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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00090900/00285
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Title: Pompano Pelican
Uniform Title: Pompano Pelican
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: Pompano Pelican
Place of Publication: Pompano Beach
Publication Date: 02-03-2012
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Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Pompano Beach
Coordinates: 26.234722 x -80.125556 ( Place of Publication )
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
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System ID: UF00090900:00285

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Friday, February 3, 2012 Vol. XX, Issue 5 Call 954-783-8700 to Advertise Email: siren2415@gmail.com Pompano Beach • Deer eld Beach • Lighthouse Point • Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Wilton Manors • Oakland Park • Hillsboro Beach • The Galt • Palm Aire The P e l i c a n Pelican Visit us online at www.pompanopelican.com T h e The P e l i c a n Pelican Big hike in water bills prompts sewer rate studyBy Judy VikPELICAN STAFFLauderdale-By-The-Sea – Before of cials changed the method of calculating sewer bills for users in the southern end of town, the monthly base rate at the 96-unit Poinciana condo was $190. Now it’s $1,368. Cristy Furth, co-owner of the Blue Seas Courtyard motel, says the current rates are “a true hardship. This is atrocious.” Furth’s water/sewer bills at the motel doubled from $250 to $500 a month when the town switched from charging by meter size to charging by the unit. “There is no rationale for charging See SEWERS on page 28 Brown’s early entry into LBTS race gives him winning edge By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFLauderdaleBy-The-Sea – Absentee ballots and a methodical campaign helped Mark Brown carry all four precincts Tuesday to win election to Seat 3 on the Lauderdale-ByThe-Sea Town Commission. He drew support from 858 voters to defeat Edmund Malkoon by 249 votes. Brown announced his candidacy early when it appeared no one was taking on incumbent Commissioner Birute Ann Clottey, and sent a mailer that included an absentee ballot request form. Then he campaigned one-onone, “as you do in a small town,” an experience he called enlightening. He said at rst he believed that his professional background and name recognition as editor of a local newspaper were enough. “But people asked me why I was running,” he said, and he realized he had to articulate his reasons. Many See BROWN WINS on page 6 Former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney shakes hands with Lauderdale-By-The-Sea resident Richard Felago at a campaign event in Pompano Beach on Sunday. Romney won the Florida Republican Primary with 46 percent of the vote. [Photo by Michael d’Oliveira]By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach – When Andy Eddy looks at Mitt Romney, he sees the Republican candidate with the right background – business. “He has much more of a business background [than the other candidates],” said Eddy, a Deer eld Beach resident, at a Romney campaign event on Jan. 29 at the Emma Lou Olsen Center in Pompano Beach. “I have no gripes with anyone being wealthy . that’s the American Dream.” Eddy was one of hundreds who packed the center to capacity to hear the former Massachusetts governor speak. Romney won the state primary Tuesday with 46 percent of the vote. He has been criticized by the other Republican candidates on some of his past nancial decisions. Pompano Beach resident Catherine McPhail said she would prefer to support former Senator Rick Santorum but defeating Obama is the most important issue. “We have to beat Obama. Period. End of story.” Republican and Broward County Commissioner Chip LaMarca agrees with McPhail. “He’s our only chance at beating Barack Obama,” said Romney presses the esh in Pompano Beach See ROMNEY on page 2Challengers win in LHP, but supporters question GOP’s interventionBy Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFLighthouse Point – An organized Republican Party attempt to in uence the non-partisan commission election here apparently back red Tuesday when incumbents Susie Gordon and Tom Hasis were turned out of of ce. Gordon was defeated by schoolteacher Becky Lysengen by 314 votes; Hasis lost to former newspaper editor Earl Maucker by 127 votes. Mailers sent to voters by the SEE LHP ON PAGE 12Brown

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2 The PelicanFriday, February 3, 2012 The Pelican 954-783-8700 SightingsA community calendar of East Broward County. Please email information to siren2415@gmail.com LaMarca while onstage next to Romney. McPhail praised Romney on his work with the 2002 Winter Olympics in Salt Lake City, saying he cut through a lot of red tape to get the event back on track. According to an online NPR article, “Romney did restore sponsor and public con dence in the Olympic committee and erased a $400 million de cit. His operating budget nished with a $100 million surplus. But not included in that budget were hundreds of millions of dollars spent for security and transportation infrastructure — money not paid back with Olympic revenues.” “Nobody really stresses that [Olympics] story,” said Colleen Stolberg, vice chair of the Broward Republican Executive Committee, at the event. Stolberg said turning the economy around was her biggest concern. “Jobs, jobs, jobs. The economy, the economy, the economy.” The former governor touched upon familiar issues like repealing “ObamaCare.” Critics often cite the Romneybacked healthcare system in Massachusetts as inspiration for “ObamaCare.” In response, Romney has said that healthcare should be left up to each state. Romney also talked about creating jobs and promised to cut spending, balance the federal budget and expand the military; criticizing the Obama Administration for its plans to cut armed forces personnel and spending. Obama recently defended the cuts, saying the U.S. still far exceeds every other country in military spending. In 2009 the U.S. spent $687 billion on defense. The second highest country, China, spent $114 billion. Along with Obama, Romney attacked former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich for his comments that there would be a base on the moon by the end of Gingrich’s second term as president. “Send him to the Moon,” shouted an audience member. Boca Raton resident Travis Johnson said he hasn’t made up his mind yet whom he will vote for. He chose Obama in ‘08 but has since become disappointed with the president. “I feel he really could have made a change instead of what he did.” Johnson came to the event to hear what Romney had to say and ask hardcore supporters why they were backing him. He added that although he will probably vote for Obama again, this time it will be more about voting against the Republican and less about voting in favor of the president. RomneyContinued from page 1 Elected Of cialsDist. 4 Commissioner Chip LaMarca – Every Wednesday from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. the district of ce of Commissioner LaMarca is open at the Lighthouse Point Library, 2200 NE 38 Street. 954-357-7004.See SIGHTINGS on page 3

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The Pelican 3 Friday, February 3, 2012 St. Valentine performance of The Ink Spots. Feb. 14, at NE Focal Point, 227 NW 2 St., Deer eld Beach from 10 to 11 a.m. will include these hits: “If I Didn’t Care,” “I Don’t Want To Set The World On Fire”, “You You You”, “Tuxedo Junction”, “Java Jive”, “Chattanooga Choo Choo” and “My Prayer” Presented by Shane Le Mar Entertainment. Call 954480-4449. The InkspotsBy Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach Supporters of Blanche Ely High School in Pompano Beach say the school’s new $5.6 million athletic facility is missing one thing: a new scoreboard. And they want one. “Why would anyone build a brand new stadium with a 35-year old scoreboard that does not address soccer or track?” asked Ernestine Price, who graduated Ely in 1958. The new stadium, which saw its rst game in May of last year, included a refurbished football eld, an expanded track, new bleachers, a new press box and a new baseball eld. To help fund a new scoreboard, Price and others Blanche Ely community says new scoreboard price is in ated; board says $165,000 too much for new oneraised $54,000. Now they are asking the School Board to fund the remaining money to make it happen. But right now it may not happen. In a unanimous decision, school board members voted against the additional funding but will take up the matter again at their Feb. 22 meeting. Kathleen Ginestra, executive secretary for School Board member Nora Rupert, said the board is waiting for further information. “Money doesn’t ow through here like it does other places,” Price said. But, according to records, the Ely scoreboard would cost nearly six times what recent purchases of scoreboards at local high schools have cost. Scoreboards range from $22,000 to $32,000. Broward Schools of cials estimated that the scoreboard Blanche Ely wanted, which is 21 ft. high by 24 ft. wide with a 7 ft. high by 24 ft. wide full color video screen, would cost about $165,000. The board would have to contribute $111,000 to the $54,000 the community raised. Proponents of the new scoreboard say that price is in ated. “We didn’t ask for $111,000. We didn’t expect $111,000,” said Price. Louis Watley, a 1967 graduate of Ely and member of the school’s success team and facilities committee, said if Ely had been given a new scoreboard, instead of the school system trying to refurbish the old one when the stadium was built, none of this would be an issue. Watley also points out that the complex which had its funding increased to $7.3 See SCOREBOARD on page 17SightingsContinued from page 2 Great EatsPancake Breakfast – Every third Sunday of the month, the St. Elizabeth’s of Hungry Parish hosts a pancake breakfast at 3331 NE 10 Terrace, Pompano Beach. The breakfast is from 7:30 a.m. to noon and bene ts the Parish and cafeteria maintenance. 954-263 8415. See SIGHTINGS on page 16

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4 The PelicanFriday, February 3, 2012 By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFWilton Manors Low voter turnout marked the passing of all three Wilton Manors’ referenda questions on Jan. 31. Voter turnout countywide was 20 percent with the majority of about 14 percent of Wilton Manors voters saying yes to allowing city commissioners to “engage in outside concurrent employment consistent with Florida law.” Voters also said yes to allowing volunteer board members to have outside jobs and yes to requiring the city to hold a referendum regarding any future move to disband its independent police department and hire another law enforcement agency. The referenda are non-binding and commissioners can vote against public opinion if they choose. Elaine Turner voted in favor of the employment questions but declined to talk about the police one because her son is an of cer with the Wilton Manors Police Department. “[Commissioners and board members] don’t make enough as part-time employees. How can you ask someone not to work?” she asked. Gary Keating voted against the commission question, saying he likes all the current commissioners but “I want to make sure we’re protected on the issue in the future. It’s not supposed to be a career.” He voted yes on the other two questions. “Citizens de nitely need to have a vote. I [want our own police department] but I’m not sure that nancially we can always have it that way.” Voter approval was uneven, with 66 percent approving of commissioners getting outside jobs, 72 percent for board members getting outside jobs and 81 percent for holding a referendum on police services. Sea Ranch Lakes and Hillsboro Beach also held a referendum on commissioners and outside employment. Sea Ranch Lakes had a 93 percent approval rating with Hillsboro recording 73 percent. In their literature explaining outside employment for Wilton Manors voters approve referenda questions, making county ethics code invalidcommissioners, Wilton Manors of cials claim that the county’s new ethics code prevents elected of cials from holding a job and serving at the same time. By reverting back to the state code, they say commissioners will be considered part-time employees and allowed to hold outside jobs; state law does not prohibit any elected of cial from holding outside employment. But the new ethics code also allows of cials to hold outside employment as long as it doesn’t con ict with state law. Under the county ordinance, the only profession elected of cials are banned from holding is lobbying. One voter, who declined to give her name, said she thought the commission Voters return city commissioners to state ethics code; city could face lawsuit from county See ETHICS CODE on page 16

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The Pelican 5 Friday, February 3, 2012 ADVERTISING? IT’S PART OF DOING BUSINESS. CALL US. 954-783-8700. Pompano Beach Soroptimists held their Annual Casino Night recently at The Elks Club of Pompano Beach. The bene t produced $19,287, which was presented to Woodhouse Executive Director. Marsha Linville. Sponsors of the event were Elks Club of Pompano Beach, the Seminole Tribe of Florida, Broward Health, Florida Shores Bank, and the Norweigan Cruise Lines. Pictured are Soroptimist President Cheryl DePretorlo, Casino Chairman Pam Euston, Fonnie Gill, Pompano Beach Elks Exalted Ruler Marilyn Kronenberg, Debbie Cline, Woodhouse Executive Director Marsha Linville and Linda Woodhouse. Fonnie, Debbie and Linda are Woodhouse Board members as well as being Soroptimists. Lots of fun and plenty of moola for a great cause

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6 The PelicanFriday, February 3, 2012 Deer eld Beach, Pompano Beach, Lighthouse Point, LauderdaleBy-The-Sea, Wilton Manors and Oakland ParkWilton Manors • Oakland Park • Hillsboro Beach The Pompano Pelican is published weekly on FridaysStreet Address: 1500-A E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, FL 33060 Telephone: 954-783-8700 • Fax: 954-783-0093Letters to the Editor are encouraged and accepted for print if signed, although a writer’s name will be withheld on request; letters must also include a daytime telephone number. Advertising rates are available upon request. Subscription rate is $31.80 including tax for one year’s delivery in Greater Pompano Beach; $95.40/per year including tax for others in the United States; call 954-783-8700 for rates abroad. The Pelican is a nonpartisan newspaper and reserves the right to decline advertising. Copyright 2011. Reproduction of this publication in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission of the publisher. The Pelican is a member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, Deer eld Beach Chamber and the LBTS Chamber. The Pelican is a state certi ed woman-owned minority business. The Pelican is delivered to businesses, libraries, schools, of ces, hospitals, news racks and single family homes. All advertising and copy is published at the sole discretion of the publisher. We welcome your critiques and ideas concerning this publication. Anne Siren, publisherExecutive Assistant: Mary Hudson Finance: Peter Pritchard Graphics: Rachel Ramirez Windsheimer and Adriana Bonilla Bookkeeper: John White Classi eds: Fran Shelby Contributing Writers: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Judy Wilson, Malcolm McClintock, Judy Vik, Mike d’Oliveira Account Executives: Paul Shroads, Carolyn Mann, Bill Heaton, Bill Fox ESTABLISHED 1993 • Volume XX, Issue 5 Founding Editor and PublisherAnne Hanby Siren Letters & OpinionsWinning candidates raised the most moneyLighthouse Point – Winning candidates in Tuesday’s city commission election were those that raised the most in campaign contributions. Becky Lysengen had the largest bankroll, $11,989 as of the Jan. 26 report, in her successful bid to unseat Susie Gordon who raised $8,875. In the city’s other race, Earl Maucker reported $6,120 in contributions since the last report bringing his total war chest to $8,270 against the losing incumbent Tom Hasis who nanced his own campaign with $7,500. Among Lysengen’s larger donors this period were the Realtors PAC of Orlando that contributed $500 and attorneys Roig,Tutan, Rosenberg & Zlotnick who gave her $500. Gordon brought in $500 from the Hillsboro Club and $500 from CPA Thomas Ahearn. Maucker’s largest nancial supporters in this period were Bill and Judy Sullivan with $500, James Acheson, $500; attorneys Greenspoon Marder, $500; attorneys Portley & Sullivan, $500; the Realtors PAC of Orlando, $500, and Mayor Fred Schorr, $300.A thank you to sponsors of the Wilton Manors Island City OpenThe Island City Open Tennis Tournament was held January 21 and 22 at Hagen Park in Wilton Manors. We had a great turnout and plenty of good tennis. A great big thank you goes to all of the sponsors, who so generously contributed gift certificates to their establishments as prizes to the winners. J. Mark’s, J. Alexander’s, Alibi’s, Bill’s Filling Station, The Manor, Rodeo, Storks, Tropic’s, Courtyard Cafe, Kitchenetta, Matty’s, Humpy’s, Le Patio, Sozo, MatchPoint, Atlantic Properties, Wilton Discount Liquor store and Celebration Cruise Line. Your support means a lot to our community. Thank you. Donna Kocyba Hagen Park Tennis DirectorWoodhouse 12th Annual Lighthouse Point Keeper Days coming upLighthouse Point – Police Officer Mike McDace and former library director Doreen Gauthier will be the honorees for the 12th Annual Keeper Days, Feb. 10 to 12 at several venues in the city. McDace receives the “Keeper” recognition posthumously after serving 34 years in the city’s police department and in code enforcement. Gauthier retired last year after 33 years at the helm of the library. Both will be honored at a dinner Friday, Feb. 10 at the LHP Yacht Club. For reservations, call John Trudel at 954-784-3439. Tickets are $50. The celebration continues on Saturday, 10 a.m. with a parade that moves north from First Presbyterian Church to McDonough Park where events include a car show, LHP Chamber Business Expo, children’s pet show, entertainment, games and rides. From 6 to 9 p.m., food, fireworks and live entertainment will be offered at Dan Witt Park. Attendees are allowed to bring lawn chairs. On Sunday, Feb. 14, a family sports day will be held from 1 to 4:30 p.m. at McDonough Park. For more, email Jane McLaughlin at ndmac@aol.com Leave us alone to run our own nonpartisan campaignsBy Anne SirenPUBLISHERThe Pelican congratulates two new commissioners in Lighthouse Point: Earl Maucker and Becky Lysengen. And to the incumbents, Tom Hasis and Susie Gordon, who lost their seats, we add more congratulations for your good work over the years and a sincere thank you for handing over a well-run city to the new kids on the block. We look forward to new ideas in the city as well with continued smooth and friendly government that has become the signature of Lighthouse Point. And now the ugly part. Despite the fact that Lighthouse Point is a small city of people who eagerly engage in their government meetings, and the fact that a citywide debate took place with all four candidates espousing their positions to a packed audience at Dixon Ahl Civic Center, and the fact that the race was non-partisan, the Republican Executive Committee put its boots on the ground to splatter mud on the two challengers, Lysengen and Maucker. The yers relied on code words aimed at pushing this Republican-dominated city into partisan politics. The Broward County Republican Committee made their mailers as partisan as they could while skirting the edges of the law as they did. Referring to Lysengen, yers read “Union bosses are coming for Lighthouse Point and they have a candidate for commissioner.” Lysengen is a Broward County school teacher where membership in the Broward County Teachers Union is not mandated, but all teachers bene t from its presence. The Republican Party has been a “union-buster” throughout the nation, but there are no public schools in Lighthouse Point. The union presence is already in the city through its police and re contracts. Maucker was painted as an “Independent liberal,” an attempt to align him with Democrats. The ironic result of the intrusion of the Republicans into this small race is that some of their own party members, angered by the intrusion, may be changing their party af liations. And the candidates for whom the yers were supposed to have helped probably caused damage. There is a reason for non-partisan races in local elections. It allows the citizens to evaluate the best candidate for his or her ability to serve the unique make-up of that town and to focus on the speci c issues and needs of that community and its citizens regardless of their individual party af liations. This attempt to control the local election from the executive committee back red, and it did so because there was neither thought nor concern for the very wise voters in Lighthouse Point. The Message: Back off. Unity in the CommunityOn Feb. 4 from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Unity in the Community, a day of free food and entertainment, will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Pompano Community Park, 2001 NE 10 St., Pompano Beach. The event’s goal is to foster community spirit and understanding. For more, call 954-899-5557 or 954-941-6364.

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The Pelican 7 Friday, February 3, 2012 Brown winsContinued from page 1 people told him they were happy with how things were going on the commission, and he was, too. “People were tired of the cronyism of the past and didn’t even want to talk about that. Brown began his fundraising early, realizing people he would have counted on said they were sitting this campaign out after Malkoon announced his candicacy. Both are members of the Unite Our Town, or UOT, Political Action Committee. Clottey decided not to seek re-election. “I’m fortunate in having a network of friends and relatives,” Brown said, explaining how he collected about $10,500 from about 100 contributors. Chuck Clark, a former town commissioner, supported Brown’s election. “Of the candidates he was far and above the most quali ed. His knowledge of the history of the town and his grasp of the issues is equal to or even better than some of the sitting commission we have now,” Clark said. “Mark will add luster to what we already have.” After the results were in, Malkoon and Brown spoke. “During the campaign, we made a gentleman’s agreement that we wouldn’t say anything negative about each other, and we lived up to that. You can’t control what others say. We’re friends, and we’re still going to be friends. I have nothing but nice things to say about him. “He made a strong showing, and I give him credit,” Brown said. “I’m very happy and satis ed that I had a good strong showing,” Malkoon said Wednesday. Without the absentee ballots, he said he carried the northern residential areas of Bel Air, Terra Mar and Sunset Lane. He said it’s too soon to know if he will run again in the future, but he plans to stay involved in his hometown. “I’m happy that I kept things positive. My aim was to open a dialogue with all parties and respect everybody,” he said. Brown said he thinks having the municipal election on the same day as the Republican Presidential Primary helped Malkoon, a Republican, and challenged one of Malkoon’s campaign tactics. An ad placed in the ByTheSeaFuture Newspaper listed both candidates’ party af liations which, in a nonpartisan election, is against state law. Brown said he plans to le a complaint with the Florida Division of Elections. According to Brown the January election, “Created an inconsistent voting pattern… a more favorable environment for a Republican. Republicans were motivated to vote, but a lot of non-Republicans were not,” Brown said. Malkoon ran with support from the Citizens Initiative Committee, or CIC, and Brown was endorsed by the UOT, board of directors. In the election two years ago, Malkoon was the rst person to announce he was running. Then he and other would-be candidates agreed to step aside if they weren’t the ones selected for UOT endorsement so as to not split the ticket. Malkoon said, “The UOT said they would support me next time. I never said it was owed to me. I helped them (the endorsed candidates, Scot Sasser and Chris Vincent), went to the condos and had them in my house. I’m a little let down and a little hurt, but I hope we will all be friends again.” he said. Brown said he has asked everyone to put any anger behind them any anger that developed during the campaign and “go back to being one town again. Friends were squeezed, (by having to choose to support him or Malkoon) and in the end it got testy in some places.” Brown will be sworn into of ce Tuesday, Feb. 14, 7 p.m. Besides, Brown, Mayor Roseann Minnet and Vice Mayor Stuart Dodd, both automatically re-elected without opposition, will also be sworn in. A new vice mayor will be selected.Latest nance reports show Brown aheadIn the latest campaign nance reports for the period ending Jan. 26, Brown raised an additional $350 in contributions for a total of $19,021.74 including a donation from Vice Mayor Dodd. Malkoon raised $2,210 in monetary contributions in the latest reporting period for a total of $6,150. He had the support of outgoing commissioner Birute Ann Clottey. He received a $250 donation from The Realtors PAC of Florida.

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8 The PelicanFriday, February 3, 2012 Making a Difference Phyllis J. Neuberger wants your suggestions about people who are making a difference. Call 954-7838700. Briefs Child abuse reports to be mandatory if passedState Representative Gwyndolen Clarke-Reed and U.S. Senators Bill Nelson and Dick Durbin attended a recent meeting in Tampa concerning HB 1355 which “requires specified educational institutions and their law enforcement agencies to report known or suspected child abuse, abandonment, or neglect in certain circumstances.” According to Clarke-Reed, the majority of members on the committee agreed that the bill needs to be passed. Along with the 500 people in attendance were. State Representative Perry Thurston, Broward County Commissioner Dale Holness, State Representative Betty Reed and Rod Smith, chair of the Florida Democratic Party.By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFThe 30 ladies in this chorus just beam with the pleasure of singing songs they know and love. They work The NOTE-ABLES hit the road to become singing ambassadors for John Knox VillageSee AMBASSADORS on page 20The NOTE-ABLES from John Knox Village are sisters in song bringing happy music and smiles wherever they perform.hard for the Diva, Harriet Mertz, who directs, teaches, cajoles, demands and pays in praise as they rehearse or ready themselves to perform on stage before an audience. The sound of enthusiastic applause is their reward. An invitation to return is a bonus. Mertz became the director of the John Knox Village, or JKV, ladies’ chorus in 2008. “This is not a new role for me,” she explains. “ I have taught voice, performed many times myself and directed choruses in the school system, churches, community centers, country clubs and hotels for umpteen years all around our country, and Canada.” She introduces her NOTE-ABLES as ‘The ladies in the 80s,’ but recently one of the ladies objected because she said, ‘I’m only 79.’ The Diva laughs and says, my ladies range in age from 79 to 97. They stand, sing, act a little and smile. They are wonderful examples of what pleasure we can have at any age. Our accompanist, Anita Ferguson, is an absolute jewel. She has even written our introductory song, “We are the NOTEABLES,” and one of our members, Mary Hooker, wrote the lyrics to our Farewell Song. I’m very proud of my singing ambassadors. They are perfectCommissioners set district meetingsDeerfield Beach – Three city commissioners are holding district meeting this month beginning with Bill Ganz who will hold a District 4 meeting Monday, Feb. 13, 7 p.m. at Constitution Park, 2841 West Hillsboro Blvd. On Thursday, Feb. 23, 7 p.m., Dist. 1 Commissioner Joe Miller will speak with constituents at City Hall and on Friday, Feb. 24, 6 p.m., Dist.2 Commissioner Ben Preston will meet with residents at Westside Park, 448 SW 2 Street.

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The Pelican 9 Friday, February 3, 2012 By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach If wearing a tuxedo and creating a candle-lit dinner at home doesn’t qualify a man as sensitive, perhaps nothing will. Years ago, that’s just what Pompano Beach resident Lee Aken did for his wife one evening. “You can do so much more at home and Chemistry.com picks Pompano as Sensitive Guy Capital of the U.S.make it more special [than a restaurant],” says Lee. “That will get you far.” “I think as they get older they get more sensitive. But he’s always been romantic,” said Lee’s wife, Barbara. Lee isn’t alone. Chemistry.com, an online dating service, recently picked Pompano as the number one city in the country to nd a sensitive guy. Some of the other cities that made the list were Sarasota, Buffalo, Indianapolis, Nashville, Staten Island and West Hollywood, California. Barbara says Lee, whom she married 23 years ago, cooks every night, helps her clean the house and is a very good dad to their two teenage children. “[Lee] just loves you, caters to you, does the right thing,” said Brett Colonel, Barbara’s co-worker at the G Designs hair salon in Pompano. “I care more about the women more than I care about myself. If mom’s not happy, nobody’s happy,” says Lee, who added that the secret to being a sensitive guy is the little things: making the bed, sending nice text messages throughout the day, buying owers. “You want to keep it simple and nice. It really makes the day go faster, better, nicer.” In a Chemistry.com press release, Dr. Helen Fisher, chief scienti c advisor to the website, seemed to be describing Lee. [Sensitive men] go way out of their way to keep their social relationships running smoothly. So they watch, listen, and gauge what they need to do to help others and they do it naturally. It’s these See SENSITIVE MAN on page 21

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10 The PelicanFriday, February 3, 2012 Business matters The Pelican takes a look at local business owners. Call The Pelican to nd out how you can tell your story here because business matters. 954-783-8700.By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFBruce Irwin, owner of Brutus Seafood in Marathon in the Florida Keys, says he’s been a commercial sherman in the Keys for 32 years catching and selling the freshest sh available. “We’re a family business now in the fourth generation. My wife, Lettie is the of ce manager. Our daughter, Jessica is her assistant. Our son Ryan is just out of college, and he’s the captain of our three-man shing boat. We have 9,400 stone crab and lobster traps so we’re busy working seven days a week to deliver the quality our customers expect from us. If we need more, we buy it fresh from day boats. Our motto is: ‘We’re a customer service business selling seafood’ and we mean it.” Seasonal catch available now includes lobster, stone crab, pink shrimp, yellow tail and Mahi. Irwin says, “We also offer prepared crab cakes and soup. As soon as our store opens in Marathon we will have a line of dips, spreads and prepared, restaurant quality dinners ready to bake and serve.” Like every other industry, the shing industry has new ways to reach customers. Irwin says, “Technology has made it possible to sell online. We ship all over the country, keeping our fresh sh fresh-packed in dry ice for next day delivery. We post an available product and price menu on our web site and it’s kept current. Our delivery to your kitchen is free for orders of $100 or more. Our prices are very competitive even with free delivery. We deliver by truck and Fed Brutus Seafood, located in Marathon, delivers fresh seafood to the customer’s kitchen in 24 hours See BRUTUS SEAFOOD on page 21Ex. Our basic route includes markets and individuals in West Palm Beach, Delray Beach, Pompano Beach, Fort Lauderdale and Miami. Most of our customers stock up with at least a week’s supply of fresh sh and seafood and they give us rave reviews.” He says a typical order is between ve and 20 pounds of seafood or a combination of prepared and seafood. Brutus Seafood Fisherman caught in the act with photos of stone crabs that make the mouth water. Your order is delivered from the ocean to your house in 24 hours. [Photos courtesy of Brutus Seafood.]Northwest improvements on the tablePompano Beach The Northwest Community Redevelopment Agency will hold meetings on Feb. 9 and 16 regarding plans to improve the Hammondville Road/Martin Luther King, Jr. Boulevard downtown area. The meetings, held at 6 p.m. at the E. Pat Larkins Center, 520 Hammondville Road, will focus on streetscape improvements and updated pedestrian connections. Northwest CRA Director Floyd Johnson said the improvements will help mold the northwest area of the city into a destination that will help local businesses and residents. Planned improvements include increased street lighting, wider sidewalks and improved landscaping. For more, visit mypompanobeach.com or call 954467-6822.Educational scholarships availablePompano Beach The City of Pompano Beach Office of Housing and Urban Development is offering nine scholarships for Pompano residents. Available are six two-year Florida pre-paid scholarships and three $1,500 Bronze Scholarships. To be eligible, students must be a high school senior in a low to moderate income household and plan on attending a Florida college, university or vocational school. Applications are due by March 30 at 5 p.m. For more, call 954-5457789.

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The Pelican 11 Friday, February 3, 2012 Although his business is leverage buyouts which means buying and selling companies, Ben Smith, 38, the owner of the two Lighthouse Inns, 3305 SE 5 St. and 3208 NE 11 St., Pompano Beach since 2008 says, “These two assisted living facilities are keepers. I’m attached to the residents and would feel like I abandoned them if I sold the Inns. My aunt, Sue Beall, is the very capable administrator of both residences and Suzi Mautner is our director of marketing.These two people are my life savers.” Mautner, who is a seasoned executive in this eld, was asked how these Inns differ from other rental assisted living residences. She replied, “ We do all of the services one expects. The difference is in the exceptionally caring staff. We’re intimate residences with a capacity of 33 in Lighthouse Inn South and 43 in Lighthouse Inn North. We’re small enough to give personal attention. The residents all know each other and have concerns for each other the way family members do for one another.” Continuing, she adds, “Our case manager/social worker applies for nancial assistance for new residents wherever it is indicated. Many of our residents are receiving bene ts from the government and VA programs. Until they moved in, they never realized they were entitled to them. This assistance helps them relax and forget their worries about being able to maintain themselves nancially. A licensed therapist attends to individual and group therapy when the need exists.” Both facilities have activity directors who keep residents busy with walks to the ocean, bingo, card games, jewelry making, painting and other crafts. There’s an exercise class every morning. Ivan Lozada has lived at Lighthouse Inn South for four years. “I like the staff. They take good care of my room andme. The food is good and always fresh. Ribs, chicken and meat loaf are my favorites. They bake the cakes and pies right here too, but butter pecan ice cream is still my favorite. I often walk the beach with my friends and I like bingo.” Cindy Ryan, thinks these Inns as life savers. “My dad lived at Lighthouse Inn, North for six years. I was impressed with the quality of care he received. When my husband needed assisted living, I moved them both to the South Inn. And I, unexpectedly ended up here too. They are very good to us. My husband needs constant attention and it is provided by willing and pleasant staff.” These two residences allow small pets. Mautner says, “if the resident can care for them. Our staff assists residents with bathing, dressing and grooming, medical management, housekeeping and personal laundry service. Physical and occupational therapy, doctor visits and podiatrists are available on site. We arrange for transportation for off site visits to dentists, doctors and other activities. Family and friends are welcome visitors from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m.”A Seaside Assisted Living ResidenceFinancial Assistance available through Government and VA Programs Suzi Mautner director of marketing and Ben Smith, owner.Call Suzi 561-667-0678ALF Lic#7127 The Lighthouse Inn Call to place your classi ed ad “Glassaholics” to unite for Depression Glass show in Pompano By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach They call them “glassaholics.” Unable to resist the allure of a beautifully-crafted, mint condition piece of Depression Glass; they wander from yard sale to antique shops to conventions in search of their next find. John Fiore’s life as a glassaholic started out innocently enough: all in the name of democracy. As a Wilton Manors citycommissioner in 1997, Fiore, who later served as mayor from 2000 to 2002, visited various yard sales in the city as a way to introduce himself to the people. “What a great way to go around and meet residents I would never [normally] meet,” he said. And that’s how he began picking up pieces of Depression Glass. “I didn’t know what it was. [at the time]” But with the help of his long-time partner, Michael Pierce, they’ve kept the habit going ever since. Last weekend, the two began prepping for the 38th Annual American Glass Pottery Dinnerware Show & Sale; Feb. 11, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Feb. 12, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 Ave., in Pompano Beach. “We look forward all year-round to this show,” says Fiore. Depression Glass, said Fiore, who served as president of the South Florida Depression Glass Club for eight years, ranges from cheap to expensive. Manufactured during the Great Depression, it became very popular and could be found as prizes inside cereal boxes or at five and dime stores. All Depression glass is American made, but over the decades, many factories have failed due to bad luck. All but two have gone out of business; victims of factory fires and changing American tastes. The growing use of plastic and aluminum for consumers added to the loss. “It was a slower, more elegant time. People had fancy dinner parties [which eventually gave way to informal barbecues],” said Fiore. Today, collectors tend to look at Depression glass as a money maker. It works for Fiore. “We look at it as an investment,” said Pierce. “We’ve made enough to [take trips to [Hawaii, Las Vegas, Mexico]. And we’ve kept the good stuff for ourselves,” said Fiore. “Good stuff,” he added that they plan to possibly sell in their own shop one day after Fiore retires from his day job as an urban planner for the Broward County Parks and Recreation Division. Their collection has taken See DEPRESSION GLASS on page 22John Fiore, right, and Michael Pierce have collected Depression glass for years.

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12 The PelicanFriday, February 3, 2012 LHPContinued from page 1 Broward Republican Executive Committee, or BREC, over the weekend painted Lysengen as a union sympathizer and Maucker as an “independent liberal.” Sitting commissioner Sandy Johnson, a registered Republican and Lysengen supporter, called the party’s interference into local politics “muckraking.” Hasis said the party’s mailer endorsing him actually “hijacked” his campaign and that he neither saw nor approved the piece. Hasis said he believes the mailer crippled his chance to continue serving the residents of Lighthouse Point. “I told them I welcomed their support in getting my conservative record out, but told them ‘absolutely no negative campaigning,’” Hasis said. The Republican Party also made robo calls linking Hasis, 65, and Gordon, 58, support Hasis said he never requested. Maucker ,64, said the GOP mailing could have had a backlash effect, but how deep it went he didn’t know. He said, however, “It was absolutely inappropriate for the Republican Party to get involved in a non-partisan election.” He lauded Hasis for running a “great campaign” and said he looks forward to the challenge of being a commissioner. The piece that labeled the 33-year-old Lysengen a union member said, “Union bosses are coming for Lighthouse Point and they have a candidate for commissioner.” It went on to infer “active union member” Lysengen would support “bloated pensions,” “irreversible tenures” “in ated pay and bene ts” and “union cronyism.” The union link is anathema in conservative Lighthouse Point where Republican voters greatly outnumber Democrats. Johnson said she thought the mailings negatively affected those the GOP intended to bene t. “This is unprecedented. Why was it done? Who wanted it done? Does this say that a teacher, reman or policeman [generally union positions] should never hold of ce? I don’t want them to support that. “This was a concentrated effort. How much money was spent and how much time was spent to get this together? And why? I am furious at them stepping into our politics and then taking such a dirty turn,” Johnson said. Lysengen, who is a recently-registered Republican, said she believes the mailer should be looked into from the standpoint of campaign ethics laws. She said she did not see it because, “I don’t care to have negative feelings.” Of her victory she said, “It was a year long process, and I am extremely relieved and proud. It feels good to have that much support.” The GOP mailers were just one element in a campaign that turned contentious in its nal days. Early in the week, attorney John Gillespie emailed a “Dear Neighbors” letter that questioned Mayor Fred Schorr’s support of Lysengen and accused him of wanting a “puppet commissioner.” The BREC also launched an email blast to voters containing information concerning Lysengen’s largest contributor, resident James Verrillo, who channeled $5,000 through 10 of his timeshare/travel companies to her campaign. According to the email, Verrillo’s companies have in the past been sued by 16 states for fraudulent and deceptive practices, cases that were settled out of court. But perhaps the riskiest and most personal campaign tactic came from Commissioner Susie Gordon herself who on Monday emailed voters a long letter detailing her nancial and family problems. Gordon wrote that she decided to air her “dirty laundry” because people in the Lysengen camp had threatened to make it public. Lysengen said after the election, “If I was going to slander her I could have done it way earlier. I chose not to do that.” Commissioner Johnson said on Wednesday only a few “inside” people knew of Gordon’s problems prior to receiving her email. Johnson said she plans to write a letter of complaint to the BREC. She said its actions may violate its charter. County Commissioner Chip LaMarca, who headed up the BREC for more than three years, said it is legal for the committee to support Republicans in non-partisan elections, but should get involved only when the opposing candidate is not a member of the GOP. A decision to support a candidate can be made by the six-member executive board, which is now headed by Richard DeNapoli, LaMarca said. As for his knowledge of the offending campaign materials, LaMarca, a resident of the city, denied “absolutely” having anything to do with them. “Unfortunately, some people think negativity works,” he said, “but I think the candidates who won were the candidates who worked the hardest. An email to BREC Chair DeNapoli had not been answered at press time. The Pelican Call us!!! 954-783-8700

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The Pelican 13 Friday, February 3, 2012 Frank Tropepe knows exactly why customers choose an Ace Hardware store over the big box chains. “We are more like a mom and pop convenience store. We cater to the area. We listen to the needs of our customers and do the research to nd them the products they need. And there are always clerks on the oor to help them nd what they need,” he said. Tropepe is the owner of four Ace Hardware stores, the rst one purchased in Margate on Margate Boulevard 17 years ago. The next one was Beach Hardware on the corner of Commercial Boulevard and A1A. Then came the store on Sample Road a few blocks west of U.S. 1 and very recently, he opened the Deer eld Beach store on South U.S. 1. “Deer eld Beach is a gamble. It is not the best time to open a store, but the lease is good and we are there for the long term. We have good visibility in a free-standing building and there is a good market there,” Tropepe said. Ace Hardware has 5,500 stores around the country. It is a $5 billion company headquartered in Oak Brook, Ill., that started 90 years ago when three retailers in Brooklyn decided they could buy goods cheaper if they went in together. Belonging to a cooperative, Tropepe says, is different from being a franchise owner. While the franchise dictates exactly how the operation is to be run, a coop provides the owners with guidelines but each operator has the freedom to make buying decisions. Each owner also has a share of the coop and a percentage of the earnings. Customer service is what keeps people come back to his stores, Tropepe says. “If we don’t have it in stock, we’ll order it. Or we’ll do the research and nd it.” With 30 years in the business, Tropepe knows how important it is to have knowledgeable help on the oor. Many of his retired employees have backgrounds in industry or are familiar with the trades – plumbing, electrical, building. “What’s it worth to the customer to have an experienced person to talk to?” he asked. While products are changing all the time, the newest major effect on the hardware business is the Ace Hardware, Margate, Lauderdale–By-The-Sea, Pompano Beach, Deer eld BeachAce Hardware is a helpful place: Customer service and products geared to the neighborhood are keys to its long history“green” movement. It is affecting everything from light bulbs to faucets to paint. “In January, you won’t be able to buy a regular light bulb,” Tropepe said. And faucets now must be lead-free. A paint product may start off ‘green,’ but when a tint is added that is not ‘green,’ the product is no longer environmentally friendly. Knowing the in’s and out’s of each new product requires constant training, he said. Luckily, for Ace Hardware store owners, Benjamin Moore, the paint line they carry, developed ‘green’ paints and holds the patents. Ace carries many national brands as well as its own labels and competes pricewise with the big box stores because of its national buying power. A marketing tool that has proven very successful, is Ace’s Helpful Hardware Club that gives rebates and rewards. A record is kept of a customer’s purchases, and discount coupons sent that match the purchases. Even nicer, a birthday is worth a $5 rebate card. “It is de nitely effective,” Tropepe said. Signing up for Ace rewards is free, he added. Tropepe is a native of the area. He now lives in Coral Springs with his wife. They have three children and three grandchildren. Owner of four Ace Hardware stores, Frank Tropepe holds his ve-month-old grandson, Michael, in front of a Benjamin Moore paint display in the Margate store. Barbecue grills come in all sizes as this display in the new Deer eld Store [pictured below] demonstrates. Call Your Local A c e H a r d w a r e S t o r e Ace Hardware StoreDeer eld Beach . 954-531-6265 Lauderdale-By-The-Sea . 954-776-5811 Margate . . . . . 954-972-1711 Pompano Beach . . . 954-942-3961 PAID ADVERTISEMENT

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14 The PelicanFriday, February 3, 2012 Advertise with The Pelican 954-783-8700 SPECIAL TO THE PELICANThe NE Focal Point’s annual luncheon/fashion show drew 178 supporters of Deer eld’s facility that provides services for the elderly and Alzheimer’s patients. Fashions were provided by Sondro’s in the Cove and Jos. A. Banks in Boca Center. Among the attendees, Focal Point Executive Director Donna De Fronzo, City Manager Burgess Hanson, Area Agency on Aging Executive Director Edith Lederberg. The event was held at the Lighthouse Point Yacht and Tennis Club. Donna DeFronzo, Burgess Hanson, City Manager, Edith Lederberg, ADRC Executive Director Model, Jean Sevigny Model, Liz McGill Focus is on fashion at Deer eld Beach NE Focal Point function

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The Pelican 15 Friday, February 3, 2012 Friendly dog needs home “Shadow” Housebroken, wonderful temperament, family pet, looking to live out her golden years in a loving home. Call 954-9463197. SPECIAL TO THE PELICANIn the 80s, Realtors at Deer Creek Real Estate created a cookbook called “Creekers Can Cook,” which is still on kitchen shelves in Deer Creek. Now, Linda Anderson, president of the real estate rm, wants to bring another collection of Creekers’ recipes to the table. So she hosted a cocktail party at The Forum featuring entries for the appetizer and dessert section of the book. So far, 130 residents of Deer Creek have submitted Enjoying the Deer Creek party are from left, Gerry Cox, Gordon and Martha McClay, Ruth Storrings, Debbie Gonot, Mondessa Swift, Nanette Hamel and Audrey Cox. Deer Creekers urged to submit recipes for new cookbook Brian Bedigian, left, Forum administrator, Gerry Cox and Linda Anderson.their culinary delights but Anderson is still on the hunt for more. She wants everyone in the community to participate and has set a Feb. 16 deadline. Recipes can be emailed to Emily@deercreekrealestate. com or dropped of at the Deer Creek Real Estate of ce on Hillsboro Boulevard. Proceeds from $13.95 book are being donated to The Thornwell Home for Children in Clinton, SC. The home cares for children from Florida, Georgia and the Carolinas. A book launching event is planned for late April. Winners in each cookbook category will be featured. LBTS – A beach cleanup is set for 9 a.m. Feb. 4, at the pavilion at Commercial Boulevard and the beach. Helpers will be provided with gloves, bags and water. This cleanup is sponsored by Leann Barber at Edward Jones, 1719 E. Commercial Blvd. Call 954-776-1000. Beach clean up Saturday

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16 The PelicanFriday, February 3, 2012 Trinity Christian School of Lighthouse Point Kindergarten class celebrated 100 days of school. Well, how about that? First 100 days Service and CharityArchivist Needed The Hillsboro Lighthouse Preservation Society is looking for a local retired archivist to volunteer to help open the new Lighthouse Museum & Information Center at 2700 N. Ocean Blvd., Pompano Beach. After the initial start up work, the time required will be four to six hours a month. 954-7823313. Alzheimer’s Caregivers Support Group – The NE Focal Point Alzheimer’s Day Care Center, located at 301 N.W. 2nd Avenue in Deer eld Beach, offers a weekly Caregiver’s Support Group every Wednesday from 10 a.m. to noon. Food Drive – NE Focal Point is manning a drop off non-perishable donations collection Monday through Friday from 8:20 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at 227 NW 2 St., Deer eld Beach. 954-4804449. Assist Local Women – Zonta International meets on the third Tuesday of the month at Duffy’s Diner, 401 N. Federal Hwy., Deer eld Beach, at 11:15 a.m. Zonta International is a classi ed service organization of executives and professionals working together to advance the status of women locally and worldwide through SightingsContinued from page 3 See SIGHTINGS on page 24 service and advocacy. 561392-2223. Hospice Volunteers Needed – VITAS Innovative Hospice Care of Broward needs volunteers who can make friendly visits to terminally ill patients and their families, provide relief for caregivers, visit veterans and more. 954-777-5396.The Pelican 954-783-8700

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The Pelican 17 Friday, February 3, 2012 million, ultimately came in under budget and a new scoreboard could have been purchased at that time. “That’s the kind of thing that’s insulting,” he said. Ed Phillips, former Pompano Beach city commissioner, said it would be a travesty if the additional funding isn’t approved. [This scoreboard] will probably take us into the next 25 or 30 years. We feel like the scoreboard that has been chosen is supportive of the kind the stadium the school board gave us,” said Phillips. He added that having a good scoreboard is part of having a good athletic program which would complement the educational side of the school. ScoreboardContinued from page 3Lighthouse Point – Police Officer Mike McDace and former library director Doreen Gauthier are the honorees for the 12th annual Keeper Days, Feb. 10 to 12 at several venues in the city. McDace receives the “Keeper” recognition posthumously after serving 34 years in the city’s police department and in code enforcement. Gauthier retired last year after 33 years at the helm of the library.12th Annual Keeper Days coming upBoth will be honored at a dinner Friday, Feb. 10 at the LHP Yacht Club. For reservations, call John Trudel at 954-784-3439. Tickets are $50. The celebration continues on Saturday, 10 a.m. with a parade that moves north from First Presbyterian Church to McDonough Park where events include a car show, LHP Chamber Business Expo, children’s pet show, entertainment, games and rides. From 6 to 9 p.m., food, fireworks and live entertainment will be offered at Dan Witt Park. Bring lawn chairs for seating. Sunday, Feb. 14, a family sports day will be held 1-4:30 p.m. at McDonough Park. For more, email Jane McLaughlin at ndmac@aol. com

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18 The Pelican Friday, February 3, 2012

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The Pelican 19 Friday, February 3, 2012 By Bill JohnsonPELICAN WRITERPompano Beach – Although he was recently awarded a master’s degree in linguistics, 30-year-old Tom Douglas is dedicating himself to a different kind of career – revitalizing a defunct coffee shop in Pompano Beach, a spot that some folks consider a landmark. You might know it as Java John’s or Boomerang Coffeehouse located at 1631 South Cypress Road, near the Fort Lauderdale line. Boomerang shut down earlier this year and was closed all summer. Under Douglas’s stewardship, Chez Cafe reopened October 4 Why would a qualified linguist choose this line of work and investment in such a very competitive business? While attending Florida Atlantic University, Douglas worked at Boomerang and enjoyed it. “I really liked the place,” he says. “It had a community-based relationship.” Then, too, Douglas grew up in his family’s food and restaurant business and knows the ins and outs cooking, customer service, finances, purchasing and all else that’s involved. He learned a lot at his father’s knee, helping out at Chez Porky’s, a popular spot where some local folks eat several times a week. Douglas likes the neighborhood and lives just a short distance away across the bridge in Fort Lauderdale. It’s a sense of community that drives his interest in operating a coffee shop in the neighborhood. “I want it to be a welcoming place for people to come,” he says, “I like the idea of incorporating a space into people’s lives.” He’s counting on groups of all ages – young people to seniors – to meet at Chez Caf for various reasons. He was pleased that a group of women met there recently for a demonstration of jewelry for sale. Douglas has given the place a new look based on warm colors shades of tan and brown and beige. “I wanted to go for the warm colors that reflect our coffee,” he says. The caf includes a kind of lounge area with a couch, sofa and rocking chair. There’s a big-screen television in one corner for folks who want to see the news at lunch, and electrical outlets conveniently located near the small tables so that customers can use their computers. His hope is that it’ll become a gathering place – a kind of “Cheers” with coffee. The coffee selection includes a variety of espresso. The food selection ranges from hotdogs to what Douglas calls a “unique panini.” He prepares fresh juices each day, such as apple-carrot juice. He has no doubt that Chez Cafe in Pompano Beach offers a new neighborhood hot spot for a Morning Joe or an afternoon of meeting up with old and new friends See CHEZ CAFE on page 24 Proud new owner of Chez Cafe, Tom Douglas, learned the business from his dad, owner of Chez Porky in Pompano Beach..

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20 The Pelican Friday, February 3, 2012 AmbassadorsContinued from page 8examples of the active and fun life people are having in retirement at John Knox. We encourage our audience to join us as residents.” Besides rehearsing at least once a week and performing every month in the Village, the singing saleswomen began to get requests from the outside and they now travel by bus to entertain clubs and service groups. In January they performed for the music clubs of the Palm Beaches, the Preserve in Palm Aire and for The Church Women United at St. Gabriel’s Catholic Church. Mertz says they’ve been a huge success and have been invited back for annual meetings next year. Already on the spring schedule are concerts for Hadassah, Brandeiss University, Palm Aire Country Club, the Noble McArtor Senior Day Care in Fort Lauderdale, The Keenagers at Coral Ridge Presbyterian Church and the Professional Educators Organization. This is an ambitious schedule for retirees, but the NOTE-ABLES are up to it, and so is the Diva who is a true show biz personality. She says everyone is welcome to join the chorus, adding, “No one has to audition. Some of my girls can read music; others can’t. I teach them breathing techniques and articulation. They know over 300 songs, but not from memory. They sing melody and they learn by rote. We now tailor our concert to the venue. We have a Broadway Show…a tribute to George Gershwin…another to Frank Sinatra… Gerry Herman and even a show featuring Operetta music. I always involve the audience and they love it. You have to have a gimmick and we have one for every concert.” Here’s what some of the Ladies in the 80s had to say. Harriet Sams: “I’ve been singing for Church Choirs all my life, but this is Broadway. I just love it. I’ve found a whole new family of friends.” Edith Meinholz: “It’s wonderful! I’ve been singing with various choruses for years, but this group is fantastic. We’ve been so well received. Harriet puts it together so well. We always make people smile and we give the audience the royal pitch on John Knox Village.” Olga DelZio: ”Harriet’s a great teacher. This group gives me something I like to do, a chance to make new friends and bring enjoyment to an audience. They even Their director, Harriet Mertz, also known as “The Diva” says, “You have to have a gimmick and we always do.”ask us back.” The Diva is so busy with her singers she has had to drop out of the many other committees in which she had been involved. “We’re all volunteers, but I earn the largest six gure salary which is $000,000, and I’m thrilled with every zero. What a wonderful way to spend my retirement.” Thank you ladies for bringing the sound of music to so many eager audiences.

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The Pelican 21 Friday, February 3, 2012 ADVERTISING? IT’S PART OF DOING BUSINESS. CALL US. 954-783-8700. Brutus SeafoodContinued from page 10 chivalrous qualities that make a sensitive man.” To celebrate its selection as the sensitive guy capital, a special edition of the city’s East Village Uncorked, “Pompano Beach Singles Meet-up” will be held from 6 to 10 p.m. tonight, Feb. 3, at the 2700 block of East Atlantic Boulevard. At the event, Mayor Lamar Fisher will recognize Pompano residents Sherri Albin and John Doumar as an online dating success story. In recent years, online dating has become more popular. Albin and Doumar met in December through Match.com and Albin says the two now plan to get married. “I’ve been looking for my fairytale [man] forever,” said Albin. “John was the rst guy I [met online that I] agreed to go out with.” She says it’s been a long time since she was in a relationship, but she didn’t want to settle. And online dating nally allowed her to nd the man she was looking for. “[We’re only a mile apart on the beach but] we never would have met if we hadn’t been online. Both of us work so much.” Singles who attend will be able to sample free hors d’oeurves, wine and enter to win a gift basket containing a voucher for a candlelight champagne dinner for two in a semi-private dining area at Frank’s Italian Ristorante in Pompano; just in time for Valentine’s Day. For more, visit www.mypompanobeach. com.Sensitive ManContinued from page 9“Our shrimp is the best in the world. Technology has enabled us to sell it chemically free. We have ash freezers on the boats so the shrimp is frozen instantly to preserve quality. We package shrimp so that they can be consumed as desired without defrosting the entire order. The stone crabs are usually quickly eaten.” Paul Limpers, Pompano Beach, has ordered from Brutus at least six times. He says, “I’ve been loving the stone crab and whenever I get to craving them, I dial Brutus. We also include Yellow Tail, lobster and lobster bisque in our order. Over the holidays we tailgated at a hockey game and I really enjoyed my stone crabs before the game.” Patrick Flannigan, Pompano Beach, is a brother in law to the owner of Brutus. He says, “Bruce’s seafood is the freshest sh available. The only way to get it fresher is to catch it yourself and throw it on the grill. Bruce is a great guy and he’s not afraid to take a chance on this new business. We’re thrilled that he’s doing so well. When we order, we include our neighbors’ requests so our orders are usually around $200 worth of Stone Crabs and Shrimp.” Irwin claims the Brutus goal is to offer the highest quality to the discriminating. “Although we do advertise, most of our clients come to us from other satis ed clients. Between Thanksgiving and Easter, we deliver on Tuesdays and Fridays. Fridays are the busiest because that’s when most folks are entertaining.” Asked about the waters being shed out, he said, “Stone crab sheries are among the most sustainable of any in the world because the crabs grow new claws. Lobster is also well managed. Snapper stocks are still very healthy. Grouper is seasonal.” Irwin is a member and past president of the Marathon Chapter of OFF, or Organized Fisherman of Florida. He is also the past president of the Florida Keys Fishermen’s Association and he sits on the advisory board for the Spiny Lobster South Atlantic Fishery Council. Before ordering visit www.brutusseafood.com to see what’s available and the current price list. Then call 1-305-743-9181 to order.

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22 The Pelican Friday, February 3, 2012 Their collection has taken over their home, especially when they’re getting ready for a convention. Shelves lined with glass pieces run throughout the house and fill cabinets and kitchen cupboards – some of it seemingly destined to sit untouched and some shownoff regularly during parties. They even bought a brand new flat-screen television, replacing a bulkier model, to make more room. When Fiore first started collecting, Pierce just thought it was something he would have to deal with. “Inevitably, it became something I had to accept and clean.” Now, says Fiore, Pierce is the first one to jump at a promising new piece when they’re out. Although they’re committed to collecting, the two differ on just how much their collection has grown. “Probably 2,000 to 3,000 pieces,” estimated Fiore. “Oh, you’re way off base,” jokes Pierce, who estimates there are thousands more. It has gotten so big they sometimes give up on finding specific pieces. “It’s like the house ate another piece of glass,” says Fiore. For more on the American Glass Pottery Dinnerware Show & Sale, visit www. sfdgc.com. Admission is $6.50 per person. The South Florida Depression Glass Club meets on the third Tuesday of every month at 7 p.m. at the Fred Lippman Multi-Purpose Adult Center, 2030 Polk Street, Hollywood. To join, call 954345-4711. The American Glass Pottery Dinnerware Show and Sale takes place Feb. 11 and Feb. 12 at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center. Call 954-345-4711. Depression GlassContinued from page 11

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The Pelican 23 Friday, February 3, 2012

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24 The Pelican Friday, February 3, 2012 success for his new business depends on building a strong and personal relationship with the community. “National businesses like Starbucks have one up,” he says. He knows he can’t build such brand recognition, so visitors or travelers would not recognize Chez Caf and would gravitate to names they know. So he must depend on the locals. Developing a new business is always a great challenge and a financial risk. Tom Douglas has evaluated all that and believes the community will support the kind of environment he strives to create. “Yes, it’s a challenge,” he says, “but I’m optimistic.” Chez CafeContinued from page 19 SightingsContinued from page 16 Tom Douglas and son, Tom, Jr. share a cup of coffee. Art and TheatreIsland City Art Walk – Every third Friday of the month from 7 to 10 p.m., Wilton Manors’ Wilton Drive is home to the Island City Art Walk. Over 40 local artists show off their works in Wilton Drive’s cafes, boutiques, restaurants and other businesses. The Art Walk runs until April.Classes and TrainingAll Breed Obedience and Rally Training Classes – Dog training classes are available at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Call 954-563-7061 for schedule.Green MarketsWilton Manors Green Market – Saturdays and Sundays at Hagen Park 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Call 954-531-5383. Pompano Beach Green Market – Every Saturday at the corner of West Atlantic Boulevard and North Dixie Highway from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., Call 954-292-8040.Recreation/LeisureEvery rst Friday of the month the Pompano Beach See SIGHTINGS on page 26

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The Pelican 25 Friday, February 3, 2012 Originally opened in 1982, Checkers Old-Munchen has become the only reliable source of authentic German fare in Pompano Beach. Brainchild of Detlaf Neuman, former head Chef of a 5-star Munich hotel, the restaurant has stayed in the family over the past three decades. Today, nephew Mat Moore is at the helm of this thriving bastion of Teutonic temptations. “German food is so much more than just sausage,” says Moore as he pours a gigantic boot of Kostritzer beer. This dark, medium bodied lager is a popular choice among the more than 30 varieties of beer available. “The Kostritzer is my favorite. It’s Germany’s answer to Guinness,” adds Moore. For wine lovers, the Peter Brum Riesling features the quintessentially aromatic and fruity overtones one expects from this crisp white varietal of the Rhine region. Beverages in hand, many patrons kick start a meal with a hearty bowl of Checkers Old-Munchen’s famous onion & apple soup. Bursting with flavor, this Bavarian version of French onion soup features sauted onions and apples slowly simmered in the house beef and lager broth topped with provolone cheese. Other classic starters include the Liverwurst & Muenster cheese platter, Bratwurst and Knackwurst on a bed of sauerkraut and several healthy salad options. Of note is the Kartoffelpuffer – home made potato pancakes served with applesauce and sour cream. A quick scan of the menu reveals that vegetarianism is not exactly a German invention. Veal, pork, beef, chicken and sausage dominate the landscape. The plethora of meat options includes mouthwatering veal or pork Wienerschnitzels. These house specialties showcase lightly breaded cutlets sauted in lemon butter and topped with rich homemade gravy. Originally created in neighboring Vienna, this preparation method has become a regional staple of southeastern Germany. Served with red cabbage and potato dumpling or spaetzel Pompano Beach’s Checkers Old-Munchen delivers tasty German cuisine in friendly European atmosphereCheckers Old-Munchen, 2209 E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach 954-785-7565(German egg noodles similar to gnocchi), these plates feel like a home cooked meal in Deutschland. Another crowd pleaser is the eye-popping Schweinhaxen. This plate features a specially seasoned 2 lb. boiled pork shank slow roasted for 6 hours. The result is a wonderfully moist and juicy fall-off-the-bone meat all topped with homemade gravy. “We use the broth of the pork shanks to make our gravy. It is absolutely delicious,” says Moore. The chicken menu includes sauted breasts Hunter style with mushrooms in a wine gravy, Black Forest ham with white wine cream or the Paprika version in sweet cream sauce with red bell peppers. “One of my favorites is the pork Stroganoff. But if you want to get a taste of several specialties, I would recommend our famous Bavarian Platter,” says Moore. This sampler dish overflows with Bratwurst, Knackwurst, Wienerschnitzel and either schweinebraten or sauerbraten. The former consists of tender oven roasted pork loin while the latter is an acquired taste involving vinegar marinated beef topped with sweet and sour gravy. “The food is outstanding and the prices are very reasonable,” say regular local customers Bob Stoetzer and Pat McQueen. A good way to conclude a culinary voyage to Germany is with a warm homemade apple strudel. Served with Alemannic alacrity by the friendly waitresses, this ice cream topped behemoth is a great dessert to share. With wall to wall beer steins as dcor, the ambiance at Checkers Old-Munchen is warm and resoundingly European. Take advantage of various coupons available for half-priced entres with beverage purchase. The “Think German It’s Friday” club (TGIF) allows off libations, appetizers and desserts with the purchase of an entre. Enjoy a Bavarian brewhaha during the monthly beer tastings. The next one is on Feb. 17 at 9:30 p.m. There will be eight different German beers, complimentary buffet and various prizes for $17. “Reservations are highly recommended as our beer tastings are extremely popular and sell out quickly,” says Moore. All entres are priced between $14 and $17, wine bottles are around $25 and beer starts at $4. There is free parking in the back and all major credit cards are accepted. The early bird special is from 5 to 6:30 p.m. and all day Sunday. Be sure to inquire about upcoming specials on Facebook. Prost! Mat Moore brings on the roasted pork shank and a German beer. Veal Wienerschnitzel features a lightly breaded veal cutlet sauted in lemon butter. Here, it comes served with potato dumpling and red cabbage and can be topped with a avorful house brown gravy if desired. Warm homemade apple strudel topped with vanilla ice cream and chocolate sauce is the perfect way to nish a hearty meal at Checkers Old-Munchen. Counterclockwise from the tangy cucumber salad, the vinegar marinated sauerbraten beef, a half portion of pork Wienerschnitzel with gravy, grilled knackwurst and bratwurst and German egg noodle known as spaetzel. PAID ADVERTISEMENT

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26 The Pelican Friday, February 3, 2012 Ethics codeContinued from page 4referendum wasn’t explained properly. “I think they need to abide by the ethics code of the county. [The question makes it look] like we don’t want them to have any other job.” At least three county commissioners share her opinion. County Commissioners Lois Wexler and Sue Gunzburger called the ballot language misleading and deceptive. Last week, Wexler promised to try and rally her fellow commissioners to sue if voters approved the referendum; she would need a majority vote of the nine-member commission to proceed with a lawsuit. At their Jan. 31 meeting while voters were still making their decisions, commissioners directed County Attorney Joni Coffey to look into the county’s options. “We need to litigate,” said Mayor John Rodstrom, according to minutes provided by the county. SightingsContinued from page 24Tennis Center 920 NE 18 Ave., holds a family friendly tennis clinic from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. The cost is $10 per person. Call 954-786-4115. Ping Pong Nights – Every Monday from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Ping Pong Nights is held at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. The cost is $1. Call 954-3902130. Bingo – The American Legion Auxiliary Unit 142, 171 SW 2 St., Pompano Beach, has Bingo on Tuesdays at 7 p.m. Call 954-942-2448. Pompano Beach Fishing Pier 222 N. Pompano Beach Blvd. 954-786-4073 Anglin’s Pier at Commercial Boulevard, LauderdaleBy-The-Sea. 954-491-9403 Deer eld Beach International Pier, 200 NE 21st Ave. 954-426-9206 or 954-9431488.Civic and Club MeetingsRotary Club of Oakland Park/Wilton Manors – Rotary meets every Thursday from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. at Tequila Sunrise Mexican Grill, 4711 N. Dixie Hwy., Oakland Park. 954-491-6158. Wilton Manors Kiwanis Club – Kiwanis meets every Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. at 2749 NE 14 Ave., Wilton Manors. 954-561-9785. Oakland Park Kiwanis Club – Kiwanis meets every Wednesday from 7:30 to 8:30 a.m. at Peter Pan Diner, 1216 E. Oakland Park Blvd., Oakland Park. 954-566-9957. Pompano Beach Kiwanis Club – Kiwanis meets Wednesdays at noon at the Riverside Grille at the Sands Resort, 125 N. Riverside Drive, Pompano Beach. 954444-4815. Pompano Beach Kiwanis Club Westside – Kiwanis Meets the rst and third Saturdays of the month at 8:30 a.m. at the E. Pat Larkin Community Center, 520 MLK Blvd., Pompano Beach. 954-7828096 Deer eld Beach Kiwanis Club – Kiwanis meets at noon every Thursday at the Deer eld Hilton, 100 Fairway Dr. 954-242-6083. Deer eld Beach West Kiwanis Club – Kiwanis meets the second and fourth Saturdays of the month at 9 a.m. at Westside Park, 445 SW 2 St., Deer eld Beach. 954-54-7329883 Toastmasters – The Gold Coast Toastmasters meet in the second and fourth Mondays of each month at Panera See SIGHTINGS on page 32

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The Pelican 27 Friday, February 3, 2012 Board rejects bid to clean and develop site for auto rentals By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFOakland Park – Much to the dismay of the applicant and at least one city commissioner, the board killed a request to allow an auto rental business at 201 W. Oakland Park Blvd., site of a former pain clinic. Representatives of Enterprise Auto Rental made the request Wednesday for a conditional use approval for the business. They also asked for approval to install two feet of PVC fence on an existing six-foot masonry wall rather an eight-foot buffer wall. In December, at the request of the same applicant, commissioners approved a text amendment to code to allow auto rental and leasing in the B-1 zoning district. The owners have made a significant investment in the site to bring it up to code, Justin Proffitt, senior planner, said in presenting the application. They planned to use the existing building and make improvements to the faade and to landscaping. A B-1district in Wilton Manors is to the south of the property, along with a Publix. The Oakland Park residential neighborhoods of Sleepy River Acres and Lloyd Estates are to the north. The city’s development review committee recommended approval of the application, concluding the addition to the fence was reasonable as a buffer, Proffitt said. The owner of property behind the proposed project said she was happy with the PVC fencing. “If the fence is removed, nearby vegetation would be impacted,” Proffitt said. The applicant has brought the property up to landscape and parking requirements. On Jan. 9, the city’s planning and zoning board unanimously approved the application. Rhon Ernest-Jones, representing Enterprise Holdings and Enterprise RentA-Car, said the firm had made significant improvements to the site, “and we’re serious about maintaining the property.” Commissioner John Adornato, while saying he was “very supportive,” said he had concerns about the additional exemptions (for the fence) and concern about using them “too freely.” He asked the financial impact of taking down the existing fence and replacing it with a new one. Ernest-Jones estimated the cost would be $35,000 to $40,000. Plus, “it’s a mess you can’t avoid with new concrete.” He said the PVC fence addition meets the city’s buffer requirement and would be significantly superior to a nearby wall. PVC maintains extremely well and meets the required wind load, he added. Proffitt said city staff estimated cost of a new fence at $15,000 to $18,000. Mayor Suzanne Boisvenue said that after an earlier meeting with the applicant, she was under the impression the fence was to be replaced and she felt misled. Commissioner Shari McCartney moved to approve the application. She and Vice Mayor Anne Sallee voted for the use, Adornato and Boisvenue voted no. Commissioenr Jed Shank abstained because a family member works for Enterprise. An exasperated ErnestJones returned to the podium during public comments to address commissioners again. “We came in for conditional use, and this appears to have eradicated conditional use,” he said. Addressing Boisvenue’s comment, he said, “When we first talked to commissioners, the company expected to replace the wall. Then residents urged them to save the plants. “We’re feeling it’s damned if you do and damned if you don’t,” he said. “We think it’s a good use and cleans the site up. Our initiative is being scuttled over a wall. We would like some clarification.” Later, McCartney said, “I’m appalled” at what happened with Enterprise. I’m concerned that that went down because the two issues were lumped together.” (She referred to the request for conditional use and the approval for the fence addition.) She asked DJ Doody, city attorney, how the matter could be rectified. He said the ordinance was dead for now, but a commissioner who voted against it could ask for a motion to reconsider. Or the applicant could file for a modification. Boisvenue said she would ask that the matter be brought back. In other business, McCartney asked for discussion of easing permit rules to spur economic development. She said some of the city’s restrictions negatively affect businesses. Several business owners spoke on the need for easing sign regulations to allow banners and temporary signs for sales. Commissioners directed staff to draft an ordinance lifting some restrictions.

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28 The Pelican Friday, February 3, 2012 The Pelican. 954.783.8700 a base rate for condos based on the number of condos,” Resident George Hunsaker said at a workshop. He was among several residents and hotel owners urging commissioners to have a study done to determine how rates should be calculated south of Pine Avenue. Commissioners directed Town Manager Connie Hoffmann to bring in a rm to do a rate study. In December 2010, the commission increased sewer rates to cover a $400,000 loss and build up the fund’s cash balance for repairs to the system. The ordinance adopted the Pompano Beach payment system that residents in the north end of town were already paying. The town owns and maintains sewer lines south of Pine Avenue. The city of Pompano Beach owns sewer lines north of Pine Avenue, and bills residents directly. A Master Sewer Agreement pays Pompano $680,000 annually to carry LBTS’ wastewater to the treatment plant on Copans Road. The budget does not allow for extra heavy rain days such as occurred in November when streets were ooded and huge volumes of water went into the sewer system. “To make matters worse, a storm occurred during seasonally high tides . there was a high tidal in ow into the ground water, too,” Hoffmann wrote in a report to commission. Volume charges for that day were $4,888 versus the more normal daily volume charge of $1,150. Last month, Pompano Beach has raised rates by 9.5 percent and volumetric rates by 7.5 percent. “We have to develop a system that’s equitable and come up with something that makes sense,” Hoffmann said. “Maybe we can be an innovator in this area.” A recent study has determined that 72 percent of the system in the south end of town needs repairs at an estimated cost of $800,000. King personnel found 632 defects, including cracks, separated or offset joints, roots in pipes and broken pipes causing the system to be in ltrated by ground water. The engineers said repairs will save $150,000 being paid to Pompano Beach for groundwater in the system Hoffmann said “We should jump on this and start with repairs.” In April, a a contractor will be selected for the construction.” SewerContinued from page 1

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The Pelican 29 Friday, February 3, 2012 Rev. Hyvenson Joseph WORSHIP DIRECTORY: Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad. By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFFort Lauderdale – Right now, Nicco Whigham is a Chief but soon he’ll be a Knight. Whigham, along with eight of his fellow Cardinal Gibbons High School classmates, put pen to paper on National Signing Day – declaring which college or university they will play for. “You hear a lot about commitments but it doesn’t mean anything ‘till you sign something,” said Mike Morrill, Gibbons’ athletic director and football coach. Whigham, a Pompano Beach resident who plays cornerback for Gibbons’ football team, signed on the dotted line for the University of Central Florida; the Gibbons mascot is a Native American, UCF’s mascot is a medieval knight. “It’s close to home. [I’ll be] staying next to my family and I’ve got an easy chance to get on the field,” he said. Whigham, who will be getting Gibbons athletes make commitments on National Signing Day a full scholarship from UCF, said he’ll be majoring in sports exercise science. Asked if he felt a little bit like a proathlete, “It feels real good. Nobody in my family has ever experienced this.” Whigham’s father, George, is happy to see his son play ball for a university. “That was my vision, my intention but I didn’t know if it would happen.” He’s also glad it won’t cost him anything. “I’m smiling because my pocket is still full.” But all the years leading up to this moment cost each parent a great deal – mainly in time and effort.See SIGNING DAY on page 35Cardinal Gibbons student athletes Michael Hanke, left, Leigh Andrew, Catie Donahoe and Nicco Whigham all committed to play sports for their chosen college or university on National Signing Day at Cardinal Gibbons High School in Fort Lauderdale.

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30 The Pelican Friday, February 3, 2012 The Pelican 954-783-8700 Classi eds Call 954-545-0013 Get to know your local Merchants HELP WANTEDDRIVER/TOUR GUIDE/ PART TIME. Have Happy & Relaxed Disposition. Good Speaking Voice & Good Driving Record. 954-784-4064. Fort Lauderdale. 2-3 SEEKING FOR CONDO MAINTENANCE WORKER. If You Have A Strong Commitment To High Level Of Service & Quality Standards, The Ability To Work Well Under Pressure, Meet Deadlines & Strong Sense Of Urgency – Please Apply By Faxing Your Resume To 954942-7685. This Is A 40 Hour Full Time Position With Varied Hours (Evenings, Weekends & Holidays) Bene ts Paid 100%, Paid Vacation & Holidays. Rate Of Pay Commensurate With Experience. EOE. 2-3 ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT For Property Management Firm. Data Entry, Client Contact, Assist Executive. FT / PT. 954-7727012. 2-10 LOCAL PEST CONTROL CO Looking For Quality Sales/Service Tech. Must Be Dependable, Team Player, Good Drivers License & People Skills. Will Train Right Person. ALSO Of ce Assistant – Computer – People & Phone Skills Needed. Fax Resume 954418-3982. 2-10VOLUNTEERS NEEDEDTHE HILLSBORO LIGHTHOUSE Preservation Society Is Looking For A Local Retired Archivist Who Is Interested In Helping Us To Open The New Lighthouse Museum & Information Center At 2700 N. Ocean Blvd. (Hwy A1A) Pompano Beach. After The Start Up Period, His Or Her Time Work Would Be About 4 To 6 Hours A Month. All Our Workers Are Volunteers As Noted. For More Info., Phone 954-782-3313 Or 305-799-5621. 2-17 SEEKING EMPLOYMENTCOMPUTER PROBLEMS? CALL MIKE For Fast 24 Hr Service. Excellent Computer Skills. Hands On Lessons From MBA. Printed Instructions For Problems Provided. 10% Off For 1st Time Customer. Mike Will Make It Happen Or The Service Is FREE! Call 954-6835607. 2-3 MEDICAL / DENTAL FRONT OFFICE MANAGER – Ex Worker. 15 Years Exp. E Pompano Area. Call 954-4713402. 2-3 CERTIFIED NURSING ASSISTANT – 15 Years Experience In Geriatric Care Including Hospice, Hospital & Assisted Living. Will Care For Your Loved One’s Days Or Nights. Live-in. Excellent References. Please Call 954709-8529. 2-3 CNA / HHA – PRIVATE DUTY. 25 Yrs Experience, Excellent References, In Home Personal Care, Shopping, Cooking And Any Personal Needs. 754-3670243. 2-3SERVICES DANNY BOY ELECTRIC – Lic & Insured. Lic. #EC13004811. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. 24/Hr Service. 954-290-1443. Beat Any Written Estimate. Sr, Discount. 2-10 PGT IMPACT WINDOWS & DOORS – Discount Prices. 3 Week Installation. CC#978288-GX – 954-295-1695. 2-24 RETIRED PLUMBING CONTRACTOR Looking For Work. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. CFC 027532. Low Rates!! 954-496-6420. 2-3 COMPUTER TUTOR – COMPUTER REPAIR – FREE Estimate! 9 Computer Certifications. 25 Years Experience. Call Bill 954-4493681. 2-3 WATSON PAINTING & WATERPROOFING CO. Interior/Exterior Painting. Res/Comm Pressure Clean Roofs/Decks. Lic/Ins. 954-6500488 Or 954-552-9457. 2-3 NINA’S CLEANING – Exceptional Cleaning Service. Comm / Res. 12 Years Exp. References Available. Your Home Will Be Treated With Respect & Attention To Detail. 954-601-6141. 2-3 MIKE THE GARDENER “THE ALL AMERICAN YARDMAN” Yard And Garden Care – Get The Best For Less! Call 561-543-6337. 2-10 EMERALD IRISH CLEANING – Est. 20 Yrs. English Speaking. Cleaning Supplies. Hand Scrubbed Floors. SPECIAL !!! 3 hrs $55 – 4 HRS $70. Service Guaranteed. www.emeraldirishcleaning. com. 954-524-3161. You Will Do An Irish Jig. 2-3 MASSAGE THERAPIST – BETTYE LERNER – Reduce The Stress – Invite The Healing. In Your Home. More Information Call 954-2704797. Lic. # MA 31964. 2-3 HANDYMAN – PAINTING – CARPENTRY – Pressure Cleaning. Decks! Everything Around The House. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. Call 561-350-3781. 2-17 MOORE PLUMBING PLUMBING SERVICES – Big Jobs – Small Jobs. We Do It All. Remodeling & Repairs. Lic. & Insured. C.C. Accepted. Call 954-772-4600. 2-3 HONEST HANDYMAN – HOME & BUILDING Maintenance/Improvements. No Job Too Small. Fast Friendly Service. Reasonable Rates. Local Resident/Homeowner. Call Today For Your FREE Upfront Quote. No Deposit Required. 754-366-1915. 2-3 HOME/OFFICE REPAIRS By State Certified G.C. Reasonable. CGC025802. More Information Call 954815-1007. GOT JUNK? DUMP TRUCK – CLEANUPS Trees/ Landscape, Yard Fill. Paint/ Pressure Wash/ Roofs/Home Repairs – Welding, Etc. Dave 954-818-9538. 2-10 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIESNew GREEN technology. New defroster control saves energy in home refrigerators, commercial chillers. Patented. All optical. Simple mfg. Strategic partners needed..www.NewAvionics.Com. 954-568-1991MUSICIANS WANTEDThe American Legion Symphonic Band is now accepting new members for the 2011-2012 season. College age to “seasoned seniors” are welcome. Rehearsals are held on Wed. evenings at American Legion Post 142 in Pompano. Percussionists, euphonium and clarinet players are especially needed. If you enjoy “making music,” call Jim McGonigal, Music Director at 954-647-0700 for more info.DEEP WATER VILLA – DOCKPOMPANO BEACH 2/2 1700 SQ FT. Screened Fla Room. Private Yard. W/D. 4 Park. No Fixed Bridges. Community Pool. Deeded Dock.. 2 Blocks Beach. $285,000. Coldwell Banker – Barbara Call 954629-1324. 2-17HOMES FOR RENTPOMPANO 2/2 Cottage Style House. Large Yard With Fish Pond. $1100 Month – Company Bills For Electric & Water. 541 NE 34 St. Darci 954-783-3723. 2-24 CO-OP SALESPOMPANO BEACH 1/1 On Water, Dockage Available At Your Door. $59,500. Coldwell Banker – Barbara – 954-6291324. 2-17

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The Pelican 31 Friday, February 3, 2012 Let the Pelican Classi eds help you Classi eds Call 954-545-0013 INCOME RESTRICTIONS APPL YThe Palms of Deerfield Beach For RentTwo and Three BedroomsAVAILABLE NOW$711 to $824 (Waiting List) $863 to $999 (Available Now)Three-Bedroom Units feature a Master Suite with Full Bathroom and Walk-in Closet PET FRIENDLYFor additional information, visit our website www.DBHAonline.org/townhomes or Contact our office 954-481-3406 Ext. 107 or 954-481-9325 Ask for Kecia R. Sanders Amenities include:• Tile throughout downstairs living area • Carpeted Bedrooms upstairs • Vertical Blinds throughout unit • Ceiling Fans • Energy Efficient Appliances • Refrigerator with Ice-maker • Programmable Oven • Dishwasher • Washer/Dryer Hookup • Patio Area per unit • Central A/C & Heat • Ample Storage • Water, Trash and Sewer are included in Rent REAL ESTATE WANTEDI BUY HOUSES!! CASH!! AS IS! QUICK CLOSE! ANY AREA – ANY CONDITION! NO EQUITY OK. CALL NOW 954-914-2355. 4-20 OWNER FINANCING WANTED! WE SEEK A Nice Large Beach Condo, Townhouse Or House With Pool In The Pompano, Lighthouse, Lauderdale, Boca Area. CONDO Size Minimum 2/2 – 1450 Sq Ft + HOUSE Minimum 3/2 With Pool 1800 Sq Ft + Safe, Quality Area Only. Up To $2200 Mo Incl Everything. $20 $25000 Down. Send Details To: BUCKSTERBOB55@ GMAIL.COM. 2-3 CONDOS FOR SALEPALM AIRE 105 – Split 2/2 King, Upgrades. Largest Kitchen. W/D. Breakfast Room. Piano. Ultra Furnished. Shopping, Pool Close By. 9th Floor. Low Maintenance/Taxes. $134K – Offers. No Brokers! 954-895-4596. Immediate Occupancy. 2-17 LIGHTHOUSE POINT 2/1.5 CONDO In A GREAT AREA. Pets Allowed. $124,900. Call Barbara – Balistreri Realty. 954-263-7129. 2-3 SUPERB DIRECT INTRACOASTAL VIEW – 2/2 Updated Condo. Low Maintenance. No Realtors Please. 954-304-4518 J Peasley / Better Homes & Garden RE. 2-3 LAUDERDALE BY THE SEA – Furnished 1/1.5 Condo $115,000. Heated Pool. Ocean Access. On Canal. 1481 S Ocean Blvd. Apt 228. Call 586549-5223. 2-3 POMPANO LEISUREVILLE 55+ ---1/1 – No Land Lease. Totally Upgraded. New Appliances – New A/C. Movein Condition. Pet Allowed. FREE Golf – 2 Pools. Furniture Optional. Bob 203-430-0235. 217 DEERFIELD BEACH 2/2 Completely Redone. Granite Kitchen, New Cabinets. S.S. Appliances. 20” Porcelain Tile Floors. Travistine Stone Baths. Freshly Painted. 1st Floor. Less Than A Mile To Beach. $84,900. Call 631-873-8715. 2-24CONDOS FOR RENTLAUDERDALE BY THE SEAAcross From Beach. Near Sea Watch. 1 Bedroom – Den – 2 Baths. Pool, W/D In Unit. $1175 Per Mo. Yrly. 1st – Last – Sec. Or Seasonal 5 Mo min. $1595/Mo. No Smoking. Call 954-942-5642. 1-20 DEERFIELD BEACH Waterfront Furnished 2/2, Huge Balcony. Awesome View! Heated Pool, Cable, Covered Parking. No Pets Or Realtors. Good Credit Required. Annual $1150. Also NON Waterfront – Annual. 2/2 $800 $825. Call 631-885-3342. 2-3 WALK TO BEACH? GOT BOAT? Nicest 1/1 In NE Pompano. Annual, Unfurnished $925 Month. Call 954-614-8428. 2-10 POMPANO WATERFRONTIsland Club 2/2 Furnished With Private Dock. Gated Community. $1300 Month Yearly. Susan 954-732-2038 – Mirsky Realty. 2-3 LAUDERDALE BY THE SEA – Across From Beach. Near Sea Watch. 1 Bedroom – Den – 2 Baths, Pool, W/D In Unit. $1175 Per Mo Yrly. 1st – Last – Sec. No Smoking. 954-9425642. 2-10APTS FOR RENTDEERFIELD/POMPANO BEACH 1 BR & 2 BR APTS FOR RENT. Remodeled, Paint, Tile, Etc. W & D On Site. Pool. Pet Friendly. Call George 954809-5030. 2-10 POMPANO BEACH LARGE 2 / 2 FURNISHED APT. Enclosed Porch. Walk To The Beach. $1000 Month – Yearly Lease. Please Call 954-9422232. 2-3 POMPANO GARDENS $795 – 1/1 $200 Deposit. Nice Area – Minutes To Beach – Pet OK. Please Call 954-515-2554. 2-17 POMPANO BEACH 1/1 NW $650 – 2/1 $750 SW 1/1 $725 – 2/1 $925 – NE 1/1 $675 2/1 NE $950 – TH 2/1.5 $1095 – All FREE Water. Rent + $70 MovU-In. 954-781-6299. 2-10 POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 Bedroom From $495. Easy Movein. 1/2 OFF DEPOSIT. Remodeled. Great Location. 954-783-1088 For More Info. 3-9 ROOMS FOR RENTROOM FOR RENT $600 / MONTH – Male / Female Professional. Pet Friendly. No Smokers, Share Bath. Walk To Beach. Very Quiet. Atlantic / Federal Area Pompano. Leave Message 954-471-3402. 2-3OUTDOOR STORAGEDEERFIELD BEACH OUTDOOR STORAGE For Boats, RV’s, Commercial Vehicles & More. Call Chris At 954-520-1777. 2-3COMMERCIAL FOR RENT-SALEPOMPANO COMMERCIAL OFFICE Spaces Available. Ranging From As Low As $500 To $700 Depending On Square Footage. Please Call Darci At 954-7833723. 2-24 DEERFIELD BEACH – Retail Of ce Warehouse – 700 Sq Ft With Loft. A/C, Bathroom. $575 Per Month. Call For More Info 561-654-1331 Or 561-9985681. 2-10 POMPANO BEACH WAREHOUSE / OFFICE – Location! Location! Atlantic Blvd & I-95. 2200 Sq Ft. Overhead Door, 18’ Ceilings, Private Bath. $1,600 Monthly. 1st / Last / Security. 954-9418731.FURNITUREBEDSETS – King $180 – Queen $130 – Full $110 – Twin $90. 5 Pc. Bedroom Set $399. Frames $39. 954-465-6498. 2-10 LIGHTHOUSE POINT – OWNER RELOCATING. Living Room, Bedroom, Dining Room, Sofabeds. Entire Contents. Like Brand New. Buy All Or Part. Offers Accepted. 718-605-9835. 2-3 MISCELLANEOUSWANTED – BUYING Old Books, Dolls, Crystal, Sterlingware, Porcelain, Estate Goods, AND MANY – MANY OTHER ITEMS. 754-244-3047 Ft Lauderdale. 2-17 WANTED OLD OR ANTIQUE GUNS – Call Bob Jones 954-942-3694 – Lighthouse Point. 2-10 4 LAWN CHAIRS $40. Stainless Steel Sink $15. Fence 30’ x 3’ With Posts $25. Large Speakers. Pompano Beach 954-591-0324. 2-3 MEDICALMOTORIZED WHEELCHAIR – High End Jazzy Select 6. Like New! $1,100. Boca 917-324-0009. schnierlaw@aol.com. 2-10WANTED TO BUYGET RID OF THOSE OLD Phonograph Records – Sell Them To Me – Jazz, Rock, Soundtracks, Etc. Curt 954610-1973. 2-3

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32 The Pelican Friday, February 3, 2012 SightingsContinued from page 26 See SIGHTINGS on page 33Bread, 1762 N. Federal Highway, Fort Lauderdale from 7 to 9 p.m. 954-895-3555. Senior Citizens Club – The Greater Pompano Beach Senior Citizens Club meets on the second Wednesday of the month at the Emma Lou Olson Community Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach, at 10 a.m. Call 954-786-411.MusicBroward County Mummers perform at 7:30 p.m. Feb. 21 at St. Stephen Lutheran Church, 2500 NE 14 St. Causeway, Pompano Beach. Mummers, a costumed group of musicians perform Dixieland and Riverboat music. Donation $10. Call 954-9424473.Sightings

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The Pelican 33 Friday, February 3, 2012 Capt. RJ Boyle is an experienced angler in South Florida. His studio is located in Lighthouse Point. Call 954-420-5001. The Pelican. 954.783.8700 By RJ BoyleRJ BOYLE STUDIOSI really enjoy dealing with customers who come into my store and ask for help. You would really be surprised how many guys constantly go fishing and don’t catch anything. They come in time after time to buy bait and some of them are so proud that they don’t want to ask for help. They would rather go out and spend $4 a gallon for gas to take a joyride and catch nothing. The smart guys will come into the shop, come right up to the counter and say one of two things: “I am from up north and I fish a lot up there but I don’t know anything about fishing down here, can you help me?” and “Can you suggest somebody local to ride out with me and show me the ropes?” I always love when a guy asks me that second question. I have fished all over the world and I consider myself a pretty decent fishermen. But why would I pretend to know Skip your pride and have a lot more fun and a lot more sh what I am doing in a new place that I have never fished before? Last year I went to Nova Scotia to catch giant bluefin tunas. We hired a crew to teach us how to catch them. Usually, people are hiring me to show them how to catch things but this time the shoe was on the other foot. I knew one thing though, I wasn’t going to pay $700 for an airline ticket and pretend I was some great tuna fisherman. The guys dialed us in and we had the trip of a lifetime. Point is: come into the shop and ask us for help. We will get you a local mate to ride along with you to show you the ropes or we can set you up on a charter boat with one of our friends to learn. Don’t waste anymore time and money pretending.SightingsContinued from page 32 2-6 – The American Association of University Women Pompano Beach Branch will hold a membership meeting at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6th St., at 12:30 p.m. Call 954-524-2938. 2-8 – The Cypress Civic Association meets at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach, at 7:30 p.m. 954-9428108. 2-9 – The Florida Trail Association will meet at 7:30 p.m. at Fern Forest Nature Center, 201 Lyons Road, Coconut Creek. Hiker Wayne Petrovich will present the 10 essential items that all backpackers, kayakers and hikers should carry. 954-609-4727. 2-9 – The Deer eld Beach Historical Society will host History at Sundown at 6 p.m. at the Old School Museum, 232 NE 2 St., Deer eld Beach. 954-429-0378. 2-11 – The 20th Annual Florida Renaissance Festiv al will take place every weekend from Feb. 11 through March 11 at Quiet Waters Park, 401 S. Powerline Road, in Deer eld Beach. Visit www. ren-fest.com or call 954-7761642. 2-11 – The Deer eld Beach Historical Society will host a Black History Month presentation at 1 p.m. at the Percy White Library, 837 E. Hillsboro Blvd., Deer eld Beach. Guest are encourage to come at 11 a.m. to share their See SIGHTINGS on page 35

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34 The Pelican Friday, February 3, 2012

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The Pelican 35 Friday, February 3, 2012 “It does pay off,” said Pompano Beach resident Diane Hanke. Diane’s son, Michael, a pitcher, signed with Flagler College where he’ll play baseball and study business and sports management. [There was] an extreme amount of driving [to games and practices] and a lot of [baseball-themed] summers,” she said. “But I wouldn’t change it for the world.” A product of Pompano’s youth baseball programs before going to Gibbons, Michael said it’s a big relief to finally get this far. “After everything you work for, it’s nice to see a result at the end.” He didn’t get a scholarship but his father, Mark, said that’s par for the course for incoming baseball freshmen and he’s confident his son will get one in his second year. “We expect that as baseball parents. It’s all about education. Baseball’s just a bonus.” Like Michael, Pompano Beach resident Catie Donahoe, who signed with the University of Miami to play volleyball on a full scholarship, was also glad to enjoy the results of all her hard work for a moment. “It feels nice with all our friends and family watching [us sign].” She’s not sure yet what her major will be, “maybe nursing or business,” but she knows she wants to keep playing volleyball. “I like that it’s a team sport. You travel with a team, friends you’ll always have.” Donahoe’s fellow teammate Leigh Andrew is off to become a Tarheel. Andrew will be playing volleyball for the University of North Carolina where she’ll use her full scholarship to major in sports medicine. “It was always like my dream school,” she said. The Pompano Beach resident said its been a “long five or six years” of practices and competitions. “It’s a grind but it’s all worth it in the end. But we also have a lot of fun.” Morrill urged the students watching from the bleachers in the school gym to look at the students signing as an example. “It takes an awful amount of dedication and hard work . in every aspect of your life [to get this far. These students are] going to the best colleges. Don’t just be a dreamer.” The Pelican is looking for your sports stories. Email Michael d’Oliveira at mdpelican@yahoo.com or call 954-783-8700.Signing DayContinued from page 29histories. 954-429-0378. 2-11 – Free car safety check event from 9 a.m. to noon at Pompano Beach Fire-Rescue Station #24, 2001 NE 10 St. Appointments must be scheduled. 954-786-4510. 2-11 & 12 – The American Glass, Pottery, Dinnerware Show & Sale will be held on Saturday and Sunday at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach. Cost is $6.50 per person. Visit www.sfdgc.com. SightingsContinued page 33

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36 The Pelican Friday, February 3, 2012



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Friday, February 3, 2012 Vol. XX, Issue 5 Call 954-783-8700 to Advertise Email: siren2415@gmail.com Pompano Beach Deer eld Beach Lighthouse Point Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Wilton Manors Oakland Park Hillsboro Beach The Galt Palm Aire The Pelican Pelican Visit us online at www.pompanopelican.com The The Pelican Pelican Big hike in water bills prompts sewer rate studyBy Judy VikPELICAN STAFFLauderdale-By-The-Sea Before of cials changed the method of calculating sewer bills for users in the southern end of town, the monthly base rate at the 96-unit Poinciana condo was $190. Now its $1,368. Cristy Furth, co-owner of the Blue Seas Courtyard motel, says the current rates are a true hardship. This is atrocious. Furths water/sewer bills at the motel doubled from $250 to $500 a month when the town switched from charging by meter size to charging by the unit. There is no rationale for charging See SEWERS on page 28 Browns early entry into LBTS race gives him winning edge By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFLauderdaleBy-The-Sea Absentee ballots and a methodical campaign helped Mark Brown carry all four precincts Tuesday to win election to Seat 3 on the Lauderdale-ByThe-Sea Town Commission. He drew support from 858 voters to defeat Edmund Malkoon by 249 votes. Brown announced his candidacy early when it appeared no one was taking on incumbent Commissioner Birute Ann Clottey, and sent a mailer that included an absentee ballot request form. Then he campaigned one-onone, as you do in a small town, an experience he called enlightening. He said at rst he believed that his professional background and name recognition as editor of a local newspaper were enough. But people asked me why I was running, he said, and he realized he had to articulate his reasons. Many See BROWN WINS on page 6 Former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney shakes hands with Lauderdale-By-The-Sea resident Richard Felago at a campaign event in Pompano Beach on Sunday. Romney won the Florida Republican Primary with 46 percent of the vote. [Photo by Michael dOliveira]By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach When Andy Eddy looks at Mitt Romney, he sees the Republican candidate with the right background business. He has much more of a business background [than the other candidates], said Eddy, a Deer eld Beach resident, at a Romney campaign event on Jan. 29 at the Emma Lou Olsen Center in Pompano Beach. I have no gripes with anyone being wealthy . thats the American Dream. Eddy was one of hundreds who packed the center to capacity to hear the former Massachusetts governor speak. Romney won the state primary Tuesday with 46 percent of the vote. He has been criticized by the other Republican candidates on some of his past nancial decisions. Pompano Beach resident Catherine McPhail said she would prefer to support former Senator Rick Santorum but defeating Obama is the most important issue. We have to beat Obama. Period. End of story. Republican and Broward County Commissioner Chip LaMarca agrees with McPhail. Hes our only chance at beating Barack Obama, said Romney presses the esh in Pompano Beach See ROMNEY on page 2Challengers win in LHP, but supporters question GOPs interventionBy Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFLighthouse Point An organized Republican Party attempt to in uence the non-partisan commission election here apparently back red Tuesday when incumbents Susie Gordon and Tom Hasis were turned out of of ce. Gordon was defeated by schoolteacher Becky Lysengen by 314 votes; Hasis lost to former newspaper editor Earl Maucker by 127 votes. Mailers sent to voters by the SEE LHP ON PAGE 12Brown

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2 The PelicanFriday, February 3, 2012 The Pelican 954-783-8700 SightingsA community calendar of East Broward County. Please email information to siren2415@gmail.com LaMarca while onstage next to Romney. McPhail praised Romney on his work with the 2002 Winter Olympics in Salt Lake City, saying he cut through a lot of red tape to get the event back on track. According to an online NPR article, Romney did restore sponsor and public con dence in the Olympic committee and erased a $400 million de cit. His operating budget nished with a $100 million surplus. But not included in that budget were hundreds of millions of dollars spent for security and transportation infrastructure money not paid back with Olympic revenues. Nobody really stresses that [Olympics] story, said Colleen Stolberg, vice chair of the Broward Republican Executive Committee, at the event. Stolberg said turning the economy around was her biggest concern. Jobs, jobs, jobs. The economy, the economy, the economy. The former governor touched upon familiar issues like repealing ObamaCare. Critics often cite the Romneybacked healthcare system in Massachusetts as inspiration for ObamaCare. In response, Romney has said that healthcare should be left up to each state. Romney also talked about creating jobs and promised to cut spending, balance the federal budget and expand the military; criticizing the Obama Administration for its plans to cut armed forces personnel and spending. Obama recently defended the cuts, saying the U.S. still far exceeds every other country in military spending. In 2009 the U.S. spent $687 billion on defense. The second highest country, China, spent $114 billion. Along with Obama, Romney attacked former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich for his comments that there would be a base on the moon by the end of Gingrichs second term as president. Send him to the Moon, shouted an audience member. Boca Raton resident Travis Johnson said he hasnt made up his mind yet whom he will vote for. He chose Obama in but has since become disappointed with the president. I feel he really could have made a change instead of what he did. Johnson came to the event to hear what Romney had to say and ask hardcore supporters why they were backing him. He added that although he will probably vote for Obama again, this time it will be more about voting against the Republican and less about voting in favor of the president. RomneyContinued from page 1 Elected Of cialsDist. 4 Commissioner Chip LaMarca Every Wednesday from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. the district of ce of Commissioner LaMarca is open at the Lighthouse Point Library, 2200 NE 38 Street. 954-357-7004.See SIGHTINGS on page 3

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The Pelican 3 Friday, February 3, 2012 St. Valentine performance of The Ink Spots. Feb. 14, at NE Focal Point, 227 NW 2 St., Deer eld Beach from 10 to 11 a.m. will include these hits: If I Didnt Care, I Dont Want To Set The World On Fire, You You You, Tuxedo Junction, Java Jive, Chattanooga Choo Choo and My Prayer Presented by Shane Le Mar Entertainment. Call 954480-4449. The InkspotsBy Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach Supporters of Blanche Ely High School in Pompano Beach say the schools new $5.6 million athletic facility is missing one thing: a new scoreboard. And they want one. Why would anyone build a brand new stadium with a 35-year old scoreboard that does not address soccer or track? asked Ernestine Price, who graduated Ely in 1958. The new stadium, which saw its rst game in May of last year, included a refurbished football eld, an expanded track, new bleachers, a new press box and a new baseball eld. To help fund a new scoreboard, Price and others Blanche Ely community says new scoreboard price is in ated; board says $165,000 too much for new oneraised $54,000. Now they are asking the School Board to fund the remaining money to make it happen. But right now it may not happen. In a unanimous decision, school board members voted against the additional funding but will take up the matter again at their Feb. 22 meeting. Kathleen Ginestra, executive secretary for School Board member Nora Rupert, said the board is waiting for further information. Money doesnt ow through here like it does other places, Price said. But, according to records, the Ely scoreboard would cost nearly six times what recent purchases of scoreboards at local high schools have cost. Scoreboards range from $22,000 to $32,000. Broward Schools of cials estimated that the scoreboard Blanche Ely wanted, which is 21 ft. high by 24 ft. wide with a 7 ft. high by 24 ft. wide full color video screen, would cost about $165,000. The board would have to contribute $111,000 to the $54,000 the community raised. Proponents of the new scoreboard say that price is in ated. We didnt ask for $111,000. We didnt expect $111,000, said Price. Louis Watley, a 1967 graduate of Ely and member of the schools success team and facilities committee, said if Ely had been given a new scoreboard, instead of the school system trying to refurbish the old one when the stadium was built, none of this would be an issue. Watley also points out that the complex which had its funding increased to $7.3 See SCOREBOARD on page 17SightingsContinued from page 2 Great EatsPancake Breakfast Every third Sunday of the month, the St. Elizabeths of Hungry Parish hosts a pancake breakfast at 3331 NE 10 Terrace, Pompano Beach. The breakfast is from 7:30 a.m. to noon and bene ts the Parish and cafeteria maintenance. 954-263 8415. See SIGHTINGS on page 16

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4 The PelicanFriday, February 3, 2012 By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFWilton Manors Low voter turnout marked the passing of all three Wilton Manors referenda questions on Jan. 31. Voter turnout countywide was 20 percent with the majority of about 14 percent of Wilton Manors voters saying yes to allowing city commissioners to engage in outside concurrent employment consistent with Florida law. Voters also said yes to allowing volunteer board members to have outside jobs and yes to requiring the city to hold a referendum regarding any future move to disband its independent police department and hire another law enforcement agency. The referenda are non-binding and commissioners can vote against public opinion if they choose. Elaine Turner voted in favor of the employment questions but declined to talk about the police one because her son is an of cer with the Wilton Manors Police Department. [Commissioners and board members] dont make enough as part-time employees. How can you ask someone not to work? she asked. Gary Keating voted against the commission question, saying he likes all the current commissioners but I want to make sure were protected on the issue in the future. Its not supposed to be a career. He voted yes on the other two questions. Citizens de nitely need to have a vote. I [want our own police department] but Im not sure that nancially we can always have it that way. Voter approval was uneven, with 66 percent approving of commissioners getting outside jobs, 72 percent for board members getting outside jobs and 81 percent for holding a referendum on police services. Sea Ranch Lakes and Hillsboro Beach also held a referendum on commissioners and outside employment. Sea Ranch Lakes had a 93 percent approval rating with Hillsboro recording 73 percent. In their literature explaining outside employment for Wilton Manors voters approve referenda questions, making county ethics code invalidcommissioners, Wilton Manors of cials claim that the countys new ethics code prevents elected of cials from holding a job and serving at the same time. By reverting back to the state code, they say commissioners will be considered part-time employees and allowed to hold outside jobs; state law does not prohibit any elected of cial from holding outside employment. But the new ethics code also allows of cials to hold outside employment as long as it doesnt con ict with state law. Under the county ordinance, the only profession elected of cials are banned from holding is lobbying. One voter, who declined to give her name, said she thought the commission Voters return city commissioners to state ethics code; city could face lawsuit from county See ETHICS CODE on page 16

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The Pelican 5 Friday, February 3, 2012 ADVERTISING? ITS PART OF DOING BUSINESS. CALL US. 954-783-8700. Pompano Beach Soroptimists held their Annual Casino Night recently at The Elks Club of Pompano Beach. The bene t produced $19,287, which was presented to Woodhouse Executive Director. Marsha Linville. Sponsors of the event were Elks Club of Pompano Beach, the Seminole Tribe of Florida, Broward Health, Florida Shores Bank, and the Norweigan Cruise Lines. Pictured are Soroptimist President Cheryl DePretorlo, Casino Chairman Pam Euston, Fonnie Gill, Pompano Beach Elks Exalted Ruler Marilyn Kronenberg, Debbie Cline, Woodhouse Executive Director Marsha Linville and Linda Woodhouse. Fonnie, Debbie and Linda are Woodhouse Board members as well as being Soroptimists. Lots of fun and plenty of moola for a great cause

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6 The PelicanFriday, February 3, 2012 Deer eld Beach, Pompano Beach, Lighthouse Point, LauderdaleBy-The-Sea, Wilton Manors and Oakland ParkWilton Manors Oakland Park Hillsboro Beach The Pompano Pelican is published weekly on FridaysStreet Address: 1500-A E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, FL 33060 Telephone: 954-783-8700 Fax: 954-783-0093Letters to the Editor are encouraged and accepted for print if signed, although a writers name will be withheld on request; letters must also include a daytime telephone number. Advertising rates are available upon request. Subscription rate is $31.80 including tax for one years delivery in Greater Pompano Beach; $95.40/per year including tax for others in the United States; call 954-783-8700 for rates abroad. The Pelican is a nonpartisan newspaper and reserves the right to decline advertising. Copyright 2011. Reproduction of this publication in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission of the publisher. The Pelican is a member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, Deer eld Beach Chamber and the LBTS Chamber. The Pelican is a state certi ed woman-owned minority business. The Pelican is delivered to businesses, libraries, schools, of ces, hospitals, news racks and single family homes. All advertising and copy is published at the sole discretion of the publisher. We welcome your critiques and ideas concerning this publication. Anne Siren, publisherExecutive Assistant: Mary Hudson Finance: Peter Pritchard Graphics: Rachel Ramirez Windsheimer and Adriana Bonilla Bookkeeper: John White Classi eds: Fran Shelby Contributing Writers: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Judy Wilson, Malcolm McClintock, Judy Vik, Mike dOliveira Account Executives: Paul Shroads, Carolyn Mann, Bill Heaton, Bill Fox ESTABLISHED 1993 Volume XX, Issue 5 Founding Editor and PublisherAnne Hanby Siren Letters & OpinionsWinning candidates raised the most moneyLighthouse Point Winning candidates in Tuesdays city commission election were those that raised the most in campaign contributions. Becky Lysengen had the largest bankroll, $11,989 as of the Jan. 26 report, in her successful bid to unseat Susie Gordon who raised $8,875. In the citys other race, Earl Maucker reported $6,120 in contributions since the last report bringing his total war chest to $8,270 against the losing incumbent Tom Hasis who nanced his own campaign with $7,500. Among Lysengens larger donors this period were the Realtors PAC of Orlando that contributed $500 and attorneys Roig,Tutan, Rosenberg & Zlotnick who gave her $500. Gordon brought in $500 from the Hillsboro Club and $500 from CPA Thomas Ahearn. Mauckers largest nancial supporters in this period were Bill and Judy Sullivan with $500, James Acheson, $500; attorneys Greenspoon Marder, $500; attorneys Portley & Sullivan, $500; the Realtors PAC of Orlando, $500, and Mayor Fred Schorr, $300.A thank you to sponsors of the Wilton Manors Island City OpenThe Island City Open Tennis Tournament was held January 21 and 22 at Hagen Park in Wilton Manors. We had a great turnout and plenty of good tennis. A great big thank you goes to all of the sponsors, who so generously contributed gift certificates to their establishments as prizes to the winners. J. Marks, J. Alexanders, Alibis, Bills Filling Station, The Manor, Rodeo, Storks, Tropics, Courtyard Cafe, Kitchenetta, Mattys, Humpys, Le Patio, Sozo, MatchPoint, Atlantic Properties, Wilton Discount Liquor store and Celebration Cruise Line. Your support means a lot to our community. Thank you. Donna Kocyba Hagen Park Tennis DirectorWoodhouse 12th Annual Lighthouse Point Keeper Days coming upLighthouse Point Police Officer Mike McDace and former library director Doreen Gauthier will be the honorees for the 12th Annual Keeper Days, Feb. 10 to 12 at several venues in the city. McDace receives the Keeper recognition posthumously after serving 34 years in the citys police department and in code enforcement. Gauthier retired last year after 33 years at the helm of the library. Both will be honored at a dinner Friday, Feb. 10 at the LHP Yacht Club. For reservations, call John Trudel at 954-784-3439. Tickets are $50. The celebration continues on Saturday, 10 a.m. with a parade that moves north from First Presbyterian Church to McDonough Park where events include a car show, LHP Chamber Business Expo, childrens pet show, entertainment, games and rides. From 6 to 9 p.m., food, fireworks and live entertainment will be offered at Dan Witt Park. Attendees are allowed to bring lawn chairs. On Sunday, Feb. 14, a family sports day will be held from 1 to 4:30 p.m. at McDonough Park. For more, email Jane McLaughlin at ndmac@aol.com Leave us alone to run our own nonpartisan campaignsBy Anne SirenPUBLISHERThe Pelican congratulates two new commissioners in Lighthouse Point: Earl Maucker and Becky Lysengen. And to the incumbents, Tom Hasis and Susie Gordon, who lost their seats, we add more congratulations for your good work over the years and a sincere thank you for handing over a well-run city to the new kids on the block. We look forward to new ideas in the city as well with continued smooth and friendly government that has become the signature of Lighthouse Point. And now the ugly part. Despite the fact that Lighthouse Point is a small city of people who eagerly engage in their government meetings, and the fact that a citywide debate took place with all four candidates espousing their positions to a packed audience at Dixon Ahl Civic Center, and the fact that the race was non-partisan, the Republican Executive Committee put its boots on the ground to splatter mud on the two challengers, Lysengen and Maucker. The yers relied on code words aimed at pushing this Republican-dominated city into partisan politics. The Broward County Republican Committee made their mailers as partisan as they could while skirting the edges of the law as they did. Referring to Lysengen, yers read Union bosses are coming for Lighthouse Point and they have a candidate for commissioner. Lysengen is a Broward County school teacher where membership in the Broward County Teachers Union is not mandated, but all teachers bene t from its presence. The Republican Party has been a union-buster throughout the nation, but there are no public schools in Lighthouse Point. The union presence is already in the city through its police and re contracts. Maucker was painted as an Independent liberal, an attempt to align him with Democrats. The ironic result of the intrusion of the Republicans into this small race is that some of their own party members, angered by the intrusion, may be changing their party af liations. And the candidates for whom the yers were supposed to have helped probably caused damage. There is a reason for non-partisan races in local elections. It allows the citizens to evaluate the best candidate for his or her ability to serve the unique make-up of that town and to focus on the speci c issues and needs of that community and its citizens regardless of their individual party af liations. This attempt to control the local election from the executive committee back red, and it did so because there was neither thought nor concern for the very wise voters in Lighthouse Point. The Message: Back off. Unity in the CommunityOn Feb. 4 from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Unity in the Community, a day of free food and entertainment, will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Pompano Community Park, 2001 NE 10 St., Pompano Beach. The events goal is to foster community spirit and understanding. For more, call 954-899-5557 or 954-941-6364.

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The Pelican 7 Friday, February 3, 2012 Brown winsContinued from page 1 people told him they were happy with how things were going on the commission, and he was, too. People were tired of the cronyism of the past and didnt even want to talk about that. Brown began his fundraising early, realizing people he would have counted on said they were sitting this campaign out after Malkoon announced his candicacy. Both are members of the Unite Our Town, or UOT, Political Action Committee. Clottey decided not to seek re-election. Im fortunate in having a network of friends and relatives, Brown said, explaining how he collected about $10,500 from about 100 contributors. Chuck Clark, a former town commissioner, supported Browns election. Of the candidates he was far and above the most quali ed. His knowledge of the history of the town and his grasp of the issues is equal to or even better than some of the sitting commission we have now, Clark said. Mark will add luster to what we already have. After the results were in, Malkoon and Brown spoke. During the campaign, we made a gentlemans agreement that we wouldnt say anything negative about each other, and we lived up to that. You cant control what others say. Were friends, and were still going to be friends. I have nothing but nice things to say about him. He made a strong showing, and I give him credit, Brown said. Im very happy and satis ed that I had a good strong showing, Malkoon said Wednesday. Without the absentee ballots, he said he carried the northern residential areas of Bel Air, Terra Mar and Sunset Lane. He said its too soon to know if he will run again in the future, but he plans to stay involved in his hometown. Im happy that I kept things positive. My aim was to open a dialogue with all parties and respect everybody, he said. Brown said he thinks having the municipal election on the same day as the Republican Presidential Primary helped Malkoon, a Republican, and challenged one of Malkoons campaign tactics. An ad placed in the ByTheSeaFuture Newspaper listed both candidates party af liations which, in a nonpartisan election, is against state law. Brown said he plans to le a complaint with the Florida Division of Elections. According to Brown the January election, Created an inconsistent voting pattern a more favorable environment for a Republican. Republicans were motivated to vote, but a lot of non-Republicans were not, Brown said. Malkoon ran with support from the Citizens Initiative Committee, or CIC, and Brown was endorsed by the UOT, board of directors. In the election two years ago, Malkoon was the rst person to announce he was running. Then he and other would-be candidates agreed to step aside if they werent the ones selected for UOT endorsement so as to not split the ticket. Malkoon said, The UOT said they would support me next time. I never said it was owed to me. I helped them (the endorsed candidates, Scot Sasser and Chris Vincent), went to the condos and had them in my house. Im a little let down and a little hurt, but I hope we will all be friends again. he said. Brown said he has asked everyone to put any anger behind them any anger that developed during the campaign and go back to being one town again. Friends were squeezed, (by having to choose to support him or Malkoon) and in the end it got testy in some places. Brown will be sworn into of ce Tuesday, Feb. 14, 7 p.m. Besides, Brown, Mayor Roseann Minnet and Vice Mayor Stuart Dodd, both automatically re-elected without opposition, will also be sworn in. A new vice mayor will be selected.Latest nance reports show Brown aheadIn the latest campaign nance reports for the period ending Jan. 26, Brown raised an additional $350 in contributions for a total of $19,021.74 including a donation from Vice Mayor Dodd. Malkoon raised $2,210 in monetary contributions in the latest reporting period for a total of $6,150. He had the support of outgoing commissioner Birute Ann Clottey. He received a $250 donation from The Realtors PAC of Florida.

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8 The PelicanFriday, February 3, 2012 Making a Difference Phyllis J. Neuberger wants your suggestions about people who are making a difference. Call 954-7838700. Briefs Child abuse reports to be mandatory if passedState Representative Gwyndolen Clarke-Reed and U.S. Senators Bill Nelson and Dick Durbin attended a recent meeting in Tampa concerning HB 1355 which requires specified educational institutions and their law enforcement agencies to report known or suspected child abuse, abandonment, or neglect in certain circumstances. According to Clarke-Reed, the majority of members on the committee agreed that the bill needs to be passed. Along with the 500 people in attendance were. State Representative Perry Thurston, Broward County Commissioner Dale Holness, State Representative Betty Reed and Rod Smith, chair of the Florida Democratic Party.By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFThe 30 ladies in this chorus just beam with the pleasure of singing songs they know and love. They work The NOTE-ABLES hit the road to become singing ambassadors for John Knox VillageSee AMBASSADORS on page 20The NOTE-ABLES from John Knox Village are sisters in song bringing happy music and smiles wherever they perform.hard for the Diva, Harriet Mertz, who directs, teaches, cajoles, demands and pays in praise as they rehearse or ready themselves to perform on stage before an audience. The sound of enthusiastic applause is their reward. An invitation to return is a bonus. Mertz became the director of the John Knox Village, or JKV, ladies chorus in 2008. This is not a new role for me, she explains. I have taught voice, performed many times myself and directed choruses in the school system, churches, community centers, country clubs and hotels for umpteen years all around our country, and Canada. She introduces her NOTE-ABLES as The ladies in the 80s, but recently one of the ladies objected because she said, Im only 79. The Diva laughs and says, my ladies range in age from 79 to 97. They stand, sing, act a little and smile. They are wonderful examples of what pleasure we can have at any age. Our accompanist, Anita Ferguson, is an absolute jewel. She has even written our introductory song, We are the NOTEABLES, and one of our members, Mary Hooker, wrote the lyrics to our Farewell Song. Im very proud of my singing ambassadors. They are perfectCommissioners set district meetingsDeerfield Beach Three city commissioners are holding district meeting this month beginning with Bill Ganz who will hold a District 4 meeting Monday, Feb. 13, 7 p.m. at Constitution Park, 2841 West Hillsboro Blvd. On Thursday, Feb. 23, 7 p.m., Dist. 1 Commissioner Joe Miller will speak with constituents at City Hall and on Friday, Feb. 24, 6 p.m., Dist.2 Commissioner Ben Preston will meet with residents at Westside Park, 448 SW 2 Street.

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The Pelican 9 Friday, February 3, 2012 By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach If wearing a tuxedo and creating a candle-lit dinner at home doesnt qualify a man as sensitive, perhaps nothing will. Years ago, thats just what Pompano Beach resident Lee Aken did for his wife one evening. You can do so much more at home and Chemistry.com picks Pompano as Sensitive Guy Capital of the U.S.make it more special [than a restaurant], says Lee. That will get you far. I think as they get older they get more sensitive. But hes always been romantic, said Lees wife, Barbara. Lee isnt alone. Chemistry.com, an online dating service, recently picked Pompano as the number one city in the country to nd a sensitive guy. Some of the other cities that made the list were Sarasota, Buffalo, Indianapolis, Nashville, Staten Island and West Hollywood, California. Barbara says Lee, whom she married 23 years ago, cooks every night, helps her clean the house and is a very good dad to their two teenage children. [Lee] just loves you, caters to you, does the right thing, said Brett Colonel, Barbaras co-worker at the G Designs hair salon in Pompano. I care more about the women more than I care about myself. If moms not happy, nobodys happy, says Lee, who added that the secret to being a sensitive guy is the little things: making the bed, sending nice text messages throughout the day, buying owers. You want to keep it simple and nice. It really makes the day go faster, better, nicer. In a Chemistry.com press release, Dr. Helen Fisher, chief scienti c advisor to the website, seemed to be describing Lee. [Sensitive men] go way out of their way to keep their social relationships running smoothly. So they watch, listen, and gauge what they need to do to help others and they do it naturally. Its these See SENSITIVE MAN on page 21

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10 The PelicanFriday, February 3, 2012 Business matters The Pelican takes a look at local business owners. Call The Pelican to nd out how you can tell your story here because business matters. 954-783-8700.By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFBruce Irwin, owner of Brutus Seafood in Marathon in the Florida Keys, says hes been a commercial sherman in the Keys for 32 years catching and selling the freshest sh available. Were a family business now in the fourth generation. My wife, Lettie is the of ce manager. Our daughter, Jessica is her assistant. Our son Ryan is just out of college, and hes the captain of our three-man shing boat. We have 9,400 stone crab and lobster traps so were busy working seven days a week to deliver the quality our customers expect from us. If we need more, we buy it fresh from day boats. Our motto is: Were a customer service business selling seafood and we mean it. Seasonal catch available now includes lobster, stone crab, pink shrimp, yellow tail and Mahi. Irwin says, We also offer prepared crab cakes and soup. As soon as our store opens in Marathon we will have a line of dips, spreads and prepared, restaurant quality dinners ready to bake and serve. Like every other industry, the shing industry has new ways to reach customers. Irwin says, Technology has made it possible to sell online. We ship all over the country, keeping our fresh sh fresh-packed in dry ice for next day delivery. We post an available product and price menu on our web site and its kept current. Our delivery to your kitchen is free for orders of $100 or more. Our prices are very competitive even with free delivery. We deliver by truck and Fed Brutus Seafood, located in Marathon, delivers fresh seafood to the customers kitchen in 24 hours See BRUTUS SEAFOOD on page 21Ex. Our basic route includes markets and individuals in West Palm Beach, Delray Beach, Pompano Beach, Fort Lauderdale and Miami. Most of our customers stock up with at least a weeks supply of fresh sh and seafood and they give us rave reviews. He says a typical order is between ve and 20 pounds of seafood or a combination of prepared and seafood. Brutus Seafood Fisherman caught in the act with photos of stone crabs that make the mouth water. Your order is delivered from the ocean to your house in 24 hours. [Photos courtesy of Brutus Seafood.]Northwest improvements on the tablePompano Beach The Northwest Community Redevelopment Agency will hold meetings on Feb. 9 and 16 regarding plans to improve the Hammondville Road/Martin Luther King, Jr. Boulevard downtown area. The meetings, held at 6 p.m. at the E. Pat Larkins Center, 520 Hammondville Road, will focus on streetscape improvements and updated pedestrian connections. Northwest CRA Director Floyd Johnson said the improvements will help mold the northwest area of the city into a destination that will help local businesses and residents. Planned improvements include increased street lighting, wider sidewalks and improved landscaping. For more, visit mypompanobeach.com or call 954467-6822.Educational scholarships availablePompano Beach The City of Pompano Beach Office of Housing and Urban Development is offering nine scholarships for Pompano residents. Available are six two-year Florida pre-paid scholarships and three $1,500 Bronze Scholarships. To be eligible, students must be a high school senior in a low to moderate income household and plan on attending a Florida college, university or vocational school. Applications are due by March 30 at 5 p.m. For more, call 954-5457789.

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The Pelican 11 Friday, February 3, 2012 Although his business is leverage buyouts which means buying and selling companies, Ben Smith, 38, the owner of the two Lighthouse Inns, 3305 SE 5 St. and 3208 NE 11 St., Pompano Beach since 2008 says, These two assisted living facilities are keepers. Im attached to the residents and would feel like I abandoned them if I sold the Inns. My aunt, Sue Beall, is the very capable administrator of both residences and Suzi Mautner is our director of marketing.These two people are my life savers. Mautner, who is a seasoned executive in this eld, was asked how these Inns differ from other rental assisted living residences. She replied, We do all of the services one expects. The difference is in the exceptionally caring staff. Were intimate residences with a capacity of 33 in Lighthouse Inn South and 43 in Lighthouse Inn North. Were small enough to give personal attention. The residents all know each other and have concerns for each other the way family members do for one another. Continuing, she adds, Our case manager/social worker applies for nancial assistance for new residents wherever it is indicated. Many of our residents are receiving bene ts from the government and VA programs. Until they moved in, they never realized they were entitled to them. This assistance helps them relax and forget their worries about being able to maintain themselves nancially. A licensed therapist attends to individual and group therapy when the need exists. Both facilities have activity directors who keep residents busy with walks to the ocean, bingo, card games, jewelry making, painting and other crafts. Theres an exercise class every morning. Ivan Lozada has lived at Lighthouse Inn South for four years. I like the staff. They take good care of my room andme. The food is good and always fresh. Ribs, chicken and meat loaf are my favorites. They bake the cakes and pies right here too, but butter pecan ice cream is still my favorite. I often walk the beach with my friends and I like bingo. Cindy Ryan, thinks these Inns as life savers. My dad lived at Lighthouse Inn, North for six years. I was impressed with the quality of care he received. When my husband needed assisted living, I moved them both to the South Inn. And I, unexpectedly ended up here too. They are very good to us. My husband needs constant attention and it is provided by willing and pleasant staff. These two residences allow small pets. Mautner says, if the resident can care for them. Our staff assists residents with bathing, dressing and grooming, medical management, housekeeping and personal laundry service. Physical and occupational therapy, doctor visits and podiatrists are available on site. We arrange for transportation for off site visits to dentists, doctors and other activities. Family and friends are welcome visitors from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m.A Seaside Assisted Living ResidenceFinancial Assistance available through Government and VA Programs Suzi Mautner director of marketing and Ben Smith, owner.Call Suzi 561-667-0678ALF Lic#7127 The Lighthouse Inn Call to place your classi ed adGlassaholics to unite for Depression Glass show in Pompano By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach They call them glassaholics. Unable to resist the allure of a beautifully-crafted, mint condition piece of Depression Glass; they wander from yard sale to antique shops to conventions in search of their next find. John Fiores life as a glassaholic started out innocently enough: all in the name of democracy. As a Wilton Manors citycommissioner in 1997, Fiore, who later served as mayor from 2000 to 2002, visited various yard sales in the city as a way to introduce himself to the people. What a great way to go around and meet residents I would never [normally] meet, he said. And thats how he began picking up pieces of Depression Glass. I didnt know what it was. [at the time] But with the help of his long-time partner, Michael Pierce, theyve kept the habit going ever since. Last weekend, the two began prepping for the 38th Annual American Glass Pottery Dinnerware Show & Sale; Feb. 11, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Feb. 12, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 Ave., in Pompano Beach. We look forward all year-round to this show, says Fiore. Depression Glass, said Fiore, who served as president of the South Florida Depression Glass Club for eight years, ranges from cheap to expensive. Manufactured during the Great Depression, it became very popular and could be found as prizes inside cereal boxes or at five and dime stores. All Depression glass is American made, but over the decades, many factories have failed due to bad luck. All but two have gone out of business; victims of factory fires and changing American tastes. The growing use of plastic and aluminum for consumers added to the loss. It was a slower, more elegant time. People had fancy dinner parties [which eventually gave way to informal barbecues], said Fiore. Today, collectors tend to look at Depression glass as a money maker. It works for Fiore. We look at it as an investment, said Pierce. Weve made enough to [take trips to [Hawaii, Las Vegas, Mexico]. And weve kept the good stuff for ourselves, said Fiore. Good stuff, he added that they plan to possibly sell in their own shop one day after Fiore retires from his day job as an urban planner for the Broward County Parks and Recreation Division. Their collection has taken See DEPRESSION GLASS on page 22John Fiore, right, and Michael Pierce have collected Depression glass for years.

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12 The PelicanFriday, February 3, 2012 LHPContinued from page 1 Broward Republican Executive Committee, or BREC, over the weekend painted Lysengen as a union sympathizer and Maucker as an independent liberal. Sitting commissioner Sandy Johnson, a registered Republican and Lysengen supporter, called the partys interference into local politics muckraking. Hasis said the partys mailer endorsing him actually hijacked his campaign and that he neither saw nor approved the piece. Hasis said he believes the mailer crippled his chance to continue serving the residents of Lighthouse Point. I told them I welcomed their support in getting my conservative record out, but told them absolutely no negative campaigning, Hasis said. The Republican Party also made robo calls linking Hasis, 65, and Gordon, 58, support Hasis said he never requested. Maucker ,64, said the GOP mailing could have had a backlash effect, but how deep it went he didnt know. He said, however, It was absolutely inappropriate for the Republican Party to get involved in a non-partisan election. He lauded Hasis for running a great campaign and said he looks forward to the challenge of being a commissioner. The piece that labeled the 33-year-old Lysengen a union member said, Union bosses are coming for Lighthouse Point and they have a candidate for commissioner. It went on to infer active union member Lysengen would support bloated pensions, irreversible tenures in ated pay and bene ts and union cronyism. The union link is anathema in conservative Lighthouse Point where Republican voters greatly outnumber Democrats. Johnson said she thought the mailings negatively affected those the GOP intended to bene t. This is unprecedented. Why was it done? Who wanted it done? Does this say that a teacher, reman or policeman [generally union positions] should never hold of ce? I dont want them to support that. This was a concentrated effort. How much money was spent and how much time was spent to get this together? And why? I am furious at them stepping into our politics and then taking such a dirty turn, Johnson said. Lysengen, who is a recently-registered Republican, said she believes the mailer should be looked into from the standpoint of campaign ethics laws. She said she did not see it because, I dont care to have negative feelings. Of her victory she said, It was a year long process, and I am extremely relieved and proud. It feels good to have that much support. The GOP mailers were just one element in a campaign that turned contentious in its nal days. Early in the week, attorney John Gillespie emailed a Dear Neighbors letter that questioned Mayor Fred Schorrs support of Lysengen and accused him of wanting a puppet commissioner. The BREC also launched an email blast to voters containing information concerning Lysengens largest contributor, resident James Verrillo, who channeled $5,000 through 10 of his timeshare/travel companies to her campaign. According to the email, Verrillos companies have in the past been sued by 16 states for fraudulent and deceptive practices, cases that were settled out of court. But perhaps the riskiest and most personal campaign tactic came from Commissioner Susie Gordon herself who on Monday emailed voters a long letter detailing her nancial and family problems. Gordon wrote that she decided to air her dirty laundry because people in the Lysengen camp had threatened to make it public. Lysengen said after the election, If I was going to slander her I could have done it way earlier. I chose not to do that. Commissioner Johnson said on Wednesday only a few inside people knew of Gordons problems prior to receiving her email. Johnson said she plans to write a letter of complaint to the BREC. She said its actions may violate its charter. County Commissioner Chip LaMarca, who headed up the BREC for more than three years, said it is legal for the committee to support Republicans in non-partisan elections, but should get involved only when the opposing candidate is not a member of the GOP. A decision to support a candidate can be made by the six-member executive board, which is now headed by Richard DeNapoli, LaMarca said. As for his knowledge of the offending campaign materials, LaMarca, a resident of the city, denied absolutely having anything to do with them. Unfortunately, some people think negativity works, he said, but I think the candidates who won were the candidates who worked the hardest. An email to BREC Chair DeNapoli had not been answered at press time. The Pelican Call us!!! 954-783-8700

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The Pelican 13 Friday, February 3, 2012 Frank Tropepe knows exactly why customers choose an Ace Hardware store over the big box chains. We are more like a mom and pop convenience store. We cater to the area. We listen to the needs of our customers and do the research to nd them the products they need. And there are always clerks on the oor to help them nd what they need, he said. Tropepe is the owner of four Ace Hardware stores, the rst one purchased in Margate on Margate Boulevard 17 years ago. The next one was Beach Hardware on the corner of Commercial Boulevard and A1A. Then came the store on Sample Road a few blocks west of U.S. 1 and very recently, he opened the Deer eld Beach store on South U.S. 1. Deer eld Beach is a gamble. It is not the best time to open a store, but the lease is good and we are there for the long term. We have good visibility in a free-standing building and there is a good market there, Tropepe said. Ace Hardware has 5,500 stores around the country. It is a $5 billion company headquartered in Oak Brook, Ill., that started 90 years ago when three retailers in Brooklyn decided they could buy goods cheaper if they went in together. Belonging to a cooperative, Tropepe says, is different from being a franchise owner. While the franchise dictates exactly how the operation is to be run, a coop provides the owners with guidelines but each operator has the freedom to make buying decisions. Each owner also has a share of the coop and a percentage of the earnings. Customer service is what keeps people come back to his stores, Tropepe says. If we dont have it in stock, well order it. Or well do the research and nd it. With 30 years in the business, Tropepe knows how important it is to have knowledgeable help on the oor. Many of his retired employees have backgrounds in industry or are familiar with the trades plumbing, electrical, building. Whats it worth to the customer to have an experienced person to talk to? he asked. While products are changing all the time, the newest major effect on the hardware business is the Ace Hardware, Margate, LauderdaleBy-The-Sea, Pompano Beach, Deer eld BeachAce Hardware is a helpful place: Customer service and products geared to the neighborhood are keys to its long historygreen movement. It is affecting everything from light bulbs to faucets to paint. In January, you wont be able to buy a regular light bulb, Tropepe said. And faucets now must be lead-free. A paint product may start off green, but when a tint is added that is not green, the product is no longer environmentally friendly. Knowing the ins and outs of each new product requires constant training, he said. Luckily, for Ace Hardware store owners, Benjamin Moore, the paint line they carry, developed green paints and holds the patents. Ace carries many national brands as well as its own labels and competes pricewise with the big box stores because of its national buying power. A marketing tool that has proven very successful, is Aces Helpful Hardware Club that gives rebates and rewards. A record is kept of a customers purchases, and discount coupons sent that match the purchases. Even nicer, a birthday is worth a $5 rebate card. It is de nitely effective, Tropepe said. Signing up for Ace rewards is free, he added. Tropepe is a native of the area. He now lives in Coral Springs with his wife. They have three children and three grandchildren. Owner of four Ace Hardware stores, Frank Tropepe holds his ve-month-old grandson, Michael, in front of a Benjamin Moore paint display in the Margate store. Barbecue grills come in all sizes as this display in the new Deer eld Store [pictured below] demonstrates. Call Your Local Ace Hardware Store Ace Hardware StoreDeer eld Beach . 954-531-6265 Lauderdale-By-The-Sea . 954-776-5811 Margate . . . . . 954-972-1711 Pompano Beach . . . 954-942-3961PAID ADVERTISEMENT

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14 The PelicanFriday, February 3, 2012 Advertise with The Pelican 954-783-8700 SPECIAL TO THE PELICANThe NE Focal Points annual luncheon/fashion show drew 178 supporters of Deer elds facility that provides services for the elderly and Alzheimers patients. Fashions were provided by Sondros in the Cove and Jos. A. Banks in Boca Center. Among the attendees, Focal Point Executive Director Donna De Fronzo, City Manager Burgess Hanson, Area Agency on Aging Executive Director Edith Lederberg. The event was held at the Lighthouse Point Yacht and Tennis Club. Donna DeFronzo, Burgess Hanson, City Manager, Edith Lederberg, ADRC Executive Director Model, Jean Sevigny Model, Liz McGill Focus is on fashion at Deer eld Beach NE Focal Point function

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The Pelican 15 Friday, February 3, 2012 Friendly dog needs home Shadow Housebroken, wonderful temperament, family pet, looking to live out her golden years in a loving home. Call 954-9463197. SPECIAL TO THE PELICANIn the 80s, Realtors at Deer Creek Real Estate created a cookbook called Creekers Can Cook, which is still on kitchen shelves in Deer Creek. Now, Linda Anderson, president of the real estate rm, wants to bring another collection of Creekers recipes to the table. So she hosted a cocktail party at The Forum featuring entries for the appetizer and dessert section of the book. So far, 130 residents of Deer Creek have submitted Enjoying the Deer Creek party are from left, Gerry Cox, Gordon and Martha McClay, Ruth Storrings, Debbie Gonot, Mondessa Swift, Nanette Hamel and Audrey Cox. Deer Creekers urged to submit recipes for new cookbook Brian Bedigian, left, Forum administrator, Gerry Cox and Linda Anderson.their culinary delights but Anderson is still on the hunt for more. She wants everyone in the community to participate and has set a Feb. 16 deadline. Recipes can be emailed to Emily@deercreekrealestate. com or dropped of at the Deer Creek Real Estate of ce on Hillsboro Boulevard. Proceeds from $13.95 book are being donated to The Thornwell Home for Children in Clinton, SC. The home cares for children from Florida, Georgia and the Carolinas. A book launching event is planned for late April. Winners in each cookbook category will be featured. LBTS A beach cleanup is set for 9 a.m. Feb. 4, at the pavilion at Commercial Boulevard and the beach. Helpers will be provided with gloves, bags and water. This cleanup is sponsored by Leann Barber at Edward Jones, 1719 E. Commercial Blvd. Call 954-776-1000. Beach clean up Saturday

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16 The PelicanFriday, February 3, 2012 Trinity Christian School of Lighthouse Point Kindergarten class celebrated 100 days of school. Well, how about that? First 100 days Service and CharityArchivist Needed The Hillsboro Lighthouse Preservation Society is looking for a local retired archivist to volunteer to help open the new Lighthouse Museum & Information Center at 2700 N. Ocean Blvd., Pompano Beach. After the initial start up work, the time required will be four to six hours a month. 954-7823313. Alzheimers Caregivers Support Group The NE Focal Point Alzheimers Day Care Center, located at 301 N.W. 2nd Avenue in Deer eld Beach, offers a weekly Caregivers Support Group every Wednesday from 10 a.m. to noon. Food Drive NE Focal Point is manning a drop off non-perishable donations collection Monday through Friday from 8:20 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at 227 NW 2 St., Deer eld Beach. 954-4804449. Assist Local Women Zonta International meets on the third Tuesday of the month at Duffys Diner, 401 N. Federal Hwy., Deer eld Beach, at 11:15 a.m. Zonta International is a classi ed service organization of executives and professionals working together to advance the status of women locally and worldwide through SightingsContinued from page 3 See SIGHTINGS on page 24 service and advocacy. 561392-2223. Hospice Volunteers Needed VITAS Innovative Hospice Care of Broward needs volunteers who can make friendly visits to terminally ill patients and their families, provide relief for caregivers, visit veterans and more. 954-777-5396.The Pelican 954-783-8700

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The Pelican 17 Friday, February 3, 2012 million, ultimately came in under budget and a new scoreboard could have been purchased at that time. Thats the kind of thing thats insulting, he said. Ed Phillips, former Pompano Beach city commissioner, said it would be a travesty if the additional funding isnt approved. [This scoreboard] will probably take us into the next 25 or 30 years. We feel like the scoreboard that has been chosen is supportive of the kind the stadium the school board gave us, said Phillips. He added that having a good scoreboard is part of having a good athletic program which would complement the educational side of the school. ScoreboardContinued from page 3Lighthouse Point Police Officer Mike McDace and former library director Doreen Gauthier are the honorees for the 12th annual Keeper Days, Feb. 10 to 12 at several venues in the city. McDace receives the Keeper recognition posthumously after serving 34 years in the citys police department and in code enforcement. Gauthier retired last year after 33 years at the helm of the library.12th Annual Keeper Days coming upBoth will be honored at a dinner Friday, Feb. 10 at the LHP Yacht Club. For reservations, call John Trudel at 954-784-3439. Tickets are $50. The celebration continues on Saturday, 10 a.m. with a parade that moves north from First Presbyterian Church to McDonough Park where events include a car show, LHP Chamber Business Expo, childrens pet show, entertainment, games and rides. From 6 to 9 p.m., food, fireworks and live entertainment will be offered at Dan Witt Park. Bring lawn chairs for seating. Sunday, Feb. 14, a family sports day will be held 1-4:30 p.m. at McDonough Park. For more, email Jane McLaughlin at ndmac@aol. com

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18 The Pelican Friday, February 3, 2012

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The Pelican 19 Friday, February 3, 2012 By Bill JohnsonPELICAN WRITERPompano Beach Although he was recently awarded a masters degree in linguistics, 30-year-old Tom Douglas is dedicating himself to a different kind of career revitalizing a defunct coffee shop in Pompano Beach, a spot that some folks consider a landmark. You might know it as Java Johns or Boomerang Coffeehouse located at 1631 South Cypress Road, near the Fort Lauderdale line. Boomerang shut down earlier this year and was closed all summer. Under Douglass stewardship, Chez Cafe reopened October 4 Why would a qualified linguist choose this line of work and investment in such a very competitive business? While attending Florida Atlantic University, Douglas worked at Boomerang and enjoyed it. I really liked the place, he says. It had a community-based relationship. Then, too, Douglas grew up in his familys food and restaurant business and knows the ins and outs cooking, customer service, finances, purchasing and all else thats involved. He learned a lot at his fathers knee, helping out at Chez Porkys, a popular spot where some local folks eat several times a week. Douglas likes the neighborhood and lives just a short distance away across the bridge in Fort Lauderdale. Its a sense of community that drives his interest in operating a coffee shop in the neighborhood. I want it to be a welcoming place for people to come, he says, I like the idea of incorporating a space into peoples lives. Hes counting on groups of all ages young people to seniors to meet at Chez Caf for various reasons. He was pleased that a group of women met there recently for a demonstration of jewelry for sale. Douglas has given the place a new look based on warm colors shades of tan and brown and beige. I wanted to go for the warm colors that reflect our coffee, he says. The caf includes a kind of lounge area with a couch, sofa and rocking chair. Theres a big-screen television in one corner for folks who want to see the news at lunch, and electrical outlets conveniently located near the small tables so that customers can use their computers. His hope is that itll become a gathering place a kind of Cheers with coffee. The coffee selection includes a variety of espresso. The food selection ranges from hotdogs to what Douglas calls a unique panini. He prepares fresh juices each day, such as apple-carrot juice. He has no doubt that Chez Cafe in Pompano Beach offers a new neighborhood hot spot for a Morning Joe or an afternoon of meeting up with old and new friends See CHEZ CAFE on page 24 Proud new owner of Chez Cafe, Tom Douglas, learned the business from his dad, owner of Chez Porky in Pompano Beach..

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20 The Pelican Friday, February 3, 2012 AmbassadorsContinued from page 8examples of the active and fun life people are having in retirement at John Knox. We encourage our audience to join us as residents. Besides rehearsing at least once a week and performing every month in the Village, the singing saleswomen began to get requests from the outside and they now travel by bus to entertain clubs and service groups. In January they performed for the music clubs of the Palm Beaches, the Preserve in Palm Aire and for The Church Women United at St. Gabriels Catholic Church. Mertz says theyve been a huge success and have been invited back for annual meetings next year. Already on the spring schedule are concerts for Hadassah, Brandeiss University, Palm Aire Country Club, the Noble McArtor Senior Day Care in Fort Lauderdale, The Keenagers at Coral Ridge Presbyterian Church and the Professional Educators Organization. This is an ambitious schedule for retirees, but the NOTE-ABLES are up to it, and so is the Diva who is a true show biz personality. She says everyone is welcome to join the chorus, adding, No one has to audition. Some of my girls can read music; others cant. I teach them breathing techniques and articulation. They know over 300 songs, but not from memory. They sing melody and they learn by rote. We now tailor our concert to the venue. We have a Broadway Showa tribute to George Gershwinanother to Frank Sinatra Gerry Herman and even a show featuring Operetta music. I always involve the audience and they love it. You have to have a gimmick and we have one for every concert. Heres what some of the Ladies in the 80s had to say. Harriet Sams: Ive been singing for Church Choirs all my life, but this is Broadway. I just love it. Ive found a whole new family of friends. Edith Meinholz: Its wonderful! Ive been singing with various choruses for years, but this group is fantastic. Weve been so well received. Harriet puts it together so well. We always make people smile and we give the audience the royal pitch on John Knox Village. Olga DelZio: Harriets a great teacher. This group gives me something I like to do, a chance to make new friends and bring enjoyment to an audience. They even Their director, Harriet Mertz, also known as The Diva says, You have to have a gimmick and we always do.ask us back. The Diva is so busy with her singers she has had to drop out of the many other committees in which she had been involved. Were all volunteers, but I earn the largest sixgure salary which is $000,000, and Im thrilled with every zero. What a wonderful way to spend my retirement. Thank you ladies for bringing the sound of music to so many eager audiences.

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The Pelican 21 Friday, February 3, 2012 ADVERTISING? ITS PART OF DOING BUSINESS. CALL US. 954-783-8700. Brutus SeafoodContinued from page 10 chivalrous qualities that make a sensitive man. To celebrate its selection as the sensitive guy capital, a special edition of the citys East Village Uncorked, Pompano Beach Singles Meet-up will be held from 6 to 10 p.m. tonight, Feb. 3, at the 2700 block of East Atlantic Boulevard. At the event, Mayor Lamar Fisher will recognize Pompano residents Sherri Albin and John Doumar as an online dating success story. In recent years, online dating has become more popular. Albin and Doumar met in December through Match.com and Albin says the two now plan to get married. Ive been looking for my fairytale [man] forever, said Albin. John was the rst guy I [met online that I] agreed to go out with. She says its been a long time since she was in a relationship, but she didnt want to settle. And online dating nally allowed her to nd the man she was looking for. [Were only a mile apart on the beach but] we never would have met if we hadnt been online. Both of us work so much. Singles who attend will be able to sample free hors doeurves, wine and enter to win a gift basket containing a voucher for a candlelight champagne dinner for two in a semi-private dining area at Franks Italian Ristorante in Pompano; just in time for Valentines Day. For more, visit www.mypompanobeach. com.Sensitive ManContinued from page 9Our shrimp is the best in the world. Technology has enabled us to sell it chemically free. We have ash freezers on the boats so the shrimp is frozen instantly to preserve quality. We package shrimp so that they can be consumed as desired without defrosting the entire order. The stone crabs are usually quickly eaten. Paul Limpers, Pompano Beach, has ordered from Brutus at least six times. He says, Ive been loving the stone crab and whenever I get to craving them, I dial Brutus. We also include Yellow Tail, lobster and lobster bisque in our order. Over the holidays we tailgated at a hockey game and I really enjoyed my stone crabs before the game. Patrick Flannigan, Pompano Beach, is a brother in law to the owner of Brutus. He says, Bruces seafood is the freshest sh available. The only way to get it fresher is to catch it yourself and throw it on the grill. Bruce is a great guy and hes not afraid to take a chance on this new business. Were thrilled that hes doing so well. When we order, we include our neighbors requests so our orders are usually around $200 worth of Stone Crabs and Shrimp. Irwin claims the Brutus goal is to offer the highest quality to the discriminating. Although we do advertise, most of our clients come to us from other satis ed clients. Between Thanksgiving and Easter, we deliver on Tuesdays and Fridays. Fridays are the busiest because thats when most folks are entertaining. Asked about the waters being shed out, he said, Stone crab sheries are among the most sustainable of any in the world because the crabs grow new claws. Lobster is also well managed. Snapper stocks are still very healthy. Grouper is seasonal. Irwin is a member and past president of the Marathon Chapter of OFF, or Organized Fisherman of Florida. He is also the past president of the Florida Keys Fishermens Association and he sits on the advisory board for the Spiny Lobster South Atlantic Fishery Council. Before ordering visit www.brutusseafood.com to see whats available and the current price list. Then call 1-305-743-9181 to order.

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22 The Pelican Friday, February 3, 2012 Their collection has taken over their home, especially when theyre getting ready for a convention. Shelves lined with glass pieces run throughout the house and fill cabinets and kitchen cupboards some of it seemingly destined to sit untouched and some shownoff regularly during parties. They even bought a brand new flat-screen television, replacing a bulkier model, to make more room. When Fiore first started collecting, Pierce just thought it was something he would have to deal with. Inevitably, it became something I had to accept and clean. Now, says Fiore, Pierce is the first one to jump at a promising new piece when theyre out. Although theyre committed to collecting, the two differ on just how much their collection has grown. Probably 2,000 to 3,000 pieces, estimated Fiore. Oh, youre way off base, jokes Pierce, who estimates there are thousands more. It has gotten so big they sometimes give up on finding specific pieces. Its like the house ate another piece of glass, says Fiore. For more on the American Glass Pottery Dinnerware Show & Sale, visit www. sfdgc.com. Admission is $6.50 per person. The South Florida Depression Glass Club meets on the third Tuesday of every month at 7 p.m. at the Fred Lippman Multi-Purpose Adult Center, 2030 Polk Street, Hollywood. To join, call 954345-4711. The American Glass Pottery Dinnerware Show and Sale takes place Feb. 11 and Feb. 12 at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center. Call 954-345-4711. Depression GlassContinued from page 11

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The Pelican 23 Friday, February 3, 2012

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24 The Pelican Friday, February 3, 2012 success for his new business depends on building a strong and personal relationship with the community. National businesses like Starbucks have one up, he says. He knows he cant build such brand recognition, so visitors or travelers would not recognize Chez Caf and would gravitate to names they know. So he must depend on the locals. Developing a new business is always a great challenge and a financial risk. Tom Douglas has evaluated all that and believes the community will support the kind of environment he strives to create. Yes, its a challenge, he says, but Im optimistic. Chez CafeContinued from page 19 SightingsContinued from page 16 Tom Douglas and son, Tom, Jr. share a cup of coffee. Art and TheatreIsland City Art Walk Every third Friday of the month from 7 to 10 p.m., Wilton Manors Wilton Drive is home to the Island City Art Walk. Over 40 local artists show off their works in Wilton Drives cafes, boutiques, restaurants and other businesses. The Art Walk runs until April.Classes and TrainingAll Breed Obedience and Rally Training Classes Dog training classes are available at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. Call 954-563-7061 for schedule.Green MarketsWilton Manors Green Market Saturdays and Sundays at Hagen Park 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Call 954-531-5383. Pompano Beach Green Market Every Saturday at the corner of West Atlantic Boulevard and North Dixie Highway from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., Call 954-292-8040.Recreation/LeisureEvery rst Friday of the month the Pompano Beach See SIGHTINGS on page 26

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The Pelican 25 Friday, February 3, 2012 Originally opened in 1982, Checkers Old-Munchen has become the only reliable source of authentic German fare in Pompano Beach. Brainchild of Detlaf Neuman, former head Chef of a 5-star Munich hotel, the restaurant has stayed in the family over the past three decades. Today, nephew Mat Moore is at the helm of this thriving bastion of Teutonic temptations. German food is so much more than just sausage, says Moore as he pours a gigantic boot of Kostritzer beer. This dark, medium bodied lager is a popular choice among the more than 30 varieties of beer available. The Kostritzer is my favorite. Its Germanys answer to Guinness, adds Moore. For wine lovers, the Peter Brum Riesling features the quintessentially aromatic and fruity overtones one expects from this crisp white varietal of the Rhine region. Beverages in hand, many patrons kick start a meal with a hearty bowl of Checkers Old-Munchens famous onion & apple soup. Bursting with flavor, this Bavarian version of French onion soup features sauted onions and apples slowly simmered in the house beef and lager broth topped with provolone cheese. Other classic starters include the Liverwurst & Muenster cheese platter, Bratwurst and Knackwurst on a bed of sauerkraut and several healthy salad options. Of note is the Kartoffelpuffer home made potato pancakes served with applesauce and sour cream. A quick scan of the menu reveals that vegetarianism is not exactly a German invention. Veal, pork, beef, chicken and sausage dominate the landscape. The plethora of meat options includes mouthwatering veal or pork Wienerschnitzels. These house specialties showcase lightly breaded cutlets sauted in lemon butter and topped with rich homemade gravy. Originally created in neighboring Vienna, this preparation method has become a regional staple of southeastern Germany. Served with red cabbage and potato dumpling or spaetzel Pompano Beachs Checkers Old-Munchen delivers tasty German cuisine in friendly European atmosphereCheckers Old-Munchen, 2209 E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach 954-785-7565(German egg noodles similar to gnocchi), these plates feel like a home cooked meal in Deutschland. Another crowd pleaser is the eye-popping Schweinhaxen. This plate features a specially seasoned 2 lb. boiled pork shank slow roasted for 6 hours. The result is a wonderfully moist and juicy fall-off-the-bone meat all topped with homemade gravy. We use the broth of the pork shanks to make our gravy. It is absolutely delicious, says Moore. The chicken menu includes sauted breasts Hunter style with mushrooms in a wine gravy, Black Forest ham with white wine cream or the Paprika version in sweet cream sauce with red bell peppers. One of my favorites is the pork Stroganoff. But if you want to get a taste of several specialties, I would recommend our famous Bavarian Platter, says Moore. This sampler dish overflows with Bratwurst, Knackwurst, Wienerschnitzel and either schweinebraten or sauerbraten. The former consists of tender oven roasted pork loin while the latter is an acquired taste involving vinegar marinated beef topped with sweet and sour gravy. The food is outstanding and the prices are very reasonable, say regular local customers Bob Stoetzer and Pat McQueen. A good way to conclude a culinary voyage to Germany is with a warm homemade apple strudel. Served with Alemannic alacrity by the friendly waitresses, this ice cream topped behemoth is a great dessert to share. With wall to wall beer steins as dcor, the ambiance at Checkers Old-Munchen is warm and resoundingly European. Take advantage of various coupons available for half-priced entres with beverage purchase. The Think German Its Friday club (TGIF) allows off libations, appetizers and desserts with the purchase of an entre. Enjoy a Bavarian brewhaha during the monthly beer tastings. The next one is on Feb. 17 at 9:30 p.m. There will be eight different German beers, complimentary buffet and various prizes for $17. Reservations are highly recommended as our beer tastings are extremely popular and sell out quickly, says Moore. All entres are priced between $14 and $17, wine bottles are around $25 and beer starts at $4. There is free parking in the back and all major credit cards are accepted. The early bird special is from 5 to 6:30 p.m. and all day Sunday. Be sure to inquire about upcoming specials on Facebook. Prost! Mat Moore brings on the roasted pork shank and a German beer. Veal Wienerschnitzel features a lightly breaded veal cutlet sauted in lemon butter. Here, it comes served with potato dumpling and red cabbage and can be topped with a avorful house brown gravy if desired. Warm homemade apple strudel topped with vanilla ice cream and chocolate sauce is the perfect way to nish a hearty meal at Checkers Old-Munchen. Counterclockwise from the tangy cucumber salad, the vinegar marinated sauerbraten beef, a half portion of pork Wienerschnitzel with gravy, grilled knackwurst and bratwurst and German egg noodle known as spaetzel. PAID ADVERTISEMENT

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26 The Pelican Friday, February 3, 2012 Ethics codeContinued from page 4referendum wasnt explained properly. I think they need to abide by the ethics code of the county. [The question makes it look] like we dont want them to have any other job. At least three county commissioners share her opinion. County Commissioners Lois Wexler and Sue Gunzburger called the ballot language misleading and deceptive. Last week, Wexler promised to try and rally her fellow commissioners to sue if voters approved the referendum; she would need a majority vote of the nine-member commission to proceed with a lawsuit. At their Jan. 31 meeting while voters were still making their decisions, commissioners directed County Attorney Joni Coffey to look into the countys options. We need to litigate, said Mayor John Rodstrom, according to minutes provided by the county. SightingsContinued from page 24Tennis Center 920 NE 18 Ave., holds a family friendly tennis clinic from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. The cost is $10 per person. Call 954-786-4115. Ping Pong Nights Every Monday from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Ping Pong Nights is held at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. The cost is $1. Call 954-3902130. Bingo The American Legion Auxiliary Unit 142, 171 SW 2 St., Pompano Beach, has Bingo on Tuesdays at 7 p.m. Call 954-942-2448. Pompano Beach Fishing Pier 222 N. Pompano Beach Blvd. 954-786-4073 Anglins Pier at Commercial Boulevard, LauderdaleBy-The-Sea. 954-491-9403 Deer eld Beach International Pier, 200 NE 21st Ave. 954-426-9206 or 954-9431488.Civic and Club MeetingsRotary Club of Oakland Park/Wilton Manors Rotary meets every Thursday from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. at Tequila Sunrise Mexican Grill, 4711 N. Dixie Hwy., Oakland Park. 954-491-6158. Wilton Manors Kiwanis Club Kiwanis meets every Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. at 2749 NE 14 Ave., Wilton Manors. 954-561-9785. Oakland Park Kiwanis Club Kiwanis meets every Wednesday from 7:30 to 8:30 a.m. at Peter Pan Diner, 1216 E. Oakland Park Blvd., Oakland Park. 954-566-9957. Pompano Beach Kiwanis Club Kiwanis meets Wednesdays at noon at the Riverside Grille at the Sands Resort, 125 N. Riverside Drive, Pompano Beach. 954444-4815. Pompano Beach Kiwanis Club Westside Kiwanis Meets the rst and third Saturdays of the month at 8:30 a.m. at the E. Pat Larkin Community Center, 520 MLK Blvd., Pompano Beach. 954-7828096 Deer eld Beach Kiwanis Club Kiwanis meets at noon every Thursday at the Deereld Hilton, 100 Fairway Dr. 954-242-6083. Deer eld Beach West Kiwanis Club Kiwanis meets the second and fourth Saturdays of the month at 9 a.m. at Westside Park, 445 SW 2 St., Deer eld Beach. 954-54-7329883 Toastmasters The Gold Coast Toastmasters meet in the second and fourth Mondays of each month at Panera See SIGHTINGS on page 32

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The Pelican 27 Friday, February 3, 2012 Board rejects bid to clean and develop site for auto rentals By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFOakland Park Much to the dismay of the applicant and at least one city commissioner, the board killed a request to allow an auto rental business at 201 W. Oakland Park Blvd., site of a former pain clinic. Representatives of Enterprise Auto Rental made the request Wednesday for a conditional use approval for the business. They also asked for approval to install two feet of PVC fence on an existing six-foot masonry wall rather an eight-foot buffer wall. In December, at the request of the same applicant, commissioners approved a text amendment to code to allow auto rental and leasing in the B-1 zoning district. The owners have made a significant investment in the site to bring it up to code, Justin Proffitt, senior planner, said in presenting the application. They planned to use the existing building and make improvements to the faade and to landscaping. A B-1district in Wilton Manors is to the south of the property, along with a Publix. The Oakland Park residential neighborhoods of Sleepy River Acres and Lloyd Estates are to the north. The citys development review committee recommended approval of the application, concluding the addition to the fence was reasonable as a buffer, Proffitt said. The owner of property behind the proposed project said she was happy with the PVC fencing. If the fence is removed, nearby vegetation would be impacted, Proffitt said. The applicant has brought the property up to landscape and parking requirements. On Jan. 9, the citys planning and zoning board unanimously approved the application. Rhon Ernest-Jones, representing Enterprise Holdings and Enterprise RentA-Car, said the firm had made significant improvements to the site, and were serious about maintaining the property. Commissioner John Adornato, while saying he was very supportive, said he had concerns about the additional exemptions (for the fence) and concern about using them too freely. He asked the financial impact of taking down the existing fence and replacing it with a new one. Ernest-Jones estimated the cost would be $35,000 to $40,000. Plus, its a mess you cant avoid with new concrete. He said the PVC fence addition meets the citys buffer requirement and would be significantly superior to a nearby wall. PVC maintains extremely well and meets the required wind load, he added. Proffitt said city staff estimated cost of a new fence at $15,000 to $18,000. Mayor Suzanne Boisvenue said that after an earlier meeting with the applicant, she was under the impression the fence was to be replaced and she felt misled. Commissioner Shari McCartney moved to approve the application. She and Vice Mayor Anne Sallee voted for the use, Adornato and Boisvenue voted no. Commissioenr Jed Shank abstained because a family member works for Enterprise. An exasperated ErnestJones returned to the podium during public comments to address commissioners again. We came in for conditional use, and this appears to have eradicated conditional use, he said. Addressing Boisvenues comment, he said, When we first talked to commissioners, the company expected to replace the wall. Then residents urged them to save the plants. Were feeling its damned if you do and damned if you dont, he said. We think its a good use and cleans the site up. Our initiative is being scuttled over a wall. We would like some clarification. Later, McCartney said, Im appalled at what happened with Enterprise. Im concerned that that went down because the two issues were lumped together. (She referred to the request for conditional use and the approval for the fence addition.) She asked DJ Doody, city attorney, how the matter could be rectified. He said the ordinance was dead for now, but a commissioner who voted against it could ask for a motion to reconsider. Or the applicant could file for a modification. Boisvenue said she would ask that the matter be brought back. In other business, McCartney asked for discussion of easing permit rules to spur economic development. She said some of the citys restrictions negatively affect businesses. Several business owners spoke on the need for easing sign regulations to allow banners and temporary signs for sales. Commissioners directed staff to draft an ordinance lifting some restrictions.

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28 The Pelican Friday, February 3, 2012 The Pelican. 954.783.8700 a base rate for condos based on the number of condos, Resident George Hunsaker said at a workshop. He was among several residents and hotel owners urging commissioners to have a study done to determine how rates should be calculated south of Pine Avenue. Commissioners directed Town Manager Connie Hoffmann to bring in a rm to do a rate study. In December 2010, the commission increased sewer rates to cover a $400,000 loss and build up the funds cash balance for repairs to the system. The ordinance adopted the Pompano Beach payment system that residents in the north end of town were already paying. The town owns and maintains sewer lines south of Pine Avenue. The city of Pompano Beach owns sewer lines north of Pine Avenue, and bills residents directly. A Master Sewer Agreement pays Pompano $680,000 annually to carry LBTS wastewater to the treatment plant on Copans Road. The budget does not allow for extra heavy rain days such as occurred in November when streets were ooded and huge volumes of water went into the sewer system. To make matters worse, a storm occurred during seasonally high tides . there was a high tidal in ow into the ground water, too, Hoffmann wrote in a report to commission. Volume charges for that day were $4,888 versus the more normal daily volume charge of $1,150. Last month, Pompano Beach has raised rates by 9.5 percent and volumetric rates by 7.5 percent. We have to develop a system thats equitable and come up with something that makes sense, Hoffmann said. Maybe we can be an innovator in this area. A recent study has determined that 72 percent of the system in the south end of town needs repairs at an estimated cost of $800,000. King personnel found 632 defects, including cracks, separated or offset joints, roots in pipes and broken pipes causing the system to be in ltrated by ground water. The engineers said repairs will save $150,000 being paid to Pompano Beach for groundwater in the system Hoffmann said We should jump on this and start with repairs. In April, a a contractor will be selected for the construction. SewerContinued from page 1

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The Pelican 29 Friday, February 3, 2012 Rev. Hyvenson Joseph WORSHIP DIRECTORY: Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad. By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFFort Lauderdale Right now, Nicco Whigham is a Chief but soon hell be a Knight. Whigham, along with eight of his fellow Cardinal Gibbons High School classmates, put pen to paper on National Signing Day declaring which college or university they will play for. You hear a lot about commitments but it doesnt mean anything till you sign something, said Mike Morrill, Gibbons athletic director and football coach. Whigham, a Pompano Beach resident who plays cornerback for Gibbons football team, signed on the dotted line for the University of Central Florida; the Gibbons mascot is a Native American, UCFs mascot is a medieval knight. Its close to home. [Ill be] staying next to my family and Ive got an easy chance to get on the field, he said. Whigham, who will be getting Gibbons athletes make commitments on National Signing Day a full scholarship from UCF, said hell be majoring in sports exercise science. Asked if he felt a little bit like a proathlete, It feels real good. Nobody in my family has ever experienced this. Whighams father, George, is happy to see his son play ball for a university. That was my vision, my intention but I didnt know if it would happen. Hes also glad it wont cost him anything. Im smiling because my pocket is still full. But all the years leading up to this moment cost each parent a great deal mainly in time and effort.See SIGNING DAY on page 35Cardinal Gibbons student athletes Michael Hanke, left, Leigh Andrew, Catie Donahoe and Nicco Whigham all committed to play sports for their chosen college or university on National Signing Day at Cardinal Gibbons High School in Fort Lauderdale.

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30 The Pelican Friday, February 3, 2012 The Pelican 954-783-8700 Classi edsCall 954-545-0013 Get to know your local Merchants HELP WANTEDDRIVER/TOUR GUIDE/ PART TIME. Have Happy & Relaxed Disposition. Good Speaking Voice & Good Driving Record. 954-784-4064. Fort Lauderdale. 2-3 SEEKING FOR CONDO MAINTENANCE WORKER. If You Have A Strong Commitment To High Level Of Service & Quality Standards, The Ability To Work Well Under Pressure, Meet Deadlines & Strong Sense Of Urgency Please Apply By Faxing Your Resume To 954942-7685. This Is A 40 Hour Full Time Position With Varied Hours (Evenings, Weekends & Holidays) Bene ts Paid 100%, Paid Vacation & Holidays. Rate Of Pay Commensurate With Experience. EOE. 2-3 ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT For Property Management Firm. Data Entry, Client Contact, Assist Executive. FT / PT. 954-7727012. 2-10 LOCAL PEST CONTROL CO Looking For Quality Sales/Service Tech. Must Be Dependable, Team Player, Good Drivers License & People Skills. Will Train Right Person. ALSO Of ce Assistant Computer People & Phone Skills Needed. Fax Resume 954418-3982. 2-10VOLUNTEERS NEEDEDTHE HILLSBORO LIGHTHOUSE Preservation Society Is Looking For A Local Retired Archivist Who Is Interested In Helping Us To Open The New Lighthouse Museum & Information Center At 2700 N. Ocean Blvd. (Hwy A1A) Pompano Beach. After The Start Up Period, His Or Her Time Work Would Be About 4 To 6 Hours A Month. All Our Workers Are Volunteers As Noted. For More Info., Phone 954-782-3313 Or 305-799-5621. 2-17 SEEKING EMPLOYMENTCOMPUTER PROBLEMS? CALL MIKE For Fast 24 Hr Service. Excellent Computer Skills. Hands On Lessons From MBA. Printed Instructions For Problems Provided. 10% Off For 1st Time Customer. Mike Will Make It Happen Or The Service Is FREE! Call 954-6835607. 2-3 MEDICAL / DENTAL FRONT OFFICE MANAGER Ex Worker. 15 Years Exp. E Pompano Area. Call 954-4713402. 2-3 CERTIFIED NURSING ASSISTANT 15 Years Experience In Geriatric Care Including Hospice, Hospital & Assisted Living. Will Care For Your Loved Ones Days Or Nights. Live-in. Excellent References. Please Call 954709-8529. 2-3 CNA / HHA PRIVATE DUTY. 25 Yrs Experience, Excellent References, In Home Personal Care, Shopping, Cooking And Any Personal Needs. 754-3670243. 2-3SERVICES DANNY BOY ELECTRIC Lic & Insured. Lic. #EC13004811. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. 24/Hr Service. 954-290-1443. Beat Any Written Estimate. Sr, Discount. 2-10 PGT IMPACT WINDOWS & DOORS Discount Prices. 3 Week Installation. CC#978288-GX 954-295-1695. 2-24 RETIRED PLUMBING CONTRACTOR Looking For Work. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. CFC 027532. Low Rates!! 954-496-6420. 2-3 COMPUTER TUTOR COMPUTER REPAIR FREE Estimate! 9 Computer Certifications. 25 Years Experience. Call Bill 954-4493681. 2-3 WATSON PAINTING & WATERPROOFING CO. Interior/Exterior Painting. Res/Comm Pressure Clean Roofs/Decks. Lic/Ins. 954-6500488 Or 954-552-9457. 2-3 NINAS CLEANING Exceptional Cleaning Service. Comm / Res. 12 Years Exp. References Available. Your Home Will Be Treated With Respect & Attention To Detail. 954-601-6141. 2-3 MIKE THE GARDENER THE ALL AMERICAN YARDMAN Yard And Garden Care Get The Best For Less! Call 561-543-6337. 2-10 EMERALD IRISH CLEANING Est. 20 Yrs. English Speaking. Cleaning Supplies. Hand Scrubbed Floors. SPECIAL !!! 3 hrs $55 4 HRS $70. Service Guaranteed. www.emeraldirishcleaning. com. 954-524-3161. You Will Do An Irish Jig. 2-3 MASSAGE THERAPIST BETTYE LERNER Reduce The Stress Invite The Healing. In Your Home. More Information Call 954-2704797. Lic. # MA 31964. 2-3 HANDYMAN PAINTING CARPENTRY Pressure Cleaning. Decks! Everything Around The House. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. Call 561-350-3781. 2-17 MOORE PLUMBING PLUMBING SERVICES Big Jobs Small Jobs. We Do It All. Remodeling & Repairs. Lic. & Insured. C.C. Accepted. Call 954-772-4600. 2-3 HONEST HANDYMAN HOME & BUILDING Maintenance/Improvements. No Job Too Small. Fast Friendly Service. Reasonable Rates. Local Resident/Homeowner. Call Today For Your FREE Upfront Quote. No Deposit Required. 754-366-1915. 2-3 HOME/OFFICE REPAIRS By State Certified G.C. Reasonable. CGC025802. More Information Call 954815-1007. GOT JUNK? DUMP TRUCK CLEANUPS Trees/ Landscape, Yard Fill. Paint/ Pressure Wash/ Roofs/Home Repairs Welding, Etc. Dave 954-818-9538. 2-10 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIESNew GREEN technology. New defroster control saves energy in home refrigerators, commercial chillers. Patented. All optical. Simple mfg. Strategic partners needed..www.NewAvionics.Com. 954-568-1991MUSICIANS WANTEDThe American Legion Symphonic Band is now accepting new members for the 2011-2012 season. College age to seasoned seniors are welcome. Rehearsals are held on Wed. evenings at American Legion Post 142 in Pompano. Percussionists, euphonium and clarinet players are especially needed. If you enjoy making music, call Jim McGonigal, Music Director at 954-647-0700 for more info.DEEP WATER VILLA DOCKPOMPANO BEACH 2/2 1700 SQ FT. Screened Fla Room. Private Yard. W/D. 4 Park. No Fixed Bridges. Community Pool. Deeded Dock.. 2 Blocks Beach. $285,000. Coldwell Banker Barbara Call 954629-1324. 2-17HOMES FOR RENTPOMPANO 2/2 Cottage Style House. Large Yard With Fish Pond. $1100 Month Company Bills For Electric & Water. 541 NE 34 St. Darci 954-783-3723. 2-24 CO-OP SALESPOMPANO BEACH 1/1 On Water, Dockage Available At Your Door. $59,500. Coldwell Banker Barbara 954-6291324. 2-17

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The Pelican 31 Friday, February 3, 2012 Let the Pelican Classi eds help you Classi edsCall 954-545-0013 INCOME RESTRICTIONS APPL YThe Palms of Deerfield Beach For RentTwo and Three BedroomsAVAILABLE NOW$711 to $824 (Waiting List) $863 to $999 (Available Now)Three-Bedroom Units feature a Master Suite with Full Bathroom and Walk-in Closet PET FRIENDLYFor additional information, visit our website www.DBHAonline.org/townhomes or Contact our office 954-481-3406 Ext. 107 or 954-481-9325 Ask for Kecia R. Sanders Amenities include: Tile throughout downstairs living area Carpeted Bedrooms upstairs Vertical Blinds throughout unit Ceiling Fans Energy Efficient Appliances Refrigerator with Ice-maker Programmable Oven Dishwasher Washer/Dryer Hookup Patio Area per unit Central A/C & Heat Ample Storage Water, Trash and Sewer are included in Rent REAL ESTATE WANTEDI BUY HOUSES!! CASH!! AS IS! QUICK CLOSE! ANY AREA ANY CONDITION! NO EQUITY OK. CALL NOW 954-914-2355. 4-20 OWNER FINANCING WANTED! WE SEEK A Nice Large Beach Condo, Townhouse Or House With Pool In The Pompano, Lighthouse, Lauderdale, Boca Area. CONDO Size Minimum 2/2 1450 Sq Ft + HOUSE Minimum 3/2 With Pool 1800 Sq Ft + Safe, Quality Area Only. Up To $2200 Mo Incl Everything. $20 $25000 Down. Send Details To: BUCKSTERBOB55@ GMAIL.COM. 2-3 CONDOS FOR SALEPALM AIRE 105 Split 2/2 King, Upgrades. Largest Kitchen. W/D. Breakfast Room. Piano. Ultra Furnished. Shopping, Pool Close By. 9th Floor. Low Maintenance/Taxes. $134K Offers. No Brokers! 954-895-4596. Immediate Occupancy. 2-17 LIGHTHOUSE POINT 2/1.5 CONDO In A GREAT AREA. Pets Allowed. $124,900. Call Barbara Balistreri Realty. 954-263-7129. 2-3 SUPERB DIRECT INTRACOASTAL VIEW 2/2 Updated Condo. Low Maintenance. No Realtors Please. 954-304-4518 J Peasley / Better Homes & Garden RE. 2-3 LAUDERDALE BY THE SEA Furnished 1/1.5 Condo $115,000. Heated Pool. Ocean Access. On Canal. 1481 S Ocean Blvd. Apt 228. Call 586549-5223. 2-3 POMPANO LEISUREVILLE 55+ ---1/1 No Land Lease. Totally Upgraded. New Appliances New A/C. Movein Condition. Pet Allowed. FREE Golf 2 Pools. Furniture Optional. Bob 203-430-0235. 217 DEERFIELD BEACH 2/2 Completely Redone. Granite Kitchen, New Cabinets. S.S. Appliances. 20 Porcelain Tile Floors. Travistine Stone Baths. Freshly Painted. 1st Floor. Less Than A Mile To Beach. $84,900. Call 631-873-8715. 2-24CONDOS FOR RENTLAUDERDALE BY THE SEAAcross From Beach. Near Sea Watch. 1 Bedroom Den 2 Baths. Pool, W/D In Unit. $1175 Per Mo. Yrly. 1st Last Sec. Or Seasonal 5 Mo min. $1595/Mo. No Smoking. Call 954-942-5642. 1-20 DEERFIELD BEACH Waterfront Furnished 2/2, Huge Balcony. Awesome View! Heated Pool, Cable, Covered Parking. No Pets Or Realtors. Good Credit Required. Annual $1150. Also NON Waterfront Annual. 2/2 $800 $825. Call 631-885-3342. 2-3 WALK TO BEACH? GOT BOAT? Nicest 1/1 In NE Pompano. Annual, Unfurnished $925 Month. Call 954-614-8428. 2-10 POMPANO WATERFRONTIsland Club 2/2 Furnished With Private Dock. Gated Community. $1300 Month Yearly. Susan 954-732-2038 Mirsky Realty. 2-3 LAUDERDALE BY THE SEA Across From Beach. Near Sea Watch. 1 Bedroom Den 2 Baths, Pool, W/D In Unit. $1175 Per Mo Yrly. 1st Last Sec. No Smoking. 954-9425642. 2-10APTS FOR RENTDEERFIELD/POMPANO BEACH 1 BR & 2 BR APTS FOR RENT. Remodeled, Paint, Tile, Etc. W & D On Site. Pool. Pet Friendly. Call George 954809-5030. 2-10 POMPANO BEACH LARGE 2 / 2 FURNISHED APT. Enclosed Porch. Walk To The Beach. $1000 Month Yearly Lease. Please Call 954-9422232. 2-3 POMPANO GARDENS $795 1/1 $200 Deposit. Nice Area Minutes To Beach Pet OK. Please Call 954-515-2554. 2-17 POMPANO BEACH 1/1 NW $650 2/1 $750 SW 1/1 $725 2/1 $925 NE 1/1 $675 2/1 NE $950 TH 2/1.5 $1095 All FREE Water. Rent + $70 MovU-In. 954-781-6299. 2-10 POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 Bedroom From $495. Easy Movein. 1/2 OFF DEPOSIT. Remodeled. Great Location. 954-783-1088 For More Info. 3-9 ROOMS FOR RENTROOM FOR RENT $600 / MONTH Male / Female Professional. Pet Friendly. No Smokers, Share Bath. Walk To Beach. Very Quiet. Atlantic / Federal Area Pompano. Leave Message 954-471-3402. 2-3OUTDOOR STORAGEDEERFIELD BEACH OUTDOOR STORAGE For Boats, RVs, Commercial Vehicles & More. Call Chris At 954-520-1777. 2-3COMMERCIAL FOR RENT-SALEPOMPANO COMMERCIAL OFFICE Spaces Available. Ranging From As Low As $500 To $700 Depending On Square Footage. Please Call Darci At 954-7833723. 2-24 DEERFIELD BEACH Retail Of ce Warehouse 700 Sq Ft With Loft. A/C, Bathroom. $575 Per Month. Call For More Info 561-654-1331 Or 561-9985681. 2-10 POMPANO BEACH WAREHOUSE / OFFICE Location! Location! Atlantic Blvd & I-95. 2200 Sq Ft. Overhead Door, 18 Ceilings, Private Bath. $1,600 Monthly. 1st / Last / Security. 954-9418731.FURNITUREBEDSETS King $180 Queen $130 Full $110 Twin $90. 5 Pc. Bedroom Set $399. Frames $39. 954-465-6498. 2-10 LIGHTHOUSE POINT OWNER RELOCATING. Living Room, Bedroom, Dining Room, Sofabeds. Entire Contents. Like Brand New. Buy All Or Part. Offers Accepted. 718-605-9835. 2-3 MISCELLANEOUSWANTED BUYING Old Books, Dolls, Crystal, Sterlingware, Porcelain, Estate Goods, AND MANY MANY OTHER ITEMS. 754-244-3047 Ft Lauderdale. 2-17 WANTED OLD OR ANTIQUE GUNS Call Bob Jones 954-942-3694 Lighthouse Point. 2-10 4 LAWN CHAIRS $40. Stainless Steel Sink $15. Fence 30 x 3 With Posts $25. Large Speakers. Pompano Beach 954-591-0324. 2-3 MEDICALMOTORIZED WHEELCHAIR High End Jazzy Select 6. Like New! $1,100. Boca 917-324-0009. schnierlaw@aol.com. 2-10WANTED TO BUYGET RID OF THOSE OLD Phonograph Records Sell Them To Me Jazz, Rock, Soundtracks, Etc. Curt 954610-1973. 2-3

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32 The Pelican Friday, February 3, 2012 SightingsContinued from page 26 See SIGHTINGS on page 33Bread, 1762 N. Federal Highway, Fort Lauderdale from 7 to 9 p.m. 954-895-3555. Senior Citizens Club The Greater Pompano Beach Senior Citizens Club meets on the second Wednesday of the month at the Emma Lou Olson Community Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach, at 10 a.m. Call 954-786-411.MusicBroward County Mummers perform at 7:30 p.m. Feb. 21 at St. Stephen Lutheran Church, 2500 NE 14 St. Causeway, Pompano Beach. Mummers, a costumed group of musicians perform Dixieland and Riverboat music. Donation $10. Call 954-9424473.Sightings

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The Pelican 33 Friday, February 3, 2012 Capt. RJ Boyle is an experienced angler in South Florida. His studio is located in Lighthouse Point. Call 954-420-5001. The Pelican. 954.783.8700 By RJ BoyleRJ BOYLE STUDIOSI really enjoy dealing with customers who come into my store and ask for help. You would really be surprised how many guys constantly go fishing and dont catch anything. They come in time after time to buy bait and some of them are so proud that they dont want to ask for help. They would rather go out and spend $4 a gallon for gas to take a joyride and catch nothing. The smart guys will come into the shop, come right up to the counter and say one of two things: I am from up north and I fish a lot up there but I dont know anything about fishing down here, can you help me? and Can you suggest somebody local to ride out with me and show me the ropes? I always love when a guy asks me that second question. I have fished all over the world and I consider myself a pretty decent fishermen. But why would I pretend to know Skip your pride and have a lot more fun and a lot more sh what I am doing in a new place that I have never fished before? Last year I went to Nova Scotia to catch giant bluefin tunas. We hired a crew to teach us how to catch them. Usually, people are hiring me to show them how to catch things but this time the shoe was on the other foot. I knew one thing though, I wasnt going to pay $700 for an airline ticket and pretend I was some great tuna fisherman. The guys dialed us in and we had the trip of a lifetime. Point is: come into the shop and ask us for help. We will get you a local mate to ride along with you to show you the ropes or we can set you up on a charter boat with one of our friends to learn. Dont waste anymore time and money pretending.SightingsContinued from page 32 2-6 The American Association of University Women Pompano Beach Branch will hold a membership meeting at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6th St., at 12:30 p.m. Call 954-524-2938. 2-8 The Cypress Civic Association meets at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach, at 7:30 p.m. 954-9428108. 2-9 The Florida Trail Association will meet at 7:30 p.m. at Fern Forest Nature Center, 201 Lyons Road, Coconut Creek. Hiker Wayne Petrovich will present the 10 essential items that all backpackers, kayakers and hikers should carry. 954-609-4727. 2-9 The Deer eld Beach Historical Society will host History at Sundown at 6 p.m. at the Old School Museum, 232 NE 2 St., Deer eld Beach. 954-429-0378. 2-11 The 20th Annual Florida Renaissance Festiv al will take place every weekend from Feb. 11 through March 11 at Quiet Waters Park, 401 S. Powerline Road, in Deer eld Beach. Visit www. ren-fest.com or call 954-7761642. 2-11 The Deer eld Beach Historical Society will host a Black History Month presentation at 1 p.m. at the Percy White Library, 837 E. Hillsboro Blvd., Deer eld Beach. Guest are encourage to come at 11 a.m. to share their See SIGHTINGS on page 35

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34 The Pelican Friday, February 3, 2012

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The Pelican 35 Friday, February 3, 2012 It does pay off, said Pompano Beach resident Diane Hanke. Dianes son, Michael, a pitcher, signed with Flagler College where hell play baseball and study business and sports management. [There was] an extreme amount of driving [to games and practices] and a lot of [baseball-themed] summers, she said. But I wouldnt change it for the world. A product of Pompanos youth baseball programs before going to Gibbons, Michael said its a big relief to finally get this far. After everything you work for, its nice to see a result at the end. He didnt get a scholarship but his father, Mark, said thats par for the course for incoming baseball freshmen and hes confident his son will get one in his second year. We expect that as baseball parents. Its all about education. Baseballs just a bonus. Like Michael, Pompano Beach resident Catie Donahoe, who signed with the University of Miami to play volleyball on a full scholarship, was also glad to enjoy the results of all her hard work for a moment. It feels nice with all our friends and family watching [us sign]. Shes not sure yet what her major will be, maybe nursing or business, but she knows she wants to keep playing volleyball. I like that its a team sport. You travel with a team, friends youll always have. Donahoes fellow teammate Leigh Andrew is off to become a Tarheel. Andrew will be playing volleyball for the University of North Carolina where shell use her full scholarship to major in sports medicine. It was always like my dream school, she said. The Pompano Beach resident said its been a long five or six years of practices and competitions. Its a grind but its all worth it in the end. But we also have a lot of fun. Morrill urged the students watching from the bleachers in the school gym to look at the students signing as an example. It takes an awful amount of dedication and hard work . in every aspect of your life [to get this far. These students are] going to the best colleges. Dont just be a dreamer. The Pelican is looking for your sports stories. Email Michael dOliveira at mdpelican@yahoo.com or call 954-783-8700.Signing DayContinued from page 29histories. 954-429-0378. 2-11 Free car safety check event from 9 a.m. to noon at Pompano Beach Fire-Rescue Station #24, 2001 NE 10 St. Appointments must be scheduled. 954-786-4510. 2-11 & 12 The American Glass, Pottery, Dinnerware Show & Sale will be held on Saturday and Sunday at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach. Cost is $6.50 per person. Visit www.sfdgc.com. SightingsContinued page 33

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36 The Pelican Friday, February 3, 2012