out as one of the greats. She has personally rescued 200 dogs in addition to her full-time dentistry practice in Fort Lauderdale. Rescuing dogs is her passion. She continues to nd those desperate souls in need of her unconditional love. Mayi was so moved by this unusual woman that he wrote a charming book, 101 Salvations about her rst amazing rescues. In his book, the dogs tell their tales expressing their love and gratitude to their patron saint for saving them from the horrors of abuse and neglect. Just one example is Gary, an English Mastiff mix, who writes, The couple I was staying with were elderly and after some time, my new mother passed away. Shortly after that, my new father had a stroke. Their son had to come to handle affairs. I was one of those affairs. In spite of my friendliness, he took me to Animal Control. I wasnt as skinny as the rst time I was homeless. I scratched around trying to nd the micro-chip Laura had put in me. Instead I felt the prick of a needle. I turned to see someone in a white coat holding the needle. I asked why? Dont you know about Laura. Didnt you know that someone cared about me? And as I thought these thoughts, everything faded into darkness. Gary didnt make it, but readers of 101 Salvations will read the stories of 100 luckier abandoned dogs who did. Dr. Evatt will tear up if you ask about Gary. Asked how this obsession to rescue dogs began, she sits back in her chair to tell her story. When I look back over my life, I know my love of animals started when I was a child. My baby book is lled with photos of me and Im always holdingSee RESCUES on page 25US Coast Guard Auxiliary Safe Boating CourseThe United States Coast Guard Auxiliary, Pompano Beach, is offering its About Boating Safely Course on Saturday, March 31 at the Imperial Point Medical Center auditorium, 6401 N. Federal Hwy, Fort Lauderdale, This one-day program begins promptly at 8 a.m. and nishes at 5 p.m. All materials and lunch are provided. Cost is $50 per person and includes materials. Contact Tom Nolan at 954-4210502 for registration and further information.Blood donors get hotdogs, burgersThe American Legion Unit 152, 171 SW 2 St., Pompano Beach will host a blood drive March 18 from 11 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Donors will receive free hot dogs and hamburgers. Call 954-942-2448. Congressman to speak in Lighthouse PointLighthouse Point Trinity Methodist Church, 3901 NE 22 Ave, Lighthouse Point, will host Congressman Allen West from 10 to 11:30 a.m. on March 14. The meeting is free and open to the public. Call 954-941-8033.I know. I may end up in the poorhouse, but what matters is how I lived my life. I sometimes think I have a big heart but I need my head examined.Dr. Laura Evatt Dr. Laura Evatt holds her latest stray who will be living with her new mother as soon as shes paid a visit to the veterinarian. [Photo by Phyllis J. Neuberger]

PAGE 9

The Pelican 9 Friday, March 9, 2012 but apparently has withdrawn, Milanowski said. A ruling generally takes four to six weeks. Local PMSA employee representatives are Pier Supervisor Vernall Higgs, Recycling Supervisor Mario Rubeo and Aquatic Complex Manager Kalid Khoury. The PMSA was certi ed here as a bargaining agent in July of 2010.New agreement may save Hillsboro treesDeer eld Beach The city is amending a $150,000 grant application in hopes of saving 121 Hillsboro Boulevard median trees ordered removed by the Florida Department of Transportation. If the new application is accepted, the scope of the project will be reduced to the area between Powerline Road and the Tri-Rail Station and the number of trees removed reduced to 17. City Landscaper Harold Hoyt told commissioners Tuesday that the 17 trees are either diseased or in motorists line of sight. They will be replaced by 77 palm trees. Originally the project was intended to beautify the median between Dixie Highway and Powerline Road. The large trees in the median did not meet the highway departments standards and so were marked for removal. Public outcry caused the city to rethink the project, said Assistant City Manager Keven Klopp. These trees existed without issue for years, he said. Among the species are yellow tabs, gumbo limbo and mahogany trees.Dixie Flyover close to openingDeer eld Beach The Dixie Flyover will open for traf c in midMarch according to state transportation department spokesperson Barbara Kellaher. The four-lane span across the Hillsboro Canal connects Northeast 2 Street in Deer eld Beach and Southeast 18 Street in Boca Raton. It was built with $48 million in federal stimulus funds. Kellaher said the project is ahead of schedule. A formal dedication ceremony will be held in July when the landscaping and other Continued from page 5By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFLauderdale-By-TheSea Despite their concerns about new ethics rules, commissioners will continue to chair town-sponsored special events Easter, July 4th and Halloween. Town manager Connie Hoffmann will determine when to involve her staff and when to hire outside help. It has been traditional in this town to have a commissioner chair the three holiday events and enlist volunteer help. Vice Mayor Scot Sasser, who favored hiring outside help when the issue was rst discussed last year, asked for reconsideration of the matter citing a need for consistency. Town Attorney Susan Trevarthen has issued a LBTS Board debates ethics of chairing community safe harbor opinion that commissioners can continue to chair town-sponsored holiday events . although they will have to be careful about the potential for being offered gifts from town vendors or contractors that may be involved in the special event. We can be the gurehead, but theres a need for consistency on how we operate and how inventory is taken, Sasser said. Weve had some problems in the past. If we had a staff person, it would free us up to get volunteers. Commissioner Mark Brown said he didnt think commissioners should be soliciting funds for events. In addition to the towns events, the Chamber of Commerce sponsors Taste of the Beach ManagementSee ETHICS on page 26 Advertise with The Pelican! 954-783-8700

PAGE 10

10 The PelicanFriday, March 9, 2012 Briefs Business matters The Pelican takes a look at local business owners. Call The Pelican to nd out how you can tell your story here because business matters. 954-783-8700. By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFBoca Raton West Boca Medical Center is a 195-bed acute care hospital that has been serving the medical and healthcare needs of the community and surrounding areas for 20 years. Located at 21644 State Road 7 in Boca Raton, one of its well known services is the Birthcare Pavilion which includes a level 111 Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. HealthGrades ranks West Bocas maternity program among the top ve percent in the nation. No wonder women travel from as far south as Miami and as far north as Port St. Lucie to have their babies in this Centers well equipped birthing unit. Toby Harris, director of maternity services, says, We have over 2,000 Pompano Beach After undergoing many months of renovation, and worshipping at neighboring Bethel AME Church and the Mitchell Moore Center, Mount Calvary Baptist Church in Pompano Beach is back in its home sanctuary. They plan a ribbon cutting March 11 at 10 a.m. and a dedication service at 4 p.m. with guest pastor, Dr. Marcus D. Davidson, and his congregation from New Mount Olive Baptist Church, of Fort Lauderdale. The community is welcome to attend and participate. For more information contact Rev. Anthony Burrell at 954-943-2422The place to have a baby West Boca Medical Center with Birthcare Pavilion and Level 111 Neonatal ICU births a year here. Moms choose us because we have 18 labor/birthing rooms. Each room has a bed that breaks down to ease delivery for the patient and the doctor. Theres a full length mirror if Mom wants to watch her baby being born, a sleeper bed for her husband or partner, a monitor for babys heart plus a walk in bathroom, telephone and television. An attractive piece of art gives the room a homey look. Behind the art work is necessary equipment, like oxygen and other devices. Theres even an infant warmer for the newborn. Unless there is a need for her room, the new mother can stay in it for two days if the delivery was vaginal and three days if it was a Csection. In addition to the birthing rooms, there are 26 postpartum rooms plus two upgraded Princess Rooms for new mothers who want something special. Jennifer Vogel, Boca Raton, says, I had both of my children at West Boca Medical Center and had a wonderful experience each time. The care I received was top notch, and I felt safe and secure knowing I had a great team of nurses and healthcare professionals around me to deliver my children. Harris continues. We are the only hospital in South Palm Beach and parts of Broward with a 111 Neonatal Intensive Care Unit for babies of one pound and up where exceptional care is needed. We have Neonatal doctors on call 24/7, and perinatologists available for moms with special conditions or multiple births whenMount Calvary brings congregation back home Hillsboro Lighthouse tours on March 10Hillsboro Beach Tours of the Hillsboro Lighthouse, 2700 N. Ocean Blvd., Hillsboro Beach, will be available March 10 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. The tour, including transportation and admission, is free for current Hillsboro Lighthouse Preservation Society, or HLPS, members. For nonmembers, there is a $15 transportation fee. Cost to join the HLPS is $25 for individuals, $35 for families, $50 for businesses or organizations and $500 for a lifetime membership. For more, visit www.hillsborolighthouse.org or call 954-942-2102.See BOCA WEST on page 24In addition to the birthing rooms, there are 26 postpartum rooms plus two upgraded Princess Rooms for new mothers who want something special.

PAGE 11

The Pelican 11 Friday, March 9, 2012 forward and give back to the community when we can. The Torch Run, April 26, goes from Hallandale Beach to Deer eld Beach and Special Olympics athletes in the run will eventually go on to compete with other Special Olympics competitors from around the country. Laura Collins, manager of the Torch Run, estimated that last year BSO raised about $60,000 for Special Olympics. The Torch Run is our largest grassroots fundraiser, she said. Donations go to pay for uniforms, food, transportation and housing for athletes. We have year-round competition and sports training for people with intellectual disabilities. We never charge an athlete or their family or caregiver a fee to participate. Huerta, a runner with her own Olympic aspirations, has been with BSO road patrol for four years and Pompano for seven months. Theres never a dull moment. Some of Huertas time on duty has been captured on lm for the television show Police Women of Broward County, which follows female BSO deputies in their daily personal and professional lives. Were hoping to get some of the girls out there for the event, said Huerta. BSO will be holding another Tip-A-Cop fundraiser on April 5 at Brus Room in Coconut Creek, 5460 W. Hillsboro Blvd., from 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. and 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. For more information on Tip-A-Cop, call 954-7864201. Another Tip-A-Cop event will be April 12 from 6 to 9 p.m. at Duffys, 401 N. Federal Hwy., Deer eld Beach. Call 954-935-6710, Ext: 223.Tip-a-CopContinued from page 2 Deputy Erika Huerta, Pompano Beach Broward Sheriffs Of ce. For many years, Betsy Bous eld, a John Knox Village resident, has supported wildlife that are attracted to the three lakes in the Village. On March 21 at 10 a.m., Bous eld will be honored when a newly completed sanctuary on Rex Foster Lake will of cially bear her name. Since 2004, the Village has been an of cial Wildlife Habitat that continues to attract a variety of birds and butter ies by supplying food, water and a safe haven.Ducks get royal treatment at John Knox VillageVillage dedicates sanctuary to resident

PAGE 12

12 The PelicanFriday, March 9, 2012 is trucked in. Normally, the federal government pays half the cost, the state and county split the rest. Lauderdale-ByThe-Seas share would be 12.5 percent. Less than 20 percent of the project is in LBTS. The county is hoping to pull permits in about a year with construction due to start in the fall 2013. It could take up to three years to complete the work which must be halted April through October for turtle season. LBTS has relatively little erosion because it bene ts from sand being dredged at the Hillsboro Inlet.The public reactsShirley McCollum of the Fountainhead at the south end of LBTS is a 20-year resident. My philosophy is sand comes and sand goes. The county has needs in many more areas. Is this the best use of our money? The answer is no, she said emphatically. Nothing Ive heard keeps me from being very violently opposed to the whole project. Michael Gittings, also of the Fountainhead said, We havent seen any sand loss in 45 years. I dont see any need to put sand in place where we havent lost any. Noting there is no access to adjacent Galt Ocean Mile beaches, Gittings said, We dont want a dump in our front yard for three years. Its absurd to have trucks hauling sand for three years. Dan Clark, director of Cry of the Water, a group that works to protect Browards reefs, urged caution. With these projects, Clark said, there is much sediment in the system and sediment is an enemy of coral reefs. We call ourselves the shore-diving capital of South Florida. Are we going to be able to say that if we put this project in place? asked resident Ron Piersante. But Paul Novak, a hotelier, was more concerned with the long-term impacts. This area is a tourist area, and people love wide beaches. We dont see these projects come around that often. Id hate to see us lose our beaches and have to wait 20 years to replenish them. Commissioners respondCommissioner Mark Brown asked about the damage to Fort Lauderdale if LBTS opted out of the project. It wouldnt kill it for Fort Lauderdale, but it would make for a much less desirable design and less longevity, Myers responded. It might result in a redesign to the detriment of the Galt, he said. One of the most critical erosion areas is along the Galt Ocean Mile. Suppose we wanted to aggressively plant sea oats and dune grass? Brown asked. Could we piggybank onto this project or would we have to do that on our own? Myers said that could be considered if thats the commission recommendation. Planting sea oats doesnt make the beach any wider. It captures windblown sand and creates a dune. Its not the same bene ts as this project. Brown said he is concerned this is a one-shot opportunity and there may not be another shot for 30 years. Im very concerned about Fort Lauderdale. Their beaches are in need of protection, he said. But I have a hard time justifying it here, where the beach is wide. Commissioner Chris Vincent said he didnt see any sense of urgency in this project. Steve Higgins, a coastal planner and engineer, said there is a case in Destin where property owners stopped a project, but the case is on appeal, adding that when an erosion control line is established, everything seaward of that belongs to the state. Its not a whole lot of sand, Commissioner Scot Sasser said. It would have a negative impact to our reefs, turtles, tourism and safety. I see no value whatsoever. I dont think we can bury our heads in the sand, Commissioner Stuart Dodd said. What if we needed the sand? They are our neighbors . we have to look at the totality of the project. SandContinued from page 1

PAGE 13

The Pelican 13 Friday, March 9, 2012 carries sand southward. None of the options presented a plausible remedy Blankenship said and each, except the rst, would require continual nourishment to maintain the beach. Doing nothing would mean the loss of the beach entirely in 10 years, he added. Recon guring the groins in Deer eld Beach would not provide enough erosion relief, he said and installing groins in Hillsboro Beach would only move the hot spot south. An emergent breakwater would stabilize the beach, but also create hot spots. The only viable solution Blankenship said is a submerged breakwater that dissipates wave energy and really helps to stabilize beaches. Such structures would slow sand loss making revetment projects necessary only every 15 years. The reality is, however, that it is almost impossible to get permits for such structures. A decade-long attempt at Singer Island is being abandoned after millions were spent in the effort, Blankenship said. Asked by Schubert to name a gure if Hillsboro decided to pursue a breakwater application, Blankenship estimated it would cost $500,000 to get in front of the necessary agencies. Another problem with a submerged breakwater here is it would likely have to be placed on the hard bottom which is impossible to permit. The study recommends the town continue to bring sand to its beach when necessary and to develop sources for sand and funding. It suggests small truck hauls every two years might be the best solution. And the town might piggyback its nourishment projects with others in the area. Looking for options other than throwing sand at it, Schubert asked what the impact would be on Deer elds beach if the groins there were altered. Wed just be taking rock away from the ve southern groins, she said. Im wondering about the cost and would it harm Deer elds beach? Blankenship said less rock would mean more damage to Deer elds south beach which already needs revetment from time to time. Contacted after the meeting, Rene Meles, a north beach resident and member of an ad hoc committee delving into the erosion issue, said he was disappointed that the study produced no good solutions. There should be some way to increase the litteral ow from the Boca Inlet shoal and capturing some of it, he said.I am disappointed that a modi cation of the Deer eld Beach groins didnt show a better result. Mayor Dan Dodge said, Im concerned about hot spots too, but I have to tell you, residents are skeptical about structures overall I would be cautious about doing anything. The mayor said he was surprised that the CSI options did not provide more relief and added that nourishing the beach every four to six years would be a nancial strain on the town. Dodge said the CSI report will go up on the towns website and a workshop to explain it to the public will be held in April. Hillsboro BeachContinued from page 1 SightingsContinued from page 2 April 1 at 3333 N. Federal Hwy., Boca Raton. Tickets are $12 for children seven and younger and $8 for others. Visit www.solchildren.org or call 561-447-8829. 3-17 An Evening with Kate Clinton at Parker Playhouse, 707 NE 8 St., Fort Lauderdale, at 8 p.m. Tickets range from $26.50 to $46.50. Visit www.parkerplayhouse. com or call 954-462-0222. 3-18 Flying Karamazov Brothers perform at 7 p.m. at Parker Playhouse, 707 NE 8 St., Fort Lauderdale. Tickets range from $26.50 to $46.50. Visit www.parkerplayhouse. com or call 954-462-0222. 3-21 Mad Romance, a group of musical performers, showcase classic jazz, mambo, lush ballads, cha-chacha, bebop, madcap swing and songs from the 60s and 70s from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m., at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach. Cost is $14 per ticket. Call 954-786-4111. 3-23 Florida Highwaymen art exhibit from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the Sample-McDougald House, Centennial Park, 450 NE 10 St., Pompano. Admission is $3. Proceeds bene t the Sample-McDougald House Preservation Society. 954786-4047.See SIGHTINGS on page 15

PAGE 14

14 The PelicanFriday, March 9, 2012 Oakland Park The Light of the World Clinic in Oakland Park presents its sixth annual Community Health Expo from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., March 17, at Coral Ridge Presbyterian Church, 5555 N. Federal Highway, Fort Lauderdale. Free screenings will be offered for diabetes, cholesterol, vision and blood pressure. Childrens immunizations will be offered from 10 a.m. to noon. Previous immunization records must be provided. The clinic provides health care and preventative medical services to the disadvantaged population in Broward County at facilities at 806 Prospect Road in Oakland Park. The clinic focuses its services on children and their families who are generally without insurance or nancial resources to obtain proper health care. The clinic serves from 10,000 to 12,000 people annually through volunteer doctors, specialists and medical professionals. For more information, go to the website: www. afreeclinic.org or call 954563-9876. Best deal on booksOakland Park Friends of the Oakland Park Library present a Pot OGold Used Book Sale from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday, March 16, and from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, March 17, at the library at 1298 NE 37 St. Call 954-630-4370. Health expo, free screeningBy Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFBroward Wilton Manors resident Richard Ives said he was ready to sue the city over its bypassing of two sections of Browards ethics code but now hes backing down. On Jan. 31, residents in Wilton Manors, Hillsboro Beach and Sea Ranch Lakes voted to allow their part-time elected of cials to be exempt from the recently passed county ethics provision that requires them to report their income and how they earned it. Ives says his change of heart stems from a change by County backs off support for possible ethics lawsuit aimed at local citiesthe county commission, which reversed itself over a Feb. 7 vote to back any resident in those cities who wanted to sue his or her city over the ballot question. Even though I know about the County Code of Ethics I still got tripped up by the wording of the ballot question . As I left the polling station I had a sinking feeling that Id just been duped, wrote Ives, a producer for WLRN Radio, in an email to Broward Mayor John Rodstroms of ce. Ives, who said he thinks commissioners intentionally mislead voters, blames himself for not going with my gut feeling that the ballot question was misleading and voting no. In a brochure, Wilton Manors of cials wrote that reverting to state ethics laws instead of adopting the county code would allow city commissioners to serve and keep their jobs. Both state and county codes allow outside jobs. The major difference between the codes was what those outside jobs could be. Lobbying is the only activity the new county code prohibits for elected of cials. Ives said he thought the See CODE on page 29

PAGE 15

The Pelican 15 Friday, March 9, 2012 Advertise with The Pelican Today! 954-783-8700 Former mayor Carmen McGarry also said there had been an account for the bridge, but after 2006. it disappeared from the budget as a separate line item. At that time over $100,000 was budgeted for repair of this bridge. The town also gets a check every year from the Florida Department of Transportation, or FDOT, to be used only for roads and bridges. FDOT yearly reports are sent to the town as the owner. The deed is also in the name of Hillsboro Beach. How can you throw this back on the condo owners who have never budgeted for this item, when suddenly, after several years of disrepair, it needs major work? McGarry asked. FDOT, hires consultants to make safety checks of bridges abutting their roadways. Germano alleges the town knew for at least seven years that repairs were needed to the span. The latest inspection in August, 2011 rated the bridge as structurally de cient and the substructure as poor and cited cracks and corrosion, enough to warrant a review. The bridge, at 1160 Hillsboro Mile, crosses the Hillsboro River, a narrow slough between A1A and the Island House. There is also a small marina for Island House boaters. Although the bridge is public property, there is no public parking along the river. Commissioner Jim Lambert said he was unaware the bridge existed and he did not see it as a public asset. Someone made a mistake when they accepted it from the developer, he said, but he acknowledged the town has a little responsibility. Lambert suggested deeding the bridge back to the condo association with compensation involved. Making the repairs would be far more expensive for the town than for the condo owners, Mayor Dan Dodge said, perhaps twice as much in both time and money. He suggested that discussions with the condo board continue. No one wants to get into litigation, the mayor said. Although Germano said the bridge has not been declared unsafe, the bottom line is when DOT says x the bridge, you have to x it. BridgeContinued from page 13-25 The Seven Last Words of Christ, choral version in English, accompanied by a string quartet, Hayden, Op. 51, performed at 6 p.m. at Trinity Cathedral, 464 NE 16 St., Miami. Tickets are $20. 305789-0074. Books & Seminars3-17 The American Association of University Women Pompano Beach Branch will hold its Scholarship Fundraiser featuring author Joanna Campbell Slan at the Lighthouse Point Yacht Club, 2701 NE 42 St Cost is $38 954-675-9249. SightingsContinued from page 13 See SIGHTINGS on page 16

PAGE 16

16 The Pelican Friday, March 9, 2012Dr. Joe McGee announces his retirement from the practice of dentistry and wishes to thank his patients for their support throughout his 33 years of practice in Pompano Beach. Retirement SightingsContinued from page 153-17 Fabulous Book Fair at the Margate Library, 5810 Park Drive, Margate, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. There will be books, videos and CDs available. 954-968-3800. 3-18 Cary Bayer, author of the Prosperity Aerobics and a life coach whos worked with Oscar-winner Alan Arkin, David Steinberg and Quality Inns, will be teaching his class The Secret of Money: How to use the Law of Attraction for Financial Health & Wealth from 1 to 3:30 p.m. at Congregation Etz Chaim, 1881 NE 26 St. Suite 100, Wilton Manors. Cost is $25 before March 11 and $30 after. Visit www. metaphysicalchapel.com or 754-300-1428.Bargains3-10 The Wilton Manors Friends of the Library Book Tent Event takes place on March 10 from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, the same time as the citys monthly yard sale event also at Hagen. There will be a selection of books and audio and video materials available. 954-390-2195 or 954-5669019. 3-17 Grannys Attic Giant Indoor Garage Sale at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Admission is free.See SIGHTINGS on page 24 Tell The Pelican about your special events ot programs. 954-783-8700!

PAGE 17

The Pelican 17 Friday, March 9, 2012 SPECIAL TO THE PELICANIn March, the Democratic Womens Club of NE Broward celebrates Womens History Month by welcoming Dr. Jane Caputi, professor of Womens Studies at Florida Atlantic University. Dr. Caputi will be speaking at the clubs March 21 meeting at 7 p.m. at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach. The topic of conversation will be the History of Reproductive Justice. Refreshments will be served. Dr. Caputi will be accompanied by Sarah Tucker Jenkins, a masters student in womens studies. Dr. Caputi arrived at Florida Atlantic University in 1997 as one of two faculty in womens studies. Prior to coming to FAU, she was professor of American studies at the University of New Mexico. Her primary research is in contemporary cultural studies, including popular culture, gender and violence and environmental feminism. She is the author of three books, The Age of Sex Crime; Gossips, Gorgons and Crones: The Fates of the Earth and Goddesses and Monsters: Women, Myth, Power and Popular Culture. She also Reproductive issues the topic at Democratic club meetingcollaborated with Mary Daly on Websters First Intergalactic Wickedary of the English Language, and has made an educational documentary, The Pornography of Everyday Life. She also was FAUs Distinguished Teacher for 2001, and received FAUs Research and Scholarly Activities award for 2005. Call 954-942-8711. Register to vote Pompano Beach The Broward County Supervisor of Elections Office will hold a voter registration event from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the E. Pat Larkins Center, 1520 NW 3 St., in Pompano Beach. Visit www.browardsoe.org or call 954-357-7050.

PAGE 18

18 The Pelican Friday, March 9, 2012 The Pelican 954-783-8700 Waksmacki, #1, scored the winning run with a stolen base. Mike Carlson, head coach Cardinals, gave his game ball to his son, Jack, who pitched at the end of the game and helped preserve the Cardinals lead. I hate giving it to my son . but he saved us. Asked what he thought his team needed to work on most, Andrew Cissone, Giants assistant coach, said base running. In the second inning, one Giants player ran to second while it already had a runner who wasnt allowed to advance. By the time he realized his mistake, the Cardinals swooped in to and tagged him out. All the little rust will be worked off in a couple of days, added Cissone.CardinalsContinued from page 7 [Top] Giants #2 Tommy Saucy and Cardinals #3 Jack Carlson both take big swings during Pompano Youth Baseballs opening day last Saturday. [Photos by Michael dOliveira]

PAGE 19

The Pelican 19 Friday, March 9, 2012 Scoreboard Send your scores to siren2415@ gmail.com To advertise on this page, call Bill Fox at 954-804-1056POMPANO BEACH MENS GOLF ASSN.WED. MAR 7, 2012 ONE BEST BALL OF FOURSOME 1st Ed Gormley, Paul Sacco b/d, Lars Adeheimer, Bob Paterson . . 50 2nd Lou Perras, Art Gatesy, John Pope, Bill Bradford . . 50 3rd Bob Van Zandt, Ed Lehky, Paul Murphy, Henry Lesburt b/d . 53 4th Jim Stumpf, Bob Johnson, Nick Rossi, Paul Dauzickas . 53 Closest to pin, Palms #11, Bill Stiehm Weekdays Before 12:00 pm $44 After 12:00pm $35 After 3:00 pm $17 Early Bird 9 Holes 6:30-8:00am $17 Weekday Specials Mulligan Special: $30 Weekends Before 12:00 pm $49 After 12:00 pm $40 After 3:00 pm $17 Early Bird 9 Holes 6:30-800am $17 All prices subject to change without notice. Call (954) 972-8140 For Your Tee Time!Margate Blvd. between Atlantic Blvd. and Royal Palm Blvd. in Margate THIS WEEKEND SPECIAL!Play any weekday (18 holes before 3pm) and receive$5.00 OFFSAME WEEKEND PLAYCheck with golf shop sta for details Expires 3/19All prices include tax. With coupon. Exp. 3/19/12 If you cannot locate a Pelican in your city or town, Call 954 .783.8700

PAGE 20

20 The Pelican Friday, March 9, 2012 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeerfield Beach One of the areas most highlyrated golf courses has made a move that insures almost every golfer will have a good day. Deer Creek Golf Club recently added silver tees to the championship course that establishes a 4,180-yard executive course within the very challenging fairways and greens. This has extended the careers of many of our golfers. Some of them are proud they can now shoot their ages. It has been a great success said Marty Martinez, general manager and director of golf. This latest renovation may be the best. Golf architect Arthur Hills rebuilt the course in 1994 and again in 2004, This is one of the better golf courses in South Florida, especially for a residential course, Martinez said. Luxury homes and condominiums are set well back from the playing field, and the club is distinct because it offers both the amenities of private membership and a daily, public fee. It is so nice here everyone thinks it is a private club. Thats a real compliment, but Positive change is ongoing at areas most challenging course, Deer Creek Golf Clubwe want everyone to know they are welcome, Martinez said. The newest improvement happens this summer in the Key West Banquet Room. The ceiling will be lifted to 17 feet, with new French doors and 15-foot arched windows installed, increasing seating to accommodate 100 additional diners. The waterfall and gardens will be enhanced with a bougainvillea-covered trellis, a gazebo, enlarged patio and lusher landscaping. Its a $1.2 million renovation. The Bridal Suite and rest rooms will also be updated. Last summer, the smaller Biscayne Banquet Room, the lobby and the Grille were refurbished. We hope to have the finest facilities in the area, Martinez said. The waterfall and garden already attract wedding parties, and Martinez said the new design will make guests feel they are in an exotic location. This is very exciting. The owner has been so generous in investing in this facility, $5 million in the last 15 years. At 7,050 yards and with a difficulty rating from the championship tees of 75.3, Deer Creek is still a fun place to play. You can find your ball and recover from a bad shot, Martinez said. Its more challenging around the green than off the tee. The course has little water and the bunkers are playable. The most challenging hole is probably the 18th, a 451yard par 4. It could be called an Arthur Hills signature with its dogleg to the left, a water hole short of the green and prevailing winds that blow left to right. You are always fighting the wind, Martinez said. It makes for a very difficult par See DEER CREEK on page 23 View of lush fairway and green at Deer Creek Golf Club with clubhouse in the distance. ADVERTISEMENT

PAGE 21

The Pelican 21 Friday, March 9, 2012

PAGE 22

22 The Pelican Friday, March 9, 2012 Pelican Classi eds Can Save You Time & Money 954.783.8700 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFOakland Park A spaghetti dinner for the benefit of the Northeast High School InVenTeam is set from 5 to 8 p.m. tonight, at Jaco Pastorius Community Center, 4000 N. Dixie Highway. The Oakland Park Kiwanis Club and City fire department are hosting the event to help the students raise funds for a trip to Boston. Tickets are $10 per person; $5 for children under 12. The 14 team members received a $9,570 grant from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology to create an emergency water filtration system for disaster relief in tropical areas. The team, led by teacher Randa Flinn, is one of 16 in the nation and the only one in Florida to be awarded a Lemelson-MIT InVenTeam grant this year. The students recently received generous donations from H. Wayne Huizenga and from Oakland Park Commissioner Shari McCartney and Broward School Board member Katherine Leach to help the team get to Boston to show their invention at EurekaFest, Brain-jocks get fundraiser in Oakland Parkaccording to Flinn. Ford Lincoln Mercury of Pompano is helping the students with a Drive for Your School event during the first week of April from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. at the school, 700 NE 56 St. The company will donate $20 per adult who test drives one of their cars. The students have raised $9,000 but still need about $2,000 more. For information on tickets for the dinner, call Flinn at 754-322-1550, Ext. 3058. High school students win MIT grant for water ltration system, now need travel funds for Boston.

PAGE 23

The Pelican 23 Friday, March 9, 2012 4. Membership here does have its benefits: unlimited golf, food, beverage and pro shop discounts, advance tee times, bag storage and lockers, special guest fees and charging privileges. For the daily player who still enjoys all that the clubhouse and course offer, Deer CreekContinued from page 20is difficult and challenging without being overly penalizing. Off-season rates, after April 23, are $50 weekdays; $75 on weekends and for twilight golfers, $35. Despite the rates or the time of year, play at Deer Creek remains steady year round, Martinez said. Although it is off the beaten path, a block north of Hillsboro Boulevard between Military Trail and Powerline Road, the clubhouse offers many social and dining opportunities. The club also caters to private parties and charity events. Especially popular are early bird dinners and Sunday brunches. The Grille serves lunch and dinner and on Thursday night is home to one of the areas hottest musical groups, Joey and the Gigolos who continue to pack the room. The Grille also offers an all-you-can-eat buffet at lunchtime, Wednesday pasta nights and other specials with no entre more than $15. St. Pats Day will be celebrated with a $12.95 corned beef and cabbage dinner and on April 8, an Easter Brunch will be served from noon to 6 p.m. for $23.95. Reservations are encouraged. Call 954-4215553. the fees varying according to the season. Martinez makes no apology for the clubs rates which in the season are as high as $110 on the weekends, $95 on weekdays. The rates reflect the demand, he said. Its a great location, its a quality course and it Architectural rendering of the new Key West Room.

PAGE 24

24 The Pelican Friday, March 9, 2012 The Pelican We Mean Business 954-783-8700 complications might occur. Were alerted beforehand if there will be a need for these specialists. All of that, plus house anesthesiologists who are always available and lactation consultants for new mothers makes it clear that we are ready for everything that can possibly happen. With a laugh, Harris adds, We have a lot of returns. The mothers come back for further deliveries because they like the care from nurses who have been in birthing areas for a long time. And they are secure knowing we have all of the knowledge and equipment to deal with early, complicated and multiple births. Currently, most women want an epidural which numbs the lower body when delivery is imminent.About Toby Harris, director of maternity servicesHarris says, Ive been an RN for 30 years. Im also a midwife. Ive been in maternity hospitals since 1980 and here in West Boca since 1989. Since coming to West Boca I have been a staff nurse, promoted to charge nurse, to clinical manager and am now director of maternity services. Along the way Harris has earned her B.S. degree in health sciences, her B.S.N. in nursing and masters in community health. She is a member of Association of Womens Health and Neonatal Nursing. For support classes, call the Call Center at 866-9049262. For further information about the birthing unit, call 561-488-8000.About West Boca Medical CenterThis medical center offers many specialties in addition to general medical and surgical care. They include cardiac and surgical intensive care, outpatient surgery services, 24-hour emergency services for adults and children, diabetes education, a cystic brosis program for adults and children, outpatient rehabilitation services, a sleep diagnostic center and comprehensive services designed to care for women throughout every stage in her life. Call 561488-8000. Photos courtesy of West Boca Boca WestContinued from page 10Toby Harris, director of maternity services is shown here consulting with an associate. The birthing unit handles ovre 2,000 births annually. Business3-12 The Wilton Manors Business Association will hold its monthly meeting at 6 p.m. at ABC Web Service, 2054 E. Oakland Park Blvd.City Meetings3-13 Wilton Manors City Commission meeting at 7 p.m. at city hall, 2020 Wilton Drive. 3-13 Pompano Beach City Commission meeting at 7 p.m. at city hall, 100 W. Atlantic Blvd. 3-13 Lighthouse Point City Commission meeting at 7:30 p.m. at city hall, 2200 N.E. 38 St. 3-13 Lauderdale-By-TheSea Town Commission meeting at 7 p.m. at Jarvis Hall, 4501 Ocean Drive.SightingsContinued from page 8 3-14 Oakland Park will hold a community meeting from 6 to 8 p.m. at the citys Municipal Building, 5399 North Dixie Hwy. The meeting is intended to provide businesses, residents, and property owners an opportunity to discuss and provide input on the proposed Commercial Blvd. Mixed Use Overlay District. The intent of the new district is to spur on compatible future redevelopment in the area. 3-20 Wilton Manors Commissioners will hold a workshop meeting at 7 p.m. at Richardson Historic Park, 1937 Wilton Drive. Commissioners will discuss the goals and objectives of all the city departments for the fiscal year 2012/2013.See SIGHTINGS on page 29

PAGE 25

The Pelican 25 Friday, March 9, 2012 The Pelican part of doing business. Call us at 954-783-8700. a dog, or on the beach with a turtle, or sitting on a horse. Animals are a big part of my life. When I was a student in dental school, I considered changing my major to veterinary medicine. I discussed this idea with my vet at that time and he said, Knowing you, youd take all the stray dogs home. That was almost a self ful lling prophecy. In dental school, she recounts, she had a black lab mix whom she named Buckwheat. I had a friend with a black lab, whom he couldnt keep anymore, so I took Duke in. Then I found a little black lab in a small country town where I was working as a dental hygienist. I named her Alfalfa and that is how my dog rescue volunteer career began. Continuing, Im known now in the rescue community as a person who will help nd a home for abandoned dogs. The reasons for abandoning are many. People move. Others cant afford to keep their pets. Some buildings dont allow pets. And then there are the strays. When I get a call, I go into action. I nd a holding place for the dog. This could be a short term foster home, a vet who works with me or my own back yard. My two dogs welcome these short term strangers. I get a medical evaluation from several vets or the people at Bayview Animal Hospital who also help me. Once we know what is needed, I take care of it. I foot the bill. I consider it my special charity. It can cost up to $2,000 depending upon what is needed. In response to raised eyebrows over the money she spends on rescuing, she laughs and says, I know. I may end up in the poorhouse, but what matters is how I lived my life. I sometimes think I have a big heart, but I need my head examined. Its not surprising to learn that all of her employees have become dog parents as have many of her patients. Of ce manager, Bonnie Faust, who has been with Dr. Evatt for 15 years, has Rickey, a pug beagle mix and Bessie, a red haired cocker spaniel. Faust says, When the doctors eyes open, so do her arms. Did she tell you what she does for St. Teresas Missionaries of Charity? Face ushed, Dr. Evatt admits that she volunteers every year in the Dominican Republic xing childrens teeth. Many have never seen a dentist, she sighs. And if that isnt enough, she does regular pro-bono dental care for the Sisters of the Missionary when they come up from their convent in Miami. On holidays, she can often be found serving in the soup kitchen in Miami. When this news elicited praise, she shook her head in denial and said, Dont praise me. What I do is more gratifying to me than any present I could receive. The Pelican agrees with author, Sachin Mayi, that Dr. Evatt is indeed a candidate for sainthood in dog heaven, and maybe people heaven too. Thank you, Dr. Evatt. For more information, call 954-565-6335. RescuesContinued from page 8 A happy waiting room is the dentists back yard. Most of the dogs shown here will all be adopted by loving owners in short order thanks to Dr. Laura Evatt.

PAGE 26

26 The Pelican Friday, March 9, 2012 and Christmas by the Sea and a new ad hoc marketing group is planning a Family Fun Week in June and a lobster mini-season dive event in July. I dont know who you are marketing these events to, and Im not clear about the towns marketing strategy, Brown said. We need to hire a professional marketing rm. Id rather not have a staff person marketing these events. We need a strategy as far as Im concerned. Commissioner Stuart Dodd said he chaired the July 4th event twice. The rst time it cost over $100,000 and included car shows and sand castle contests. It was an enormous amount of work, shared by Commissioner (Birute Ann) Clottey and myself. Last years event had a lower budget and was organized with a great deal of assistance from businesses and the Volunteer Fire Department, he said. Dodd said an event organizer was hired in the past and the expense was much more than anticipated. Hoffmann said she sees the tasks separately: an event organizer, an operational person who follows through, and someone else to market events. Is it someone we hire by contract or a staff person? she asked, looking for commission direction. Hoffmann said her assistant, Pat Himelberger, is coordinating the family event, and Steve dOliveira, the towns public information of cer, is coordinating the lobster fest. I think this should be the town managers scope of responsibility, Mayor Roseann Minnet said. We need more help from staff. This needs to be in your hands. Hoffmann said she will come back with a budget request. Commissioners will be honorary chairs of the holiday events. Minnet then asked commissioners to take event assignments for the next two years. She volunteered for the Easter event April 7. Brown wanted more assurance that fundraising wouldnt be the responsibility of the chairperson noting, The issue in ethics law is the appearance of con ict. Lets say a restaurant contributes food or money or a band to an event. Then a couple months later something comes up with that restaurant that requires a commission vote. Somebody les an ethics complaint against the commissioner who chaired the event. In public of ce, its guilty until proven innocent. He added, Im really reluctant to put myself out there where someone may le a complaint, and I cant vote on an issue because that restaurant contributed to an event I chaired. Minnet responded, Commissioner Brown, then you wont chair any event. Im proud to stand up and do it. I can understand where youre coming from. Im not doing anything ethically wrong, the mayor said. Dodd said he totally disagreed with Brown and volunteered to chair Halloween. Sasser said he would chair the Easter event in 2013. Vincent will chair the July 4th celebration this year. At that, Brown said he would chair July 4th in 2013, after I see how many ethics complaints get led against everyone else. Only one resident, Ron Piersante, a regular volunteer at holiday events, spoke up. We elected you to run the town, not to run special events, he said. Most of you work. The town manager said we should hire someone to plan events. You could be chairperson, but we need someone to coordinate. You need something in the budget for special events. I hope this is not going on deaf ears. EthicsContinued from page 9

PAGE 27

The Pelican 27 Friday, March 9, 2012 Garden Isle Marine, 641 S. Federal Highway, Pompano Beach 954-785-7181Pull up dockside and solve your crafts problems at Garden Isle Marine ServicesDrive to the back of McCulloch Marine lot to nd Garden Isle Marine Services on the water at 641 S. Federal Highway in Pompano Beach. Thats where to nd John Hall and his team servicing boat problems so that boaters can rev up and hit the waves with peace of mind. John and Tracey Hall, owners of Garden Isle Marine Services, took the plunge and rented McCullochs back lot to open their business in 2003. It took a lot of courage to give up a good pay check and take on the headaches of being a business owner, John says, but with my wife Tracey running the of ce and my hands-on team of Tom Woods, Tom Ferrick and Eddie Spiller working with me, Ive never regretted the move. We met working at Hideaway and married in 2003, the same year we opened Garden Isle. It was a busy year. Its been an adventure and were glad we did it, Tracey said echoing her husbands feelings. Business came to us one customer at a time, and now its all referrals and responses to our Pelican ads that bring boaters to us. Our clients are a mix of sherman and pleasure cruisers. They keep busy in the summer because John says, Permanent residents know that summer offers better boating conditions than winter. When the snowbirds y in, were even busier. Water access is very important. With our forklift, we can haul a craft out of the water, do the necessary work and then drop the boat back in the water. Because of the Federal Highway Bridge and our lift capacity, we are limited to servicing boats from 13 to 35-feet. One long time customer is David Bobst, captain and owner of Calypso Poet Yacht Services, who says, I have used John to service all of my smaller boats and Ive been a more than satis ed customer for many years. Greg Bennett is another. He says, I highly recommend John and Garden Isle Marine Services to all of my boating friends. Ive been a happy and loyal customer for over ve years. John does all of the maintenance on my boat, including bottom painting twice a year and that way everything stays ship shape. Eddie Spiller does the bottom painting which John says is very important to every boat that sits in the water. It keeps growth away, allowing a boat to perform better, enjoy maximum speed and save on fuel. The mechanics handle all mechanical and electrical problems, and do zinc replacement. John says hes equipped to repair or replace any kind of engine. Parts are readily available and the work is done as quickly as possible to get folks back in the water. Ive been in the business since I was 14 years old. Im certi ed by many different factory schools. One of his mechanics, Tom Woods has been on the team for ve years and says, I love my work. We have many interesting and pleasant customers and theyre good to deal with. Youre always learning because the problems are never quite the same. When he has a minute John enjoys getting out there himself and occasionally hooks a dolphin. Its fun being in my own boat instead of working on other peoples boats. But the ocean is not for Tracey who gets sea sick. I like cruising the intracoastal, looking at the mansions, sipping my wine and nibbling on cheese. For information, call 954785-7181. Open Mon. to Fri. 8 a.m. to 5:30; Sat. 8 to 12 noon.John and Tracey Hall, owners of Garden Isle Marine Services are proud of their water location with forklift, enabling them to offer repair, replacement and maintenance services for boats up to 35-feet. [Right] Eddie Spiller, pushing 70, is the teams dedicated bottom painter. Shown here, ready to paint. John and Tom Woods use the forklift to get boats out of the water and ready for maintenance and repair. ADVERTISEMENT

PAGE 28

28 The Pelican Friday, March 9, 2012 The Shuck & Dives Chef Staz shows off some fresh oysters freshly prepared by his assistants Junior and Kerry.People are talking about . Taste of the Beach in Lauderdale-By-The-SeaAthena-By-The-Sea s Louis and Martha Marchelos dish out their famous meatballs as well as signature Greek salad. The Shuck & Dives Chef Staz shows off some fresh oysters freshly prepared by his assistants Junior and Kerry. Great Food and Lively Ambiance make LBTS Taste of the Beach a resounding successBy Malcolm McClintockPELICAN STAFFOnce again this year, the great white tent on El Mar Drive signaled the coming of Lauderdale-by-the-Seas much anticipated annual culinary event. Hundreds of area residents and visitors attended the classic gastronomic soire known as Taste of the Beach. Presented by the LBTS Chamber of Commerce, the Taste of lived up to expectations by featuring over 30 area restaurants. The maelstrom of aromatic scents, lively music and good cheer created the perfect atmosphere for fine dining. Everyone seems to be having a good time said event organizer Guy Contrada as he walked the floor making sure guests and restaurateurs were enjoying the experience. In addition, several wine and spirits purveyors were present to showcase their particular brands of tonic. Ambrosial vintages, flavored vodkas and frosty beers were great complements to the toothsome fare on hand. We also had many fantastic gift baskets and prizes for the silent auction, adds newly installed Chamber President Mark Silver. One of the most rewarding evenings of the year, Taste of the Beach is a memorable occasion that should always be marked on ones calendar. Simply drop by the Chamber Welcome Center to plan next years visit.Pompano Beach. Century Plaza Condominium Celebrates its 40th AnniversaryL to R: Angela Galland, Jean Krupp, Leslie & Tom Roe, Verna Davis, Anna Gerres L to R: Aurora Jebejian, Chair; Susan Vercesi, Vice-Chair; Joan Larkin, Treasurer; Judith Desrosiers, Sunshine Lady; Joan Doonan, Assistant Treasurer; Patty Monteson, Secretary; Terri Brooks, Programs/Activities Ed McPherson, Director; Norm Derosiers, Treasurer; Tony Coletta, President; Ray Larkin, Director; Ron Vercesi, Vice President; Patty Monteson, Director; Lucy OConnor, SecretaryPompano Beach Last month Century Plaza celebrated its 40th Anniversary with a dinner/ dance at the Lighthouse Point Yacht & Racquet Club. The event, sponsored by the Century Plaza Womens Club, was attended by almost 140 residents who enjoyed a an evening of fine dining. Aurora Jebejian, president of the Womens Club, welcomed guests and introduced 32-year association president, Tony Coletta, who gave a brief early history of Century Plaza. Tony and his wife, Rose, the First Couple of Century Plaza, will soon celebrate their 72nd wedding anniversary. After remarks by vice president, Ron Vercesi, festivities began with Paul Anthony and the Live Wire band. During the program Womens Club Treasurer, Joan Larkin, recognized the Century Plaza Pioneers; Verna Davis, Anna Gerres, Jean Krupp, Tom and Leslie Roe and Angela Galland., owners who still live at Century Plaza and signed their deeds 40 year ago. Joan also recognized the kids those offspring of original owners still living at Century PlazaDiane Seiwert, Chuck and Shirley Cooper, Arthur and Roberta Gualtieri, Adriann Weir, Ron and Susan Vercesi, Marie Boroski and Pat Titone. After the group honored Tony Coletta, 99-year old resident, Jerry Miller, read a heartfelt poem he wrote about life at Century Plaza. Attendees were then given a commemorative Book of Memories that was created and published by resident Kay McPherson. The booklet included a 1971 Fort Lauderdale News article announcing the opening of Century Plaza; photos from past parties and other condo events; meeting minutes from the past; and letters from residents.

PAGE 29

The Pelican 29 Friday, March 9, 2012 WORSHIP DIRECTORY: Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad. Rev. Hyvenson Joseph ballot was a self-serving move by commissioners to allow them to lobby. Wilton Manors Mayor Gary Resnick, an attorney who is registered as a lobbyist with the county and lobbies on behalf of his law firm, has said he is not commenting on the ethics code. County commissioners also called the ballot question CodeContinued from page 14misleading. We went down this road is because there was discussion on the board that the ballot titles in those three cities were misleading, said Commissioner Ilene Lieberman. In a previous interview, Wilton Manors Commissioner Julie Carson said she thought it was insulting for county officials to say voters didnt understand what they were voting for. The county vote was 6 to 2 to rescind support of residents who wanted to sue their cities. Sue Gunzburger and Lois Wexler dissenting. A motion to bring the issue up again failed 4 to 3 because the county requires at least five votes to pass a motion; Rodstrom was the one who tried to change sides. Commissioner Barbara Sharief, who voted to rescind, said its the right of every city to change whatever it feels needs to be changed. I know our ethics code is horrible. What we have to abide by is horrible. Why are we so adamant about going out and suing these cities when theyve figured out a way, I guess, to modify it to allow people to continue to work? she asked. I think that were out there fishing for somebody to come forward, and I just think its inappropriate what were doing right now. Responded Rodstrom, You asked why would anybody want to [sue a city] . and my answer is that it gives us a forum, if you think this ordinance is so horrible, it gives the ordinance a forum to have it tested in a court of law, and so the parts of it that are unconstitutional may or may not be dealt with potentially in court. Festivals & Events3-10 The Fort Lauderdale St. Patricks Day Parade and Festival will be held at Huizenga Plaza, 32 E. Las Olas Blvd., from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. There will be food, live entertainment and activities for children. The parade down Las Olas Boulevard starts at noon. Visit www. ftlaudirishfest.com or call 954-828-5985. 3-11 There will be a beach cleanup at North Ocean Park, 3424 NE 16 St., Pompano Beach, from 9 to 11 a.m. Those interested should meet at the First Presbyterian church of Pompano Beach, 3424 NE 16 St., at 8:30 a.m. 3-16 & 30 The St. Coleman Parishs Mens Club Fish Fry takes place from 5:30 to 9 p.m. at St. Coleman, 1200 S. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. Cost is $8 for adults and $5 for kids. Visit www. stcmc.org or 954-942-3533. SightingsContinued from page 24 See SIGHTINGS on page 33

PAGE 30

30 The Pelican Friday, March 9, 2012 The Pelican Classi eds can save you time and money! The Pelican 954-783-8700 The Pelican 954-783-8700 Classi edsCall 954-545-0013 HELP WANTEDADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT For Property Management Firm. Data Entry, Client Contact, Assist Executive. FT / PT. 954-7727012. 3-9 BAIT & TACKLE CLERK PART TIME 1 OR 2 DAYS PER WEEK Retired OK. Pompano Beach. Call 954-946-1307. 3-16 LOCAL PEST CONTROL CO Looking For Quality Sales/Service Tech. Must Be Dependable, Team Player, Good Drivers License & People Skills. Will Train Right Person. ALSO Of ce Assistant Computer People & Phone Skills Needed. Fax Resume 954418-3982. 3-9 SEEKING EMPLOYMENTHOME HEALTH AIDE I Will Take Care Of The Elderly. Honest, Kind, Loving. With Own Car. Live In Or Live Out. 954-588-3102. 3-9 0 EXPERIENCED POLISH & SOME ENGLISH Speaking Lady. Will Take Good Care Of Your Loved One. Help With ADL. Own Car. Light Cleaning Available. 954-319-8376. 3-9 LPN AT CNA PRICES Will Give Tender Care To Your Loved Ones. Live Out Broward Area Only. Dependable & Honest. References Available. Your Car Or Mine For Shopping & Appts. 954-895-7850. (15 Yrs. Exp. ) CNA / HHA EXPERIENCED CNA /HHA Seeking Immediate Employment As Caregiver. Prerequisite: Must Be Elderly In Need Of Personal Care, Single, Private Duty (Hourly) 786-443-8519. LPN / EMT QUALITY Care For Sick Or Elderly. Night Or Day. Flexible Hrs. 15 Yrs Exp. & Refs. Available. 954-3999929 Cell 305-720-0080. 3-9 SERVICES DANNY BOY ELECTRIC Lic & Insured. Lic. #EC13004811. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. 24/Hr Service. 954-290-1443. Beat Any Written Estimate. Sr, Discount. 3-9 AAA AFFORDABLE FLOORS Carpet Tile Wood & Bamboo Floors Moldings Painting. TRASH REMOVAL Comm / Res. Same Day Service. FREE Est. 954646-1889. 3-9 FLAT TILE ROOF REPAIR COATINGS Leak Repair Experts 30 Years Experience. Call Today For A FREE Estimate. 954-258-7677. 3-9 AAA AFFORDABLE TRASH REMOVAL Garage Clean Ups Condos Apts. Furniture Appliances Trees. Lic / Ins. FREE Est. Same Day Service. 954-646-1889. 3-9 HANDYMAN PAINTING CARPENTRY Pressure Cleaning. Decks! Everything Around The House. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. Call 561350-3781. 3-16 MOORE PLUMBING PLUMBING SERVICES Big Jobs Small Jobs. We Do It All. Remodeling & Repairs. Lic. & Insured. C.C. Accepted. Call 954-772-4600. 3-30 HONEST HANDYMAN HOME & BUILDING Maintenance/Improvements. No Job Too Small. Fast Friendly Service. Reasonable Rates. Local Resident/Homeowner. Call Today For Your FREE Upfront Quote. No Deposit Required. 754-366-1915. 3-9 HOME/OFFICE REPAIRS By State Certified G.C. Reasonable. CGC025802. More Information Call 954815-1007. C GOT JUNK? DUMP TRUCK CLEANUPS Trees/ Landscape, Yard Fill. Paint/ Pressure Wash/ Roofs/Home Repairs Welding, Etc. Dave 954-818-9538. 3-9 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIESNew GREEN technology. New defroster control saves energy in home refrigerators, commercial chillers. Patented. All optical. Simple mfg. Strategic partners needed..www.NewAvionics.Com. 954-568-1991. C MUSICIANS WANTEDThe American Legion Symphonic Band is now accepting new members for the 2011-2012 season. College age to seasoned seniors are welcome. Rehearsals are held on Wed. evenings at American Legion Post 142 in Pompano. Percussionists, euphonium and clarinet players are especially needed. If you enjoy making music, call Jim McGonigal, Music Director at 954-647-0700 for more info.DEEP WATER VILLA DOCKPOMPANO BEACH 2/2 1700 SQ FT. Screened Fla Room. Private Yard. W/D. 4 Park. No Fixed Bridges. Community Pool. Deeded Dock.. 2 Blocks Beach. $285,000. Coldwell Banker Barbara Call 954629-1324. 3-16 OPEN HOUSEPOMPANO BEACH SUNDAY 1-4pm. 1201 N Riverside Drive. TRULY AMAZING VIEW. This Updated 2/2 1st Floor Corner Unit Is Directly On The Intracoastal With No Wake Zone Insuring Quiet Enjoyment Of an Endless Boat Parade. Must See Camille Hall Balistreri Realty. 954254-2085. 3-9 OPEN HOUSE Sunday 11am 3pm. 2/2 Condo On Intracoastal 1111 N Riverside #306 Pompano Beach. Better Homes & Gardens RE 954304-4518. 3-9 THRIFT STORETHRIFT STORE GRAND OPENING 5130 N Federal Ft Laud. 2nd Floor (No Clothing) Beautiful Household Items. From $2 Call 954-839-8182. 3-9 HOMES FOR RENTPOMPANO 2/2 Cottage Style House. Large Yard With Fish Pond. $1100 Month Company Bills For Electric & Water. 541 NE 34 St. Darci 954-783-3723. 3-23 CO-OP SALESPOMPANO BEACH 1/1 On Water, Dockage Available At Your Door. $59,500. Coldwell Banker Barbara 954-6291324. 3-16 REAL ESTATE WANTEDI BUY HOUSES!! CASH!! AS IS! QUICK CLOSE! ANY AREA ANY CONDITION! NO EQUITY OK. CALL NOW 954-914-2355. 4-20 CONDOS FOR SALELIGHTHOUSE POINT 2/1.5 CONDO In A GREAT AREA. Pets Allowed. $124,900. Call Barbara Balistreri Realty. 954-263-7129. 3-9 DEERFIELD BEACH 2/2 Completely Redone. Granite Kitchen, New Cabinets. S.S. Appliances. 20 Porcelain Tile Floors. Travistine Stone Baths. Freshly Painted. 1st Floor. Less Than A Mile To Beach. $84,900. Call 631-873-8715. 3-9 WOW!! ON THE INTRACOASTAL. Owner Financing. $99,500 Firm. New C / A, Paint & Carpeting. Boat Slip When Available. 954-6820485. 3-9 LAUDERDALE BY THE SEA Furnished 1/1.5 Condo $115,000. Heated Pool. Ocean Access. On Canal. 1481 S Ocean Blvd. Apt 228. Call 586549-5223. 3-30 CONDOS FOR RENTDEERFIELD BEACH 2/2 CONDO Corner Unit, Pool. $800 $825. Good Credit Required. No Pets Or Realtors. 631-885-3342. 3-16 LAUDERDALE BY THE SEA Across From Beach Near Assumption Catholic Church. 1 Bedroom Den 2 Bath CHA, Pool, W/D In Unit. $1175 Per Month Yearly 1st Last Security. No Pets No Smoking. 954-942-5642. 3-16 POMPANO BEACH 1 / 1.5 At Sea Haven Immaculate Condition. Fully Furnished / Leather.. Magni cent Rec & Pool Facilities On Waterfront. $950 Month. 954-913-7383. 3-16 OCEANFRONT CONDO POMPANO BEACH CLUB. Furn. 2/2 Newly Updated 15th Floor W/Fabulous Views Of Ocean & Intracoastal. Restaurant, 2 Pools, Bar, Gym. Available April $2,000 Per Month. May Thru November $1,500 Per Month. Call Audrey 570-246-9240 Cell Or E-mail audrey@chantre.com 3-9 Classi eds continued on page31

PAGE 31

The Pelican 31 Friday, March 9, 2012 Advertise with The Pelican Classi edsCall 954-545-0013 Get to know your local Merchants APTS FOR RENTDEERFIELD/POMPANO BEACH 1 BR & 2 BR APTS FOR RENT. Remodeled, Paint, Tile, Etc. W & D On Site. Pool. Pet Friendly. Call George 954-809-5030. 3-9 POMPANO 1/1 & 2/1 E OF FEDERAL Tiled. 10 Overhang. Walk To Everything. Park At Your Door. 954-2546325. 3-16 POMPANO BEACH 2/2 Furnished. Large Ef ciency With Kitchen. Fully Furnished. Cable, Internet. Pool, Laundry. 500 To The Beach. Weekly Monthly Yearly. 954-2948483 Or 248-736-1533. 3-16 POMPANO GARDENS $795 1/1 $200 Deposit. Nice Area. Minutes To Beach. Pet OK. Please Call 954-515-2554. 3-16 POMPANO BEACH CLUB NORTH 1/1 Unfurnished 5th Floor $1,200 Month Annual. Oceanview, Indoor Parking, 24 Hour Security. Done Deal Realty. E. Robbins. 954-3440709. 3-16 POMPANO ATLANTIC / INTRACOASTAL AREA South Of Publix Furnished Ef ciency Private Entrance Utilities Included. Long Term! $700 Month. 954-4158838. 3-9 POMPANO GARDENS $795 1/1 $500 Deposit. Nice Area Minutes To Beach Pet OK. Please Call 954-515-2554. 3-16 POMPANO BEACH 1/1 SW. C/A $725 2/1 $895 NE 2/1 $950 Townhouse 2/1.5 $1095. ALL FREE WATER. Rent + $70 Application Moves U In. 954-781-6299. 3-9 POMPANO MCNAB RD & NE 18 AVENUE 1 & 2 Bedrooms Furnished/ Unfurnished. $695 $950 And Up. Pool, Tile Floors. Central A/C. 954-6102327. 3-16 POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 Bedroom From $495. Easy Movein. 1/2 OFF DEPOSIT. Remodeled. Great Location. 954-783-1088 For More Info. 3-9 LUXURY BEACH PADS FOR RENT! Pompano Grand Opening: FREE 32 Flat Screen HDTV! Newly Renovated in 2012 One Bedrooms & Studio Apts., 75 Yards From Private Beach Access, Eastern Exposure. New Kitchens & Baths, Granite Counter Tops, Central Air, Pool, Laundry, Dedicated Parking, Near Pier & Downtown. All Bills Paid! Includes Water, Electric, Premium Cable TV And WIFI. Furnished Or Unfurnished. Short Or Long Stays. No Utility Deposits. Small Pets Welcome. Only 9x, 8x, 7 Left! Pax Properties 888-729-4948 Or 954-603-8857. Photos At www.beachpads.net 3-30 COMMERCIAL FOR RENT-SALEPOMPANO COMMERCIAL OFFICE Spaces Available. Ranging From As Low As $500 To $700 Depending On Square Footage. Please Call Darci At 954783-3723. 3-23 DEERFIELD BEACH Retail Of ce Warehouse 700 Sq Ft With Loft. A/C, Bathroom. $575 Per Month. Call For More Info 561-654-1331 Or 561-9985681. 3-9 FURNITUREBEDSETS King $180 Queen $130 Full $110 Twin $90. 5 Pc. Bedroom Set $399. Frames $39. 954-465-6498. 3-9 ENTERTAINMENT WALL UNIT Light Wood. 12 x 6 7 5 Piece, Includes 2 Side Units, Glass Top. Shelves In Middle Drawers & Door On The Bottom. $600 Or Best Offer!! 954-785-5792. 3-9 DOCK FOR RENT60 FT DOCK THE COVE MARINA 50 AMP / H20 Included. $1,200 Month Price Negotiable Depending On Boat Size. Restaurant & Fuel On Premises. 954-9140053. a.j.barsotti@comcast. net. 3-30 MISCELLANEOUSNICE OLD THINGS WANTED Watches, Fountain pens, Gold & Silver Jewelry, Sterling Silverware, World War II Memorabilia, etc. Call Dirk 954-709-0191. 3-9 OLD NAUTICAL STUFF WANTED By Collector. Sextants, Officers Watches, Captain Clocks, Compasses, etc. Marine / Submarine. Dirk 954-709-0191. 3-9 OLD OMEGA & JAEGER & LeCOULTRE Watches & Clocks Every Kind & Condition Wanted. Call Dirk 954-709-0191. 3-9 BOHEMIAN CRYSTAL CHANDELIER By Breciosa. New In Box. Pictures Available By email. $950. 561-542-2988. Boca. 3-9 BABY GRAND PIANO Cherry Wood Like New!! $3,500. 561-381-0361 Delray Beach. 3-16 LIKE NEW STATIONARY BIKE Floor Model $50. ROCKIN AB ROCKET $50. Like New! ToolsMisc Items. Pompano 954-943-0250. 3-9 GARAGE SALESPOMPANO BEACH NEW & OLD SALE!! Parliament House 405 N Ocean Blvd. Saturday March 10 9am 2pm. Books Household Seasonal Clothing Jewelry Home Dcor Lots More!! 3-9 POMPANO VOYAGER CONDO 2900 NE 14 St Causeway! March 10th & 11th 8am-2pm. Multi Family Quality Items. Clothes, China, TVs, Furniture. Much More!!!! Come Early Great Bargains! 3-9 POMPANO BEACH GARDEN AIRE VILLAGE NORTH 2601 NE 14 St. Causeway. TAG SALE Saturday March 10 8am1pm. Bake Sale Furniture Lamps Clothing & Trash & Treasure. 3-9The Pelican Classi eds can save you time and money! The Pelican 954-783-8700

PAGE 32

32 The Pelican Friday, March 9, 2012

PAGE 33

The Pelican 33 Friday, March 9, 2012 Capt. RJ Boyle is an experienced angler in South Florida. His studio is located in Lighthouse Point. Call 954-420-5001. RJ BoyleRJ BOYLE STUDIOSIf you ever have the chance, you need to take a trip to Costa Rica and do some shing. We got back two days The Paci c waters off Costa Rica yield some big catchesago from a short four-day trip to Los Suenos Marina. And what a time it was. We caught a bunch of big sail sh around 100 lbs each. The sail sh are much bigger in the Paci c Ocean than the Atlantic. We also saw a 250 lb. blue marlin, which was caught by a 12year-old girl. We fought the sh for about 45 minutes before we brought it beside the boat. She was so happy and her dad couldnt have been more excited. The marina is ve-star and the restaurants are off the chain. The ights are about $350 and it only takes about two and a half hours to get there. It is truly amazing to take a ight and be in a third world country so quickly. Above all, what is so cool about shing there is that it is at calm most of the time. You can relax and really enjoy the boat and your friends without having to worry about spilling your cocktail. Most of the natives there speak English so you dont need to worry if you dont speak Spanish. So, get off the couch and put a trip together and charter a boat there for a few days. You wont regret it! If you have any questions about putting a trip together, call us at the shop at 954-420-5001. Get Tight! For the Kids3-9 Sol Children Theatre Troupe is hosting a social from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Sol Children Theatre, 3333 N. Federal Highway, Boca Raton. The event is free and includes games, refreshments and a meet and greet with directors, teachers and actors. Visit www.solchildren.org or call 561-447-8829. 3-11 Bike Fest, an event with bike safety and games, will take place from 1 to 4 p.m. at Roosevelt Gardens Park, 2841 NW 11 St., Fort Lauderdale. The free event is for ages 6 to 17. Call 954327-3888. 3-15 Pony rides offered for $3 per ride from 9 to 11:30 a.m. at Sand & Spurs Equestrian Park, 1600 NE 5 Ave., behind the Goodyear Blimp base, Pompano Beach. 954.786.4507. 3-22 Secret Woods Nature Center, 2701 W. State Road 84, Dania Beach, offers Nature Tots, a program that teaches children ages two to four to appreciate nature. The program is $5 per child and runs from 10 to 11 a.m. Preregistration is required. 954357-5198 or 954-357-8884.Health & Fitness3-10 Free car seat safety check available from 9 a.m. to noon at Pompano Beach Fire-Rescue Station 24, located at 2001 NE 10th St., on the corner of Northeast 10 Street and Federal Highway. Certi ed child passenger safety technicians will be checking childrens car seats for proper installation, safety and recall status. Call 954-786-4510 to schedule an appointment. 3-17 The 6th Annual Community Health Expo takes place from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Coral Ridge Presbyterian Church, 555 N. Fed. Hwy., Fort Luaderdale. Event is free. 954-563-9876.SightingsContinued from page 29

PAGE 34

34 The Pelican Friday, March 9, 2012 County, city of cials don aprons for Sample-McDougald House Dirk DeJong, president of Frank H. Furman Insurance, serves breakfast to a table of diners at John Knox Village. DeJong was one of many local celebrities to donate time at Breakfast at the Big House, a fundraiser for the historic Sample-McDougald House. In the background, Pompano Beach Commissioner Rex Hardin and Pompano Beach Chamber CEO Ric Green wait in line to get orders. By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach Its not everyday that a candidate for Congress works as a waitress but Kristin Jacobs, Broward County Commissioner and candidate for U.S. House Dist. 22, recently slapped on an apron and served SampleMcDougald House benefactors at Breakfast for the Big House. The event, held at John Knox Village in Pompano Beach on March 22, was a fundraiser for the nearly 100year-old structure. Jacobs, Pompano City Commissioner Rex Hardin, Pompano Chamber of Commerce President/CEO Ric Green, City Manager Dennis Beach and others worked as waiters and waitresses for the event. We keep knocking down our history and we keep forgetting, said Jacobs about the importance of preserving the site. Its a beautiful building, she added. Now in its fourth year, the fundraiser is put on by the Sample-McDougald House Preservation Society, which was formed in 1999 to relocate, promote and preserve the historic digs. Its great, said Hardin, who has been a waiter four Pompano Beach City Commissioner Rex Hardin re lls the coffee cup of Michael Carey, of Kimley-Horn and Associates. Also pictured is Suzanne Danielson of Kimley-Horn and Associates. [Photos by Michael dOliveira] Robert Scharmann, executive director of John Knox Village; Dan Hobby, executive director of the Sample-McDougald and Dodie Keith-Lazowick, Sample-McDougald board member. See BIG HOUSE on page 35

PAGE 35

The Pelican 35 Friday, March 9, 2012 times. They realize youre not a professional server . they cut you some slack. Recently, SampleMcDougald received its certificate of occupancy, or CO, allowing it to open to the public. This has been 12 years in the making, said Dodie Keith-Lazowick, Sample-McDougald board member and president of Keith & Associates. Responsible for obtaining the CO was JWR Construction Services. Along with a $20,000 donation, which was used to pay off creditors, JWR also took over management of the project. They said were going to run the entire project for you and by the way, were going to charge you zero, said Dirk DeJong, president/COO of Frank Furman Insurance and president of SampleMcDougald. Our success is 100 percent due to JWR, said Keith-Lazowick. Jerry DuBois, president of JWR, said he couldnt guess how much time and materials JWR and other contractors have donated. The house has been such a great piece of Pompano, he said. Private donations, public grants, including $400,000 secured by Jacobs, have helped fund the restoration. At the breakfast, Jerry Bowman, Centennial Celebration Committee board member, donated $5,000 from the Centennial Celebration fund to Sample-McDougald. The first official event at the house will feature a Florida Highwaymen art exhibit from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. on March 23. Admission is $3. Proceeds benefit the Pompano Beach Historical Society and the Sample-McDougald House Preservation Society. The house will be open for the community on a year-round basis, said Dan Hobby, executive director of SampleMcDougald. Built in 1916 by Albert Neal Sample, a Pompano pioneer, the house was purchased in 1943 by William D. McDougald, a Deerfield Beach lawman and farmer. Members of the McDougald Family lived in the house for six decades and eventually donated it to the city. In 2001, the house was moved from its original foundation to its current location at Centennial Park, 450 NE 10 St. Call 954-786-4047 for upcoming events. Big HouseContinued from page 34

PAGE 36

36 The Pelican Friday, March 9, 2012



PAGE 1

Friday, March 9, 2012 Vol. XX, Issue 10 Call 954-783-8700 to Advertise Email: siren2415@gmail.com Pompano Beach • Deer eld Beach • Lighthouse Point • Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Wilton Manors • Oakland Park • Hillsboro Beach • The Galt • Palm Aire The P e l i c a n Pelican Pompano Beach incumbents returned to seatsPompano Beach On Jan. 31, three commissioners in Pompano Beach were re-elected by acclamation as none of them faced challengers. On March 20 at noon, Commissioners Barry Dockswell, George Brummer and Rex Hardin will serve additional two-year terms. In addition, commissioners will select one commissioner to serve as vice-mayor for a one-year term. The ceremony will take place at city hall, 100 W. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach. Beach nourishment not a popular idea in sand-rich LBTSBy Judy VikPELICAN STAFFLauderdale-By-The-Sea – A proposed multi-million dollar beach nourishment project received mostly negative reviews Monday after the commission heard a county administrator describe the plan. Eric Myers, natural resources administrator for the county, said two sections of the town’s beach could be part of a larger nourishment project which will place sand south of Anglin’s Pier to Terra Mar Street in Fort Lauderdale and north of the Ocean Colony Condominium to Southeast 4 Street in Pompano Beach. Myers said he wanted to take the town’s response to the county commission in April. Cost of the revetment is estimated at $38 million if material is pumped from offshore and $45 million if it See SAND on page 12 Town attempts to charge condo residents for bridge repairsBy Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFHillsboro Beach – Residents of Island House had a nasty shock recently when they received a letter from the town making them responsible for a costly bridge repair. Former condo president Joe Germano brought their case to the city commission this week asking in essence if the entrance bridge to their condominium was deeded to the town in 1966, how can the 64 unit owners now be liable for the repairs? Germano said gas tax money designated for transportation costs is collected by the town each year. Germano said he understood at one time there was $100,000 set aside to maintain the bridge. “Now that the bridge needs repairs, they want to give it back,” he said. See BRIDGE on page 15By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFHillsboro Beach – The town’s north beach, continually scoured of sand, is likely to always be a ‘hot spot’ ocean engineers told the commission this week. Of seven possible erosionprevention options, only one submerged breakwaters appears to have any value here and obtaining permits for such structures is almost impossible, said Tim Blankenship, Director of Coastal Systems International, or CSI. The town commissioned CSI to study available solutions to the constant loss of sand on the north 5,000 feet of beach. Last year, a $6 million nourishment project placed 340,000 cubic yards of sand there. Today, due to winter winds and tides, none of it is visible. “It’s still there under the water,” said Commissioner Claire Schubert. “Some of it will come back this summer.” Seeking a solution to the ongoing sand shift, CSI engineers studied seven scenarios: 1. Do nothing. 2. Nourish every four to six years. 3. Modify Deer eld’s groin system to the north which is blamed for creating the hot spot. 4. Extend the groin system into Hillsboro Beach. 5. Install Tgroins in Hillsboro Beach. 6. Install a breakwater that rises above the surface a short way offshore. 7. Install a submerged breakwater. The results of all the models in the study are contingent on sand from the Boca Raton Inlet continuing to be pumped into the litteral drift which North beach doomed unless sand restoration is ongoing experts saySee HILLSBORO BEACH on page 13 Motor Deputy Mario Potvin, Pompano Beach Broward Sheriff’s Of ce, takes some time out to practice for the upcoming Tip-A-Cop fundraiser at Bru’s Room, 235 S. Federal Hwy. in Pompano Beach, on March 22 from 5 to 9 p.m. Tip-A-Cop bene ts Special Olympics athletes in Broward County. See story on page 2 [Photo by Michael d’Oliveira]

PAGE 2

2 The PelicanFriday, March 9, 2012 SightingsA community calendar of East Broward County. Please email information to siren2415@gmail.com Building permits go virtual for faster servicePompano Beach – Builders anxious to get their plans reviewed may be able to put the shovel in the sand sooner than ever. This month the city began offering e-reviews. Builders can submit their plans to the city’s web site which allows different departments to check them simultaneously. Needed revisions will be highlighted and returned electronically. The change also reduces driving time and production costs. A presentation of the e-review took place this week at city hall. For information, call 954-786-4601. By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach – Members of the Broward Sheriff’s Of ce will soon temporarily trade in their badges for serving trays. On March 22, from 5 to 9 p.m., Bru’s Room, 235 S. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach, will become the latest restaurant to host Tip-ACop, a fundraiser bene ting Special Olympics athletes in Broward County and the Law Enforcement Torch Run for Special Olympics. “It’s not just BSO, its pretty much every law enforcement department in Broward County,” said Erika Huerta, Pompano BSO road patrol deputy. “It’s just a way for law enforcement to get together for the Special Olympics.” During the event BSO personnel will assist Bru’s Room’s staff, serving drinks and bringing food orders to tables. And at the end of the meal an envelope is left for customers to leave a tip with 100 percent of the amount going to Special Olympics. “We don’t take the waiters’ tips . that’s separate,” said Huerta. And diners who come out for the event will have a chance to meet those bene ting from it. “The athletes will be at the event helping us serve the food,” said Huerta. Bru’s Room has hosted Tip-A-Cop for at least the last 10 years. “We do a lot of events where we give back to the community,” said Barbara Gobbi, marketing director for Bru’s Room. “That comes from the culture of Bru’s Room. We’ve been really blessed here. We like to pay it Tip-A-Cop at Bru’s Room on March 22 and help Special Olympic Athletes make it to regional games Art, Music & Theatre3-11 – Forbidden Hollywood performance at the Parker Playhouse, 707 NE 8 St., Fort Lauderdale, at 2 and 5 p.m. Tickets are $35. Visit www.parkerplayhouse.com or call 954-462-0222. 3-11 – Skolnick Sunday Jazz & Arts Fest from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Skolnick Center at 800 SW 36 Ave., Pompano Beach. The event is free and features live jazz music and giveaways. Call 954-786-4590. 3-17 – Sol Children Theatre Troupe performs Rapunzel on Saturdays and Sundays at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. from March 17 through See SIGHTINGS on page 13 Tip-A-Cop on page 11

PAGE 3

The Pelican 3 Friday, March 9, 2012 By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach – In the end, it all came down to defense. On March 3, the Blanche Ely Tigers varsity boys basketball team defeated Oak Ridge 78 to 46, winning the Class 7a state championship. “That’s all we practiced Blanche Ely Tigers win state basketball championship 78 to 46on,” said forward and cocaptain Clide Gifford about defense. The 30-point blow-out was standard fare for the Tigers, who regularly defeated opponents by wide margins and only lost two games all season; the state title brought Ely’s winning streak to 18 games. The day before, the Tigers beat Saint Petersburg 62 to 29. “They’re extremely wellcoached. They have incredible depth, and they play as a team,” said Malcom Spence, assistant principal of athletics. “People don’t know but all the stars have to align. We were mostly injury free and had won the tough games.” Gifford thought the competition would be a little harder but victory was no less sweet, saying he had something similar to tears of joy. “I didn’t cry though.” Co-captain and point Guard Dallas Cameron also credited good defense for their state title. He added teams outside of South Florida weren’t prepared for their style of defense. “They weren’t used to really seeing the depth, the speed.” Cameron said good defense forces teams into a lot of turnovers and brings in easy points. The school and community will be celebrating the Tigers’ victory, the school’s “A” state rating and the state nish of the school’s cheerleader and wrestling teams tomorrow. There will be a parade at 9:30 a.m. followed by a pep rally at 10:30 a.m. with food and music at the school’s football stadium at 11:30 a.m. “We can balance academics with athletics,” said Johnson. “I’m proud of the students, the community, the teachers, the coaches, all the staff members.” The team has been invited to the 2012 ESPN National High School Invitational Basketball Tournament, March 29 to 31 in Maryland.

PAGE 4

4 The PelicanFriday, March 9, 2012 Advertise with The Pelican 954.783.8700 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFLauderdale-By-The-Sea – The board of directors of the Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Chamber of Commerce has terminated the employment of Judy Swaggerty, longtime chamber executive director. The decision was nearly unanimous, according to Mark Silver, newly elected board president. The vote was 11 to 1 in favor of asking for Swaggerty’s resignation. Swaggerty was asked to sign a letter of resignation last Friday. Silver said he didn’t believe she has done so. He did not want to go into details of what the letter offered in terms of severance pay. Asked why she was terminated and if any one incident led to the board’s decision, Silver said, “I believe things happen for a reason. Sometimes people move on and go to another chapter in life. It’s all in God’s time. It’s what it is. “It was a board vote, and directors do the voting. They’re in control,” Silver said. Swaggerty had been chamber executive director since January 2001. Prior to that she had been program manager for LauderdaleBy-The-Sea Main Street organization. Asked about the decision to terminate her, Paul Novak, a board member and former chamber president, said only, “The board has spoken.” He referred questions to Silver. The chamber is moving in a new direction, Silver said. The board decided to form committees, such as nance, marketing, events and membership, so they can better delegate and keep more organized. At this Thursday’s meeting committees were to be formed. “We’ll get ideas and take baby steps to move forward in a positive way. That’s very important,” Silver said. Silver, owner of Argenti Designer Jewelers, is taking part in a new ad hoc business group working with the town to plan a Family Fun Week in June. “We will do all we can to bring together a brotherhood with the chamber and Connie [Hoffmann, town manager] and Pat Himelberger,” Hoffmann’s assistant. “Pat’s doing a lot of wonderful work on a great idea,” Silver said, referring to the June event. He is attempting to get chamber members involved. “We’re trying to do something at a time when business is very slow,” he said. The chamber board named Malcolm McClintock, a board member, as interim executive director. He is owner of Alabaska, Inc., a restaurant consulting business, and a restaurant review columnist for The Pelican Silver said the board is not looking for a new executive director now. Instead they’re “reorganizing and straightening out.” Ron Piersante, a chamber volunteer for 14 years, was not happy with the decision to terminate Swaggerty. In his dealings with her, he said, “I nd her to be most cooperative and ef cient.” Chamber board plans ‘new direction’ without 10-year veteran leader

PAGE 5

The Pelican 5 Friday, March 9, 2012 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach – The city and the union representing mid-level managers are engaged in an impasse hearing today after prolonged negotiations to write employment contracts City and management union at odds; contract in mediationhave failed. The city’s chief negotiator, Personnel Director Mike Milanowski, said attempts to obtain an agreement with the Professional Managers and Supervisors Association, or PMSA, began in August of 2010 and quickly went to impasse because the parties were “not even close.” Sticking points were the city’s demand to rollback merit raises, ask employees to take a ve percent decrease in pay and contribute 10 percent to their healthcare plans. The city’s other unionized employees have accepted those conditions. A mediation hearing was held Dec. 1 which resulted in a settlement and a rati cation vote Jan. 13 by union members. The city commission approved the contract on Jan. 24. On Jan. 23, the union noti ed Milanowski it could not stand behind the rati cation vote and subsequently it was reversed 22 to 0 leading to today’s hearing. Affected are 52 employees in mid-management positions such as facilities manager, eet manager, of ce supervisor, recycling supervisor, parks and recreation managers. Milanowski said annual pay scales range from $50,000 to $85,000. For today’s hearing, the city has added another condition to its demands, a further reduction in pay of 15 percent in an attempt to recoup some of the money lost since January. Attorney Brett Schneider will represent the city at the impasse hearing being held at the public works facility. The executive director of the PMSA had been representing local employees Se MANAGEMENT on page 9

PAGE 6

6 The PelicanFriday, March 9, 2012 Deer eld Beach, Pompano Beach, Lighthouse Point, LauderdaleBy-The-Sea, Wilton Manors and Oakland ParkWilton Manors • Oakland Park • Hillsboro Beach The Pompano Pelican is published weekly on FridaysStreet Address: 1500-A E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, FL 33060 Telephone: 954-783-8700 • Fax: 954-783-0093Letters to the Editor are encouraged and accepted for print if signed, although a writer’s name will be withheld on request; letters must also include a daytime telephone number. Advertising rates are available upon request. Subscription rate is $31.80 including tax for one year’s delivery in Greater Pompano Beach; $95.40/per year including tax for others in the United States; call 954-783-8700 for rates abroad. The Pelican is a nonpartisan newspaper and reserves the right to decline advertising. Copyright 2011. Reproduction of this publication in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission of the publisher. The Pelican is a member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, Deer eld Beach Chamber and the LBTS Chamber. The Pelican is a state certi ed woman-owned minority business. The Pelican is delivered to businesses, libraries, schools, of ces, hospitals, news racks and single family homes. All advertising and copy is published at the sole discretion of the publisher. We welcome your critiques and ideas concerning this publication. Anne Siren, publisherExecutive Assistant: Mary Hudson Graphics: Rachel Ramirez Windsheimer Bookkeeper: John White Classi eds: Fran Shelby Contributing Writers: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Judy Wilson, Malcolm McClintock, Judy Vik, Mike d’Oliveira Account Executives: Paul Shroads, Carolyn Mann, Bill Heaton, Bill Fox Special Of ce Assistant: Cathy Siren ESTABLISHED 1993 • Volume XX, Issue 10 Founding Editor and PublisherAnne Hanby Siren Letters & Opinions Bike lanes offer insane alternatives for cyclists on Federal HighwayU.S.1 and Copans Road, a truck makes a right hand turn forcing cyclists to change lanes.The photograph above depicts Federal Highway where a bicycle path has been routed across traf c to allow vehicles to pass to the right for a right-hand turn. Tricky business for vehicle and cyclist. With this maneuver, the bike path puts the cyclist between two vehicle pathways: the car moving ahead and the car turning. While the idea of having cyclists weave through traf c appears to be an insane idea, it is legal. According to the U.S. Department of Transportation, cyclists have a right to travel on all roads with the exception of turnpikes and Interstate Highways. This month is bicycle safety month, and it’s a good time for drivers to reconsider their habits at the wheel. Now is the time to remove all distractions from our driving so that we can control the wheel, remembering that we cannot control the cyclists. The phones need to be off-limits along with make-up applications, iPads, arguments with passengers or anything else that distracts us at the wheel. And for the cyclists, there are laws. Here are some. A cyclist on a roadway must ride on the side reserved for his direction of travel. Riding in the opposite direction, so as to face oncoming traf c, doubles the risk of collision with a motor vehicle and is a contributing factor in about 15 percent of bicycle-motor vehicle crashes. A bicycle operated between sunset and sunrise must be equipped with a lamp on the front exhibiting a white light visible from 500 feet to the front and both a red re ector and a lamp on the rear exhibiting a red light visible from 600 feet to the rear. Over half of fatal bicycle crashes in Florida occur after sunset, even though most cycling is done during daylight hours. A bicycle rider or passenger under 16 years of age must wear a bicycle helmet that is properly tted, fastened securely and meets a nationally recognized standard. Head injuries account for about one-third of hospital emergency room visits for bicycle-related injuries. The role model effect of adults is an important factor in enhancing helmet wearing by youth. Bicyclists must use a xed, regular seat for riding. A bicycle may not be used to carry more persons at one time than the number for which it is designed or equipped. An adult bicyclist may carry a child in a backpack or sling, child seat or trailer designed to carry children. A bicyclist may not allow a passenger to remain in a child seat or carrier when not in immediate control of the bicycle. At least one hand must be kept on the handlebars while riding. Every bicycle must be equipped with a brake or brakes which allow the rider to stop within 25 feet from a speed of 10 miles per hour on dry, level, clean pavement. Message: We need to get there without killing each otherWe must share the road, like it or not Lauderdale-By-The Sea commissioners should rethink their take on beach re-nourishmentOn Tuesday, when Lauderdale-By-The-Sea commissioners turned their backs on beach re-nourishment, placing cost over value, we think they erred. Re-nourishing our beaches is an expensive and troubling headache. Months of dust, heavy trucks and piles of sand will be offensive to beach goers, tourists and hoteliers. The federally-funded project, expected to be in the millions with some costs sustained by the state and county, will leave about 12.5 percent of the bill to rest on the shoulders of the taxpayers who live in this small tourist mecca. We believe they should go ahead and write the check for a much larger cause--that cause being the future viability of tourism here for generations yet to come. It won’t be fun, and it really isn’t fair. It’s not fair mainly because earlier pioneers and later real estate moguls traded the future of the beach for immediate wealth. We all rue the day that Florida beaches were fair game for builders. But now, the idea of “fair” rests on the shoulders of town and city leaders who will not promulgate this problem. Florida beaches will need re-nourishment for as long as we live on them, and that’s the tough pill to swallow. But this is about nature itself as well as the nature of man. Commissioner Stuart Dodd offered some thoughts this week to his colleagues.“I don’t think we can bury our heads in the sand,” Dodd said. “What if we needed the sand? They are our neighbors.”Erosion is the enemy of Florida beaches. It is an enemy as real as a platoon of soldiers determined to ruin us. Erosion will swallow our beaches wherever it occurs, and when that sand has washed away, the enemy will seek more of the shore. Dodd’s words are wise. We hope the rest of the commission will open up their ears and rethink the critical importance of re-nourishment for their beach and for this town’s future.Message: We must stand together to face the common enemy especially before it turns on us.

PAGE 7

The Pelican 7 Friday, March 9, 2012 COURTESY OF TEMPLE SHOLOMPompano Beach With a military junta ruling Egypt, the bloodbath in Syria, and Iran’s nuclear sabre-rattling, how safe can it be for Israel these days? Indeed, what can American Jews do to assist our Israeli brothers and sisters? We can become well-acquainted with the background and politics of the area. Join Rabbi David Mark as he describes a brief history of Israel’s founding, the philosophy of Zionism, and the strange amalgam of secularism, religion, and nationalism which comprise the political and sociological makeup of the Jewish State. The group will examine different aspects of Modern Israel through news sources, websites and organizations dealing with the Middle East, from all points on the political spectrum, left, right, and centrist. “If not we, then who? And if not now, when?” The series is free and open to the public on Wednesday nights in the Temple Sholom, 132 SE 11 Ave., Pompano Beach, Bet Midrash/Chapel at 7:30 p.m. The series continues through April 18. Call 954-942-6410. New adult discussion group on the Middle East By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach – After giving up 8 runs in the rst inning, the Cardinals battled their way back in three innings of baseball to beat the Giants in a squeaker, 16 to 15. This was the season opener for the two teams, played on Saturday at Kester Park. In a game mostly determined by runs scored on stealing home base, the lead changed hands three times. Tyler Cissone, #9, gave the Giants their rst stirrings of life, knocking in Kevin Wright, #4, from second base for the game’s rst run; earlier, Wright stole second after he was walked. But the Cardinals responded immediately, racking up eight runs of their own, including two runs from a triple hit by Timmy Dorn, #6, who later brought himself in for a run by stealing home on a pitch that got past Giants’ catcher. After a tied 8 to 8 rst inning, the Giants tacked on three more runs in the second inning but gave up ve to the Cardinals in the bottom of the inning. Dorn gave a verbatim performance in the second inning, stealing home base again after hitting another triple, which drove in two runs; Dorn stole home and tied the game up with the Cardinals getting in two more runs after and taking the lead 13 to 11. But the Giants weren’t done and scored four more at the top of the third inning, forcing the Cardinals to score or lose. But, after getting four more runs off solid base hits, the Cardinals’ Nicholas Cardinals beat Giants in opening day of Pompano Baseball at Kester ParkSee CARDINALS on page 18

PAGE 8

8 The PelicanFriday, March 9, 2012 Briefs Making a Difference Phyllis J. Neuberger wants your suggestions about people who are making a difference. Call 954-7838700.By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFWhen The Pelican arrived at Dr. Laura Evatt’s dental suite of of ces, on the third oor of the 4800 NE 20 Terrace medical building just off Federal Highway, in Fort Lauderdale, a uffy white dog barked his greeting. He was on a leash held rmly by a smiling Dr. Evatt who gently handed the leash and dog over to her of ce manager so that this interview would not be interrupted. She said, “I just picked up that little bundle of energy earlier today from a family that could no longer afford to take care of him. He’s pretty neglected so as soon as this interview is over I’m taking him to the vet to be examined and treated. I think I have found a home for him. One of our associates in the building fell in love with him, and offered to adopt, bless Sachin Mayi pro les 101 abandoned dogs rescued by Dr. Laura Evatt who has since rescued 100 moreher.” This is not an unusual event in Dr. Evatt’s life. One of her patients, author Sachin Mayi wrote, “There seem to be many saints for animals these days. Dr. Evatt stands out as one of the greats. She has personally rescued 200 dogs in addition to her full-time dentistry practice in Fort Lauderdale. Rescuing dogs is her passion. She continues to nd those desperate souls in need of her unconditional love.” Mayi was so moved by this unusual woman that he wrote a charming book, 101 Salvations about her rst amazing rescues. In his book, the dogs tell their tales expressing their love and gratitude to their patron saint for saving them from the horrors of abuse and neglect. Just one example is Gary, an English Mastiff mix, who writes, “The couple I was staying with were elderly and after some time, my new mother passed away. Shortly after that, my new father had a stroke. Their son had to come to handle affairs. I was one of those affairs. In spite of my friendliness, he took me to Animal Control. I wasn’t as skinny as the rst time I was homeless. I scratched around trying to nd the micro-chip Laura had put in me. Instead I felt the prick of a needle. I turned to see someone in a white coat holding the needle. I asked why? Don’t you know about Laura. Didn’t you know that someone cared about me? And as I thought these thoughts, everything faded into darkness.” Gary didn’t make it, but readers of 101 Salvations will read the stories of 100 luckier abandoned dogs who did. Dr. Evatt will tear up if you ask about Gary. Asked how this obsession to rescue dogs began, she sits back in her chair to tell her story. “When I look back over my life, I know my love of animals started when I was a child. My baby book is lled with photos of me and I’m always holdingSee RESCUES on page 25US Coast Guard Auxiliary Safe Boating CourseThe United States Coast Guard Auxiliary, Pompano Beach, is offering its “About Boating Safely” Course on Saturday, March 31 at the Imperial Point Medical Center auditorium, 6401 N. Federal Hwy, Fort Lauderdale, This one-day program begins promptly at 8 a.m. and nishes at 5 p.m. All materials and lunch are provided. Cost is $50 per person and includes materials. Contact Tom Nolan at 954-4210502 for registration and further information.Blood donors get hotdogs, burgersThe American Legion Unit 152, 171 SW 2 St., Pompano Beach will host a blood drive March 18 from 11 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Donors will receive free hot dogs and hamburgers. Call 954-942-2448. Congressman to speak in Lighthouse PointLighthouse Point Trinity Methodist Church, 3901 NE 22 Ave, Lighthouse Point, will host Congressman Allen West from 10 to 11:30 a.m. on March 14. The meeting is free and open to the public. Call 954-941-8033.“I know. I may end up in the poorhouse, but what matters is how I lived my life. I sometimes think I have a big heart but I need my head examined.”Dr. Laura Evatt Dr. Laura Evatt holds her latest stray who will be living with her new mother as soon as she’s paid a visit to the veterinarian. [Photo by Phyllis J. Neuberger]

PAGE 9

The Pelican 9 Friday, March 9, 2012 but apparently has withdrawn, Milanowski said. A ruling generally takes four to six weeks. Local PMSA employee representatives are Pier Supervisor Vernall Higgs, Recycling Supervisor Mario Rubeo and Aquatic Complex Manager Kalid Khoury. The PMSA was certi ed here as a bargaining agent in July of 2010.New agreement may save Hillsboro treesDeer eld Beach – The city is amending a $150,000 grant application in hopes of saving 121 Hillsboro Boulevard median trees ordered removed by the Florida Department of Transportation. If the new application is accepted, the scope of the project will be reduced to the area between Powerline Road and the Tri-Rail Station and the number of trees removed reduced to 17. City Landscaper Harold Hoyt told commissioners Tuesday that the 17 trees are either diseased or in motorists’ line of sight. They will be replaced by 77 palm trees. Originally the project was intended to beautify the median between Dixie Highway and Powerline Road. The large trees in the median did not meet the highway department’s standards and so were marked for removal. Public outcry caused the city to rethink the project, said Assistant City Manager Keven Klopp. “These trees existed without issue for years,” he said. Among the species are yellow tabs, gumbo limbo and mahogany trees.Dixie Flyover close to openingDeer eld Beach – The Dixie Flyover will open for traf c in midMarch according to state transportation department spokesperson Barbara Kellaher. The four-lane span across the Hillsboro Canal connects Northeast 2 Street in Deer eld Beach and Southeast 18 Street in Boca Raton. It was built with $48 million in federal stimulus funds. Kellaher said the project is ahead of schedule. A formal dedication ceremony will be held in July when the landscaping and other Continued from page 5By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFLauderdale-By-TheSea – Despite their concerns about new ethics rules, commissioners will continue to chair town-sponsored special events – Easter, July 4th and Halloween. Town manager Connie Hoffmann will determine when to involve her staff and when to hire outside help. It has been traditional in this town to have a commissioner chair the three holiday events and enlist volunteer help. Vice Mayor Scot Sasser, who favored hiring outside help when the issue was rst discussed last year, asked for reconsideration of the matter citing a need for consistency. Town Attorney Susan Trevarthen has issued a LBTS Board debates ethics of chairing community safe harbor opinion that commissioners can continue to chair town-sponsored holiday events . although they will have to be careful about the potential for being offered gifts from town vendors or contractors that may be involved in the special event.” “We can be the gurehead, but there’s a need for consistency on how we operate and how inventory is taken,” Sasser said. “We’ve had some problems in the past. If we had a staff person, it would free us up to get volunteers.” Commissioner Mark Brown said he didn’t think commissioners should be soliciting funds for events. In addition to the town’s events, the Chamber of Commerce sponsors “Taste of the Beach” ManagementSee ETHICS on page 26 Advertise with The Pelican 954-783-8700

PAGE 10

10 The PelicanFriday, March 9, 2012 Briefs Business matters The Pelican takes a look at local business owners. Call The Pelican to nd out how you can tell your story here because business matters. 954-783-8700. By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFBoca Raton West Boca Medical Center is a 195-bed acute care hospital that has been serving the medical and healthcare needs of the community and surrounding areas for 20 years. Located at 21644 State Road 7 in Boca Raton, one of its well known services is the Birthcare Pavilion which includes a level 111 Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. HealthGrades ranks West Boca’s maternity program among the top ve percent in the nation. No wonder women travel from as far south as Miami and as far north as Port St. Lucie to have their babies in this Center’s well equipped birthing unit. Toby Harris, director of maternity services, says, “We have over 2,000 Pompano Beach After undergoing many months of renovation, and worshipping at neighboring Bethel AME Church and the Mitchell Moore Center, Mount Calvary Baptist Church in Pompano Beach is back in its home sanctuary. They plan a ribbon cutting March 11 at 10 a.m. and a dedication service at 4 p.m. with guest pastor, Dr. Marcus D. Davidson, and his congregation from New Mount Olive Baptist Church, of Fort Lauderdale. The community is welcome to attend and participate. For more information contact Rev. Anthony Burrell at 954-943-2422The place to have a baby West Boca Medical Center with Birthcare Pavilion and Level 111 Neonatal ICU births a year here. “Moms choose us because we have 18 labor/birthing rooms. Each room has a bed that breaks down to ease delivery for the patient and the doctor. There’s a full length mirror if Mom wants to watch her baby being born, a sleeper bed for her husband or partner, a monitor for baby’s heart plus a walk in bathroom, telephone and television. An attractive piece of art gives the room a homey look. Behind the art work is necessary equipment, like oxygen and other devices. There’s even an infant warmer for the newborn. Unless there is a need for her room, the new mother can stay in it for two days if the delivery was vaginal and three days if it was a Csection.” In addition to the birthing rooms, there are 26 postpartum rooms plus two upgraded Princess Rooms for new mothers who want something special. Jennifer Vogel, Boca Raton, says, “I had both of my children at West Boca Medical Center and had a wonderful experience each time. The care I received was top notch, and I felt safe and secure knowing I had a great team of nurses and healthcare professionals around me to deliver my children.” Harris continues. “We are the only hospital in South Palm Beach and parts of Broward with a 111 Neonatal Intensive Care Unit for babies of one pound and up where exceptional care is needed. We have Neonatal doctors on call 24/7, and perinatologists available for moms with special conditions or multiple births whenMount Calvary brings congregation back home Hillsboro Lighthouse tours on March 10Hillsboro Beach Tours of the Hillsboro Lighthouse, 2700 N. Ocean Blvd., Hillsboro Beach, will be available March 10 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. The tour, including transportation and admission, is free for current Hillsboro Lighthouse Preservation Society, or HLPS, members. For nonmembers, there is a $15 transportation fee. Cost to join the HLPS is $25 for individuals, $35 for families, $50 for businesses or organizations and $500 for a lifetime membership. For more, visit www.hillsborolighthouse.org or call 954-942-2102.See BOCA WEST on page 24In addition to the birthing rooms, there are 26 postpartum rooms plus two upgraded Princess Rooms for new mothers who want som ething special.

PAGE 11

The Pelican 11 Friday, March 9, 2012 forward and give back to the community when we can.” The Torch Run, April 26, goes from Hallandale Beach to Deer eld Beach and Special Olympics athletes in the run will eventually go on to compete with other Special Olympics competitors from around the country. Laura Collins, manager of the Torch Run, estimated that last year BSO raised about $60,000 for Special Olympics. “The Torch Run is our largest grassroots fundraiser,” she said. Donations go to pay for uniforms, food, transportation and housing for athletes. “We have year-round competition and sports training for people with intellectual disabilities. We never charge an athlete or their family or caregiver a fee to participate.” Huerta, a runner with her own Olympic aspirations, has been with BSO road patrol for four years and Pompano for seven months. “There’s never a dull moment.” Some of Huerta’s time on duty has been captured on lm for the television show Police Women of Broward County which follows female BSO deputies in their daily personal and professional lives. “We’re hoping to get some of the girls out there for the event,” said Huerta. BSO will be holding another Tip-A-Cop fundraiser on April 5 at Bru’s Room in Coconut Creek, 5460 W. Hillsboro Blvd., from 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. and 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. For more information on Tip-A-Cop, call 954-7864201. Another Tip-A-Cop event will be April 12 from 6 to 9 p.m. at Duffy’s, 401 N. Federal Hwy., Deer eld Beach. Call 954-935-6710, Ext: 223.Tip-a-CopContinued from page 2 Deputy Erika Huerta, Pompano Beach Broward Sheriff’s Of ce. For many years, Betsy Bous eld, a John Knox Village resident, has supported wildlife that are attracted to the three lakes in the Village. On March 21 at 10 a.m., Bous eld will be honored when a newly completed sanctuary on Rex Foster Lake will of cially bear her name. Since 2004, the Village has been an of cial Wildlife Habitat that continues to attract a variety of birds and butter ies by supplying food, water and a safe haven.Ducks get royal treatment at John Knox VillageVillage dedicates sanctuary to resident

PAGE 12

12 The PelicanFriday, March 9, 2012 is trucked in. Normally, the federal government pays half the cost, the state and county split the rest. Lauderdale-ByThe-Sea’s share would be 12.5 percent. Less than 20 percent of the project is in LBTS. The county is hoping to pull permits in about a year with construction due to start in the fall 2013. It could take up to three years to complete the work which must be halted April through October for turtle season. LBTS has relatively little erosion because it bene ts from sand being dredged at the Hillsboro Inlet.The public reactsShirley McCollum of the Fountainhead at the south end of LBTS is a 20-year resident. “My philosophy is sand comes and sand goes. The county has needs in many more areas. Is this the best use of our money? The answer is no,” she said emphatically. “Nothing I’ve heard keeps me from being very violently opposed to the whole project.” Michael Gittings, also of the Fountainhead said, “We haven’t seen any sand loss in 45 years. I don’t see any need to put sand in place where we haven’t lost any.” Noting there is no access to adjacent Galt Ocean Mile beaches, Gittings said, “We don’t want a dump in our front yard for three years. It’s absurd to have trucks hauling sand for three years.” Dan Clark, director of Cry of the Water, a group that works to protect Broward’s reefs, urged caution. With these projects, Clark said, there is much sediment in the system and sediment is an enemy of coral reefs. “We call ourselves the shore-diving capital of South Florida. Are we going to be able to say that if we put this project in place?” asked resident Ron Piersante. But Paul Novak, a hotelier, was more concerned with the long-term impacts. “This area is a tourist area, and people love wide beaches. We don’t see these projects come around that often. I’d hate to see us lose our beaches and have to wait 20 years to replenish them.” Commissioners respondCommissioner Mark Brown asked about the damage to Fort Lauderdale if LBTS opted out of the project. “It wouldn’t kill it for Fort Lauderdale, but it would make for a much less desirable design and less longevity,” Myers responded. “It might result in a redesign to the detriment of the Galt,” he said. One of the most critical erosion areas is along the Galt Ocean Mile. “Suppose we wanted to aggressively plant sea oats and dune grass?” Brown asked. “Could we piggybank onto this project or would we have to do that on our own?” Myers said that could be considered if that’s the commission recommendation. “Planting sea oats doesn’t make the beach any wider. It captures windblown sand and creates a dune. It’s not the same bene ts as this project.” Brown said he is concerned this is a one-shot opportunity and there may not be another shot for 30 years. “I’m very concerned about Fort Lauderdale. Their beaches are in need of protection,” he said. “But I have a hard time justifying it here, where the beach is wide.” Commissioner Chris Vincent said he didn’t see any sense of urgency in this project. Steve Higgins, a coastal planner and engineer, said there is a case in Destin where property owners stopped a project, but the case is on appeal, adding that when an erosion control line is established, everything seaward of that belongs to the state. “It’s not a whole lot of sand,” Commissioner Scot Sasser said. “It would have a negative impact to our reefs, turtles, tourism and safety. I see no value whatsoever.” “I don’t think we can bury our heads in the sand,” Commissioner Stuart Dodd said. “What if we needed the sand? They are our neighbors . we have to look at the totality of the project.” SandContinued from page 1

PAGE 13

The Pelican 13 Friday, March 9, 2012 carries sand southward. None of the options presented a plausible remedy Blankenship said and each, except the rst, would require continual nourishment to maintain the beach. Doing nothing would mean the loss of the beach entirely in 10 years, he added. Recon guring the groins in Deer eld Beach would not provide enough erosion relief, he said and installing groins in Hillsboro Beach would only move the hot spot south. An emergent breakwater would stabilize the beach, but also create hot spots. The only viable solution Blankenship said is a submerged breakwater that dissipates wave energy and “really helps” to stabilize beaches. Such structures would slow sand loss making revetment projects necessary only every 15 years. The reality is, however, that it is almost impossible to get permits for such structures. A decade-long attempt at Singer Island is being abandoned after millions were spent in the effort, Blankenship said. Asked by Schubert to name a gure if Hillsboro decided to pursue a breakwater application, Blankenship estimated it would cost $500,000 to get in front of the necessary agencies. Another problem with a submerged breakwater here is it would likely have to be placed on the hard bottom which is “impossible to permit.” The study recommends the town continue to bring sand to its beach when necessary and to develop sources for sand and funding. It suggests small truck hauls every two years might be the best solution. And the town might piggyback its nourishment projects with others in the area. Looking for options other “than throwing sand at it,” Schubert asked what the impact would be on Deer eld’s beach if the groins there were altered. “We’d just be taking rock away from the ve southern groins, she said. “I’m wondering about the cost and would it harm Deer eld’s beach?” Blankenship said less rock would mean more damage to Deer eld’s south beach which already needs revetment from time to time. Contacted after the meeting, Rene Meles, a north beach resident and member of an ad hoc committee delving into the erosion issue, said he was disappointed that the study produced no good solutions. “There should be some way to increase the litteral ow from the Boca Inlet shoal and capturing some of it,” he said.”I am disappointed that a modi cation of the Deer eld Beach groins didn’t show a better result.” Mayor Dan Dodge said, “I’m concerned about hot spots too, but I have to tell you, residents are skeptical about structures … overall I would be cautious about doing anything.” The mayor said he was surprised that the CSI options did not provide more relief and added that nourishing the beach every four to six years would be a “ nancial strain” on the town. Dodge said the CSI report will go up on the town’s website and a workshop to explain it to the public will be held in April. Hillsboro BeachContinued from page 1 SightingsContinued from page 2 April 1 at 3333 N. Federal Hwy., Boca Raton. Tickets are $12 for children seven and younger and $8 for others. Visit www.solchildren.org or call 561-447-8829. 3-17 – An Evening with Kate Clinton at Parker Playhouse, 707 NE 8 St., Fort Lauderdale, at 8 p.m. Tickets range from $26.50 to $46.50. Visit www.parkerplayhouse. com or call 954-462-0222. 3-18 – Flying Karamazov Brothers perform at 7 p.m. at Parker Playhouse, 707 NE 8 St., Fort Lauderdale. Tickets range from $26.50 to $46.50. Visit www.parkerplayhouse. com or call 954-462-0222. 3-21 – Mad Romance, a group of musical performers, showcase classic jazz, mambo, lush ballads, cha-chacha, bebop, madcap swing and songs from the 60’s and 70’s from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m., at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach. Cost is $14 per ticket. Call 954-786-4111. 3-23 – Florida Highwaymen art exhibit from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the Sample-McDougald House, Centennial Park, 450 NE 10 St., Pompano. Admission is $3. Proceeds bene t the Sample-McDougald House Preservation Society. 954786-4047.See SIGHTINGS on page 15

PAGE 14

14 The PelicanFriday, March 9, 2012 Oakland Park – The Light of the World Clinic in Oakland Park presents its sixth annual Community Health Expo from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., March 17, at Coral Ridge Presbyterian Church, 5555 N. Federal Highway, Fort Lauderdale. Free screenings will be offered for diabetes, cholesterol, vision and blood pressure. Children’s immunizations will be offered from 10 a.m. to noon. Previous immunization records must be provided. The clinic provides health care and preventative medical services to the disadvantaged population in Broward County at facilities at 806 Prospect Road in Oakland Park. The clinic focuses its services on children and their families who are generally without insurance or nancial resources to obtain proper health care. The clinic serves from 10,000 to 12,000 people annually through volunteer doctors, specialists and medical professionals. For more information, go to the website: www. afreeclinic.org or call 954563-9876. Best deal on booksOakland Park – Friends of the Oakland Park Library present a “Pot O’Gold Used Book Sale” from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday, March 16, and from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, March 17, at the library at 1298 NE 37 St. Call 954-630-4370. Health expo, free screeningBy Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFBroward – Wilton Manors resident Richard Ives said he was ready to sue the city over its bypassing of two sections of Broward’s ethics code – but now he’s backing down. On Jan. 31, residents in Wilton Manors, Hillsboro Beach and Sea Ranch Lakes voted to allow their part-time elected of cials to be exempt from the recently passed county ethics provision that requires them to report their income and how they earned it. Ives says his change of heart stems from a change by County backs off support for possible ethics lawsuit aimed at local citiesthe county commission, which reversed itself over a Feb. 7 vote to back any resident in those cities who wanted to sue his or her city over the ballot question. “Even though I know about the County Code of Ethics I still got tripped up by the wording of the ballot question . As I left the polling station I had a sinking feeling that I’d just been duped,” wrote Ives, a producer for WLRN Radio, in an email to Broward Mayor John Rodstrom’s of ce. Ives, who said he thinks commissioners intentionally mislead voters, blames himself “for not going with my gut feeling that the ballot question was misleading and voting no.” In a brochure, Wilton Manors of cials wrote that reverting to state ethics laws instead of adopting the county code would allow city commissioners to serve and keep their jobs. Both state and county codes allow outside jobs. The major difference between the codes was what those outside jobs could be. Lobbying is the only activity the new county code prohibits for elected of cials. Ives said he thought the See CODE on page 29

PAGE 15

The Pelican 15 Friday, March 9, 2012 Advertise with The Pelican Today! 954-783-8700 Former mayor Carmen McGarry also said there had been an account for the bridge, but after 2006. it disappeared from the budget as a separate line item. “At that time over $100,000 was budgeted for repair of this bridge. The town also gets a check every year from the Florida Department of Transportation, or FDOT, to be used only for roads and bridges. FDOT yearly reports are sent to the town as the owner. The deed is also in the name of Hillsboro Beach. How can you throw this back on the condo owners who have never budgeted for this item, when suddenly, after several years of disrepair, it needs major work?” McGarry asked. FDOT, hires consultants to make safety checks of bridges abutting their roadways. Germano alleges the town knew for at least seven years that repairs were needed to the span. The latest inspection in August, 2011 rated the bridge as “structurally de cient” and the substructure as “poor” and cited cracks and corrosion, enough to “warrant a review.” The bridge, at 1160 Hillsboro Mile, crosses the Hillsboro River, a narrow slough between A1A and the Island House. There is also a small marina for Island House boaters. Although the bridge is public property, there is no public parking along the river. Commissioner Jim Lambert said he was unaware the bridge existed and he did not see it “as a public asset. “Someone made a mistake when they accepted it from the developer,” he said, but he acknowledged the town “has a little responsibility.” Lambert suggested deeding the bridge back to the condo association “with compensation involved.” Making the repairs would be far more expensive for the town than for the condo owners, Mayor Dan Dodge said, perhaps twice as much in both time and money. He suggested that discussions with the condo board continue. ”No one wants to get into litigation,” the mayor said. Although Germano said the bridge has not been declared unsafe, “the bottom line is when DOT says ‘ x the bridge,’ you have to x it.” BridgeContinued from page 13-25 – The Seven Last Words of Christ, choral version in English, accompanied by a string quartet, Hayden, Op. 51, performed at 6 p.m. at Trinity Cathedral, 464 NE 16 St., Miami. Tickets are $20. 305789-0074. Books & Seminars3-17 – The American Association of University Women Pompano Beach Branch will hold its Scholarship Fundraiser featuring author Joanna Campbell Slan at the Lighthouse Point Yacht Club, 2701 NE 42 St Cost is $38 954-675-9249. SightingsContinued from page 13 See SIGHTINGS on page 16

PAGE 16

16 The Pelican Friday, March 9, 2012Dr. Joe McGee announces his retirement from the practice of dentistry and wishes to thank his patients for their support throughout his 33 years of practice in Pompano Beach. Retirement SightingsContinued from page 153-17 – Fabulous Book Fair at the Margate Library, 5810 Park Drive, Margate, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. There will be books, videos and CDs available. 954-968-3800. 3-18 – Cary Bayer, author of the Prosperity Aerobics and a life coach who’s worked with Oscar-winner Alan Arkin, David Steinberg and Quality Inns, will be teaching his class “The Secret of Money: How to use the Law of Attraction for Financial Health & Wealth” from 1 to 3:30 p.m. at Congregation Etz Chaim, 1881 NE 26 St. Suite 100, Wilton Manors. Cost is $25 before March 11 and $30 after. Visit www. metaphysicalchapel.com or 754-300-1428.Bargains3-10 – The Wilton Manors Friends of the Library Book Tent Event takes place on March 10 from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, the same time as the city’s monthly yard sale event also at Hagen. There will be a selection of books and audio and video materials available. 954-390-2195 or 954-5669019. 3-17 – Granny’s Attic Giant Indoor Garage Sale at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Admission is free.See SIGHTINGS on page 24 Tell The Pelican about your special events ot programs. 954-783-8700!

PAGE 17

The Pelican 17 Friday, March 9, 2012 SPECIAL TO THE PELICANIn March, the Democratic Women’s Club of NE Broward celebrates Women’s History Month by welcoming Dr. Jane Caputi, professor of Women’s Studies at Florida Atlantic University. Dr. Caputi will be speaking at the club’s March 21 meeting at 7 p.m. at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach. The topic of conversation will be the History of Reproductive Justice. Refreshments will be served. Dr. Caputi will be accompanied by Sarah Tucker Jenkins, a master’s student in women’s studies. Dr. Caputi arrived at Florida Atlantic University in 1997 as one of two faculty in women’s studies. Prior to coming to FAU, she was professor of American studies at the University of New Mexico. Her primary research is in contemporary cultural studies, including popular culture, gender and violence and environmental feminism. She is the author of three books, The Age of Sex Crime; Gossips, Gorgons and Crones: The Fates of the Earth and Goddesses and Monsters: Women, Myth, Power and Popular Culture. She also Reproductive issues the topic at Democratic club meetingcollaborated with Mary Daly on Webster’s’ First Intergalactic Wickedary of the English Language, and has made an educational documentary, The Pornography of Everyday Life. She also was FAU’s Distinguished Teacher for 2001, and received FAU’s Research and Scholarly Activities award for 2005. Call 954-942-8711. Register to vote Pompano Beach The Broward County Supervisor of Elections Office will hold a voter registration event from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the E. Pat Larkins Center, 1520 NW 3 St., in Pompano Beach. Visit www.browardsoe.org or call 954-357-7050.

PAGE 18

18 The Pelican Friday, March 9, 2012 The Pelican • 954-783-8700 Waksmacki, #1, scored the winning run with a stolen base. Mike Carlson, head coach Cardinals, gave his game ball to his son, Jack, who pitched at the end of the game and helped preserve the Cardinals’ lead. “I hate giving it to my son . but he saved us.” Asked what he thought his team needed to work on most, Andrew Cissone, Giants assistant coach, said “base running.” In the second inning, one Giants player ran to second while it already had a runner who wasn’t allowed to advance. By the time he realized his mistake, the Cardinals swooped in to and tagged him out. “All the little rust will be worked off in a couple of days,” added Cissone.CardinalsContinued from page 7 [Top] Giants’ #2 Tommy Saucy and Cardinals’ #3 Jack Carlson both take big swings during Pompano Youth Baseball’s opening day last Saturday. [Photos by Michael d’Oliveira]

PAGE 19

The Pelican 19 Friday, March 9, 2012 Scoreboard Send your scores to siren2415@ gmail.com To advertise on this page, call Bill Fox at 954-804-1056POMPANO BEACH MEN’S GOLF ASSN.WED. MAR 7, 2012 ONE BEST BALL OF FOURSOME 1st Ed Gormley, Paul Sacco b/d, Lars Adeheimer, Bob Paterson . . 50 2nd Lou Perras, Art Gatesy, John Pope, Bill Bradford . . 50 3rd Bob Van Zandt, Ed Lehky, Paul Murphy, Henry Lesburt b/d . 53 4th Jim Stumpf, Bob Johnson, Nick Rossi, Paul Dauzickas . 53 Closest to pin, Palms #11, Bill Stiehm Weekdays Before 12:00 pm $44 After 12:00pm $35 After 3:00 pm $17 Early Bird 9 Holes 6:30-8:00am $17 Weekday Specials Mulligan Special: $30 Weekends Before 12:00 pm $49 After 12:00 pm $40 After 3:00 pm $17 Early Bird 9 Holes 6:30-800am $17 All prices subject to change without notice. Call (954) 972-8140 For Your Tee Time!Margate Blvd. between Atlantic Blvd. and Royal Palm Blvd. in Margate THIS WEEKEND SPECIAL!Play any weekday (18 holes before 3pm) and receive$5.00 OFFSAME WEEKEND PLAYCheck with golf shop sta for details € Expires 3/19All prices include tax. With coupon. Exp. 3/19/12 If you cannot locate a Pelican in your city or town, Call 954 .783.8700

PAGE 20

20 The Pelican Friday, March 9, 2012 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeerfield Beach – One of the area’s most highlyrated golf courses has made a move that insures almost every golfer will have a good day. Deer Creek Golf Club recently added silver tees to the championship course that establishes a 4,180-yard executive course within the very challenging fairways and greens. “This has extended the careers of many of our golfers. Some of them are proud they can now shoot their ages. It has been a great success” said Marty Martinez, general manager and director of golf. This latest renovation may be the best. Golf architect Arthur Hills rebuilt the course in 1994 and again in 2004, “This is one of the better golf courses in South Florida, especially for a residential course,” Martinez said. Luxury homes and condominiums are set well back from the playing field, and the club is distinct because it offers both the amenities of private membership and a daily, public fee. “It is so nice here everyone thinks it is a private club. That’s a real compliment, but Positive change is ongoing at area’s most challenging course, Deer Creek Golf Clubwe want everyone to know they are welcome,” Martinez said. The newest improvement happens this summer in the Key West Banquet Room. The ceiling will be lifted to 17 feet, with new French doors and 15-foot arched windows installed, increasing seating to accommodate 100 additional diners. The waterfall and gardens will be enhanced with a bougainvillea-covered trellis, a gazebo, enlarged patio and lusher landscaping. It’s a $1.2 million renovation. The Bridal Suite and rest rooms will also be updated. Last summer, the smaller Biscayne Banquet Room, the lobby and the Grille were refurbished. “We hope to have the finest facilities in the area,” Martinez said. The waterfall and garden already attract wedding parties, and Martinez said the new design will make guests feel they are in an exotic location. “This is very exciting. The owner has been so generous in investing in this facility, $5 million in the last 15 years.” At 7,050 yards and with a difficulty rating from the championship tees of 75.3, Deer Creek is still a fun place to play. “You can find your ball and recover from a bad shot,” Martinez said. “It’s more challenging around the green than off the tee. The course has little water and the bunkers are playable.” The most challenging hole is probably the 18th, a 451yard par 4. It could be called an Arthur Hills signature with its dogleg to the left, a water hole short of the green and prevailing winds that blow left to right. “You are always fighting the wind,” Martinez said. “It makes for a very difficult par See DEER CREEK on page 23 View of lush fairway and green at Deer Creek Golf Club with clubhouse in the distance. ADVERTISEMENT

PAGE 21

The Pelican 21 Friday, March 9, 2012

PAGE 22

22 The Pelican Friday, March 9, 2012 Pelican Classi eds Can Save You Time & Money 954.783.8700 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFOakland Park – A spaghetti dinner for the benefit of the Northeast High School InVenTeam is set from 5 to 8 p.m. tonight, at Jaco Pastorius Community Center, 4000 N. Dixie Highway. The Oakland Park Kiwanis Club and City fire department are hosting the event to help the students raise funds for a trip to Boston. Tickets are $10 per person; $5 for children under 12. The 14 team members received a $9,570 grant from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology to create an emergency water filtration system for disaster relief in tropical areas. The team, led by teacher Randa Flinn, is one of 16 in the nation and the only one in Florida to be awarded a Lemelson-MIT InVenTeam grant this year. The students recently received generous donations from H. Wayne Huizenga and from Oakland Park Commissioner Shari McCartney and Broward School Board member Katherine Leach to help the team get to Boston to show their invention at EurekaFest, Brain-jocks get fundraiser in Oakland Parkaccording to Flinn. Ford Lincoln Mercury of Pompano is helping the students with a “Drive for Your School” event during the first week of April from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. at the school, 700 NE 56 St. The company will donate $20 per adult who test drives one of their cars. The students have raised $9,000 but still need about $2,000 more. For information on tickets for the dinner, call Flinn at 754-322-1550, Ext. 3058. High school students win MIT grant for water ltration system, now need travel funds for Boston.

PAGE 23

The Pelican 23 Friday, March 9, 2012 4.” Membership here does have its benefits: unlimited golf, food, beverage and pro shop discounts, advance tee times, bag storage and lockers, special guest fees and charging privileges. For the daily player who still enjoys all that the clubhouse and course offer, Deer CreekContinued from page 20is difficult and challenging without being overly penalizing.” ‘Off-season rates, after April 23, are $50 weekdays; $75 on weekends and for twilight golfers, $35. Despite the rates or the time of year, play at Deer Creek remains steady year round, Martinez said. Although it is off the beaten path, a block north of Hillsboro Boulevard between Military Trail and Powerline Road, the clubhouse offers many social and dining opportunities. The club also caters to private parties and charity events. Especially popular are early bird dinners and Sunday brunches. The Grille serves lunch and dinner and on Thursday night is home to one of the area’s hottest musical groups, Joey and the Gigolos who continue to pack the room. The Grille also offers an all-you-can-eat buffet at lunchtime, Wednesday pasta nights and other specials with no entre more than $15. St. Pat’s Day will be celebrated with a $12.95 corned beef and cabbage dinner and on April 8, an Easter Brunch will be served from noon to 6 p.m. for $23.95. Reservations are encouraged. Call 954-4215553. the fees varying according to the season. Martinez makes no apology for the club’s rates which in the season are as high as $110 on the weekends, $95 on weekdays. “The rates reflect the demand,” he said. “It’s a great location, it’s a quality course and it Architectural rendering of the new Key West Room.

PAGE 24

24 The Pelican Friday, March 9, 2012 The Pelican We Mean Business 954-783-8700 complications might occur. We’re alerted beforehand if there will be a need for these specialists. All of that, plus house anesthesiologists who are always available and lactation consultants for new mothers makes it clear that we are ready for everything that can possibly happen.” With a laugh, Harris adds, “We have a lot of returns. The mothers come back for further deliveries because they like the care from nurses who have been in birthing areas for a long time. And they are secure knowing we have all of the knowledge and equipment to deal with early, complicated and multiple births. Currently, most women want an epidural which numbs the lower body when delivery is imminent.About Toby Harris, director of maternity servicesHarris says, “I’ve been an RN for 30 years. I’m also a midwife. I’ve been in maternity hospitals since 1980 and here in West Boca since 1989. Since coming to West Boca I have been a staff nurse, promoted to charge nurse, to clinical manager and am now director of maternity services.” Along the way Harris has earned her B.S. degree in health sciences, her B.S.N. in nursing and master’s in community health. She is a member of Association of Women’s Health and Neonatal Nursing. For support classes, call the Call Center at 866-9049262. For further information about the birthing unit, call 561-488-8000.About West Boca Medical CenterThis medical center offers many specialties in addition to general medical and surgical care. They include cardiac and surgical intensive care, outpatient surgery services, 24-hour emergency services for adults and children, diabetes education, a cystic brosis program for adults and children, outpatient rehabilitation services, a sleep diagnostic center and comprehensive services designed to care for women throughout every stage in her life. Call 561488-8000. Photos courtesy of West Boca Boca WestContinued from page 10Toby Harris, director of maternity services is shown here consulting with an associate. The birthing unit handles ovre 2,000 births annually. Business3-12 – The Wilton Manors Business Association will hold its monthly meeting at 6 p.m. at ABC Web Service, 2054 E. Oakland Park Blvd.City Meetings3-13 – Wilton Manors City Commission meeting at 7 p.m. at city hall, 2020 Wilton Drive. 3-13 – Pompano Beach City Commission meeting at 7 p.m. at city hall, 100 W. Atlantic Blvd. 3-13 – Lighthouse Point City Commission meeting at 7:30 p.m. at city hall, 2200 N.E. 38 St. 3-13 – Lauderdale-By-TheSea Town Commission meeting at 7 p.m. at Jarvis Hall, 4501 Ocean Drive.SightingsContinued from page 8 3-14 – Oakland Park will hold a community meeting from 6 to 8 p.m. at the city’s Municipal Building, 5399 North Dixie Hwy. The meeting is intended to provide businesses, residents, and property owners an opportunity to discuss and provide input on the proposed “Commercial Blvd. Mixed Use Overlay District.” The intent of the new district is to spur on compatible future redevelopment in the area. 3-20 – Wilton Manors Commissioners will hold a workshop meeting at 7 p.m. at Richardson Historic Park, 1937 Wilton Drive. Commissioners will discuss the goals and objectives of all the city departments for the fiscal year 2012/2013.See SIGHTINGS on page 29

PAGE 25

The Pelican 25 Friday, March 9, 2012 The Pelican part of doing business. Call us at 954-783-8700. a dog, or on the beach with a turtle, or sitting on a horse. Animals are a big part of my life. When I was a student in dental school, I considered changing my major to veterinary medicine. I discussed this idea with my vet at that time and he said, “Knowing you, you’d take all the stray dogs home. That was almost a self ful lling prophecy.” In dental school, she recounts, she had a black lab mix whom she named Buckwheat. “I had a friend with a black lab, whom he couldn’t keep anymore, so I took Duke in. Then I found a little black lab in a small country town where I was working as a dental hygienist. I named her Alfalfa and that is how my dog rescue volunteer career began.” Continuing, “I’m known now in the rescue community as a person who will help nd a home for abandoned dogs. The reasons for abandoning are many. People move. Others can’t afford to keep their pets. Some buildings don’t allow pets. And then there are the strays.” “When I get a call, I go into action. I nd a holding place for the dog. This could be a short term foster home, a vet who works with me or my own back yard. My two dogs welcome these short term strangers. I get a medical evaluation from several vets or the people at Bayview Animal Hospital who also help me. Once we know what is needed, I take care of it. I foot the bill. I consider it my special charity. It can cost up to $2,000 depending upon what is needed.” In response to raised eyebrows over the money she spends on rescuing, she laughs and says, “ I know. I may end up in the poorhouse, but what matters is how I lived my life. I sometimes think I have a big heart, but I need my head examined.” It’s not surprising to learn that all of her employees have become dog parents as have many of her patients. Of ce manager, Bonnie Faust, who has been with Dr. Evatt for 15 years, has Rickey, a pug beagle mix and Bessie, a red haired cocker spaniel. Faust says, “When the doctor’s eyes open, so do her arms. Did she tell you what she does for St. Teresa’s Missionaries of Charity?” Face ushed, Dr. Evatt admits that she volunteers every year in the Dominican Republic xing children’s teeth. “Many have never seen a dentist,” she sighs. And if that isn’t enough, she does regular pro-bono dental care for the Sisters of the Missionary when they come up from their convent in Miami. On holidays, she can often be found serving in the soup kitchen in Miami. When this news elicited praise, she shook her head in denial and said, “Don’t praise me. What I do is more gratifying to me than any present I could receive.” The Pelican agrees with author, Sachin Mayi, that Dr. Evatt is indeed a candidate for sainthood in dog heaven, and maybe people heaven too. Thank you, Dr. Evatt. For more information, call 954-565-6335. RescuesContinued from page 8 A happy waiting room is the dentist’s back yard. Most of the dogs shown here will all be adopted by loving owners in short order thanks to Dr. Laura Evatt.

PAGE 26

26 The Pelican Friday, March 9, 2012 and “Christmas by the Sea and a new ad hoc marketing group is planning a “Family Fun Week” in June and a lobster mini-season dive event in July. “I don’t know who you are marketing these events to, and I’m not clear about the town’s marketing strategy,” Brown said. “We need to hire a professional marketing rm. I’d rather not have a staff person marketing these events. We need a strategy as far as I’m concerned.” Commissioner Stuart Dodd said he chaired the July 4th event twice. The rst time it cost over $100,000 and included car shows and sand castle contests. “It was an enormous amount of work, shared by Commissioner (Birute Ann) Clottey and myself.” Last year’s event had a lower budget and was organized “with a great deal of assistance from businesses and the Volunteer Fire Department,” he said. Dodd said an event organizer was hired in the past and the expense was much more than anticipated. Hoffmann said she sees the tasks separately: an event organizer, an operational person who follows through, and someone else to market events. “Is it someone we hire by contract or a staff person?” she asked, looking for commission direction. Hoffmann said her assistant, Pat Himelberger, is coordinating the family event, and Steve d’Oliveira, the town’s public information of cer, is coordinating the lobster fest. “I think this should be the town manager’s scope of responsibility,” Mayor Roseann Minnet said. “We need more help from staff. This needs to be in your hands.” Hoffmann said she will come back with a budget request. Commissioners will be honorary chairs of the holiday events. Minnet then asked commissioners to take event assignments for the next two years. She volunteered for the Easter event April 7. Brown wanted more assurance that fundraising wouldn’t be the responsibility of the chairperson noting, “The issue in ethics law is the appearance of con ict. Let’s say a restaurant contributes food or money or a band to an event. Then a couple months later something comes up with that restaurant that requires a commission vote. Somebody les an ethics complaint against the commissioner who chaired the event. In public of ce, it’s ‘guilty until proven innocent.’” He added, “I’m really reluctant to put myself out there where someone may le a complaint, and I can’t vote on an issue because that restaurant contributed to an event I chaired.” Minnet responded, “Commissioner Brown, then you won’t chair any event. I’m proud to stand up and do it. I can understand where you’re coming from. I’m not doing anything ethically wrong,” the mayor said. Dodd said he totally disagreed with Brown and volunteered to chair Halloween. Sasser said he would chair the Easter event in 2013. Vincent will chair the July 4th celebration this year. At that, Brown said he would chair July 4th in 2013, “after I see how many ethics complaints get led against everyone else.” Only one resident, Ron Piersante, a regular volunteer at holiday events, spoke up. “We elected you to run the town, not to run special events,” he said. “Most of you work. The town manager said we should hire someone to plan events. You could be chairperson, but we need someone to coordinate. You need something in the budget for special events. I hope this is not going on deaf ears.” EthicsContinued from page 9

PAGE 27

The Pelican 27 Friday, March 9, 2012 Garden Isle Marine, 641 S. Federal Highway, Pompano Beach 954-785-7181Pull up dockside and solve your craft’s problems at Garden Isle Marine ServicesDrive to the back of McCulloch Marine lot to nd Garden Isle Marine Services on the water at 641 S. Federal Highway in Pompano Beach. That’s where to nd John Hall and his team servicing boat problems so that boaters can rev up and hit the waves with peace of mind. John and Tracey Hall, owners of Garden Isle Marine Services, took the plunge and rented McCulloch’s back lot to open their business in 2003. “It took a lot of courage to give up a good pay check and take on the headaches of being a business owner,” John says, “but with my wife Tracey running the of ce and my hands-on team of Tom Woods, Tom Ferrick and Eddie Spiller working with me, I’ve never regretted the move.“ “We met working at Hideaway and married in 2003, the same year we opened Garden Isle. It was a busy year. It’s been an adventure and we’re glad we did it,” Tracey said echoing her husband’s feelings. “Business came to us one customer at a time, and now it’s all referrals and responses to our Pelican ads that bring boaters to us. Our clients are a mix of sherman and pleasure cruisers.” They keep busy in the summer because John says, “Permanent residents know that summer offers better boating conditions than winter. When the snowbirds y in, we’re even busier. Water access is very important. With our forklift, we can haul a craft out of the water, do the necessary work and then drop the boat back in the water. Because of the Federal Highway Bridge and our lift capacity, we are limited to servicing boats from 13 to 35-feet.” One long time customer is David Bobst, captain and owner of Calypso Poet Yacht Services, who says, “I have used John to service all of my smaller boats and I’ve been a more than satis ed customer for many years.” Greg Bennett is another. He says, “I highly recommend John and Garden Isle Marine Services to all of my boating friends. I’ve been a happy and loyal customer for over ve years. John does all of the maintenance on my boat, including bottom painting twice a year and that way everything stays ship shape.” Eddie Spiller does the bottom painting which John says is very important to every boat that sits in the water. “It keeps growth away, allowing a boat to perform better, enjoy maximum speed and save on fuel.” The mechanics handle all mechanical and electrical problems, and do zinc replacement. John says he’s equipped to repair or replace any kind of engine. Parts are readily available and the work is done as quickly as possible to get folks back in the water. “I’ve been in the business since I was 14 years old. I’m certi ed by many different factory schools.” One of his mechanics, Tom Woods has been on the team for ve years and says, “I love my work. We have many interesting and pleasant customers and they’re good to deal with. You’re always learning because the problems are never quite the same.” When he has a minute John enjoys getting out there himself and occasionally hooks a dolphin. “It’s fun being in my own boat instead of working on other peoples’ boats. But the ocean is not for Tracey who gets sea sick. “I like cruising the intracoastal, looking at the mansions, sipping my wine and nibbling on cheese.” For information, call 954785-7181. Open Mon. to Fri. 8 a.m. to 5:30; Sat. 8 to 12 noon.John and Tracey Hall, owners of Garden Isle Marine Services are proud of their water location with forklift, enabling them to o ffer repair, replacement and maintenance services for boats up to 35-feet. [Right] Eddie Spiller, pushing 70, is the team’s dedicated bottom painter. Shown here, ready to paint. John and Tom Woods use the forklift to get boats out of the water and ready for maintenance and repair. ADVERTISEMENT

PAGE 28

28 The Pelican Friday, March 9, 2012 The Shuck & Dive’s Chef Staz shows off some fresh oysters freshly prepared by his assistants Junior and Kerry.People are talking about . Taste of the Beach in Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Athena-By-The-Sea ‘s Louis and Martha Marchelos dish out their famous meatballs as well as signature Greek salad. The Shuck & Dive’s Chef Staz shows off some fresh oysters freshly prepared by his assistants Junior and Kerry. Great Food and Lively Ambiance make LBTS Taste of the Beach a resounding successBy Malcolm McClintockPELICAN STAFFOnce again this year, the great white tent on El Mar Drive signaled the coming of Lauderdale-by-the-Sea’s much anticipated annual culinary event. Hundreds of area residents and visitors attended the classic gastronomic soire known as Taste of the Beach. Presented by the LBTS Chamber of Commerce, the Taste of lived up to expectations by featuring over 30 area restaurants. The maelstrom of aromatic scents, lively music and good cheer created the perfect atmosphere for fine dining. “Everyone seems to be having a good time” said event organizer Guy Contrada as he walked the floor making sure guests and restaurateurs were enjoying the experience. In addition, several wine and spirits purveyors were present to showcase their particular brands of tonic. Ambrosial vintages, flavored vodkas and frosty beers were great complements to the toothsome fare on hand. “We also had many fantastic gift baskets and prizes for the silent auction,” adds newly installed Chamber President Mark Silver. One of the most rewarding evenings of the year, Taste of the Beach is a memorable occasion that should always be marked on one’s calendar. Simply drop by the Chamber Welcome Center to plan next year’s visit.Pompano Beach. Century Plaza Condominium Celebrates its 40th AnniversaryL to R: Angela Galland, Jean Krupp, Leslie & Tom Roe, Verna Davis, Anna Gerres L to R: Aurora Jebejian, Chair; Susan Vercesi, Vice-Chair; Joan Larkin, Treasurer; Judith Desrosiers, Sunshine Lady; Joan Doonan, Assistant Treasurer; Patty Monteson, Secretary; Terri Brooks, Programs/Activities Ed McPherson, Director; Norm Derosiers, Treasurer; Tony Coletta, President; Ray Larkin, Director; Ron Vercesi, Vice President; Patty Monteson, Director; Lucy O’Connor, SecretaryPompano Beach Last month Century Plaza celebrated its 40th Anniversary with a dinner/ dance at the Lighthouse Point Yacht & Racquet Club. The event, sponsored by the Century Plaza Women’s Club, was attended by almost 140 residents who enjoyed a an evening of fine dining. Aurora Jebejian, president of the Women’s Club, welcomed guests and introduced 32-year association president, Tony Coletta, who gave a brief early history of Century Plaza. Tony and his wife, Rose, the “First Couple of Century Plaza,” will soon celebrate their 72nd wedding anniversary. After remarks by vice president, Ron Vercesi, festivities began with Paul Anthony and the Live Wire band. During the program Women’s Club Treasurer, Joan Larkin, recognized the “Century Plaza Pioneers;” Verna Davis, Anna Gerres, Jean Krupp, Tom and Leslie Roe and Angela Galland., owners who still live at Century Plaza and signed their deeds 40 year ago. Joan also recognized the “kids” those offspring of original owners still living at Century Plaza…Diane Seiwert, Chuck and Shirley Cooper, Arthur and Roberta Gualtieri, Adriann Weir, Ron and Susan Vercesi, Marie Boroski and Pat Titone. After the group honored Tony Coletta, 99-year old resident, Jerry Miller, read a heartfelt poem he wrote about life at Century Plaza. Attendees were then given a commemorative Book of Memories that was created and published by resident Kay McPherson. The booklet included a 1971 Fort Lauderdale News article announcing the opening of Century Plaza; photos from past parties and other condo events; meeting minutes from the past; and letters from residents.

PAGE 29

The Pelican 29 Friday, March 9, 2012 WORSHIP DIRECTORY: Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad. Rev. Hyvenson Joseph ballot was a self-serving move by commissioners to allow them to lobby. Wilton Manors Mayor Gary Resnick, an attorney who is registered as a lobbyist with the county and lobbies on behalf of his law firm, has said he is not commenting on the ethics code. County commissioners also called the ballot question CodeContinued from page 14misleading. “We went down this road is because there was discussion on the board that the ballot titles in those three cities were misleading,” said Commissioner Ilene Lieberman. In a previous interview, Wilton Manors Commissioner Julie Carson said she thought it was insulting for county officials to say voters didn’t understand what they were voting for. The county vote was 6 to 2 to rescind support of residents who wanted to sue their cities. Sue Gunzburger and Lois Wexler dissenting. A motion to bring the issue up again failed 4 to 3 because the county requires at least five votes to pass a motion; Rodstrom was the one who tried to change sides. Commissioner Barbara Sharief, who voted to rescind, said it’s the right of every city to change whatever it feels needs to be changed. “I know our ethics code is horrible. What we have to abide by is horrible. Why are we so adamant about going out and suing these cities when they’ve figured out a way, I guess, to modify it to allow people to continue to work?” she asked. “I think that we’re out there fishing for somebody to come forward, and I just think it’s inappropriate what we’re doing right now.” Responded Rodstrom, “You asked why would anybody want to [sue a city] . and my answer is that it gives us a forum, if you think this ordinance is so horrible, it gives the ordinance a forum to have it tested in a court of law, and so the parts of it that are unconstitutional may or may not be dealt with potentially in court.” Festivals & Events3-10 – The Fort Lauderdale St. Patrick’s Day Parade and Festival will be held at Huizenga Plaza, 32 E. Las Olas Blvd., from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. There will be food, live entertainment and activities for children. The parade down Las Olas Boulevard starts at noon. Visit www. ftlaudirishfest.com or call 954-828-5985. 3-11 – There will be a beach cleanup at North Ocean Park, 3424 NE 16 St., Pompano Beach, from 9 to 11 a.m. Those interested should meet at the First Presbyterian church of Pompano Beach, 3424 NE 16 St., at 8:30 a.m. 3-16 & 30 – The St. Coleman Parish’s Men’s Clu b Fish Fry takes place from 5:30 to 9 p.m. at St. Coleman, 1200 S. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. Cost is $8 for adults and $5 for kids. Visit www. stcmc.org or 954-942-3533. SightingsContinued from page 24 See SIGHTINGS on page 33

PAGE 30

30 The Pelican Friday, March 9, 2012 The Pelican Classi eds can save you time and money! The Pelican • 954-783-8700 The Pelican 954-783-8700 Classi eds Call 954-545-0013 HELP WANTEDADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT For Property Management Firm. Data Entry, Client Contact, Assist Executive. FT / PT. 954-7727012. 3-9 BAIT & TACKLE CLERK – PART TIME 1 OR 2 DAYS PER WEEK – Retired OK. Pompano Beach. Call 954-946-1307. 3-16 LOCAL PEST CONTROL CO Looking For Quality Sales/Service Tech. Must Be Dependable, Team Player, Good Drivers License & People Skills. Will Train Right Person. ALSO Of ce Assistant – Computer – People & Phone Skills Needed. Fax Resume 954418-3982. 3-9 SEEKING EMPLOYMENTHOME HEALTH AIDE I Will Take Care Of The Elderly. Honest, Kind, Loving. With Own Car. Live – In Or Live – Out. 954-588-3102. 3-9 0 EXPERIENCED POLISH & SOME ENGLISH Speaking Lady. Will Take Good Care Of Your Loved One. Help With ADL. Own Car. Light Cleaning Available. 954-319-8376. 3-9 LPN AT CNA PRICES – Will Give Tender Care To Your Loved Ones. Live Out Broward Area Only. Dependable & Honest. References Available. Your Car Or Mine For Shopping & Appts. 954-895-7850. (15 Yrs. Exp. ) CNA / HHA – EXPERIENCED CNA /HHA Seeking Immediate Employment As Caregiver. Prerequisite: Must Be Elderly In Need Of Personal Care, Single, Private Duty (Hourly) 786-443-8519. LPN / EMT – QUALITY Care For Sick Or Elderly. Night Or Day. Flexible Hrs. 15 Yrs Exp. & Refs. Available. 954-3999929 Cell 305-720-0080. 3-9 SERVICES DANNY BOY ELECTRIC – Lic & Insured. Lic. #EC13004811. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. 24/Hr Service. 954-290-1443. Beat Any Written Estimate. Sr, Discount. 3-9 AAA AFFORDABLE FLOORS – Carpet – Tile Wood & Bamboo Floors – Moldings – Painting. TRASH REMOVAL Comm / Res. Same Day Service. FREE Est. 954646-1889. 3-9 FLAT – TILE ROOF REPAIR COATINGS – Leak Repair Experts – 30 Years Experience. Call Today For A FREE Estimate. 954-258-7677. 3-9 AAA AFFORDABLE TRASH REMOVAL – Garage Clean Ups – Condos – Apts. – Furniture – Appliances – Trees. Lic / Ins. FREE Est. Same Day Service. 954-646-1889. 3-9 HANDYMAN – PAINTING – CARPENTRY – Pressure Cleaning. Decks! Everything Around The House. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. Call 561350-3781. 3-16 MOORE PLUMBING PLUMBING SERVICES – Big Jobs – Small Jobs. We Do It All. Remodeling & Repairs. Lic. & Insured. C.C. Accepted. Call 954-772-4600. 3-30 HONEST HANDYMAN – HOME & BUILDING Maintenance/Improvements. No Job Too Small. Fast Friendly Service. Reasonable Rates. Local Resident/Homeowner. Call Today For Your FREE Upfront Quote. No Deposit Required. 754-366-1915. 3-9 HOME/OFFICE REPAIRS By State Certified G.C. Reasonable. CGC025802. More Information Call 954815-1007. C GOT JUNK? DUMP TRUCK – CLEANUPS Trees/ Landscape, Yard Fill. Paint/ Pressure Wash/ Roofs/Home Repairs – Welding, Etc. Dave 954-818-9538. 3-9 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIESNew GREEN technology. New defroster control saves energy in home refrigerators, commercial chillers. Patented. All optical. Simple mfg. Strategic partners needed..www.NewAvionics.Com. 954-568-1991. C MUSICIANS WANTEDThe American Legion Symphonic Band is now accepting new members for the 2011-2012 season. College age to “seasoned seniors” are welcome. Rehearsals are held on Wed. evenings at American Legion Post 142 in Pompano. Percussionists, euphonium and clarinet players are especially needed. If you enjoy “making music,” call Jim McGonigal, Music Director at 954-647-0700 for more info.DEEP WATER VILLA – DOCKPOMPANO BEACH 2/2 1700 SQ FT. Screened Fla Room. Private Yard. W/D. 4 Park. No Fixed Bridges. Community Pool. Deeded Dock.. 2 Blocks Beach. $285,000. Coldwell Banker – Barbara Call 954629-1324. 3-16 OPEN HOUSEPOMPANO BEACH SUNDAY 1-4pm. 1201 N Riverside Drive. TRULY AMAZING VIEW. This Updated 2/2 – 1st Floor Corner Unit Is Directly On The Intracoastal With No – Wake Zone Insuring Quiet Enjoyment Of an Endless Boat Parade. Must See – Camille Hall – Balistreri Realty. 954254-2085. 3-9 OPEN HOUSE Sunday 11am – 3pm. 2/2 Condo On Intracoastal – 1111 N Riverside #306 Pompano Beach. Better Homes & Gardens RE – 954304-4518. 3-9 THRIFT STORETHRIFT STORE GRAND OPENING 5130 N Federal Ft Laud. 2nd Floor (No Clothing) Beautiful Household Items. From $2 – Call 954-839-8182. 3-9 HOMES FOR RENTPOMPANO 2/2 Cottage Style House. Large Yard With Fish Pond. $1100 Month – Company Bills For Electric & Water. 541 NE 34 St. Darci 954-783-3723. 3-23 CO-OP SALESPOMPANO BEACH 1/1 On Water, Dockage Available At Your Door. $59,500. Coldwell Banker – Barbara – 954-6291324. 3-16 REAL ESTATE WANTEDI BUY HOUSES!! CASH!! AS IS! QUICK CLOSE! ANY AREA – ANY CONDITION! NO EQUITY OK. CALL NOW 954-914-2355. 4-20 CONDOS FOR SALELIGHTHOUSE POINT 2/1.5 CONDO In A GREAT AREA. Pets Allowed. $124,900. Call Barbara – Balistreri Realty. 954-263-7129. 3-9 DEERFIELD BEACH 2/2 Completely Redone. Granite Kitchen, New Cabinets. S.S. Appliances. 20” Porcelain Tile Floors. Travistine Stone Baths. Freshly Painted. 1st Floor. Less Than A Mile To Beach. $84,900. Call 631-873-8715. 3-9 WOW!! ON THE INTRACOASTAL. Owner Financing. $99,500 Firm. New C / A, Paint & Carpeting. Boat Slip When Available. 954-6820485. 3-9 LAUDERDALE BY THE SEA – Furnished 1/1.5 Condo $115,000. Heated Pool. Ocean Access. On Canal. 1481 S Ocean Blvd. Apt 228. Call 586549-5223. 3-30 CONDOS FOR RENTDEERFIELD BEACH 2/2 CONDO – Corner Unit, Pool. $800 $825. Good Credit Required. No Pets Or Realtors. 631-885-3342. 3-16 LAUDERDALE BY THE SEA – Across From Beach – Near Assumption Catholic Church. 1 Bedroom – Den – 2 Bath – CHA, Pool, W/D In Unit. $1175 Per Month Yearly – 1st – Last – Security. No Pets – No Smoking. 954-942-5642. 3-16 POMPANO BEACH 1 / 1.5 At Sea Haven – Immaculate Condition. Fully Furnished / Leather.. Magni cent Rec & Pool Facilities – On Waterfront. $950 Month. 954-913-7383. 3-16 OCEANFRONT CONDO – POMPANO BEACH CLUB. Furn. 2/2 Newly Updated 15th Floor W/Fabulous Views Of Ocean & Intracoastal. Restaurant, 2 Pools, Bar, Gym. Available April $2,000 Per Month. May Thru November $1,500 Per Month. Call Audrey 570-246-9240 Cell Or E-mail audrey@chantre.com 3-9 Classi eds continued on page31

PAGE 31

The Pelican 31 Friday, March 9, 2012 Advertise with The Pelican Classi eds Call 954-545-0013 Get to know your local Merchants APTS FOR RENTDEERFIELD/POMPANO BEACH 1 BR & 2 BR APTS FOR RENT. Remodeled, Paint, Tile, Etc. W & D On Site. Pool. Pet Friendly. Call George 954-809-5030. 3-9 POMPANO 1/1 & 2/1 – E OF FEDERAL – Tiled. 10’ Overhang. Walk To Everything. Park At Your Door. 954-2546325. 3-16 POMPANO BEACH – 2/2 Furnished. Large Ef ciency With Kitchen. Fully Furnished. Cable, Internet. Pool, Laundry. 500’ To The Beach. Weekly – Monthly – Yearly. 954-2948483 Or 248-736-1533. 3-16 POMPANO GARDENS $795 – 1/1 $200 Deposit. Nice Area. Minutes To Beach. Pet OK. Please Call 954-515-2554. 3-16 POMPANO BEACH CLUB NORTH – 1/1 Unfurnished 5th Floor $1,200 Month Annual. Oceanview, Indoor Parking, 24 Hour Security. Done Deal Realty. E. Robbins. 954-3440709. 3-16 POMPANO – ATLANTIC / INTRACOASTAL AREA – South Of Publix – Furnished Ef ciency – Private Entrance – Utilities Included. Long Term! $700 Month. 954-4158838. 3-9 POMPANO GARDENS $795 – 1/1 $500 Deposit. Nice Area – Minutes To Beach – Pet OK. Please Call 954-515-2554. 3-16 POMPANO BEACH 1/1 SW. C/A $725 – 2/1 $895 – NE 2/1 $950 – Townhouse 2/1.5 $1095. ALL FREE WATER. Rent + $70 Application Moves – U – In. 954-781-6299. 3-9 POMPANO MCNAB RD & NE 18 AVENUE – 1 & 2 Bedrooms Furnished/ Unfurnished. $695 $950 And Up. Pool, Tile Floors. Central A/C. 954-6102327. 3-16 POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 Bedroom From $495. Easy Movein. 1/2 OFF DEPOSIT. Remodeled. Great Location. 954-783-1088 For More Info. 3-9 LUXURY BEACH PADS FOR RENT! Pompano Grand Opening: FREE 32” Flat Screen HDTV! Newly Renovated in 2012 One – Bedrooms & Studio Apts., 75 Yards From Private Beach Access, Eastern Exposure. New Kitchens & Baths, Granite Counter Tops, Central Air, Pool, Laundry, Dedicated Parking, Near Pier & Downtown. All Bills Paid! Includes Water, Electric, Premium Cable TV And WIFI. Furnished Or Unfurnished. Short Or Long Stays. No Utility Deposits. Small Pets Welcome. Only 9x, 8x, 7 Left! Pax Properties – 888-729-4948 Or 954-603-8857. Photos At www.beachpads.net 3-30 COMMERCIAL FOR RENT-SALEPOMPANO COMMERCIAL OFFICE Spaces Available. Ranging From As Low As $500 To $700 Depending On Square Footage. Please Call Darci At 954783-3723. 3-23 DEERFIELD BEACH – Retail Of ce Warehouse – 700 Sq Ft With Loft. A/C, Bathroom. $575 Per Month. Call For More Info 561-654-1331 Or 561-9985681. 3-9 FURNITUREBEDSETS – King $180 – Queen $130 – Full $110 – Twin $90. 5 Pc. Bedroom Set $399. Frames $39. 954-465-6498. 3-9 ENTERTAINMENT WALL UNIT – Light Wood. 12’ x 6’ 7” – 5 Piece, Includes 2 Side Units, Glass Top. Shelves In Middle Drawers & Door On The Bottom. $600 Or Best Offer!! 954-785-5792. 3-9 DOCK FOR RENT60 FT DOCK – THE COVE MARINA – 50 AMP / H20 Included. $1,200 Month – Price Negotiable Depending On Boat Size. Restaurant & Fuel On Premises. 954-9140053. a.j.barsotti@comcast. net 3-30 MISCELLANEOUSNICE OLD THINGS WANTED – Watches, Fountain pens, Gold & Silver Jewelry, Sterling Silverware, World War II Memorabilia, etc. Call Dirk 954-709-0191. 3-9 OLD NAUTICAL STUFF WANTED By Collector. Sextants, Officers Watches, Captain Clocks, Compasses, etc. Marine / Submarine. Dirk 954-709-0191. 3-9 OLD OMEGA & JAEGER & LeCOULTRE Watches & Clocks – Every Kind & Condition Wanted. Call Dirk 954-709-0191. 3-9 BOHEMIAN CRYSTAL CHANDELIER – By Breciosa. New In Box. Pictures Available By email. $950. 561-542-2988. Boca. 3-9 BABY GRAND PIANO – Cherry Wood – Like New!! $3,500. 561-381-0361 – Delray Beach. 3-16 LIKE NEW STATIONARY BIKE Floor Model $50. ROCKIN AB ROCKET $50. Like New! ToolsMisc Items. Pompano 954-943-0250. 3-9 GARAGE SALESPOMPANO BEACH – NEW & OLD SALE!! Parliament House – 405 N Ocean Blvd. Saturday March 10 – 9am – 2pm. Books – Household – Seasonal – Clothing – Jewelry – Home Dcor – Lots More!! 3-9 POMPANO VOYAGER CONDO – 2900 NE 14 St Causeway! March 10th & 11th – 8am-2pm. Multi Family – Quality Items. Clothes, China, TV’s, Furniture. Much More!!!! Come Early – Great Bargains! 3-9 POMPANO BEACH – GARDEN AIRE VILLAGE NORTH – 2601 NE 14 St. Causeway. TAG SALE Saturday March 10 – 8am1pm. Bake Sale – Furniture – Lamps – Clothing & Trash & Treasure. 3-9 The Pelican Classi eds can save you time and money! The Pelican • 954-783-8700

PAGE 32

32 The Pelican Friday, March 9, 2012

PAGE 33

The Pelican 33 Friday, March 9, 2012 Capt. RJ Boyle is an experienced angler in South Florida. His studio is located in Lighthouse Point. Call 954-420-5001. RJ BoyleRJ BOYLE STUDIOSIf you ever have the chance, you need to take a trip to Costa Rica and do some shing. We got back two days The Paci c waters off Costa Rica yield some big catchesago from a short four-day trip to Los Suenos Marina. And what a time it was. We caught a bunch of big sail sh around 100 lbs each. The sail sh are much bigger in the Paci c Ocean than the Atlantic. We also saw a 250 lb. blue marlin, which was caught by a 12year-old girl. We fought the sh for about 45 minutes before we brought it beside the boat. She was so happy and her dad couldn’t have been more excited. The marina is ve-star and the restaurants are off the chain. The ights are about $350 and it only takes about two and a half hours to get there. It is truly amazing to take a ight and be in a third world country so quickly. Above all, what is so cool about shing there is that it is at calm most of the time. You can relax and really enjoy the boat and your friends without having to worry about spilling your cocktail. Most of the natives there speak English so you don’t need to worry if you don’t speak Spanish. So, get off the couch and put a trip together and charter a boat there for a few days. You wont regret it! If you have any questions about putting a trip together, call us at the shop at 954-420-5001. Get Tight! For the Kids3-9 – Sol Children Theatre Troupe is hosting a social from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Sol Children Theatre, 3333 N. Federal Highway, Boca Raton. The event is free and includes games, refreshments and a meet and greet with directors, teachers and actors. Visit www.solchildren.org or call 561-447-8829. 3-11 – Bike Fest, an event with bike safety and games, will take place from 1 to 4 p.m. at Roosevelt Gardens Park, 2841 NW 11 St., Fort Lauderdale. The free event is for ages 6 to 17. Call 954327-3888. 3-15 – Pony rides offered for $3 per ride from 9 to 11:30 a.m. at Sand & Spurs Equestrian Park, 1600 NE 5 Ave., behind the Goodyear Blimp base, Pompano Beach. 954.786.4507. 3-22 – Secret Woods Nature Center, 2701 W. State Road 84, Dania Beach, offers Nature Tots, a program that teaches children ages two to four to appreciate nature. The program is $5 per child and runs from 10 to 11 a.m. Preregistration is required. 954357-5198 or 954-357-8884.Health & Fitness3-10 – Free car seat safety check available from 9 a.m. to noon at Pompano Beach Fire-Rescue Station 24, located at 2001 NE 10th St., on the corner of Northeast 10 Street and Federal Highway. Certi ed child passenger safety technicians will be checking children’s car seats for proper installation, safety and recall status. Call 954-786-4510 to schedule an appointment. 3-17 – The 6th Annual Community Health Expo takes place from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Coral Ridge Presbyterian Church, 555 N. Fed. Hwy., Fort Luaderdale. Event is free. 954-563-9876.SightingsContinued from page 29

PAGE 34

34 The Pelican Friday, March 9, 2012 County, city of cials don aprons for Sample-McDougald House Dirk DeJong, president of Frank H. Furman Insurance, serves breakfast to a table of diners at John Knox Village. DeJong was one of many local celebrities to donate time at “Breakfast at the Big House,” a fundraiser for the historic Sample-McDougald House. In the background, Pompano Beach Commissioner Rex Hardin and Pompano Beac h Chamber CEO Ric Green wait in line to get orders. By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach – It’s not everyday that a candidate for Congress works as a waitress but Kristin Jacobs, Broward County Commissioner and candidate for U.S. House Dist. 22, recently slapped on an apron and served SampleMcDougald House benefactors at Breakfast for the “Big” House. The event, held at John Knox Village in Pompano Beach on March 22, was a fundraiser for the nearly 100year-old structure. Jacobs, Pompano City Commissioner Rex Hardin, Pompano Chamber of Commerce President/CEO Ric Green, City Manager Dennis Beach and others worked as waiters and waitresses for the event. “We keep knocking down our history and we keep forgetting,” said Jacobs about the importance of preserving the site. “It’s a beautiful building,” she added. Now in its fourth year, the fundraiser is put on by the Sample-McDougald House Preservation Society, which was formed in 1999 to relocate, promote and preserve the historic digs. “It’s great,” said Hardin, who has been a waiter four Pompano Beach City Commissioner Rex Hardin re lls the coffee cup of Michael Carey, of Kimley-Horn and Associates. Also pictured is Suzanne Danielson of Kimley-Horn and Associates. [Photos by Michael d’Oliveira] Robert Scharmann, executive director of John Knox Village; Dan Hobby, executive director of the Sample-McDougald and Dodie Keith-Lazowick, Sample-McDougald board member. See BIG HOUSE on page 35

PAGE 35

The Pelican 35 Friday, March 9, 2012 times. “They realize you’re not a professional server . they cut you some slack.” Recently, SampleMcDougald received its certificate of occupancy, or CO, allowing it to open to the public. “This has been 12 years in the making,” said Dodie Keith-Lazowick, Sample-McDougald board member and president of Keith & Associates. Responsible for obtaining the CO was JWR Construction Services. Along with a $20,000 donation, which was used to pay off creditors, JWR also took over management of the project. “They said ‘we’re going to run the entire project for you and by the way, we’re going to charge you zero,’” said Dirk DeJong, president/COO of Frank Furman Insurance and president of SampleMcDougald. “Our success is 100 percent due to JWR,” said Keith-Lazowick. Jerry DuBois, president of JWR, said he “couldn’t guess” how much time and materials JWR and other contractors have donated. “The house has been such a great piece of Pompano,” he said. Private donations, public grants, including $400,000 secured by Jacobs, have helped fund the restoration. At the breakfast, Jerry Bowman, Centennial Celebration Committee board member, donated $5,000 from the Centennial Celebration fund to Sample-McDougald. The first official event at the house will feature a Florida Highwaymen art exhibit from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. on March 23. Admission is $3. Proceeds benefit the Pompano Beach Historical Society and the Sample-McDougald House Preservation Society. “The house will be open for the community on a year-round basis,” said Dan Hobby, executive director of SampleMcDougald. Built in 1916 by Albert Neal Sample, a Pompano pioneer, the house was purchased in 1943 by William D. McDougald, a Deerfield Beach lawman and farmer. Members of the McDougald Family lived in the house for six decades and eventually donated it to the city. In 2001, the house was moved from its original foundation to its current location at Centennial Park, 450 NE 10 St. Call 954-786-4047 for upcoming events. Big HouseContinued from page 34

PAGE 36

36 The Pelican Friday, March 9, 2012