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Pompano Pelican
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00090900/00289
 Material Information
Title: Pompano Pelican
Uniform Title: Pompano Pelican
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: Pompano Pelican
Place of Publication: Pompano Beach
Publication Date: 03-02-2012
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Pompano Beach
Coordinates: 26.234722 x -80.125556 ( Place of Publication )
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00090900:00289

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Friday, March 2, 2012 Vol. XX, Issue 9 Call 954-783-8700 to Advertise Email: siren2415@gmail.com Pompano Beach Deer eld Beach Lighthouse Point Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Wilton Manors Oakland Park Hillsboro Beach The Galt Palm Aire The Pelican Pelican LBTS Commissioners in Lauderdale-ByThe-Sea selected members of three advisory boards at Tuesdays meeting. Named to the Planning and Zoning Board were Alfred Oldaker, William Brady, William Patrick Murphy, David Chanon and Avi Braverman. Alternates are Eric Yankwitt and David Gilman. Board of Adjustment members are Helene Wetherington, Verenice Rapaport, Henry Overton, Gerri Ann Caposto and Arthur Franczak. Alternate is Helen Swinghammer. Museum, new Barefoot Mailman statue dedication mark 105th birthday of Hillsboro LighthouseSee LIGHTHOUSE on page 25 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach Local history buffs have a big day coming Saturday, March 10. The new Barefoot Mailman statue at the base of the Hillsboro Inlet Lighthouse will be dedicated and a new Lighthouse Museum will be opened in Inlet Park. The day also celebrates the 105th anniversary of the lighthouse. The 400-square foot museum is Historic Sentry to celebrate 105 years of lighting the way for mariners through the Hillsboro Inlet. [Photo courtesy of Hillsboro Lighthouse Preservation Society] Winners of 18th Annual Children in the Arts Piano competition, Matthew Reichenberger, Blanch Kuo and Alyce Kuo with Vice Mayor George Brummer and Sue Bloom, Palm Aire Friends of the Arts. More than 116 piano students competed last weekend at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center in Pompano Beach. [See story on page 2] Deer elds groin system saved the beach says engineer who installed itBy Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach For all those who castigate this citys beach groin system, there is one staunch defender: civil engineer Art Strock, the man who designed it and supervised the placement of the limestone rocks along the shoreline in 1963. At the time, there was no opposition to the project. One street and a number of homes had been lost to the sea and eroding sands threatened to take SE 21 Avenue, a motel pool next to the Wyndham and, on the south end, more homes. You have to look at it from the standpoint of timing. There was virtually no beach. It was hard to argue against it, Strock said. Now 84, Strock is not certain how much the groin system cost the city. He estimates it at $500,000, funds that came from city, county and state coffers. It was a big number at that See GROINS on page 35By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach A magistrate has ruled the Lady Go Diver, a commercial dive boat, cannot be docked in the Pelican Canal after residents there complained that the boats diesel engines were noisy and emitted bad-smelling fumes. Donna Garcia, a resident at 1539 SE 8 St., said when the boat departed the dock across her canal she had to close all her windows and doors to keep the fumes out of her house. Garcia and her husband, Manny, led a complaint with code enforcement in January. On Feb. 21, they got Magistrate Eugene Steinfelds order that the dock at 1612 SE 7 Court was being used for commercial purposes prohibited by Deer eld Beachs code. Neighbors complain of noise and fumes; dive boat must leave berth See DIVE BOAT on page 34 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFLBTS Commissioners have agreed to renew a franchise agreement with Choice Environmental Services to operate the only solid waste and recyclable collection system in the See CHOICE on page 13Choice gets contract; residents get new carts

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2 The PelicanFriday, March 2, 2012 SightingsA community calendar of East Broward County. Please email information to siren2415@gmail.com See SIGHTINGS on page 5 By Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach It was a family affair at this years 14-year-old Matthew Reichenberger takes top spot at Pompano Beach piano competitionpiano competition, Feb. 25, at the Emma Lou Olson Civic center when it came to the winners. At the Advanced II level, rst place winner Matthew Reichenberger, 14, was lauded for his performance of Chopins Ballade No 3. That performance also landed him the Steinway Virtuoso award of a $500 music scholarship. Blanche Kuo, took second place with her performance of Debussys Jardins Sous La Pluie. Third place winner was Kuos twin sister, Alyce, who played Chopins, Etude, Op 10, No 3. And not far behind in the Advanced I level, Reichenbergers brother, Jonathan, took rst place, followed by Kerstin Yu and Vivian Zhai. Other winners were, Intermediate II, Jada Campbell, rst; Joy Quan, second and Christine Tao, third. Intermediate I winners were Michelle Huang, rst; Tyler Harrison, second and Crystal Tang, third. Elementary III winners were Daniel Pan, rst; Sophia Noh, second and Carol Jiang, third. Elementary II winners were Johanna Tam, rst; Nhi Tran, second and Eileen Chong, third. Elementary I winners were Megan Yang, rst; Benny Montes, second and Claire Wang, third. For the 116 competitors, the day began at 8 a.m. with beginner level pianists handing over their memorized pieces to judges and playing for them. By 5 p.m. 18 winners emerged from the ve levels of playing from beginner to See PIANO Competition on page 16SightingsArt, Music & Theatre3-3 Dropkick Murphys and Frank Turner & the Sleeping Souls performs at 7:30 p.m. at the Pompano Beach Amphitheatre, 1801 NE 6 St. Visit, www. livenation.com for tickets. 3-3 & 4 Intergalactic Bead Show & Sale at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center; 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Precious and semiprecious gemstone beads, sterling silver, freshwater pearls, hand blown glass beads, vintage beads, crystals

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The Pelican 3 Friday, March 2, 2012 COP volunteer records almost 5,000 service hoursPompano Beach Carmel McCormack was 90 years old on Thursday and had planned to retire from her volunteer position with the citys Citizens on Patrol, or COP. But Tuesday night, as she received recognition for the 4,972 volunteer hours she has logged with COP, Mayor Lamar Fisher told her she had to stay on the job. You cant go, the mayor said. We need you. McCormack, who has achieved the rank of major with COP, described the years since she joined in 2002 as fun, adding, I wouldnt be there if it wasnt. It is one of the things I am most proud of. To describe what she has practiced in her long life, McCormack quoted a poem that hangs in a childrens home run by Mother Teresa in Calcutta. It points out that all ones good qualities may be criticized by others, but those qualities, forgiveness, kindness, honesty and other virtues, should be practiced anyway. The good you do today, people will forget tomorrow. Do good anyway, she quoted. Give the world the best you have.By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach Only two more victories stand between the Ely High School boys basketball team and their rst state championship since 2007. Today at 4:30 p.m., the Tigers play St. Petersburg in the State Semi nals in Lakeland with the winner advancing to Saturdays State Ely Tigers on the brink of rst state title since 2007 Championship game against either Oviedo or Oak Ridge. Ely has won four of its last ve tournament games in convincing fashion beating Coconut Creek 92 to 19, Northeast 63 to 33, McArthur 75 to 42, St. Thomas 56 to 52 and Atlantic 75 to 58. Melvin Randall, Elys coach since 2002, already has three state titles underSee Tigers on page 29The last time the Ely Tigers won the basketball state title was in 2007. Today at 4:30 p.m. the Tigers play the rst of the seasons two nal games.

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4 The PelicanFriday, March 2, 2012 Advertise with The Pelican 954.783.8700 Judy VikPELICAN STAFFOakland Park Commissioners want to know how the City of Fort Lauderdale bills its Oakland Park water and wastewater customers. They have $25,000 in the budget to hire a consultant to bring them back that information. At a recent meeting, Commissioner Jed Shank presented ideas for audits to review different city processes to make sure taxpayers money is used as effectively and ef ciently as possible. Its not just a matter of economic return on investment but how does (a process) impact citizens and how can we do a better job, Shank said. Shank is employed in the Broward County auditors of ce. City Manager John Stunson said the biggest saving could be in the citys enterprise or business funds. He suggested utility billing as one area where the city might get the biggest bang for the buck if it is not being billed correctly. Oakland Park purchases the bulk of its water and wastewater services from Fort Lauderdale. Shank said utility billing is an area where a number of processes could be looked at. He said that might require more of a study than an audit. When Fort Lauderdale recently raised water rates for cities it services, Stunson said he and Wilton Manors City Manager Joseph Gallegos received assurances from then-Fort Lauderdale city manager (George Gretsas) that a study would be done to determine how rates are calculated. They threw one together, but we havent had the time or staff to analyze it, Stunson said. The issue has been gnawing in the back of my brain, but we havent had the time, energy or staff to see if theres anything in (the study) that would bene t the citizens, said Bill Underwood, director of nancial services in Oakland Park. (The town of LauderdaleBy-The-Sea recently agreed to hire a rm to look at how Fort Lauderdale determines rates for its for water and sewer services.) Mayor Suzanne Boisvenue suggested charging Fort Lauderdale a franchise fee to run lines through Oakland Park. Our contract says they should charge us their costs, Shank said. It should be a simple process, but it isnt. Its a big concern if theyre the only ones doing it and no one else is looking at it. Boisvenue said the entire South Florida area needs to look at desalination of ocean water, or water is going to be like gold. Were having droughts and increases in building. Were seeing the ocean rise and come into parts of Fort Lauderdale. We have an ocean full of water. City of cials unsure how Fort Lauderdale bills for water servicesSee WATER on page 5

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The Pelican 5 Friday, March 2, 2012 If it were properly processed and desalinated, we wouldnt be looking at fees like were looking at today. Commissioner Shari McCartney recommended setting aside funds for ongoing audits and as policy doing them on an annual or semi-annual basis. She also said an audit should be done of the charges levied by the Supervisor of Elections for local elections. Im not convinced they accurately re ect the cost of providing services, she said. Vice Mayor Anne Sallee said she would like to see code enforcement and building permitting tracked to see and how ef ciently they operate. We need a way to gauge improvement. At least get a baseline for something to compare against what were doing. Shank narrowed the studies to utility billing and the purchase of water from Fort Lauderdale; code enforcement and liens; the permitting process and election costs. Commissioner John Adornato said fuel expenses is an area staff could look at. Well probably need to be tightening our belts again, and staff should look at where they can nd savings. WaterContinued from page 4SightingsContinued from page 2and more will be on sale. Visit www.beadshows.com or call 888-729-6904. 3-7 American Legion Symphonic Band will be performing at 7:30 p.m. at the Herb Skolnick Center, 800 SW 36 Ave., Pompano Beach, during Support the Arts Night. Tickets are $10. 954-7864590. 3-7 The Coney Island Baby Musical Duo performs from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach. Tickets are $14. Visit www. coneyislandbabies.com or call 954-786-4111. 3-11 Forbidden Hollywood performs at the Prker Playhouse, 707 NE 8 St., Fort Lauderdale, at 2 and 5 p.m. Tickets are $35. Recent classics like Titanic, Star Wars, Harry Potter and Austin Powers all receive the comic once-over from Forbidden Hollywoods cast. Visit www.parkerplayhouse. com or call 954-462-0222. 3-11 Skolnick Sunday Jazz & Arts Fest will be held at 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Skolnick Center at 800 SW 36th Ave., Pompano Beach. The event is free and features live jazz music and giveaways. Artists can reserve a 6 ft. table for $10 or a 15 ft. table for $15. 954-786-4590. 3-17 The Sol Children Theatre Troupe performs Rapunzel on Saturdays and Sundays at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. from March 17 through April 1 at 3333 N. Federal Hwy., Boca Raton. Tickets are $12 for children seven and younger and $8 for others. Visit www.solchildren.org or call 561-447-8829. 3-17 An Evening with Kate Clinton at Parker Playhouse, 707 NE 8 St., Fort Lauderdale, at 8 p.m. Tickets range from $26.50 to $46.50. Call 954-462-0222. 3-18 Flying Karamazov Brothers will be performing at 7 p.m. at Parker Playhouse, 707 NE 8 St., Fort Lauderdale. Tickets range from $26.50 to $46.50. They are not your fathers wild-haired, juggling, amethrowing, kilt-and-tutu wearing performers. Visit www.parkerplayhouse.com or call 954-462-0222. 3-21 Mad Romance, a group of musical performers, will be showcasing their original act of classic jazz, mambo, lush ballads, cha-chacha and more from the 60s and 70s from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m, at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach. Call 954786-4111. 3-28 The Crests Tommy Maras performs at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach, from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Cost is $14 per ticket. Visit www.thecrests. com or call 954-786-41111.Books, Education, Classes & Seminars3-17 The American Association of University Women Pompano Beach Branch will hold their Annual Scholarship Fundraiser featuring author Joanna Campbell Slan, who has written eleven nonction books and two mystery series. She will discuss her most See SIGHTINGS on page 9

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6 The PelicanFriday, March 2, 2012 The Pelican . What can we do for you? Deer eld Beach, Pompano Beach, Lighthouse Point, LauderdaleBy-The-Sea, Wilton Manors and Oakland ParkWilton Manors Oakland Park Hillsboro Beach The Pompano Pelican is published weekly on FridaysStreet Address: 1500-A E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, FL 33060 Telephone: 954-783-8700 Fax: 954-783-0093Letters to the Editor are encouraged and accepted for print if signed, although a writers name will be withheld on request; letters must also include a daytime telephone number. Advertising rates are available upon request. Subscription rate is $31.80 including tax for one years delivery in Greater Pompano Beach; $95.40/per year including tax for others in the United States; call 954-783-8700 for rates abroad. The Pelican is a nonpartisan newspaper and reserves the right to decline advertising. Copyright 2011. Reproduction of this publication in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission of the publisher. The Pelican is a member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, Deer eld Beach Chamber and the LBTS Chamber. The Pelican is a state certi ed woman-owned minority business. The Pelican is delivered to businesses, libraries, schools, of ces, hospitals, news racks and single family homes. All advertising and copy is published at the sole discretion of the publisher. We welcome your critiques and ideas concerning this publication. Anne Siren, publisherExecutive Assistant: Mary Hudson Graphics: Rachel Ramirez Windsheimer Bookkeeper: John White Classi eds: Fran Shelby Contributing Writers: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Judy Wilson, Malcolm McClintock, Judy Vik, Mike dOliveira Account Executives: Paul Shroads, Carolyn Mann, Bill Heaton, Bill Fox Special Of ce Assistant: Cathy Siren ESTABLISHED 1993 Volume XX, Issue 9 Founding Editor and PublisherAnne Hanby Siren Letters & OpinionsBy By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFPalm Aire Auschwitz survivor, Kurt Moses, honored by Pennsylvania State University Author of Home at Last, Kurt Moses says, The purpose in writing my book was to inform young people of what can happen when good people do nothing. I tell them, dont be an innocent bystander. When you know something is wrong, stand up and work to get it changed. Use the power of your vote. I feel terrible about people who dont vote. Be a good citizen and x what needs to be xed. Keep America the wonderful country it is. This soft spoken, gentle man who survived the hell of Auschwitz will never forget the day the Russians liberated this infamous concentration camp. I felt free. I felt the world now belonged to me. I was young and still hopeful. I was right. A beautiful life was waiting for me. With a chuckle, Moses says, Im the only survivor who went from the fth grade to become an honorary alumnus of Penn State. His wife, Doris, says with a sweet smile, Kurts sense of humor and his attitude of looking to the future rather than dwelling on the horrors of the past makes my husband an unusual man. Thirty years ago he was asked by a local school in Harrisburg, Pa. if he would talk about his experiences in surviving the Holocaust. He said yes, and that was the beginning of his many years on the lecture circuit speaking at churches, synagogues, museums, service clubs, elementary schools, high schools and nearby collegesand he made a permanent record of them in his book, Home At Last. In June of 2011, Moses was given an Honorary Alumni Award presented to him by Graham Spanier, president of Penn State University. The program for the event explains the award. This award has been given by the Penn State Alumni Association since 1973 to honor people who are not graduates of this university, but who have made signi cant contributions towards its welfare, reputation or prestige. The award is given only when the Alumni Association wishes to honor an exceptional person. This year the award is given to Kurt Moses for his courage and inspiration in sharing his experiences as a Holocaust survivor. It was a thrilling affair for the Moses family, all of whom joined him for the banquet that followed. Moses admits it was always painful to speak about this terrible time he can never forget. He prefers to talk about his wonderful life since coming to America in 1947 and becoming an American citizen in 1952. He says, I found Doris, the love of my life, and together we had a beautiful family, built a successful business and life in Harrisburg and after retirement became Florida snowbirds. His eyes ll with tears when he tells how he felt when the ship pulled into New York Harbor and he saw Kurt Moses became an Honorary Alumni of Penn State University in June. Shown here receiving his award from University President Graham Spanier.See MOSES on page 7Deer eld Beach commissioners can save money with a simple change in election datesTime is of the essence. Some member of the commission has to step up to schedule a vote in the upcoming city election. Right now, the mayor and the commissioners from districts 3 and 4 have to run for re-election on March 13, 2013 at a cost of $67,000. The commission has the authority to make a change in that date. They can call for the election to take place Nov. 6, 2012. This is the same date on which the voters will be electing a president. The change would cost the city in the neighborhood of $20,000 or less. The city would save almost $50,000 dollars and would also see a greater amount of city voters than we have seen in the past. Although there are 42,000 registered voters in Deerfield Beach, fewer than 6,000 voted in the last city election. This hardly makes for representative government. I plan to put the proposition of the date change to the commission at the meeting on March 6. It will be interesting to see whether the commission takes some positive action. I do believe that if they do not take the opportunity to save $50,000 dollars and have a greater proportion of voter participation, their lack of concern will surface at the next election. Steve Krevoy Deerfield Beach resident

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The Pelican 7 Friday, March 2, 2012 the Statue of Liberty. She opened her arms to me. She welcomed me to a new world and I loved her. I wrote a letter to her on her 125th birthday, and when it was made public that she needed money for repairs, I reached for my checkbook. His lectures, and his book, recount the events of his life. My formal education ended in the fth grade at age 10 or 11. We were Germans. My father was a veteran of WWI and had earned an Iron Cross. But in 1933 when Hitler began to come into power, my father moved our family to the Netherlands where I actually grew up. But like a disease, Hitler swept into Holland and though our Dutch friends tried to help us, the Gestapo arrested us in 1942. My father and I were sent to Westerbork, Terezin and Auschwitz where my father disappeared. My mother and sister went to a different camp. Mother, who had had typhus. and my sister survived. My mother died shortly after being liberated. She and my father were in their 50s. My sister is alive and well. In fact she winters in Florida. Asked speci cally what it was like in Auschwitz, Moses became very emotional, but he bravely answered, wiping away the tears that he could not control. Sixty thousand Dutch Jews made the trip to Auschwitz; 673 people returned. My college years were spent in concentration camps. To see men torture and murder children and other men and women kills something inside you. The part that dies is any feeling for other people like mercy, charity, compassion and love. Those feelings disappear like lights going out in your soul. You become an animal trying to survive. All that matters is to get food. You are no longer a person. I weighed about 87 pounds when I was rescued. Students asked him why no one did anything. Where were our parents, they asked. What did the world do to help? Moses replies, Thats the point that I try to make. It can happen if you allow it to happen. We continue to build Holocaust museums in different cities and Im so happy every time I hear of a new one because this horrible part of Jewish history must be told and felt by generations to come. We must never forget. We must never let it happen again. Doris puts her hand on Kurts arm to calm him. He smiles at her and says, I dont talk about it anymore. After 30 years, Ive given up the lecture circuit. At 86, I get too emotional and realize my health wont allow me to continue to do this. Doris says, It helps to be with young people and share their interests instead of dwelling in the past. We are retired business people, but we have many worthwhile things to do. I paint and Kurt has been busy writing, gol ng and lecturing. He smiles and pats her hand. I belong to many service groups in Harrisburg, My college years were spent in concentration camps. To see men torture and murder children and other men and women kills something inside you. Moses the bustling capital of Pennsylvania, our home for so many years. We spend four months or so in Palm Aire and enjoy the weather and the activities. I can no longer golf which I miss terribly, but Im now an avid bridge player. And of course, we are very involved with our family of two daughters, their husbands and we have one grandson to carry us on. Thank you Kurt Moses for your book and for sharing your story. The Nazis did not win because of the spirit of survivors, like you, who prove that hope can fuel a beautiful future like yours.MosesContinued from page 6

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8 The PelicanFriday, March 2, 2012 Briefs Making a Difference Phyllis J. Neuberger wants your suggestions about people who are making a difference. Call 954-7838700. By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFTheres nothing new about sending monthly payments to Florida Power & Light, or FPL, but when FPL awards $500 to a customer that is news. Just before Christmas last year, Elizabeth OConnor received an American Express Gift Card for $500 as a reward for her many efforts to 31 TEN Fitness Center wins $500 from FPL for going green and making a difference in the environmentconserve energy in her tness studio at 3110 N. Federal Hwy. in Lighthouse Point. Shes happy to tell how it all came about. I received an FPL questionnaire asking what I did to save energy in my business. Because I am passionate about physical health and our environment, I decided to respond to their query. Her answer was not one, but a series of small but important moves that added up to a lot of energy and money saved. The ways in which she saves are easily duplicated, for an improved environment and a thicker wallet. She shares her energy saving moves. I use fresh air and fans over air conditioning whenever possible. Daytime tness classes are done in natural light instead of Elizabeth OConnor with clients Samwin and Anahid Armoyan who have just nished a personal training session. [Photos by Phyllis J. Neuberger] Elizabeth OConnor is the owner of 31 Ten Fitness at 3110 N. Federal Hwy. in Lighthouse Point. Shown here on an energy saving, non electric spinning bike.See FITNESS CENTER AWARD on page 24Deer eld Beach Innovation ZoneThe elementary schools belonging to the Deer eld Beach Innovation Zone: Cresthaven, Deer eld Beach, Deer eld Park, Norcrest, Park Ridge and Tedder will be conducting Early Kindergarten Registration on March 23 at 8:30 a.m. Each school will be open to the public so potential students and their families can learn more about the school, its curriculum, activities and principal, teachers and staff. Students must be ve years old by Sept. 1, 2012 in order to be eligible for kindergarten. Each student must bring an original birth certi cate, two proofs of residency, current immunization records including varicella, 680 form and a physical exam form from a doctor. For more information call 754-321-0000. Month of Luck at East Village Uncorked Tonight, East Village Uncorked will celebrate Month of Luck from 6 to 9 p.m. in Harbor Village, located on the 2600 block of East Atlantic Boulevard. Those who attend will enjoy free country music by Burnt Biscuit, food and art and jewelry displays. There will also be a scavenger hunt; rst person to nish the scavenger hunt will win a prize courtesy of Isle Casino. East Village Uncorked is a free event that occurs the rst Friday of every month. For more, visit www.pompanobeachcra. com call 954-786-7824.

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The Pelican 9 Friday, March 2, 2012 LBTS The Town of Lauderdale-By-The-Sea will install a new storm water drainage system on Bougainvilla Drive between Pine Avenue and Town Hall property to eliminate ooding that occurs on the street in most big rainstorms. While the streets are torn up, designers will look at different ways to beautify the street which will involve modifying parking on the street. A meeting is set for 7 p.m. Thursday, March 8, at Jarvis Hall, 4505 Ocean Drive, to get community input on the plans. Opinions are sought on design concepts and desirability of beautifying the street. For more information on the meeting, contact Steve dOliveira, public information of cer, at 954-640-4209 or steved@lbts.gov. LBTS A monthly beach clean-up is scheduled for 9 to 9:30 a.m. Saturday, March 3, at Commercial Boulevard and the beach. All those interested in taking part are invited to meet at the beach pavilion. Helpers will be provided with gloves, bags and water. This clean-up is sponsored by Rich Barnhart, By The Sea Realty, 223 Commercial Blvd., LBTS. Call 954-3517007. LBTS An Irish Variety Show is set for 7 p.m. Sunday, March 4, at Assumption Church, 2201 S. Ocean Blvd. The program features performers from Ireland, who will present a program of comedy, dancing and song. The event is open to the public. Tickets are $15. For tickets and more information, contact Mary Danis at 954781-7412. Lauderdale-by-the-Sea events include Irish variety show LBTS Commissioners have selected members for three advisory boards. Named to the Planning and Zoning Board were Alfred Oldaker, William Brady, William Patrick Murphy, David Chanon and Avi Braverman. Alternates are Eric Yankwitt and David Gilman. Board of Adjustment members are Helene Wetherington, Verenice Rapaport, Henry Overton, Gerri Ann Caposto and Arthur Franczak. Alternate is Helen Swinghammer. Named to the Audit Committee were William Patrick Murphy, Ben Freeny and John Oughton. Members of the Audit Committee must have experience and knowledge of municipal accounting and nancial matters. The commission agreed with Commissioner Stuart Dodds suggestion that if committee members miss three consecutive meetings, they will be removed from the board. The commissioner who appointed them will then appoint a replacement or move the alternate up. If a board member resigns, the commissioner who made the appointment will name a successor. Board members named in Lauderdale-By-The-Sea SightingsContinued from page 5of Attraction for Financial Health & Wealth from 1 to 3:30 p.m. at Congregation Etz Chaim, 1881 NE 26 St. Suite 100, Wilton Manors. Cost is $25 before March 11 and $30 after. Visit www. metaphysicalchapel.com or 754-300-1428. recent publication: Make, Take, Murder. The event includes a silent auction. Cost is $38 and the event will be held at the Lighthouse Point Yacht Club, 2701 NE 42 St. 954-675-9249. 3-18 Cary Bayer, author of the Prosperity Aerobics and a life coach whos worked with Oscar-winner Alan Arkin, David Steinberg and Quality Inns, will be teaching his class The Secret of Money: How to use the Law See SIGHTINGS on page 11 Star gazer alertSouth Florida Amateur Astronomers Association, or SFAAA, meets March 9 at 7 p.m. at Fern Forest Nature Center, 201 Lyons Rd., South, Coconut Creek. The sessions are free and for all ages. Call 954-357-5198.

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10 The PelicanFriday, March 2, 2012 Briefs Business matters The Pelican takes a look at local business owners. Call The Pelican to nd out how you can tell your story here because business matters. 954-783-8700.Kayak along Middle RiverOakland Park The city recently completed installation of a new kayak launch, part of the renovated city boat ramp facility at the end of Northeast 12 Terrace. A Florida Inland Navigational District, or FIND, grant covered 50 percent of the cost. The launch, just south of Peter Pan Diner, is adjacent to the former Gibbys restaurant site. Theres also a picnic area with a view of the north fork of the Middle River. The project was completed ahead of time and within budget. The area will be the site of a waterway cleanup, part of the annual cleanup in Broward County sponsored by the Marine Industry Association South Florida, on Saturday, March 10. For information, call 954-524-2733 or email WaterwayCleanup@miasf.org. By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFI sold my 12-year dental practice In Boston so my husband and I could live in beautiful, warm South Florida, says Dr. Mandy Esmaili. She flashes a smile as bright and white as the ones she can create for her patients. Her first move was to get re-licensed by passing the Florida boards. Next, she leased a suite of offices at 2324 NE 53 Street in the Cross Medical and Professional Building, Fort Lauderdale. She says, I can honestly tell my new patients that I am equipped to offer them the best and most efficient care using the newest state-of-the-art equipment. Shortly after she opened, Frank Velez was helping her set up her computer system. He says, I recognized the sophisticated state of the art equipment she was using because Im a nerd on stuff like that. I overheard her speaking to a patient, and I was impressed. Ive avoided dentists for almost two decades, but I decided to try her. I am so happy I did. She had to do extensive teeth cleaning and replace a cap on a front tooth. She is very knowledgeable. Her hands so skilled that she injected me with French speaking dentist opens, a new state-of-the-art of ce in Cross Medical/Professional BuildingNovocain and I didnt even know it. I live in Coral Gables, but Ill make the long ride because shes worth it. Id recommend her to anyone. Her new equipment saves patients time. Time is money, so that means she saves them money as well. As she proudly led The Pelican on a tour of her offices, she paused to talk about each piece of the newest equipment. This digital x-ray machine gives the patient 90 percent less radiation exposure than the conventional machine. Dr. Mandi Esmaili is a new dentist in town. Fluent in French and English, shes offering complimentary consultations and exams to introduce herself to the community. Shes shown here explaining her suggestions to a patient. [Staff photo by Phyllis J. Neuberger] See ESMAILI on page 11Adopt a dog or cat and get a free bag of pet foodAnyone who adopts a dog or cat during the month of March will get a free bag of pet food. To qualify, the pet must be adopted from Broward County Animal Care and Adoption or a participating Pet Supermarket location. In addition, the adopters name will be placed into a special drawing that will be held on March 31 for a chance to win a $100 gift card to Pet Supermarket stores. Visit www. broward.org/Animal or call 954-3591313 for more.

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The Pelican 11 Friday, March 2, 2012 In addition, it offers a very crisp image which can be rotated to reveal every angle of the teeth, bones, sinuses and surrounding nerves so that I can detect gum disease, cancer, cracks, infection or any abnormality. The teeth whitening machine, called Lumi-brite, is made by the makers of Lumineers. It has the ability to lighten teeth eight shades in one hour. It also allows Dr. Esmaili, (pronounced e-smile) to do white fillings in three minutes saving the patient the discomfort of being in the chair for an hour. An intra-oral camera allows patients to see their own dental abnormalities. This dentist can complete root canals in an hour with new rotary instruments. She is equipped to do total implants without referring patients to a specialist. Her family preventative dentistry services for children, teens and adults include the basics such as fillings, bridges, crowns, dentures and extractions. Lee Reyes works near Dr. Esmailis office and went to her in an emergency. I have a terrible fear of dentists, she explains, so I was happy to find her so pleasant, gentle and caring. She took care of my immediate problem so well that I dont dread future appointments for gum surgery, extractions, and more. She inspires my confidence. Im grateful I found her. I highly recommend her to my family and friends. Dr. Esmaili is also trained with special continuing education in cosmetic dentistry. She says, We offer Invisalign braces which are invisible and effective, allowing children and adults to correct problems without feeling self conscious. Just before I left Boston, I treated an 86-year old woman with these braces. She was thrilled with the improvement. Continuing, I also install Lumineers which are thin, permanent coverings for discolored or misaligned teeth eliminating shots and drilling. A native of Montreal, Canada, Dr. Esmaili is fluent in French and English: a fact very much appreciated by the many French Canadian snowbirds in the area. Her credentials are impressive. She is a graduate of New York University School of Dentistry where she was in the top five percent of her class. She goes beyond the annual requirements for continuing education, seeking out every advanced course offered. Open for just two weeks she says, Im lucky. Ive handled several emergencies and established good relations with my new patients. Several have made plans for extensive dental work. Because I am new and just building a practice, I am offering many promotions, including discounts to seniors. To introduce myself to new patients, I am offering a complimentary consultation and examination. Call 954-9906543 for an appointment. EsmailiContinued from page 10 Bargains 3-17 Grannys Attic Giant Indoor Garage Sale at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Admission is free. Festivals & Outdoor Events 3-8 & 22 Fern Forest Nature Center, 201 Lyons Rd. South, Coconut Creek, offers Nature Tots, a program that teaches children ages two to four to appreciate nature. The program is $5 per child and runs from 10 to 11 a.m. Pre-registration is required. The March 22 program will be held at the Secret Woods Nature Center, 2701 W. State SightingsContinued from page 9 See SIGHTINGS on page 13

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12 The PelicanFriday, March 2, 2012 By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach When Deacon Dwight Higgs was a boy growing up in Pompano Beach, the city was a divided one literally. That division was marked by Dixie Highway where the citys black residents crossed at night at their own risks. I couldnt be here after dark, Higgs told members of the Pompano Beach Historical Society at their meeting in February, referring to the Dick & Miriam Hood Center, located east of Dixie. This is Black History Month, but its just February for me, said Higgs. Its kind of a sad statement in that its almost trying to make up for things that were lost or ignored for many years. But, he said, the month still serves a valuable purpose. Deacon Dwight Higgs talks about family, Pompanos divided pastFebruary allows people to ask questions. If the questions never get asked, thats a bad thing. Asked if he ever found himself on the wrong side of the tracks after dark, Higgs did not answer, but he said, The [black] adults would protect you. They would make sure everyone else got everyone out of that area. He said people shouldnt be fooled by Floridas current state of diversity. This is the deepest of the deep South. The same mentality existed here that existed [in the rest of the South]. It started changing slowly in the later part of the 1950s with certain stores you were allowed to visit. Those stores were strategically placed so they could be visited by all sides of the town but you could also make that quick exit to go where you belonged. But through it all, Higgs says he was taught to go around obstacles, not let them stand in his way. Higgs admits that he never expected to see an African American in the White House. I did not think Id live to see that, he said. And just as Pompanos black residents overcame social injustice, educational and economic inequities have been righted to a certain degree. Higgs was the rst child in his family who didnt have to leave school to tend to the bean harvest, thanks, in large part, to one of Pompanos most famous daughters, Blanche General Ely. Ely, who was the principal of the Pompano Colored School, now Blanche Ely High School, led the way in getting children out of the bean elds. She started Saturday school to make up for lost time, said Higgs, and was key in eventually getting the stage legislature to pass a law against students missing school to work in the elds. She was a force, he said.Deacon Dwight Higgs rings a bell that used to belong to his great, great grandfather, a former slave. He used it to call his children and the grandchildren to dinner, said Higgs. [Photo by Michael dOliveira] City of cials unsure how Fort Lauderdale bills for water services Judy Vik Pelican Staff See HIGGS on page 14

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The Pelican 13 Friday, March 2, 2012 town. The vote on rst reading was 4 to 1, Mayor Roseann Minnet dissenting. The threeyear contract begins June 21. New under the agreement recycling carts will replace current bins and will provided to residents by Choice at no cost. Monthly charge for all collection service is $15.35 for single-family and duplex customers. The town commissioners will select the color and two sizes of recycling carts, Assistant City Manager Bud Bentley said. Color choices are blue, black, brown and green. Multifamily properties will get one recycling container for each garbage container. Recycling dumpsters at condominiums will now be provided at no cost to the town. When recycling increases, disposal costs must decrease, and this contract does that, Bentley said. This is a signi cantly better contract for the citizens of LauderdaleBy-The-Sea. Bentley noted that Vice Mayor Scot Sasser ...was very helpful in providing insight and guidance on this. Our partners have stepped up to the plate and done everything we asked and then some, Sasser said of the Choice representatives. Newly elected Commissioner Mark Brown said if he had been on the commission last year, he would have asked for new bids on the solid waste collection contract which is what Minnet preferred. Since the negotiation process worked well, Brown said, I wont be a y in the ointment. Town Manager Connie Hoffmann had praise for her assistant. Bud Bentley did a superlative job in anticipating every possible thing that could happen in this contract and coming up with solutions with Choice. He has worked many holidays on this contract, which took concentrated effort. The town is eligible also for a $121,429 recycling rebate. ChoiceContinued from page 1 SightingsContinued from page 11 See SIGHTINGS on page 24Road 84, Dania Beach. 954357-5198 or 954-357-8884. 3-10 The Fort Lauderdale St. Patricks Day Parade and Festival will be held at Huizenga Plaza, 32 E. Las Olas Blvd., from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. There will be food, live entertainment and activities for children. The parade down Las Olas Boulevard starts at noon. Visit www.ftlaudirishfest.com or call 954-828-5985. 3-10 Browards annual county-wide Waterway Cleanup event will take place in Deer eld Beach at Pioneer Park, 249 NE 5 Ave.; in Fort Lauderdale at Hugh Taylor Birch State Park, 3109 E. Sunrise Blvd.; in Oakland Park, 2900 NE 12 Terrace; in Wilton Manors, Colohatchee Park, 1975 NE 15 Ave, and other cities. Participants must RSVP. For more, visit www. waterwaycleanup.com.For the Kids3-9 Sol Children Theatre Troupe is hosting a social from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Sol Children Theatre, 3333 N. Federal Highway, Boca Raton. The event is free and includes games, refreshments and a meet and greet with directors, teachers and actors. Visit www.solchildren.org or call 561-447-8829. 3-15 Pony rides offered for $3 per ride from 9 to 11:30 a.m. at Sand & Spurs Equestrian Park, 1600 NE 5 Ave., behind the Goodyear Blimp base, Pompano Beach. 954.786.4507.Health & Fitness3-3 Friends of Poor 5K Walk/Run takes place from 8 to 10 a.m. at St. Gabriel Catholic Church, 731 N. Ocean Blvd. Pompano Beach, which is on A1A. Registration starts at 7 a.m. Donations are requested but not required. Visit www. stgabrielpompano5k.org.

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14 The PelicanFriday, March 2, 2012 But while Higgs sees progress on a local and national scale, he also sees regression at the most basic level the family. God himself [in Genesis] mentions that is how blessings are dolled out, he said. Family is where it starts. Before Hillary Clinton and her book, It Takes a Village thats exactly the way it used to be. [Now] our children are taught not to care. They say they dont care, and the bad thing is they mean it. Growing up, Higgss mother, Thurstia, died when he was just nine and his father, Cecil, whom he met for the rst time at his mothers funeral, had been missing in action. That left his grandparents. Im the product of four very special people. One grandparent in particular, Rhodie, stands out in Higgss memory. Our family had gotten so big she wanted to make sure I wasnt bringing cousins home, said Higgs. So whenever Higgs came home with a new girl, his grandmother always asked the her, Who are your people? Higgs estimates that about 50 people were in his extended family at that point. All we had to do was gather, and it was an instant family reunion. One of those family members includes the late actress Esther Rolle, best known for her part on the popular 70s TV show Good Times. Higgss grandmother and Rolles father were brother and sister. She t right into the family. You would think she would be extremely extroverted but she wasnt. She was just one of the family. It was really quite refreshing, said Higgs, adding, But I guess you cant put on airs with people who have known you from the time that you were little. Since then, Higgs has done his part to keep the family line going. His 33year marriage to Eileen, a kindergarten teacher at Markham Elementary School in Pompano, has produced three children. After graduating from Rollins College, Higgs worked for the Palm Beach County Parks and Recreation Department. Higgs left the Palm Beach job and began selling life insurance in Pompano Beach. We were expecting Timothy at the time, and I was looking for something that would pay me a little more than I was making. Timothy, 33, was named after his maternal grandfather; Mahrtina, 20, was named after Martin Luther King, Jr.She also shares Kings birthday; and Liahna, 20, named after her two maternal grandmothers. And 33 years later, hes still in the insurance business, selling mostly life insurance for United Insurance Company of America.HiggsContinued from 12

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16 The Pelican Friday, March 2, 2012 Advanced II. The event was emceed by Joanna Marie, formerly of WXEL Classical Radio. Pompano Beach Vice Mayor George Brummer and Palm Aire Friends of the Arts, Sue Bloom, made the awards. In its 18th year, the competition, Children in the Arts of Pompano Beach, has grown to be the largest competition in the state. Competition regulations are determined by the Broward County Music Teachers Association. Steinway Gallery of Boca Raton provides Steinway pianos for the event. Bob Luptak, owner of Steinway Gallery also provides the $500 scholarship to the performer who demonstrates virtuosity in his or her performance. Major sponsors of the event are the City of Pompano Beach, the Herb Skolnick Cultural Arts Foundation, John Knox Village, Palm Aire Friends of the Arts, Pompano Beach Parks and Recreation, Frank H. Furman, Dr. Joe McGee, The Pelican and local business owners. Jonathan Reichenbergers performance of Chopins Nocturne C# Minor was the winning piece in the Advanced I level. He was followed by Kerstin Yu and Vivian ZhaiPiano Competition Continued from page 2Dr. Joe McGee announces his retirement from the practice of dentistry and wishes to thank his patients for their support throughout his 33 years of practice in Pompano Beach. Retirement

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The Pelican 17 Friday, March 2, 2012 By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach Anglers looking for a tasty piece of fried tilapia can satisfy their hunger without breaking out their rods and reels at St. Coleman Parishs annual Fish Fry tonight. The Fish Fry, organized by the parishs Mens Club, will be held at the church, 1200 S. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach, from 5:30 to 9 p.m. and the same time again on St. Coleman Mens Club Fish Fry series begins another yearMarch 16 and 30. For $8, attendees can choose from fried tilapia, coleslaw and dinner roll; shrimp with Caesar salad and dinner roll or New England clam chowder with Caesar salad and dinner roll. For $5, kids can eat macaroni and cheese or tilapia and French fries. The annual seafood tradition is one of the many events Mens Club members organize to keep their charitable efforts going. Some of the events, which have become popular community happenings, include a golf tournament, comedy show, Italian Night and Servicemens Charity Drive. The group helps fund the Mens Clubs Walk On Water Salt Water Fishing Tournament, youth sports programs and its Childrens Christmas Party. Mark Todd, Mens Club vice president says, We also send supplies to military personnel overseas and help the Special Olympics. Theres a lot of things we do, Todd says two years ago the club donated about $70,000 to the various charities. The purpose of the Mens Club is to provide support to the church and the community, he said. Mike Sereg, chairman of the event, says the fish fry events started 10 years ago and gave the club a much-needed boost. It made us some money to put into our coffers. For more, visit www.stcmc. org or call 954-942-3533.

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18 The Pelican Friday, March 2, 2012 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeerfield Beach Tucked away between Military Trail and Sample Road is one of Northeast Browards signature golf courses, Crystal Lake Golf Club. Designed by Rees Jones, the course has been a mainstay for golfers here since 1965. Today it sports a brand new clubhouse and dining patio with panoramic views of four fairways and a lake. The 5,500 square foot clubhouse, with a 2,400 square foot open patio lounge, was opened last May to rave reviews following the grand opening. What we have achieved here is a comfortable golf club facility catering to the public, said Bill MacLaughlin, the clubs general manager and PGA director of golf. The British-Colonial-style building was built at a cost of $1.5 million and contains a grill, pro shop, executive offices and the patio bar with lots of seating. Chef Sean White has created a moderately-priced menu that features a Saugy hot dog, an import from the Rhode Island area that is served on a grilled New England style roll; an eight-ounce handmade Angus Beef burger, and on Friday and Saturdays, New England beer battered fish and chips. Happy Hour is 4 to 6 p.m. or until the last golfer has recounted his day, hole-byhole. We have a golfer-friendly club, and we are reaching out to our neighbors and all South Florida residents, MacLaughlin said. The golf course is an old-style design and no residential areas nearby. MacLaughlin oversees annual capital projects so that the course undergoes constant improvement. Owned by a private investment group, Crystal Lake has long fairways lined with mature trees, challenging par 3s, fast greens and a maintenance budget that assures its aesthetic appeal and playability. It is managed by Littlestone Management Company. At 6,983 yards, it is a typical length for a par 72 championship course, with ladiesfriendly forward tees. The most challenging hole is Crystal Lake Golf Club: An old standby is back with new clubhouse See CRYSTAL LAKE on page 26 Crystal Lake Golf Club sports a brand new clubhouse and dining patio with panoramic views of four fairways and a lake. The 5,500 square foot clubhouse, with a 2,400 square foot open patio lounge, was opened last May to rave reviews following the grand opening. Owned by a private investment group, Crystal Lake has long fairways lined with mature trees, challenging par 3s, fast greens and a maintenance budget that assures its aesthetic appeal and playability. It is managed by Littlestone Management Company.

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The Pelican 19 Friday, March 2, 2012 954-943-2902 Same Weekend PlayScoreboardResults Pompano Beach 9 Hole Womens League 2/28/12Class A Low gross 1st Cathy Olson . . . . . . 52 2nd Carol Metevier . . . . 55 Bara Lattimer . . . . . . 55 Class B 1st -Helene Caruso . . . . 56 2nd Kathy Gardner .. . . . 57 Class A Low net 1st Shirley Salines . . . . 37 2nd Place (tie): S. Rust, M.C.Friedman, A. Wynn, M. Hussian, J. Murphy . 40 Class B: Low Net 1st Jill Goldfarb . . . 37 2nd Place (tie): Maddy Matyas, Harriet Fisher, Eileen Wankmueller . . 38Pompano Beach Womens Gold The Pines A Class1st Janet Stuart . 36.5 2nd Kathy Stewart . . 37B ClassDebbie Browan . 36 Giovanny Caruso . . 37.5 Brenda Joy . . 41C ClassPatti VanZandt . . 38 Dianne Levanti39.5D ClassBarbara Mahoney . . 36 Beth Ruocco . . 41.5 Rochele Duva-Dolen . . 41.5 Send your scores to siren2415@ gmail.com To advertise on this page, call Bill Fox at 954-782-4440

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20 The Pelican Friday, March 2, 2012 By Malcolm McClintockPELICAN STAFFLitos Turf and Surf 2469 N. Federal Hwy Shoppes at Beacon Light plaza Lighthouse Point954-782-8111Located just north of Copans Road. across the road from the Muvico theater complex, the newly opened Litos restaurant is the latest addition to North Browards culinary scene. Proprietors Don and Joan Hoy are seasoned industry veterans who traded in their enormous eatery in the City of Plantation for the more tranquil setting of Lighthouse Point. We owned the Landlubbers Raw Bar & Grill for 20 years, and it was very successful, says Joan. But the long hours were really wearing us down. Thats when we started looking for a smaller place and a more manageable pace, adds Don who has been in the food business for over 40 years. Luckily, the Hoys found a perfect site in the Shoppes at Beacon Light plaza where they are grooming sons Stephen and Kyle to take over the family business. The people of this community have been so nice to us. We really couldnt be happier. Serving a cornucopia of American classics as well as a few Italian and Asian inspired specialties, Litos encyclopedic menu has something tantalizing for every palate. From bisques to burgers, sandwiches to salads, seafood to steaks, customers can indulge in all their favorites at wallet-friendly prices. For starters, soup lovers can sample the Bahamian Conch or New England clam chowders. Our lobstercrab bisque is also very Litos Turf and Surf brings great food, friendly service and relaxed atmosphere to Lighthouse Point Litos famous Tsunami plate features sesame seared Ahi tuna with marinated calamari and seaweed salad topped with sweet & spicy plum sauce.See LITOS on page 32

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22 The Pelican Friday, March 2, 2012 Advertise with The Pelican 954-783-8700 Re nancing bond could save thousandsLighthouse Point -Bond consul Mark Raymond has been hired to refinance the citys $3.9 million general obligation bond. Raymond, of Palm Beach Gardens, was selected from six applicants. His fee will be $7,500. In August 2002, the city issued its first general obligation bond, $6.190 million which was used for improvements to the police station, library, storm drainage system, parks and to purchase right of way. Now the outstanding amount of $3.9 million is eligible for refunding after August 1 and Finance Director Terry Sharp said with the current low interest rates, the city could save as much as $400,000. Sharp said the next step is to get bids from banks for a loan to pay off the bonds. He expects an interest rate of no more than three percent on the bank loan.Now available Sunday morningsLighthouse Point Sunday morning imbibers will be able to get an earlier start now. Tuesday, the city commission approved a local law giving restaurants permission to sell alcoholic beverages beginning at 10 a.m. rather than noon. Previously, only Christmas Eve and New Years Eve were except from the Sunday selling rule. Retail sales are not included in the new law and remain prohibited until noon on Sundays. No other changes were made to the law which prohibits the sale of alcohol on weekdays between 2 and 7 a.m. and on weekends, between 3 and 7 a.m.

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The Pelican 23 Friday, March 2, 2012 By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFProceeds from the tournament, which takes place on March 17 and 18 from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. at the Dillon Tennis Center, 4091 NE 5 Ave. in Oakland Park, benefit the Backpack Food Program and other charitable programs. The cost is $28 for doubles teams and $20 for singles players. Participants can enter either singles A and B or doubles A or B; there will be mens and womens divisions. Mike Bennett, Oakland Parks tennis director estimates last year a little over 100 players participated; up from about 20 to 30 from when he took over in 2004. Its one of the cheapest tournaments, and we give out prizes all weekend. There will be trophies for the finalists, free T-shirts for everyone, said Bennett. Deadline to sign up is March 14 by 10 p.m. Says Carol Stevens, Kiwanis member and former Oakland Park mayor, Its a great fundraiser for us. We have kids, teenagers, right on up to seniors playing. The Backpack Program consists of members buying or collecting donated canned goods, pasta or other nonperishable food items and placing them into backpacks. Backpacks are given to disadvantaged students Weekly. Thats one of the premier projects that we work with, said Michael Goldstein, past president. We were informed that in the four elementary schools in our area [a lot of students] eat subsidized breakfast and lunch. They have no food or limited food over the weekend. Goldstein estimates the number of families served by the program has grown to 30, up from 22 during March of last year. Along with helping to feed needy students, Oakland Park Kiwanis members participate in a pet therapy program, reading program, collect cell phones for Women In Distress, knit blankets for children and a myriad of other programs. Were a busy club, said Stevens. To sign up, call 954-5616180.Oakland Park Kiwanis Tennis Tournament, March 17 and 18Oakland Park Players who enter into the Oakland Park Kiwanis Clubs 19th Annual Tennis Tournament can help Kiwanis members continue in their spirit of giving.

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24 The Pelican Friday, March 2, 2012 using my uorescents. This keeps my clients cooler while they workout. We block the western afternoon sunlight with blinds to keep the heat out. I removed as many light bulbs as I could in my studio and still have enough light for evening classes. When my clients arent using equipment, I unplug it and do the same with my computer. When I leave the studio, I turn off the breakers. I purchased non-electric spinning bikes to save energy. She continues. Our home is run the same way. I bike to work instead of driving. We use blinds to keep the house cooler, and seldom use air conditioning. When we leave we turn off the fans. We run the dryer in the evening when its cooler so it doesnt create heat and we hang clothes in the patio to dry. We use the recommended new light bulbs, and our pool pump is run for only one hour each day. Of course she recycles everything she can and uses only green products. Ive always felt this way because our electric bill is our biggest bill in the summer and it has dropped considerably. In the tness center my bill is $130. As we cool off it drops to between $40 and $70. I forgot to mention that instead of using paper products to clean the equipment, I cut up old towels into a handy size and we use those instead. I take them home, launder them and theyre ready to go again. When I do use paper I choose Publix recycled green wise products. About the centerThe owner of 31Ten Fitness is young, full of energy and likes to be called Elizabeth. She is a certi ed personal trainer and tness instructor. Shes also a certi ed Silver Sneaker trainer who has worked with seniors and been trained speci cally help those with limitations because of hip, knee and shoulder replacements as well as heart and blood pressure issues. Just before this interview took place, Elizabeth was working with Anahid and Samwin Armoyan who were quick to say, Shes an angel. My husband is recovering from open heart surgery and Elizabeth is helping him return to full strength. As long as hes here, I work out, too, and get the bene t. Our son encourages us to do the most we can do. Elizabeth is making that possible. After bidding her clients a friendly goodbye, Elizabeth says, We are a tness and pilates studio for all ages, all shapes and all sizes at all tness levels. Were a small business with six certi ed instructors. We offer classes with six to 12 people and we do individual personal training. The center is open seven days a week and is a friendly, nonintimidating place. Bandit, my boxer, greets every newcomer and barks his approval. Another client of this tness center is Doreen Gauthier who says, Exercise for most people is a chore, but Elizabeth and her staff make every individual seem so special that sweating, huf ng and puf ng becomes less of a drudge. She does everything she can to make exercise work for you in terms of time, money and results. Married with a 12 year old daughter, Elizabeth has had her studio for 2 years. She says, Before starting my own business, I taught at and was the aerobic coordinator for Pompano tness, formerly Golds gym. When I was in college, working as a bartender, I intended to become a pharmacist. I changed my mind and decided I could help people more by getting them t. I like the idea of good nutrition and exercise over pills. I switched my focus, and attended school at World Fitness Association. After that I worked on certi cation by attending workshops for spinning, pilates, personal training, tness and all of the options. I became certi ed in each. I love what I do and I see the bene ts my clients are getting. Its a rewarding career which I have never regretted. Congratulations on your FPL Award and your concern for the environment. For class times and fees visit the web site at 31ten t.com or call 954-532-3497. Fitness center awardContinued from page 8 SightingsContinued from page 13 See SIGHTINGS on page 26OngoingPancake Breakfast Every third Sunday of the month, the St. Elizabeths of Hungry Parish hosts a pancake breakfast at 3331 NE 10 Terrace, Pompano Beach. The breakfast is from 7:30 a.m. to noon and bene ts the Parish and cafeteria maintenance. 954-263 8415. Alzheimers Caregivers Support Group The NE Focal Point Alzheimers Day Care Center, located at 301 NW 2nd Avenue in Deer eld Beach, offers a weekly Caregivers Support Group every Wednesday from 10 a.m. to noon. Food Drive NE Focal Point is manning a drop off non-perishable donations collection Monday through Friday from 8:20 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at 227 NW 2 St., Deer eld Beach. 954-4804449. Zonta International meets on the third Tuesday of the month at Duffys Diner, 401 N. Federal Hwy., Deer eld Beach, at 11:15 a.m. Zonta International is a classi ed service organization of executives and professionals working together to advance the status of women locally and

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The Pelican 25 Friday, March 2, 2012 The Pelican -part of doing business. Call us at 954-783-8700. the culmination of 12 years of effort by the Hillsboro Lighthouse Preservation Society to provide a permanent home for its artifacts and exhibits. The building also contains an education room for public programs. Curator is LarsOle Mortensen who comes to south Florida from the McCarthy-Kennicott Historical Society and Museum at the foot of the Kennicott Glacier in Alaska, and the Santa Maria Valley Historical Society in California. Also on staff are archivist Jacqui May and museum manager Judy Knobel. Knobel said the museums contents wont be on display until May when an of cial grand opening will be held. Across the Inlet, on the grounds of the US Coast Guard, a bronze statue of the Barefoot Mailman commemorating Ed Hamilton, the most famous of the postmen who trudged the beach delivering mail to South Florida, will be rededicated. The bronzed statue will replace the concrete and marble one created in 1973 by Frank Varga which had deteriorated badly. This week the base is being poured. It will be lifted into place by a crane. Hillsboro Beach Historian Carmen McGarry, who is been raising money to replace the statue, said she hopes the original will be taken to sea and sunk as an attraction for divers. I think that would be a tting eulogy for the Barefoot Mailman, she said this week. McGarry has raised $20,000 of the $35,000 needed to cast the solid-bronze gure. Varga, working with a foundry in Detroit, was again the artist-in-charge. Names of those giving $500 or more will be commemorated on a plaque. Festivities at the 105th anniversary celebration in Inlet Park are 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. and include cake, music and food. Boat transportation to the lighthouse is $15 for the public and free for members of the Hillsboro Lighthouse Preservation Society. The rst boat leaves the park at 9 a.m.; the last one at 2:30 p.m. There will be no tours of the lighthouse itself as the building is closed for repairs. This is an incredible time for the Hillsboro Lighthouse Preservation Society as we have nally found a place that will allow for the continued growth of our educational mission and future exhibits, said Society President Art Makenian. We are delighted that the showcase of our new museum corresponds with the 105th anniversary celebration of the light. LighthouseContinued from page 1

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26 The Pelican Friday, March 2, 2012 probably the 605-yard, Par 5, 7th hole. It is tree lined with a dogleg to the right and a fairway that rises slightly, just enough to throw you off with your approach shot, said MacLaughlin. The course is built around two lakes and playable sand traps. The 18th hole, like the 7th, presents a challenge with its sloping fairway and big undulating green which is bordered by one of the lakes. Long-ball hitters will try to carry the lake; others take the dogleg approach. MacLaughlin has been at the club for 30 years and remembers arguably its most spectacular moment when one of the ladies in the LGA shot back-to-back holes-in-one, on the 2nd and 5th holes. More remarkable was the fact that she was 80 years old. She performed the feat with a four wood and became instantly famous. Good Morning America, along with local television stations, came to the golf course to interview her and Governor Jeb Bush played nine holes with her at the golf club. When MacLaughlin joined the PGA and became a golf professional, he brought his business background to Crystal Lake which he uses today to give golfers a very fair shake. Crystal Lake is a semiprivate/ daily fee facility which MacLaughlin believes gives the best golfing value around. A $99 annual Players Card offers year-round rates as low as $18 per round. Right now, in the height of the season, green fees are $40 before noon, $34 after noon with the Player Card. We are very conscious of the South Florida economy and how it affects disposable income. We are in a position to offer affordable golf at a quality course, MacLaughlin said. Were trying to do everything we can to give back to the residents, MacLaughlin said. The consumerfriendly approach and the new clubhouse are attracting new card holders and right now new evening leagues are forming. One new league for the ladies includes nine holes and dinner at the grill. A Friday Night Couples League is also forming. The Club Pro, Jonathon Sprague, will be holding a Junior Clinic this summer and is also available for private lessons. For more information, call 954-943-2902. Crystal LakeContinued from page 18 SightingsContinued from page 24worldwide through service and advocacy. 561-392-2223. Hospice Volunteers Needed VITAS Innovative Hospice Care of Broward needs volunteers who can make friendly visits to terminally ill patients and their families, provide relief for caregivers, visit veterans and more. A two-day orientation is required. 954-777-5396. Island City Art Walk Every third Friday of the month from 7 to 10 p.m., Wilton Manors Wilton Drive is home to the Island City Art Walk. Over 40 local artists show off their works in Wilton Drives cafes, boutiques, restaurants and other businesses. The Art Walk runs until April. All Breed Obedience and Rally Training Classes Dog training classes are available at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Call 954-563-7061 for schedule. Wilton Manors Green Market Saturdays and Sundays at Hagen Park 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. fresh produce, baked goods, herbs, spices, doggie treats, pickles, jams, infused vinegars, pasta and more are available at the Green Market. 954-531-5363. Pompano Beach Green Market Every Saturday at the corner of West Atlantic Boulevard and North Dixie Highway from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., fresh vegetables, crafts, plants, food and music are available at the Green Market. 954-292-8040.See SIGHTINGS on page 29

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The Pelican 27 Friday, March 2, 2012 front restaurant, Williams said. Oceans is now celebrating its 10-year anniversary which resulted in a complete change of identity. The new restaurant offers oceanfront dining, indoor/outdoor bar, a menu that features fresh local sh, live music and more recently a series of later night events to attract a young crowd. We work on keeping our ideas fresh and try to reinvent ourselves every few years so that we always have something exciting to offer our clientele, said operations manager Danielle Williams. This summer and last summer, two exciting events were on the calendar, a Havana White Night Party featuring salsa dancers, hand-rolled cigars, Cuban treats and $5 mojitos and Thursday Night Fever where the music of the s reigned and customers won prizes for best costumes and best twisting. Three years ago, Oceans was slightly reinvented inside and outside with a new color scheme and the addition of a sushi bar. Menu changes were made also. I was very excited to give Oceans 234 a fresh face so that our guests had a great experience and something new to look forward to. The creation of the sushi bar was an addition that was prompted by the growing trend in sushi. I felt that it was a nice dynamic to add to a beach-Oceans 234 is one of Deereld Beachs signature beachfront restaurants today, and in its place 41 years ago was another signature eatery, The Ranch House, which given its location lasted far longer in this area than any other store in the chain. The metamorphosis could not be more extreme. From beach burger shack to sophisticated restaurant, Oceans has come a long way. The vision began with Lois and Joseph Pallaria who bought the Ranch House in 1999 and operated it for three years. Then they oversaw a complete rebuild of the structure and Williams and her team have many new parties, concepts and additions in mind for the coming year.Oceans 234, 234 N. Ocean Blvd., Deer eld Beach. 954-428-2539Oceans 234 owners replaced old standby with vibrant new restaurant Oceans 234s popularity is so much more than just the view in Deer eld Beach. Honey soy glazed salmon

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28 The Pelican Friday, March 2, 2012 Advertise with The Pelican 954-783-8700 By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFF Wilton Manors Tedd Marefka usually makes his grandmothers spaghetti sauce recipe just for family and friends. But hes hoping to make it for a lot more people at the Taste of Italy. On March 14, A Taste of Italy in Wilton Manors, organized by the Wilton Manors Community Affairs Advisory Board, or CAAB, will take place from 6 to 8 p.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive; doors open at 5:30 p.m. Dinner, $8 per person or $15 per couple, includes spaghetti with meatballs, salad, desert and drink. Attendees are invited to bring their own wine. We are making [everything from] CAAB breaks out family recipes for Taste of Italythe spaghetti sauce to the meatballs to putting the filling inside the cannolis. Were doing it all, said Sherrill McCarthy, CAAB member. For years, CAAB has been allocating funds to various community organizations and events. McCarthy said events like Taste of the Island and the Westside Association of Wilton Manors Garlic Fest have gotten money from the CAAB to start but now dont need help to keep going. Theyre off and running all on their own. We kind of jump start things, she said. We give them a certain amount every year and they develop their budget on what theyre going to spend it on, said Vice Mayor Tom Green. Now, with Taste of Italy, board members will be trying to raise money that will benefit Kids In Distress, located in Wilton Manors. Were spending money and now were making money to give to the charities, said McCarthy. [The commissioners] like that were not just giving money to people. We have a board thats willing to raise money but brings the community together also. Its hard enough to get people to be on a board. But when theyre willing to work to raise additional money, I think thats outstanding civic pride, said Green. McCarthy said all the supplies for Taste of Italy are coming out of the members own pockets. As for the sauce, Its a very mild Italian red sauce full of garlic and flavor, said Marefka. Its not as sweet as some other sauces but its got a lot of chunks of tomatoes. So if you like a hearty sauce, come join us. For more, call 954-390-2120.

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The Pelican 29 Friday, March 2, 2012 Rev. Hyvenson Joseph WORSHIP DIRECTORY: Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad. his belt including two, 1997 and 1999, at Deer eld Beach High School. Hes also taken Ely to two Regional Championships and six District Championships during his tenure. This season, including playoff games, the Tigers are 28 and 2 with their last defeat coming against Vanguard in Ocala on Dec. 30, 2011 after a 16-game winning streak. Pompano Beach Mayor Lamar Fisher remembers watching the 2007 team but this team, in my opinion, is probably better. Fisher watched the Tigers beat McArthur and Atlantic. They won handsomely, he said. Everybody just played truly as a team and their defense is incredible. [Randall] runs a tight ship. Principal Karlton Johnson said hes also noticed teamwork trumping individuality on the court. Theyre a great team. Theyve got a lot of unity, he said. You never see them fussing at one another. He also had high praise for Randall, especially when it comes to how well players are doing in the classroom. This is a great group of guys. Theyre focused academically and have been together four years, most of em. [Randalls] doing an extraordinary job. You cant ask for a better coach than that. Johnson also praised Elys varsity cheerleading squad for its second place nish in the state nals. And regardless of whether or not the Tigers grab another title, Elys students, teachers, parents, administrators and staff will be celebrating their basketball season as well as the A grade the school received in January and all of this years accomplishments. On March 10, there will be a parade at 9:30 a.m. followed by a pep rally at 10:30 a.m. and food and music at the schools football stadium at 11:30 a.m. Im happy that [athletic] success also comes with being an A school, said Johnson.SightingsContinued from page 26 The 20th Annual Florida Renaissance Festival will take place every weekend through March 11 at Quiet Waters Park, 401 S. Powerline Road, in Deer eld Beach. For more, visit www.ren-fest. com or call 954-776-1642. Kayaks are available for rental every Saturday and Sunday at Richardson Historic Park, 1937 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. The cost is $15 per hour for single kayaks and $23 per hour for tandem kayaks. Group rates are also available. Visit www.AtlanticCoastKayak.com or call 954-781-0073. Every rst Friday of the month the Pompano Beach Tennis Center 920 NE 18 Ave., holds a family friendly tennis clinic from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. The cost is $10 per person. Refreshments will be served. Call 954-786-4115 to reserve a spot. Ping Pong Nights Every Monday from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Ping Pong Nights is held at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. The cost is $1. All ages can participate. 954-390-2130. Bingo The American Legion Auxiliary Unit 142, 171 SW 2 St., Pompano Beach, has Bingo on Tuesdays at 7 p.m. Food is available from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. 954-9422448. Pompano Beach Fishing Pier 222 N. Pompano Beach Blvd. 954-786-4073 Anglins Pier at Commercial Boulevard, Lauderdale-By-The-Sea. 954-4919403 Deer eld Beach International Pier 200 NE 21st Ave. 954-426-9206 or 954-9431488. Pompano Beach Rotary Club Meets every Friday at 12:15 p.m. at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. Call 954-786-3274.TigersContinued from page 3

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30 The Pelican Friday, March 2, 2012 The Pelican 954-783-8700 Classi edsCall 954-545-0013 HELP WANTEDADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT For Property Management Firm. Data Entry, Client Contact, Assist Executive. FT / PT. 954-7727012. 3-9 POMPANO AREA PART TIME SEAMSTRESS WANTED CALL 954-9416493. 9 5 PM. 3-2 LOCAL PEST CONTROL CO Looking For Quality Sales/Service Tech. Must Be Dependable, Team Player, Good Drivers License & People Skills. Will Train Right Person. ALSO Of ce Assistant Computer People & Phone Skills Needed. Fax Resume 954418-3982. 3-9 SEEKING EMPLOYMENTTUTOR RETIRED TEACHER Willing To Work With Elementary School Age Child. Call 954-978-2999. 3-2 HOME HEALTH AIDE I Will Take Care Of The Elderly. Honest, Kind, Loving. With Own Car. Live In Or Live Out. 954-588-3102. 3-2 EXPERIENCED POLISH & SOME ENGLISH Speaking Lady. Will Take Good Care Of Your Loved One. Help With ADL. Own Car. Light Cleaning Available. 954-319-8376. 3-2 LPN AT CNA PRICES Will Give Tender Care To Your Loved Ones. Live Out Broward Area Only. Dependable & Honest. References Available. Your Car Or Mine For Shopping & Appts. 954-895-7850. (15 Yrs. Exp. ) CNA / HHA EXPERIENCED CNA /HHA Seeking Immediate Employment As Caregiver. Prerequisite: Must Be Elderly In Need Of Personal Care, Single, Private Duty (Hourly) 786-443-8519. 3-9 LPN / EMT QUALITY Care For Sick Or Elderly. Night Or Day. Flexible Hrs. 15 Yrs Exp. & Refs. Available. 954-3999929 Cell 305-720-0080. 3-2 CERTIFIED CNA Honest, Reliable, Seeking Position To Take Care Of Your Loved Ones. Live In Or Out. Excellent References. 954-682-1198. 3-2 EXPERIENCED CAREGIVER Loving And Reliable Seeking Position 12 Hour Shifts And Overnights. Excellent References. 561-7035550. 3-2 SERVICES DANNY BOY ELECTRIC Lic & Insured. Lic. #EC13004811. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. 24/Hr Service. 954-290-1443. Beat Any Written Estimate. Sr, Discount. 3-9 AAA AFFORDABLE FLOORS Carpet Tile Wood & Bamboo Floors Moldings Painting. TRASH REMOVAL Comm / Res. Same Day Service. FREE Est. 954646-1889. 3-9 RETIRED PLUMBING CONTRACTOR Looking For Work. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. CFC 027532. Low Rates!! 954-496-6420. 3-2 FLAT TILE ROOF REPAIR COATINGS Leak Repair Experts 30 Years Experience. Call Today For A FREE Estimate. 954-258-7677. 3-9 CALL BRENDAN THE HANDYMAN Construction & Repairs. Carpentry, Plumbing, Roo ng, Masonry, Windows, Painting, Decking, Tile. FREE Estimates. 954-7736134. Emergency Calls. 3-2 REPAIRS RESTRETCH AND INSTALLATION OF CARPET. CALL MIKE 954675-3810. 3-2 AAA AFFORDABLE TRASH REMOVAL Garage Clean Ups Condos Apts. Furniture Appliances Trees. Lic / Ins. FREE Est. Same Day Service. 954-646-1889. 3-9 HANDYMAN PAINTING CARPENTRY Pressure Cleaning. Decks! Everything Around The House. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. Call 561-350-3781. 3-16 MOORE PLUMBING PLUMBING SERVICES Big Jobs Small Jobs. We Do It All. Remodeling & Repairs. Lic. & Insured. C.C. Accepted. Call 954-772-4600. 3-30 HONEST HANDYMAN HOME & BUILDING Maintenance/Improvements. No Job Too Small. Fast Friendly Service. Reasonable Rates. Local Resident/Homeowner. Call Today For Your FREE Upfront Quote. No Deposit Required. 754-366-1915. 3-2 HOME/OFFICE REPAIRS By State Certified G.C. Reasonable. CGC025802. More Information Call 954815-1007. C GOT JUNK? DUMP TRUCK CLEANUPS Trees/ Landscape, Yard Fill. Paint/ Pressure Wash/ Roofs/Home Repairs Welding, Etc. Dave 954-818-9538. 3-9 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIESNew GREEN technology. New defroster control saves energy in home refrigerators, commercial chillers. Patented. All optical. Simple mfg. Strategic partners needed..www.NewAvionics.Com. 954-568-1991. C MUSICIANS WANTEDThe American Legion Symphonic Band is now accepting new members for the 2011-2012 season. College age to seasoned seniors are welcome. Rehearsals are held on Wed. evenings at American Legion Post 142 in Pompano. Percussionists, euphonium and clarinet players are especially needed. If you enjoy making music, call Jim McGonigal, Music Director at 954-647-0700 for more info.DEEP WATER VILLA DOCKPOMPANO BEACH 2/2 1700 SQ FT. Screened Fla Room. Private Yard. W/D. 4 Park. No Fixed Bridges. Community Pool. Deeded Dock.. 2 Blocks Beach. $285,000. Coldwell Banker Barbara Call 954629-1324. 3-16 MISC. RENTALSBOCA RATON Spaces Available Evenings And Sunday For Meetings, Dance Lessons, Etc. PLENTY OF PARKING! Rent By The Hour! Call Nick 954-415-4937. 3-2THRIFT STORETHRIFT STORE GRAND OPENING 5130 N Federal Ft Laud. 2nd Floor (No Clothing) Beautiful Household Items. From $2 Call 954-839-8182. 3-2 HOMES FOR RENTPOMPANO 2/2 Cottage Style House. Large Yard With Fish Pond. $1100 Month Company Bills For Electric & Water. 541 NE 34 St. Darci 954-783-3723. 3-23 CO-OP SALESPOMPANO BEACH 1/1 On Water, Dockage Available At Your Door. $59,500. Coldwell Banker Barbara 954-6291324. 3-16 REAL ESTATE WANTED I BUY HOUSES!! CASH!! AS IS! QUICK CLOSE! ANY AREA ANY CONDITION! NO EQUITY OK. CALL NOW 954-914-2355. 4-20 CONDOS FOR SALELIGHTHOUSE POINT 2/1.5 CONDO In A GREAT AREA. Pets Allowed. $124,900. Call Barbara Balistreri Realty. 954-263-7129. 3-2 POMPANO LEISUREVILLE 55+ ---1/1 No Land Lease. Totally Upgraded. New Appliances New A/C. Movein Condition. Pet Allowed. FREE Golf 2 Pools. Furniture Optional. Bob 203-430-0235. 3-2 WOW DIRECT Intracoastal Views N Riverside Dr. Pompano. 2/2 Semi Updated Condo. $209,900. Seller Says No Realtors Please Call Better Homes & Gardens Judy Peasley 954-304-4518. 3-9 DEERFIELD BEACH 2/2 Completely Redone. Granite Kitchen, New Cabinets. S.S. Appliances. 20 Porcelain Tile Floors. Travistine Stone Baths. Freshly Painted. 1st Floor. Less Than A Mile To Beach. $84,900. Call 631-873-8715. 3-9 WOW!! ON THE INTRACOASTAL. Owner Financing. $99,500 Firm. New C / A, Paint & Carpeting. Boat Slip When Available. 954-6820485. 3-2 LAUDERDALE BY THE SEA Furnished 1/1.5 Condo $115,000. Heated Pool. Ocean Access. On Canal. 1481 S Ocean Blvd. Apt 228. Call 586549-5223. 3-2

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The Pelican 31 Friday, March 2, 2012 Classi edsCall 954-545-0013 Get to know your local Merchants CONDOS FOR RENTDEERFIELD BEACH 2/2 CONDO Corner Unit, Pool. $800 $825. Good Credit Required. No Pets Or Realtors. 631-885-3342. 3-2 POMPANO BEACH 1 / 1.5 At Sea Haven Immaculate Condition. Fully Furnished / Leather.. Magni cent Rec & Pool Facilities On Waterfront. $950 Month. 954-913-7383. 3-16 OCEANFRONT CONDO POMPANO BEACH CLUB. Furn. 2/2 Newly Updated 15th Floor W/Fabulous Views Of Ocean & Intracoastal. Restaurant, 2 Pools, Bar, Gym. Available April $2,000 Per Month. May Thru November $1,500 Per Month. Call Audrey 570-246-9240 Cell Or E-mail audrey@chantre.com 3-9 APTS FOR RENTDEERFIELD/POMPANO BEACH 1 BR & 2 BR APTS FOR RENT. Remodeled, Paint, Tile, Etc. W & D On Site. Pool. Pet Friendly. Call George 954-809-5030. 3-9 POMPANO 1/1 & 2/1 E OF FEDERAL Tiled. 10 Overhang. Walk To Everything. Park At Your Door. 954-2546325. 3-16 BOX BOLD POMPANO BEACH 2/2 Furnished. Large Ef ciency With Kitchen. Fully Furnished. Cable, Internet. Pool, Laundry. 500 To The Beach. Weekly Monthly Yearly. 954-2948483 Or 248-736-1533. 3-16 POMPANO GARDENS $795 1/1 $200 Deposit. Nice Area. Minutes To Beach. Pet OK. Please Call 954-515-2554. 3-16 POMPANO BEACH CLUB NORTH 1/1 Unfurnished 5th Floor $1,200 Month Annual. Oceaniew, Indoor Parking, 24 Hour Security. Done Deal Realty. E. Robbins. 954-3440709. 3-16 POMPANO GARDENS $795 1/1 $200 Deposit. Nice Area Minutes To Beach Pet OK. Please Call 954-515-2554. 2-17 POMPANO BEACH 1/1 SW. C/A $725 2/1 $895 NE 2/1 $950 Townhouse 2/1.5 $1095. ALL FREE WATER. Rent + $70 Application Moves U In. 954-781-6299. 3-9 POMPANO MCNAB RD & NE 18 AVENUE 1 & 2 Bedrooms Furnished/ Unfurnished. $695 $950 And Up. Pool, Tile Floors. Central A/C. 954-6102327. 3-2 POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 Bedroom From $495. Easy Move-in. 1/2 OFF DEPOSIT. Remodeled. Great Location. 954-783-1088 For More Info. 3-9 LUXURY BEACH PADS FOR RENT! Pompano Grand Opening: FREE 32 Flat Screen HDTV! Newly Renovated in 2012 One Bedrooms & Studio Apts., 75 Yards From Private Beach Access, Eastern Exposure. New Kitchens & Baths, Granite Counter Tops, Central Air, Pool, Laundry, Dedicated Parking, Near Pier & Downtown. All Bills Paid! Includes Water, Electric, Premium Cable TV And WIFI. Furnished Or Unfurnished. Short Or Long Stays. No Utility Deposits. Small Pets Welcome. Only 9x, 8x, 7 Left! Pax Properties 888-729-4948 Or 954-603-8857. Photos At www.beachpads.net. 3-2 COMMERCIAL FOR RENT-SALEPOMPANO COMMERCIAL OFFICE Spaces Available. Ranging From As Low As $500 To $700 Depending On Square Footage. Please Call Darci At 954783-3723. 3-23 DEERFIELD BEACH Retail Of ce Warehouse 700 Sq Ft With Loft. A/C, Bathroom. $575 Per Month. Call For More Info 561-654-1331 Or 561-9985681. 3-9 OFFICES FOR RENTPROFESSIONAL OFFICE SPACE Within Law Firm. 2 Of ces Available. From $600 And Up. Includes Use Of Extras! Call To Discuss. 954781-8230. 3-2 FURNITUREBEDSETS King $180 Queen $130 Full $110 Twin $90. 5 Pc. Bedroom Set $399. Frames $39. 954-465-6498. 3-9 DOLPHIN COCKTAIL TABLE Cast Brass, Glass Is 5/8 Inch Thick. Can Email Photo. $1500 Or Best Offer. 954-242-8815. 3-2 MISC.NICE OLD THINGS WANTED Watches, Fountain pens, Gold & Silver Jewelry, Sterling Silverware, World War II Memorabilia, etc. Call Dirk 954-709-0191. 3-9 OLD NAUTICAL STUFF WANTED By Collector. Sextants, Officers Watches, Captain Clocks, Compasses, etc. Marine / Submarine. Dirk 954-709-0191. 3-9 OLD OMEGA & JAEGER & LeCOULTRE Watches & Clocks Every Kind & Condition Wanted. Call Dirk 954-709-0191. 3-9 BABY GRAND PIANO Cherry Wood Like New!! $3,500. 561-381-0361 Delray Beach. 3-16 LIKE NEW STATIONARY BIKE Floor Model $50. ROCKIN AB ROCKET $50. Like New! ToolsMisc Items. Pompano 954-943-0250. 3-2

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32 The Pelican Friday, March 2, 2012 popular, says kitchen artiste Stephen Hoy as he brings a sample portion to the table. The velvety soup is loaded with tender crustacean meat and bursting with maritime flavors. Appetizers include homemade fish dip, spicy chili lime shrimp, Maryland crab cakes, stuffed Portabella mushrooms, Grouper finger basket and the everpopular Tsunami plate of sesame seared Ahi tuna with marinated calamari atop seaweed salad. Shellfish aficionados can sidle up to the bar for some raw or Rockefeller oysters, steamed Little Neck clams, cocktail shrimp or garlic butter mussels. With several frosty beers on tap and a good selection of red and white wines, Litos is also a great spot to catch all the big games on the many flat screen TVs located throughout the restaurant. I would say that our Maine lobster rolls, our pulled pork and our Philly cheesesteak sandwiches are the three biggest sellers, says Joan without hesitation. But we are also well-known for our delicious 10-oz. Angus beef burgers. As the name implies, Litos offers a wealth of delectable favorites from the land and the sea. The juicy 12-oz. ribeye steak, the fall-offthe-bone full rack of ribs, the glorious chicken wings, the tempting Teriyaki ginger Wings and ribs are house specialties. The wings come with a host of sauces such as raspberry, teriyaki, honey and garlic parm while the ribs can be enjoyed with a avorful dry rub or with 3 types of BBQ sauce.salmon, the plump blackened shrimp, the zesty Cajun catfish and the seductive grilled lobster tails are just a few of the appealing items on the menu. Everything is made inhouse including desserts and we are very flexible with respect to food preparation, says Joan. Pompano resident Vicki Thornton is a regular. She says, The food is great and they have an outstanding key lime pie as well. Enjoy!Malcolm McClintock holds an MBA and has lived in Thailand, Spain, France, Mexico, Canada and the US where he has developed a deep appreciation for world gastronomy. The Seafood Trio includes shrimp, mussels and clams prepared scampi, marinara or Fra Diavolo style over linguini. LitosContinued from page 20Joan Hoy, Stephanie Lamana, Stephen and Don Hoy show off some Litos most popular dishes.

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The Pelican 33 Friday, March 2, 2012 Capt. RJ Boyle is an experienced angler in South Florida. His studio is located in Lighthouse Point. Call 954-420-5001. RJ BoyleRJ BOYLE STUDIOSThis weekend, Im planning on bustin up some mutton snappers. I am going to anchor and fish off Boca in about 80 feet of water. We will put a chum basket down on our anchor With a little chum and a little luck youll have a big snapper weekend at sealine in front of the boat as well as have one hanging at the surface; the menhaden chum will be our chum of choice. A light north current will usually yield the most fish but we have caught them on all directions of current. We will fish three rods in our spread. We will fish a flat line [no weight] out behind the boat about 30 yards. On this rod we usually fish a triple-hooked sardine. This rod will catch snappers occasionally but we use it to catch kings and sailfish that swim up the chum slick on the surface. We fish a second rod on the bottom. On that rod we use a long fluorocarbon leader, about 25 ft. We also use an Owner Mutu light circle hook 5/0 on one end and a barrel swivel on the other. On the main line of the rod we will fish a 4 to 6 ounce lead. On the circle hook we will fish a live pilchard or a dead sardine. The bottom rod is the main mutton rod. Our third rod will be an 8 to 12 lb. spinning rod combo that we will fish a small jig on. We constantly hold this rod. We will let out the jig with a silverside on the end. The yellowtail snappers will be all over this rod when they turn on. Allow the chum slick to work for a while. Some days it may take up to 30 minutes for the snappers to really start biting.As always, if youve got questions visit the shop Get tight!

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34 The Pelican Friday, March 2, 2012 The Garcias had intended to bring their issue to the city commission meeting that same night. Although they had received a favorable ruling, they decided to speak at the meeting anyway. We wanted them (the commission) to know how antiquated the law is, Donna Garcia said. The couple also wanted to know why code enforcement of cers cant rule on a violation and enact penalties on the spot rather than the matter going to a hearing. It took a month for the Garcias and their neighbors to get a hearing and another two weeks for the order. Lady Go Diver owner Arilton Pavon then had 14 days to remove his vessel which at press time he apparently had. But for the Garcias, the two-months that they endured the boats comings and goings was infuriating. Why is there Dive boatContinued from page 1a residential code of its not to protect the residents and homeowners? Donna Garcia said this week. We had the feeling that the BSO code enforcers felt helpless too. Pavan and the dock owner Brian Cochran were represented at the magistrate hearing by attorney Tom Connick and Garcia said she and her neighbors were cross examined by the attorney. It was like lets put the neighbors on trial. It was humiliating. We thought it was to be a hearing, not a court case, Garcia said. The city code addressing docking and mooring facilities says commercial use of docks in residentially zoned districts is prohibited. This includes, but shall not necessarily be limited to the prohibition of boarding cruise parties at a dock located at residentially zoned property. The Lady Go Diver was not being boarded at the 7th Court dock. Pavan has a three-way agreement with the city and the county to use the oating dock at Sullivan Park to take on passengers. Steinfelds determination was based on the intent of the code. The magistrate wrote that the code does not de ne commercial use and that he went online at www. de itions, USLegal.com to get a de nition. That source de nes commercial use as one undertaken for a business purpose rather than a hobby, recreation or educationdirectly or indirectly for nancial gain. Connick argued for Pavan that only activities uniquely related to business, similar to loading of parties ( which Pavan was not doing) should be prohibited. Code enforcement ofcer Jenny Walsh had acted on a complaint from another neighborhood in early January before the 46-foot Go Diver appeared at SE 7 Court. The boat, she said, is commercially registered and bears the name and phone number on its hull. City Planning Director Jerry Ferguson testi ed that if the activities on a commercial boat were the same as a private boat, it would not necessarily be a violation of the code. Merely docking a commercial boat at a residence is not a violation, Ferguson said. He used as an example, The Gallant Lady, a 50-foot corporate vessel docked in Hillsboro Beach, and said it would not violate Deer elds code. Pavan, contacted this week at his dive shop, Dixie Divers, was reluctant to speak about the situation. I docked the boat a few blocks away for 11 years without a complaint, he said. Reportedly, he has found a berth for the Go Diver at Marina One on Federal Highway. Dist. 1 City Commissioner Joe Miller said he was sympathetic to both parties but added that he would like to see the code clari ed it should be clear. Vagueness could lead to a lawsuit.

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The Pelican 35 Friday, March 2, 2012 time, Strock remembers. The system, vertical concrete barriers running east and west with rocks placed at the east end, was designed by University of Florida scientist Per Brun and installed in 1963. The limestone rocks, weighing up to eight tons each, were brought in from Dade County by rail, trucked from the Seaboard Railway Station to the beach and lifted into place by crane. He remembers the permitting from the state and Army Corps taking a matter of months, not years as it would be today. Once the groins were installed, the sand stabilized giving this city one of the countys nest beaches. Strock, who was the city engineer at the time, believes other communities would have used the groin method too but for the Army Corps edict: no more groins. Today, the rock piles are being blamed for the loss of sand on Hillsboros north beach. That town has commissioned a study of possible permanent solutions to its continual erosion problem and that study will be discussed at a commission meeting Tuesday, March 6. Said Hillsboros beach commissioner Claire Schubert, We are looking into every possible method of preserving our beach. Groins will be one thing discussed. From what I have been told, the Army Corps has become less rigid about groin installation if you can prove a need. Strock is less certain Deer elds groins are responsible for Hillsboros lack of sand. With the groins having trapped all the sand they can hold, sediment being pumped from the Boca Raton Inlet moves with the litteral drift to beaches south of here he said. Once the beach is stable, the groins are not trapping sand, he said. Deer elds beach is not taking more than it can handle. Schubert is more inclined to believe that the rocks push the sand off shore and it doesnt come back to the beach for about a mile south of the last groin leaving an area very much exposed to winds and tide. Whatever the situation, south Floridas coastline belongs to an ecological system that starts in Georgia, Strock said, and sediment from rivers in Georgia has been found on beaches in Ft. Pierce. Historically, the beaches were nourished naturally by inland erosion, Strock said. But we stopped river erosion, so the sand doesnt get to the beaches now. At the time of Deer elds groin project, the powers that be in Hillsboro Beach did not want to change the appearance of their beaches. Later, when he went into private practice, Strock was Hillsboros town engineer for a time and he remembers a number of experiments being tried to combat erosion. None of them were successful. As one of a very few people familiar with groins, Strock was hired by governing agencies at New York Harbor, in New Jersey, North Carolina and on Floridas west coast, but no more groins were ever built. He likens the current practice of nourishing beaches with new sand to painting a house. You have to do it over and over again, he said. And the disadvantage of trucking in sand is about more than the cost. Strock said, It is about eroding Florida from the inside. A resident of Little Harbor, Strock retired from engineering in 1985. At one time he was on the Broward County Erosion Prevention District Board. He remembers then that of cials in Sea Ranch Lakes, determined to combat their beach erosion, got permission to install what he calls Venetian blinds off shore. When the waves came crashing over the structures, they made horri c clanging sounds. Sometimes you have to let history do the teaching, he said. GroinsContinued from page 1The Pelican Classi eds can save you time and money!

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36 The Pelican Friday, March 2, 2012



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Friday, March 2, 2012 Vol. XX, Issue 9 Call 954-783-8700 to Advertise Email: siren2415@gmail.com Pompano Beach • Deer eld Beach • Lighthouse Point • Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Wilton Manors • Oakland Park • Hillsboro Beach • The Galt • Palm Aire The P e l i c a n Pelican LBTS – Commissioners in Lauderdale-ByThe-Sea selected members of three advisory boards at Tuesday’s meeting. Named to the Planning and Zoning Board were Alfred Oldaker, William Brady, William Patrick Murphy, David Chanon and Avi Braverman. Alternates are Eric Yankwitt and David Gilman. Board of Adjustment members are Helene Wetherington, Verenice Rapaport, Henry Overton, Gerri Ann Caposto and Arthur Franczak. Alternate is Helen Swinghammer. Museum, new Barefoot Mailman statue dedication mark 105th birthday of Hillsboro LighthouseSee LIGHTHOUSE on page 25 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach – Local history buffs have a big day coming Saturday, March 10. The new Barefoot Mailman statue at the base of the Hillsboro Inlet Lighthouse will be dedicated and a new Lighthouse Museum will be opened in Inlet Park. The day also celebrates the 105th anniversary of the lighthouse. The 400-square foot museum is Historic Sentry to celebrate 105 years of lighting the way for mariners through the Hillsboro Inlet. [Photo courtesy of Hillsboro Lighthouse Preservation Society] Winners of 18th Annual Children in the Arts Piano competition, Matthew Reichenberger, Blanch Kuo and Alyce Kuo with Vice Mayor George Brummer and Sue Bloom, Palm Aire Friends of the Arts. More than 116 piano students competed last weekend at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center in Pompano Beach. [See story on page 2] Deer eld’s groin system saved the beach says engineer who installed itBy Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach – For all those who castigate this city’s beach groin system, there is one staunch defender: civil engineer Art Strock, the man who designed it and supervised the placement of the limestone rocks along the shoreline in 1963. At the time, there was no opposition to the project. One street and a number of homes had been lost to the sea and eroding sands threatened to take SE 21 Avenue, a motel pool next to the Wyndham and, on the south end, more homes. “You have to look at it from the standpoint of timing. There was virtually no beach. It was hard to argue against it,” Strock said. Now 84, Strock is not certain how much the groin system cost the city. He estimates it at $500,000, funds that came from city, county and state coffers. “It was a big number at that See GROINS on page 35By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach – A magistrate has ruled the Lady Go Diver a commercial dive boat, cannot be docked in the Pelican Canal after residents there complained that the boat’s diesel engines were noisy and emitted bad-smelling fumes. Donna Garcia, a resident at 1539 SE 8 St., said when the boat departed the dock across her canal she “had to close all her windows and doors…” to keep the fumes out of her house. Garcia and her husband, Manny, led a complaint with code enforcement in January. On Feb. 21, they got Magistrate Eugene Steinfeld’s order that the dock at 1612 SE 7 Court was being used for commercial purposes prohibited by Deer eld Beach’s code. Neighbors complain of noise and fumes; dive boat must leave berth See DIVE BOAT on page 34 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFLBTS – Commissioners have agreed to renew a franchise agreement with Choice Environmental Services to operate the only solid waste and recyclable collection system in the See CHOICE on page 13Choice gets contract; residents get new carts

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2 The PelicanFriday, March 2, 2012 SightingsA community calendar of East Broward County. Please email information to siren2415@gmail.com See SIGHTINGS on page 5 By Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach – It was a family affair at this year’s 14-year-old Matthew Reichenberger takes top spot at Pompano Beach piano competitionpiano competition, Feb. 25, at the Emma Lou Olson Civic center when it came to the winners. At the Advanced II level, rst place winner Matthew Reichenberger, 14, was lauded for his performance of Chopin’s “Ballade No 3.” That performance also landed him the Steinway Virtuoso award of a $500 music scholarship. Blanche Kuo, took second place with her performance of Debussy’s “Jardins Sous La Pluie.” Third place winner was Kuo’s twin sister, Alyce, who played Chopin’s, “Etude, Op 10, No 3.” And not far behind in the Advanced I level, Reichenberger’s brother, Jonathan, took rst place, followed by Kerstin Yu and Vivian Zhai. Other winners were, Intermediate II, Jada Campbell, rst; Joy Quan, second and Christine Tao, third. Intermediate I winners were Michelle Huang, rst; Tyler Harrison, second and Crystal Tang, third. Elementary III winners were Daniel Pan, rst; Sophia Noh, second and Carol Jiang, third. Elementary II winners were Johanna Tam, rst; Nhi Tran, second and Eileen Chong, third. Elementary I winners were Megan Yang, rst; Benny Montes, second and Claire Wang, third. For the 116 competitors, the day began at 8 a.m. with beginner level pianists handing over their memorized pieces to judges and playing for them. By 5 p.m. 18 winners emerged from the ve levels of playing from beginner to See PIANO Competition on page 16SightingsArt, Music & Theatre3-3 – Dropkick Murphys and Frank Turner & the Sleeping Souls performs at 7:30 p.m. at the Pompano Beach Amphitheatre, 1801 NE 6 St. Visit, www. livenation.com for tickets. 3-3 & 4 – Intergalactic Bead Show & Sale at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center; 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Precious and semiprecious gemstone beads, sterling silver, freshwater pearls, hand blown glass beads, vintage beads, crystals

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The Pelican 3 Friday, March 2, 2012 COP volunteer records almost 5,000 service hoursPompano Beach – Carmel McCormack was 90 years old on Thursday and had planned to retire from her volunteer position with the city’s Citizens on Patrol, or COP. But Tuesday night, as she received recognition for the 4,972 volunteer hours she has logged with COP, Mayor Lamar Fisher told her she had to stay on the job. “You can’t go,” the mayor said. “We need you.” McCormack, who has achieved the rank of major with COP, described the years since she joined in 2002 as “fun,” adding, “I wouldn’t be there if it wasn’t. It is one of the things I am most proud of.” To describe what she has practiced in her long life, McCormack quoted a poem that hangs in a children’s home run by Mother Teresa in Calcutta. It points out that all one’s good qualities may be criticized by others, but those qualities, forgiveness, kindness, honesty and other virtues, should be practiced anyway. “The good you do today, people will forget tomorrow. Do good anyway,” she quoted. “Give the world the best you have.”By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach – Only two more victories stand between the Ely High School boys basketball team and their rst state championship since 2007. Today at 4:30 p.m., the Tigers play St. Petersburg in the State Semi nals in Lakeland with the winner advancing to Saturday’s State Ely Tigers on the brink of rst state title since 2007 Championship game against either Oviedo or Oak Ridge. Ely has won four of its last ve tournament games in convincing fashion beating Coconut Creek 92 to 19, Northeast 63 to 33, McArthur 75 to 42, St. Thomas 56 to 52 and Atlantic 75 to 58. Melvin Randall, Ely’s coach since 2002, already has three state titles underSee Tigers on page 29The last time the Ely Tigers won the basketball state title was in 2007. Today at 4:30 p.m. the Tigers play the rst of the season’s two nal games.

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4 The PelicanFriday, March 2, 2012 Advertise with The Pelican 954.783.8700 Judy VikPELICAN STAFFOakland Park – Commissioners want to know how the City of Fort Lauderdale bills its Oakland Park water and wastewater customers. They have $25,000 in the budget to hire a consultant to bring them back that information. At a recent meeting, Commissioner Jed Shank presented ideas for audits to review different city processes to make sure taxpayers’ money is used as effectively and ef ciently as possible. “It’s not just a matter of economic return on investment but how does (a process) impact citizens and how can we do a better job,” Shank said. Shank is employed in the Broward County auditor’s of ce. City Manager John Stunson said the biggest saving could be in the city’s enterprise or business funds. He suggested utility billing as one area where the city might get the biggest bang for the buck if it is not being billed correctly. Oakland Park purchases the bulk of its water and wastewater services from Fort Lauderdale. Shank said utility billing is an area where a number of processes could be looked at. He said that might require more of a study than an audit. When Fort Lauderdale recently raised water rates for cities it services, Stunson said he and Wilton Manors City Manager Joseph Gallegos received assurances from then-Fort Lauderdale city manager (George Gretsas) that a study would be done to determine how rates are calculated. “They threw one together, but we haven’t had the time or staff to analyze it,” Stunson said. “The issue has been gnawing in the back of my brain, but we haven’t had the time, energy or staff to see if there’s anything in (the study) that would bene t the citizens,” said Bill Underwood, director of nancial services in Oakland Park. (The town of LauderdaleBy-The-Sea recently agreed to hire a rm to look at how Fort Lauderdale determines rates for its for water and sewer services.) Mayor Suzanne Boisvenue suggested charging Fort Lauderdale a franchise fee to run lines through Oakland Park. “Our contract says they should charge us their costs,” Shank said. “It should be a simple process, but it isn’t. It’s a big concern if they’re the only ones doing it and no one else is looking at it.” Boisvenue said the entire South Florida area needs to look at desalination of ocean water, “or water is going to be like gold. We’re having droughts and increases in building. We’re seeing the ocean rise and come into parts of Fort Lauderdale. We have an ocean full of water. City of cials unsure how Fort Lauderdale bills for water servicesSee WATER on page 5

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The Pelican 5 Friday, March 2, 2012 If it were properly processed and desalinated, we wouldn’t be looking at fees like we’re looking at today.” Commissioner Shari McCartney recommended setting aside funds for ongoing audits and as policy doing them on an annual or semi-annual basis. She also said an audit should be done of the charges levied by the Supervisor of Elections for local elections. “I’m not convinced they accurately re ect the cost of providing services,” she said. Vice Mayor Anne Sallee said she would like to see code enforcement and building permitting tracked to see and how ef ciently they operate. “We need a way to gauge improvement. At least get a baseline for something to compare against what we’re doing.” Shank narrowed the studies to utility billing and the purchase of water from Fort Lauderdale; code enforcement and liens; the permitting process and election costs. Commissioner John Adornato said fuel expenses is an area staff could look at. “We’ll probably need to be tightening our belts again, and staff should look at where they can nd savings.” WaterContinued from page 4SightingsContinued from page 2and more will be on sale. Visit www.beadshows.com or call 888-729-6904. 3-7 – American Legion Symphonic Band will be performing at 7:30 p.m. at the Herb Skolnick Center, 800 SW 36 Ave., Pompano Beach, during Support the Arts Night. Tickets are $10. 954-7864590. 3-7 – The Coney Island Baby Musical Duo performs from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach. Tickets are $14. Visit www. coneyislandbabies.com or call 954-786-4111. 3-11 – Forbidden Hollywood performs at the Prker Playhouse, 707 NE 8 St., Fort Lauderdale, at 2 and 5 p.m. Tickets are $35. “Recent classics like Titanic, Star Wars, Harry Potter and Austin Powers” all receive the comic once-over from Forbidden Hollywood’s cast.” Visit www.parkerplayhouse. com or call 954-462-0222. 3-11 – Skolnick Sunday Jazz & Arts Fest will be held at 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Skolnick Center at 800 SW 36th Ave., Pompano Beach. The event is free and features live jazz music and giveaways. Artists can reserve a 6 ft. table for $10 or a 15 ft. table for $15. 954-786-4590. 3-17 – The Sol Children Theatre Troupe performs Rapunzel on Saturdays and Sundays at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. from March 17 through April 1 at 3333 N. Federal Hwy., Boca Raton. Tickets are $12 for children seven and younger and $8 for others. Visit www.solchildren.org or call 561-447-8829. 3-17 – An Evening with Kate Clinton at Parker Playhouse 707 NE 8 St., Fort Lauderdale, at 8 p.m. Tickets range from $26.50 to $46.50. Call 954-462-0222. 3-18 – Flying Karamazov Brothers will be performing at 7 p.m. at Parker Playhouse, 707 NE 8 St., Fort Lauderdale. Tickets range from $26.50 to $46.50. “They are not your father’s wild-haired, juggling, amethrowing, kilt-and-tutu wearing performers.” Visit www.parkerplayhouse.com or call 954-462-0222. 3-21 – Mad Romance a group of musical performers, will be showcasing their original act of classic jazz, mambo, lush ballads, cha-chacha and more from the 60’s and 70’s from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m, at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach. Call 954786-4111. 3-28 – The Crests Tommy Mara’s performs at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach, from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Cost is $14 per ticket. Visit www.thecrests. com or call 954-786-41111.Books, Education, Classes & Seminars3-17 – The American Association of University Women Pompano Beach Branch will hold their Annual Scholarship Fundraiser featuring author Joanna Campbell Slan, who has written eleven non ction books and two mystery series. She will discuss her most See SIGHTINGS on page 9

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6 The PelicanFriday, March 2, 2012 The Pelican . What can we do for you? Deer eld Beach, Pompano Beach, Lighthouse Point, LauderdaleBy-The-Sea, Wilton Manors and Oakland ParkWilton Manors • Oakland Park • Hillsboro Beach The Pompano Pelican is published weekly on FridaysStreet Address: 1500-A E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, FL 33060 Telephone: 954-783-8700 • Fax: 954-783-0093Letters to the Editor are encouraged and accepted for print if signed, although a writer’s name will be withheld on request; letters must also include a daytime telephone number. Advertising rates are available upon request. Subscription rate is $31.80 including tax for one year’s delivery in Greater Pompano Beach; $95.40/per year including tax for others in the United States; call 954-783-8700 for rates abroad. The Pelican is a nonpartisan newspaper and reserves the right to decline advertising. Copyright 2011. Reproduction of this publication in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission of the publisher. The Pelican is a member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, Deer eld Beach Chamber and the LBTS Chamber. The Pelican is a state certi ed woman-owned minority business. The Pelican is delivered to businesses, libraries, schools, of ces, hospitals, news racks and single family homes. All advertising and copy is published at the sole discretion of the publisher. We welcome your critiques and ideas concerning this publication. Anne Siren, publisherExecutive Assistant: Mary Hudson Graphics: Rachel Ramirez Windsheimer Bookkeeper: John White Classi eds: Fran Shelby Contributing Writers: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Judy Wilson, Malcolm McClintock, Judy Vik, Mike d’Oliveira Account Executives: Paul Shroads, Carolyn Mann, Bill Heaton, Bill Fox Special Of ce Assistant: Cathy Siren ESTABLISHED 1993 • Volume XX, Issue 9 Founding Editor and PublisherAnne Hanby Siren Letters & OpinionsBy By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFPalm Aire Auschwitz survivor, Kurt Moses, honored by Pennsylvania State University Author of Home at Last, Kurt Moses says, “The purpose in writing my book was to inform young people of what can happen when good people do nothing. I tell them, don’t be an innocent bystander. When you know something is wrong, stand up and work to get it changed. Use the power of your vote. I feel terrible about people who don’t vote. Be a good citizen and x what needs to be xed. Keep America the wonderful country it is.” This soft spoken, gentle man who survived the hell of Auschwitz will never forget the day the Russians liberated this infamous concentration camp. “I felt free. I felt the world now belonged to me. I was young and still hopeful. I was right. A beautiful life was waiting for me.” With a chuckle, Moses says, “I’m the only survivor who went from the fth grade to become an honorary alumnus of Penn State.” His wife, Doris, says with a sweet smile, “Kurt’s sense of humor and his attitude of looking to the future rather than dwelling on the horrors of the past makes my husband an unusual man.” Thirty years ago he was asked by a local school in Harrisburg, Pa. if he would talk about his experiences in surviving the Holocaust. He said yes, and that was the beginning of his many years on the lecture circuit speaking at churches, synagogues, museums, service clubs, elementary schools, high schools and nearby colleges—and he made a permanent record of them in his book, Home At Last. I n June of 2011, Moses was given an Honorary Alumni Award presented to him by Graham Spanier, president of Penn State University. The program for the event explains the award. “This award has been given by the Penn State Alumni Association since 1973 to honor people who are not graduates of this university, but who have made signi cant contributions towards its welfare, reputation or prestige. The award is given only when the Alumni Association wishes to honor an exceptional person. This year the award is given to Kurt Moses for his courage and inspiration in sharing his experiences as a Holocaust survivor.” It was a thrilling affair for the Moses family, all of whom joined him for the banquet that followed. Moses admits it was always painful to speak about this terrible time he can never forget. He prefers to talk about his wonderful life since coming to America in 1947 and becoming an American citizen in 1952. He says, “I found Doris, the love of my life, and together we had a beautiful family, built a successful business and life in Harrisburg and after retirement became Florida snowbirds.” His eyes ll with tears when he tells how he felt when the ship pulled into New York Harbor and he saw Kurt Moses became an Honorary Alumni of Penn State University in June. Shown here receiving his award from University President Graham Spanier.See MOSES on page 7Deer eld Beach commissioners can save money with a simple change in election datesTime is of the essence. Some member of the commission has to step up to schedule a vote in the upcoming city election. Right now, the mayor and the commissioners from districts 3 and 4 have to run for re-election on March 13, 2013 at a cost of $67,000. The commission has the authority to make a change in that date. They can call for the election to take place Nov. 6, 2012. This is the same date on which the voters will be electing a president. The change would cost the city in the neighborhood of $20,000 or less. The city would save almost $50,000 dollars and would also see a greater amount of city voters than we have seen in the past. Although there are 42,000 registered voters in Deerfield Beach, fewer than 6,000 voted in the last city election. This hardly makes for representative government. I plan to put the proposition of the date change to the commission at the meeting on March 6. It will be interesting to see whether the commission takes some positive action. I do believe that if they do not take the opportunity to save $50,000 dollars and have a greater proportion of voter participation, their lack of concern will surface at the next election. Steve Krevoy Deerfield Beach resident

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The Pelican 7 Friday, March 2, 2012 “ the Statue of Liberty. “She opened her arms to me. She welcomed me to a new world and I loved her. I wrote a letter to her on her 125th birthday, and when it was made public that she needed money for repairs, I reached for my checkbook.” His lectures, and his book, recount the events of his life. “My formal education ended in the fth grade at age 10 or 11. We were Germans. My father was a veteran of WWI and had earned an Iron Cross. But in 1933 when Hitler began to come into power, my father moved our family to the Netherlands where I actually grew up. But like a disease, Hitler swept into Holland and though our Dutch friends tried to help us, the Gestapo arrested us in 1942. My father and I were sent to Westerbork, Terezin and Auschwitz where my father disappeared. My mother and sister went to a different camp. Mother, who had had typhus. and my sister survived. My mother died shortly after being liberated. She and my father were in their 50’s. My sister is alive and well. In fact she winters in Florida.” Asked speci cally what it was like in Auschwitz, Moses became very emotional, but he bravely answered, wiping away the tears that he could not control. “Sixty thousand Dutch Jews made the trip to Auschwitz; 673 people returned. My college years were spent in concentration camps. To see men torture and murder children and other men and women kills something inside you. The part that dies is any feeling for other people like mercy, charity, compassion and love. Those feelings disappear like lights going out in your soul. You become an animal trying to survive. All that matters is to get food. You are no longer a person. I weighed about 87 pounds when I was rescued.” Students asked him why no one did anything. “Where were our parents,” they asked. “What did the world do to help?” Moses replies, “That’s the point that I try to make. It can happen if you allow it to happen. We continue to build Holocaust museums in different cities and I’m so happy every time I hear of a new one because this horrible part of Jewish history must be told and felt by generations to come. We must never forget. We must never let it happen again.” Doris puts her hand on Kurt’s arm to calm him. He smiles at her and says, “I don’t talk about it anymore. After 30 years, I’ve given up the lecture circuit. At 86, I get too emotional and realize my health won’t allow me to continue to do this.” Doris says, “It helps to be with young people and share their interests instead of dwelling in the past. We are retired business people, but we have many worthwhile things to do. I paint and Kurt has been busy writing, gol ng and lecturing.” He smiles and pats her hand. “I belong to many service groups in Harrisburg, My college years were spent in concentration camps. To see men torture and murder children and other men and women kills something inside you. Moses the bustling capital of Pennsylvania, our home for so many years. We spend four months or so in Palm Aire and enjoy the weather and the activities. I can no longer golf which I miss terribly, but I’m now an avid bridge player. And of course, we are very involved with our family of two daughters, their husbands and we have one grandson to carry us on.” Thank you Kurt Moses for your book and for sharing your story. The Nazis did not win because of the spirit of survivors, like you, who prove that hope can fuel a beautiful future like yours.MosesContinued from page 6

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8 The PelicanFriday, March 2, 2012 Briefs Making a Difference Phyllis J. Neuberger wants your suggestions about people who are making a difference. Call 954-7838700. By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFThere’s nothing new about sending monthly payments to Florida Power & Light, or FPL, but when FPL awards $500 to a customer that is news. Just before Christmas last year, Elizabeth O’Connor received an American Express Gift Card for $500 as a reward for her many efforts to 31 TEN Fitness Center wins $500 from FPL for going green and making a difference in the environmentconserve energy in her tness studio at 3110 N. Federal Hwy. in Lighthouse Point. She’s happy to tell how it all came about. “I received an FPL questionnaire asking what I did to save energy in my business. Because I am passionate about physical health and our environment, I decided to respond to their query.” Her answer was not one, but a series of small but important moves that added up to a lot of energy and money saved. The ways in which she saves are easily duplicated, for an improved environment and a thicker wallet. She shares her energy saving moves. “I use fresh air and fans over air conditioning whenever possible. Daytime tness classes are done in natural light instead of Elizabeth O’Connor with clients Samwin and Anahid Armoyan who have just nished a personal training session. [Photos by Phyllis J. Neuberger] Elizabeth O’Connor is the owner of 31 Ten Fitness at 3110 N. Federal Hwy. in Lighthouse Point. Shown here on an energy saving, non electric spinning bike.See FITNESS CENTER AWARD on page 24Deer eld Beach Innovation ZoneThe elementary schools belonging to the Deer eld Beach Innovation Zone: Cresthaven, Deer eld Beach, Deer eld Park, Norcrest, Park Ridge and Tedder will be conducting Early Kindergarten Registration on March 23 at 8:30 a.m. Each school will be open to the public so potential students and their families can learn more about the school, its curriculum, activities and principal, teachers and staff. Students must be ve years old by Sept. 1, 2012 in order to be eligible for kindergarten. Each student must bring an original birth certi cate, two proofs of residency, current immunization records – including varicella, 680 form – and a physical exam form from a doctor. For more information call 754-321-0000. “Month of Luck” at East Village Uncorked Tonight, East Village Uncorked will celebrate “Month of Luck” from 6 to 9 p.m. in Harbor Village, located on the 2600 block of East Atlantic Boulevard. Those who attend will enjoy free country music by Burnt Biscuit, food and art and jewelry displays. There will also be a scavenger hunt; rst person to nish the scavenger hunt will win a prize courtesy of Isle Casino. East Village Uncorked is a free event that occurs the rst Friday of every month. For more, visit www.pompanobeachcra. com call 954-786-7824.

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The Pelican 9 Friday, March 2, 2012 LBTS – The Town of Lauderdale-By-The-Sea will install a new storm water drainage system on Bougainvilla Drive between Pine Avenue and Town Hall property to eliminate ooding that occurs on the street in most big rainstorms. While the streets are torn up, designers will look at different ways to beautify the street which will involve modifying parking on the street. A meeting is set for 7 p.m. Thursday, March 8, at Jarvis Hall, 4505 Ocean Drive, to get community input on the plans. Opinions are sought on design concepts and desirability of beautifying the street. For more information on the meeting, contact Steve d’Oliveira, public information of cer, at 954-640-4209 or steved@lbts .gov. LBTS – A monthly beach clean-up is scheduled for 9 to 9:30 a.m. Saturday, March 3, at Commercial Boulevard and the beach. All those interested in taking part are invited to meet at the beach pavilion. Helpers will be provided with gloves, bags and water. This clean-up is sponsored by Rich Barnhart, By The Sea Realty, 223 Commercial Blvd., LBTS. Call 954-3517007. LBTS – An Irish Variety Show is set for 7 p.m. Sunday, March 4, at Assumption Church, 2201 S. Ocean Blvd. The program features performers from Ireland, who will present a program of comedy, dancing and song. The event is open to the public. Tickets are $15. For tickets and more information, contact Mary Danis at 954781-7412. Lauderdale-by-the-Sea events include Irish variety show LBTS – Commissioners have selected members for three advisory boards. Named to the Planning and Zoning Board were Alfred Oldaker, William Brady, William Patrick Murphy, David Chanon and Avi Braverman. Alternates are Eric Yankwitt and David Gilman. Board of Adjustment members are Helene Wetherington, Verenice Rapaport, Henry Overton, Gerri Ann Caposto and Arthur Franczak. Alternate is Helen Swinghammer. Named to the Audit Committee were William Patrick Murphy, Ben Freeny and John Oughton. Members of the Audit Committee must have experience and knowledge of municipal accounting and nancial matters. The commission agreed with Commissioner Stuart Dodd’s suggestion that if committee members miss three consecutive meetings, they will be removed from the board. The commissioner who appointed them will then appoint a replacement or move the alternate up. If a board member resigns, the commissioner who made the appointment will name a successor. Board members named in Lauderdale-By-The-Sea SightingsContinued from page 5of Attraction for Financial Health & Wealth” from 1 to 3:30 p.m. at Congregation Etz Chaim, 1881 NE 26 St. Suite 100, Wilton Manors. Cost is $25 before March 11 and $30 after. Visit www. metaphysicalchapel.com or 754-300-1428. recent publication: Make, Take, Murder. The event includes a silent auction. Cost is $38 and the event will be held at the Lighthouse Point Yacht Club, 2701 NE 42 St. 954-675-9249. 3-18 – Cary Bayer, author of the Prosperity Aerobics and a life coach who’s worked with Oscar-winner Alan Arkin, David Steinberg and Quality Inns, will be teaching his class “The Secret of Money: How to use the Law See SIGHTINGS on page 11 Star gazer alertSouth Florida Amateur Astronomers Association or SFAAA, meets March 9 at 7 p.m. at Fern Forest Nature Center, 201 Lyons Rd., South, Coconut Creek. The sessions are free and for all ages. Call 954-357-5198.

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10 The PelicanFriday, March 2, 2012 Briefs Business matters The Pelican takes a look at local business owners. Call The Pelican to nd out how you can tell your story here because business matters. 954-783-8700.Kayak along Middle RiverOakland Park The city recently completed installation of a new kayak launch, part of the renovated city boat ramp facility at the end of Northeast 12 Terrace. A Florida Inland Navigational District, or FIND, grant covered 50 percent of the cost. The launch, just south of Peter Pan Diner, is adjacent to the former Gibby’s restaurant site. There’s also a picnic area with a view of the north fork of the Middle River. The project was completed ahead of time and within budget. The area will be the site of a waterway cleanup, part of the annual cleanup in Broward County sponsored by the Marine Industry Association South Florida, on Saturday, March 10. For information, call 954-524-2733 or email WaterwayCleanup@miasf.org. By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFF“I sold my 12-year dental practice In Boston so my husband and I could live in beautiful, warm South Florida,” says Dr. Mandy Esmaili. She flashes a smile as bright and white as the ones she can create for her patients. Her first move was to get re-licensed by passing the Florida boards. Next, she leased a suite of offices at 2324 NE 53 Street in the Cross Medical and Professional Building, Fort Lauderdale. She says, “I can honestly tell my new patients that I am equipped to offer them the best and most efficient care using the newest state-of-the-art equipment.” Shortly after she opened, Frank Velez was helping her set up her computer system. He says, “I recognized the sophisticated state of the art equipment she was using because I’m a nerd on stuff like that. I overheard her speaking to a patient, and I was impressed. I’ve avoided dentists for almost two decades, but I decided to try her. I am so happy I did. She had to do extensive teeth cleaning and replace a cap on a front tooth. She is very knowledgeable. Her hands so skilled that she injected me with French speaking dentist opens, a new state-of-the-art of ce in Cross Medical/Professional BuildingNovocain and I didn’t even know it. I live in Coral Gables, but I’ll make the long ride because she’s worth it. I’d recommend her to anyone. Her new equipment saves patients time. Time is money, so that means she saves them money as well.” As she proudly led The Pelican on a tour of her offices, she paused to talk about each piece of the newest equipment. “This digital x-ray machine gives the patient 90 percent less radiation exposure than the conventional machine. Dr. Mandi Esmaili is a new dentist in town. Fluent in French and English, she’s offering complimentary consultations and exams to introduce herself to the community. She’s shown here explaining her suggestions to a patient. [Staff photo by Phyllis J. Neuberger] See ESMAILI on page 11Adopt a dog or cat and get a free bag of pet foodAnyone who adopts a dog or cat during the month of March will get a free bag of pet food. To qualify, the pet must be adopted from Broward County Animal Care and Adoption or a participating Pet Supermarket location. In addition, the adopter’s name will be placed into a special drawing that will be held on March 31 for a chance to win a $100 gift card to Pet Supermarket stores. Visit www. broward.org/Animal or call 954-3591313 for more.

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The Pelican 11 Friday, March 2, 2012 In addition, it offers a very crisp image which can be rotated to reveal every angle of the teeth, bones, sinuses and surrounding nerves so that I can detect gum disease, cancer, cracks, infection or any abnormality.” The teeth whitening machine, called Lumi-brite, is made by the makers of Lumineers. It has the ability to lighten teeth eight shades in one hour. It also allows Dr. Esmaili, (pronounced e-smile) to do white fillings in three minutes saving the patient the discomfort of being in the chair for an hour.” An intra-oral camera allows patients to see their own dental abnormalities. This dentist can complete root canals in an hour with new rotary instruments. She is equipped to do total implants without referring patients to a specialist. Her family preventative dentistry services for children, teens and adults include the basics such as fillings, bridges, crowns, dentures and extractions. Lee Reyes works near Dr. Esmaili’s office and went to her in an emergency. “I have a terrible fear of dentists,” she explains, “so I was happy to find her so pleasant, gentle and caring. She took care of my immediate problem so well that I don’t dread future appointments for gum surgery, extractions, and more. She inspires my confidence. I’m grateful I found her. I highly recommend her to my family and friends.” Dr. Esmaili is also trained with special continuing education in cosmetic dentistry. She says, “We offer Invisalign braces which are invisible and effective, allowing children and adults to correct problems without feeling self conscious. Just before I left Boston, I treated an 86-year old woman with these braces. She was thrilled with the improvement.” Continuing, “I also install Lumineers which are thin, permanent coverings for discolored or misaligned teeth eliminating shots and drilling.” A native of Montreal, Canada, Dr. Esmaili is fluent in French and English: a fact very much appreciated by the many French Canadian snowbirds in the area. Her credentials are impressive. She is a graduate of New York University School of Dentistry where she was in the top five percent of her class. She goes beyond the annual requirements for continuing education, seeking out every advanced course offered. Open for just two weeks she says, “I’m lucky. I’ve handled several emergencies and established good relations with my new patients. Several have made plans for extensive dental work. Because I am new and just building a practice, I am offering many promotions, including discounts to seniors. To introduce myself to new patients, I am offering a complimentary consultation and examination. Call 954-9906543 for an appointment. EsmailiContinued from page 10 Bargains 3-17 – Granny’s Attic Giant Indoor Garage Sale at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Admission is free. Festivals & Outdoor Events 3-8 & 22 – Fern Forest Nature Center, 201 Lyons Rd. South, Coconut Creek, offers Nature Tots, a program that teaches children ages two to four to appreciate nature. The program is $5 per child and runs from 10 to 11 a.m. Pre-registration is required. The March 22 program will be held at the Secret Woods Nature Center, 2701 W. State SightingsContinued from page 9 See SIGHTINGS on page 13

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12 The PelicanFriday, March 2, 2012 By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach – When Deacon Dwight Higgs was a boy growing up in Pompano Beach, the city was a divided one – literally. That division was marked by Dixie Highway where the city’s black residents crossed at night at their own risks. “I couldn’t be here after dark,” Higgs told members of the Pompano Beach Historical Society at their meeting in February, referring to the Dick & Miriam Hood Center, located east of Dixie. “This is Black History Month, but its just February for me,” said Higgs. “It’s kind of a sad statement in that it’s almost trying to make up for things that were lost or ignored for many years.” But, he said, the month still serves a valuable purpose. Deacon Dwight Higgs talks about family, Pompano’s divided past“February allows people to ask questions. If the questions never get asked, that’s a bad thing.” Asked if he ever found himself on the wrong side of the tracks after dark, Higgs did not answer, but he said, “The [black] adults would protect you. They would make sure everyone else got everyone out of that area.” He said people shouldn’t be fooled by Florida’s current state of diversity. “This is the deepest of the deep South. The same mentality existed here that existed [in the rest of the South]. It started changing slowly in the later part of the 1950s with certain stores you were allowed to visit. Those stores were strategically placed so they could be visited by all sides of the town but you could also make that quick exit to go where you belonged.” But through it all, Higgs says he was taught to go around obstacles, not let them stand in his way. Higgs admits that he never expected to see an African American in the White House. “I did not think I’d live to see that,” he said. And just as Pompano’s black residents overcame social injustice, educational and economic inequities have been righted to a certain degree. Higgs was the rst child in his family who didn’t have to leave school to tend to the bean harvest, thanks, in large part, to one of Pompano’s most famous daughters, Blanche General Ely. Ely, who was the principal of the Pompano Colored School, now Blanche Ely High School, led the way in getting children out of the bean elds. “She started Saturday school to make up for lost time,” said Higgs, and was key in eventually getting the stage legislature to pass a law against students missing school to work in the elds. “She was a force,” he said.Deacon Dwight Higgs rings a bell that used to belong to his great, great grandfather, a former slave. “He used it to call his children and the grandchildren to dinner,” said Higgs. [Photo by Michael d’Oliveira] City of cials unsure how Fort Lauderdale bills for water services Judy Vik Pelican Staff See HIGGS on page 14

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The Pelican 13 Friday, March 2, 2012 town. The vote on rst reading was 4 to 1, Mayor Roseann Minnet dissenting. The threeyear contract begins June 21. New under the agreement recycling carts will replace current bins and will provided to residents by Choice at no cost. Monthly charge for all collection service is $15.35 for single-family and duplex customers. “The town commissioners will select the color and two sizes of recycling carts,” Assistant City Manager Bud Bentley said. Color choices are blue, black, brown and green. Multifamily properties will get one recycling container for each garbage container. Recycling dumpsters at condominiums will now be provided at no cost to the town. “When recycling increases, disposal costs must decrease, and this contract does that,” Bentley said. “This is a signi cantly better contract for the citizens of LauderdaleBy-The-Sea.” Bentley noted that Vice Mayor Scot Sasser “...was very helpful in providing insight and guidance on this.” “Our partners have stepped up to the plate and done everything we asked and then some,” Sasser said of the Choice representatives. Newly elected Commissioner Mark Brown said if he had been on the commission last year, he would have asked for new bids on the solid waste collection contract which is what Minnet preferred. Since the negotiation process worked well, Brown said, “I won’t be a y in the ointment.” Town Manager Connie Hoffmann had praise for her assistant. “Bud Bentley did a superlative job in anticipating every possible thing that could happen in this contract and coming up with solutions with Choice. He has worked many holidays on this contract, which took concentrated effort.” The town is eligible also for a $121,429 recycling rebate. ChoiceContinued from page 1 SightingsContinued from page 11 See SIGHTINGS on page 24Road 84, Dania Beach. 954357-5198 or 954-357-8884. 3-10 – The Fort Lauderdale St. Patrick’s Day Parade and Festival will be held at Huizenga Plaza, 32 E. Las Olas Blvd., from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. There will be food, live entertainment and activities for children. The parade down Las Olas Boulevard starts at noon. Visit www.ftlaudirishfest.com or call 954-828-5985. 3-10 – Broward’s annual county-wide Waterway Cleanup event will take place in Deer eld Beach at Pioneer Park, 249 NE 5 Ave.; in Fort Lauderdale at Hugh Taylor Birch State Park, 3109 E. Sunrise Blvd.; in Oakland Park, 2900 NE 12 Terrace; in Wilton Manors, Colohatchee Park, 1975 NE 15 Ave, and other cities. Participants must RSVP. For more, visit www. waterwaycleanup.com.For the Kids3-9 – Sol Children Theatre Troupe is hosting a social from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Sol Children Theatre, 3333 N. Federal Highway, Boca Raton. The event is free and includes games, refreshments and a meet and greet with directors, teachers and actors. Visit www.solchildren.org or call 561-447-8829. 3-15 – Pony rides offered for $3 per ride from 9 to 11:30 a.m. at Sand & Spurs Equestrian Park, 1600 NE 5 Ave., behind the Goodyear Blimp base, Pompano Beach. 954.786.4507.Health & Fitness3-3 – Friends of Poor 5K Walk/Run t akes place from 8 to 10 a.m. at St. Gabriel Catholic Church, 731 N. Ocean Blvd. Pompano Beach, which is on A1A. Registration starts at 7 a.m. Donations are requested but not required. Visit www. stgabrielpompano5k.org.

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14 The PelicanFriday, March 2, 2012 But while Higgs sees progress on a local and national scale, he also sees regression at the most basic level – the family. “God himself [in Genesis] mentions that is how blessings are dolled out,” he said. “Family is where it starts. Before Hillary Clinton and her book, It Takes a Village that’s exactly the way it used to be. [Now] our children are taught not to care. They say they don’t care, and the bad thing is they mean it.” Growing up, Higgs’s mother, Thurstia, died when he was just nine and his father, Cecil, whom he met for the rst time at his mother’s funeral, had been missing in action. That left his grandparents. “I’m the product of four very special people.” One grandparent in particular, Rhodie, stands out in Higgs’s memory. “Our family had gotten so big she wanted to make sure I wasn’t bringing cousins home,” said Higgs. So whenever Higgs came home with a new girl, his grandmother always asked the her, “Who are your people?” Higgs estimates that about 50 people were in his extended family at that point. “All we had to do was gather, and it was an instant family reunion.” One of those family members includes the late actress Esther Rolle, best known for her part on the popular 70s TV show “Good Times.” Higgs’s grandmother and Rolle’s father were brother and sister. “She t right into the family. You would think she would be extremely extroverted but she wasn’t. She was just one of the family. It was really quite refreshing,” said Higgs, adding, “But I guess you can’t put on airs with people who have known you from the time that you were little.” Since then, Higgs has done his part to keep the family line going. His 33year marriage to Eileen, a kindergarten teacher at Markham Elementary School in Pompano, has produced three children. After graduating from Rollins College, Higgs worked for the Palm Beach County Parks and Recreation Department. Higgs left the Palm Beach job and began selling life insurance in Pompano Beach. “We were expecting Timothy at the time, and I was looking for something that would pay me a little more than I was making.” Timothy, 33, was named after his maternal grandfather; Mahrtina, 20, was named after Martin Luther King, Jr.She also shares King’s birthday; and Liahna, 20, named after her two maternal grandmothers. And 33 years later, he’s still in the insurance business, selling mostly life insurance for United Insurance Company of America.HiggsContinued from 12

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The Pelican 15 Friday, March 2, 2012

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16 The Pelican Friday, March 2, 2012 Advanced II. The event was emceed by Joanna Marie, formerly of WXEL Classical Radio. Pompano Beach Vice Mayor George Brummer and Palm Aire Friends of the Arts, Sue Bloom, made the awards. In its 18th year, the competition, Children in the Arts of Pompano Beach, has grown to be the largest competition in the state. Competition regulations are determined by the Broward County Music Teachers Association. Steinway Gallery of Boca Raton provides Steinway pianos for the event. Bob Luptak, owner of Steinway Gallery also provides the $500 scholarship to the performer who demonstrates virtuosity in his or her performance. Major sponsors of the event are the City of Pompano Beach, the Herb Skolnick Cultural Arts Foundation, John Knox Village, Palm Aire Friends of the Arts, Pompano Beach Parks and Recreation, Frank H. Furman, Dr. Joe McGee, The Pelican and local business owners. Jonathan Reichenberger’s performance of Chopin’s Nocturne C# Minor was the winning piece in the Advanced I level. He was followed by Kerstin Yu and Vivian ZhaiPiano Competition Continued from page 2Dr. Joe McGee announces his retirement from the practice of dentistry and wishes to thank his patients for their support throughout his 33 years of practice in Pompano Beach. Retirement

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The Pelican 17 Friday, March 2, 2012 By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach – Anglers looking for a tasty piece of fried tilapia can satisfy their hunger without breaking out their rods and reels at St. Coleman Parish’s annual Fish Fry tonight. The Fish Fry, organized by the parish’s Men’s Club, will be held at the church, 1200 S. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach, from 5:30 to 9 p.m. and the same time again on St. Coleman Men’s Club Fish Fry series begins another yearMarch 16 and 30. For $8, attendees can choose from fried tilapia, coleslaw and dinner roll; shrimp with Caesar salad and dinner roll or New England clam chowder with Caesar salad and dinner roll. For $5, kids can eat macaroni and cheese or tilapia and French fries. The annual seafood tradition is one of the many events Men’s Club members organize to keep their charitable efforts going. Some of the events, which have become popular community happenings, include a golf tournament, comedy show, Italian Night and Servicemen’s Charity Drive. The group helps fund the Men’s Club’s Walk On Water Salt Water Fishing Tournament, youth sports programs and its Children’s Christmas Party. Mark Todd, Men’s Club vice president says, “We also send supplies to military personnel overseas and help the Special Olympics. There’s a lot of things we do,” Todd says two years ago the club donated about $70,000 to the various charities. “The purpose of the Men’s Club is to provide support to the church and the community, he said. Mike Sereg, chairman of the event, says the fish fry events started 10 years ago and gave the club a much-needed boost. “It made us some money to put into our coffers.” For more, visit www.stcmc. org or call 954-942-3533.

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18 The Pelican Friday, March 2, 2012 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeerfield Beach Tucked away between Military Trail and Sample Road is one of Northeast Broward’s signature golf courses, Crystal Lake Golf Club. Designed by Rees Jones, the course has been a mainstay for golfers here since 1965. Today it sports a brand new clubhouse and dining patio with panoramic views of four fairways and a lake. The 5,500 square foot clubhouse, with a 2,400 square foot open patio lounge, was opened last May to rave reviews following the grand opening. “What we have achieved here is a comfortable golf club facility catering to the public,” said Bill MacLaughlin, the club’s general manager and PGA director of golf. The British-Colonial-style building was built at a cost of $1.5 million and contains a grill, pro shop, executive offices and the patio bar with lots of seating. Chef Sean White has created a moderately-priced menu that features a Saugy hot dog, an import from the Rhode Island area that is served on a grilled New England style roll; an eight-ounce handmade Angus Beef burger, and on Friday and Saturdays, New England beer battered fish and chips. Happy Hour is 4 to 6 p.m. or until the last golfer has recounted his day, hole-byhole. “We have a golfer-friendly club, and we are reaching out to our neighbors and all South Florida residents,” MacLaughlin said. The golf course is an “old-style” design and no residential areas nearby. MacLaughlin oversees annual capital projects so that the course undergoes constant improvement. Owned by a private investment group, Crystal Lake has long fairways lined with mature trees, challenging par 3’s, fast greens and a maintenance budget that assures its aesthetic appeal and playability. It is managed by Littlestone Management Company. At 6,983 yards, it is a typical length for a par 72 championship course, with ladies–friendly forward tees. The most challenging hole is Crystal Lake Golf Club: An old standby is back with new clubhouse See CRYSTAL LAKE on page 26 Crystal Lake Golf Club sports a brand new clubhouse and dining patio with panoramic views of four fairways and a lake. The 5,500 square foot clubhouse, with a 2,400 square foot open patio lounge, was opened last May to rave reviews following the grand opening. Owned by a private investment group, Crystal Lake has long fairways lined with mature trees, challenging par 3’s, fast greens and a maintenance budget that assures its aesthetic appeal and playability. It is managed by Littlestone Management Company.

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The Pelican 19 Friday, March 2, 2012 954-943-2902 Same Weekend PlayScoreboardResults Pompano Beach 9 Hole Women’s League 2/28/12 Class A Low gross 1st Cathy Olson . . . . . . 52 2nd Carol Metevier . . . . 55 Bara Lattimer . . . . . . 55 Class B 1st -Helene Caruso . . . . 56 2nd Kathy Gardner .. . . . 57 Class A Low net 1st Shirley Salines . . . . 37 2nd Place (tie): S. Rust, M.C.Friedman, A. Wynn, M. Hussian, J. Murphy . 40 Class B: Low Net 1st Jill Goldfarb . . . 37 2nd Place (tie): Maddy Matyas, Harriet Fisher, Eileen Wankmueller . . 38Pompano Beach Women’s Gold The Pines A Class1st Janet Stuart . 36.5 2nd Kathy Stewart . . 37B ClassDebbie Browan . 36 Giovanny Caruso . . 37.5 Brenda Joy . . 41C ClassPatti VanZandt . . 38 Dianne Levanti39.5D ClassBarbara Mahoney . . 36 Beth Ruocco . . 41.5 Rochele Duva-Dolen . . 41.5 Send your scores to siren2415@ gmail.com To advertise on this page, call Bill Fox at 954-782-4440

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20 The Pelican Friday, March 2, 2012 By Malcolm McClintockPELICAN STAFFLito’s Turf and Surf 2469 N. Federal Hwy Shoppes at Beacon Light plaza Lighthouse Point954-782-8111Located just north of Copans Road. across the road from the Muvico theater complex, the newly opened Lito’s restaurant is the latest addition to North Broward’s culinary scene. Proprietors Don and Joan Hoy are seasoned industry veterans who traded in their enormous eatery in the City of Plantation for the more tranquil setting of Lighthouse Point. “We owned the Landlubbers Raw Bar & Grill for 20 years, and it was very successful,” says Joan. “But the long hours were really wearing us down.” “That’s when we started looking for a smaller place and a more manageable pace,” adds Don who has been in the food business for over 40 years. Luckily, the Hoys found a perfect site in the Shoppes at Beacon Light plaza where they are grooming sons Stephen and Kyle to take over the family business. “The people of this community have been so nice to us. We really couldn’t be happier.” Serving a cornucopia of American classics as well as a few Italian and Asian inspired specialties, Lito’s encyclopedic menu has something tantalizing for every palate. From bisques to burgers, sandwiches to salads, seafood to steaks, customers can indulge in all their favorites at wallet-friendly prices. For starters, soup lovers can sample the Bahamian Conch or New England clam chowders. “Our lobstercrab bisque is also very Lito’s Turf and Surf brings great food, friendly service and relaxed atmosphere to Lighthouse Point Lito’s famous Tsunami plate features sesame seared Ahi tuna with marinated calamari and seaweed salad topped with sweet & spicy plum sauce.See LITO”S on page 32

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The Pelican 21 Friday, March 2, 2012

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22 The Pelican Friday, March 2, 2012 Advertise with The Pelican 954-783-8700 Re nancing bond could save thousandsLighthouse Point -Bond consul Mark Raymond has been hired to refinance the city’s $3.9 million general obligation bond. Raymond, of Palm Beach Gardens, was selected from six applicants. His fee will be $7,500. In August 2002, the city issued its first general obligation bond, $6.190 million which was used for improvements to the police station, library, storm drainage system, parks and to purchase right of way. Now the outstanding amount of $3.9 million is eligible for refunding after August 1 and Finance Director Terry Sharp said with the current low interest rates, the city could save as much as $400,000. Sharp said the next step is to get bids from banks for a loan to pay off the bonds. He expects an interest rate of no more than three percent on the bank loan.Now available Sunday morningsLighthouse Point Sunday morning imbibers will be able to get an earlier start now. Tuesday, the city commission approved a local law giving restaurants permission to sell alcoholic beverages beginning at 10 a.m. rather than noon. Previously, only Christmas Eve and New Year’s Eve were except from the Sunday selling rule. Retail sales are not included in the new law and remain prohibited until noon on Sundays. No other changes were made to the law which prohibits the sale of alcohol on weekdays between 2 and 7 a.m. and on weekends, between 3 and 7 a.m.

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The Pelican 23 Friday, March 2, 2012 By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFProceeds from the tournament, which takes place on March 17 and 18 from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. at the Dillon Tennis Center, 4091 NE 5 Ave. in Oakland Park, benefit the Backpack Food Program and other charitable programs. The cost is $28 for doubles teams and $20 for singles players. Participants can enter either singles A and B or doubles A or B; there will be men’s and women’s divisions. Mike Bennett, Oakland Park’s tennis director estimates last year a little over 100 players participated; up from about 20 to 30 from when he took over in 2004. “It’s one of the cheapest tournaments, and we give out prizes all weekend. There will be trophies for the finalists, free T-shirts for everyone,” said Bennett. Deadline to sign up is March 14 by 10 p.m. Says Carol Stevens, Kiwanis member and former Oakland Park mayor, “It’s a great fundraiser for us. We have kids, teenagers, right on up to seniors playing.” The Backpack Program consists of members buying or collecting donated canned goods, pasta or other nonperishable food items and placing them into backpacks. Backpacks are given to disadvantaged students Weekly. “That’s one of the premier projects that we work with,” said Michael Goldstein, past president. “We were informed that in the four elementary schools in our area [a lot of students] eat subsidized breakfast and lunch. They have no food or limited food over the weekend.” Goldstein estimates the number of families served by the program has grown to 30, up from 22 during March of last year. Along with helping to feed needy students, Oakland Park Kiwanis members participate in a pet therapy program, reading program, collect cell phones for Women In Distress, knit blankets for children and a myriad of other programs. “We’re a busy club,” said Stevens. To sign up, call 954-5616180.Oakland Park Kiwanis Tennis Tournament, March 17 and 18Oakland Park – Players who enter into the Oakland Park Kiwanis Club’s 19th Annual Tennis Tournament can help Kiwanis members continue in their spirit of giving.

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24 The Pelican Friday, March 2, 2012 using my uorescents. This keeps my clients cooler while they workout. We block the western afternoon sunlight with blinds to keep the heat out. I removed as many light bulbs as I could in my studio and still have enough light for evening classes. When my clients aren’t using equipment, I unplug it and do the same with my computer. When I leave the studio, I turn off the breakers. I purchased non-electric spinning bikes to save energy.” She continues. “Our home is run the same way. I bike to work instead of driving. We use blinds to keep the house cooler, and seldom use air conditioning. When we leave we turn off the fans. We run the dryer in the evening when it’s cooler so it doesn’t create heat and we hang clothes in the patio to dry. We use the recommended new light bulbs, and our pool pump is run for only one hour each day.” Of course she recycles everything she can and uses only green products. “I’ve always felt this way because our electric bill is our biggest bill in the summer and it has dropped considerably. In the tness center my bill is $130. As we cool off it drops to between $40 and $70. I forgot to mention that instead of using paper products to clean the equipment, I cut up old towels into a handy size and we use those instead. I take them home, launder them and they’re ready to go again. When I do use paper I choose Publix recycled green wise products. “About the centerThe owner of 31Ten Fitness is young, full of energy and likes to be called Elizabeth. She is a certi ed personal trainer and tness instructor. She’s also a certi ed Silver Sneaker trainer who has worked with seniors and been trained speci cally help those with limitations because of hip, knee and shoulder replacements as well as heart and blood pressure issues. Just before this interview took place, Elizabeth was working with Anahid and Samwin Armoyan who were quick to say, “She’s an angel. My husband is recovering from open heart surgery and Elizabeth is helping him return to full strength. As long as he’s here, I work out, too, and get the bene t. Our son encourages us to do the most we can do. Elizabeth is making that possible.” After bidding her clients a friendly goodbye, Elizabeth says, “We are a tness and pilates studio for all ages, all shapes and all sizes at all tness levels. We’re a small business with six certi ed instructors. We offer classes with six to 12 people and we do individual personal training. The center is open seven days a week and is a friendly, nonintimidating place. Bandit, my boxer, greets every newcomer and barks his approval.” Another client of this tness center is Doreen Gauthier who says, “Exercise for most people is a chore, but Elizabeth and her staff make every individual seem so special that sweating, huf ng and puf ng becomes less of a drudge. She does everything she can to make exercise work for you in terms of time, money and results.” Married with a 12 year old daughter, Elizabeth has had her studio for 2 years. She says, “Before starting my own business, I taught at and was the aerobic coordinator for Pompano tness, formerly Gold’s gym. When I was in college, working as a bartender, I intended to become a pharmacist. I changed my mind and decided I could help people more by getting them t. I like the idea of good nutrition and exercise over pills. I switched my focus, and attended school at World Fitness Association. After that I worked on certi cation by attending workshops for spinning, pilates, personal training, tness and all of the options. I became certi ed in each. I love what I do and I see the bene ts my clients are getting. It’s a rewarding career which I have never regretted.” Congratulations on your FPL Award and your concern for the environment. For class times and fees visit the web site at 31ten t.com or call 954-532-3497. Fitness center awardContinued from page 8 SightingsContinued from page 13 See SIGHTINGS on page 26OngoingPancake Breakfast – Every third Sunday of the month, the St. Elizabeth’s of Hungry Parish hosts a pancake breakfast at 3331 NE 10 Terrace, Pompano Beach. The breakfast is from 7:30 a.m. to noon and bene ts the Parish and cafeteria maintenance. 954-263 8415. Alzheimer’s Caregivers Support Group – The NE Focal Point Alzheimer’s Day Care Center, located at 301 NW 2nd Avenue in Deer eld Beach, offers a weekly Caregiver’s Support Group every Wednesday from 10 a.m. to noon. Food Drive – NE Focal Point is manning a drop off non-perishable donations collection Monday through Friday from 8:20 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at 227 NW 2 St., Deer eld Beach. 954-4804449. Zonta International meets on the third Tuesday of the month at Duffy’s Diner, 401 N. Federal Hwy., Deer eld Beach, at 11:15 a.m. Zonta International is a classi ed service organization of executives and professionals working together to advance the status of women locally and

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The Pelican 25 Friday, March 2, 2012 The Pelican -part of doing business. Call us at 954-783-8700. the culmination of 12 years of effort by the Hillsboro Lighthouse Preservation Society to provide a permanent home for its artifacts and exhibits. The building also contains an education room for public programs. Curator is LarsOle Mortensen who comes to south Florida from the McCarthy-Kennicott Historical Society and Museum at the foot of the Kennicott Glacier in Alaska, and the Santa Maria Valley Historical Society in California. Also on staff are archivist Jacqui May and museum manager Judy Knobel. Knobel said the museum’s contents won’t be on display until May when an of cial grand opening will be held. Across the Inlet, on the grounds of the US Coast Guard, a bronze statue of the Barefoot Mailman commemorating Ed Hamilton, the most famous of the postmen who trudged the beach delivering mail to South Florida, will be rededicated. The bronzed statue will replace the concrete and marble one created in 1973 by Frank Varga which had deteriorated badly. This week the base is being poured. It will be lifted into place by a crane. Hillsboro Beach Historian Carmen McGarry, who is been raising money to replace the statue, said she hopes the original will be taken to sea and sunk as an attraction for divers. “I think that would be a tting eulogy for the Barefoot Mailman,” she said this week. McGarry has raised $20,000 of the $35,000 needed to cast the solid-bronze gure. Varga, working with a foundry in Detroit, was again the artist-in-charge. Names of those giving $500 or more will be commemorated on a plaque. Festivities at the 105th anniversary celebration in Inlet Park are 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. and include cake, music and food. Boat transportation to the lighthouse is $15 for the public and free for members of the Hillsboro Lighthouse Preservation Society. The rst boat leaves the park at 9 a.m.; the last one at 2:30 p.m. There will be no tours of the lighthouse itself as the building is closed for repairs. “This is an incredible time for the Hillsboro Lighthouse Preservation Society as we have nally found a place that will allow for the continued growth of our educational mission and future exhibits,” said Society President Art Makenian. “We are delighted that the showcase of our new museum corresponds with the 105th anniversary celebration of the light.” LighthouseContinued from page 1

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26 The Pelican Friday, March 2, 2012 probably the 605-yard, Par 5, 7th hole. It is tree lined with a dogleg to the right and a fairway that rises slightly, “just enough to throw you off with your approach shot,” said MacLaughlin. The course is built around two lakes and playable sand traps. The 18th hole, like the 7th, presents a challenge with its sloping fairway and big undulating green which is bordered by one of the lakes. Long-ball hitters will try to carry the lake; others take the dogleg approach. MacLaughlin has been at the club for 30 years and remembers arguably its most spectacular moment when one of the ladies in the LGA shot back-to-back holes-in-one, on the 2nd and 5th holes. More remarkable was the fact that she was 80 years old. She performed the feat with a four wood and became instantly famous. “Good Morning America,” along with local television stations, came to the golf course to interview her and Governor Jeb Bush played nine holes with her at the golf club. When MacLaughlin joined the PGA and became a golf professional, he brought his business background to Crystal Lake which he uses today to give golfers a very fair shake. Crystal Lake is a semiprivate/ daily fee facility which MacLaughlin believes gives the best golfing value around. A $99 annual Players’ Card offers year-round rates as low as $18 per round. Right now, in the height of the season, green fees are $40 before noon, $34 after noon with the Player Card. “We are very conscious of the South Florida economy and how it affects disposable income. We are in a position to offer affordable golf at a quality course,” MacLaughlin said. “We’re trying to do everything we can to give back to the residents,” MacLaughlin said. The consumer–friendly approach and the new clubhouse are attracting new card holders and right now new evening leagues are forming. One new league for the ladies includes nine holes and dinner at the grill. A Friday Night Couples League is also forming. The Club Pro, Jonathon Sprague, will be holding a Junior Clinic this summer and is also available for private lessons. For more information, call 954-943-2902. Crystal LakeContinued from page 18 SightingsContinued from page 24worldwide through service and advocacy. 561-392-2223. Hospice Volunteers Needed – VITAS Innovative Hospice Care of Broward needs volunteers who can make friendly visits to terminally ill patients and their families, provide relief for caregivers, visit veterans and more. A two-day orientation is required. 954-777-5396. Island City Art Walk – Every third Friday of the month from 7 to 10 p.m., Wilton Manors’ Wilton Drive is home to the Island City Art Walk. Over 40 local artists show off their works in Wilton Drive’s cafes, boutiques, restaurants and other businesses. The Art Walk runs until April. All Breed Obedience and Rally Training Classes – Dog training classes are available at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Call 954-563-7061 for schedule. Wilton Manors Green Market – Saturdays and Sundays at Hagen Park 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. fresh produce, baked goods, herbs, spices, doggie treats, pickles, jams, infused vinegars, pasta and more are available at the Green Market. 954-531-5363. Pompano Beach Green Market – Every Saturday at the corner of West Atlantic Boulevard and North Dixie Highway from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., fresh vegetables, crafts, plants, food and music are available at the Green Market. 954-292-8040.See SIGHTINGS on page 29

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The Pelican 27 Friday, March 2, 2012 front restaurant,” Williams said. Oceans is now celebrating its 10-year anniversary which resulted in a complete change of identity. The new restaurant offers oceanfront dining, indoor/outdoor bar, a menu that features fresh local sh, live music and more recently a series of later night events to attract a young crowd. “We work on keeping our ideas fresh and try to reinvent ourselves every few years so that we always have something exciting to offer our clientele,” said operations manager Danielle Williams. This summer and last summer, two “exciting” events were on the calendar, a Havana White Night Party featuring salsa dancers, hand-rolled cigars, Cuban treats and $5 mojitos and Thursday Night Fever where the music of the ‘70s reigned and customers won prizes for best costumes and best twisting. Three years ago, Oceans was slightly reinvented inside and outside with a new color scheme and the addition of a sushi bar. Menu changes were made also. “I was very excited to give Oceans 234 a fresh face so that our guests had a great experience and something new to look forward to. The creation of the sushi bar was an addition that was prompted by the growing trend in sushi. I felt that it was a nice dynamic to add to a beach-Oceans 234 is one of Deer eld Beach’s signature beachfront restaurants today, and in its place 41 years ago was another signature eatery, The Ranch House, which given its location lasted far longer in this area than any other store in the chain. The metamorphosis could not be more extreme. From beach burger shack to sophisticated restaurant, Oceans has come a long way. The vision began with Lois and Joseph Pallaria who bought the Ranch House in 1999 and operated it for three years. Then they oversaw a complete rebuild of the structure and Williams and her team have many new parties, concepts and additions in mind for the coming year.Oceans 234, 234 N. Ocean Blvd., Deer eld Beach. 954-428-2539Oceans 234 owners replaced old standby with vibrant new restaurant Oceans 234’s popularity is so much more than just the view in Deer eld Beach. Honey soy glazed salmon

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28 The Pelican Friday, March 2, 2012 Advertise with The Pelican 954-783-8700 By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFF Wilton Manors – Tedd Marefka usually makes his grandmother’s spaghetti sauce recipe just for family and friends. But he’s hoping to make it for a lot more people at the Taste of Italy. On March 14, A Taste of Italy in Wilton Manors, organized by the Wilton Manors Community Affairs Advisory Board, or CAAB, will take place from 6 to 8 p.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive; doors open at 5:30 p.m. Dinner, $8 per person or $15 per couple, includes spaghetti with meatballs, salad, desert and drink. Attendees are invited to bring their own wine. “We are making [everything from] CAAB breaks out family recipes for Taste of Italythe spaghetti sauce to the meatballs to putting the filling inside the cannolis. We’re doing it all,” said Sherrill McCarthy, CAAB member. For years, CAAB has been allocating funds to various community organizations and events. McCarthy said events like Taste of the Island and the Westside Association of Wilton Manors’ Garlic Fest have gotten money from the CAAB to start but now don’t need help to keep going. “They’re off and running all on their own. We kind of jump start things,” she said. “We give them a certain amount every year and they develop their budget on what they’re going to spend it on,” said Vice Mayor Tom Green. Now, with Taste of Italy, board members will be trying to raise money that will benefit Kids In Distress, located in Wilton Manors. “We’re spending money and now we’re making money to give to the charities,” said McCarthy. “[The commissioners] like that we’re not just giving money to people. We have a board that’s willing to raise money but brings the community together also.” “It’s hard enough to get people to be on a board. But when they’re willing to work to raise additional money, I think that’s outstanding civic pride,” said Green. McCarthy said all the supplies for Taste of Italy are coming out of the member’s own pockets. As for the sauce, “It’s a very mild Italian red sauce full of garlic and flavor,” said Marefka. “It’s not as sweet as some other sauces but it’s got a lot of chunks of tomatoes. So if you like a hearty sauce, come join us.” For more, call 954-390-2120.

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The Pelican 29 Friday, March 2, 2012 Rev. Hyvenson Joseph WORSHIP DIRECTORY: Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad. his belt including two, 1997 and 1999, at Deer eld Beach High School. He’s also taken Ely to two Regional Championships and six District Championships during his tenure. This season, including playoff games, the Tigers are 28 and 2 with their last defeat coming against Vanguard in Ocala on Dec. 30, 2011 after a 16-game winning streak. Pompano Beach Mayor Lamar Fisher remembers watching the 2007 team but “this team, in my opinion, is probably better.” Fisher watched the Tigers beat McArthur and Atlantic. “They won handsomely,” he said. “Everybody just played truly as a team and their defense is incredible. [Randall] runs a tight ship.” Principal Karlton Johnson said he’s also noticed teamwork trumping individuality on the court. “They’re a great team. They’ve got a lot of unity,” he said. “You never see them fussing at one another.” He also had high praise for Randall, especially when it comes to how well players are doing in the classroom. “This is a great group of guys. They’re focused academically and have been together four years, most of ‘em. [Randall’s] doing an extraordinary job. You can’t ask for a better coach than that.” Johnson also praised Ely’s varsity cheerleading squad for its second place nish in the state nals. And regardless of whether or not the Tigers grab another title, Ely’s students, teachers, parents, administrators and staff will be celebrating their basketball season as well as the “A” grade the school received in January and all of this year’s accomplishments. On March 10, there will be a parade at 9:30 a.m. followed by a pep rally at 10:30 a.m. and food and music at the school’s football stadium at 11:30 a.m. “I’m happy that [athletic] success also comes with being an “A” school,” said Johnson.SightingsContinued from page 26 The 20th Annual Florida Renaissance Festival will take place every weekend through March 11 at Quiet Waters Park, 401 S. Powerline Road, in Deer eld Beach. For more, visit www.ren-fest. com or call 954-776-1642. Kayaks are available for rental every Saturday and Sunday at Richardson Historic Park, 1937 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. The cost is $15 per hour for single kayaks and $23 per hour for tandem kayaks. Group rates are also available. Visit www.AtlanticCoastKayak.com or call 954-781-0073. Every rst Friday of the month the Pompano Beach Tennis Center 920 NE 18 Ave., holds a family friendly tennis clinic from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. The cost is $10 per person. Refreshments will be served. Call 954-786-4115 to reserve a spot. Ping Pong Nights – Every Monday from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Ping Pong Nights is held at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. The cost is $1. All ages can participate. 954-390-2130. Bingo – The American Legion Auxiliary Unit 142, 171 SW 2 St., Pompano Beach, has Bingo on Tuesdays at 7 p.m. Food is available from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. 954-9422448. Pompano Beach Fishing Pier 222 N. Pompano Beach Blvd. 954-786-4073 Anglin’s Pier at Commercial Boulevard, Lauderdale-By-The-Sea. 954-4919403 Deer eld Beach International Pier 200 NE 21st Ave. 954-426-9206 or 954-9431488. Pompano Beach Rotary Club – Meets every Friday at 12:15 p.m. at Galuppis, 1103 N. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. Call 954-786-3274.TigersContinued from page 3

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30 The Pelican Friday, March 2, 2012 The Pelican • 954-783-8700 Classi eds Call 954-545-0013 HELP WANTEDADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT For Property Management Firm. Data Entry, Client Contact, Assist Executive. FT / PT. 954-7727012. 3-9 POMPANO AREA – PART TIME SEAMSTRESS WANTED CALL 954-9416493…. 9 – 5 PM. 3-2 LOCAL PEST CONTROL CO Looking For Quality Sales/Service Tech. Must Be Dependable, Team Player, Good Drivers License & People Skills. Will Train Right Person. ALSO Of ce Assistant – Computer – People & Phone Skills Needed. Fax Resume 954418-3982. 3-9 SEEKING EMPLOYMENTTUTOR – RETIRED TEACHER – Willing To Work With Elementary School Age Child. Call 954-978-2999. 3-2 HOME HEALTH AIDE I Will Take Care Of The Elderly. Honest, Kind, Loving. With Own Car. Live – In Or Live – Out. 954-588-3102. 3-2 EXPERIENCED POLISH & SOME ENGLISH Speaking Lady. Will Take Good Care Of Your Loved One. Help With ADL. Own Car. Light Cleaning Available. 954-319-8376. 3-2 LPN AT CNA PRICES – Will Give Tender Care To Your Loved Ones. Live Out Broward Area Only. Dependable & Honest. References Available. Your Car Or Mine For Shopping & Appts. 954-895-7850. (15 Yrs. Exp. ) CNA / HHA – EXPERIENCED CNA /HHA Seeking Immediate Employment As Caregiver. Prerequisite: Must Be Elderly In Need Of Personal Care, Single, Private Duty (Hourly) 786-443-8519. 3-9 LPN / EMT – QUALITY Care For Sick Or Elderly. Night Or Day. Flexible Hrs. 15 Yrs Exp. & Refs. Available. 954-3999929 Cell 305-720-0080. 3-2 CERTIFIED CNA – Honest, Reliable, Seeking Position To Take Care Of Your Loved Ones. Live In Or Out. Excellent References. 954-682-1198. 3-2 EXPERIENCED CAREGIVER – Loving And Reliable Seeking Position – 12 Hour Shifts And Overnights. Excellent References. 561-7035550. 3-2 SERVICES DANNY BOY ELECTRIC – Lic & Insured. Lic. #EC13004811. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. 24/Hr Service. 954-290-1443. Beat Any Written Estimate. Sr, Discount. 3-9 AAA AFFORDABLE FLOORS – Carpet – Tile Wood & Bamboo Floors – Moldings – Painting. TRASH REMOVAL Comm / Res. Same Day Service. FREE Est. 954646-1889. 3-9 RETIRED PLUMBING CONTRACTOR Looking For Work. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. CFC 027532. Low Rates!! 954-496-6420. 3-2 FLAT – TILE ROOF REPAIR COATINGS – Leak Repair Experts – 30 Years Experience. Call Today For A FREE Estimate. 954-258-7677. 3-9 CALL BRENDAN THE HANDYMAN – Construction & Repairs. Carpentry, Plumbing, Roo ng, Masonry, Windows, Painting, Decking, Tile. FREE Estimates. 954-7736134. Emergency Calls. 3-2 REPAIRS – RESTRETCH AND INSTALLATION OF CARPET. CALL MIKE 954675-3810. 3-2 AAA AFFORDABLE TRASH REMOVAL – Garage Clean Ups – Condos – Apts. – Furniture – Appliances – Trees. Lic / Ins. FREE Est. Same Day Service. 954-646-1889. 3-9 HANDYMAN – PAINTING – CARPENTRY – Pressure Cleaning. Decks! Everything Around The House. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. Call 561-350-3781. 3-16 MOORE PLUMBING PLUMBING SERVICES – Big Jobs – Small Jobs. We Do It All. Remodeling & Repairs. Lic. & Insured. C.C. Accepted. Call 954-772-4600. 3-30 HONEST HANDYMAN – HOME & BUILDING Maintenance/Improvements. No Job Too Small. Fast Friendly Service. Reasonable Rates. Local Resident/Homeowner. Call Today For Your FREE Upfront Quote. No Deposit Required. 754-366-1915. 3-2 HOME/OFFICE REPAIRS By State Certified G.C. Reasonable. CGC025802. More Information Call 954815-1007. C GOT JUNK? DUMP TRUCK – CLEANUPS Trees/ Landscape, Yard Fill. Paint/ Pressure Wash/ Roofs/Home Repairs – Welding, Etc. Dave 954-818-9538. 3-9 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIESNew GREEN technology. New defroster control saves energy in home refrigerators, commercial chillers. Patented. All optical. Simple mfg. Strategic partners needed..www.NewAvionics.Com. 954-568-1991. C MUSICIANS WANTEDThe American Legion Symphonic Band is now accepting new members for the 2011-2012 season. College age to “seasoned seniors” are welcome. Rehearsals are held on Wed. evenings at American Legion Post 142 in Pompano. Percussionists, euphonium and clarinet players are especially needed. If you enjoy “making music,” call Jim McGonigal, Music Director at 954-647-0700 for more info.DEEP WATER VILLA – DOCKPOMPANO BEACH 2/2 1700 SQ FT. Screened Fla Room. Private Yard. W/D. 4 Park. No Fixed Bridges. Community Pool. Deeded Dock.. 2 Blocks Beach. $285,000. Coldwell Banker – Barbara Call 954629-1324. 3-16 MISC. RENTALSBOCA RATON – Spaces Available – Evenings And Sunday For Meetings, Dance Lessons, Etc. PLENTY OF PARKING! Rent By The Hour! Call Nick 954-415-4937. 3-2THRIFT STORETHRIFT STORE GRAND OPENING 5130 N Federal Ft Laud. 2nd Floor (No Clothing) Beautiful Household Items. From $2 – Call 954-839-8182. 3-2 HOMES FOR RENTPOMPANO 2/2 Cottage Style House. Large Yard With Fish Pond. $1100 Month – Company Bills For Electric & Water. 541 NE 34 St. Darci 954-783-3723. 3-23 CO-OP SALESPOMPANO BEACH 1/1 On Water, Dockage Available At Your Door. $59,500. Coldwell Banker – Barbara – 954-6291324. 3-16 REAL ESTATE WANTED I BUY HOUSES!! CASH!! AS IS! QUICK CLOSE! ANY AREA – ANY CONDITION! NO EQUITY OK. CALL NOW 954-914-2355. 4-20 CONDOS FOR SALELIGHTHOUSE POINT 2/1.5 CONDO In A GREAT AREA. Pets Allowed. $124,900. Call Barbara – Balistreri Realty. 954-263-7129. 3-2 POMPANO LEISUREVILLE 55+ ---1/1 – No Land Lease. Totally Upgraded. New Appliances – New A/C. Movein Condition. Pet Allowed. FREE Golf – 2 Pools. Furniture Optional. Bob 203-430-0235. 3-2 WOW – DIRECT Intracoastal Views – N Riverside Dr. Pompano. 2/2 Semi – Updated Condo. $209,900. Seller Says “No Realtors Please” Call Better Homes & Gardens – Judy Peasley 954-304-4518. 3-9 DEERFIELD BEACH 2/2 Completely Redone. Granite Kitchen, New Cabinets. S.S. Appliances. 20” Porcelain Tile Floors. Travistine Stone Baths. Freshly Painted. 1st Floor. Less Than A Mile To Beach. $84,900. Call 631-873-8715. 3-9 WOW!! ON THE INTRACOASTAL. Owner Financing. $99,500 Firm. New C / A, Paint & Carpeting. Boat Slip When Available. 954-6820485. 3-2 LAUDERDALE BY THE SEA – Furnished 1/1.5 Condo $115,000. Heated Pool. Ocean Access. On Canal. 1481 S Ocean Blvd. Apt 228. Call 586549-5223. 3-2

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The Pelican 31 Friday, March 2, 2012 Classi eds Call 954-545-0013 Get to know your local Merchants CONDOS FOR RENTDEERFIELD BEACH 2/2 CONDO – Corner Unit, Pool. $800 $825. Good Credit Required. No Pets Or Realtors. 631-885-3342. 3-2 POMPANO BEACH 1 / 1.5 At Sea Haven – Immaculate Condition. Fully Furnished / Leather.. Magni cent Rec & Pool Facilities – On Waterfront. $950 Month. 954-913-7383. 3-16 OCEANFRONT CONDO – POMPANO BEACH CLUB. Furn. 2/2 Newly Updated 15th Floor W/Fabulous Views Of Ocean & Intracoastal. Restaurant, 2 Pools, Bar, Gym. Available April $2,000 Per Month. May Thru November $1,500 Per Month. Call Audrey 570-246-9240 Cell Or E-mail audrey@chantre.com 3-9 APTS FOR RENTDEERFIELD/POMPANO BEACH 1 BR & 2 BR APTS FOR RENT. Remodeled, Paint, Tile, Etc. W & D On Site. Pool. Pet Friendly. Call George 954-809-5030. 3-9 POMPANO 1/1 & 2/1 – E OF FEDERAL – Tiled. 10’ Overhang. Walk To Everything. Park At Your Door. 954-2546325. 3-16 BOX BOLD POMPANO BEACH – 2/2 Furnished. Large Ef ciency With Kitchen. Fully Furnished. Cable, Internet. Pool, Laundry. 500’ To The Beach. Weekly – Monthly – Yearly. 954-2948483 Or 248-736-1533. 3-16 POMPANO GARDENS $795 – 1/1 $200 Deposit. Nice Area. Minutes To Beach. Pet OK. Please Call 954-515-2554. 3-16 POMPANO BEACH CLUB NORTH – 1/1 Unfurnished 5th Floor $1,200 Month Annual. Oceaniew, Indoor Parking, 24 Hour Security. Done Deal Realty. E. Robbins. 954-3440709. 3-16 POMPANO GARDENS $795 – 1/1 $200 Deposit. Nice Area – Minutes To Beach – Pet OK. Please Call 954-515-2554. 2-17 POMPANO BEACH 1/1 SW. C/A $725 – 2/1 $895 – NE 2/1 $950 – Townhouse 2/1.5 $1095. ALL FREE WATER. Rent + $70 Application Moves – U – In. 954-781-6299. 3-9 POMPANO MCNAB RD & NE 18 AVENUE – 1 & 2 Bedrooms Furnished/ Unfurnished. $695 $950 And Up. Pool, Tile Floors. Central A/C. 954-6102327. 3-2 POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 Bedroom From $495. Easy Move-in. 1/2 OFF DEPOSIT. Remodeled. Great Location. 954-783-1088 For More Info. 3-9 LUXURY BEACH PADS FOR RENT! Pompano Grand Opening: FREE 32” Flat Screen HDTV! Newly Renovated in 2012 One – Bedrooms & Studio Apts., 75 Yards From Private Beach Access, Eastern Exposure. New Kitchens & Baths, Granite Counter Tops, Central Air, Pool, Laundry, Dedicated Parking, Near Pier & Downtown. All Bills Paid! Includes Water, Electric, Premium Cable TV And WIFI. Furnished Or Unfurnished. Short Or Long Stays. No Utility Deposits. Small Pets Welcome. Only 9x, 8x, 7 Left! Pax Properties – 888-729-4948 Or 954-603-8857. Photos At www.beachpads.net. 3-2 COMMERCIAL FOR RENT-SALEPOMPANO COMMERCIAL OFFICE Spaces Available. Ranging From As Low As $500 To $700 Depending On Square Footage. Please Call Darci At 954783-3723. 3-23 DEERFIELD BEACH – Retail Of ce Warehouse – 700 Sq Ft With Loft. A/C, Bathroom. $575 Per Month. Call For More Info 561-654-1331 Or 561-9985681. 3-9 OFFICES FOR RENTPROFESSIONAL OFFICE SPACE Within Law Firm. 2 Of ces Available. From $600 And Up. Includes Use Of Extras! Call To Discuss. 954781-8230. 3-2 FURNITUREBEDSETS – King $180 – Queen $130 – Full $110 – Twin $90. 5 Pc. Bedroom Set $399. Frames $39. 954-465-6498. 3-9 DOLPHIN COCKTAIL TABLE – Cast Brass, Glass Is 5/8 Inch Thick. Can Email Photo. $1500 Or Best Offer. 954-242-8815. 3-2 MISC.NICE OLD THINGS WANTED – Watches, Fountain pens, Gold & Silver Jewelry, Sterling Silverware, World War II Memorabilia, etc. Call Dirk 954-709-0191. 3-9 OLD NAUTICAL STUFF WANTED By Collector. Sextants, Officers Watches, Captain Clocks, Compasses, etc. Marine / Submarine. Dirk 954-709-0191. 3-9 OLD OMEGA & JAEGER & LeCOULTRE Watches & Clocks – Every Kind & Condition Wanted. Call Dirk 954-709-0191. 3-9 BABY GRAND PIANO – Cherry Wood – Like New!! $3,500. 561-381-0361 – Delray Beach. 3-16 LIKE NEW STATIONARY BIKE Floor Model $50. ROCKIN AB ROCKET $50. Like New! ToolsMisc Items. Pompano 954-943-0250. 3-2

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32 The Pelican Friday, March 2, 2012 popular,” says kitchen artiste Stephen Hoy as he brings a sample portion to the table. The velvety soup is loaded with tender crustacean meat and bursting with maritime flavors. Appetizers include homemade fish dip, spicy chili lime shrimp, Maryland crab cakes, stuffed Portabella mushrooms, Grouper finger basket and the everpopular Tsunami plate of sesame seared Ahi tuna with marinated calamari atop seaweed salad. Shellfish aficionados can sidle up to the bar for some raw or Rockefeller oysters, steamed Little Neck clams, cocktail shrimp or garlic butter mussels. With several frosty beers on tap and a good selection of red and white wines, Lito’s is also a great spot to catch all the big games on the many flat screen TVs located throughout the restaurant. “I would say that our Maine lobster rolls, our pulled pork and our Philly cheesesteak sandwiches are the three biggest sellers,” says Joan without hesitation. “But we are also well-known for our delicious 10-oz. Angus beef burgers.” As the name implies, Lito’s offers a wealth of delectable favorites from the land and the sea. The juicy 12-oz. ribeye steak, the fall-offthe-bone full rack of ribs, the glorious chicken wings, the tempting Teriyaki ginger Wings and ribs are house specialties. The wings come with a host of sauces such as raspberry, teriyaki, honey and garlic parm while the ribs can be enjoyed with a avorful dry rub or with 3 types of BBQ sauce.salmon, the plump blackened shrimp, the zesty Cajun catfish and the seductive grilled lobster tails are just a few of the appealing items on the menu. “Everything is made inhouse including desserts and we are very flexible with respect to food preparation,” says Joan. Pompano resident Vicki Thornton is a regular. She says, “The food is great and they have an outstanding key lime pie as well.” Enjoy!Malcolm McClintock holds an MBA and has lived in Thailand, Spain, France, Mexico, Canada and the US where he has developed a deep appreciation for world gastronomy. The Seafood Trio includes shrimp, mussels and clams prepared scampi, marinara or Fra Diavolo style over linguini. Lito’sContinued from page 20Joan Hoy, Stephanie Lamana, Stephen and Don Hoy show off some Lito’s most popular dishes.

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The Pelican 33 Friday, March 2, 2012 Capt. RJ Boyle is an experienced angler in South Florida. His studio is located in Lighthouse Point. Call 954-420-5001. RJ BoyleRJ BOYLE STUDIOSThis weekend, I’m planning on bustin’ up some mutton snappers. I am going to anchor and fish off Boca in about 80 feet of water. We will put a chum basket down on our anchor With a little chum and a little luck you’ll have a big snapper weekend at sealine in front of the boat as well as have one hanging at the surface; the menhaden chum will be our chum of choice. A light north current will usually yield the most fish but we have caught them on all directions of current. We will fish three rods in our spread. We will fish a flat line [no weight] out behind the boat about 30 yards. On this rod we usually fish a triple-hooked sardine. This rod will catch snappers occasionally but we use it to catch kings and sailfish that swim up the chum slick on the surface. We fish a second rod on the bottom. On that rod we use a long fluorocarbon leader, about 25 ft. We also use an Owner Mutu light circle hook 5/0 on one end and a barrel swivel on the other. On the main line of the rod we will fish a 4 to 6 ounce lead. On the circle hook we will fish a live pilchard or a dead sardine. The bottom rod is the main mutton rod. Our third rod will be an 8 to 12 lb. spinning rod combo that we will fish a small jig on. We constantly hold this rod. We will let out the jig with a silverside on the end. The yellowtail snappers will be all over this rod when they turn on. Allow the chum slick to work for a while. Some days it may take up to 30 minutes for the snappers to really start biting.As always, if you’ve got questions visit the shop Get tight!

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34 The Pelican Friday, March 2, 2012 The Garcias had intended to bring their issue to the city commission meeting that same night. Although they had received a favorable ruling, they decided to speak at the meeting anyway. “We wanted them (the commission) to know how antiquated the law is,” Donna Garcia said. The couple also wanted to know why code enforcement of cers can’t rule on a violation and enact penalties on the spot rather than the matter going to a hearing. It took a month for the Garcias and their neighbors to get a hearing and another two weeks for the order. Lady Go Diver owner Arilton Pavon then had 14 days to remove his vessel which at press time he apparently had. But for the Garcias, the two-months that they endured the boat’s comings and goings was infuriating. “Why is there Dive boatContinued from page 1a residential code of it’s not to protect the residents and homeowners?” Donna Garcia said this week. “We had the feeling that the BSO code enforcers felt helpless too. “ Pavan and the dock owner Brian Cochran were represented at the magistrate hearing by attorney Tom Connick and Garcia said she and her neighbors were cross examined by the attorney. “It was like let’s put the neighbors on trial. It was humiliating. We thought it was to be a hearing, not a court case,” Garcia said. The city code addressing docking and mooring facilities says “… commercial use of docks in residentially zoned districts is prohibited. This includes, but shall not necessarily be limited to the prohibition of boarding cruise parties at a dock located at residentially zoned property.” The Lady Go Diver was not being boarded at the 7th Court dock. Pavan has a three-way agreement with the city and the county to use the oating dock at Sullivan Park to take on passengers. Steinfeld’s determination was based on the ”intent” of the code. The magistrate wrote that the code does not de ne commercial use and that he went online at www. de itions, USLegal.com to get a de nition. That source de nes commercial use as “one undertaken for a business purpose rather than a hobby, recreation or education…directly or indirectly for nancial gain.” Connick argued for Pavan that only activities uniquely related to business, similar to loading of parties ( which Pavan was not doing) should be prohibited. Code enforcement of cer Jenny Walsh had acted on a complaint from another neighborhood in early January before the 46-foot Go Diver appeared at SE 7 Court. The boat, she said, is commercially registered and bears the name and phone number on its hull. City Planning Director Jerry Ferguson testi ed that if the activities on a commercial boat were the same as a private boat, it would not necessarily be a violation of the code. Merely docking a commercial boat at a residence is not a violation, Ferguson said. He used as an example, The Gallant Lady, a 50-foot corporate vessel docked in Hillsboro Beach, and said it would not violate Deer eld’s code. Pavan, contacted this week at his dive shop, Dixie Divers, was reluctant to speak about the situation. “I docked the boat a few blocks away for 11 years without a complaint,” he said. Reportedly, he has found a berth for the Go Diver at Marina One on Federal Highway. Dist. 1 City Commissioner Joe Miller said he was sympathetic to both parties but added that he would like to see the code “clari ed… it should be clear. Vagueness could lead to a lawsuit.”

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The Pelican 35 Friday, March 2, 2012 time,” Strock remembers. The system, vertical concrete barriers running east and west with rocks placed at the east end, was designed by University of Florida scientist Per Brun and installed in 1963. The limestone rocks, weighing up to eight tons each, were brought in from Dade County by rail, trucked from the Seaboard Railway Station to the beach and lifted into place by crane. He remembers the permitting from the state and Army Corps taking “a matter of months, not years” as it would be today. Once the groins were installed, the sand stabilized giving this city one of the county’s nest beaches. Strock, who was the city engineer at the time, believes other communities would have used the groin method too but for the Army Corps’ edict: “no more groins.” Today, the rock piles are being blamed for the loss of sand on Hillsboro’s north beach. That town has commissioned a study of possible permanent solutions to its continual erosion problem and that study will be discussed at a commission meeting Tuesday, March 6. Said Hillsboro’s beach commissioner Claire Schubert, “We are looking into every possible method of preserving our beach. Groins will be one thing discussed. From what I have been told, the Army Corps has become less rigid about groin installation if you can prove a need.” Strock is less certain Deer eld’s groins are responsible for Hillsboro’s lack of sand. With the groins having trapped all the sand they can hold, sediment being pumped from the Boca Raton Inlet moves with the litteral drift to beaches south of here he said. “Once the beach is stable, the groins are not trapping sand,” he said. “Deer eld’s beach is not taking more than it can handle.” Schubert is more inclined to believe that the rocks push the sand off shore and it doesn’t come back to the beach for about a mile south of the last groin leaving an area very much exposed to winds and tide. Whatever the situation, south Florida’s coastline belongs to an ecological system that starts in Georgia, Strock said, and sediment from rivers in Georgia has been found on beaches in Ft. Pierce. “Historically, the beaches were nourished naturally by inland erosion,” Strock said. “But we stopped river erosion, so the sand doesn’t get to the beaches now.” At the time of Deer eld’s groin project, the powers that be in Hillsboro Beach did not want to change the appearance of their beaches. Later, when he went into private practice, Strock was Hillsboro’s town engineer for a time and he remembers a number of experiments being tried to combat erosion. None of them were successful. As one of a very few people familiar with groins, Strock was hired by governing agencies at New York Harbor, in New Jersey, North Carolina and on Florida’s west coast, but no more groins were ever built. He likens the current practice of nourishing beaches with new sand to painting a house. “You have to do it over and over again,” he said. And the disadvantage of trucking in sand is about more than the cost. Strock said, “It is about eroding Florida from the inside.” A resident of Little Harbor, Strock retired from engineering in 1985. At one time he was on the Broward County Erosion Prevention District Board. He remembers then that of cials in Sea Ranch Lakes, determined to combat their beach erosion, got permission to install what he calls “Venetian blinds” off shore. When the waves came crashing over the structures, they made horri c clanging sounds. “Sometimes you have to let history do the teaching,” he said. GroinsContinued from page 1 The Pelican Classi eds can save you time and money!

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36 The Pelican Friday, March 2, 2012