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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00090900/00284
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Title: Pompano Pelican
Uniform Title: Pompano Pelican
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: Pompano Pelican
Place of Publication: Pompano Beach
Publication Date: 01-27-2012
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Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Pompano Beach
Coordinates: 26.234722 x -80.125556 ( Place of Publication )
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
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System ID: UF00090900:00284

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Friday, January 27, 2012 Vol. XX, Issue 4 Call 954-783-8700 to Advertise Email: siren2415@gmail.com Pompano Beach • Deer eld Beach • Lighthouse Point • Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Wilton Manors • Oakland Park • Hillsboro Beach • The Galt • Palm Aire The P e l i c a n Pelican Visit us online at www.pompanopelican.com T h e The P e l i c a n Pelican Cast Your Vote on Election Day, Jan. 31 DBHS DECA member David Trebego collected 42 pairs of jeans recently, part of a community project to target homeless teenagers. Working with S.W.A.T. and Interact clubs, DECA students donated 235 pairs of jeans to Broward Partnership for the Homeless. In their research, the students discovered that one out of every three homeless people is under the age of 18 which translates to 1.7 million teens who will experience homelessness this year. Project leaders were Jimmy Charles, Jenaire Gumbs, Latoya Peeples and Calvin Harris. Academy of Finance and Marketing sponsor Frank Pizza said, “This was a great opportunity for the students to know that they are directly helping other teenagers in Broward County.” Citizens launch another committee to study beach erosionFirst symposium set for Feb. 16By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFHillsboro Beach – How to best preserve the town’s trademark four miles of private beach continues to be the hot topic here. After a $6 million nourishment of the north beach late last year, City Commissioner Claire Schubert proposed commission workshops to explore future methods of beach preservation. Schubert has held two such meetings and plans another in late February. But ve “concerned citizens” of the town fear the commission is taking the wrong tack, and they are organizing a symposium on Thursday, Feb. 16 to inform residents about beach erosion here and what the future may bring. “Whatever the town decides, the people will need to buy into it,” said Rene Males, an organizing member of the ad hoc committee. Males said few people are See HILLSBORO on page 23By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFF Pompano Beach When Maria Bailey heard the news she broke down crying. “I’m still kind of in shock, actually.” Last week, her son, Owen, received the call: he had been accepted to West Point Military Academy. “My family was extremely happy. I gave them all hugs and they were screaming and yelling,” said Owen, 18. “It’s one of those moments you think about, and when the moment gets here it’s so unexpected,” said Maria. It’s a moment Owen, a Pompano Beach resident, has been preparing for since he started Cardinal Gibbons High School in Fort Lauderdale. “I’ve wanted to go to West Point ever since See WEST POINT on page 30 Gibbons senior, Owen Bailey, accepted at West Point Redo of Sunland Terrace seen as a positiveBut HUD project has residents concernedBy Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFLighthouse PointOf cials here are taking a positive stance toward the workforce housing project at 2100 NE 39 Street now undergoing renovation. Mayor Fred Schorr said this week, “Let’s give them a chance. I think it’s a possible positive.” The 22-units known as Sunland Terrace were in foreclosure when the South Florida Community Land Trust (SFCLT) won the bid and purchased them in June 2010 for $1.6 million with funds from the county’s Neighborhood Stabilization Program. More federal Housing and Urban Development (HUD) money came in the form of $482,000 for upgrades to the complex and matching funds were contributed by the Federal Home Loan Bank. While the mayor wants to be a good neighbor, he does have a problem with the amount the nonpro t agency paid for the building. The cost of each apartment, most of them about 650-square feet of living space, is about $80,000 before the nearly $1 million in improvements. “If in fact, they are committed to lowincome housing, the money could have been better spent,” he said. You See SUNLAND on page 4 After four years of working and hoping, Owen Bailey holds up his acceptance letter from West Point.

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2 The PelicanFriday, January 27, 2012 SightingsA local calendar for events, meetings and more in North Broward County. Please email calendar items to siren2415@gmail. com or fax to 954-783-0093. Arbor Day at Trinity School in Lighthouse Point was a time to plant and pay homage to Mother nature. Mason Yeary and Reagan VanBuskirk plant a tree with Cynthia Rohkamm. The event was sponsored the Lighthouse Point Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution. See SIGHTINGS on page 4By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFOakland Park – Commissioners in Oakland Park have rejected an ordinance to create a historic preservation board that would provide a process for protecting historic properties.Process to preserve historic properties fails for now, Pioneer House at riskThe vote was 3-2 against the ordinance. Vice Mayor Anne Sallee and Commissioner John Adornato voted for the board. Commissioner Jed Shank said he wanted more time for review and public input. Commissioners received information about the proposed ordinance in a supplement to the agenda two days before the meeting. The city currently has no regulations to protect historic properties, Chris Gratz, senior planner, said. He described the proposed ordinance as “a gentle ordinance,” providing for voluntary designation of properties as historic with the owner’s approval. Having a process would make the city competitive in grant applications, and becoming a certi ed local government provides a means to protect historic properties, enhance property values and stabilize neighborhoods, Gratz said. Commissioners would need to recruit people with a background in historic preservation to serve on the Historic Preservation Board, Gratz said. Residents See HISTORIC BOARD on page 7 MeetingsDist. 4 Commissioner Chip LaMarca – Every Wednesday from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. the district of ce of Commissioner LaMarca is open at the Lighthouse Point Library, 2200 NE 38 Street. 954-357-7004.Great EatsPancake Breakfast – Every third Sunday of the month, the St. Elizabeth’s of Hungry Parish hosts a pancake breakfast at 3331 NE 10 Terrace, Pompano Beach. The breakfast is from 7:30 a.m. to noon and bene ts the Parish and cafeteria maintenance. 954-263 8415.Service and CharityArchivist Needed – The Hillsboro Lighthouse Preservation Society is looking for a local retired archivist to volunteer to help open the new Lighthouse Museum & Information Center at 2700 N. Ocean Blvd., Pompano Beach. After the initial start up work, the

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The Pelican 3 Friday, January 27, 2012 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFF LBTS – Narrower streets, wider sidewalks and parallel parking is the recommendation of the city’s design team, and the commission has agreed to move ahead, but slowly, on plans to beautify three blocks of Commercial Boulevard. The challenge, according to designer Jaime Correa, is that the town has only $2 million to spend on this project. Correa named the three blocks to be improved. Block 1, the area from the beach west to El Mar Drive; Block 2, El Mar to A1A and Block 3, A1A to Bougainvilla. “Very good streets around the world have 50 percent or more of the right –ofway dedicated to pedestrians and 50 percent or less for autos,” Correa said.Urban planners get caution light on downtown traf c planBlock 1, he said, is a very good street for obtaining a 50-50 ratio but currently 30 percent is for pedestrian use and 70 percent for autos. Beachgoers take up most of the parking from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. and not many spaces are used by shoppers or diners. In Block 2, 20 percent of the space is now used by pedestrians and 30 percent for autos. In Block 3, sidewalks are narrow and autos prevail. “Every time we had to cross A1A, we called home to say good-bye to our wives and children,” Correa quipped. “It’s almost suicidal.” Traf c speed will be reduced if the streets are narrower and the sidewalks wider, Correa said. He recommends shifting from angle to parallel parking in Block 2. In the block from the beach to El Mar, the team suggests an exclusive lane for passenger drop off and pick up and drop off stands for valet parking. The lane is next to an informal plaza that connects to a more formal plaza for public events such as markets or performances. In the plan, the Aruba Beach Caf terrace and valet parking stand remain in place. Entrance to the shing pier is moved closer to the plaza. With these changes, the area nearest the beach would cater 70 percent to pedestrians and 30 percent to autos. “It would be the best piece of urbanism in South Florida, with the exception of areas of Miami Beach,” Correa said. Low maintenance landscaping suggestions include coconut palms, thatch palms, live oaks, cabbage palms, buttonwoods and pigeon palms. Reaction from the public was mixed. Three relatives of the late Melvin Anglin, who built the town’s shing pier, spoke against the project. Nancy Demko said, “My entire family is 100 percent against this project.” She expressed concern over lack of parking and ow of traf c, noting, “Ninety percent of people can’t parallel park anymore. And planting a lot of trees will attract a lot of birds and be very dirty.” “I don’t like this at all. You’re taking away too much parking,” said John Demko. He suggested buying three hotels that are for sale for parking areas. “Parking has always been horrible, and with this plan we lose 23 spaces,” said Jim Demko. He said having only one lane in and one out at the beach plaza will result in traf c jams.

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4 The PelicanFriday, January 27, 2012 can buy condos for $20,000 apiece every day of the week.” Mandi Bartle, SFCLT’s executive director, disagrees. “Rental units are a competitive market because there is such a big need in the community.” There were other bidders for the units, she said. Whatever the cost, the South Florida Community Land Trust bears little of that expense. The non-pro t pays no real estate taxes nor does the HUD mortgage have to be repaid as long as SFCLT ful lls HUD’s standards. At the end of the 30-year commitment, the building becomes the property of the land trust. The purpose of this redevelopment is to “improve the community and prevent further decay,” said Bartle. Some residents of the city are fearful of the HUD project. Bruce Cramb, president of the neighboring Venetian Park Gardens Association, asked at a commission meeting earlier this month that the city not allow more such projects. And Sharon Fay of Northeasr 27 Avenue spoke at two meetings to express her concerns over property values. According to City Attorney Mike Cirullo the city has no authority over the sale or purchase of real property. The city in fact had no knowledge of the sale of Sunland Terrace until someone from the county called to check possible liens three days before the closing. Bartle said the one and two bedroom units will be leased at two income levels: people making the county’s median income of $62,300 and those making up to 120 percent of the median, or around $82,000 annually. “We need to dispell the myths about affordable housing,” Bartle said. “These are the people we see every day, teachers, clerks, secretaries, the elderly. And our mission is to provide and preserve housing for them.” Schorr is hopeful that the mission will be ful lled here. Under the former owner, the apartment complex had been a source of problems with numerous code violations and police responses. “They have not been model citizens,” the mayor said. After the owner was murdered several years ago, the property went into foreclosure. He understands that neighbors fear for their property values but feels the improvements will better the situation. “Nothing drives property values down more than derelict properties,” he said. Commissioner Mike Long put a positive spin on the situation saying the derelict property is being improved and the tenants will have to uphold the city’s codes. Residents got word of the workforce housing project only via a sign that had been placed on the property, but Bartle said her agency appeared before the city’s Community Appearance Board with construction plans. The building is being painted, fencing, landscaping and irrigation installed along with some hurricane-resistant and energy-saving features, she said. The units, now 60 percent occupied, will rent from $740 to $850 a month but no new leases will be signed until construction is complete in April. County Commissioner Chip LaMarca, a resident of the city, said those that are upset with the HUD presence should “wait and see before they get excited.” SunlandContinued from page 1 time required will be four to six hours a month. 954-7823313. Food Drive – NE Focal Point is manning a drop off non-perishable donations collection Monday through Friday from 8:20 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at 227 NW 2 St., Deer eld Beach. 954-4804449. Assist Local Women – Zonta International meets on the third Tuesday of the month at Duffy’s Diner, 401 N. Federal Hwy., Deer eld Beach, at 11:15 a.m. Zonta International is a classi ed service organization of executives and professionals working together to advance the status of women locally and worldwide through service and advocacy. 561392-2223. Hospice Volunteers Needed – VITAS Innovative Hospice Care of Broward needs volunteers who can SightingsContinued from page 2 See SIGHTNGS on page 11

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The Pelican 5 Friday, January 27, 2012 County commissioner threatens to sue Wilton Manors over referendumBy Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFWilton Manors – If voters pass a referendum on Jan. 31 that designates city commissioners as part-time employees, Broward County Commissioner Lois Wexler says she wants to sue the city to keep it from being implemented. Wexler’s remarks are a direct result of a new county ethics code that prohibits elected of cials from serving as registered lobbyists. Other restrictions including the acceptance food or water from a lobbyist would equally apply. Her threat to sue stems from what she sees as deceptive ballot language. Any move towards litigation would take a majority vote. Wexler said she’s con dent enough commissioners would vote with her on the issue. The referendum would remove Wilton Manors elected of cials from all constraints of the new county ethics code and return them to the state code. The referendum asks voters if being a city commissioner should be considered part-time job and be permitted to “engage in outside employment concurrent employment consistent with Florida law.” Wexler said the question as written doesn’t contain any of the “trigger words,” such as “lobbying,” that would make it clear to voters that the referendum would allow the city to ignore the county code. “I think local rule is very important, but being clear in what you’re asking people is equally important,” she said. “I hate to use Mayor [Gary] Resnick as an example, but Mayor Resnick is a very good example for – for this. As far as I know, he does do some lobbying in his personal life, professional life, and he happens to be a wonderful elected of cial,” said Wexler at the October commission meeting. According to the county’s database, Resnick is registered as a lobbyist. An attorney and partner at GrayRobinson in Fort Lauderdale, he represents private and government clients in communications law and other issues. County Commissioner Sue Gunzburger agrees with Wexler. “It leads you to believe that the state law is stricter than the current law, when the opposite is true . it doesn’t talk about lobbying, it doesn’t mention the word.” The county ethics code, which took effect Jan. 2, prohibits elected of cials from lobbying any Broward or municipal governments unless they are doing it on behalf of the county. Florida law doesn’t prohibit elected of cials from lobbying other government entities. And the new code is not restricted to the elected of cial only. Their spouses, registered domestic partners, immediate family members and of ce staff are also impacted by the same code. The county de nes a lobbyist as anyone who communicates in any way on behalf of another entity or person to any county commissioner, board member or county employee with the purpose of in uencing a decision, regardless if any compensation takes place. History of the code In August of 2010, county commissioners imposed new ethical standards on themselves. Those rules barred them from lobbying and accepting gifts from lobbyists. In November of See THREAT on page 16

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6 The PelicanFriday, January 27, 2012 Deer eld Beach, Pompano Beach, Lighthouse Point, LauderdaleBy-The-Sea, Wilton Manors and Oakland ParkWilton Manors • Oakland Park • Hillsboro Beach The Pompano Pelican is published weekly on FridaysStreet Address: 1500-A E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, FL 33060 Telephone: 954-783-8700 • Fax: 954-783-0093Letters to the Editor are encouraged and accepted for print if signed, although a writer’s name will be withheld on request; letters must also include a daytime telephone number. Advertising rates are available upon request. Subscription rate is $31.80 including tax for one year’s delivery in Greater Pompano Beach; $95.40/per year including tax for others in the United States; call 954-783-8700 for rates abroad. The Pelican is a nonpartisan newspaper and reserves the right to decline advertising. Copyright 2011. Reproduction of this publication in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission of the publisher. The Pelican is a member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, Deer eld Beach Chamber and the LBTS Chamber. The Pelican is a state certi ed woman-owned minority business. The Pelican is delivered to businesses, libraries, schools, of ces, hospitals, news racks and single family homes. All advertising and copy is published at the sole discretion of the publisher. We welcome your critiques and ideas concerning this publication. Anne Siren, publisherExecutive Assistant: Mary Hudson Finance: Peter Pritchard Graphics: Rachel Ramirez Windsheimer and Adriana Bonilla Bookkeeper: John White Classi eds: Fran Shelby Contributing Writers: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Judy Wilson, Malcolm McClintock, Judy Vik, Mike d’Oliveira Account Executives: Paul Shroads, Carolyn Mann, Bill Heaton, Bill Fox ESTABLISHED 1993 • Volume XX, Issue 4 Founding Editor and PublisherAnne Hanby Siren Letters & Opinions Wilton Manors Year in Review Mayor Gary ResnickWILTON MANORSAs we look forward to 2012, it’s nice to take a moment and re ect back upon what was a very busy year here in the Island City. While we faced a few challenges brought on by a slow economy, it was a year that we will remember for positive developments that occurred in our community. At city hall we welcomed new members to the leadership team who have brought with them years of experience, and have eagerly begun to implement new programs and nd better ways to deliver services to our residents. Some of the biggest changes have occurred within our community development services department. Our staff, led by Director Heidi Shafran, has focused on improving customer service and promoting economic development within the city. Beginning with the Mayor’s Business Roundtable early this year, we started gathering feedback and comments from the business community about how we could better serve them and support their success. We, in turn, began online permitting services, one-day walk through permitting, simpli ed parking regulations, and allowed restaurants the ability to develop outdoor dining. The newer and simpli ed permitting process has been wellreceived by residents and business owners. Without a doubt, the economy has taken its toll on local governments over the past couple of years. However, we should never take for granted that our city’s nances are sound, but be assured that we have all the safeguards in place to ensure it remains that way. The city commission and staff have been very proactive in addressing challenging budget issues from pension reform to redesigning our employee health insurance program. One of the great ways we support our many programs and amenities is through grants. This year, we were successful in procuring approximately $500,000 in outside funds. Such funds are being used to pay for an additional police of cer, improve amenities in our parks and improve pedestrian lighting on Powerline Road. While we enjoyed a peaceful hurricane season, we did experience a ooding event in the rst days of November that showed the responsiveness of our emergency management division. High tides, combined with heavy rains, led to neighborhood ooding like we have not experienced in quite some time. Our staff worked tirelessly day and night to alleviate the drainage and worked with FEMA on behalf of property owners that experienced damage. During such weather emergencies, it remains the city’s role to guard the safety of our residents and protect their property. Wilton Manors greatest resource remains its residents. I have enjoyed seeing many of you at our meetings and special events throughout the year and encourage those of you who have not yet attended one of our community events to make it out to one in 2012. My family and I wish everyone a happy, healthy and prosperous 2012, as we continue to pursue improvements to our already terri c City. The vote is Jan. 31 and it’s not just for RepublicansBy Anne SirenPUBLISHERThe eyes of the nation and the world are on the Florida Presidential Primary elections on Jan. 31, but Independents and Democrats in some cities still have good reason to go to the polls. Lauderdale-By-The-Sea voters will choose a new commissioner. In that race Edmund Malkoon and Mark Brown seek the seat left vacant by Birute Ann Clottey. All registered voters, regardless of their party af liations will have a chance to cast their votes on the commission race. Registered Republicans will also choose their preferred presidential candidate. Lighthouse Point voters will elect two commissioners. The two incumbents, Susie Gordon and Tom Hasis have challengers for their seats. Gordon faces Becky Lysengen and Hasis faces Earl Maucker for the three-year terms. Wilton Manors voters have three ballot questions. 1. City Elected Of cials Serve Part-time and may be Concurrently Employed Pursuant to Florida Law A “Yes” vote will essentially allow city of cials to serve under the Florida State ethics laws as all elected of cials have for the past 55 years. It further releases elected of cials from the constraints of the recently enacted, and severely limiting, Broward County Code of Ethics. 2. “City Board Service is Voluntary and Members May Be Concurrently Employed Pursuant to Florida Law. A “Yes” vote will essentially allow volunteer board members to serve under the Florida State laws as all board members have for the past 55 years. It further releases volunteer board members from the constraints of the recently enacted Broward County Code of Ethics. 3. “Voter Referendum is Required Before the City Seeks to Abolish and Transfer The Police Department. A “Yes” vote mandates that the commission seek a vote from the citizens on their desire to abolish and transfer its city police department. Note: While the vote is mandated, commissioners maintain the right to make the nal decision. Hillsboro Beach and Sea Ranch Lakes voters also have local issues on their ballots, like Wilton Manors, the choice to mandate that state ethics rules rather than the Broward County Ethics Code will govern the actions of their elected of cials and those who volunteer for municipal advisory boards. Along all the heat and hoopla of the presidential primary, voters should weigh these local ballot questions and make educated decisions.They got carried away and ended up with stupid, expensive stuffBy Anne SirenPUBISHERWho can blame the county commissioners for coming up with a super tight, squeaky silly code of ethics after so many of our county and local elected of cials over recent months and years have had to wear the orange prison uniforms? We think the taxpayer should blame them, and here’s why. The restrictions on all elected of cials are so tight that they literally, and this is not a joke, cannot accept a glass of water from anyone with whom the city does business or could potentially do business. And here’s the kicker. Neither can their relatives do so all the way to a rather distant second cousin. With such restrictions, we can be sure that ethics complaints will be ying throughout the county. When that happens, the nancial burden could easily fall on the taxpayer. If a complaint becomes an investigation, the elected of cial will hire an attorney. If the inspector general nds the complaint unworthy, the law says the taxpayers will pay the elected of cial’s legal expenses. Only three cities are ghting this county ethics code: Wilton Manors, Sea Ranch Lakes and Hillsboro Beach. For 55 years, the state ethics code has been in effect, and with all those arrests, it appears to be working just ne. We encourage the voters of Wilton Manors, Sea Ranch Lakes and Hillsboro Beach to vote “YES” on Jan. 31 and return their cities to the state ethics code of behavior for elected of cials.

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The Pelican 7 Friday, January 27, 2012 could apply for property tax exemptions for additions done in a historically compatible way. The commission could grant this exemption. To be eligible for exemptions, commercial buildings must be open to the public 1,800 hours a year. “It’s been a long time coming,” Sallee said, noting that discussion on the proposed ordinance began in 1975 when the Pioneer House was opened. In that year, the Historical Society compiled a survey of historical properties in Oakland Park. “Fifty percent of those properties are gone. We had no means or incentive for owners to add on rather than mow them down and build a modern structure,” she said. Adornato supported the ordinance, noting, “There are some good provisions in here, and owners get to object if they don’t want their property designated [historic.]” “There is a lot of value [to the ordinance] but a lot of implications,” Shank said. “It can affect property values. It puts a lot of power in the hands of a board,” he noted, suggesting the commission defer a vote on the proposed ordinance until the issues can be vetted and safeguards put in place. During public comments resident Bill Sears said he was not impressed with the historic preservation initiative. He described it as another layer of bureaucracy for citizens. “I don’t think this board should OK what a homeowner can do with his house,” Sears said. “And if we get grant money, taxpayers have to pay to match funds. Taxpayers would pay for something they have no vote on. The board has too much power. This board could manipulate real estate values. They should be restricted by the city as to what they can and cannot do.” Sears said he only knows of one or two historic properties in the city. “I’m sure if this ordinance is passed, there will be 60 to 70 that show up,” he said. “Maybe due to my age, history means a lot to me,” said Caryl Stevens, former mayor and head of the Oakland Park Historical Society. “Please consider this again.” Sallee has hopes the ordinance soon will be back on the commission agenda. “One of the biggest misconceptions was that it would be forced on residents. It’s purely voluntary. It won’t be forced on anyone.” Properties must be at least 50 years old to be designated as historic. The city’s rst post of ce, a small building, remains on on Dixie Highway. “It’s not a pretty building, but it’s where early residents caught up with their neighbors. The city’s rst postmistress, Mildred Delegal, had to nd the property and build the of ce,” Sallee said. Sallee countered claims about late information on the ordinance. “The information has been out there for years and on the city’s business plan for two years,” she said. The ordinance would help to rescue the Pioneer House, where $60,000 is needed for repairs. The building has termites, moisture coming from the roof, and the air conditioner was stolen. Historic items have been moved elsewhere. Gratz said this week that he is unaware of any further commission action on the ordinance. Historic boardContinued from page 2

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8 The PelicanFriday, January 27, 2012 Oakland Park – An AARP Driver Safety Course will be given from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 1, at Collins Center, 3900 NE Third Ave. Participants will take a refresher course on rules of the road and get a three-year vehicle insurance discount. Cost is $12 for AARP members (must have membership card with them) and $14 for non-AARP members or those without card. Payments must be by check to AARP. Call Camille Moite at 954-7392148.Driver’s class offers insurance discounts By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach NE Focal Point located at 227 NW 2 Ave. in Deer eld Beach offers a wonderful group of senior services and programs available on its unpretentious campus. One of its most appreciated programs is the Alzheimer Day Care Center. This program gives participants activities that effectively reduce the rate of premature institutionalization of persons with Alzheimer’s Disease and related memory disorders. And there’s help for the caregivers, too. While their loved ones are entertained by a day long schedule of stimulating activities from 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, caregivers have important down time to accomplish the many other demands of daily living. The center offers recreation, health support, nutrition, information, referrals, and even transportation to clients from Deer eld Beach, Hillsboro Beach, Lighthouse Point, Pompano Beach, Sea Ranch Lakes, Lauderdale-ByThe-Sea and unincorporated Broward County. What a relief this is to caregivers who are providing at home care needed for their loved person who is diagnosed with dementia, Alzheimer’s disease or memory loss. Established in 1986, the Alzheimer’s Day Care Center is administrated by the City of Deer eld Beach and funded by the Florida Alzheimer’s Disease Initiative, the Broward County Aging and Disability Resource Center, CASA, a 501c3NE Focal Point Alzheimer Day Care Center offers a weekly caregiver support groupThe Pompano Beach Highlands Civic Improvement Association meets Tuesday, Feb. 7 at 7 p.m. at Pompano Highlands Beach Park. The topic for the evening is real estate and foreclosure. Real Estate Broker Gerry Contrino will speak on current market trends and opportunities available in bankowned properties. Attorney Paul DeBianchi will discuss the foreclosure process and options available to homeowners. All are welcome, admission is free. Highlands Park is located at 1650 Northeast 50 Court, just south of Northeast 51 Street, in Pompano Beach. Refreshments will be served. Call 954933-6393.Foreclosures, opportunities Making a Difference Phyllis J. Neuberger wants your suggestions about people who are making a difference. Call 954-783-8700.See NE FOCAL POINT on page 20Here a client enjoys a game of dominoes.This client enjoys an inter-generational chat with a young visitor. Briefs

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The Pelican 9 Friday, January 27, 2012 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFLBTS A town commission candidate in Lauderdale-By-The-Sea may have violated a state election law by including his political party af liation and that of his opponent in an advertisement in a local newspaper. Edmund Malkoon, a Political ad appears to violate state elections law candidate for Seat #3, ran the ad in the Jan. 20 edition of the monthly ByTheSeaFuture newspaper. Malkoon included his Republican Party status in the ad as well as his opponent’s Democratic Party af liation. According to state law, “A political advertisement of a candidate running for nonpartisan of ce may not state the candidate’s political party af liation. This section does not prohibit a political advertisement from stating the candidate’s partisan-related experience. A candidate for nonpartisan of ce is prohibited from campaigning based on party af liation.” For enforcement of any willful violation of this provision, a complaint must be led with the Florida Elections Commission. The commission has exclusive jurisdiction over this matter and may impose a ne not to exceed $1,000 per count. Asked about the ad before Tuesday’s commission meeting, Malkoon said he had “no comment.” “If elected of cials break the law, they should be held accountable for their action. The same applies to candidates,” his opponent Mark Brown said. “The laws are there for a reason, and people should comply with them.” Brown said he would like to see Malkoon’s ad brought before the State Division of Elections for review but does See ELECTION LAW on page 11

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10 The PelicanFriday, January 27, 2012 Advertise with The Pelican 954-783-8700 Business matters The Pelican takes a look at local business owners. Call The Pelican to nd out how you can tell your story here because business matters. 954-783-8700. By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFWith open enrollment, this just might be the perfect time to check out a highly successful, private school that has been serving families of all faiths since 1964. Come from 1 to 3 p.m. to meet the teachers, students, parents and administrative staff, enjoy a guided tour of the 14-acre campus and all of its amenities. Director of Marketing Randy A. Loren says, “We offer a terri c environment for children from six weeks through Grade 12. And we have had many graduates who have been with us throughout their years of Don’t miss the Open House this Sunday from 1 to 3 p.m. at Zion Lutheran Christian school in Deer eld Beacheducation. Almost all of our graduates go on to college.” According to Loren, Zion Lutheran is very technologically savvy. He says, “Every high school student has a fully-integrated iPad 2 educational platform used in conjunction with text books. That, plus that fact that we’re already implementing the National Core Academic Standards set for 2014 puts, Zion Lutheran Christian School way ahead of the curve. We stress math, science and reading. We realize in order to be competitive, we have to stay ahead of the competition.” “To enhance and round out our students’ education, we have an outstanding sports program run by Cody Loomis who sees that every student has an opportunity to play at the right level. Our gymnasium is also outstanding. Students get a crack at baseball, football, soccer, volley ball, basketball, swimming and more. Our teams compete with other schools. In fact, our basketball team is currently on a winning streak.” He continues, “As for the arts we offer bells, choir, drama, art classes, art history and more.” Asked about religious studies, he says, “We cater to all faiths. Every grade has an age appropriate class taught by Pastor Sean Forde, the The sanctuary of Zion Lutheran Church in Deer eld Beach.See CHRISTIAN SCHOOL on page 14 1-28 – The Lauderdale-By-TheSea Garden Club Super Rummage Plant and Bake Sale will be held from 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Jarvis Hall, 4505 Ocean Drive, Lauderdale-By-The-Sea. 954 393 2008. 1-28 & 29 – The Nautical Flea Market will be held from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center 1801 NE 6 St. Cost is $5. Children 12 and under are free. Parking is free. Boating, diving gear, nautical clothing, anchors, mooring products, arts and crafts and other nautical themed items will be for sale. 954-786-4111. 129 Pompano Beach Elks Lodge Clam Bake Jan. 29 12 to 4 p.m., 700 NE 10 St. 954-941-2940. 1-29 – A Clarinet trio of Beethoven and more will be presented by the Chameleon Chamber Music Series at the Leiser Center, 221 SW 3 Ave., Fort Lauderdale. Tickets are $35. 954-761-3435. 2-1 – Motown legends The Four Tops & The Temptations will be performing at the Broward Center for the Performing Arts, 201 SW 5 Ave. in Fort Lauderdale, at 8 p.m. Tickets are $29.50 to $79.50. 954-462-0222 or www.browardcenter.org. 2-2 – A classical concert will be held at 7 p.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. 954390-2130 Big Deals!

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The Pelican 11 Friday, January 27, 2012 not plan on taking that action himself.Campaign signs at polls OK on election dayIn other election-related news, commissioners decided Tuesday that despite the code that bans campaign signs on town property, signs will be allowed outside polling places Jan. 31. Campaigners must be at least 100 feet away from the polls. Connie Hoffmann, town manager, asked for commission direction after noticing all the campaign signs outside Jarvis Hall during the last general election. She said she tried to get Bud Bentley, assistant town manager, to have the signs removed. “He asked me, ‘Do you really want me to do that?’” she said, and the signs remained. Candidates and their supporters traditionally set up tents and campaign at voting sites on election day here. “Good luck” [in banning them], said Vice Mayor Stuart Dodd. “Historically, it’s gone on, and I wouldn’t like to cut it off. Call it election day fever. So long as it’s cleaned up after, I think it’s just part of the election. It’s not worth it to police it. It’s a tradition in this town.” “We have to maintain that 100-foot limit from the door,” Commissioner Birute Ann Clottey said. “It’s tradition to put up tents. It’s a little late now [to prohibit it].” “You gave me good advice, Bud. Thank you,” Hoffmann said. Bentley responded with a thumbs-up gesture. Susan Trevarthen, town attorney, suggested that as the code is revised next month it be changed to allow an exception to the sign ban. Voters in LBTS will select a commissioner for Seat 3. Polling places are at Jarvis Hall at 4501 N. Ocean Drive and at Assumption Catholic Church parish hall at 2001 S. Ocean Blvd. The polling place for Sea Ranch Lakes has moved to the Sea Ranch Lakes Beach Club, but LBTS sites remain the same. Registered Republicans will also vote for a presidential candidate. Election lawContinued from page 9make friendly visits to terminally ill patients and their families, provide relief for caregivers, visit veterans and more. A two-day orientation is required. 954777-5396. Disaster Relief – Pompano Has Heart, a volunteer group that assists people impacted by disasters, meets monthly. Volunteers are needed to man tables at the City of Pompano Beach Health Fair on Wednesdays and from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Art and TheatreCall to Artists – Artists in all media are invited to submit a sampling of their work to be considered for inclusion in the March 11th Lighthouse Point Arts Exhibition. The Arts panel will view artists’ work Jan. 26 from 2 to 5 p.m. at the LHP Yacht & Racquet Club, 2701 NE 42nd Street. 954-8064749 or 954-376-0538. The Producers – The Tamarac Theatre of Performing will be showing The Producers until Jan. 29 at its theater, 7143 Pine Island SightingsContinued from page 4 See SIGHTINGS on page 13

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12 The PelicanFriday, January 27, 2012 LHP Chamber celebrates 8th Annual Taste Around Lighthouse PointOn Jan. 17, the Lighthouse Point Chamber of Commerce held its 8th Annual Taste Around Lighthouse Point at the Lighthouse Point Yacht and Racquet Club. Over 400 area locals and visitors gathered for an evening of food, friends and silent auctions. Over 30 restaurants participated in the event. All funds raised go back into the local community via donations and grants. Ali Ahmed and Laura Balistreri enjoying food from 30 eateries and a silent auction at the Taste Around Lighthouse Point. Kyle Hoy and Olivia Delbrouck of Lito’s Turf and Surf show off their signature dish Lighthouse Point Shrimp. Lito’s, located in the Shoppes at Beacon Pointe, is one of the newer eateries in the area. Theresa Zimmerman and Diana Evers of the Red Fox Diner setting up for the 8th Annual Taste Around Lighthouse Point. Earl and Betsy Maucker and Judy and Bill Sullivan enjoying great food and company. [Photos by Nicole Goldstein] Julie Mahfood, Veronica Reynolds, Mary Grif n and President Lucille Pignataro of the Lighthouse Point Chamber of Commerce. Friendly dog needs home“Shadow” Housebroken, wonderful temperament, family pet, looking to live out her golden years in a loving home. Call 954-9463197.

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The Pelican 13 Friday, January 27, 2012 SightingsContinued from page 11 Angel Ruguian plants a tree at Trinity Learning Center in Lighthouse Point. The event was sponsored by the Lighthouse Point Chapter of The Daughters of the American Revolution. Road. Tickets are $25. 954726-7898.Green MarketsWilton Manors Green Market – Saturdays and Sundays at Hagen Park 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. fresh produce, baked goods, herbs, spices, doggie treats, pickles, jams, infused vinegars, pasta and more are available at the Green Market. 954-531-5383. Pompano Beach Green Market – Every Saturday at the corner of West Atlantic Boulevard and North Dixie Highway from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., fresh vegetables, crafts, plants, food and music are available at the Green Market. 954-292-8040.Recreation and Leisure2-3 Friday Night Under the Lights – Every rst Friday of the month the Pompano Beach Tennis Center 920 NE 18 Ave., holds a family friendly tennis clinic from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. The cost is $10 per person. Refreshments will be served. Call 954-786-4115 to reserve a spot. Ping Pong Nights – Every Monday from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Ping Pong Nights is held at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. The cost is $1. All ages can participate. 954-390-2130. Bingo – The American Legion Auxiliary Unit 142, 171 SW 2 St., Pompano Beach, has Bingo on Tuesdays at 7 p.m. Food is available from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. 954-942-2448. Pompano Beach Fishing Pier 222 N. Pompano Beach Blvd. 954-786-4073 Anglin’s Pier at Commercial Boulevard, Lauderdale-By-The-Sea. 954491-9403 Deer eld Beach International Pier, 200 NE 21st Ave. 954-426-9206 or 954-943-1488. Help and SupportAlzheimer’s Caregivers Support Group – The NE Focal Point Alzheimer’s Day Care Center, located at 301 N.W. 2nd Avenue in Deer eld Beach, offers a weekly Caregiver’s Support Group every Wednesday from 10 a.m. to noon. Club MeetingsRotary Club of Oakland Park/Wilton Manors – Rotary meets every Thursday from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. at Tequila Sunrise Mexican See SIGHTINGS on page 14

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14 The PelicanFriday, January 27, 2012 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach A new industrial zoning category for the city’s most southwesterly region is moving through the approval process. Tuesday, the commission passed on rst reading the I-2 category [industrial, limited use] which curtails some of the activities now allowed by the M-3 and M-4 heavy industry zoning currently in place. Mayor Peggy Noland urged the effected residents and property owners to meet I-2 industrial zoning gains tractionbefore the second reading in two weeks to smooth out remaining issues. Residents of Independence Bay and the Waterways want the more restrictive I-2 zoning, while business interests and land owners fear eliminating permitted uses of their properties will reduce values. Attorney Dennis Mele, representing developer Dan Mancini, said some of permitted uses have been given up: wrecking yards, crematories, fertilizer storage, penal institutions, bulk gas storage, medical waste incineration, but wanted to talk with the neighborhood about the 300-foot setbacks being included in the new zoning. Mele said maybe other buffering methods could be found. Barbara Hall, an attorney representing Rooms to Go said some of the new restrictions “make no sense” such as regulating the number of machines or employees and asked for a review. More than a dozen residents spoke in favor of the new zoning citing their years of exposure to noxious fumes, particulate and noise created Grill, 4711 N. Dixie Hwy., Oakland Park. 954-491-6158. Wilton Manors Kiwanis Club – Kiwanis meets every Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. at 2749 NE 14 Ave., Wilton Manors. 954-561-9785. Oakland Park Kiwanis Club – Kiwanis meets every Wednesday from 7:30 to 8:30 a.m. at Peter Pan Diner, 1216 E. Oakland Park Blvd., Oakland Park. 954-566-9957. Pompano Beach Kiwanis Club – Kiwanis meets Wednesdays at noon at the SightingsContinued from page 13 Riverside Grille at the Sands Resort, 125 N. Riverside Drive, Pompano Beach. 954444-4815. Pompano Beach Kiwanis Club Westside – Kiwanis Meets the rst and third Saturdays of the month at 8:30 a.m. at the E. Pat Larkin Community Center, 520 MLK Blvd., Pompano Beach. 954782-8096 Deer eld Beach Kiwanis Club – Kiwanis meets at noon every Thursday at the Deer eld Hilton, 100 Fairway Dr. 954-242-6083. Deer eld Beach West Kiwanis Club – Kiwanis meets the second and fourth Saturdays of the month at 9 a.m. at Westside Park, 445 SW 2 St., Deer eld Beach. 954-54-732-9883 Toastmasters – The Gold Coast Toastmasters meet in the second and fourth Mondays of each month at Panera Bread, 1762 N. See SIGHTINGS on page 18 See DEERFIELD on page 18

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The Pelican 15 Friday, January 27, 2012 By Malcolm McClintockPELICAN STAFF“We’ve always offered complete meals but now we are excited to introduce our new Brooks Bistro menu,” says the enthusiastic Bernard Perron, a friendly Frenchman who has owned and operated onions. For those wanting a more substantial meal, Brooks restaurant unveils its xed price, all-encompassing mix and match three course dinner plan of appetizer, entre and dessert. “All our dishes are made from scratch and we use only prime organic meats, locally farmed produce and the freshest seafood from our sustainable sheries,” says Perron who is equally proud of his outstanding dessert selection. “We have an inhouse ptissier [pastry chef] who makes all our desserts daily.” For starters, Brooks offers tantalizing options such as the Maine lobster bisque or the novel Crispy Eggplant “sandwich” featuring a tower of tomatoes, roasted peppers, spinach and goat cheese vertically bookended by fried eggplant patties. “It is a very popular dish,” says helpful and well-dressed waiter Tony. On the entre front, a plethora of eye-catching choices will provide deep satisfaction for every type of palate. Meat lovers can indulge in the root beer glazed boneless pork chop with caramelized balsamic onions and bourbon mashed sweet potatoes, the grilled Creekstone Farms Rib Eye or Center Cut let mignon, the crispy half duckling with dried cherries, currants and port wine or the hugely popular rack of lamb with brown sugar, mustard and rum. Seafood a cionados will revel in the sauted wild shrimp scampi with angel hair pasta, the Key Largo snapper with lemon and capers, the miso marinated grouper with ginger-pineapple mint relish and lemongrass cream or, the addictive sweet poached South African lobster tails with drawn butter. All meals are served with fresh warm bread in a friendly atmosphere where patrons can even enjoy live music and dancing. “We are very proud of our long history of A longtime Deer eld Beach favorite, Brooks restaurant nally re-opens its doors after complete overhaul of premises and menuBrooks500 S. Federal Hwy Deer eld Beach, FL 954-427-9302 See BROOKS on page 21this stalwart of the gourmet food scene since 1981. “It’s a lighter menu with a whole host of appetizers to be enjoyed between 4:30 and 6:30 p.m. along with drinks at reduced prices.” Available Wednesdays, Thursdays and Fridays, it is touted as an evening event “where Happy Hour meets a supper club atmosphere.” Mixed drinks are $5, house wines are $6 and the entire Bistro menu is priced between $3 and $14. The mouthwatering appetizers include a wealth of delectable favorites such as Tuna Tartar, sliced tenderloin sliders, rock shrimp & chorizo atbread, P.E.I. mussels with white wine cream sauce, garlic butter escargot, artisan cheese plate, fried calamari, crabcake sliders with zesty remoulade and even sauted spinach with caramelized The Crispy Eggplant “sandwich” with tomatoes, roasted peppers, spinach and goat cheese is a hugely popular appetizer. Owner Bernard Perron has paved the way for daughter Lisa and husband Jon Howe to continue the Brooks tradition of ne dining and exquisite service. A highlight of any Brooks meal, the South African lobster tails are astoundingly sweet and tender.

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16 The PelicanFriday, January 27, 2012 2010, 75 percent of voters agreed to extend the county code of ethics to Broward’s 31 municipalities; Wilton Manors’ precincts, some by greater than 80 percent, also voted to extend the ethics code. And in October of 2011, the county commission unanimously approved the new ethics code. In June 2011, before county commissioners passed the code, Resnick predicted many of cials would resign. “They’ll have an untenable choice between their jobs and their city positions, which, obviously, is not something that I think our residents want to see, and force cities to have special elections.” Also before passing the code, commissioners amended it to grandfather-in of cials who were elected before the new rules were adopted; under the code, they will be allowed to serve out the rest of their terms. “I think we need to understand that it’s going to take cities a while, just as it did us, to come up to speed,” said Commissioner Kristin Jacobs. Last October, Resnick and other city of cials suggested the county look at recommendations by the Broward League of Cities. One of the League’s recommendations was to relax the rules on of cials accepting food and beverages from lobbyists or possible lobbyists. The new code makes accepting gifts with even a small dollar amount like a baseball game ticket, a violation. “We do not want the limitation to be so extreme as to be absurd and result in unintended consequences for our elected of cials,” said Coconut Creek Commissioner Lisa Aronson. In November, Wilton Manors commissioners voted to put the question on the ballot; Vice Mayor Tom Green was the only one to vote against it. Said Green, “I just didn’t want to interfere with what I thought was the intention of the county.” Commissioners Julie Carson, Scott Newton and Ted Galatis said they have no problem. “Our city’s been governed by the state ethics code [all these years], and it’s worked well so far,” said Galatis. In a memo, Broward Inspector General John Scott wrote that the Ethics Commission was concerned about “lobbying down,” a term used to describe an elected of cial lobbying a government body that is subordinate to them; adding that the issue probably wouldn’t apply to municipal commissioners. He also wrote that public of cials who are lobbied by of cials from another government might feel pressure to act favorably in order to secure a favorable outcome for themselves in the future.ThreatContinued from page 3

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The Pelican 17 Friday, January 27, 2012

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18 The Pelican Friday, January 27, 2012 Call The Pelican 954-783-8700 Deer eldContinued from page 14SightingsContinued from page 14by heavy industry. Most feared is metal shredding which has been removed in the I-2 zoning category. A metal shredding operation that had planned to open here was the catalyst for the revised zoning. Owners of that company have since located in Pompano Beach. Dan Mancini urged the residents to revisit the uses not allowed in the new zoning using as an example medical waste transfer stations. Such facilities create no emissions, are totally enclosed, and the waste is sterilized before being shipped to the land ll, Mancini said. He did point out to the audience that the county has recently added 30 more acres to the land ll which is located just south of their homes. Federal Highway, Fort Lauderdale from 7 to 9 p.m. 954-895-3555. Senior Citizens Club – The Greater Pompano Beach Senior Citizens Club meets on the second Wednesday of the month at the Emma Lou Olson Community Center, 1801 NE 6th St., Pompano Beach, at 10 a.m. Activities focus on the general welfare, health, education and security of senior citizens. HealthYoga – A Yoga class is available for all levels at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors, on Tuesday nights from 6:30 to 8 p.m. and Saturday mornings from 10:30 a.m. until noon. The cost is $7. 305-607-3520.Sightings1-28 & 29 – Curtain Call Playhouse presents “A Funny Thing Happened on the way to the Forum” at the Herb Skolnick Center, 800 SW 36th Ave., Pompano Beach. Tickets are $23. Call 954-7840768 for times. 2-2 – The Naked Grape, 2163 Wilton Drive, will host a fundraiser for the Pet Project from 7 to 9 p.m. Donations will be accepted and tickets for raf e prizes will be available. There will also be discounts on wine. 954-5635631 See SIGHTINGS on page 23

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The Pelican 19 Friday, January 27, 2012 Deer eld Beach – Howard Haimowitz’s neighbors came through for him Tuesday night and spoke in favor of his plans to build a very large single-family home at 536 NE 20 Avenue. Haimowitz’s 45-foothigh home faced opposition by the planning and zoning board and city staff and citizens who thought it would be a monstrosity amid the small homes in the area. Haimowitz’s neighbors, however, thought it would be a boon to the north beach. Speaking against the project, Marti McGeary said the house could be built under the current zoning with greater setbacks. City planners rejected Haimowitz’s request for a zoning change on his property from RM-25 to RM-10 on the grounds it was spot zoning and incompatible with the surroundings. The RM-10 zoning allows the building to be within 10 feet of the rear property line rather the 25 feet required by the RM-25 zoning. After hearing comments on both sides of the issue, Dist. 1 Commissioner Joe Miller said,”It’s a bene t to the area and the tax structure and people overwhelmingly support.” Mayor Peggy Noland said. “I’m all for it” and thanked Haimowitz for “investing in our community.” “Red Tails” essayist will meet the real deal Deer eld Beach – Commissioner Ben Preston said this week the city-sponsored “Red Tails” movie day for more than 100 teenagers was an “overwhelming success.” Preston and city staffers put together a free showing of the movie last and then posed the teens two essay questions: “What did “Red Tails” experience teach you about yourself?” and “How do you give back to your community and your country?” The movie portrays the story of the WWII Muskagee Airmen, a Black group of Air Force pilots who became renowned for their successful missions. Preston said when the winners are presented to the city commission, a surviving member of the Muskagee Airmen, Lt. Col. Leon Gray, will attend. Twenty ve of the teens signed up for the contest which carries prizes of $50 to $100.Neighbors support mansion builder

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20 The Pelican Friday, January 27, 2012 fund raising group from NE Focal Point and United Way of Broward County. These contributors make it possible for NE Focal Point Center to offer this comprehensive day care program on a co-payment, sliding fee scale for qualifying clients. Deputy Director, Frieda Caldes says, “Fees range from $1 to over $200 a month. There’s a private fee option of $50 per day for Deer eld Beach residents and $60 a day for non residents. Our program is run by a team including a case manager, recreation therapist, nurse, CNA, or certi ed nurse assistant, and volunteers. Currently we have about 35 clients. There is room for more.” In the course of a day, the program participants will be involved in a craft project, music, horticulture, pet therapy, intergenerational story times and games with the pre-school children, exercise, dancing and more. For more speci c information, contact the Interim Case Manager, Sue Addis at 954-480-4463.Support Group for CaregiversOne of the most successful and appreciated aspects of the Alzheimer’s Day Care Center is the Support Group for Caregivers which meets every Wednesday morning from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. A guest speaker with valuable information for this group is scheduled monthly. The January 18 speaker was attorney Patrick J. Murphy who offered updated information on changes in the Power of Attorney Law. The group is facilitated by Interim Case Manager, Sue Addis, who says, “This group session becomes the place to vent and share feelings. They share anger, loneliness, feelings of failure, resentment of siblings who aren’t there to help, fears of going broke, seek ideas on how to handle relatives who, though absent, give plenty of advice. Some have had relatives who want to save money on care so that they can inherit it later. By sharing their pain and common problems these struggling caregivers nd fellowship, relief and help. They let their hair down and tell it like it is.. They nd out they are not alone. They listen to others who are coping or have coped with some of the same issues.” Here’s what some group members had to say. For privacy reasons, full names are home. He just lies on his back, staring at the ceiling. I was spending every day from 11 a.m. until 10 p.m. feeding him, reminding aids to change his diaper, keeping track of every detail. I drove myself crazy. This group has given me the courage to stop this compulsive behavior and start to live my own life again. Since I stopped being there every minute, I stopped hating everyone in that place and even him sometimes.” A gentleman from Canada adds, “We learn from each other. Problems linger. We get advice. I read somewhere that if you are doing it for them and not to them, it’s OK. We’ve all coped with relatives who aren’t there, but who are full of advice without ever understanding the real situation.” Another man said, “We wish the family members not given. Kenneth: “This group has given me a new lease on life. It’s given me the time and the ability to handle things with a prospective that has developed because of this group. I know now that I’m not alone. Hearing what other men and women are dealing with has made me realize I’m luckier than some of my friends here. The only good thing about this disease is that the loved one never remembers the embarrassing things that happen. You have to have a sense of humor.” At least four members of the group have lost their loved ones, but they keep coming to the group anyway to relieve pain and share their thoughts which may not be understood elsewhere. This is part of the group’s healing power. Viola says, “I lost my husband six years ago, but I never miss a meeting. I learned so much. I really didn’t understand or know about this disease. We all have different problems, but we share a common loss. The real person, we spent a lifetime with, is alive but lost to us. That’s not easy to understand or deal with. I’ve received so much help here that I hope I can give just one other person a helping hand.” Another woman said, “We’re women with lost husbands, men with lost wives, daughters and sons with parents. We care for them until we’re exhausted and they don’t even realize what we’re doing. Sometimes you feel as if you’re keeping him or her alive and yet, they don’t even exist for you. You get nothing back except the fact that you’re doing what you should do.” One member said, “My husband went from the program here into a nursing would come to these sessions. You go away feeling better. We get more realistic about what we can do and what we can’t.” “When I come here,” a woman said, her eyes filling with tears, “I feel that there’s no light at the end of the tunnel. When I leave, I don’t feel like that.” The Pelican thanks this support group for shedding light on what it’s like to be a caregiver with a loved one who neither knows nor cares about the caregiver or what is being done to keep him or her comfortable. NE Focal Point is to be commended for its Alzheimer Day Care program and the very helpful support group which provides a venting place for the thankless lot of the caregivers. Call 954480-4463 for information on the program and the support group.NE Focal PointContinued from page 8

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The Pelican 21 Friday, January 27, 2012 ADVERTISING? IT’S PART OF DOING BUSINESS. CALL US. 954-783-8700. BrooksContinued from page 15 ne dining service. With hard work, dedication and our attention to details, we look forward to continuing our traditions in the foreseeable future,” says Lisa, the amiable daughter who, with the help of husband and Executive Chef Jon Howe, has gradually taken over the reins of proprietorship from her father, Bernard. Brooks is also the ideal venue to celebrate life’s many special occasions. “We have expertly hosted birthdays, anniversaries, Bar and Bat Mitzvahs, weddings and corporate events for over thirty years,” says Perron. “Our four very different dining rooms can be reserved for groups ranging from 20 to 180 people. Our dedicated staff is here to skillfully insure a personalized and enjoyable experience for all.” As expected, Brooks offers an eye-popping array of meticulously selected wines from around the globe. Outstanding red and white vintages start at as low as $18 while the beautifully appointed bar area serves up all types of refreshing libations at equally reasonable prices. “We have decided to adjust our prices to re ect the current reality of our dif cult economic times,” adds Howe. The three course dinners are generally priced between $30 and $40 and can be adjusted to t any dietary requirements. For a sweet conclusion to the Brooks dining experience, diners can have Grand Marnier souf s, creamy crme brle, Lisa’s decadent Mocha Brownies and even a pyramid of pro teroles featuring baby cream puffs loaded with vanilla ice cream and warm chocolate sauce. Bon apptit!The melt-in-your-mouth Tuna Tartar is loaded with fresh raw tuna served with wasabi cream, micro greens and homemade chips.

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22 The Pelican Friday, January 27, 2012 By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFWilton Manors When the “perfect shot” presented itself, Kelly Stratton nailed it. In the final match of the Women’s Doubles B at Wilton Manors’ Island City Open Tennis Tournament, Jan. 21 and 22 at Hagen Park, Stratton ensured that she and her teammate would take home the trophy in just two sets. “Kelly ended it with an overhead smash,” said teammate Bernadette Mosquera. “When I saw the ball go up, I decided to end it right there,” said Stratton. Mosquera and Stratton, defending champs, were among the 40 players who took part in the 3rd annual tournament. “I think it’s grown in energy,” said Donna Kocyba, Hagen Park’s tennis director and Island City Open organizer. “[We have] a lot of the same players but there are more spectators. More people are coming. We have some good players.” Kocyba took over the tournament last year when Hagen’s former tennis director left. The Open was arranged into Men’s Singles, Women’s Rackets come out at 3rd Annual Island City Open Singles, Men’s Doubles, Women’s Doubles and Mixed Doubles. With each having an A, B and C category; A being filled with the highest skilled players and C filled with the lowest. Phil Sokolov and Andy Lennon took the Man’s Doubles A trophy. “Unfortunately, the other team double faulted,” said Lennon, who was a little unhappy with winning by default. “I’d rather see somebody hit a good shot.” Sokolov seemed less concerned. “We all double fault [every now and then]. You don’t really want to lose that way but it’s part of the game. But it was a fun tournament.” It was Lennon’s first tournament win. “Every time I get to the point I can win, I get better [and advance to a tougher division],” he said, joking, “[But] Phil has more trophies than [Anna] Kournikova.” Mayor Gary Resnick views the Open as a way to showcase Hagen and the city’s tennis facilities. “It’s beautiful weather. There’s nothing better. All the sponsors are local businesses. It’s a very local event.” Bobby O’Dor, president of the South Florida Tennis Club, which has 193 members and plays in Oakland Park, Wilton Manors and Fort Lauderdale, says Wilton Manors has the best tennis facilities. “We See RACKETS on page 23 Kelly Stratton, left, and Bernadette Mosquera, Women’s Doubles B champions. Phil Sokolov, left, and Andy Lennon, Man’s Doubles A champions.

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The Pelican 23 Friday, January 27, 2012 The Pelican. 954.783.8700 attending Schubert’s workshops and the public is not aware of the investment the town has, and will have, in beach restoration over the long term. His group fears that the town’s marine consultants, Coastal Systems International, are selling the commission on t-groins as an effective sand-holding measure. Males said the t-groins do capture sand, and if kept full, allow sand in the lateral drift to reach beaches. If not kept full, then the groins contribute to erosion such as occurs on the town’s north beach, south of Deer eld’s groin system. Schubert said this week the commission has made no decision on a beach protection method. “They are jumping the gun. We are certainly a long way and lots of questions off [from making a decision]. By assuming we’ve made up our minds, they’ve made up their minds,” she said. In a letter to residents, Males’s committee writes that the preservation issues “have not been suf ciently addressed” and the symposium will offer “supplemental efforts.” Chair of the ad hoc committee, Males said, will be retiring city commissioner, Rhea Weiss. On the agenda for the rst symposium 7:30 p.m. at Opal Towers will be the Administrator of the Florida Beach erosion control program, Paden Woodruff; former Broward County Beach erosion administrator, Steve Higgins and Hillsboro Inlet Improvement District President Jack Holland. The topic will be the technical issues involved in protecting the beach, and the decisions on preserving it that the town will have to face. Males said he believes the workshop will attract a good turnout. “People know us,” he said of the committee. “We are approaching them one-onone to get them interested in our potentially huge liability.” Other committee members are Harry Ambrose, John Carlson and Angelo Rocco.HillsboroContinued from page 1 prefer here. They keep their courts in great shape. Donna [a certified instructor with the U.S Professional Tennis Association] does a great job training our players.” Resnick, who also competed, lost a close backand-forth match in the final round of the Men’s Doubles B to Nick DeJesu and Mike Gula. “They were tough and steady,” said Gula. DeJesu said their strategy was to try to outlast and outgun their opponents. “We just felt like if we could overpower them maybe they might get a little tired.” Men’s Singles A champion was Christian Trimmer, Men’s Singles C champion was Brooke Yarborough, Mixed Doubles champions were Rob Hofman and Pam Burton, Men’s Doubles C champions were Andrew Nice and Sri Kandula. The Men’s Singles B champion will be determined tomorrow at 10 a.m. at Hagen Park. RacketsContinued from page 22 Mike Manfra, left, Wilton Manors Mayor Gary Resnick, Donna Kocyba, Wilton Manors tennis director and Nick DeJesu, left, and Mike Gula. Dejesu and Gula were the Men’s Doubles B Champions. 2-2 – The Broward Sierra Club Meeting and Holiday Dinner will be held at 7:30 p.m. at the Fern Forest Nature Center, 201 Lyons Rd. S., Coconut Creek. 954-9467359. 2-3 & 4 – Curtain Call Playhouse presents “A Funny Thing Happened on the way to the Forum” at 8 p.m. at the Herb Skolnick Center, 800 SW 36 Ave., Pompano Beach. 2-4 – Unity in the Community, a day of free food and entertainment, will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Pompano Community Park, 2001 NE 10 St., Pompano Beach. 954-899-5557 or 954941-6364. 2-4 – The Boca Raton Symphonia “Saturday Night” concert at 8 p.m. at Parents’ Association Performing Arts Center, Pine Crest School, 2700 St. Andrews Road, Boca Raton The program includes Hayden, Beethoven and Barber. 561-376-3848.SightingsContinued from page 18

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24 The Pelican Friday, January 27, 2012 Hedglon Chiropractic Center, 1313 East Sample Road, Pompano Beach 954-946-1799Dr. Paula Hedglon’s Center offers a natural way to get well and stay healthy Children respond especially well to chiropractic care. Here, mom Kelley Reed watches as Dr. Paula adjusts Abby. The staff of Hedglon Chiropractic Center: Michele, Kelli, Marilyn, Dr. Paula, Tom and Giselle.through the spinal cord and then to the organs. My job is to clear the way for the messages.” She says “stress” is the biggest interference in healing, and stress presents itself in three forms: physical, chemical and mental. God does the healing,” she says. “I just adjust, or move the bone that is causing pressure on the spinal cord” Prior to completing her chiropractic degree, Dr. Hedglon taught upper grades at St. Elizabeth Roman Catholic School in Pompano Beach. She earned her degree in education at Florida State University. She earned her degree in chiropractic care from Life Chiropractic College, Marietta, GA. in 1985. But this small, quiet-spoken woman makes no claims on her part other than releasing the body’s own innate healing ability. Her personal faith emanates a quiet con dence in her chosen profession. The days begin at Hedglon Chiropractic Center with meditations and prayer, and the atmosphere re ects a calm and settling comfort for patients. She builds strong relationships with her patients through her skills of caring. Dr. Hedglon is not alone with her philosophy. There are a growing number of chiropractors like Dr. Hedglon who have chosen the philosophy of Dr. James M. Sigafoose, a recognized leader in “natural healing.” “More and more people want to stop living on drugs. Paula Hedglon sees chiropractic care as an ongoing way to stay healthy. Walking down the long hallway at her chiropractic center in Pompano Beach, visitors can read testimonials from patients who have watched their health improve, but many of them talk about additional bene ts that were surprises. They are are what Dr. Hedglon calls ‘miracles.’ One patient, 44, came because she could not move her neck. After a neck scan and an x-ray, Dr. Hedglon saw in her neck a bone fusion. “When the spinal bones go out of alignment, it causes nerve interference in the spine. I adjusted her neck with a ‘toggle.’ After three months of care she went back to her primary physician. She could not only move her neck, her doctor told her that her kidney, atrophied since birth, had regenerated and was growing.” Another patient with Bell’s Palsy, was unable to open his mouth on the left side for a year and a half. After one adjustment he was able to open his mouth. The testimonials are real; the patients include their photographs for all to see. Dr. Hedglon has her own philosophy as to these “miracles,” a word she uses freely in her practice. “The body can replicate and heal itself if there is no interference with the brain. This is healing from the inside out. The brain sends messages We help them realize that the body has its own healing experience,” she says. Her practice is for the whole family, and she encourages parents to start their children early with the world of chiropractic healing. “We see a lot of families. This is my mission, from womb to tomb,” she adds. Children are welcomed at Hedglon’s Center. They also bene t from the experience. She explains that children aren’t always aware of something being wrong with their bodies. They can have traumas that impact their well-being and go for years or a lifetime accepting an issue that could be healed. “The rst trauma is birth,” says Dr. Hedglon. She recounts the story of a newborn whose father, a Broward Sheriff ‘s Of ce deputy, was a regular patient. When it was apparent at birth that his child was unable to nurse because he could not move his head, the midwife recommended chiropractic care. “When I adjusted the baby, he was able to move his head and nurse. Then the whole family continued the care, coming twice a week at rst and then weekly,” she says. “Every muscle in the body, including the sucking re ex, is controlled by a nerve. Without the connection, the muscle cannot do its job.” “It’s good to set up regular checkups for the entire family—like people do with the dentist—to maintain a body that is able to continually heal itself,” she says. Dr. Hedglon’s introduction to chiropractic care came to her from her great uncle, Dr. Frank Fasulo, a pioneer in chiropractic care. He graduated from Palmer College of Chiropractic in 1947. When Hedglon’s brother, Armand, was injured in a fall and hit the back of his head, Dr. Fasulo took care of him using chiropractic adjustments. Today, Hedglon’s brother is also a chiropractor, practicing in Margate. See if Chiropractic can help you! Guests receive a complimentary: Computer Scan, Spinal Exam and X-rays (if needed) ($390 retail value)The Patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbrused for payment for any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for free, discounted service, examination or treatment.Paid advertising

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The Pelican 25 Friday, January 27, 2012 Rev. Hyvenson Joseph WORSHIP DIRECTORY: Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad. Guy Contrada, general manager of Aruba, also objected to the one lane and said planting trees will block views of the ocean. Business owner Spiro Marchelos said moving the pier entrance close to the plaza will, “have the potential for chaos, confusion and loss of life. If the project is approved as is, you will be in a position worse than Costa Cruiselines,” he said, referring to the company whose ship sank recently in Italy. Spiro’s brother Louis called the plans “innovative and exciting and a good start.” Still, he added, “The impact is great, and you should proceed with care and caution.” Resident Lawrence Wick suggested a solution for the congested A1A / Commercial intersection. “The number one issue when people come to town is parking. Let’s buy some facilities and put up a parking garage,” he said. Terra Mar resident Susan Delegal urged commissioners to go forward.”The area is crying out for improvement and changes. I would hate to see you not continue what you started,” she said.Commissioners input Scot Sasser asked if sidewalks could be reduced to 15-18-feet widths to allow more traf c lanes, but favored moving forward with “some small compromises.” Vice Mayor Stuart Dodd said the proposal calls for a 50 percent reduction in parking spaces. “That’s not acceptable. The businesses will die,” he said. Clottey said the project, needs a lot of tweaking. “Losing 40 spaces may kill the businesses down there, so go back and look at that and come back for another public meeting.” Commissioner Chris Vincent asked for bike lanes and bike racks. Mayor Roseann Minnet said, “It’s sad to hear we’re catering to cars,” Minnet continued. “We should cater to pedestrians. Cars aren’t spending money. People walking around have money in their pockets. Cars don’t.” “Point of information,” Sasser said. “Cars don’t drive themselves. People drive them. And when they get out of their cars, they spend money.”LBTSContinued from page 3

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26 The Pelican Friday, January 27, 2012 The Pelican 954-783-8700 Classi eds Call 954-545-0013 Get to know your local Merchants HELP WANTEDFULL SERVICE NAIL TECHNICIAN Needed. With Or Without Following. Pompano Beach The Orange Room Salon. 954-782-8838. 1-27 DRIVER/TOUR GUIDE/ PART TIME. Have Happy & Relaxed Disposition. Good Speaking Voice & Good Driving Record. 954-784-4064. Fort Lauderdale. 2-3 SEEKING FOR CONDO MAINTENANCE WORKER. If You Have A Strong Commitment To High Level Of Service & Quality Standards, The Ability To Work Well Under Pressure, Meet Deadlines & Strong Sense Of Urgency – Please Apply By Faxing Your Resume To 954942-7685. This Is A 40 Hour Full Time Position With Varied Hours (Evenings, Weekends & Holidays) Bene ts Paid 100%, Paid Vacation & Holidays. Rate Of Pay Commensurate With Experience. EOE. 2-3 ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT For Property Management Firm. Data Entry, Client Contact, Assist Executive. FT / PT. 954-7727012. 2-10 SECRETARY – MATURE – Part-Time – Flexible Hours. Must Be Computer Wise. Good Hourly Rate. Non-Smoker. Pompano Area. 954-895-4596. 2-3 LOCAL PEST CONTROL CO Looking For Quality Sales/Service Tech. Must Be Dependable, Team Player, Good Drivers License & People Skills. Will Train Right Person. ALSO Of ce Assistant – Computer – People & Phone Skills Needed. Fax Resume 954418-3982. 2-10 VOLUNTEERS NEEDEDTHE HILLSBORO LIGHTHOUSE Preservation Society Is Looking For A Local Retired Archivist Who Is Interested In Helping Us To Open The New Lighthouse Museum & Information Center At 2700 N. Ocean Blvd. (Hwy A1A) Pompano Beach. After The Start Up Period, His Or Her Time Work Would Be About 4 To 6 Hours A Month. All Our Workers Are Volunteers As Noted. For More Info., Phone 954-782-3313 Or 305799-5621. 2-17 SEEKING EMPLOYMENTCOMPUTER PROBLEMS? CALL MIKE For Fast 24 Hr Service. Excellent Computer Skills. Hands On Lessons From MBA. Printed Instructions For Problems Provided. 10% Off For 1st Time Customer. Mike Will Make It Happen Or The Service Is FREE! Call 954-6835607. 2-3 MANAGER – SEEKING FT / PT Or Interim Employment In Food & Beverage Industry. Euro Exp. + 25 Yrs In US In Country Clubs, Hotels, Restaurants & Banqueting. Ref. Available. 954-326-7603. 1-27 CNA / HHA – PRIVATE DUTY. 25 Yrs Experience, Excellent References, In Home Personal Care, Shopping, Cooking And Any Personal Needs. 754-3670243. 2-3 HONEST MALE WITH References Seeking Position As A CAREGIVER….Call Chris 954-290-7344. 1-27SERVICES RETIRED PLUMBING CONTRACTOR Looking For Work. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. CFC 027532. Low Rates. 954-496-6420. 1-27 DANNY BOY ELECTRIC – Lic & Insured. Lic. #EC13004811. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. 24/Hr Service. 954-290-1443. Beat Any Written Estimate. Sr, Discount. 2-10 REPAIRS – RESTRETCH AND INSTALLATION OF CARPET. Call Mike 954-6753810. 1-27 COMPUTER TUTOR – COMPUTER REPAIR – FREE Estimate! 9 Computer Certifications. 25 Years Experience. Call Bill 954-4493681. 2-3 WATSON PAINTING & WATERPROOFING CO. Interior/Exterior Painting. Res/Comm Pressure Clean Roofs/Decks. Lic/Ins. 954-6500488 Or 954-552-9457. 2-3 D & R RESCREENING – POOL – PATIO RESCREENING.. $.75 SQ FT. Minimum 300 Sq Ft. Window – Sliding Door Repair. Call 954-650-1566. 1-27 EMERALD IRISH CLEANING – Est. 20 Yrs. English Speaking. Cleaning Supplies. Hand Scrubbed Floors. SPECIAL !!! 3 hrs $55 – 4 HRS $70. Service Guaranteed. www.emeraldirishcleaning. com. 954-524-3161. You Will Do An Irish Jig. 2-3 MIKE THE GARDENER “THE ALL AMERICAN YARDMAN” Yard And Garden Care – Get The Best For Less! Call 561-543-6337. 2-10 MASSAGE THERAPIST – BETTYE LERNER – Reduce The Stress – Invite The Healing. In Your Home. More Information Call 954-2704797. Lic. # MA 31964. 2-3 HANDYMAN – PAINTING – CARPENTRY – Pressure Cleaning. Decks! Everything Around The House. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. Call 561-350-3781. 2-17 MOORE PLUMBING PLUMBING SERVICES – Big Jobs – Small Jobs. We Do It All. Remodeling & Repairs. Lic. & Insured. C.C. Accepted. Call 954-772-4600. 2-3 HONEST HANDYMAN – HOME & BUILDING Maintenance/Improvements. No Job Too Small. Fast Friendly Service. Reasonable Rates. Local Resident/Homeowner. Call Today For Your FREE Upfront Quote. No Deposit Required. 754-366-1915. 1-27 HOME/OFFICE REPAIRS By State Certified G.C. Reasonable. CGC025802. More Information Call 954815-1007. GOT JUNK? DUMP TRUCK – CLEANUPS Trees/ Landscape, Yard Fill. Paint/ Pressure Wash/ Roofs/Home Repairs – Welding, Etc. Dave 954-818-9538. 2-10BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIESNew GREEN technology. New defroster control saves energy in home refrigerators, commercial chillers. Patented. All optical. Simple mfg. Strategic partners needed..www.NewAvionics.Com. 954-568-1991.MUSICIANS WANTEDThe American Legion Symphonic Band is now accepting new members for the 2011-2012 season. College age to “seasoned seniors” are welcome. Rehearsals are held on Wed. evenings at American Legion Post 142 in Pompano. Percussionists, euphonium and clarinet players are especially needed. If you enjoy “making music,” call Jim McGonigal, Music Director at 954-647-0700 for more info.DEEP WATER VILLA – DOCKPOMPANO BEACH 2/2 1700 SQ FT. Screened Fla Room. Private Yard. W/D. 4 Park. No Fixed Bridges. Community Pool. Deeded Dock.. 2 Blocks Beach. $285,000. Coldwell Banker – Barbara Call 954629-1324. 2-17OPEN HOUSE POMPANO THE TRITON – 501 N RIVERSIDE DRIVE Unit 901. Sun 1-4pm. Remodeled 1800 Sq Ft 2/2.5 Condo. Inside Laundry. 3 Balconies With Ocean & Intracoastal Views. Pet OK! Camille Hall 954-2542085 Balistreri Realty. 1-27

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The Pelican 27 Friday, January 27, 2012 Classi eds Call 954-545-0013 INCOME RESTRICTIONS APPL YThe Palms of Deerfield Beach For RentTwo and Three BedroomsAVAILABLE NOW$711 to $824 (Waiting List) $863 to $999 (Available Now)Three-Bedroom Units feature a Master Suite with Full Bathroom and Walk-in Closet PET FRIENDLYFor additional information, visit our website www.DBHAonline.org/townhomes or Contact our office 954-481-3406 Ext. 107 or 954-481-9325 Ask for Kecia R. Sanders Amenities include:• Tile throughout downstairs living area • Carpeted Bedrooms upstairs • Vertical Blinds throughout unit • Ceiling Fans • Energy Efficient Appliances • Refrigerator with Ice-maker • Programmable Oven • Dishwasher • Washer/Dryer Hookup • Patio Area per unit • Central A/C & Heat • Ample Storage • Water, Trash and Sewer are included in Rent HOMES FOR RENTPOMPANO 2/2 Cottage Style House. Large Yard With Fish Pond. $1100 Month – Company Bills For Electric & Water. 540 NE 34 St. Darci 954-7833723. 1-27 POMPANO BEACH 3/2 – CENTRAL AIR. Screened Porch. Small Utility Room. $1100 Mo. 620 NE 35 Street. Call Darci 954783-3723. 1-27SEASONAL RENTALLAUD BY THE SEA Furn. 1/1, 2nd Floor, Beach Access. Feb – March $1,600 Mo Yrly $1,000 Mo. Pool, Gardens, No Smoking/Pets. 954-942-3274 Or 516-474-0951. 1-27CO-OP SALESPOMPANO BEACH 1/1 On Water, Dockage Available At Your Door. $59,500. Coldwell Banker – Barbara – 954-6291324. 2-17REAL ESTATE WANTEDI BUY HOUSES!! CASH!! AS IS! QUICK CLOSE! ANY AREA – ANY CONDITION! NO EQUITY OK. CALL NOW 954-914-2355. 4-20 CONDOS FOR SALEPALM AIRE 105 – Split 2/2 King, Upgrades. Largest Kitchen. W/D. Breakfast Room. Piano. Ultra Furnished. Shopping, Pool Close By. 9th Floor. Low Maintenance/Taxes. $134K – Offers. No Brokers! 954-895-4596. Immediate Occupancy. 2-17 LIGHTHOUSE POINT 2/1.5 CONDO In A GREAT AREA. Pets Allowed. $124,900. Call Barbara – Balistreri Realty. 954-263-7129. 1-27 POMPANO LEISUREVILLE 55+ ---1/1 – No Land Lease. Totally Upgraded. New Appliances – New A/C. Movein Condition. Pet Allowed. FREE Golf – 2 Pools. Furniture Optional. Bob 203-430-0235. 2-17 FT LAUD BAYVIEW WATERFRONT – Gorgeous 2/2 Furnished – Completely Remodeled. Over 1400 Sq Ft. Boat Parade Everyday! Dockage Available. Move Right In. Colleen Majeski – Balistreri Realty. 754-235-1208. 1-27 LEISUREVILLE 2/2 FURNISHED!! Immaculate Condition. Priced For Immediate Sale $25,900….. Joe Ryan Broker…954-6389656. 1-27 POMPANO DIRECT WATER CONDOS – Magni cent 2007 sf, 3/2.5 $339,900. Estate Sale – 1430 sf, 2/2 $259,900. Others Available. Call Walt – 954-461-1012, Blacksmith Realty. 1-27 SUPERB DIRECT INTRACOASTAL VIEW – 2/2 Updated Condo. Low Maintenance. No Realtors Please. 954-304-4518 J Peasley / Better Homes & Garden RE. 2-3 LAUDERDALE BY THE SEA – Furnished 1/1.5 Condo $115,000. Heated Pool. Ocean Access. On Canal. 1481 S Ocean Blvd. Apt 228. Call 586549-5223. 2-3CONDOS FOR RENTPOMPANO DIRECT WATER ANNUAL RENTAL: 2/2, 1438 sf, $1,600/Mo. Call Walt 954461-1012. Others Available. Blacksmith Realty. 1-27 LAUDERDALE BY THE SEAAcross From Beach. Near Sea Watch. 1 Bedroom – Den – 2 Baths. Pool, W/D In Unit. $1175 Per Mo. Yrly. 1st – Last – Sec. Or Seasonal 5 Mo min. $1595/Mo. No Smoking. Call 954-942-5642. 1-20 DEERFIELD BEACH Waterfront Furnished 2/2, Huge Balcony. Awesome View! Heated Pool, Cable, Covered Parking. No Pets Or Realtors. Good Credit Required. Annual $1150. Also NON Waterfront – Annual. 2/2 $800 $825. Call 631-885-3342. 2-3 WALK TO BEACH? GOT BOAT? Nicest 1/1 In NE Pompano. Annual, Unfurnished $925 Month. Call 954-614-8428. 1-27 POMPANO WATERFRONTIsland Club 2/2 Furnished With Private Dock. Gated Community. $1300 Month Yearly. Susan 954-732-2038 – Mirsky Realty. 2-3APTS FOR RENTDEERFIELD/POMPANO BEACH 1 BR & 2 BR APTS FOR RENT. Remodeled, Paint, Tile, Etc. W & D On Site. Pool. Pet Friendly. Call George 954809-5030. 2-10 POMPANO MCNAB ROAD & NE 18 AVENUE – 1 & 2 Bedrooms Furnished/ Unfurnished. $675 $950 And Up. Pool, Tile Floors. Central A/C. 954-610-2327. 1-27 POMPANO GARDENS $795 – 1/1 $200 Deposit. Nice Area – Minutes To Beach – Pet OK. Please Call 954-515-2554. 2-17 POMPANO BEACH 1/1 NW $650 – 2/1 $750 SW 1/1 $725 – 2/1 $925 – NE 1/1 $675 2/1 NE $950 – TH 2/1.5 $1095 – All FREE Water. Rent + $70 MovU-In. 954-781-6299. 1-27 POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 Bedroom From $495. Easy Movein. 1/2 OFF DEPOSIT. Remodeled. Great Location. 954-783-1088 For More Info. 3-9 STUDIOS – EFFICIENCIESDEERFIELD BEACH A1A – Live at the beach off season. Ef ciencies available for $500 Weekly, pay as you go, no deposit or security, cable, pool, laundry, wireless. Ocean Villa 954-427-4608. 1-27OUTDOOR STORAGEDEERFIELD BEACH OUTDOOR STORAGE For Boats, RV’s, Commercial Vehicles & More. Call Chris At 954-520-1777. 2-3COMMERCIAL FOR RENT-SALEPOMPANO COMMERCIAL OFFICE Spaces Available. Ranging From As Low As $500 To $700 Depending On Square Footage. Please Call Darci At 954-7833723. 1-27 DEERFIELD BEACH – Retail Of ce Warehouse – 700 Sq Ft With Loft. A/C, Bathroom. $575 Per Month. Call For More Info 561-654-1331 Or 561-9985681. 2-10 GARAGE SALESSEA HAVEN CONDO – 2731 NE 14 St. Causeway Pompano Beach. Sat. Jan 28 8am1pm. Linens, Jewelry, Books, Lamps, Baskets, Furniture, Pots & Pans, Dishes & Much More. 1-27 MULTI FAMILY TAG SALE!! 9am – 2pm Saturday. 299 N Riverside Drive Pompano. Furniture, Electronics, Clothing, Household Items & Much More. 1-27 FURNITUREBEDSETS – King $180 – Queen $130 – Full $110 – Twin $90. 5 Pc. Bedroom Set $399. Frames $39. 954-465-6498. 2-10 LIGHTHOUSE POINT – OWNER RELOCATING. Living Room, Bedroom, Dining Room, Sofabeds. Entire Contents. Like Brand New. Buy All Or Part. Offers Accepted. 718-605-9835. 2-3MUSICAL INSTRUMENTSPIANO FOR SALE – PERFECT CONDITION. POMPANO BEACH. PLEASE CALL 954-601-7791. 1-27 Vintage Rogers 3 piece drum set, snare, mounted tom and bass drum. $300 obo. 954-647-0700 2/3MISCELLANEOUSWANTED – BUYING Old Books, Dolls, Crystal, Sterlingware, Porcelain, Estate Goods, AND MANY – MANY OTHER ITEMS. 754-244-3047 Ft Lauderdale. 2-17

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28 The Pelican Friday, January 27, 2012 Capt. RJ Boyle is an experienced angler in South Florida. His studio is located in Lighthouse Point. Call 954-420-5001. Making great shing memories is all about the right baitRJ Boyle RJ BOYLE STUDIOSThe blackfin tunas have been solid out off our coast for about three weeks. Anglers keep coming into the shop wondering how to catch those tunas. I was actually fishing with my daughter three weeks ago, about a mile off of Boca Raton, when we got into the tunas. We had the right lure to catch them, so we put two out on top about a hundred yards behind the boat. Both rods continued to bend over for the next hour and we proceeded to catch 23 blackfin tunas, each up to 12 pounds. But we couldn’t help but notice the three boats next to us struggling just to get a bite. They kept getting closer and closer to try and see what we were using for bait. I could tell that all three boats were pulling ballyhoos behind them. Later that afternoon at the shop, one of my friends on the boat next to me came in and asked me what we were using. When I showed him he couldn’t believe it. We were using a three-inch purple and red feather with no bait, just a hook. If you see baby flying fish getting airborne around your boat then scale the size of your baits down to match. Find out what those tunas are feeding on and then you can pick your bait. We have spent tons of time fishing the reefs out here and we have an idea of what to troll at different times of the year. Stop by the shop so we can clue you in. Get tightVOTE ON JAN. 31

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The Pelican 29 Friday, January 27, 2012 campus chaplain. Our senior pastor is Mark Luttio.” Amy Cumming, has a daughter, Stephanie in the tenth grade and she says, “Stephanie is very happy in this school and doing well. We’re Catholic, not Lutheran, but I have never felt uncomfortable or unwelcome.” Loren ticked off the reasons parents and children choose this school. “It’s academically excellent with a low student to teacher ratio. We offer advanced placement classes and have a dual enrollment program with Florida Atlantic University. We’re proud to have a high parent involvement with staff and teachers who are certi ed, highly skilled and experienced.” Kim Danielson will testify to parent involvement, saying, “I often volunteer in the school so I’m exposed to the teachers and I see how well they relate academically and socially with the students. They challenge the children and that’s important. My son Trace is a second grader and daughter, Skyler is in the seventh grade. They’re doing well. We’re thrilled with the athletics program which gives them a fun outlet and helps them focus on class work later. It pleases me that Zion still offers a good exposure to the arts.” Zion Lutheran Christian School also offers Spanish, Italian, French, Mandarin, Japanese and Portuguese. According to Loren, by graduation, every student will have had three years of language and science, four years of math and English and be fully prepared for college. Asked about tuition, Loren claims the school is very competitive. The school accepts government programs such as VPK and Family Central which are state funded, preschool programs. Government assisted programs such as Step Up and McKay are available for lower levels through high school. A $1,000 tuition discount is given to all students with proof of a church af liation, be it a Catholic Church, Synagogue, or other.” Students come as from far as Delray on the north to Plantation on the south. Transportation can be arranged. During this interview several staff members passed by and offered a few comments. Chief Operating Of cer, Frank Strey, said, “I like to have both students and administration on the cutting edge of technology, and they are. This is where the money is spent because this is the future of education.” Principal Jayne Cunningham said, “We’re ahead of the curve with outstanding curriculum. We go the extra mile for our students. We are not test driven; we are academic driven.” George Theodore, history teacher, has been on staff six years. His comment, “Zion Luthern Christian School is a great environment for a teacher. It’s family oriented and stresses Christian values.” Eleventh grader, Caitlin Huiting has been a student at Zion Lutheran since the rst grade. She says, “Every year things change for the better. It helps a lot to have an iPad.” After graduation she “hopes to go to college and major in sports management and physiology. I’m a golfer. Sure, I’d like to be a pro, but if not, I want to be part of the sports world.” For more information, call 954-421-3146 or visit the web site at www.zion-luthern.org. Zion LionsContinued from page 8Students here have no fear of lions. Zion team spirit gets a big boost from its cheer leading squad.

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30 The Pelican Friday, January 27, 2012 freshman year. It’s been my goal and dream.” He also applied to the U.S. Naval Academy but through it all, his heart was set on the Army. “I like the challenge in life. It’s not about me, it’s always about the team, the squad . it’s always about the group.” It’s also a moment very few will ever experience. Along with involvement in student government or other extracurricular activities, West Point requires applicants to excel athletically and academically – especially in calculus, trigonometry and physics. Along with his 4.5 GPA, Owen plays on the football team and serves as senior class vice president. He said he’s not sure what his major will be but he’s leaning towards something involving math or engineering. Prospective cadets must also be nominated by a member of Congress or the vice president. Owen’s nomination letters came from U.S. Senator Marco Rubio and U.S. Rep. Allen West. Owen’s main extracurricular activity is as a member of Cardinal Gibbons’ wrestling team, named state champs in 2011. Frank Pettineo, Owen’s coach, said the attitude he has displayed on the wrestling mat makes him perfectly suited for the military. “He’s a strong athlete but regardless of whether he starts or doesn’t start, he does what he needs to do for the team. I’m an ex-marine who likes that particular attitude.” Pettineo said that although Owen wasn’t a starter last year, he still showed up to practice everyday to help his teammates prepare for their next match. “It takes a lot for a kid to do that. That’s what the military looks for – guys who are going to do what’s best for the group.” Owen got his rst up-close look at West Point, located in New York, last June. “I loved it. It was really beautiful. It’s a lot different than down here in South Florida. I like the change.” Ric Green, president/ CEO of the Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, is a friend of Owen’s father, Tim, and has watched him grow up, watched him strive to get accepted into West Point. “It couldn’t have happened to a better kid.” Owen reports to West Point July 2, a little over a month after graduating high school. Maria says the family has one more trip planned before seeing him off. [I just looked] at ights to Costa Rica to go shing one last time,” she said. Asked if he was nervous, Owen said, “Not yet. I’m sure I will be, but not yet.” West PointContinued from page 1

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The Pelican 31 Friday, January 27, 2012 Advertise with The Pelican Although his business is leverage buyouts which means buying and selling companies, Ben Smith, 38, the owner of the two Lighthouse Inns, 3305 SE 5 St. and 3208 NE 11 St., Pompano Beach since 2008 says, “These two assisted living facilities are keepers. I’m attached to the residents and would feel like I abandoned them if I sold the Inns. My aunt, Sue Beall, is the very capable administrator of both residences and Suzi Mautner is our director of marketing.These two people are my life savers.” Mautner, who is a seasoned executive in this eld, was asked how these Inns differ from other rental assisted living residences. She replied, “ We do all of the services one expects. The difference is in the exceptionally caring staff. We’re intimate residences with a capacity of 33 in Lighthouse Inn South and 43 in Lighthouse Inn North. We’re small enough to give personal attention. The residents all know each other and have concerns for each other the way family members do for one another.” Continuing, she adds, “Our case manager/social worker applies for nancial assistance for new residents wherever it is indicated. Many of our residents are receiving bene ts from the government and VA programs. Until they moved in, they never realized they were entitled to them. This assistance helps them relax and forget their worries about being able to maintain themselves nancially. A licensed therapist attends to individual and group therapy when the need exists.” Both facilities have activity directors who keep residents busy with walks to the ocean, bingo, card games, jewelry making, painting and other crafts. There’s an exercise class every morning. Ivan Lozada has lived at Lighthouse Inn South for four years. “I like the staff. They take good care of my room andme. The food is good and always fresh. Ribs, chicken and meat loaf are my favorites. They bake the cakes and pies right here too, but butter pecan ice cream is still my favorite. I often walk the beach with my friends and I like bingo.” Cindy Ryan, thinks these Inns as life savers. “My dad lived at Lighthouse Inn, North for six years. I was impressed with the quality of care he received. When my husband needed assisted living, I moved them both to the South Inn. And I, unexpectedly ended up here too. They are very good to us. My husband needs constant attention and it is provided by willing and pleasant staff.” These two residences allow small pets. Mautner says, “if the resident can care for them. Our staff assists residents with bathing, dressing and grooming, medical management, housekeeping and personal laundry service. Physical and occupational therapy, doctor visits and podiatrists are available on site. We arrange for transportation for off site visits to dentists, doctors and other activities. Family and friends are welcome visitors from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m.”A Seaside Assisted Living ResidenceFinancial Assistance available through Government and VA Programs Suzi Mautner director of marketing and Ben Smith, owner.Call Suzi 561-667-0678ALF Lic#7127 The Lighthouse Inn

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32 The Pelican Friday, January 27, 2012



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Friday, January 27, 2012 Vol. XX, Issue 4 Call 954-783-8700 to Advertise Email: siren2415@gmail.com Pompano Beach Deer eld Beach Lighthouse Point Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Wilton Manors Oakland Park Hillsboro Beach The Galt Palm Aire The Pelican Pelican Visit us online at www.pompanopelican.com The The Pelican Pelican Cast Your Vote on Election Day, Jan. 31 DBHS DECA member David Trebego collected 42 pairs of jeans recently, part of a community project to target homeless teenagers. Working with S.W.A.T. and Interact clubs, DECA students donated 235 pairs of jeans to Broward Partnership for the Homeless. In their research, the students discovered that one out of every three homeless people is under the age of 18 which translates to 1.7 million teens who will experience homelessness this year. Project leaders were Jimmy Charles, Jenaire Gumbs, Latoya Peeples and Calvin Harris. Academy of Finance and Marketing sponsor Frank Pizza said, This was a great opportunity for the students to know that they are directly helping other teenagers in Broward County. Citizens launch another committee to study beach erosionFirst symposium set for Feb. 16By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFHillsboro Beach How to best preserve the towns trademark four miles of private beach continues to be the hot topic here. After a $6 million nourishment of the north beach late last year, City Commissioner Claire Schubert proposed commission workshops to explore future methods of beach preservation. Schubert has held two such meetings and plans another in late February. But ve concerned citizens of the town fear the commission is taking the wrong tack, and they are organizing a symposium on Thursday, Feb. 16 to inform residents about beach erosion here and what the future may bring. Whatever the town decides, the people will need to buy into it, said Rene Males, an organizing member of the ad hoc committee. Males said few people are See HILLSBORO on page 23By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFF Pompano Beach When Maria Bailey heard the news she broke down crying. Im still kind of in shock, actually. Last week, her son, Owen, received the call: he had been accepted to West Point Military Academy. My family was extremely happy. I gave them all hugs and they were screaming and yelling, said Owen, 18. Its one of those moments you think about, and when the moment gets here its so unexpected, said Maria. Its a moment Owen, a Pompano Beach resident, has been preparing for since he started Cardinal Gibbons High School in Fort Lauderdale. Ive wanted to go to West Point ever since See WEST POINT on page 30 Gibbons senior, Owen Bailey, accepted at West Point Redo of Sunland Terrace seen as a positiveBut HUD project has residents concernedBy Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFLighthouse PointOf cials here are taking a positive stance toward the workforce housing project at 2100 NE 39 Street now undergoing renovation. Mayor Fred Schorr said this week, Lets give them a chance. I think its a possible positive. The 22-units known as Sunland Terrace were in foreclosure when the South Florida Community Land Trust (SFCLT) won the bid and purchased them in June 2010 for $1.6 million with funds from the countys Neighborhood Stabilization Program. More federal Housing and Urban Development (HUD) money came in the form of $482,000 for upgrades to the complex and matching funds were contributed by the Federal Home Loan Bank. While the mayor wants to be a good neighbor, he does have a problem with the amount the nonpro t agency paid for the building. The cost of each apartment, most of them about 650-square feet of living space, is about $80,000 before the nearly $1 million in improvements. If in fact, they are committed to lowincome housing, the money could have been better spent, he said. You See SUNLAND on page 4 After four years of working and hoping, Owen Bailey holds up his acceptance letter from West Point.

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2 The PelicanFriday, January 27, 2012 SightingsA local calendar for events, meetings and more in North Broward County. Please email calendar items to siren2415@gmail. com or fax to 954-783-0093. Arbor Day at Trinity School in Lighthouse Point was a time to plant and pay homage to Mother nature. Mason Yeary and Reagan VanBuskirk plant a tree with Cynthia Rohkamm. The event was sponsored the Lighthouse Point Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution. See SIGHTINGS on page 4By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFOakland Park Commissioners in Oakland Park have rejected an ordinance to create a historic preservation board that would provide a process for protecting historic properties.Process to preserve historic properties fails for now, Pioneer House at riskThe vote was 3-2 against the ordinance. Vice Mayor Anne Sallee and Commissioner John Adornato voted for the board. Commissioner Jed Shank said he wanted more time for review and public input. Commissioners received information about the proposed ordinance in a supplement to the agenda two days before the meeting. The city currently has no regulations to protect historic properties, Chris Gratz, senior planner, said. He described the proposed ordinance as a gentle ordinance, providing for voluntary designation of properties as historic with the owners approval. Having a process would make the city competitive in grant applications, and becoming a certi ed local government provides a means to protect historic properties, enhance property values and stabilize neighborhoods, Gratz said. Commissioners would need to recruit people with a background in historic preservation to serve on the Historic Preservation Board, Gratz said. Residents See HISTORIC BOARD on page 7 MeetingsDist. 4 Commissioner Chip LaMarca Every Wednesday from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. the district of ce of Commissioner LaMarca is open at the Lighthouse Point Library, 2200 NE 38 Street. 954-357-7004.Great EatsPancake Breakfast Every third Sunday of the month, the St. Elizabeths of Hungry Parish hosts a pancake breakfast at 3331 NE 10 Terrace, Pompano Beach. The breakfast is from 7:30 a.m. to noon and bene ts the Parish and cafeteria maintenance. 954-263 8415.Service and CharityArchivist Needed The Hillsboro Lighthouse Preservation Society is looking for a local retired archivist to volunteer to help open the new Lighthouse Museum & Information Center at 2700 N. Ocean Blvd., Pompano Beach. After the initial start up work, the

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The Pelican 3 Friday, January 27, 2012 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFF LBTS Narrower streets, wider sidewalks and parallel parking is the recommendation of the citys design team, and the commission has agreed to move ahead, but slowly, on plans to beautify three blocks of Commercial Boulevard. The challenge, according to designer Jaime Correa, is that the town has only $2 million to spend on this project. Correa named the three blocks to be improved. Block 1, the area from the beach west to El Mar Drive; Block 2, El Mar to A1A and Block 3, A1A to Bougainvilla. Very good streets around the world have 50 percent or more of the right ofway dedicated to pedestrians and 50 percent or less for autos, Correa said.Urban planners get caution light on downtown traf c planBlock 1, he said, is a very good street for obtaining a 50-50 ratio but currently 30 percent is for pedestrian use and 70 percent for autos. Beachgoers take up most of the parking from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. and not many spaces are used by shoppers or diners. In Block 2, 20 percent of the space is now used by pedestrians and 30 percent for autos. In Block 3, sidewalks are narrow and autos prevail. Every time we had to cross A1A, we called home to say good-bye to our wives and children, Correa quipped. Its almost suicidal. Traf c speed will be reduced if the streets are narrower and the sidewalks wider, Correa said. He recommends shifting from angle to parallel parking in Block 2. In the block from the beach to El Mar, the team suggests an exclusive lane for passenger drop off and pick up and drop off stands for valet parking. The lane is next to an informal plaza that connects to a more formal plaza for public events such as markets or performances. In the plan, the Aruba Beach Caf terrace and valet parking stand remain in place. Entrance to the shing pier is moved closer to the plaza. With these changes, the area nearest the beach would cater 70 percent to pedestrians and 30 percent to autos. It would be the best piece of urbanism in South Florida, with the exception of areas of Miami Beach, Correa said. Low maintenance landscaping suggestions include coconut palms, thatch palms, live oaks, cabbage palms, buttonwoods and pigeon palms. Reaction from the public was mixed. Three relatives of the late Melvin Anglin, who built the towns shing pier, spoke against the project. Nancy Demko said, My entire family is 100 percent against this project. She expressed concern over lack of parking and ow of traf c, noting, Ninety percent of people cant parallel park anymore. And planting a lot of trees will attract a lot of birds and be very dirty. I dont like this at all. Youre taking away too much parking, said John Demko. He suggested buying three hotels that are for sale for parking areas. Parking has always been horrible, and with this plan we lose 23 spaces, said Jim Demko. He said having only one lane in and one out at the beach plaza will result in traf c jams.

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4 The PelicanFriday, January 27, 2012 can buy condos for $20,000 apiece every day of the week. Mandi Bartle, SFCLTs executive director, disagrees. Rental units are a competitive market because there is such a big need in the community. There were other bidders for the units, she said. Whatever the cost, the South Florida Community Land Trust bears little of that expense. The non-pro t pays no real estate taxes nor does the HUD mortgage have to be repaid as long as SFCLT ful lls HUDs standards. At the end of the 30-year commitment, the building becomes the property of the land trust. The purpose of this redevelopment is to improve the community and prevent further decay, said Bartle. Some residents of the city are fearful of the HUD project. Bruce Cramb, president of the neighboring Venetian Park Gardens Association, asked at a commission meeting earlier this month that the city not allow more such projects. And Sharon Fay of Northeasr 27 Avenue spoke at two meetings to express her concerns over property values. According to City Attorney Mike Cirullo the city has no authority over the sale or purchase of real property. The city in fact had no knowledge of the sale of Sunland Terrace until someone from the county called to check possible liens three days before the closing. Bartle said the one and two bedroom units will be leased at two income levels: people making the countys median income of $62,300 and those making up to 120 percent of the median, or around $82,000 annually. We need to dispell the myths about affordable housing, Bartle said. These are the people we see every day, teachers, clerks, secretaries, the elderly. And our mission is to provide and preserve housing for them. Schorr is hopeful that the mission will be ful lled here. Under the former owner, the apartment complex had been a source of problems with numerous code violations and police responses. They have not been model citizens, the mayor said. After the owner was murdered several years ago, the property went into foreclosure. He understands that neighbors fear for their property values but feels the improvements will better the situation. Nothing drives property values down more than derelict properties, he said. Commissioner Mike Long put a positive spin on the situation saying the derelict property is being improved and the tenants will have to uphold the citys codes. Residents got word of the workforce housing project only via a sign that had been placed on the property, but Bartle said her agency appeared before the citys Community Appearance Board with construction plans. The building is being painted, fencing, landscaping and irrigation installed along with some hurricane-resistant and energy-saving features, she said. The units, now 60 percent occupied, will rent from $740 to $850 a month but no new leases will be signed until construction is complete in April. County Commissioner Chip LaMarca, a resident of the city, said those that are upset with the HUD presence should wait and see before they get excited. SunlandContinued from page 1 time required will be four to six hours a month. 954-7823313. Food Drive NE Focal Point is manning a drop off non-perishable donations collection Monday through Friday from 8:20 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at 227 NW 2 St., Deer eld Beach. 954-4804449. Assist Local Women Zonta International meets on the third Tuesday of the month at Duffys Diner, 401 N. Federal Hwy., Deer eld Beach, at 11:15 a.m. Zonta International is a classi ed service organization of executives and professionals working together to advance the status of women locally and worldwide through service and advocacy. 561392-2223. Hospice Volunteers Needed VITAS Innovative Hospice Care of Broward needs volunteers who can SightingsContinued from page 2 See SIGHTNGS on page 11

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The Pelican 5 Friday, January 27, 2012 County commissioner threatens to sue Wilton Manors over referendumBy Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFWilton Manors If voters pass a referendum on Jan. 31 that designates city commissioners as part-time employees, Broward County Commissioner Lois Wexler says she wants to sue the city to keep it from being implemented. Wexlers remarks are a direct result of a new county ethics code that prohibits elected of cials from serving as registered lobbyists. Other restrictions including the acceptance food or water from a lobbyist would equally apply. Her threat to sue stems from what she sees as deceptive ballot language. Any move towards litigation would take a majority vote. Wexler said shes con dent enough commissioners would vote with her on the issue. The referendum would remove Wilton Manors elected of cials from all constraints of the new county ethics code and return them to the state code. The referendum asks voters if being a city commissioner should be considered part-time job and be permitted to engage in outside employment concurrent employment consistent with Florida law. Wexler said the question as written doesnt contain any of the trigger words, such as lobbying, that would make it clear to voters that the referendum would allow the city to ignore the county code. I think local rule is very important, but being clear in what youre asking people is equally important, she said. I hate to use Mayor [Gary] Resnick as an example, but Mayor Resnick is a very good example for for this. As far as I know, he does do some lobbying in his personal life, professional life, and he happens to be a wonderful elected of cial, said Wexler at the October commission meeting. According to the countys database, Resnick is registered as a lobbyist. An attorney and partner at GrayRobinson in Fort Lauderdale, he represents private and government clients in communications law and other issues. County Commissioner Sue Gunzburger agrees with Wexler. It leads you to believe that the state law is stricter than the current law, when the opposite is true . it doesnt talk about lobbying, it doesnt mention the word. The county ethics code, which took effect Jan. 2, prohibits elected of cials from lobbying any Broward or municipal governments unless they are doing it on behalf of the county. Florida law doesnt prohibit elected of cials from lobbying other government entities. And the new code is not restricted to the elected of cial only. Their spouses, registered domestic partners, immediate family members and of ce staff are also impacted by the same code. The county de nes a lobbyist as anyone who communicates in any way on behalf of another entity or person to any county commissioner, board member or county employee with the purpose of in uencing a decision, regardless if any compensation takes place. History of the code In August of 2010, county commissioners imposed new ethical standards on themselves. Those rules barred them from lobbying and accepting gifts from lobbyists. In November of See THREAT on page 16

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6 The PelicanFriday, January 27, 2012 Deer eld Beach, Pompano Beach, Lighthouse Point, LauderdaleBy-The-Sea, Wilton Manors and Oakland ParkWilton Manors Oakland Park Hillsboro Beach The Pompano Pelican is published weekly on FridaysStreet Address: 1500-A E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, FL 33060 Telephone: 954-783-8700 Fax: 954-783-0093Letters to the Editor are encouraged and accepted for print if signed, although a writers name will be withheld on request; letters must also include a daytime telephone number. Advertising rates are available upon request. Subscription rate is $31.80 including tax for one years delivery in Greater Pompano Beach; $95.40/per year including tax for others in the United States; call 954-783-8700 for rates abroad. The Pelican is a nonpartisan newspaper and reserves the right to decline advertising. Copyright 2011. Reproduction of this publication in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission of the publisher. The Pelican is a member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, Deer eld Beach Chamber and the LBTS Chamber. The Pelican is a state certi ed woman-owned minority business. The Pelican is delivered to businesses, libraries, schools, of ces, hospitals, news racks and single family homes. All advertising and copy is published at the sole discretion of the publisher. We welcome your critiques and ideas concerning this publication. Anne Siren, publisherExecutive Assistant: Mary Hudson Finance: Peter Pritchard Graphics: Rachel Ramirez Windsheimer and Adriana Bonilla Bookkeeper: John White Classi eds: Fran Shelby Contributing Writers: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Judy Wilson, Malcolm McClintock, Judy Vik, Mike dOliveira Account Executives: Paul Shroads, Carolyn Mann, Bill Heaton, Bill Fox ESTABLISHED 1993 Volume XX, Issue 4 Founding Editor and PublisherAnne Hanby Siren Letters & Opinions Wilton Manors Year in Review Mayor Gary ResnickWILTON MANORSAs we look forward to 2012, its nice to take a moment and re ect back upon what was a very busy year here in the Island City. While we faced a few challenges brought on by a slow economy, it was a year that we will remember for positive developments that occurred in our community. At city hall we welcomed new members to the leadership team who have brought with them years of experience, and have eagerly begun to implement new programs and nd better ways to deliver services to our residents. Some of the biggest changes have occurred within our community development services department. Our staff, led by Director Heidi Shafran, has focused on improving customer service and promoting economic development within the city. Beginning with the Mayors Business Roundtable early this year, we started gathering feedback and comments from the business community about how we could better serve them and support their success. We, in turn, began online permitting services, one-day walk through permitting, simpli ed parking regulations, and allowed restaurants the ability to develop outdoor dining. The newer and simpli ed permitting process has been wellreceived by residents and business owners. Without a doubt, the economy has taken its toll on local governments over the past couple of years. However, we should never take for granted that our citys nances are sound, but be assured that we have all the safeguards in place to ensure it remains that way. The city commission and staff have been very proactive in addressing challenging budget issues from pension reform to redesigning our employee health insurance program. One of the great ways we support our many programs and amenities is through grants. This year, we were successful in procuring approximately $500,000 in outside funds. Such funds are being used to pay for an additional police of cer, improve amenities in our parks and improve pedestrian lighting on Powerline Road. While we enjoyed a peaceful hurricane season, we did experience a ooding event in the rst days of November that showed the responsiveness of our emergency management division. High tides, combined with heavy rains, led to neighborhood ooding like we have not experienced in quite some time. Our staff worked tirelessly day and night to alleviate the drainage and worked with FEMA on behalf of property owners that experienced damage. During such weather emergencies, it remains the citys role to guard the safety of our residents and protect their property. Wilton Manors greatest resource remains its residents. I have enjoyed seeing many of you at our meetings and special events throughout the year and encourage those of you who have not yet attended one of our community events to make it out to one in 2012. My family and I wish everyone a happy, healthy and prosperous 2012, as we continue to pursue improvements to our already terri c City. The vote is Jan. 31 and its not just for RepublicansBy Anne SirenPUBLISHERThe eyes of the nation and the world are on the Florida Presidential Primary elections on Jan. 31, but Independents and Democrats in some cities still have good reason to go to the polls. Lauderdale-By-The-Sea voters will choose a new commissioner. In that race Edmund Malkoon and Mark Brown seek the seat left vacant by Birute Ann Clottey. All registered voters, regardless of their party af liations will have a chance to cast their votes on the commission race. Registered Republicans will also choose their preferred presidential candidate. Lighthouse Point voters will elect two commissioners. The two incumbents, Susie Gordon and Tom Hasis have challengers for their seats. Gordon faces Becky Lysengen and Hasis faces Earl Maucker for the three-year terms. Wilton Manors voters have three ballot questions. 1. City Elected Of cials Serve Part-time and may be Concurrently Employed Pursuant to Florida Law A Yes vote will essentially allow city of cials to serve under the Florida State ethics laws as all elected of cials have for the past 55 years. It further releases elected of cials from the constraints of the recently enacted, and severely limiting, Broward County Code of Ethics. 2. City Board Service is Voluntary and Members May Be Concurrently Employed Pursuant to Florida Law. A Yes vote will essentially allow volunteer board members to serve under the Florida State laws as all board members have for the past 55 years. It further releases volunteer board members from the constraints of the recently enacted Broward County Code of Ethics. 3. Voter Referendum is Required Before the City Seeks to Abolish and Transfer The Police Department. A Yes vote mandates that the commission seek a vote from the citizens on their desire to abolish and transfer its city police department. Note: While the vote is mandated, commissioners maintain the right to make the nal decision. Hillsboro Beach and Sea Ranch Lakes voters also have local issues on their ballots, like Wilton Manors, the choice to mandate that state ethics rules rather than the Broward County Ethics Code will govern the actions of their elected of cials and those who volunteer for municipal advisory boards. Along all the heat and hoopla of the presidential primary, voters should weigh these local ballot questions and make educated decisions.They got carried away and ended up with stupid, expensive stuffBy Anne SirenPUBISHERWho can blame the county commissioners for coming up with a super tight, squeaky silly code of ethics after so many of our county and local elected of cials over recent months and years have had to wear the orange prison uniforms? We think the taxpayer should blame them, and heres why. The restrictions on all elected of cials are so tight that they literally, and this is not a joke, cannot accept a glass of water from anyone with whom the city does business or could potentially do business. And heres the kicker. Neither can their relatives do so all the way to a rather distant second cousin. With such restrictions, we can be sure that ethics complaints will be ying throughout the county. When that happens, the nancial burden could easily fall on the taxpayer. If a complaint becomes an investigation, the elected of cial will hire an attorney. If the inspector general nds the complaint unworthy, the law says the taxpayers will pay the elected of cials legal expenses. Only three cities are ghting this county ethics code: Wilton Manors, Sea Ranch Lakes and Hillsboro Beach. For 55 years, the state ethics code has been in effect, and with all those arrests, it appears to be working just ne. We encourage the voters of Wilton Manors, Sea Ranch Lakes and Hillsboro Beach to vote YES on Jan. 31 and return their cities to the state ethics code of behavior for elected of cials.

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The Pelican 7 Friday, January 27, 2012 could apply for property tax exemptions for additions done in a historically compatible way. The commission could grant this exemption. To be eligible for exemptions, commercial buildings must be open to the public 1,800 hours a year. Its been a long time coming, Sallee said, noting that discussion on the proposed ordinance began in 1975 when the Pioneer House was opened. In that year, the Historical Society compiled a survey of historical properties in Oakland Park. Fifty percent of those properties are gone. We had no means or incentive for owners to add on rather than mow them down and build a modern structure, she said. Adornato supported the ordinance, noting, There are some good provisions in here, and owners get to object if they dont want their property designated [historic.] There is a lot of value [to the ordinance] but a lot of implications, Shank said. It can affect property values. It puts a lot of power in the hands of a board, he noted, suggesting the commission defer a vote on the proposed ordinance until the issues can be vetted and safeguards put in place. During public comments resident Bill Sears said he was not impressed with the historic preservation initiative. He described it as another layer of bureaucracy for citizens. I dont think this board should OK what a homeowner can do with his house, Sears said. And if we get grant money, taxpayers have to pay to match funds. Taxpayers would pay for something they have no vote on. The board has too much power. This board could manipulate real estate values. They should be restricted by the city as to what they can and cannot do. Sears said he only knows of one or two historic properties in the city. Im sure if this ordinance is passed, there will be 60 to 70 that show up, he said. Maybe due to my age, history means a lot to me, said Caryl Stevens, former mayor and head of the Oakland Park Historical Society. Please consider this again. Sallee has hopes the ordinance soon will be back on the commission agenda. One of the biggest misconceptions was that it would be forced on residents. Its purely voluntary. It wont be forced on anyone. Properties must be at least 50 years old to be designated as historic. The citys rst post of ce, a small building, remains on on Dixie Highway. Its not a pretty building, but its where early residents caught up with their neighbors. The citys rst postmistress, Mildred Delegal, had to nd the property and build the of ce, Sallee said. Sallee countered claims about late information on the ordinance. The information has been out there for years and on the citys business plan for two years, she said. The ordinance would help to rescue the Pioneer House, where $60,000 is needed for repairs. The building has termites, moisture coming from the roof, and the air conditioner was stolen. Historic items have been moved elsewhere. Gratz said this week that he is unaware of any further commission action on the ordinance. Historic boardContinued from page 2

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8 The PelicanFriday, January 27, 2012 Oakland Park An AARP Driver Safety Course will be given from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 1, at Collins Center, 3900 NE Third Ave. Participants will take a refresher course on rules of the road and get a three-year vehicle insurance discount. Cost is $12 for AARP members (must have membership card with them) and $14 for non-AARP members or those without card. Payments must be by check to AARP. Call Camille Moite at 954-7392148.Drivers class offers insurance discounts By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach NE Focal Point located at 227 NW 2 Ave. in Deer eld Beach offers a wonderful group of senior services and programs available on its unpretentious campus. One of its most appreciated programs is the Alzheimer Day Care Center. This program gives participants activities that effectively reduce the rate of premature institutionalization of persons with Alzheimers Disease and related memory disorders. And theres help for the caregivers, too. While their loved ones are entertained by a day long schedule of stimulating activities from 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, caregivers have important down time to accomplish the many other demands of daily living. The center offers recreation, health support, nutrition, information, referrals, and even transportation to clients from Deer eld Beach, Hillsboro Beach, Lighthouse Point, Pompano Beach, Sea Ranch Lakes, Lauderdale-ByThe-Sea and unincorporated Broward County. What a relief this is to caregivers who are providing at home care needed for their loved person who is diagnosed with dementia, Alzheimers disease or memory loss. Established in 1986, the Alzheimers Day Care Center is administrated by the City of Deer eld Beach and funded by the Florida Alzheimers Disease Initiative, the Broward County Aging and Disability Resource Center, CASA, a 501c3NE Focal Point Alzheimer Day Care Center offers a weekly caregiver support groupThe Pompano Beach Highlands Civic Improvement Association meets Tuesday, Feb. 7 at 7 p.m. at Pompano Highlands Beach Park. The topic for the evening is real estate and foreclosure. Real Estate Broker Gerry Contrino will speak on current market trends and opportunities available in bankowned properties. Attorney Paul DeBianchi will discuss the foreclosure process and options available to homeowners. All are welcome, admission is free. Highlands Park is located at 1650 Northeast 50 Court, just south of Northeast 51 Street, in Pompano Beach. Refreshments will be served. Call 954933-6393.Foreclosures, opportunities Making a Difference Phyllis J. Neuberger wants your suggestions about people who are making a difference. Call 954-783-8700.See NE FOCAL POINT on page 20Here a client enjoys a game of dominoes. This client enjoys an inter-generational chat with a young visitor. Briefs

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The Pelican 9 Friday, January 27, 2012 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFLBTS A town commission candidate in Lauderdale-By-The-Sea may have violated a state election law by including his political party af liation and that of his opponent in an advertisement in a local newspaper. Edmund Malkoon, a Political ad appears to violate state elections law candidate for Seat #3, ran the ad in the Jan. 20 edition of the monthly ByTheSeaFuture newspaper. Malkoon included his Republican Party status in the ad as well as his opponents Democratic Party af liation. According to state law, A political advertisement of a candidate running for nonpartisan of ce may not state the candidates political party af liation. This section does not prohibit a political advertisement from stating the candidates partisan-related experience. A candidate for nonpartisan of ce is prohibited from campaigning based on party af liation. For enforcement of any willful violation of this provision, a complaint must be led with the Florida Elections Commission. The commission has exclusive jurisdiction over this matter and may impose a ne not to exceed $1,000 per count. Asked about the ad before Tuesdays commission meeting, Malkoon said he had no comment. If elected of cials break the law, they should be held accountable for their action. The same applies to candidates, his opponent Mark Brown said. The laws are there for a reason, and people should comply with them. Brown said he would like to see Malkoons ad brought before the State Division of Elections for review but does See ELECTION LAW on page 11

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10 The PelicanFriday, January 27, 2012 Advertise with The Pelican 954-783-8700 Business matters The Pelican takes a look at local business owners. Call The Pelican to nd out how you can tell your story here because business matters. 954-783-8700. By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFWith open enrollment, this just might be the perfect time to check out a highly successful, private school that has been serving families of all faiths since 1964. Come from 1 to 3 p.m. to meet the teachers, students, parents and administrative staff, enjoy a guided tour of the 14-acre campus and all of its amenities. Director of Marketing Randy A. Loren says, We offer a terri c environment for children from six weeks through Grade 12. And we have had many graduates who have been with us throughout their years of Dont miss the Open House this Sunday from 1 to 3 p.m. at Zion Lutheran Christian school in Deer eld Beacheducation. Almost all of our graduates go on to college. According to Loren, Zion Lutheran is very technologically savvy. He says, Every high school student has a fully-integrated iPad 2 educational platform used in conjunction with text books. That, plus that fact that were already implementing the National Core Academic Standards set for 2014 puts, Zion Lutheran Christian School way ahead of the curve. We stress math, science and reading. We realize in order to be competitive, we have to stay ahead of the competition. To enhance and round out our students education, we have an outstanding sports program run by Cody Loomis who sees that every student has an opportunity to play at the right level. Our gymnasium is also outstanding. Students get a crack at baseball, football, soccer, volley ball, basketball, swimming and more. Our teams compete with other schools. In fact, our basketball team is currently on a winning streak. He continues, As for the arts we offer bells, choir, drama, art classes, art history and more. Asked about religious studies, he says, We cater to all faiths. Every grade has an age appropriate class taught by Pastor Sean Forde, the The sanctuary of Zion Lutheran Church in Deer eld Beach.See CHRISTIAN SCHOOL on page 14 1-28 The Lauderdale-By-TheSea Garden Club Super Rummage, Plant and Bake Sale will be held from 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Jarvis Hall, 4505 Ocean Drive, Lauderdale-By-The-Sea. 954 393 2008. 1-28 & 29 The Nautical Flea Market will be held from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center 1801 NE 6 St. Cost is $5. Children 12 and under are free. Parking is free. Boating, diving gear, nautical clothing, anchors, mooring products, arts and crafts and other nautical themed items will be for sale. 954-786-4111. 129 Pompano Beach Elks Lodge Clam Bake, Jan. 29 12 to 4 p.m., 700 NE 10 St. 954-941-2940. 1-29 A Clarinet trio of Beethoven and more will be presented by the Chameleon Chamber Music Series at the Leiser Center, 221 SW 3 Ave., Fort Lauderdale. Tickets are $35. 954-761-3435. 2-1 Motown legends The Four Tops & The Temptations will be performing at the Broward Center for the Performing Arts, 201 SW 5 Ave. in Fort Lauderdale, at 8 p.m. Tickets are $29.50 to $79.50. 954-462-0222 or www.browardcenter.org. 2-2 A classical concert will be held at 7 p.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. 954390-2130 Big Deals!

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The Pelican 11 Friday, January 27, 2012 not plan on taking that action himself.Campaign signs at polls OK on election dayIn other election-related news, commissioners decided Tuesday that despite the code that bans campaign signs on town property, signs will be allowed outside polling places Jan. 31. Campaigners must be at least 100 feet away from the polls. Connie Hoffmann, town manager, asked for commission direction after noticing all the campaign signs outside Jarvis Hall during the last general election. She said she tried to get Bud Bentley, assistant town manager, to have the signs removed. He asked me, Do you really want me to do that? she said, and the signs remained. Candidates and their supporters traditionally set up tents and campaign at voting sites on election day here. Good luck [in banning them], said Vice Mayor Stuart Dodd. Historically, its gone on, and I wouldnt like to cut it off. Call it election day fever. So long as its cleaned up after, I think its just part of the election. Its not worth it to police it. Its a tradition in this town. We have to maintain that 100-foot limit from the door, Commissioner Birute Ann Clottey said. Its tradition to put up tents. Its a little late now [to prohibit it]. You gave me good advice, Bud. Thank you, Hoffmann said. Bentley responded with a thumbs-up gesture. Susan Trevarthen, town attorney, suggested that as the code is revised next month it be changed to allow an exception to the sign ban. Voters in LBTS will select a commissioner for Seat 3. Polling places are at Jarvis Hall at 4501 N. Ocean Drive and at Assumption Catholic Church parish hall at 2001 S. Ocean Blvd. The polling place for Sea Ranch Lakes has moved to the Sea Ranch Lakes Beach Club, but LBTS sites remain the same. Registered Republicans will also vote for a presidential candidate. Election lawContinued from page 9make friendly visits to terminally ill patients and their families, provide relief for caregivers, visit veterans and more. A two-day orientation is required. 954777-5396. Disaster Relief Pompano Has Heart, a volunteer group that assists people impacted by disasters, meets monthly. Volunteers are needed to man tables at the City of Pompano Beach Health Fair on Wednesdays and from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Art and TheatreCall to Artists Artists in all media are invited to submit a sampling of their work to be considered for inclusion in the March 11th Lighthouse Point Arts Exhibition. The Arts panel will view artists work Jan. 26 from 2 to 5 p.m. at the LHP Yacht & Racquet Club, 2701 NE 42nd Street. 954-8064749 or 954-376-0538. The Producers The Tamarac Theatre of Performing will be showing The Producers until Jan. 29 at its theater, 7143 Pine Island SightingsContinued from page 4 See SIGHTINGS on page 13

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12 The PelicanFriday, January 27, 2012 LHP Chamber celebrates 8th Annual Taste Around Lighthouse PointOn Jan. 17, the Lighthouse Point Chamber of Commerce held its 8th Annual Taste Around Lighthouse Point at the Lighthouse Point Yacht and Racquet Club. Over 400 area locals and visitors gathered for an evening of food, friends and silent auctions. Over 30 restaurants participated in the event. All funds raised go back into the local community via donations and grants. Ali Ahmed and Laura Balistreri enjoying food from 30 eateries and a silent auction at the Taste Around Lighthouse Point. Kyle Hoy and Olivia Delbrouck of Litos Turf and Surf show off their signature dish Lighthouse Point Shrimp. Litos, located in the Shoppes at Beacon Pointe, is one of the newer eateries in the area. Theresa Zimmerman and Diana Evers of the Red Fox Diner setting up for the 8th Annual Taste Around Lighthouse Point. Earl and Betsy Maucker and Judy and Bill Sullivan enjoying great food and company. [Photos by Nicole Goldstein] Julie Mahfood, Veronica Reynolds, Mary Grif n and President Lucille Pignataro of the Lighthouse Point Chamber of Commerce. Friendly dog needs homeShadow Housebroken, wonderful temperament, family pet, looking to live out her golden years in a loving home. Call 954-9463197.

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The Pelican 13 Friday, January 27, 2012 SightingsContinued from page 11 Angel Ruguian plants a tree at Trinity Learning Center in Lighthouse Point. The event was sponsored by the Lighthouse Point Chapter of The Daughters of the American Revolution. Road. Tickets are $25. 954726-7898.Green MarketsWilton Manors Green Market Saturdays and Sundays at Hagen Park 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. fresh produce, baked goods, herbs, spices, doggie treats, pickles, jams, infused vinegars, pasta and more are available at the Green Market. 954-531-5383. Pompano Beach Green Market Every Saturday at the corner of West Atlantic Boulevard and North Dixie Highway from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., fresh vegetables, crafts, plants, food and music are available at the Green Market. 954-292-8040.Recreation and Leisure2-3 Friday Night Under the Lights Every rst Friday of the month the Pompano Beach Tennis Center 920 NE 18 Ave., holds a family friendly tennis clinic from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. The cost is $10 per person. Refreshments will be served. Call 954-786-4115 to reserve a spot. Ping Pong Nights Every Monday from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Ping Pong Nights is held at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. The cost is $1. All ages can participate. 954-390-2130. Bingo The American Legion Auxiliary Unit 142, 171 SW 2 St., Pompano Beach, has Bingo on Tuesdays at 7 p.m. Food is available from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. 954-942-2448. Pompano Beach Fishing Pier 222 N. Pompano Beach Blvd. 954-786-4073 Anglins Pier at Commercial Boulevard, Lauderdale-By-The-Sea. 954491-9403 Deer eld Beach International Pier, 200 NE 21st Ave. 954-426-9206 or 954-943-1488. Help and SupportAlzheimers Caregivers Support Group The NE Focal Point Alzheimers Day Care Center, located at 301 N.W. 2nd Avenue in Deer eld Beach, offers a weekly Caregivers Support Group every Wednesday from 10 a.m. to noon. Club MeetingsRotary Club of Oakland Park/Wilton Manors Rotary meets every Thursday from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. at Tequila Sunrise Mexican See SIGHTINGS on page 14

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14 The PelicanFriday, January 27, 2012 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach A new industrial zoning category for the citys most southwesterly region is moving through the approval process. Tuesday, the commission passed on rst reading the I-2 category [industrial, limited use] which curtails some of the activities now allowed by the M-3 and M-4 heavy industry zoning currently in place. Mayor Peggy Noland urged the effected residents and property owners to meet I-2 industrial zoning gains tractionbefore the second reading in two weeks to smooth out remaining issues. Residents of Independence Bay and the Waterways want the more restrictive I-2 zoning, while business interests and land owners fear eliminating permitted uses of their properties will reduce values. Attorney Dennis Mele, representing developer Dan Mancini, said some of permitted uses have been given up: wrecking yards, crematories, fertilizer storage, penal institutions, bulk gas storage, medical waste incineration, but wanted to talk with the neighborhood about the 300-foot setbacks being included in the new zoning. Mele said maybe other buffering methods could be found. Barbara Hall, an attorney representing Rooms to Go said some of the new restrictions make no sense such as regulating the number of machines or employees and asked for a review. More than a dozen residents spoke in favor of the new zoning citing their years of exposure to noxious fumes, particulate and noise created Grill, 4711 N. Dixie Hwy., Oakland Park. 954-491-6158. Wilton Manors Kiwanis Club Kiwanis meets every Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. at 2749 NE 14 Ave., Wilton Manors. 954-561-9785. Oakland Park Kiwanis Club Kiwanis meets every Wednesday from 7:30 to 8:30 a.m. at Peter Pan Diner, 1216 E. Oakland Park Blvd., Oakland Park. 954-566-9957. Pompano Beach Kiwanis Club Kiwanis meets Wednesdays at noon at the SightingsContinued from page 13 Riverside Grille at the Sands Resort, 125 N. Riverside Drive, Pompano Beach. 954444-4815. Pompano Beach Kiwanis Club Westside Kiwanis Meets the rst and third Saturdays of the month at 8:30 a.m. at the E. Pat Larkin Community Center, 520 MLK Blvd., Pompano Beach. 954782-8096 Deer eld Beach Kiwanis Club Kiwanis meets at noon every Thursday at the Deer eld Hilton, 100 Fairway Dr. 954-242-6083. Deer eld Beach West Kiwanis Club Kiwanis meets the second and fourth Saturdays of the month at 9 a.m. at Westside Park, 445 SW 2 St., Deer eld Beach. 954-54-732-9883 Toastmasters The Gold Coast Toastmasters meet in the second and fourth Mondays of each month at Panera Bread, 1762 N. See SIGHTINGS on page 18 See DEERFIELD on page 18

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The Pelican 15 Friday, January 27, 2012 By Malcolm McClintockPELICAN STAFFWeve always offered complete meals but now we are excited to introduce our new Brooks Bistro menu, says the enthusiastic Bernard Perron, a friendly Frenchman who has owned and operated onions. For those wanting a more substantial meal, Brooks restaurant unveils its xed price, all-encompassing mix and match three course dinner plan of appetizer, entre and dessert. All our dishes are made from scratch and we use only prime organic meats, locally farmed produce and the freshest seafood from our sustainable sheries, says Perron who is equally proud of his outstanding dessert selection. We have an inhouse ptissier [pastry chef] who makes all our desserts daily. For starters, Brooks offers tantalizing options such as the Maine lobster bisque or the novel Crispy Eggplant sandwich featuring a tower of tomatoes, roasted peppers, spinach and goat cheese vertically bookended by fried eggplant patties. It is a very popular dish, says helpful and well-dressed waiter Tony. On the entre front, a plethora of eye-catching choices will provide deep satisfaction for every type of palate. Meat lovers can indulge in the root beer glazed boneless pork chop with caramelized balsamic onions and bourbon mashed sweet potatoes, the grilled Creekstone Farms Rib Eye or Center Cut let mignon, the crispy half duckling with dried cherries, currants and port wine or the hugely popular rack of lamb with brown sugar, mustard and rum. Seafood a cionados will revel in the sauted wild shrimp scampi with angel hair pasta, the Key Largo snapper with lemon and capers, the miso marinated grouper with ginger-pineapple mint relish and lemongrass cream or, the addictive sweet poached South African lobster tails with drawn butter. All meals are served with fresh warm bread in a friendly atmosphere where patrons can even enjoy live music and dancing. We are very proud of our long history of A longtime Deer eld Beach favorite, Brooks restaurant nally re-opens its doors after complete overhaul of premises and menuBrooks500 S. Federal Hwy Deer eld Beach, FL 954-427-9302 See BROOKS on page 21this stalwart of the gourmet food scene since 1981. Its a lighter menu with a whole host of appetizers to be enjoyed between 4:30 and 6:30 p.m. along with drinks at reduced prices. Available Wednesdays, Thursdays and Fridays, it is touted as an evening event where Happy Hour meets a supper club atmosphere. Mixed drinks are $5, house wines are $6 and the entire Bistro menu is priced between $3 and $14. The mouthwatering appetizers include a wealth of delectable favorites such as Tuna Tartar, sliced tenderloin sliders, rock shrimp & chorizo atbread, P.E.I. mussels with white wine cream sauce, garlic butter escargot, artisan cheese plate, fried calamari, crabcake sliders with zesty remoulade and even sauted spinach with caramelized The Crispy Eggplant sandwich with tomatoes, roasted peppers, spinach and goat cheese is a hugely popular appetizer. Owner Bernard Perron has paved the way for daughter Lisa and husband Jon Howe to continue the Brooks tradition of ne dining and exquisite service. A highlight of any Brooks meal, the South African lobster tails are astoundingly sweet and tender.

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16 The PelicanFriday, January 27, 2012 2010, 75 percent of voters agreed to extend the county code of ethics to Browards 31 municipalities; Wilton Manors precincts, some by greater than 80 percent, also voted to extend the ethics code. And in October of 2011, the county commission unanimously approved the new ethics code. In June 2011, before county commissioners passed the code, Resnick predicted many of cials would resign. Theyll have an untenable choice between their jobs and their city positions, which, obviously, is not something that I think our residents want to see, and force cities to have special elections. Also before passing the code, commissioners amended it to grandfather-in of cials who were elected before the new rules were adopted; under the code, they will be allowed to serve out the rest of their terms. I think we need to understand that its going to take cities a while, just as it did us, to come up to speed, said Commissioner Kristin Jacobs. Last October, Resnick and other city of cials suggested the county look at recommendations by the Broward League of Cities. One of the Leagues recommendations was to relax the rules on of cials accepting food and beverages from lobbyists or possible lobbyists. The new code makes accepting gifts with even a small dollar amount like a baseball game ticket, a violation. We do not want the limitation to be so extreme as to be absurd and result in unintended consequences for our elected of cials, said Coconut Creek Commissioner Lisa Aronson. In November, Wilton Manors commissioners voted to put the question on the ballot; Vice Mayor Tom Green was the only one to vote against it. Said Green, I just didnt want to interfere with what I thought was the intention of the county. Commissioners Julie Carson, Scott Newton and Ted Galatis said they have no problem. Our citys been governed by the state ethics code [all these years], and its worked well so far, said Galatis. In a memo, Broward Inspector General John Scott wrote that the Ethics Commission was concerned about lobbying down, a term used to describe an elected of cial lobbying a government body that is subordinate to them; adding that the issue probably wouldnt apply to municipal commissioners. He also wrote that public of cials who are lobbied by of cials from another government might feel pressure to act favorably in order to secure a favorable outcome for themselves in the future.ThreatContinued from page 3

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The Pelican 17 Friday, January 27, 2012

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18 The Pelican Friday, January 27, 2012 Call The Pelican 954-783-8700 Deer eldContinued from page 14SightingsContinued from page 14by heavy industry. Most feared is metal shredding which has been removed in the I-2 zoning category. A metal shredding operation that had planned to open here was the catalyst for the revised zoning. Owners of that company have since located in Pompano Beach. Dan Mancini urged the residents to revisit the uses not allowed in the new zoning using as an example medical waste transfer stations. Such facilities create no emissions, are totally enclosed, and the waste is sterilized before being shipped to the land ll, Mancini said. He did point out to the audience that the county has recently added 30 more acres to the land ll which is located just south of their homes. Federal Highway, Fort Lauderdale from 7 to 9 p.m. 954-895-3555. Senior Citizens Club The Greater Pompano Beach Senior Citizens Club meets on the second Wednesday of the month at the Emma Lou Olson Community Center, 1801 NE 6th St., Pompano Beach, at 10 a.m. Activities focus on the general welfare, health, education and security of senior citizens. HealthYoga A Yoga class is available for all levels at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors, on Tuesday nights from 6:30 to 8 p.m. and Saturday mornings from 10:30 a.m. until noon. The cost is $7. 305-607-3520.Sightings1-28 & 29 Curtain Call Playhouse presents A Funny Thing Happened on the way to the Forum at the Herb Skolnick Center, 800 SW 36th Ave., Pompano Beach. Tickets are $23. Call 954-7840768 for times. 2-2 The Naked Grape, 2163 Wilton Drive, will host a fundraiser for the Pet Project from 7 to 9 p.m. Donations will be accepted and tickets for raf e prizes will be available. There will also be discounts on wine. 954-5635631 See SIGHTINGS on page 23

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The Pelican 19 Friday, January 27, 2012 Deer eld Beach Howard Haimowitzs neighbors came through for him Tuesday night and spoke in favor of his plans to build a very large single-family home at 536 NE 20 Avenue. Haimowitzs 45-foothigh home faced opposition by the planning and zoning board and city staff and citizens who thought it would be a monstrosity amid the small homes in the area. Haimowitzs neighbors, however, thought it would be a boon to the north beach. Speaking against the project, Marti McGeary said the house could be built under the current zoning with greater setbacks. City planners rejected Haimowitzs request for a zoning change on his property from RM-25 to RM-10 on the grounds it was spot zoning and incompatible with the surroundings. The RM-10 zoning allows the building to be within 10 feet of the rear property line rather the 25 feet required by the RM-25 zoning. After hearing comments on both sides of the issue, Dist. 1 Commissioner Joe Miller said,Its a bene t to the area and the tax structure and people overwhelmingly support. Mayor Peggy Noland said. Im all for it and thanked Haimowitz for investing in our community. Red Tails essayist will meet the real deal Deer eld Beach Commissioner Ben Preston said this week the city-sponsored Red Tails movie day for more than 100 teenagers was an overwhelming success. Preston and city staffers put together a free showing of the movie last and then posed the teens two essay questions: What did Red Tails experience teach you about yourself? and How do you give back to your community and your country? The movie portrays the story of the WWII Muskagee Airmen, a Black group of Air Force pilots who became renowned for their successful missions. Preston said when the winners are presented to the city commission, a surviving member of the Muskagee Airmen, Lt. Col. Leon Gray, will attend. Twentyve of the teens signed up for the contest which carries prizes of $50 to $100.Neighbors support mansion builder

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20 The Pelican Friday, January 27, 2012 fund raising group from NE Focal Point and United Way of Broward County. These contributors make it possible for NE Focal Point Center to offer this comprehensive day care program on a co-payment, sliding fee scale for qualifying clients. Deputy Director, Frieda Caldes says, Fees range from $1 to over $200 a month. Theres a private fee option of $50 per day for Deer eld Beach residents and $60 a day for non residents. Our program is run by a team including a case manager, recreation therapist, nurse, CNA, or certi ed nurse assistant, and volunteers. Currently we have about 35 clients. There is room for more. In the course of a day, the program participants will be involved in a craft project, music, horticulture, pet therapy, intergenerational story times and games with the pre-school children, exercise, dancing and more. For more speci c information, contact the Interim Case Manager, Sue Addis at 954-480-4463.Support Group for CaregiversOne of the most successful and appreciated aspects of the Alzheimers Day Care Center is the Support Group for Caregivers which meets every Wednesday morning from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. A guest speaker with valuable information for this group is scheduled monthly. The January 18 speaker was attorney Patrick J. Murphy who offered updated information on changes in the Power of Attorney Law. The group is facilitated by Interim Case Manager, Sue Addis, who says, This group session becomes the place to vent and share feelings. They share anger, loneliness, feelings of failure, resentment of siblings who arent there to help, fears of going broke, seek ideas on how to handle relatives who, though absent, give plenty of advice. Some have had relatives who want to save money on care so that they can inherit it later. By sharing their pain and common problems these struggling caregivers nd fellowship, relief and help. They let their hair down and tell it like it is.. They nd out they are not alone. They listen to others who are coping or have coped with some of the same issues. Heres what some group members had to say. For privacy reasons, full names are home. He just lies on his back, staring at the ceiling. I was spending every day from 11 a.m. until 10 p.m. feeding him, reminding aids to change his diaper, keeping track of every detail. I drove myself crazy. This group has given me the courage to stop this compulsive behavior and start to live my own life again. Since I stopped being there every minute, I stopped hating everyone in that place and even him sometimes. A gentleman from Canada adds, We learn from each other. Problems linger. We get advice. I read somewhere that if you are doing it for them and not to them, its OK. Weve all coped with relatives who arent there, but who are full of advice without ever understanding the real situation. Another man said, We wish the family members not given. Kenneth: This group has given me a new lease on life. Its given me the time and the ability to handle things with a prospective that has developed because of this group. I know now that Im not alone. Hearing what other men and women are dealing with has made me realize Im luckier than some of my friends here. The only good thing about this disease is that the loved one never remembers the embarrassing things that happen. You have to have a sense of humor. At least four members of the group have lost their loved ones, but they keep coming to the group anyway to relieve pain and share their thoughts which may not be understood elsewhere. This is part of the groups healing power. Viola says, I lost my husband six years ago, but I never miss a meeting. I learned so much. I really didnt understand or know about this disease. We all have different problems, but we share a common loss. The real person, we spent a lifetime with, is alive but lost to us. Thats not easy to understand or deal with. Ive received so much help here that I hope I can give just one other person a helping hand. Another woman said, Were women with lost husbands, men with lost wives, daughters and sons with parents. We care for them until were exhausted and they dont even realize what were doing. Sometimes you feel as if youre keeping him or her alive and yet, they dont even exist for you. You get nothing back except the fact that youre doing what you should do. One member said, My husband went from the program here into a nursing would come to these sessions. You go away feeling better. We get more realistic about what we can do and what we cant. When I come here, a woman said, her eyes filling with tears, I feel that theres no light at the end of the tunnel. When I leave, I dont feel like that. The Pelican thanks this support group for shedding light on what its like to be a caregiver with a loved one who neither knows nor cares about the caregiver or what is being done to keep him or her comfortable. NE Focal Point is to be commended for its Alzheimer Day Care program and the very helpful support group which provides a venting place for the thankless lot of the caregivers. Call 954480-4463 for information on the program and the support group.NE Focal PointContinued from page 8

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The Pelican 21 Friday, January 27, 2012 ADVERTISING? ITS PART OF DOING BUSINESS. CALL US. 954-783-8700. BrooksContinued from page 15 ne dining service. With hard work, dedication and our attention to details, we look forward to continuing our traditions in the foreseeable future, says Lisa, the amiable daughter who, with the help of husband and Executive Chef Jon Howe, has gradually taken over the reins of proprietorship from her father, Bernard. Brooks is also the ideal venue to celebrate lifes many special occasions. We have expertly hosted birthdays, anniversaries, Bar and Bat Mitzvahs, weddings and corporate events for over thirty years, says Perron. Our four very different dining rooms can be reserved for groups ranging from 20 to 180 people. Our dedicated staff is here to skillfully insure a personalized and enjoyable experience for all. As expected, Brooks offers an eye-popping array of meticulously selected wines from around the globe. Outstanding red and white vintages start at as low as $18 while the beautifully appointed bar area serves up all types of refreshing libations at equally reasonable prices. We have decided to adjust our prices to re ect the current reality of our dif cult economic times, adds Howe. The three course dinners are generally priced between $30 and $40 and can be adjusted to t any dietary requirements. For a sweet conclusion to the Brooks dining experience, diners can have Grand Marnier souf s, creamy crme brle, Lisas decadent Mocha Brownies and even a pyramid of pro teroles featuring baby cream puffs loaded with vanilla ice cream and warm chocolate sauce. Bon apptit!The melt-in-your-mouth Tuna Tartar is loaded with fresh raw tuna served with wasabi cream, micro greens and homemade chips.

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22 The Pelican Friday, January 27, 2012 By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFWilton Manors When the perfect shot presented itself, Kelly Stratton nailed it. In the final match of the Womens Doubles B at Wilton Manors Island City Open Tennis Tournament, Jan. 21 and 22 at Hagen Park, Stratton ensured that she and her teammate would take home the trophy in just two sets. Kelly ended it with an overhead smash, said teammate Bernadette Mosquera. When I saw the ball go up, I decided to end it right there, said Stratton. Mosquera and Stratton, defending champs, were among the 40 players who took part in the 3rd annual tournament. I think its grown in energy, said Donna Kocyba, Hagen Parks tennis director and Island City Open organizer. [We have] a lot of the same players but there are more spectators. More people are coming. We have some good players. Kocyba took over the tournament last year when Hagens former tennis director left. The Open was arranged into Mens Singles, Womens Rackets come out at 3rd Annual Island City Open Singles, Mens Doubles, Womens Doubles and Mixed Doubles. With each having an A, B and C category; A being filled with the highest skilled players and C filled with the lowest. Phil Sokolov and Andy Lennon took the Mans Doubles A trophy. Unfortunately, the other team double faulted, said Lennon, who was a little unhappy with winning by default. Id rather see somebody hit a good shot. Sokolov seemed less concerned. We all double fault [every now and then]. You dont really want to lose that way but its part of the game. But it was a fun tournament. It was Lennons first tournament win. Every time I get to the point I can win, I get better [and advance to a tougher division], he said, joking, [But] Phil has more trophies than [Anna] Kournikova. Mayor Gary Resnick views the Open as a way to showcase Hagen and the citys tennis facilities. Its beautiful weather. Theres nothing better. All the sponsors are local businesses. Its a very local event. Bobby ODor, president of the South Florida Tennis Club, which has 193 members and plays in Oakland Park, Wilton Manors and Fort Lauderdale, says Wilton Manors has the best tennis facilities. We See RACKETS on page 23 Kelly Stratton, left, and Bernadette Mosquera, Womens Doubles B champions. Phil Sokolov, left, and Andy Lennon, Mans Doubles A champions.

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The Pelican 23 Friday, January 27, 2012 The Pelican. 954.783.8700 attending Schuberts workshops and the public is not aware of the investment the town has, and will have, in beach restoration over the long term. His group fears that the towns marine consultants, Coastal Systems International, are selling the commission on t-groins as an effective sand-holding measure. Males said the t-groins do capture sand, and if kept full, allow sand in the lateral drift to reach beaches. If not kept full, then the groins contribute to erosion such as occurs on the towns north beach, south of Deer elds groin system. Schubert said this week the commission has made no decision on a beach protection method. They are jumping the gun. We are certainly a long way and lots of questions off [from making a decision]. By assuming weve made up our minds, theyve made up their minds, she said. In a letter to residents, Maless committee writes that the preservation issues have not been suf ciently addressed and the symposium will offer supplemental efforts. Chair of the ad hoc committee, Males said, will be retiring city commissioner, Rhea Weiss. On the agenda for the rst symposium 7:30 p.m. at Opal Towers will be the Administrator of the Florida Beach erosion control program, Paden Woodruff; former Broward County Beach erosion administrator, Steve Higgins and Hillsboro Inlet Improvement District President Jack Holland. The topic will be the technical issues involved in protecting the beach, and the decisions on preserving it that the town will have to face. Males said he believes the workshop will attract a good turnout. People know us, he said of the committee. We are approaching them one-onone to get them interested in our potentially huge liability. Other committee members are Harry Ambrose, John Carlson and Angelo Rocco.HillsboroContinued from page 1 prefer here. They keep their courts in great shape. Donna [a certified instructor with the U.S Professional Tennis Association] does a great job training our players. Resnick, who also competed, lost a close backand-forth match in the final round of the Mens Doubles B to Nick DeJesu and Mike Gula. They were tough and steady, said Gula. DeJesu said their strategy was to try to outlast and outgun their opponents. We just felt like if we could overpower them maybe they might get a little tired. Mens Singles A champion was Christian Trimmer, Mens Singles C champion was Brooke Yarborough, Mixed Doubles champions were Rob Hofman and Pam Burton, Mens Doubles C champions were Andrew Nice and Sri Kandula. The Mens Singles B champion will be determined tomorrow at 10 a.m. at Hagen Park. RacketsContinued from page 22 Mike Manfra, left, Wilton Manors Mayor Gary Resnick, Donna Kocyba, Wilton Manors tennis director and Nick DeJesu, left, and Mike Gula. Dejesu and Gula were the Mens Doubles B Champions. 2-2 The Broward Sierra Club Meeting and Holiday Dinner will be held at 7:30 p.m. at the Fern Forest Nature Center, 201 Lyons Rd. S., Coconut Creek. 954-9467359. 2-3 & 4 Curtain Call Playhouse presents A Funny Thing Happened on the way to the Forum at 8 p.m. at the Herb Skolnick Center, 800 SW 36 Ave., Pompano Beach. 2-4 Unity in the Community, a day of free food and entertainment, will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Pompano Community Park, 2001 NE 10 St., Pompano Beach. 954-899-5557 or 954941-6364. 2-4 The Boca Raton Symphonia Saturday Night concert at 8 p.m. at Parents Association Performing Arts Center, Pine Crest School, 2700 St. Andrews Road, Boca Raton The program includes Hayden, Beethoven and Barber. 561-376-3848.SightingsContinued from page 18

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24 The Pelican Friday, January 27, 2012 Hedglon Chiropractic Center, 1313 East Sample Road, Pompano Beach 954-946-1799Dr. Paula Hedglons Center offers a natural way to get well and stay healthy Children respond especially well to chiropractic care. Here, mom Kelley Reed watches as Dr. Paula adjusts Abby. The staff of Hedglon Chiropractic Center: Michele, Kelli, Marilyn, Dr. Paula, Tom and Giselle.through the spinal cord and then to the organs. My job is to clear the way for the messages. She says stress is the biggest interference in healing, and stress presents itself in three forms: physical, chemical and mental. God does the healing, she says. I just adjust, or move the bone that is causing pressure on the spinal cord Prior to completing her chiropractic degree, Dr. Hedglon taught upper grades at St. Elizabeth Roman Catholic School in Pompano Beach. She earned her degree in education at Florida State University. She earned her degree in chiropractic care from Life Chiropractic College, Marietta, GA. in 1985. But this small, quiet-spoken woman makes no claims on her part other than releasing the bodys own innate healing ability. Her personal faith emanates a quiet con dence in her chosen profession. The days begin at Hedglon Chiropractic Center with meditations and prayer, and the atmosphere re ects a calm and settling comfort for patients. She builds strong relationships with her patients through her skills of caring. Dr. Hedglon is not alone with her philosophy. There are a growing number of chiropractors like Dr. Hedglon who have chosen the philosophy of Dr. James M. Sigafoose, a recognized leader in natural healing. More and more people want to stop living on drugs. Paula Hedglon sees chiropractic care as an ongoing way to stay healthy. Walking down the long hallway at her chiropractic center in Pompano Beach, visitors can read testimonials from patients who have watched their health improve, but many of them talk about additional bene ts that were surprises. They are are what Dr. Hedglon calls miracles. One patient, 44, came because she could not move her neck. After a neck scan and an x-ray, Dr. Hedglon saw in her neck a bone fusion. When the spinal bones go out of alignment, it causes nerve interference in the spine. I adjusted her neck with a toggle. After three months of care she went back to her primary physician. She could not only move her neck, her doctor told her that her kidney, atrophied since birth, had regenerated and was growing. Another patient with Bells Palsy, was unable to open his mouth on the left side for a year and a half. After one adjustment he was able to open his mouth. The testimonials are real; the patients include their photographs for all to see. Dr. Hedglon has her own philosophy as to these miracles, a word she uses freely in her practice. The body can replicate and heal itself if there is no interference with the brain. This is healing from the inside out. The brain sends messages We help them realize that the body has its own healing experience, she says. Her practice is for the whole family, and she encourages parents to start their children early with the world of chiropractic healing. We see a lot of families. This is my mission, from womb to tomb, she adds. Children are welcomed at Hedglons Center. They also bene t from the experience. She explains that children arent always aware of something being wrong with their bodies. They can have traumas that impact their well-being and go for years or a lifetime accepting an issue that could be healed. The rst trauma is birth, says Dr. Hedglon. She recounts the story of a newborn whose father, a Broward Sheriff s Of ce deputy, was a regular patient. When it was apparent at birth that his child was unable to nurse because he could not move his head, the midwife recommended chiropractic care. When I adjusted the baby, he was able to move his head and nurse. Then the whole family continued the care, coming twice a week at rst and then weekly, she says. Every muscle in the body, including the sucking re ex, is controlled by a nerve. Without the connection, the muscle cannot do its job. Its good to set up regular checkups for the entire familylike people do with the dentistto maintain a body that is able to continually heal itself, she says. Dr. Hedglons introduction to chiropractic care came to her from her great uncle, Dr. Frank Fasulo, a pioneer in chiropractic care. He graduated from Palmer College of Chiropractic in 1947. When Hedglons brother, Armand, was injured in a fall and hit the back of his head, Dr. Fasulo took care of him using chiropractic adjustments. Today, Hedglons brother is also a chiropractor, practicing in Margate. See if Chiropractic can help you! Guests receive a complimentary: Computer Scan, Spinal Exam and X-rays (if needed) ($390 retail value)The Patient and any other person responsible for payments has the right to refuse to pay, cancel payment or be reimbrused for payment for any other service, examination or treatment which is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to the advertisement for free, discounted service, examination or treatment.Paid advertising

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The Pelican 25 Friday, January 27, 2012 Rev. Hyvenson Joseph WORSHIP DIRECTORY: Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad. Guy Contrada, general manager of Aruba, also objected to the one lane and said planting trees will block views of the ocean. Business owner Spiro Marchelos said moving the pier entrance close to the plaza will, have the potential for chaos, confusion and loss of life. If the project is approved as is, you will be in a position worse than Costa Cruiselines, he said, referring to the company whose ship sank recently in Italy. Spiros brother Louis called the plans innovative and exciting and a good start. Still, he added, The impact is great, and you should proceed with care and caution. Resident Lawrence Wick suggested a solution for the congested A1A / Commercial intersection. The number one issue when people come to town is parking. Lets buy some facilities and put up a parking garage, he said. Terra Mar resident Susan Delegal urged commissioners to go forward.The area is crying out for improvement and changes. I would hate to see you not continue what you started, she said.Commissioners input Scot Sasser asked if sidewalks could be reduced to 15-18-feet widths to allow more traf c lanes, but favored moving forward with some small compromises. Vice Mayor Stuart Dodd said the proposal calls for a 50 percent reduction in parking spaces. Thats not acceptable. The businesses will die, he said. Clottey said the project, needs a lot of tweaking. Losing 40 spaces may kill the businesses down there, so go back and look at that and come back for another public meeting. Commissioner Chris Vincent asked for bike lanes and bike racks. Mayor Roseann Minnet said, Its sad to hear were catering to cars, Minnet continued. We should cater to pedestrians. Cars arent spending money. People walking around have money in their pockets. Cars dont. Point of information, Sasser said. Cars dont drive themselves. People drive them. And when they get out of their cars, they spend money.LBTSContinued from page 3

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26 The Pelican Friday, January 27, 2012 The Pelican 954-783-8700 Classi edsCall 954-545-0013 Get to know your local Merchants HELP WANTEDFULL SERVICE NAIL TECHNICIAN Needed. With Or Without Following. Pompano Beach The Orange Room Salon. 954-782-8838. 1-27 DRIVER/TOUR GUIDE/ PART TIME. Have Happy & Relaxed Disposition. Good Speaking Voice & Good Driving Record. 954-784-4064. Fort Lauderdale. 2-3 SEEKING FOR CONDO MAINTENANCE WORKER. If You Have A Strong Commitment To High Level Of Service & Quality Standards, The Ability To Work Well Under Pressure, Meet Deadlines & Strong Sense Of Urgency Please Apply By Faxing Your Resume To 954942-7685. This Is A 40 Hour Full Time Position With Varied Hours (Evenings, Weekends & Holidays) Bene ts Paid 100%, Paid Vacation & Holidays. Rate Of Pay Commensurate With Experience. EOE. 2-3 ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT For Property Management Firm. Data Entry, Client Contact, Assist Executive. FT / PT. 954-7727012. 2-10 SECRETARY MATURE Part-Time Flexible Hours. Must Be Computer Wise. Good Hourly Rate. Non-Smoker. Pompano Area. 954-895-4596. 2-3 LOCAL PEST CONTROL CO Looking For Quality Sales/Service Tech. Must Be Dependable, Team Player, Good Drivers License & People Skills. Will Train Right Person. ALSO Of ce Assistant Computer People & Phone Skills Needed. Fax Resume 954418-3982. 2-10 VOLUNTEERS NEEDEDTHE HILLSBORO LIGHTHOUSE Preservation Society Is Looking For A Local Retired Archivist Who Is Interested In Helping Us To Open The New Lighthouse Museum & Information Center At 2700 N. Ocean Blvd. (Hwy A1A) Pompano Beach. After The Start Up Period, His Or Her Time Work Would Be About 4 To 6 Hours A Month. All Our Workers Are Volunteers As Noted. For More Info., Phone 954-782-3313 Or 305799-5621. 2-17 SEEKING EMPLOYMENTCOMPUTER PROBLEMS? CALL MIKE For Fast 24 Hr Service. Excellent Computer Skills. Hands On Lessons From MBA. Printed Instructions For Problems Provided. 10% Off For 1st Time Customer. Mike Will Make It Happen Or The Service Is FREE! Call 954-6835607. 2-3 MANAGER SEEKING FT / PT Or Interim Employment In Food & Beverage Industry. Euro Exp. + 25 Yrs In US In Country Clubs, Hotels, Restaurants & Banqueting. Ref. Available. 954-326-7603. 1-27 CNA / HHA PRIVATE DUTY. 25 Yrs Experience, Excellent References, In Home Personal Care, Shopping, Cooking And Any Personal Needs. 754-3670243. 2-3 HONEST MALE WITH References Seeking Position As A CAREGIVER.Call Chris 954-290-7344. 1-27SERVICES RETIRED PLUMBING CONTRACTOR Looking For Work. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. CFC 027532. Low Rates. 954-496-6420. 1-27 DANNY BOY ELECTRIC Lic & Insured. Lic. #EC13004811. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. 24/Hr Service. 954-290-1443. Beat Any Written Estimate. Sr, Discount. 2-10 REPAIRS RESTRETCH AND INSTALLATION OF CARPET. Call Mike 954-6753810. 1-27 COMPUTER TUTOR COMPUTER REPAIR FREE Estimate! 9 Computer Certifications. 25 Years Experience. Call Bill 954-4493681. 2-3 WATSON PAINTING & WATERPROOFING CO. Interior/Exterior Painting. Res/Comm Pressure Clean Roofs/Decks. Lic/Ins. 954-6500488 Or 954-552-9457. 2-3 D & R RESCREENING POOL PATIO RESCREENING.. $.75 SQ FT. Minimum 300 Sq Ft. Window Sliding Door Repair. Call 954-650-1566. 1-27 EMERALD IRISH CLEANING Est. 20 Yrs. English Speaking. Cleaning Supplies. Hand Scrubbed Floors. SPECIAL !!! 3 hrs $55 4 HRS $70. Service Guaranteed. www.emeraldirishcleaning. com. 954-524-3161. You Will Do An Irish Jig. 2-3 MIKE THE GARDENER THE ALL AMERICAN YARDMAN Yard And Garden Care Get The Best For Less! Call 561-543-6337. 2-10 MASSAGE THERAPIST BETTYE LERNER Reduce The Stress Invite The Healing. In Your Home. More Information Call 954-2704797. Lic. # MA 31964. 2-3 HANDYMAN PAINTING CARPENTRY Pressure Cleaning. Decks! Everything Around The House. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. Call 561-350-3781. 2-17 MOORE PLUMBING PLUMBING SERVICES Big Jobs Small Jobs. We Do It All. Remodeling & Repairs. Lic. & Insured. C.C. Accepted. Call 954-772-4600. 2-3 HONEST HANDYMAN HOME & BUILDING Maintenance/Improvements. No Job Too Small. Fast Friendly Service. Reasonable Rates. Local Resident/Homeowner. Call Today For Your FREE Upfront Quote. No Deposit Required. 754-366-1915. 1-27 HOME/OFFICE REPAIRS By State Certified G.C. Reasonable. CGC025802. More Information Call 954815-1007. GOT JUNK? DUMP TRUCK CLEANUPS Trees/ Landscape, Yard Fill. Paint/ Pressure Wash/ Roofs/Home Repairs Welding, Etc. Dave 954-818-9538. 2-10BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIESNew GREEN technology. New defroster control saves energy in home refrigerators, commercial chillers. Patented. All optical. Simple mfg. Strategic partners needed..www.NewAvionics.Com. 954-568-1991.MUSICIANS WANTEDThe American Legion Symphonic Band is now accepting new members for the 2011-2012 season. College age to seasoned seniors are welcome. Rehearsals are held on Wed. evenings at American Legion Post 142 in Pompano. Percussionists, euphonium and clarinet players are especially needed. If you enjoy making music, call Jim McGonigal, Music Director at 954-647-0700 for more info.DEEP WATER VILLA DOCKPOMPANO BEACH 2/2 1700 SQ FT. Screened Fla Room. Private Yard. W/D. 4 Park. No Fixed Bridges. Community Pool. Deeded Dock.. 2 Blocks Beach. $285,000. Coldwell Banker Barbara Call 954629-1324. 2-17OPEN HOUSE POMPANO THE TRITON 501 N RIVERSIDE DRIVE Unit 901. Sun 1-4pm. Remodeled 1800 Sq Ft 2/2.5 Condo. Inside Laundry. 3 Balconies With Ocean & Intracoastal Views. Pet OK! Camille Hall 954-2542085 Balistreri Realty. 1-27

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The Pelican 27 Friday, January 27, 2012 Classi edsCall 954-545-0013 INCOME RESTRICTIONS APPL YThe Palms of Deerfield Beach For RentTwo and Three BedroomsAVAILABLE NOW$711 to $824 (Waiting List) $863 to $999 (Available Now)Three-Bedroom Units feature a Master Suite with Full Bathroom and Walk-in Closet PET FRIENDLYFor additional information, visit our website www.DBHAonline.org/townhomes or Contact our office 954-481-3406 Ext. 107 or 954-481-9325 Ask for Kecia R. Sanders Amenities include: Tile throughout downstairs living area Carpeted Bedrooms upstairs Vertical Blinds throughout unit Ceiling Fans Energy Efficient Appliances Refrigerator with Ice-maker Programmable Oven Dishwasher Washer/Dryer Hookup Patio Area per unit Central A/C & Heat Ample Storage Water, Trash and Sewer are included in Rent HOMES FOR RENTPOMPANO 2/2 Cottage Style House. Large Yard With Fish Pond. $1100 Month Company Bills For Electric & Water. 540 NE 34 St. Darci 954-7833723. 1-27 POMPANO BEACH 3/2 CENTRAL AIR. Screened Porch. Small Utility Room. $1100 Mo. 620 NE 35 Street. Call Darci 954783-3723. 1-27SEASONAL RENTALLAUD BY THE SEA Furn. 1/1, 2nd Floor, Beach Access. Feb March $1,600 Mo Yrly $1,000 Mo. Pool, Gardens, No Smoking/Pets. 954-942-3274 Or 516-474-0951. 1-27CO-OP SALESPOMPANO BEACH 1/1 On Water, Dockage Available At Your Door. $59,500. Coldwell Banker Barbara 954-6291324. 2-17REAL ESTATE WANTEDI BUY HOUSES!! CASH!! AS IS! QUICK CLOSE! ANY AREA ANY CONDITION! NO EQUITY OK. CALL NOW 954-914-2355. 4-20 CONDOS FOR SALEPALM AIRE 105 Split 2/2 King, Upgrades. Largest Kitchen. W/D. Breakfast Room. Piano. Ultra Furnished. Shopping, Pool Close By. 9th Floor. Low Maintenance/Taxes. $134K Offers. No Brokers! 954-895-4596. Immediate Occupancy. 2-17 LIGHTHOUSE POINT 2/1.5 CONDO In A GREAT AREA. Pets Allowed. $124,900. Call Barbara Balistreri Realty. 954-263-7129. 1-27 POMPANO LEISUREVILLE 55+ ---1/1 No Land Lease. Totally Upgraded. New Appliances New A/C. Movein Condition. Pet Allowed. FREE Golf 2 Pools. Furniture Optional. Bob 203-430-0235. 2-17 FT LAUD BAYVIEW WATERFRONT Gorgeous 2/2 Furnished Completely Remodeled. Over 1400 Sq Ft. Boat Parade Everyday! Dockage Available. Move Right In. Colleen Majeski Balistreri Realty. 754-235-1208. 1-27 LEISUREVILLE 2/2 FURNISHED!! Immaculate Condition. Priced For Immediate Sale $25,900.. Joe Ryan Broker-6389656. 1-27 POMPANO DIRECT WATER CONDOS Magni cent 2007 sf, 3/2.5 $339,900. Estate Sale 1430 sf, 2/2 $259,900. Others Available. Call Walt 954-461-1012, Blacksmith Realty. 1-27 SUPERB DIRECT INTRACOASTAL VIEW 2/2 Updated Condo. Low Maintenance. No Realtors Please. 954-304-4518 J Peasley / Better Homes & Garden RE. 2-3 LAUDERDALE BY THE SEA Furnished 1/1.5 Condo $115,000. Heated Pool. Ocean Access. On Canal. 1481 S Ocean Blvd. Apt 228. Call 586549-5223. 2-3CONDOS FOR RENTPOMPANO DIRECT WATER ANNUAL RENTAL: 2/2, 1438 sf, $1,600/Mo. Call Walt 954461-1012. Others Available. Blacksmith Realty. 1-27 LAUDERDALE BY THE SEAAcross From Beach. Near Sea Watch. 1 Bedroom Den 2 Baths. Pool, W/D In Unit. $1175 Per Mo. Yrly. 1st Last Sec. Or Seasonal 5 Mo min. $1595/Mo. No Smoking. Call 954-942-5642. 1-20 DEERFIELD BEACH Waterfront Furnished 2/2, Huge Balcony. Awesome View! Heated Pool, Cable, Covered Parking. No Pets Or Realtors. Good Credit Required. Annual $1150. Also NON Waterfront Annual. 2/2 $800 $825. Call 631-885-3342. 2-3 WALK TO BEACH? GOT BOAT? Nicest 1/1 In NE Pompano. Annual, Unfurnished $925 Month. Call 954-614-8428. 1-27 POMPANO WATERFRONTIsland Club 2/2 Furnished With Private Dock. Gated Community. $1300 Month Yearly. Susan 954-732-2038 Mirsky Realty. 2-3APTS FOR RENTDEERFIELD/POMPANO BEACH 1 BR & 2 BR APTS FOR RENT. Remodeled, Paint, Tile, Etc. W & D On Site. Pool. Pet Friendly. Call George 954809-5030. 2-10 POMPANO MCNAB ROAD & NE 18 AVENUE 1 & 2 Bedrooms Furnished/ Unfurnished. $675 $950 And Up. Pool, Tile Floors. Central A/C. 954-610-2327. 1-27 POMPANO GARDENS $795 1/1 $200 Deposit. Nice Area Minutes To Beach Pet OK. Please Call 954-515-2554. 2-17 POMPANO BEACH 1/1 NW $650 2/1 $750 SW 1/1 $725 2/1 $925 NE 1/1 $675 2/1 NE $950 TH 2/1.5 $1095 All FREE Water. Rent + $70 MovU-In. 954-781-6299. 1-27 POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 Bedroom From $495. Easy Movein. 1/2 OFF DEPOSIT. Remodeled. Great Location. 954-783-1088 For More Info. 3-9 STUDIOS EFFICIENCIESDEERFIELD BEACH A1A Live at the beach off season. Ef ciencies available for $500 Weekly, pay as you go, no deposit or security, cable, pool, laundry, wireless. Ocean Villa 954-427-4608. 1-27OUTDOOR STORAGEDEERFIELD BEACH OUTDOOR STORAGE For Boats, RVs, Commercial Vehicles & More. Call Chris At 954-520-1777. 2-3COMMERCIAL FOR RENT-SALEPOMPANO COMMERCIAL OFFICE Spaces Available. Ranging From As Low As $500 To $700 Depending On Square Footage. Please Call Darci At 954-7833723. 1-27 DEERFIELD BEACH Retail Of ce Warehouse 700 Sq Ft With Loft. A/C, Bathroom. $575 Per Month. Call For More Info 561-654-1331 Or 561-9985681. 2-10 GARAGE SALESSEA HAVEN CONDO 2731 NE 14 St. Causeway Pompano Beach. Sat. Jan 28 8am1pm. Linens, Jewelry, Books, Lamps, Baskets, Furniture, Pots & Pans, Dishes & Much More. 1-27 MULTI FAMILY TAG SALE!! 9am 2pm Saturday. 299 N Riverside Drive Pompano. Furniture, Electronics, Clothing, Household Items & Much More. 1-27 FURNITUREBEDSETS King $180 Queen $130 Full $110 Twin $90. 5 Pc. Bedroom Set $399. Frames $39. 954-465-6498. 2-10 LIGHTHOUSE POINT OWNER RELOCATING. Living Room, Bedroom, Dining Room, Sofabeds. Entire Contents. Like Brand New. Buy All Or Part. Offers Accepted. 718-605-9835. 2-3MUSICAL INSTRUMENTSPIANO FOR SALE PERFECT CONDITION. POMPANO BEACH. PLEASE CALL 954-601-7791. 1-27 Vintage Rogers 3 piece drum set, snare, mounted tom and bass drum. $300 obo. 954-647-0700 2/3MISCELLANEOUSWANTED BUYING Old Books, Dolls, Crystal, Sterlingware, Porcelain, Estate Goods, AND MANY MANY OTHER ITEMS. 754-244-3047 Ft Lauderdale. 2-17

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28 The Pelican Friday, January 27, 2012 Capt. RJ Boyle is an experienced angler in South Florida. His studio is located in Lighthouse Point. Call 954-420-5001. Making great shing memories is all about the right baitRJ Boyle RJ BOYLE STUDIOSThe blackfin tunas have been solid out off our coast for about three weeks. Anglers keep coming into the shop wondering how to catch those tunas. I was actually fishing with my daughter three weeks ago, about a mile off of Boca Raton, when we got into the tunas. We had the right lure to catch them, so we put two out on top about a hundred yards behind the boat. Both rods continued to bend over for the next hour and we proceeded to catch 23 blackfin tunas, each up to 12 pounds. But we couldnt help but notice the three boats next to us struggling just to get a bite. They kept getting closer and closer to try and see what we were using for bait. I could tell that all three boats were pulling ballyhoos behind them. Later that afternoon at the shop, one of my friends on the boat next to me came in and asked me what we were using. When I showed him he couldnt believe it. We were using a three-inch purple and red feather with no bait, just a hook. If you see baby flying fish getting airborne around your boat then scale the size of your baits down to match. Find out what those tunas are feeding on and then you can pick your bait. We have spent tons of time fishing the reefs out here and we have an idea of what to troll at different times of the year. Stop by the shop so we can clue you in. Get tightVOTE ON JAN. 31

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The Pelican 29 Friday, January 27, 2012 campus chaplain. Our senior pastor is Mark Luttio. Amy Cumming, has a daughter, Stephanie in the tenth grade and she says, Stephanie is very happy in this school and doing well. Were Catholic, not Lutheran, but I have never felt uncomfortable or unwelcome. Loren ticked off the reasons parents and children choose this school. Its academically excellent with a low student to teacher ratio. We offer advanced placement classes and have a dual enrollment program with Florida Atlantic University. Were proud to have a high parent involvement with staff and teachers who are certi ed, highly skilled and experienced. Kim Danielson will testify to parent involvement, saying, I often volunteer in the school so Im exposed to the teachers and I see how well they relate academically and socially with the students. They challenge the children and thats important. My son Trace is a second grader and daughter, Skyler is in the seventh grade. Theyre doing well. Were thrilled with the athletics program which gives them a fun outlet and helps them focus on class work later. It pleases me that Zion still offers a good exposure to the arts. Zion Lutheran Christian School also offers Spanish, Italian, French, Mandarin, Japanese and Portuguese. According to Loren, by graduation, every student will have had three years of language and science, four years of math and English and be fully prepared for college. Asked about tuition, Loren claims the school is very competitive. The school accepts government programs such as VPK and Family Central which are state funded, preschool programs. Government assisted programs such as Step Up and McKay are available for lower levels through high school. A $1,000 tuition discount is given to all students with proof of a church af liation, be it a Catholic Church, Synagogue, or other. Students come as from far as Delray on the north to Plantation on the south. Transportation can be arranged. During this interview several staff members passed by and offered a few comments. Chief Operating Of cer, Frank Strey, said, I like to have both students and administration on the cutting edge of technology, and they are. This is where the money is spent because this is the future of education. Principal Jayne Cunningham said, Were ahead of the curve with outstanding curriculum. We go the extra mile for our students. We are not test driven; we are academic driven. George Theodore, history teacher, has been on staff six years. His comment, Zion Luthern Christian School is a great environment for a teacher. Its family oriented and stresses Christian values. Eleventh grader, Caitlin Huiting has been a student at Zion Lutheran since the rst grade. She says, Every year things change for the better. It helps a lot to have an iPad. After graduation she hopes to go to college and major in sports management and physiology. Im a golfer. Sure, Id like to be a pro, but if not, I want to be part of the sports world. For more information, call 954-421-3146 or visit the web site at www.zion-luthern.org. Zion LionsContinued from page 8Students here have no fear of lions. Zion team spirit gets a big boost from its cheer leading squad.

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30 The Pelican Friday, January 27, 2012 freshman year. Its been my goal and dream. He also applied to the U.S. Naval Academy but through it all, his heart was set on the Army. I like the challenge in life. Its not about me, its always about the team, the squad . its always about the group. Its also a moment very few will ever experience. Along with involvement in student government or other extracurricular activities, West Point requires applicants to excel athletically and academically especially in calculus, trigonometry and physics. Along with his 4.5 GPA, Owen plays on the football team and serves as senior class vice president. He said hes not sure what his major will be but hes leaning towards something involving math or engineering. Prospective cadets must also be nominated by a member of Congress or the vice president. Owens nomination letters came from U.S. Senator Marco Rubio and U.S. Rep. Allen West. Owens main extracurricular activity is as a member of Cardinal Gibbons wrestling team, named state champs in 2011. Frank Pettineo, Owens coach, said the attitude he has displayed on the wrestling mat makes him perfectly suited for the military. Hes a strong athlete but regardless of whether he starts or doesnt start, he does what he needs to do for the team. Im an ex-marine who likes that particular attitude. Pettineo said that although Owen wasnt a starter last year, he still showed up to practice everyday to help his teammates prepare for their next match. It takes a lot for a kid to do that. Thats what the military looks for guys who are going to do whats best for the group. Owen got his rst up-close look at West Point, located in New York, last June. I loved it. It was really beautiful. Its a lot different than down here in South Florida. I like the change. Ric Green, president/ CEO of the Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, is a friend of Owens father, Tim, and has watched him grow up, watched him strive to get accepted into West Point. It couldnt have happened to a better kid. Owen reports to West Point July 2, a little over a month after graduating high school. Maria says the family has one more trip planned before seeing him off. [I just looked] at ights to Costa Rica to go shing one last time, she said. Asked if he was nervous, Owen said, Not yet. Im sure I will be, but not yet. West PointContinued from page 1

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The Pelican 31 Friday, January 27, 2012 Advertise with The Pelican Although his business is leverage buyouts which means buying and selling companies, Ben Smith, 38, the owner of the two Lighthouse Inns, 3305 SE 5 St. and 3208 NE 11 St., Pompano Beach since 2008 says, These two assisted living facilities are keepers. Im attached to the residents and would feel like I abandoned them if I sold the Inns. My aunt, Sue Beall, is the very capable administrator of both residences and Suzi Mautner is our director of marketing.These two people are my life savers. Mautner, who is a seasoned executive in this eld, was asked how these Inns differ from other rental assisted living residences. She replied, We do all of the services one expects. The difference is in the exceptionally caring staff. Were intimate residences with a capacity of 33 in Lighthouse Inn South and 43 in Lighthouse Inn North. Were small enough to give personal attention. The residents all know each other and have concerns for each other the way family members do for one another. Continuing, she adds, Our case manager/social worker applies for nancial assistance for new residents wherever it is indicated. Many of our residents are receiving bene ts from the government and VA programs. Until they moved in, they never realized they were entitled to them. This assistance helps them relax and forget their worries about being able to maintain themselves nancially. A licensed therapist attends to individual and group therapy when the need exists. Both facilities have activity directors who keep residents busy with walks to the ocean, bingo, card games, jewelry making, painting and other crafts. Theres an exercise class every morning. Ivan Lozada has lived at Lighthouse Inn South for four years. I like the staff. They take good care of my room andme. The food is good and always fresh. Ribs, chicken and meat loaf are my favorites. They bake the cakes and pies right here too, but butter pecan ice cream is still my favorite. I often walk the beach with my friends and I like bingo. Cindy Ryan, thinks these Inns as life savers. My dad lived at Lighthouse Inn, North for six years. I was impressed with the quality of care he received. When my husband needed assisted living, I moved them both to the South Inn. And I, unexpectedly ended up here too. They are very good to us. My husband needs constant attention and it is provided by willing and pleasant staff. These two residences allow small pets. Mautner says, if the resident can care for them. Our staff assists residents with bathing, dressing and grooming, medical management, housekeeping and personal laundry service. Physical and occupational therapy, doctor visits and podiatrists are available on site. We arrange for transportation for off site visits to dentists, doctors and other activities. Family and friends are welcome visitors from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m.A Seaside Assisted Living ResidenceFinancial Assistance available through Government and VA Programs Suzi Mautner director of marketing and Ben Smith, owner.Call Suzi 561-667-0678ALF Lic#7127 The Lighthouse Inn

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32 The Pelican Friday, January 27, 2012