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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00090900/00283
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Title: Pompano Pelican
Uniform Title: Pompano Pelican
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: Pompano Pelican
Place of Publication: Pompano Beach
Publication Date: 01-20-2012
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Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Pompano Beach
Coordinates: 26.234722 x -80.125556 ( Place of Publication )
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
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System ID: UF00090900:00283

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Friday, January 20, 2012 Vol. XX, Issue 3 Call 954-783-8700 to Advertise Email: siren2415@gmail.com Pompano Beach • Deer eld Beach • Lighthouse Point • Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Wilton Manors • Oakland Park • Hillsboro Beach • The Galt • Palm Aire The P e l i c a n Pelican Visit us online at www.pompanopelican.com T h e The P e l i c a n Pelican Giant meet and greet is planned for Unity in the Community DayBy Judy VikPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach – Mark the calendar and save the date Saturday, Feb. 4. That’s when an inaugural celebration, “Unity in the Community Pompano Beach,” takes place from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Pompano Community Park, 2001 NE 10 St., next to the amphitheater. “The goal is to foster unity among various multi-cultural and religious groups in Pompano Beach,” said Rev. William Clark, president of the volunteer board planning the event.Cast Your Vote on Election Day, Jan. 31 See UNITY on page 11 Lysengen gets big nancial boost from one backerBy Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFLighthouse Point City commission candidate Becky Lysengen has raised more than $12,000 in campaign funding since the last reporting period, making her the ‘richest’ contender for one of two commission seats. The largest chunk of new money, $5,000, came from 10 travel-related/timeshare companies all operating out of 2419 E. Commercial Boulevard in Fort Lauderdale and owned by LHP resident James Verrillo. Each company donated $500, the maximum allowed by law. Lysengen said those checks came to her campaign through a third party See LYSENGEN on page 3 District 1 Commissioner Joe Miller stands by as pier buildings are demolished. The structures on Deer eld’s International Fishing Pier were demolished this week to make way for a new restaurant, bait shop and restrooms. Community Development Agency Manager Keven Klopp called it a “bittersweet moment” as the 50-yearold buildings were trashed in just a few minutes. The pier remains open for shermen and sightseers via a temporary bait shop entrance. All systems there are not in place however, so for a few days admission to the pier will be free.Photo courtesy of City of Deer eld BeachFamiliar landmarks hit the dust in Deer eld Beach Sonny Ogden will show her giant Tridacna gigas she discovered while living in the Marshall Islands. The shell and its story will be at the Broward Shell Show Saturday, Jan. 21, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Sunday, Jan. 22, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The center is at 1801 NE 6 Street. See story on page 2.By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach Willie Heath was 22 when Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was assassinated in 1968. And almost 45 years after the civil rights icon was cut down, she still vividly remembers the sorrow and MLK event focuses on faith, progress, educationSee MLK on page 4

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2 The PelicanFriday, January 20, 2012 SightingsA local calendar for events, meetings and more in North Broward County. Please email calendar items to siren2415@gmail. com or fax to 954-783-0093. SPECIAL TO THE PELICANPompano Beach A clam shell weighing 328 pounds and brought here from the waters of the Kwajalein Atoll will be among the exhibits at the Broward Shell Show this weekend, Jan. 21 to 22 at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Giant Tridacna gigas is star of Broward Shell ShowPompano Beach. The shell, a rst-place winner in last year’s show, was discovered by Sonny Ogden in 1967 when she was living in the Marshall Islands. Kwajalein is the world’s largest coral atoll, 97 islands surrounded by 2,175 square kilometers of water. Squarely in the middle of the South Paci c, it is 2,136 miles from Hawaii, 2,300 miles from New Guinea and 2,300 miles from Tokyo. For the Ogden’s, who loved to sh, snorkel, sail and dive, it was paradise. Ogden had learned that a giant clam (Tridacna gigas) was living on one of the coral heads in a nearby lagoon and she planned to photograph it while on a dive trip. When she and her party arrived at the coral head, however, they found the shell lying on its side, dead. Although greatly disappointed, Ogden decided to bring the shell home. It was located in 20 feet of water so she and her fellow divers lifted the shell to the surface using air bags. It took four people to bring shell aboard the boat. Ogden nicknamed her giant nd, Killer Clam. In 1969, when her family moved back to the USA, Sonny’s enormous clam, over three feet wide and two feet high, was packed in a crate and shipped back with their belongings to the US where they settled in Pompano Beach. She rst exhibited Killer Clam at the 2011 Broward Shell Show, winning rst prize in the Scienti c SelfCollected category. The shell is now the Broward Shell Show mascot and will be exhibited again this year. The show is open to the public. Admission and parking are free. Show hours are Saturday, Jan. 21, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Sunday, Jan. 22, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. For more information, call Nancy Galdo, 305-467-4412.See SIGHTINGS on page 41-20 – The Oakland Park Friends of the Library will have a book sale from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Oakland Park Library, 1298 NE 37th Street. Proceeds will benefit the library. 954-630-4370. 1-20 – The City of Wilton Manors will be showing Dolphin Tale at 7 p.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, as part of Movie in the Park. Dolphin Tale, rated PG, is the story of a boy who befriends a dolphin who has lost its tail. 954390-2130.

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The Pelican 3 Friday, January 20, 2012 The Pelican 954-783-8700 who is a “big supporter. I needed to get my rst mailer out early for absentee voters,” Lysengen said. “Unfortunately, I am hearing rumors that I would help him get timeshares in the city. And no way has he funded my entire campaign.” Attempts to reach Verrillo were unsuccessful. His son Jerry said the companies own hotels and a cruise ship and the rms are booking agents. He would not comment on his father’s political contributions. Contributions from Lysengen’s big backer made her the top fundraiser in this reporting cycle which ended Jan. 6. Since then, she said, she has raised another $2,000. Her current report re ects only $438 in expenditures. Figures for printing and mailings will be included in the next report, Lysengen said this week, because her printer gave her credit until the total order is complete. Her opponent, incumbent Susie Gordon brought in another $2,750 for a total of $6,250 in contributions. County Commissioner Chip LaMarca, Hillsboro Beach Vice Mayor Dan Dodge and LHP Chamber of Commerce founder Michele Greene are LysengenContinued from page 1By Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFWilton Manors – Nearly all of Wilton Manors’ strip malls and mixed-use developments have at least one or two empty storefronts and Wilton Park, a mixed-use development at Wilton Drive and Northeast 21 Court with 145 units and 19,000 sq. ft. of commercial space, sits almost completely empty. But despite the economic downturn, developers and businesses are still investing in the city. Melissa Kaushner, the newly-minted owner of Menchie’s, a frozen yogurt shop, said she was attracted to the city because of its neighborhood feel. “I loved Despite downturn and some failures, investors stay in Wilton Manors the community . I’m thrilled to be here. Every night is a better night.” Menchie’s is the newest of three businesses at Five Points, on Wilton Drive, Dixie Highway and Northeast 26 Street. The other two, Lola’s Healthy Pet Caf and Chopsticks, a Chinese restaurant, both opened within the last few months. Down the street on Dixie Highway, Wilton’s Manor Doggie Daycare also counts itself as a recent addition to the city’s business community. The newest and biggest addition is Wilton’s Bier Garden, on Wilton Drive. Bier Garden’s 5,000 square foot restaurant with outside dining, was built from the ground zSee WILTON MANORS on page 24among her donors. The other commission seat is being sought by incumbent Tom Hasis who is nancing his own campaign with a bank account so far of $4,000, and his challenger Earl Maucker who has raised $2,000. Among his supporters is land planning attorney Susan Motley, who also contributed to Lysengen’s campaign. On Jan. 31, voters in Lighthouse Point will elect two commissioners. Registered Republicans will vote for a presidential primary candidate in addition to the commission vote.

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4 The PelicanFriday, January 20, 2012 discontentment she felt that day. [I thought] it was the end of everything that could be, not knowing it was only the beginning.” On Jan. 16, the day after the 83rd anniversary of King’s birthday, public of cials, Heath and hundreds of her fellow Pompano Beach residents turned out for the city’s 2012 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. celebration at Ely High School. Among the speakers and performers who were a part of the event, a common theme resounded: faith, courage and service to others. “People of faith are the pillars of our society. [King’s] convictions came from his faith. It’s what he stood for. It’s what he lived for. It’s what he died for,” said Broward Sheriff Al Lamberti. “How many of us wait around to be served? When you leave, ask yourself, ‘What are you doing to serve others?’” William C. McCormick, Jr., former president of the Fort Lauderdale branch of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, echoed Lamberti, saying no one should “think society owes us something.” McCormick said individuals who don’t strive to illuminate their own lives risk setting back the progress others have made. “Our destinies are interwoven . A quality education is the only equalizer,” said McCormick, who highlighted Ely’s recent A grade from the State of Florida. McCormick said he and Ely’s principal, Karlton Johnson, attended Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University together and competed to see who would do better athletically and educationally. “I see his works are paying off here,” said McCormick. He also read a ctional telegram from King, saying that the shackles of Jim Crow have been removed but replaced by the shackles of poor economic and educational progress. The U.S. Department of Labor estimates that 15.2 percent of the African MLKContinued from page 1American workforce is unemployed compared to 7.2 percent of their white counterparts. And, according to the U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistics, African Americans comprise 39.4 percent of the prison population but, according to the 2010 Census, only 12.6 percent of the total population. In an interview with The Pelican Commissioner Woodrow Poitier said the city was working on redeveloping northwest Pompano by bringing in new businesses and “jobs for the community” so that the area is “a destination, not just a pass through.” Asked how she thought the African American community could improve its situation, Heath responded, “With God’s help . without God, we can’t do anything.” Calvin Holloway, 4, of Young Minds of Greatness, performs a rap song for attendees at Pompano’s Martin Luther King, Jr. event on Jan. 16. [Photo by Michael d’Oliveira] SightingsContinued from page 2 1-21 – The Model Railroad Flea Market and Swap Meet will take place from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Westside Park Recreation Center, 445 SW 2nd street, Deer eld Beach. 954-4488935 or 954-260-7013. 1-21 – Pony rides will be available at Sand & Spurs Equestrian Park, 1600 NE 5th Avenue from 9 to 11:30 a.m. Admission is free and rides cost $3. Public welcome. 954786-4507. 1-21 to 22 – The 3rd Annual Island City Open will take place at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive. The tournament is open to men and women in the singles, doubles and mixed doubles See SIGHTINGS on page 9

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The Pelican 5 Friday, January 20, 2012 By Anne SirenPELICAN STAFF“Nobody can know your body as well as you,” says Dr. Eugenio L. Menendez, a Pompano Beach physician. Behind this statement lies much of Dr. Menendez’s medical philosophy. He employs active listening when he meets his patients. He observes each patient’s physical movements and complaints. Yet he is surrounded with computer screens and the latest technology in his spacious of ce. His slogan is “21st Century Medicine practiced the Old-fashioned Way.” And that is part of the main difference between an M.D. and a D.O. Dr. Menendez explains, “A doctor with an D.O. has all the training of an M.D. plus the additional skills to treat the body holistically. Observing and examining the body structure gives me more information in my diagnosis. This is a bene t to the patient.” Osteopathic medicine involves the manipulation of muscles and bones to create a healthier body. Dr. Menendez teaches his patients to understand the messages of speci c pain. When the heart is under stress, through its nerves, it sends messages through tingling and numbness in the left hand. The gall bladder’s messages are emitted to the right shoulder blade where pain can become intense. These are strong alerts to call the doctor. Patients here will share their concerns about speci c pain and other issues with Dr. Menendez, and in some cases may nd better health through diet and a prescribed exercise. “The word ‘physician’ means teacher,” says Dr. Menendez, “so I teach patients about what’s going on in their bodies. Through this method I can nd and prevent disease.” Obesity is considered a disease by Dr. Menendez, and overeating, he sees as an addiction. And as he saw more and more overweight problems in his of ce, he began to write down his concepts and ideas about the disease. Now Dr. Menendez offers a medically-supervised weight loss program and preventative health screening with state-of-the-art ultrasound equipment in the of ce. Dr. Menendez’s book, “The People’s Diet,” is a companion with a nutritious diet for his patients to use, lose weight and keep the pounds off. “It is geared to improve a healthier heart, lose inches around the waist and improve tolerance for exercise,” he says.Staff additionThe practice is proud to announce that Dr. Charles Srour, Board-Certi ed Chiropractic Physician of Pro Healthcare, is now accepting appointments at Pompano Beach Internal Medicine. Dr. Srour diagnoses and treats a variety of injuries including many sports-related conditions. Some of the injuries he has had success treating include whiplash, headaches, back pain, sciatica, shoulder pain, tennis elbow, carpal tunnel syndrome, knee and ankle pain. Over the past ten years, he has treated many professional athletes including players from the Miami Dolphins, Florida Marlins and Florida Panthers. He has also worked on various Hollywood movie sets working with actors and stunt men. Please call 954-946-7171 to reach Dr. Srour’s staff to schedule an appointment.Dr. Menendez and staff offer professional medical services The Team Dr. Eugenio Menendez, Leeann Lluberes, Sonaly DeAlmeida, Angela La Torre and Eugenio Menendez, Sr. [Staff photo]

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6 The PelicanFriday, January 20, 2012 Deer eld Beach, Pompano Beach, Lighthouse Point, LauderdaleBy-The-Sea, Wilton Manors and Oakland ParkWilton Manors • Oakland Park • Hillsboro Beach The Pompano Pelican is published weekly on FridaysStreet Address: 1500-A E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, FL 33060 Telephone: 954-783-8700 • Fax: 954-783-0093Letters to the Editor are encouraged and accepted for print if signed, although a writer’s name will be withheld on request; letters must also include a daytime telephone number. Advertising rates are available upon request. Subscription rate is $31.80 including tax for one year’s delivery in Greater Pompano Beach; $95.40/per year including tax for others in the United States; call 954-783-8700 for rates abroad. The Pelican is a nonpartisan newspaper and reserves the right to decline advertising. Copyright 2011. Reproduction of this publication in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission of the publisher. The Pelican is a member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, Deer eld Beach Chamber and the LBTS Chamber. The Pelican is a state certi ed woman-owned minority business. The Pelican is delivered to businesses, libraries, schools, of ces, hospitals, news racks and single family homes. All advertising and copy is published at the sole discretion of the publisher. We welcome your critiques and ideas concerning this publication. Anne Siren, publisherExecutive Assistant: Mary Hudson Finance: Peter Pritchard Graphics: Rachel Ramirez Windsheimer and Adriana Bonilla Bookkeeper: John White Classi eds: Fran Shelby Contributing Writers: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Judy Wilson, Malcolm McClintock, Judy Vik, Mike d’Oliveira Account Executives: Paul Shroads, Carolyn Mann, Bill Heaton, Bill Fox ESTABLISHED 1993 • Volume XX, Issue 3 Founding Editor and PublisherAnne Hanby Siren Letters & OpinionsLysengen and Maucker will bring new eyes to LHP CommissionEven in Lighthouse Point, considered a model city by some, there is room for improvement. It is this concept that struck The Pelican’s editorial board as it deliberated this recommendation for the Jan. 31 city commission election. Each of the four candidates possess outstanding quali cations and, if elected, will serve the community well. Tom Hasis and Susie Gordon have been highly productive for years. But it may be time for a change. Challengers Earl Maucker and Becky Lysengen have more ideas for the future than incumbents Tom Hasis and Susie Gordon. Maucker speaks about the possibility of nding new ways to pay for dredging canals, a feature of the city that keeps real estate values high. He says new technology is needed quickly in order to bring the city’s cherished library up to speed and believes grants are available to help pay for that. He wants the city to be pro-active in attracting businesses to the somewhat blighted US 1 strip, an area that has been neglected for years. Although burying utility lines is expensive, Maucker believes there may be grant dollars to create a plan for the at-risk areas. In his brief stint on the commission, Maucker met with each of the department heads, so has handled that learning curve. His knowledge of business practices is another asset. And nally, if he could successfully manage a newsroom, as he did for many years, he can be an effective leader on the commission. Becky Lysengen brings many of the same qualities to the campaign: experience in grant funding, an understanding of new technology with the added plus that she sees the opportunities offered by social networking. She also has ideas for using the city’s playing elds more effectively and hosting moneymaking youth tournaments. We particularly like the fact that after losing her rst election attempt, Lysengen did not retreat. Already involved in kids’ sports, she added another component to the city’s image, a cultural one, and with her committee is bringing in movies and music for families to enjoy. She also went to work on two of the city’s major events, Keeper’s Days and LHP A’glow. Her place of residence is another plus. Lysengen lives north of Sample Road where less tax dollars have been spent in the past. It’s a grievance for those living there and one she would address. Lysengen’s youth is a huge asset. She exudes vitality. And her exposure every day to the needs of young families would give the board a balance it does not have currently. Both Lysengen and Maucker believe commissioners should limit their public service and after a few terms in of ce make way so other interested citizens can do his or her part. In a town with so much available talent, we agree. Mark Brown has edge over his opponent in the Jan. 31 race for Seat 3 in Lauderdale-By-The-SeaCompared to the division and rancor seen on the dais a few years ago, the commission is functioning smoothly and with civility now. Brown says he’s running to keep things moving forward. We believe his experience as a journalist and as chief of staff for two members of Congress will serve him well as a town commissioner. He appears able to weigh both sides of an issue and come to a conclusion based on what’s best for the town and its taxpayers. Brown says he will keep an eye on dollars spent, eliminate unnecessary, wasteful spending and try to provide the town with the best quality service at the lowest cost. As the volunteer editor of a local newspaper, he proposed the ethics ordinance the commission passed. He also championed a personal code of conduct for commissioners, passed by the commission after the last election. If elected, Brown says the rst thing he will do is sign the voluntary code of personal conduct. It commits him to treat people with respect and conduct himself properly. He says he will set the kind of example people expect or want out of their elected of cials. “If your gut says that doesn’t sound right . you just don’t do it. Even if ethics is not a pressing issue at this time, people are never going to get con dent in government until of cials, to a person, set the kind of example that will restore their faith in government,” he said in an interview with The Pelican editorial board. We agree with his views and believe all town residents and businesses will be well served by Brown. Brown’s opponent, Edmund Malkoon, 36, is a lifelong resident of the town. He has volunteered at many community events and served on the town’s now defunct master plan steering committee and on the board of his neighborhood Bel-Air Civic Association. He is a realtor and insurance agent. We believe Brown’s more extensive resume and knowledge of how things work in government will bring more to the commission.Choice for LHP voters is change versus the continuumBy Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFLighthouse Point – In practically perfect Lighthouse Point, the issue in this campaign for two city commission seats is whether or not change would be an improvement. The contest for Seat 1 is between incumbent Tom Hasis who has been a commissioner for 22 years and retired newspaper executive Earl Maucker; and for Seat 3, Susie Gordon, a commission veteran of 12 years and teacher Becky Lysengen. All four express a desire for public service and deep feelings for the community. Each of them, when the question was posed “Will there be a time when merging police and re services with BSO would be an option?,” answered with a resounding “no.” Hasis 65, is a local attorney, who grew up in the city working in the family restaurant, Cap’s Place, where he is now an owner. He has been active in the Broward League of Cities and Florida League of Cities for most of his years on the commission, serves as a trustee of the Municipal Insurance Trust and was on the South Florida Regional Planning Council. He was a director of the Pompano Chamber, is a member of the Exchange Club and on the Broward Historical Commission. He holds his law degree from the University of Florida and is single. Here’s what the candidates say in Lighthouse PointSee LHP Candidates on page 7 Mark Brown Becky Lysengen Earl Maucker

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The Pelican 7 Friday, January 20, 2012 Advertise with The Pelican 954.783.8700 His opponent, Maucker, 64, retired after 30 years as editor of the Sun-Sentinel newspaper and now owns Maucker Media Consultants. He serves on the LHP planning and zoning board, on the board of the United Way and is a member of the Exchange Club. A graduate of Leadership Broward, he was chosen Leader of the Year in 2006. Maucker moved to LHP in 1999 and is married with two sons. He was chosen by the commission last year to serve out the term of Chip LaMarca who was elected to the county commission. He is a veteran of the U.S. Air Force. He received his degree in journalism at Southern Illinois University. Gordon, 58, came to LHP in 1978, married and raised ve children. She presents a long list of civic involvements including leadership positions with the Friends of the LHP Library, LHP Historical Committee, Children’s Home Society, American Cancer Society, Norcrest Elementary School Advisory Council and First Presbyterian Church. She is currently president of the city commission and has campaigned over the years for a number of successful Republican candidates. Her challenger, Becky Lysengen, 33, grew up in Lighthouse Point and is raising her family here. She is a fth-grade teacher at Norcrest Elementary School and chair of the school’s SAT committee. Lysengen ran unsuccessfully for the commission last year. After the election she organized the LHP Cultural Arts Committee which now sponsors family movie nights, the Fourth of July celebration, band concerts and, still to come this year, an appearance of the Florida Youth Orchestra. She is a member of Soroptimist Club, the Keeper’s Days Committee, Lighthouse A’glow and is a soccer coach. She holds degrees from the University of Florida and Florida Atlantic University. The Pelican editorial board met with all four candidates and posed these questions. Does the town shuttle provide a signi cant bene t and should public funds continue to be used for so few riders? Hasis -“I was an early proponent of the shuttle. Without it, senior citizens were trapped in their homes. The route needs expanding, and perhaps the bus could be put in service for community events like the Taste of LHP, but we don’t need to serve a lot of people to be doing the right thing. That is what government is all about.” Maucker “The city needs to market it more. It is a worthwhile and essential service.”Gordon -“I’d like to see it continue. I don’t know why there are not more riders. I thought everyone would jump on it. I’d like to see the route posted on the outside of the bus.”Lysengen “I am a big supporter of the shuttle and we need to communicate more about this service, maybe with a community letter to get that information out to the condominiums.” The city is becoming younger demographically. Will there be enough athletic elds to support this generation? Any thoughts on changes in the recreation programs? Hasis “We may have to adjust the schedulesmore hours rather than more space. The recreation programs are well regarded and our tennis facility gets raves. If people want something new, we’ll provide it.” Maucker -“We are limited on space so we need to use it effectively… develop new programs that would do that. But I hear nothing but good things about our recreation program.” Gordon “I can’t see us nding more property but there are ways to do things, like the $2,000 I found in the travel budget for our Halloween party. I would like to see the hours of the summer program extended for working parents from 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.” Lysengen -“We should look at the times elds are not in use. There are ways to play soccer on short elds which would be a more ef cient use of space. We could host tournaments which would bring in money. Also, our fees are low. Outsiders should be charged more to play here.” What about the library? What are your thoughts on expanding services there? Hasis “We need access to cyberspace. We’ll evolve. We should keep our ear to the ground to best serve the residents.” Maucker“We must continue to get digitized and move very quickly into the 22nd Century. There are grants around for this. The new librarian has to be a futurist.” Gordon -“The library is my baby. I still read books, but we need to tap into technology so patrons can rent books. That could be a revenue raiser. I would never support our library going into the county system.” Lysengen “I write grants and there are all sorts of literary grants available. We should get more Kindles. They save space. The library should be a lifelong learning center.” What can the city do to stimulate business on US 1? Hasis -“We should seek out the kind of businesses we’d like to see come here and offer nancial incentives. We should market the town showing our demographic. Personally, I’d like to see more restaurants and retail services.” Maucker “The city is not marketing itself successfully. It could be more proactive … needs to create a helpful environment for business.” Gordon “I butt heads on this one. When every building is occupied, then we can restrict signage again. I am okay with banner signs and neon. I voted for the blue signs Carpet Mills wanted. I am proud the Gordons bought a building here for their family insurance business. We went where we lived.” Lysengen“I hear there are problems in the building department. It may be worth the money to get our own department. We should market LHP via social networks – Twitter, Facebook and YouTube. I think businesses that appeal to youngsters would do well here.” Is it time to term-limit city commissioners? Hasis -“I am term limited every three years. It takes time to learn the issues, put a plan in place and carry it out. Change is not always positive.” Maucker -“Being a city commissioner should not be a lifelong occupation. I’m not for mandatory rules. People should limit themselves. I am looking at two terms. New life brings vibrancy (to a board).” Gordon -“Maybe it is; on the other hand, if everyone gets along and is doing a good job, why? The machine is going well and I have a direct connection to department heads. Let the voters decide.” Lysengen “There are talented people in the city. New faces force more civic activity and involvement. I think two terms are enough.” What particular expertise do you, or would you, bring to the dais? Hasis “My experience and knowledge of the city’s history and what works here.” Maucker “I have been immersed in local government all my life. I know I can be effective. I want to bring my spirit of service to the community. I know how to be an effective leader. I know budgets. I will be visible and accessible to the public.” Gordon “I have contact with state and county of cials. When I need to, I can reach out to them… I have a name and a number. I know ways to get things done.” Lysengen “I am a teacher. I can multitask. I do a lot with less money. At school I have come up with nancial solutions. I think about the long term effects of actions. I am also a business owner and understand customer service. I have energy. I get a lot done.” Gordon “Our infrastructure is 54 years oldthe seawall, canals, drainage – we need to keep up the maintenance. I am running because I like it (being a commissioner.) I enjoy being tapped to solve a problem. I have deep roots here. LHP adopted me. I want to give something back.” Lysengen “We need street lights and sidewalks particularly on the north end. Street closures might deter crime, but neighborhoods should decide that. We should plan for obsolescence, plan for underground utilities, keep taxes low, increase our property values. “I grew up here. I want to be a community leader and think about our future, how to protect and improve it.” LHP candidate interviewsContinued from page 6

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8 The PelicanFriday, January 20, 2012 Business matters The Pelican takes a look at local business owners. Call The Pelican to nd out how you can tell your story here because business matters. 954-783-8700. Let’s do some business!Do potential customers know of your existence?By Ted SmithMARKETING EXECUTIVEIn business, it seems ironic that the sector needing marketing the most is the most neglected. Owners of highpowered marketing agencies or public relations agencies fail to consider the small business sector a viable market in terms of pro tability. But equally, owners of small businesses shy away from agencies either because they are pre-occupied with staying open during the current economic crisis or distrust the consulting process. Marketing is not an exact science rather a discipline, and its unique virtue is inherent in its personalization Marketing begins with a sound foundation very much like a building does. Marketing starts with a check-up for businesses similar to your annual physical. So let’s get going. Pull out your rst business plan. If for some reason you never did a plan then you should do one now. This exercise will probably reap havoc, so put on your army boots rst. If you think it’s too late to write a plan now, I can promise you that it is an enlightening exercise. There is more to owning a business than just being the owner. See LET’S DO BUSINESS on page 18 James Gotzman, Jimmy Lindo, Luther Gray, Gary Lanham, owner of Real Estate Recovery, Spencer Jennings, Anthony Mas, Richard Rog owskiBy Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFOakland Park Spend ve minutes with Gary Lanham, and it is clear that this is a man with a new and powerful approach for people who want to buy and sell property today. Lanham, the creative owner of Real Estate Recovery, 3242 NE 12 Ave., Oakland Park is a licensed Realtor and broker with several additional designations. He is also a certi ed residential specialist, a certi ed international specialist and an E-Pro which means he is technologically knowledgeable with clients using the internet. Real Estate Recovery offers new technology power to buyers and sellers facing today’s real estate challengesHe has a staff of eight licensed Realtors and one broker assistant who is also a licensed real estate attorney in Florida and New York. “I have chosen a team that deals in numbers as I do, and my approach works well for us,” Lanham says. Our lawyer, Jeff Yunis is very important and reassuring to New York clients who are accustomed to a lawyer writing the contract. Three of my staff members speak English and Spanish. We’d love to add a quali ed speaker of Portuguese, Creole or French. We are huge in social media. Our Facebook business page brings us many clients from South America and New York who want a property in our paradise. We have Google click-through ads which are producing many listings and buyers. In fact, we have used technology for listing and buying campaigns.” He continues with an example. “Let’s say we have a New Yorker who wants to sell a Florida property. Our ad will show up whenever a prospective buyer checks the internet for available South Florida properties for sale. This campaign has brought buyers to us helping the seller maximize the nal sales amount. Our internet campaigns have made our See REAL ESTATE on page 23

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The Pelican 9 Friday, January 20, 2012 Advertise with The Pelican 954-783-8700 categories. The cost is $25 for singles and $30 per team. Entry fee includes a t-shirt, gift bag and barbecue. A portion of the proceeds will go to help fund the restoration and upkeep of the tennis courts. 954-390-2132. SightingsContinued from page 4 See SIGHTINGS on page 111-21 – The Oakland Park Historical Society is hosting its second annual Highwaymen Show from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Jaco Pastorius Community Center, 4000 N. Dixie Highway, Oakland Park. Admission is free. 1 -21 – There will be a park cleanup event at Exchange Club Park, 2800 NE 24 St., Pompano Beach, from 8 to 11 a.m. Gloves, trash bags and water will be provided for volunteers. The event is organized by the Recycling and Solid Waste Advisory Committee for Pompano Beach. 954-7864111. 1-22 – The South Florida Chamber Ensemble, SFCE, will present Mirror Images at 2 p.m. at Zion Lutheran, 959 SE 6th Ave., Deer eld Beach. The program will feature Farrenc, Fasch, Doppler, Vinee, and Chaminade. SFCE is made up of six musicians from the brass, woodwind, string and percussion families. 954-803-3762. 1-23 – Deer eld Beach Commissioner Bill Ganz and Police Chief Pete Sudler will hold a Dist. 4 crime watch meeting at Constitution Park, 2841 W. Hillsboro Blvd., at 7 p.m. All residents are invited to attend. 954-4804417. 1-23 – The Library Advocate General Barbara Correll will be at the Friends of the Century Plaza Library Annual Meeting, 1856A West Hillsboro Blvd, Deer eld Beach, at 2:45 p.m. She will be speaking about “What the Public Should Expect From Public Libraries, and the Role of Citizens Advocates.” Light refreshments will be served. 954-360-1330. 1-24 – The Benevolent Patriotic Order of DOES Drive 142 will hold a pancake breakfast from 9 a.m. to noon at the Elks lodge, 700 N.E. 10 St., Pompano Beach. Cost is $5 for adults and $2.50 for children. 954-725-5192 1-25 – The NE Focal Point 14th Annual Fashion Show will be held from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the Lighthouse Point Yacht & Racquet Club, 2701 NE 42 St. Tickets are $50. 954-4804460. 1-25 – The Wilton Drive Task Force will meet at 7 p.m. in the Emergency Operations Conference room at city hall, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. The Task Force was formed in 2010 to come up with recommendations regarding Wilton Drive.

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10 The PelicanFriday, January 20, 2012 Making a DifferencePhyllis J. Neuberger wants your suggestions about people who are making a difference. Call 954-783-8700. Philly/Jersey Shore reunionLighthouse Point Join fellow Philly and Jersey Shore friends at JC Wahoo’s Sports Bar on Jan. 28 at 6 p.m., 3110 N. Federal Highway, Lighthouse Point for a good time and a good bene t. Frankie “Fats” Montana, Philly’s #1 World Famous Banjo Player and his showmen start the evening and are followed by “The Human Percolator” at 9 p.m. On Sunday, Jan. 29 from 3 to 6 p.m., enjoy the Broward County Mummers, a Philly tradition. Tickets for each event are $5. Proceeds bene t the Wounded Warriors, a project to assist severely wounded U.S. militarymen and women. Call 954410-5536.Days of Capone recalled in history tourDeer eld Beach -The 53.3 acres that make up Deer eld Island Park in Deer eld Beach are full of history. In the early 1930s the land was labeled Capone Island after gangster Al Capone even though Capone himself never actually owned it. The area at that time was a peninsula, not an island. Find out more about the county park system’s true island park when it hosts an Intracoastal History Tour, from 10 to 11:30 a.m. on Sunday, Jan. 29. A boat shuttle to the island is provided. Participants should arrive at Sullivan Park dock by 9:30 a.m. Sullivan Park is on Riverview Road off Hillsboro Boulevard on the west side of the Intracoastal Waterway. Tickets are $5. Call 954-357-5100 BriefsBy Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFAnn Brummer is much more than that beautiful lady on the arm of Pompano Beach Vice Mayor, George Brummer. They’re a team, married for 63 years, with two children, six grandchildren and one great grand child. Ann, who has had her own career and still keeps a busy schedule, says, “We listen to each other, offer suggestions but in the end, we must make up our own minds and our own decisions.” Right now, she and her committee are focusing on making the second gala fundraiser, planned for March 31, a big success. “Last year, we gave four scholarships to graduating students who are pursuing a career in the arts. Each of our two high schools recommended the students and we were thrilled to present them with their checks. This year we hope to raise even more money at our gala so that we can give even more scholarships.” She continued. “Those of us who support the arts including music, Ann Brummer and team plan second gala fundraiser on March 31 for Herb Skolnick Cultural Arts Foundation This playful young couple, George and Ann Brummer [left] are dressed as Maurice Chevalier and GiGi for a costume party in the 70s with friends. Above George and Ann are on another outing. Strong proponents of theater and entertainment, Ann promises lots of fun at the upcoming fund raiser for the Herb Skolnick Foundation of the arts.dance, art and theater are devastated to see that in a bad economy, the arts always face the rst cuts. So we do what we can to help students in the arts. Our Gala tries to help ll that gap.” The self appointed Gala committee includes Suzan Fisher, Debbi Beach, Amy Harden, Cynthia Portier and Ann Brummer. The Gala event will include cocktails and dinner at the Oaks Club in Palm Aire. The music and entertainment will be provided by Pompano Beach High School. “Last year the Blanche Ely High School jazz band performed, and it was a delight,” Ann says. Additional entertainment came from the students at the Fort Lauderdale School of Ballet. They performed vignettes from the ballet classics. This year’s program promises to be very exciting with a musical variety from show tunes to opera. We want to make this spectacular evening affordable to many Pompano residents. (Last year’s tickets were $75. The Gala price for this year was not determined at press time.) Ann referred The Pelican to her husband to explain how it works. George said, “These women, volunteering to have a Gala to raise funds for the Herb Skolnick Cultural Arts Foundation, are a self appointed group. The actual Foundation committee which controls the funds in this foundation is the city commission. When we function as a foundation committee we must See GALA on page 18

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The Pelican 11 Friday, January 20, 2012 “Our plan is to provide a sense of camaraderie among all ethnic communities, races, religions and the ve distinct districts of Pompano Beach.” Admission is free, and the event will feature free food and drinks. DJ Jim Balistreri is managing stage entertainment. Performers include: Blanche Ely High School Jazz Band, Elvis Presley impersonator David Morin and dancers from the Polynesian Cultural Association. Also taking part are professional skateboarders from Rocketown, clowns, a facepainter and representatives from Swim with Mr. Blue, a swimming school. The Broward Sheriff’s Of ce will have a display, and there will be bounce houses for the youngsters. Businesses, cultural groups, religious organizations, civic and homeowners’ associations are invited to take part. Participants must bring their own 10 x 10-foot tent, sixfoot table and two chairs. No selling of articles or food will be allowed but materials can be displayed to promote businesses. No alcohol, tobacco or adult entertainment will be allowed. Also planned are a raf e and a 50-50 drawing. Presenting sponsor of the event is 1-800-411-PAIN. Other sponsors are Rodriguez Charities, Bobby Rubino’s, Chick l-A, Minuteman Press, BB&T, Pompano Has Heart, Cresthaven Civic Association and David Morin. Rev. Clark is a former pastor of the Unity Church in Pompano Beach. Serving with him on the Unity in the Community Board are Ronald Boehl, Diana Thomas, Robert Holmes, Paul Laya, and Carol Waldrop. UIC is on Facebook. For more information on the event, call 954-899-5557 or 954-941-6364. Those who want a free space should contact Mark Beaudreau at 954-786-4111 or e-mail mark.beaudreau@ copb .com. Unitycontinued on page 1 LBTS – Candidate Mark Brown continues his lead in fundraising over opponent Edmund Malkoon in the contest for Seat 3 on the Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Town Commission. The election is Jan. 31. In the latest reporting period, from Dec. 24 to Jan. 6, Brown has two new $100 contributions. One is from an LBTS resident, and the other from an out-of-state friend. He listed no expenses for the period. Brown’s total contributions are $18,671.74 and expenses $8,714. Malkoon reports $450 in new contributions. They are from three people, none from LBTS. His expenses are $941.25 for yard signs, an invitation to a fund-raiser and advertising in The Pelican newspaper. Malkoon’s total contributions are $3,840, and expenses are $2,216.88. Registered voters in LBTS will choose one commissioner on Jan. 31. Registered Republicans will vote for their presidential choice along with the commission seat.Brown’s funding more than triples Malkoon in LBTS

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12 The PelicanFriday, January 20, 2012 Stonewall organizer pulls out of 2012 eventBy Michael d’OliveiraPELICAN STAFFWilton Manors One and done. Wedner & Friends, which organized the Stonewall Street Festival and the city’s Halloween event in 2011, has decided not to take on Stonewall in 2012. Last year was the only time Wedner ran the event. “After careful consideration I have chosen . not to continue with the remaining two years of our three year contract,” wrote Ellen Wedner in a letter to the city. “While this was a hard decision to make after the success of the 2011 Stonewall Street Festival and Parade, moving forward within the current situation is not favorable to the interests of Wedner & Friends.” Wedner did not return a call by The Pelican in time for publication. Mayor Gary Resnick said the city is in negotiations with the Rainbow Business Coalition, or RBC, a group of about 100 countywide Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender business owners, to take over the event. “It’s part of our identity. We are determined to have the Stonewall Street Festival,” said Resnick. The event stretches back to 2000, just as the city was starting to develop its identity as a gay enclave. During its rst year, an estimated 7,000 attended. Now, the city’s biggest event attracts tens of thousands from around South Florida and the country. The name comes from the Stonewall Street Riots, a series of violent protests by gays and lesbians in New York City in June of 1969 that occurred in response to harassment by police. “We wish to make this a true city event,” said Reece Darham, owner of Island City Health & Fitness in Wilton Manors and a member of the RBC. If negotiations are successful with RBC, it would be the third organization to take over Stonewall in as many years. In 2010, Pride of Greater Fort Lauderdale took the helm. Pride, which has since been dissolved, ended the event without paying the $5,114 they owed to police of cers they hired to work security. And two years later, said Assistant City Manager Leigh Ann Henderson, of cers who worked the event still haven’t been paid. According to Bob Mays, nance director, the city made $2,500 from last year’s Stonewall. Krishan Manners, Main Street president and CEO, said he supports the RBC taking over the event. “No major event like that is going to succeed in Wilton Manors without bar support and RBC certainly has that. I will throw [Wilton Manors] Main Street behind them to help in any way I can.” Don’t forget to VOTE on Jan. 31.By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach – When she was younger, Kiani Collins, 16, thought she wanted to be a fashion designer. Like most little girls she liked to get decked out in fancy garb. Now her career goals have changed to the more practical arts: law or criminal justice or journalism, but when she had to organize a fundraiser for her community service hours, a fashion show seemed like a good idea. So Saturday, Jan. 21 at 2 p.m., Kiani is staging “Winter IB student single-handedly organizing fashion show to bene t Make-A-Wish Wishes Fashion Show” at First Presbyterian Church to bene t the Make-A-Wish Foundation of South Florida. Along with clothes from Beall’s Department Store and Island Water Sports, there will be a silent auction of goodie baskets from Macy’s and the Dolphin’s, and refreshments. Classmates will model the fashions which will range from party dresses to beachwear. Kiani is in the International Baccalaureate program at Deer eld Beach See FASHION on page 16Decked in yellow, Kiani Collins is ready to put the fashions on the runway.

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The Pelican 13 Friday, January 20, 2012 Oakland Park The city of Oakland Park plans a citywide Yard Sale from 7 a.m. to noon Saturday, Jan. 21, at Jaco Pastorius Park, 4000 N. Dixie Hwy. Vendors must provide their own tables, chairs and tents. No food or beverages will be sold in the yard sale area. Cost for Oakland Park residents is $20 for one space and $40 for non-residents. Cost for each additional space is $15 for residents and $20 for non-residents. Call Parks and Leisure Services at 954-6304500.Oakland Park yard sale planned for Jan. 21 Jacobs to speak at local Democratic ClubPompano Beach Broward County Commissioner Kristin Jacobs will speak at the North Broward Democratic Club Wednesday, Jan. 25 at 7:30 p.m. at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach. Jacobs, elected in 1998 to represent the residents of Pompano Beach, Coconut Creek, Deer eld Beach and Margate, has previously served as Broward County’s vice mayor in 2004 and mayor in 2005. Jacobs who has served on numerous county boards dealing with climate, energy and transportation, was recently appointed chair of President Obama’s White House National Ocean Council Governance Coordinating Committee. Refreshments will be served. The meeting is free and open to the public. Call 954-783-8232, or email jgoodwinnbdc@aol. com.

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14 The PelicanFriday, January 20, 2012 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFOakland Park – The Oakland Park Historical Society is hosting its 2nd annual Highwaymen Show with three of the Hall of Fame Highwaymen artists from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 21. Admission is free with donations accepted. The show will be at Jaco Pastorius Community Center, 4000 N. Dixie Highway.. A specially commissioned Highwaymen-style painting of an Oakland Park scene will be raf ed for the bene t of the Oakland Park Historical Society. The Highwaymen are a loose association of AfricanAmerican artists from Fort Pierce. Originally there were 26 of them, some painting under the supervision of the more famous Beanie Bacchus. Nine are still living. Throughout the 1950s and 1960s they painted about 200,000 paintings and sold them out of their cars. At the end of the 1960s, the artists ceased painting and slipped into obscurity. They were reHighwaymen return Saturday for Oakland Park art showdiscovered in the mid-1990s and have since become known for their idyllic landscapes of rural Florida. The Highwaymen were inducted into the Florida Artists Hall of Fame in 2004. Last year R.L. Lewis, an historian, artist and entertainer, talked about the history of the Highwaymen, painted two paintings at the show and reviewed personal pieces of art attendees brought from home. A video of his appearance can be seen at www.youtube.com and type in RL Lewis Highwaymen. Lewis is one of the artists returning for Saturday’s event along with R.A. McClendon and Willie Reagan. Their paintings will be for sale. Seven of their paintings line the walls of the City Commission Chambers here; Several are at the Oakland Park Library. For more information on the event, call 954-566-9957. Deer eld Beach Dennis Max opened one of his three new restaurants this week in completely remodeled space formerly Marciello’s on S. Federal Highway, Deer eld Beach. Attending to give him a hand with the ribbon-cutting were members of the Deer eld Beach Chamber and other local dignitaries. Pictured from left are Chamber Chair Kiku Martinson, City Commissioner Joe Miller, interior designer Adolfo Galvez, Dennis Max, Mayor Peggy Noland, Chef Patrick Broadhead (behind), Silvana Broadhead. Other principals of the company in attendance were Fred Stampone and John Williams.Deer eld Chamber welcomes Frank & Dino’scutline cutline cutline cutline cutline cutline cutline cutline cutline cutline

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The Pelican 15 Friday, January 20, 2012 Now Online • www.pompanopelican.com By Malcolm McClintockPELICAN STAFFTedesco’s2460 E. Commercial Blvd. Fort-Lauderdale954-493-9233Situated minutes from Lauderdale-By-The-Sea, the ber-quaint Tedesco’s Restaurant adds a ne new alternative on this busy Commercial Boulevard. This well appointed eatery delivers outstanding cuisine, superlative service and cozy old world charm surrounded by the sounds of Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin and New owner of Tedesco’s Restaurant introduces some of the nest Italian fare to Fort Lauderdale and surrounding communities other crooners from music’s golden epoch. Owner Fiore Casale is always on hand to greet patrons to his newly renovated trattoria. “We specialize in fresh seafood,” says the mildmannered restaurateur. “But we also have a great selection of chicken, steak, veal and pasta dishes.” Indeed, Tedesco’s menu is replete with all the quintessentially Italian favorites that turn rst time visitors into life-long customers. Seductive appetizers such as the beef Carpacio Di Manzo with shaved parmesan, the sweet baby clams in white wine sauce, the prosciutto stuffed artichokes or the Calamari Fritte with marinara sauce are just a few of the tantalizing options that will help kickstart a well-rounded meal. “My family has been in the restaurant business for over 50 years,” says Casale. “People just have to visit us once and they become friends for life.” On the entre front, a cornucopia of mouthwatering specialties titillates the senses. Seafood lovers can blissfully gorge on the Linguine al Vongole with baby clams, the lemon fuelled snapper Francaise, the grilled salmon with basil oil or the sauted Shrimp Fra Diavolo with garlic, white wine, fresh basil and diced cherry tomatoes. “This is the best Italian restaurant in Broward. Plus the service is great. Honestly, I wouldn’t go anywhere else,” says Lighthouse Point resident George Miner who popped in to buy gift certi cates for friends and family. Meat a cionados can luxuriate in a hearty portion of veal Marsala, Ribeye steak, fettuccini Carbonara or the always reliable spaghetti with meatballs. “Our meatballs are made from an old Neapolitan A Tedesco’s specialty, the Frutti di Mare over ows with fresh seafood smothered in a zesty marechiare sauce. See TEDESCO’s on page 29

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16 The PelicanFriday, January 20, 2012 The Pelican 954-783-8700 If I asked you what business you are in, could you answer in one sentence in ve seconds? If you can’t, don’t feel bad, most people I interview have trouble answering the question. The interview process asks some tough questions. Here are basic questions that business owners should be able to answer. How do you judge the success or failure of your business? What percentage of your business comes from a radius of 10 miles? How long have you been in business? Is this your rst business? Describe your ideal or target market? What percent of your business comes from repeat clients? How do you attract new business? How you retain your clients? If you have these answers, you are ready to develop an effective marketing strategy. We will discuss those steps next week. For marketing questions, email Ted Smith at ted@ neweyesmarketing.com or call 561-310-0109. Let’s Do BusinessContinued from page 8 Each child is an individual at LHP Christian School By Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFLighthouse Point Rita O’Leary, principal of Lighthouse Christian School, 2331 NE 26 Ave., recently took The Pelican on a quick tour of her school in Lighthouse Point. We visited Sharalyn Cazel’s second grade class where students were listening to each other read from their journals. Today, the journal writing had been about their daydreams. Madison was sharing his daydream when we arrived. Around the brightly decorated classroom, children listened, some of them contemplating whether or not they would share. Over their clothes, they all wore lab coats with words written on them in bright colors.Wearing their vocabulary lab coats, students in Sharalyn Cazel’s second grade class, listen to Dylan read from his journal. “Those are our vocabulary lab coats,” said Cazel, who pointed to the board. “Today’s word is ‘re ect.’” Back in her of ce, O’Leary talked about her school. “We’re the neighborhood school over here,” she says. “Most of our families are very close. We even have some who drive their children to school in their electric carts.” Classes here are for students in kindergarten through eighth grades and are limited to 20 in a class. But O’Leary says if the numbers get close to that in the lower grades, she hires an assistant. “We try to bring everybody to be the best they can be,” she says. “We also believe that children do not t into a mold or learn the same thing on the same day.”See SCHOOL on page 22 High School. Her required community service project is turning out to be a challenge. “I’m really excited about it, but it is a lot of work,” she said. Organizing the affair without the help of a committee she said, “I am the one who has to have everything in place. But it has been a good learning experience.” She chose Make-AWish because, “I truly respect what they aim to accomplish –delivering hope and happiness to children with life-threatening medical conditions. I think they really do help achieve miracles.” Tickets for “Winter Wishes” are $8 and can be purchased at the door. First Presbyterian Church is at 2331 NE 26 Avenue, Pompano Beach.FashionContinued from page 12

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The Pelican 17 Friday, January 20, 2012

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18 The Pelican Friday, January 20, 2012 wear different hats. Herb [Skolnick] was my predecessor as commissioner of District 5. He persuaded the commission at that time to establish the foundation as an entity separate from the commission. Occasionally this foundation receives contributions, and it also has distributed funds to city art programs like the city’s piano competition which creates a venue for children to showcase their talents. The gala team raises scholarship funds for students in the arts. Those funds will be donated to the foundation which, in turn, will be awarded to students from the city’s two high schools. “It is rather confusing,” he added. “The commission as a foundation committee has limited power. We designate distribution of funds, but we cannot raise them. If we had more money in the foundation, we would meet and distribute more frequently.” Gala plans have been in the works for about six months but Ann says, “I don’t mind because it is so worthwhile. George and I love the theater and attend as much as we can. I’m a member of the Friends of the Arts, a Palm Aire volunteer group that supports the arts with year ‘round activities. We attend many of their sponsored programs. In fact this past New Year’s Eve we were with the group. We dined at the Oaks Club and then went on to the Stage Theatre where we saw ‘I Love A Piano.’ It was a delightful evening.” Before she rushed off to rehearse for a fashion show at the Herb Skolnick Center, she told us a little about her career. “I attended the Fashion Institute in New York City until I left to earn my MRS degree. While raising our family, I pursued my love of the arts by painting. A few of my paintings still hang in our home. I hope to resume painting soon. It is a relaxing and rewarding experience to me.” Once their children were in the school system, Ann became a milliner in a bridal department. She soon took over as a bridal consultant which became a 20-year career. After the couple settled in Florida, Ann managed Peacock, a boutique in Boca Raton. She gave it up to work with George on Currents a Palm Aire paper which he published until he became a commissioner eight years ago. And now, on with the gala! The Pelican thanks this busy lady and her volunteer group who invest in the future of the arts in Pompano Beach.GalaContinued from page 10

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The Pelican 19 Friday, January 20, 2012 Wine, cheese reception for solo exhibitionWilton Manors Los Angeles artist, Maxwell Britton, will be featured in a solo exhibition, The Fifth Column, Jan. 20 through Feb. 12 at Ellen Charapko Gallery, 2374 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. The public is invited to a wine and cheese reception Jan. 20 from 7 to 10 p.m. New works by Britton include both acrylic on canvas and framed works on paper. Britton is known for his intuitive use of intense color even when depicting landscapes. Many of Britton’s artwork is in various private and corporate collections in the United States and abroad. Call 954-547-9014 or visit www.ellencharapkogallery.com SightingsContinued from page 91-26 – The Wilton Manors Business Association will be holding a networking lunch from 12 to 1 p.m. at Bona Italian Restaurant, 2468 Wilton Drive. 1-26 – The Westside Association of Wilton Manors will be holding a meeting from 7 to 9 p.m. at Somerset Academy, 225 NW 29 Street. 1-27 – St. Jude Classic Golf Tournament at Woodlands Country Club, Tamarac. 954-323-8405. 1-28 – The LauderdaleBy-The-Sea Garden Club Super Rummage Plant and Bake Sale will be held from 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Jarvis Hall, 4505 Ocean Drive, Lauderdale-By-The-Sea. 954 393 2008. 1-28 & 29 – Curtain Call Playhouse presents “A Funny Thing Happened on the way to the Forum” at the Herb Skolnick Center, 800 SW 36th Ave., Pompano Beach. Tickets are $23. Call 954-7840768 for times. 1-28 & 29 – The Nautical Flea Market will be held from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center 1801 NE 6 St. Cost is $5. Children 12 and under are free. Parking is free. Boating, diving gear, nautical clothing, anchors, mooring products, arts and crafts and other nautical themed items will be for sale. 954-786-4111.See SIGHTINGS on page 21

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20 The Pelican Friday, January 20, 2012 ADVERTISING? IT’S PART OF DOING BUSINESS. CALL US. 954-783-8700. By Judy WIlsonPELICAN STAFFDeerfield Beach – The 32nd Annual Festival of the Arts will be held Saturday and Sunday, Jan. 28-29, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. with a lineup of 130 extraordinary artists and craftsmen. Among them will be underwater photographer Chris Gug who won Best in Show in 2009. Gug has been expanding his portfolio in Papua, New Guinea for the past two years and will show this new work here. Other artists using water as inspiration are EJ Espinal who works in mixed media and silversmith Rick Heard. The event includes continuous live music, food from local restaurants, ethnic vendors, beer and wine, all with the beach as a backdrop. The Festival is staged by the Deerfield Beach Cultural Committee and proceeds go to art scholarships. Opening ceremonies include the Deerfield Beach High School Marching Band, The Starlight Twirlers, The Cathedral Church of God Gospel Choir and a special surprise. The event location is on the beach, south of the Pier. Saturday entertainment schedule: 10 to 11:30 a.m.Marcus Howell Jazz BandArt Festival returns to the beach Jan. 28 to 291to 3 p.m.South Bound Train 3:30 to 5:30 p.m.Ernie Southern and the Deltaholics Sunday : 10 a.m. to noon Pit Bull of Blues Band 1to 2:45 p.m.Smugglin’ Yo Yo’s 3:15 to 5 p.m.Amber Leigh In addition street entertainers Kraig Kenning, Phill Fest and Walt Rooney will appear. Rick Heard’s piece will be part of the show.

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The Pelican 21 Friday, January 20, 2012 By Malcolm McClintockPELICAN STAFFLauderdale-By-The-Sea As is customary, January is the month when the new Board of Directors convenes to set its goals and objectives for the upcoming year. Composed of local business leaders, the LBTS Chamber is eagerly preparing for the numerous events (i.e. Taste of the Beach), after hours socials and a wealth of initiatives Lauderdale By The Sea Chamber welcomes newly elected board of directorsdesigned to promote the interests of the many talented men and women of the local business community. Working closely with City officials and other area business associations, the LBTS Chamber is wholly committed to developing a blueprint for success that will attract increased commerce and visibility for all its members in what can be considered challenging economic times. Newly installed president Mark Silver encouraged his board to seek a bold approach in 2012. “Our goal should be to not only maintain our excellent reputation, but to build upon it. It is my hope to deliver bold, innovative new ideas and help market businesses throughout Lauderdale By The Sea to new audiences,” Silver said. Elected Directors for 2012: Shevaun Steward-Kuhn, Better Homes and Gardens FL 1st Realty; Amy Weiss, Coastal Computer Systems; Mindy Correa, Tours to You; Jim Richards, Richards Tax Returns and Accounting Solutions; Ed White, Croton Arms Resort Apartments; Mark Silver, Argenti Designer Jewelers; Chuck Maxwell, Dr. G’s Pharmacy By The Sea; Malcolm McClintock, Alabaska/Pelican Newspaper; Guy Contrada, Aruba; Paul Novak, High Noon; Dorothy Hacker, Away Inn; Bob Eckblad, By The Sea Realty; Greg Anderson, Suntrust Bank and Leann Barber, Edward Jones. For more information or to join the Chamber, please visit www.lbts.com. Back Row Jim Richards, Ed White, Mark Silver, president; Chuck Maxwell, Malcolm McClintock [Front] Shevaun Steward-Kuhn Mindy Correa and Amy Weiss. 1-29 – A Clarinet trio of Beethoven and more will be presented by the Chameleon Chamber Music Series at the Leiser Center, 221 SW 3 Ave., Fort Lauderdale. Tickets are $35. 954-761-3435. 2-2 – A classical concert will be held at 7 p.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. 954-390-2130 2-2 – The Naked Grape, 2163 Wilton Drive will host a fundraiser for the Pet Project from 7 to 9 p.m. There will also be discounts on wine. 954-563-5631 2-2 – The Broward Sierra Club Meeting will be held at 7:30 p.m. at the Fern Forest Nature Center, 201 Lyons Rd. S., Coconut Creek. 954-946-7359. SightingsContinued from page 19 See SIGHTINGS on page 22

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22 The Pelican Friday, January 20, 2012 We Mean Business 954-783-8700 O’Leary adds that when children jump ahead in math or science, they have an opportunity to further explore those subjects in the math lab. At the lab, they meet Linda Hinkle, former Broward County Teacher of the Year, who encourages the student to push a little more. “But the lab is also for students who need a little extra help,” she adds. There are other experiences open to students after the school day ends at this school. “I’m always open to ideas,” O’Leary says. “One parent wanted a chess club. We started it, and it will continue next semester.” Other opportunities besides the academic classes include lessons in voice, piano, guitar, theater and cooking. The school has three choirs that perform for special events at the church. Lighthouse Christian School is a ministry of the First Presbyterian Church, known locally as The Pink Church. Christian ethics are part of the school’s philosophy, and children of all denominations are welcome. SchoolContinued from page 16“As soon as you walk in the door, you feel a good spirit here,” says O’Leary. “We want our parents to know that we nurture the children just as they would. We greet them in the morning, and we place them in their cars in the afternoon.” The school also offers soccer and tennis, using elds within the city for practice. O’Leary has been in the education eld for 35 years and in administration for 31 years. That experience has been part of the success of Lighthouse Christian School. All eighth-grade graduates have been accepted into the high schools of their choices. The school measures academic achievement through the California Test of Basic Skills, or CTBS. O’Leary says the children exceed those skills and explains that private schools do not participate in the FCAT, a state test required in public schools. Lighthouse Christian School will host an Open House Jan. 25 and 26. Prospective families will have a chance to talk to the faculty and principal that evening, and tours will be offered. For more information, call 954-941-7501. Republicans gather for primary debateThe Greater Pompano Republican Club will host a debate watching party Thursday, Jan. 26 at 7:30 p.m. at Galuppi’s Restaurant, 1103 N. Federal Highway, Pompano Beach. All presidential candidate campaigns are welcome to present their candidates. Cost is $5. Refreshments will be served. Call 954-785-0226.VOTE ON Jan.. 31 2-3 & 4 – Curtain Call Playhouse presents “A Funny Thing Happened on the way to the Forum” at 8 p.m. at the Herb Skolnick Center, 800 SW 36 Ave., Pompano Beach. 2-4 – The Boca Raton Symphonia “Saturday Night” concert at 8 p.m. at Parents’ Association Performing Arts Center, Pine Crest School, 2700 St. Andrews Road, Boca Raton The program includes Hayden, Beethoven and Barber. 561-376-3848. 2-6 – The American Association of University Women Pompano Beach Branch meets at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6th St., at 12:30 p.m. 954-524-2938. 2-18 – The 7th Annual Dr. Carter G. Woodson Festival runs from 12 to 9 p.m. at Jaco Pastorius Park, 1098 NE 40 Court, Oakland Park. 954630-4500. 2-25 & 3-3 – Two CERT classes will be provided from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Fort Lauderdale Fire-Rescue Station #53, 2200 Executive Airport Way, Fort Lauderdale. CERT SightingsContinued from page 21 See SIGHTINGS on page 24

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The Pelican 23 Friday, January 20, 2012 We Mean Business! company very attractive to buyers and sellers and is allowing us to contribute to our South Florida real estate recovery.” Kim and Bill Caruthers recently purchased a home in Coral Ridge Isles from Real Estate Recovery. Kim, an executive with Kaplan University, wanted to be nearer to work, the beach and friends. “We were referred to Gary by several friends who had dealt with him and liked the way they were handled. He found us a house that needed a lot of work on the interior and was priced right considering what needed to be done. We’re very pleased with the company and the way things worked out.” Another happy client is Al Landsberger, a Chicago resident. He and his wife, Diana Chrissis recently bought a home in Oakland Park. Landsberger said, “We were referred to Gary by several friends and found him to be very easy to deal with and very knowledgeable. We took advantage of the market and bought the place before we can actually live in it. I’m a graphics designer and my wife is in marketing. We have teen children and are not ready to retire, so we will rent our home in the interim. Gary was very professional. The transaction was nished in just six weeks. Gary’s rm will manage it and nd a responsible renter for us. It has been a great experience.” According to Lanham, the market is greatly improved. He suggests that a property, priced correctly, should be in contract within 30 days. “We have no inventory right now,“ he claims. “This should encourage sellers to be realistic and take advantage of the current market to sell their properties.” He reminds buyers that interest rates are at historic lows, saying “There will never be a better time to buy. The banks are lending to credit worthy clients.” Real Estate Recovery services Oakland Park, Pompano Beach, Fort Lauderdale, Plantation and Pembroke Pines. Being adjacent to Wilton Manors, Lanham makes a point of saying, “We welcome gay and lesbian clients as well as anybody. Ours is a truly non-discriminatory business.” Visitors are frequent to the of ces of this company. And no wonder. Drop-ins can get up-to-the minute daily foreclosure listings giving buyers a heads up on new listings as they appear. Asked why he opened his of ce in Oakland Park, Lanham answers, “It’s one of the few, if not the only city in South Florida, that has a master plan which is followed. It was clear to see the work of Main Street Oakland Park’s efforts. The infrastructure has been redone. New pipes now allow for better drainage. Parks and vignette seating with fountains headline the new Oakland Park Main Street effort. We have Jaco Pastorius Park for concerts, major events, and movie nights. I view this town as an up-and-coming place for a real estate business. Growth is all around us, and it is being done according to the master plan.”Gary LanhamReal Estate is a second career for Lanham who moved to Oakland Park 12 years ago when he decided to retire after 25 years in the health care eld. He holds a master’s degree in hospital administration. He says, “By the end of my rst career as sales manager for a group health insurance company, I had become very savvy with technology. This knowledge translated very well into my Real Estate business. I’m an active volunteer with the Board of Realtors, serving on several committees. I also serve on the board of directors for the Master Chorale which performs in Miami/Dade, Broward and Palm Beach counties.” Lanham makes a point of attending the city commission meetings and willingly makes presentations to church and community organizations. His presentations are helpful to areas with high foreclosure properties. Call 954-530-8198 for further information.RecoveryContinued from page 8 Applicants sought for three boardsLBTS – The Town of Lauderdale-By-The-Sea is seeking applications from residents to fill upcoming vacancies on the Board of Adjustment, Planning and Zoning Board and Charter Review Board. Deadline to apply is Friday, Feb. 3. The Board of Adjustment, which meets as needed, conducts quasi-judicial hearings on applications for variances from the town’s land development regulations. The P&Z Board meets once a month and advises the Town Commission on planning matters. The Charter Review Board will recommend updates and revisions to the town’s charter. The board’s recommendations will be given to the commission. If approved, recommendations will be placed before voters. Applicants for all three boards must be town residents and registered voters. Application forms are available at the town clerk’s office at 4501 Ocean Drive, LBTS. Forms also are found on the town’s web site at www.lbts-fl.gov under Documents in the left-hand column of the homepage. For more information, call 954-640-4200.

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24 The Pelican Friday, January 20, 2012 up in front of an existing apartment building. Gilbert Galeano, one of Bier Garden’s partners, said he chose the city because, “I’m gay, and I wanted to bring something new to our community. We’re proud to be here and a part of Wilton Manors.” He estimated they’ve invested $500,000 in the property. Asked if lack of parking worried the owners, Galeano said they’ve hired a private valet service. “Even though we knew [about parking issues] we took a chance.” Heidi Shafran, community services department director, said the city averages about 12 new business tax licenses a month. “A lot of those are for existing buildings,” she said. One recent application came from the owners of Shushi Rock Restaurant proposed for The old Wings ‘n Things property, 2199 Wilton Drive. But the slew of new businesses comes after the city has lost an almost equal number of businesses last year. At least four establishments long Wilton Drive, Urban Dwell, a furniture store; Painted Pickle, a deli; Crema D’ Roma, an Italian restaurant; and The Mix, a piano bar, have all closed shop. But unlike The Mix’s former digs, which remain closed, the void created by Urban Dwell and Painted Pickle has been lled by two established concerns, Naked Grape and Copy This. While Copy This expanded, Naked Grape moved from one spot on Wilton Drive to another. “We couldn’t grow anymore,” said Naked Grape co-owner Caleb Ben-Avram. Before moving, BenAvram said he and his partner looked at possibly moving to Las Olas Boulevard, the beach or Oakland Park. “We talked to Krishan [Manners, Wilton Manors Main Street director of marketing and sales] and Heidi [Shafran]. They convinced us to stay,” said Ben-Avram. “A lot of our customers are very local,” said co-owner Tim Slivinski. Unlike their old location, Ben-Avram and Slivinski have added an outside dining area and can now serve more than just wine. “Food has been a huge asset to us,” said Slivinski. Along with the city’s commercial prospects, residential opportunities are also attracting attention. Larry Baum of Stellar Homes Group, Inc., has purchased ve apartment complexes along Powerline Road: 2412, 2500 and 2509 Powerline Road, 807 NW 24 St., 925 and 1007 NW 30 St., and renovated and rented 98 apartments. All but one of the buildings, he said, had been boarded up. The units range from onetotwo -bedroom apartments and rent for between $700 and $1,000 a month. “That whole area was really rife with drug problems before these guys came in. They’re doing a great service towards unity and cleaning that area up,” said Manners. Baum said he and his partners have invested close to $6 million in the buildings. They are also looking to build apartments on the site of the Center for Spiritual Living at the corner of Northeast 15 Avenue and Northeast 26 Street. “We are long term investors that keep properties for long periods of time, therefore we like to outreach into the community and become more involved. Before we invest in a particular community, we make sure we feel comfortable being there for at least 10 years,” he wrote in an email. Baum added that he and his partners see a lot of potential in the city. “The government is involved and the city takes pride in itself.” Wilton Manors on the upswingContinued from page 2 members are trained to assist law enforcement and emergency personnel in the aftermath of a disaster. Pre-registration is required. No cost to attend. 954828-6700. 3-11 – The Skolnick Sunday Jazz & Arts Fest will be held at 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Skolnick Center at 800 SW 36th Ave., Pompano Beach. The event is free and features live jazz music and giveaways. Artists can reserve a 6 ft. table for $10 or a 15 ft. table for $15. 954-786-4590. ArtCall to Artists – Artists in all media are invited to submit a sampling of their work to be considered for inclusion in the March 11th Lighthouse Point Arts Exhibition. The Arts panel will view artists’ work Jan. 26 from 2 to 5 p.m. at the LHP Yacht & Racquet Club, 2701 NE 42nd Street. 954806-4749 or 954-376-0538. Food Drive – NE Focal Point. Drop off non-perishable donations from 8:20 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at 227 SightingsContinued from page 21 See SIGHTINGS on page 24

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The Pelican 25 Friday, January 20, 2012 Rev. Hyvenson Joseph WORSHIP DIRECTORY: Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad. Oakland Park – A funeral mass was held Tuesday for Moni Mackinaw Zimmerman, 64, of Oakland Park, who died Jan. 4. Services were at St. Elizabeth of Hungary Catholic Church, Pompano Beach. Mackinaw was born March 28, 1947 in Birmingham, Ala. She graduated from John Carroll High School and attended Montevallo College. Soon after moving to Fort Lauderdale, she met and married the love of her life, her husband of 40 years, Leigh Zimmerman. They had one son David Leigh Zimmerman, who was the light of her life. While raising her family and working in the banking industry, she also found time to serve as president of Royal Palm Isles and contribute to her city, Oakland Park. Moni leaves behind, Leigh; David (Gina); eight brothers; three sisters; many nieces and nephews; and too many friends and great memories to count. Her infectious smile, open heart and southern accent will be missed by anyone who had the gift to know her. The Oakland Park City Commission observed a moment of silence in her memory Wednesday. She was preceded in death by her parents and one brother. Burial was at Pompano Beach Cemetery. Arrangements by All Faith Funeral Chapel, Deerfield Beach.Moni Mackinaw Zimmerman, contributor to her city, served as president of Royal Palm NW 2 St., Deer eld Beach. 954-480-4449. Wilton Manors Green Market – Saturdays and Sundays at Hagen Park 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. fresh produce, baked goods, herbs, spices, doggie treats, pickles, jams, infused vinegars, pasta and more are available at the Green Market. 954-531-5383. Pompano Beach Green Market – Every Saturday at the corner of West Atlantic Boulevard and North Dixie Highway from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., fresh vegetables, crafts, plants, food and music are available at the Green Market. 954-292-8040. Call to Artists – Artists in all media are invited to submit a sampling of their work to be considered for inclusion in the March 11th Lighthouse Point Arts Exhibition. The Arts panel will view artists’ work Jan. 26 from 2 to 5 p.m. at the LHP Yacht & Racquet Club, 2701 NE 42nd Street. 954-806-4749 or 954376-0538. Wilton Manors Green Market – Saturdays and Sundays at Hagen Park 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. fresh produce, baked goods, herbs, spices, doggie treats, pickles, jams, infused vinegars, pasta and more are available at the Green Market. 954-531-5383. Pompano Beach Green Market – Every Saturday at the corner of West Atlantic Boulevard and North Dixie Highway from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., fresh vegetables, crafts, plants, food and music are available at the Green Market. 954-292-8040.Fashion Show2/4 – Wishing on a Star – a fashion show and luncheon sponsored by the St. Gabriel Council of Catholic women at the Royal Fiesta at The cove of Deer eld beach at 11:30 a.m. Donation is $35. 954-786-0667. Fishing Piers The Pompano Beach Fishing Pier extends more than SightingsContinued from page 21 See SIGHTINGS on page 30

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26 The Pelican Friday, January 20, 2012 Advertise with The Pelican 954-783-8700 The Pelican 954-783-8700 Classi eds Call 954-545-0013 Get to know your local Merchants HELP WANTEDFULL SERVICE NAIL TECHNICIAN Needed. With Or Without Following. Pompano Beach The Orange Room Salon. 954-782-8838. 1-27 DRIVER/TOUR GUIDE/ PART TIME. Have Happy & Relaxed Disposition. Good Speaking Voice & Good Driving Record. 954-784-4064. Fort Lauderdale. 1-20 BEAUTY – HAIR STYLIST – NAIL TECH – MASSAGE, FACIALIST. GUARANTEED START WITH 100% COMMISSION. BOCA 954415-4937. 1-20 SEEKING FOR CONDO MAINTENANCE WORKER. If You Have A Strong Commitment To High Level Of Service & Quality Standards, The Ability To Work Well Under Pressure, Meet Deadlines & Strong Sense Of Urgency – Please Apply By Faxing Your Resume To 954942-7685. This Is A 40 Hour Full Time Position With Varied Hours (Evenings, Weekends & Holidays) Bene ts Paid 100%, Paid Vacation & Holidays. Rate Of Pay Commensurate With Experience. EOE. 2-3 ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT For Property Management Firm. Data Entry, Client Contact, Assist Executive. FT / PT. 954-7727012. 2-10 LOCAL PEST CONTROL CO Looking For Quality Sales/Service Tech. Must Be Dependable, Team Player, Good Drivers License & People Skills. Will Train Right Person. ALSO Of ce Assistant – Computer – People & Phone Skills Needed. Fax Resume 954418-3982. 2-10 WATSON PAINTING & WATERPROOFING CO. Interior/Exterior Painting. Res/Comm Pressure Clean Roofs/Decks. Lic/Ins. 954-6500488 Or 954-552-9457. 2-3 FLASH MOVERS – FREE ESTIMATES/ FLAT Rates By Owner – 30 Years Experience – Moving Done The Right Way! Small Or Large Jobs. No Job Too Dif cult! Additional Home Pickup Service Available – Will Take Good Condition Furniture, Working Order Appliances & Electronics, Knick Knacks, Household Items, Etc, AT NO EXTRA CHARGE Applied To The Move, Call Anytime – 954832-6802. 1-20 D & R RESCREENING – POOL – PATIO RESCREENING.. $.75 SQ FT. Minimum 300 Sq Ft. Window – Sliding Door Repair. Call 954-650-1566. 1-27 MIKE THE GARDENER “THE ALL AMERICAN YARDMAN” Yard And Garden Care – Get The Best For Less! Call 561-543-6337. 2-10 HONEST PC EXPERT – Setups, Viruses, Repairs, Upgrades, Networking, Tutoring. Call Andy For A FREE Estimate. 954-857-4846. 1-20 SEEKING EMPLOYMENTCOMPUTER PROBLEMS? CALL MIKE For Fast 24 Hr Service. Excellent Computer Skills. Hands On Lessons From MBA. Printed Instructions For Problems Provided. 10% Off For 1st Time Customer. Mike Will Make It Happen Or The Service Is FREE! Call 954-6835607. 1-20 I NEED YOUR HELP! You Need Me. I Am A Chef, Dining Room Helper, Bartender, Manager + If You Need My Care Or Dog Care Try Me – 2 Days NO CHARGE. Concetta 754-245-1446. 1-20 HONEST MALE WITH References Seeking Position As A CAREGIVER….Call Chris 954-290-7344. 1-27DOMESTIC SERVICESYOUNG MALE – ADULT Needs A Furnished Bedroom And Some Minimal Care. Prefer Pompano Area. Call 954-942-9172. 1-20SERVICES RETIRED PLUMBING CONTRACTOR Looking For Work. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. CFC 027532. Low Rates. 954-496-6420. 1-20 DANNY BOY ELECTRIC – Lic & Insured. Lic. #EC13004811. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. 24/Hr Service. 954-290-1443. Beat Any Written Estimate. Sr, Discount. 2-10 COMPUTER TUTOR – COMPUTER REPAIR – FREE Estimate! 9 Computer Certifications. 25 Years Experience. Call Bill 954-4493681. 2-3 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIESNew GREEN technology. New defroster control saves energy in home refrigerators, commercial chillers. Patented. All optical. Simple mfg. Strategic partners needed..www.NewAvionics.Com. 954-568-1991. OPEN HOUSESHILLSBORO MILE 1045 HILLSBORO MILE #9 – Sun 1-4pm. Small Complex Directly On The Sand. Beautiful Ocean & Intracoastal Views. Pool – Dockage Available. Low Maintenance. $262K. Call Ruthie Brooks – Balistreri Realty. 954-803-4174. 1-20 HANDYMAN – PAINTING – CARPENTRY – Pressure Cleaning. Decks! Everything Around The House. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. Call 561-350-3781. 1-20 MOORE PLUMBING PLUMBING SERVICES – Big Jobs – Small Jobs. We Do It All. Remodeling & Repairs. Lic. & Insured. C.C. Accepted. Call 954-772-4600. 2-3 HONEST HANDYMAN – HOME & BUILDING Maintenance/Improvements. No Job Too Small. Fast Friendly Service. Reasonable Rates. Local Resident/Homeowner. Call Today For Your FREE Upfront Quote. No Deposit Required. 754-366-1915. 1-20 HOME/OFFICE REPAIRS By State Certified G.C. Reasonable. CGC025802. More Information Call 954815-1007. GOT JUNK? DUMP TRUCK – CLEANUPS Trees/ Landscape, Yard Fill. Paint/ Pressure Wash/ Roofs/Home Repairs – Welding, Etc. Dave 954-818-9538. 2-10THRIFT STORELUCKY STAR THRIFT 5130 N Federal Hwy. 2ND Floor. Ft Lauderdale. Great Items At Low Prices From $2 Up. (No Clothing) 954-839-8182, 1-20MUSICIANS WANTEDThe American Legion Symphonic Band is now accepting new members for the 2011-2012 season. College age to “seasoned seniors” are welcome. Rehearsals are held on Wed. evenings at American Legion Post 142 in Pompano. Percussionists, euphonium and clarinet players are especially needed. If you enjoy “making music,” call Jim McGonigal, Music Director at 954-647-0700 for more info.DEEP WATER VILLA – DOCKPOMPANO BEACH 2/2 1700 SQ FT. Screened Fla Room. Private Yard. W/D. 4 Park. No Fixed Bridges. Community Pool. Deeded Dock.. 2 Blocks Beach. $285,000. Call 954-6291324. 1-20 Call Us!!

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The Pelican 27 Friday, January 20, 2012 Classi eds Call 954-545-0013 SUPERB DIRECT INTRACOASTAL VIEW – 2/2 Updated Condo. Low Maintenance. No Realtors Please. 954-304-4518 J Peasley / Better Homes & Garden RE. 2-3 LAUDERDALE BY THE SEA – Furnished 1/1.5 Condo $115,000. Heated Pool. Ocean Access. On Canal. 1481 S Ocean Blvd. Apt 228. Call 586549-5223. 2-3CONDOS FOR RENTPOMPANO DIRECT WATER ANNUAL RENTAL: 2/2, 1438 sf, $1,600/Mo. Call Walt 954461-1012. Others Available. Blacksmith Realty. 1-27 LAUDERDALE BY THE SEAAcross From Beach. Near Sea Watch. 1 Bedroom – Den – 2 Baths. Pool, W/D In Unit. $1175 Per Mo. Yrly. 1st – Last – Sec. Or Seasonal 5 Mo min. $1595/Mo. No Smoking. Call 954-942-5642. 1-20 DEERFIELD BEACH Waterfront Furnished 2/2, Huge Balcony. Awesome View! Heated Pool, Cable, Covered Parking. No Pets Or Realtors. Good Credit Required. Annual $1100. Also NON Waterfront – Annual. 2/2 $800 $825. Call 631-885-3342. 1-20 POMPANO BEACH 1/1 UNFURNISHED APT. $700 Per Month. 1st And Security. Call 954-785-7270. 1-20 WALK TO BEACH? GOT BOAT? Nicest 1/1 In NE Pompano. Annual, Unfurnished $925 Month. Call 954-614-8428. 1-27 EAST DEERFIELD / WATER 1/1 – 1st Floor, 55+. Furnished $1200 Mo. Unfurnished $1,000 Mo. Completely Remodeled. W/D. Screened Patio. All Amenities. Walk Beach & Shops. Dockage When Available. 954-415-9730. 1-20 POMPANO LEISUREVILLE 55+ 2/1 – Completely Furn. Sunroom On Golf Course. 2 Pools, 2 Clubs. $875 Month Yearly. 954-788-9312. 1-20APTS FOR RENTDEERFIELD/POMPANO BEACH 1 BR & 2 BR APTS FOR RENT. Remodeled, Paint, Tile, Etc. W & D On Site. Pool. Pet Friendly. Call George 954809-5030. 2-10HOMES FOR RENTPOMPANO 2/2 Cottage Style House. Large Yard With Fish Pond. $1100 Month – Company Bills For Electric & Water. 540 NE 34 St. Darci 954-783-3723. 1-27 POMPANO BEACH 3/2 – CENTRAL AIR. Screened Porch. Small Utility Room. $1100 Mo. 620 NE 35 Street. Call Darci 954783-3723. 1-27SEASONAL RENTALLAUD BY THE SEA Furn. 1/1, 2nd Floor, Beach Access. Feb – March $1,600 Mo Yrly $1,000 Mo. Pool, Gardens, No Smoking/Pets. 954-942-3274 Or 516-474-0951. 1-20CO-OP SALESPOMPANO BEACH 1/1 On Water, Dockage Available At Your Door. $59,500. Coldwell Banker – Barbara – 954-6291324. 1-20REAL ESTATE WANTEDI BUY HOUSES!! CASH!! AS IS! QUICK CLOSE! ANY AREA – ANY CONDITION! NO EQUITY OK. CALL NOW 954-914-2355. 1-20CONDOS FOR SALEPALM AIRE 105 – Split 2/2 King, Upgrades. Largest Kitchen. W/D. Breakfast Room. Piano. Ultra Furnished. Shopping, Pool Close By. 9th Floor. Low Maintenance/Taxes. $134K – Offers. No Brokers! 954-895-4596. 1-20 LIGHTHOUSE POINT 2/1.5 CONDO In A GREAT AREA. Pets Allowed. $124,900. Call Barbara – Balistreri Realty. 954-263-7129. 1-20 DEERFIELD BEACH 2/2 Completely Redone. Granite Kitchen, New Cabinets. S.S. Appliances. 20” Porcelain Tile Floors. Travistine Stone Baths. Freshly Painted. 1st Floor. Less Than A Mile To Beach. $84,900. Call 631-873-8715. 1-20 POMPANO DIRECT WATER CONDOS – Magni cent 2007 sf, 3/2.5 $339,900. Estate Sale – 1430 sf, 2/2 $259,900. Others Available. Call Walt – 954-461-1012, Blacksmith Realty. 1-27 POMPANO MCNAB ROAD & NE 18 AVENUE – 1 & 2 Bedrooms Furnished/ Unfurnished. $675 $950 And Up. Pool, Tile Floors. Central A/C. 954-610-2327. 1-27 DEERFIELD BEACH – Retail Of ce Warehouse – 700 Sq Ft With Loft. A/C, Bathroom. $575 Per Month. Call For More Info 561-654-1331 Or 561-9985681. 2-10 FURNITURE BEDSETS – King $180 – Queen $130 – Full $110 – Twin $90. 5 Pc. Bedroom Set $399. Frames $39. 954-465-6498. 2-10GARAGE SALESMULTI FAMILY GARAGE SALE Fri & Sat Jan 20 & 21. 8am-1pm. 1100 SE 5 Court Deer eld. Household, Furniture, Clothes, Electronics, Records & Collectibles + Much Misc. Items. 1-20 SEA HAVEN CONDO – 2731 NE 14 St. Causeway Pompano Beach. Sat. Jan 28 8am1pm. Linens, Jewelry, Books, Lamps, Baskets, Furniture, Pots & Pans, Dishes & Much More. 1-27 POMPANO BEACH GARAGE SALE Saturday 8am – 2pm. 412 NE 12 Avenue. Furniture, PIANO & Misc. Items. Great Bargains. 954-601-7791. 1-20COLLECTIBLESJAEGER AND LE COULTRE WATCHES, CLOCKS, Any Kind – Any Condition Wanted By Collector. Call Dirk 954709-0191. 1-20MUSICAL INSTRUMENTSVintage Rogers 3 piece drum set snare, mounted tom and bass drum. $300 obo. 954-647-0700 2-3 POMPANO GARDENS $795 – 1/1 $200 Deposit. Nice Area – Minutes To Beach – Pet OK. Please Call 954-515-2554. 1-20 POMPANO BEACH 1/1 NW $650 – 2/1 $750 SW 1/1 $725 – 2/1 $925 – NE 1/1 $675 2/1 NE $950 – TH 2/1.5 $1095 – All FREE Water. Rent + $70 MovU-In. 954-781-6299. 1-27 POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 Bedroom From $495. Easy Movein. 1/2 OFF DEPOSIT. Remodeled. Great Location. 954-783-1088 For More Info. 3-9 STUDIOS – EFFICIENCIESDEERFIELD BEACH A1A – Live at the beach off season. Ef ciencies available for $500 Weekly, pay as you go, no deposit or security, cable, pool, laundry, wireless. Ocean Villa 954-427-4608. 1-27OUTDOOR STORAGEDEERFIELD BEACH OUTDOOR STORAGE For Boats, RV’s, Commercial Vehicles & More. Call Chris At 954-520-1777. 2-3COMMERCIAL FOR RENT-SALEPOMPANO COMMERCIAL OFFICE Spaces Available. Ranging From As Low As $500 To $700 Depending On Square Footage. Please Call Darci At 954-7833723. 1-27 POOL BUILDING – BLOCK FROM BEACH. Bright Spacious Apartments w/Tile Flooring, Newer Kitchens. 1 Bedroom Apt $999/Month & Extra Large 1 Bedroom Apt. $1075/Month. Include: WI-FI, Cable, Water & Coin Laundry. Also Available Studio Unit, Unfurnished Includes Electric: $689/Month – Small Pet Considered. Owner/ Agent Contact 954-608-7368. Seasonal Rates Are Available In Deer eld Beach Building. 1-20 EFFICIENCY AVAILABLE WITH FULL KITCHEN. Includes: Electric, Cable, Wi-Fi, Water, Pool. 2nd Floor End Unit. Clean – Move-in Condition. 2 Blocks From Ocean – North Of Atlantic. Owner Agent. $669 Month – Lease. 954-608-7368. POMPANO – JUST OFF FEDERAL. 1/1, Pool, Laundry. Close To Shopping & Transportation. $700 Per Mo. 1st Mo + Security To Move In. Call Anthony 954857-5207. 1-20 What Can We Do For You?The Pelican. 954.783.8700

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28 The Pelican Friday, January 20, 2012 The Pelican We Mean Business Advertise with The Pelican 954-783-8700 Capt. RJ Boyle is an experienced angler in South Florida. His studio is located in Lighthouse Point. Call 954-420-5001. RJ BoyleRJ BOYLE STUDIOSThey always say things come full circle over time. Some things just take longer than others. Since the introduction of daytime swordfishing some years back, not many people had been night fishing for swords. The new fishery overshadowed the old one with tales of bigger fish, epic battles with giants and the ability to come in at a normal hour to get some sleep. I have spent so much time out there in the day that I really started to miss night fishing. Though daytime sword fishing can be great, it’s technical and requires concentration 100 percent of the time. Lately, I have been in the mood to swordfish but without the stress of the daytime attention, so I broke out the night rods. There is nothing cooler than turning off the engines and putting out a spread of swordfish baits under the moon. The sound of the clicker going off during a conversation with your buddies is so exciting. I had really missed night fishing until I went a couple weeks ago and caught two in an hour. I can’t wait to go again. Just nothing like puttin on the sword bait under the moonBy Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFNext weekend Community Park, 2001 NE 10 St., will resemble a boat yard more than a sports field as the Annual Nautical Flea Market launches on Jan. 28 and 29. Visitors will find boats, Nautical Flea market calls for mariners at Community Park to pick up great dealsfishing and diving gear, art, boat wear, anchors and much more. This event has also been a favorite among boaters not only for the inexpensive buys but also for the significant finds. Lots of people show up seeking items that are hard to find or out of production. The market opens at 8 a.m. on both days. Closings times are 5 p.m. on Saturday and 3 p.m. on Sunday. Entrance fees for both days are $5. Many people consider the day at the park a family event with lots of food vendors, music and games. Vendor applications are still being accepted. Call 954-786-4111.

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The Pelican 29 Friday, January 20, 2012 family recipe,” says Casale who also enjoys the unwavering support of his wife, Rose Ann. Equally noteworthy are the zesty chicken wings with either mild or tear-inducing hot sauce. Other poultry favorites include the chicken Piccata with wine and capers, the Sinatra with prosciutto and spinach or the balsamic roasted half-bird with seasoned rub. One more unexpected Tedesco’s surprise is the “One Pound Flame Burger.” Speaking of outrageous sandwiches, Tedesco’s offers belt-busting lunch classics such as the roasted turkey, the rare roast beef, eggplant ParTedescoContinued from page 15migiana, Philly cheesesteak, hot pastrami and the Italian sausage. “We are also known for our great pizzas,” adds Casale just as two large Meat Lover pies head out the door for hungry clients on the Galt Mile. “And just so people know, we will soon be introducing our 20” pizza.” All salads, sandwiches, burgers and appetizers are under $10. Large entres are priced between $12 and $22. There is an Early Bird menu and half-price Happy Hour at the bar from 4 to 7 p.m. Financially-friendly lunch and dinner specials can be found on the website. An outstanding selection of wines is offered with bottles starting at $16 and carafes at $18. “Many of our wines are imported from Italy and cannot be found anywhere else,” says Casale. All major credit cards are accepted. There is ample parking. Delivery is free. A catering menu is the perfect choice for large parties and of ce functions. For a sweet ending, the convivial Tedesco’s unveils tasty desserts such as cannoli, tiramisu and a truly divine cheesecake. Buon appetito! Malcolm McClintock holds an MBA and has lived in Thailand, Spain, France, Mexico, Canada and the US where he has developed a deep appreciation for world gastronomy. The tangy Caprese salad with fresh mozzarella, tomatoes and basil is always a crowd pleaser. The healthy grilled salmon let with Portobello ravioli is a fan favorite. Fiore Casale welcomes all to enjoy ne Italian cuisine at Tedesco’s.

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30 The Pelican Friday, January 20, 2012 Pompano Beach The Broadway hit, A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum opens Jan. 28 at the Herb Skolnick Center, 800 SW 36 Ave., Pompano Beach. The production runs through Feb. 5. Call 954-784-0768 for specific times and dates.Curtain Call Playhouse presents A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum opens this month at the Herb Skolnick Center1,000 feet into the Atlantic, 222 N Pompano Beach Blvd., Pompano Beach. 954-7864073 Anglin’s Pier at Commercial Blvd., Lauderdale-by-theSea. 954-491-9403 Deer eld Beach International Pier 200 NE 21st Ave., Deer eld Beach. 954426-9206 or 954-943-1488.LeisureBingo – The American Legion Auxiliary Unit 142 has Bingo on Tuesdays at 7 p.m. at 171 SW 2 St., Pompano Beach. Food is available from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. 954942-2448. Free Support Group See SIGHTNGS on page 31SightingsContinued from page 25

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The Pelican 31 Friday, January 20, 2012 – The NE Focal Point Alzheimer’s Day Care Center, located at 301 N.W. 2nd Avenue in Deer eld Beach, offers a weekly Caregiver’s Support Group every Wednesday from 10 a.m. to noon. MeetingsToastmasters – The Gold Coast Toastmasters meet in the second and fourth Mondays of each month at Panera Bread, 1762 N. Federal Highway, Fort Lauderdale from 7 to 9 p.m. 954-895-3555.ServiceZonta International meets on the third Tuesday of the month at Duffy’s Diner, 401 N. Federal Hwy., Deer eld Beach at 11:15 a.m. Zonta International is a classi ed service organization of executives and professionals working together to advance the status of women locally and worldwide through service and advocacy. 561-392-2223. Senior Citizens – The Greater Pompano Beach Senior Citizens Club meets on the second Wednesday of the month at the Emma Lou Olson Community Center on NE 6th Street, Pompano Beach at 10 a.m. Activities focus on the general welfare, health, education and security of senior citizens. We welcome people of all ages. HealthYoga – A Yoga class is available for all levels at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive in Wilton Manors, on Tuesday nights from 6:30 to 8 p.m. and Saturday mornings from 10:30 a.m. until noon. The cost is $7. 305-607-3520.TheaterThe Producers – The Tamarac Theatre of Performing will be showing The Producers until Jan. 29 at its theater, 7143 Pine Island Road. Tickets are $25. 954-726-7898.VolunteerHospice volunteers needed – VITAS Innovative Hospice Care of Broward needs volunteers who can make friendly visits to terminally ill patients and their families, provide relief for caregivers, visit veterans and more. A two-day orientation is required. 954777-5396. Disaster relief – Pompano Has Heart, a volunteer group that assists people impacted by disasters, meets monthly. Volunteers are needed to man tables at the City of Pompano Beach Health Fair on Wednesday and Aug. 10 and 11 from 9 a.m. to 3 p. SightingsContinued from page 30

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32 The Pelican Friday, January 20, 2012 Theirs is not only a partnership in business but a partnership in life, as well. They are the Doctors Hecker – Melanie and David – a married couple who operate Hecker Dermatology Group in Pompano Beach. Not all couples would choose to spend so much time together, but the Heckers enjoy it and say it’s an advantage in their medical practice. “There’s no challenge in working together,” says Melanie. “I’m working with someone I trust.” David says they want the practice to succeed, “so we’re on the same page.” These doctors love what they do. “The beauty of dermatology is that we do everything,” explains Melanie. “We see men, women and children, and the situation in each examination room is different.” The doctors may remove a skin cancer from one patient and perform a cosmetic procedure on the next. “The variety makes for an interesting day,” Melanie says. Besides taking much satisfaction in helping people, the Hecker doctors like the size and personal nature of their practice, which is at 3500 NE 5 Ave., just off Sample Road near Dixie Highway, in Pompano Beach. They call it a “mom and pop” or “boutique operation.” The doctors entered careers in dermatology from different directions. As a teenager growing up in Hollywood, Florida, David was impressed by his dermatologist, who became a role model and mentor. He decided then to pursue such a medical career himself. During his medical residency at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City, David trained with an internationally recognized expert on psoriasis, and he developed a special interest in that disease. He did research and published professional papers on the subject. He is excited about “a big revolution in the treatment of psoriasis” – a new class of medication called biologics. Psoriasis is a chronic disease, he explains. There is no cure. Patients must stay on the drug forever, but their skin is clear. “We’ve never gotten someone clear before,” he says. “This is exciting because I can help people in a way that I never could before.” Melanie’s path to health care is probably not surpris rst practicing in Boca Raton. He still sees patients part-time in Boynton Beach. But it was always their hope to practice together, and he joined Melanie in Pompano Beach a couple of years ago. Despite their busy medical practice and the demands of parenting three children, the Doctors Hecker make time for community service. They have participated in numerous free cancer screening events sponsored by various community groups, distributing information, providing advice and screening hundreds of people for signs of cancer. They are quick to stress the importance of these screening events. “Routine body checks can prevent you from having cancer down the road,” Melanie says. It’s important because one person in the U.S. dies every hour from melanoma, one of the fastest growing cancers in the U.S.” She explains that 80 percent of the damage to your skin is done before you are 18 years old, so it’s important to educate children. “That’s why we like to see families,” she adds. The realities and economics of practicing medicine today result in many dermatologists joining larger group practices. But the Heckers plan to stay right where they are to continue their “mom and pop” approach to serving patients for just as long as they can. Hecker Dermatology Group, 3500 NE 5th Avenue, Pompano Beach 954-783-2323Pompano Beach dermatologists share life and work togethering, considering that her father and three brothers are medical doctors. But she did not take a direct route to her medical practice. After earning an MBA in nance, she began a career on Wall Street. While she enjoyed Wall Street, it wasn’t as satisfying as she’d like, so she headed for medical school and a career based on helping people directly. Her education led her to research dermatology at Weill Cornell Medical Center in New York City at the same time David was studying there. They met while making “rounds” at the hospital. The rest, as they say, is history – a meeting that led to marriage, three children, a medical practice together in Pompano Beach and a home in Lighthouse Point. They began their medical careers in 1999 with David Together Husband and wife physicians in Pompano Beach, Drs. Melanie and David Hecker. Pompano Beach Hecker Dermatology Group, focuses on diseases of the skin and cosmetic procedures.



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Friday, January 20, 2012 Vol. XX, Issue 3 Call 954-783-8700 to Advertise Email: siren2415@gmail.com Pompano Beach Deer eld Beach Lighthouse Point Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Wilton Manors Oakland Park Hillsboro Beach The Galt Palm Aire The Pelican Pelican Visit us online at www.pompanopelican.com The The Pelican Pelican Giant meet and greet is planned for Unity in the Community DayBy Judy VikPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach Mark the calendar and save the date Saturday, Feb. 4. Thats when an inaugural celebration, Unity in the Community Pompano Beach, takes place from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Pompano Community Park, 2001 NE 10 St., next to the amphitheater. The goal is to foster unity among various multi-cultural and religious groups in Pompano Beach, said Rev. William Clark, president of the volunteer board planning the event.Cast Your Vote on Election Day, Jan. 31 See UNITY on page 11 Lysengen gets big nancial boost from one backerBy Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFLighthouse Point City commission candidate Becky Lysengen has raised more than $12,000 in campaign funding since the last reporting period, making her the richest contender for one of two commission seats. The largest chunk of new money, $5,000, came from 10 travel-related/timeshare companies all operating out of 2419 E. Commercial Boulevard in Fort Lauderdale and owned by LHP resident James Verrillo. Each company donated $500, the maximum allowed by law. Lysengen said those checks came to her campaign through a third party See LYSENGEN on page 3 District 1 Commissioner Joe Miller stands by as pier buildings are demolished. The structures on Deer elds International Fishing Pier were demolished this week to make way for a new restaurant, bait shop and restrooms. Community Development Agency Manager Keven Klopp called it a bittersweet moment as the 50-yearold buildings were trashed in just a few minutes. The pier remains open for shermen and sightseers via a temporary bait shop entrance. All systems there are not in place however, so for a few days admission to the pier will be free.Photo courtesy of City of Deer eld BeachFamiliar landmarks hit the dust in Deer eld Beach Sonny Ogden will show her giant Tridacna gigas she discovered while living in the Marshall Islands. The shell and its story will be at the Broward Shell Show Saturday, Jan. 21, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Sunday, Jan. 22, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The center is at 1801 NE 6 Street. See story on page 2.By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach Willie Heath was 22 when Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was assassinated in 1968. And almost 45 years after the civil rights icon was cut down, she still vividly remembers the sorrow and MLK event focuses on faith, progress, educationSee MLK on page 4

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2 The PelicanFriday, January 20, 2012 SightingsA local calendar for events, meetings and more in North Broward County. Please email calendar items to siren2415@gmail. com or fax to 954-783-0093. SPECIAL TO THE PELICANPompano Beach A clam shell weighing 328 pounds and brought here from the waters of the Kwajalein Atoll will be among the exhibits at the Broward Shell Show this weekend, Jan. 21 to 22 at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Giant Tridacna gigas is star of Broward Shell ShowPompano Beach. The shell, a rst-place winner in last years show, was discovered by Sonny Ogden in 1967 when she was living in the Marshall Islands. Kwajalein is the worlds largest coral atoll, 97 islands surrounded by 2,175 square kilometers of water. Squarely in the middle of the South Paci c, it is 2,136 miles from Hawaii, 2,300 miles from New Guinea and 2,300 miles from Tokyo. For the Ogdens, who loved to sh, snorkel, sail and dive, it was paradise. Ogden had learned that a giant clam (Tridacna gigas) was living on one of the coral heads in a nearby lagoon and she planned to photograph it while on a dive trip. When she and her party arrived at the coral head, however, they found the shell lying on its side, dead. Although greatly disappointed, Ogden decided to bring the shell home. It was located in 20 feet of water so she and her fellow divers lifted the shell to the surface using air bags. It took four people to bring shell aboard the boat. Ogden nicknamed her giant nd, Killer Clam. In 1969, when her family moved back to the USA, Sonnys enormous clam, over three feet wide and two feet high, was packed in a crate and shipped back with their belongings to the US where they settled in Pompano Beach. She rst exhibited Killer Clam at the 2011 Broward Shell Show, winning rst prize in the Scienti c SelfCollected category. The shell is now the Broward Shell Show mascot and will be exhibited again this year. The show is open to the public. Admission and parking are free. Show hours are Saturday, Jan. 21, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Sunday, Jan. 22, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. For more information, call Nancy Galdo, 305-467-4412.See SIGHTINGS on page 41-20 The Oakland Park Friends of the Library will have a book sale from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Oakland Park Library, 1298 NE 37th Street. Proceeds will benefit the library. 954-630-4370. 1-20 The City of Wilton Manors will be showing Dolphin Tale at 7 p.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, as part of Movie in the Park. Dolphin Tale, rated PG, is the story of a boy who befriends a dolphin who has lost its tail. 954390-2130.

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The Pelican 3 Friday, January 20, 2012 The Pelican 954-783-8700 who is a big supporter. I needed to get my rst mailer out early for absentee voters, Lysengen said. Unfortunately, I am hearing rumors that I would help him get timeshares in the city. And no way has he funded my entire campaign. Attempts to reach Verrillo were unsuccessful. His son Jerry said the companies own hotels and a cruise ship and the rms are booking agents. He would not comment on his fathers political contributions. Contributions from Lysengens big backer made her the top fundraiser in this reporting cycle which ended Jan. 6. Since then, she said, she has raised another $2,000. Her current report re ects only $438 in expenditures. Figures for printing and mailings will be included in the next report, Lysengen said this week, because her printer gave her credit until the total order is complete. Her opponent, incumbent Susie Gordon brought in another $2,750 for a total of $6,250 in contributions. County Commissioner Chip LaMarca, Hillsboro Beach Vice Mayor Dan Dodge and LHP Chamber of Commerce founder Michele Greene are LysengenContinued from page 1By Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFWilton Manors Nearly all of Wilton Manors strip malls and mixed-use developments have at least one or two empty storefronts and Wilton Park, a mixed-use development at Wilton Drive and Northeast 21 Court with 145 units and 19,000 sq. ft. of commercial space, sits almost completely empty. But despite the economic downturn, developers and businesses are still investing in the city. Melissa Kaushner, the newly-minted owner of Menchies, a frozen yogurt shop, said she was attracted to the city because of its neighborhood feel. I loved Despite downturn and some failures, investors stay in Wilton Manors the community . Im thrilled to be here. Every night is a better night. Menchies is the newest of three businesses at Five Points, on Wilton Drive, Dixie Highway and Northeast 26 Street. The other two, Lolas Healthy Pet Caf and Chopsticks, a Chinese restaurant, both opened within the last few months. Down the street on Dixie Highway, Wiltons Manor Doggie Daycare also counts itself as a recent addition to the citys business community. The newest and biggest addition is Wiltons Bier Garden, on Wilton Drive. Bier Gardens 5,000 square foot restaurant with outside dining, was built from the ground zSee WILTON MANORS on page 24among her donors. The other commission seat is being sought by incumbent Tom Hasis who is nancing his own campaign with a bank account so far of $4,000, and his challenger Earl Maucker who has raised $2,000. Among his supporters is land planning attorney Susan Motley, who also contributed to Lysengens campaign. On Jan. 31, voters in Lighthouse Point will elect two commissioners. Registered Republicans will vote for a presidential primary candidate in addition to the commission vote.

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4 The PelicanFriday, January 20, 2012 discontentment she felt that day. [I thought] it was the end of everything that could be, not knowing it was only the beginning. On Jan. 16, the day after the 83rd anniversary of Kings birthday, public of cials, Heath and hundreds of her fellow Pompano Beach residents turned out for the citys 2012 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. celebration at Ely High School. Among the speakers and performers who were a part of the event, a common theme resounded: faith, courage and service to others. People of faith are the pillars of our society. [Kings] convictions came from his faith. Its what he stood for. Its what he lived for. Its what he died for, said Broward Sheriff Al Lamberti. How many of us wait around to be served? When you leave, ask yourself, What are you doing to serve others? William C. McCormick, Jr., former president of the Fort Lauderdale branch of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, echoed Lamberti, saying no one should think society owes us something. McCormick said individuals who dont strive to illuminate their own lives risk setting back the progress others have made. Our destinies are interwoven . A quality education is the only equalizer, said McCormick, who highlighted Elys recent A grade from the State of Florida. McCormick said he and Elys principal, Karlton Johnson, attended Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University together and competed to see who would do better athletically and educationally. I see his works are paying off here, said McCormick. He also read a ctional telegram from King, saying that the shackles of Jim Crow have been removed but replaced by the shackles of poor economic and educational progress. The U.S. Department of Labor estimates that 15.2 percent of the African MLKContinued from page 1American workforce is unemployed compared to 7.2 percent of their white counterparts. And, according to the U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistics, African Americans comprise 39.4 percent of the prison population but, according to the 2010 Census, only 12.6 percent of the total population. In an interview with The Pelican Commissioner Woodrow Poitier said the city was working on redeveloping northwest Pompano by bringing in new businesses and jobs for the community so that the area is a destination, not just a pass through. Asked how she thought the African American community could improve its situation, Heath responded, With Gods help . without God, we cant do anything. Calvin Holloway, 4, of Young Minds of Greatness, performs a rap song for attendees at Pompanos Martin Luther King, Jr. event on Jan. 16. [Photo by Michael dOliveira] SightingsContinued from page 2 1-21 The Model Railroad Flea Market and Swap Meet will take place from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Westside Park Recreation Center, 445 SW 2nd street, Deer eld Beach. 954-4488935 or 954-260-7013. 1-21 Pony rides will be available at Sand & Spurs Equestrian Park, 1600 NE 5th Avenue from 9 to 11:30 a.m. Admission is free and rides cost $3. Public welcome. 954786-4507. 1-21 to 22 The 3rd Annual Island City Open will take place at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive. The tournament is open to men and women in the singles, doubles and mixed doubles See SIGHTINGS on page 9

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The Pelican 5 Friday, January 20, 2012 By Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFNobody can know your body as well as you, says Dr. Eugenio L. Menendez, a Pompano Beach physician. Behind this statement lies much of Dr. Menendezs medical philosophy. He employs active listening when he meets his patients. He observes each patients physical movements and complaints. Yet he is surrounded with computer screens and the latest technology in his spacious of ce. His slogan is st Century Medicine practiced the Old-fashioned Way. And that is part of the main difference between an M.D. and a D.O. Dr. Menendez explains, A doctor with an D.O. has all the training of an M.D. plus the additional skills to treat the body holistically. Observing and examining the body structure gives me more information in my diagnosis. This is a bene t to the patient. Osteopathic medicine involves the manipulation of muscles and bones to create a healthier body. Dr. Menendez teaches his patients to understand the messages of speci c pain. When the heart is under stress, through its nerves, it sends messages through tingling and numbness in the left hand. The gall bladders messages are emitted to the right shoulder blade where pain can become intense. These are strong alerts to call the doctor. Patients here will share their concerns about speci c pain and other issues with Dr. Menendez, and in some cases may nd better health through diet and a prescribed exercise. The word physician means teacher, says Dr. Menendez, so I teach patients about whats going on in their bodies. Through this method I can nd and prevent disease. Obesity is considered a disease by Dr. Menendez, and overeating, he sees as an addiction. And as he saw more and more overweight problems in his of ce, he began to write down his concepts and ideas about the disease. Now Dr. Menendez offers a medically-supervised weight loss program and preventative health screening with state-of-the-art ultrasound equipment in the of ce. Dr. Menendezs book, The Peoples Diet, is a companion with a nutritious diet for his patients to use, lose weight and keep the pounds off. It is geared to improve a healthier heart, lose inches around the waist and improve tolerance for exercise, he says.Staff additionThe practice is proud to announce that Dr. Charles Srour, Board-Certi ed Chiropractic Physician of Pro Healthcare, is now accepting appointments at Pompano Beach Internal Medicine. Dr. Srour diagnoses and treats a variety of injuries including many sports-related conditions. Some of the injuries he has had success treating include whiplash, headaches, back pain, sciatica, shoulder pain, tennis elbow, carpal tunnel syndrome, knee and ankle pain. Over the past ten years, he has treated many professional athletes including players from the Miami Dolphins, Florida Marlins and Florida Panthers. He has also worked on various Hollywood movie sets working with actors and stunt men. Please call 954-946-7171 to reach Dr. Srours staff to schedule an appointment.Dr. Menendez and staff offer professional medical services The Team Dr. Eugenio Menendez, Leeann Lluberes, Sonaly DeAlmeida, Angela La Torre and Eugenio Menendez, Sr. [Staff photo]

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6 The PelicanFriday, January 20, 2012 Deer eld Beach, Pompano Beach, Lighthouse Point, LauderdaleBy-The-Sea, Wilton Manors and Oakland ParkWilton Manors Oakland Park Hillsboro Beach The Pompano Pelican is published weekly on FridaysStreet Address: 1500-A E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, FL 33060 Telephone: 954-783-8700 Fax: 954-783-0093Letters to the Editor are encouraged and accepted for print if signed, although a writers name will be withheld on request; letters must also include a daytime telephone number. Advertising rates are available upon request. Subscription rate is $31.80 including tax for one years delivery in Greater Pompano Beach; $95.40/per year including tax for others in the United States; call 954-783-8700 for rates abroad. The Pelican is a nonpartisan newspaper and reserves the right to decline advertising. Copyright 2011. Reproduction of this publication in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission of the publisher. The Pelican is a member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, Deer eld Beach Chamber and the LBTS Chamber. The Pelican is a state certi ed woman-owned minority business. The Pelican is delivered to businesses, libraries, schools, of ces, hospitals, news racks and single family homes. All advertising and copy is published at the sole discretion of the publisher. We welcome your critiques and ideas concerning this publication. Anne Siren, publisherExecutive Assistant: Mary Hudson Finance: Peter Pritchard Graphics: Rachel Ramirez Windsheimer and Adriana Bonilla Bookkeeper: John White Classi eds: Fran Shelby Contributing Writers: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Judy Wilson, Malcolm McClintock, Judy Vik, Mike dOliveira Account Executives: Paul Shroads, Carolyn Mann, Bill Heaton, Bill Fox ESTABLISHED 1993 Volume XX, Issue 3 Founding Editor and PublisherAnne Hanby Siren Letters & OpinionsLysengen and Maucker will bring new eyes to LHP CommissionEven in Lighthouse Point, considered a model city by some, there is room for improvement. It is this concept that struck The Pelicans editorial board as it deliberated this recommendation for the Jan. 31 city commission election. Each of the four candidates possess outstanding quali cations and, if elected, will serve the community well. Tom Hasis and Susie Gordon have been highly productive for years. But it may be time for a change. Challengers Earl Maucker and Becky Lysengen have more ideas for the future than incumbents Tom Hasis and Susie Gordon. Maucker speaks about the possibility of nding new ways to pay for dredging canals, a feature of the city that keeps real estate values high. He says new technology is needed quickly in order to bring the citys cherished library up to speed and believes grants are available to help pay for that. He wants the city to be pro-active in attracting businesses to the somewhat blighted US 1 strip, an area that has been neglected for years. Although burying utility lines is expensive, Maucker believes there may be grant dollars to create a plan for the at-risk areas. In his brief stint on the commission, Maucker met with each of the department heads, so has handled that learning curve. His knowledge of business practices is another asset. And nally, if he could successfully manage a newsroom, as he did for many years, he can be an effective leader on the commission. Becky Lysengen brings many of the same qualities to the campaign: experience in grant funding, an understanding of new technology with the added plus that she sees the opportunities offered by social networking. She also has ideas for using the citys playing elds more effectively and hosting moneymaking youth tournaments. We particularly like the fact that after losing her rst election attempt, Lysengen did not retreat. Already involved in kids sports, she added another component to the citys image, a cultural one, and with her committee is bringing in movies and music for families to enjoy. She also went to work on two of the citys major events, Keepers Days and LHP Aglow. Her place of residence is another plus. Lysengen lives north of Sample Road where less tax dollars have been spent in the past. Its a grievance for those living there and one she would address. Lysengens youth is a huge asset. She exudes vitality. And her exposure every day to the needs of young families would give the board a balance it does not have currently. Both Lysengen and Maucker believe commissioners should limit their public service and after a few terms in of ce make way so other interested citizens can do his or her part. In a town with so much available talent, we agree. Mark Brown has edge over his opponent in the Jan. 31 race for Seat 3 in Lauderdale-By-The-SeaCompared to the division and rancor seen on the dais a few years ago, the commission is functioning smoothly and with civility now. Brown says hes running to keep things moving forward. We believe his experience as a journalist and as chief of staff for two members of Congress will serve him well as a town commissioner. He appears able to weigh both sides of an issue and come to a conclusion based on whats best for the town and its taxpayers. Brown says he will keep an eye on dollars spent, eliminate unnecessary, wasteful spending and try to provide the town with the best quality service at the lowest cost. As the volunteer editor of a local newspaper, he proposed the ethics ordinance the commission passed. He also championed a personal code of conduct for commissioners, passed by the commission after the last election. If elected, Brown says the rst thing he will do is sign the voluntary code of personal conduct. It commits him to treat people with respect and conduct himself properly. He says he will set the kind of example people expect or want out of their elected of cials. If your gut says that doesnt sound right . you just dont do it. Even if ethics is not a pressing issue at this time, people are never going to get con dent in government until of cials, to a person, set the kind of example that will restore their faith in government, he said in an interview with The Pelican editorial board. We agree with his views and believe all town residents and businesses will be well served by Brown. Browns opponent, Edmund Malkoon, 36, is a lifelong resident of the town. He has volunteered at many community events and served on the towns now defunct master plan steering committee and on the board of his neighborhood Bel-Air Civic Association. He is a realtor and insurance agent. We believe Browns more extensive resume and knowledge of how things work in government will bring more to the commission.Choice for LHP voters is change versus the continuumBy Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFLighthouse Point In practically perfect Lighthouse Point, the issue in this campaign for two city commission seats is whether or not change would be an improvement. The contest for Seat 1 is between incumbent Tom Hasis who has been a commissioner for 22 years and retired newspaper executive Earl Maucker; and for Seat 3, Susie Gordon, a commission veteran of 12 years and teacher Becky Lysengen. All four express a desire for public service and deep feelings for the community. Each of them, when the question was posed Will there be a time when merging police and re services with BSO would be an option?, answered with a resounding no. Hasis, 65, is a local attorney, who grew up in the city working in the family restaurant, Caps Place, where he is now an owner. He has been active in the Broward League of Cities and Florida League of Cities for most of his years on the commission, serves as a trustee of the Municipal Insurance Trust and was on the South Florida Regional Planning Council. He was a director of the Pompano Chamber, is a member of the Exchange Club and on the Broward Historical Commission. He holds his law degree from the University of Florida and is single. Heres what the candidates say in Lighthouse PointSee LHP Candidates on page 7 Mark Brown Becky Lysengen Earl Maucker

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The Pelican 7 Friday, January 20, 2012 Advertise with The Pelican 954.783.8700 His opponent, Maucker, 64, retired after 30 years as editor of the Sun-Sentinel newspaper and now owns Maucker Media Consultants. He serves on the LHP planning and zoning board, on the board of the United Way and is a member of the Exchange Club. A graduate of Leadership Broward, he was chosen Leader of the Year in 2006. Maucker moved to LHP in 1999 and is married with two sons. He was chosen by the commission last year to serve out the term of Chip LaMarca who was elected to the county commission. He is a veteran of the U.S. Air Force. He received his degree in journalism at Southern Illinois University. Gordon, 58, came to LHP in 1978, married and raised ve children. She presents a long list of civic involvements including leadership positions with the Friends of the LHP Library, LHP Historical Committee, Childrens Home Society, American Cancer Society, Norcrest Elementary School Advisory Council and First Presbyterian Church. She is currently president of the city commission and has campaigned over the years for a number of successful Republican candidates. Her challenger, Becky Lysengen, 33, grew up in Lighthouse Point and is raising her family here. She is a fth-grade teacher at Norcrest Elementary School and chair of the schools SAT committee. Lysengen ran unsuccessfully for the commission last year. After the election she organized the LHP Cultural Arts Committee which now sponsors family movie nights, the Fourth of July celebration, band concerts and, still to come this year, an appearance of the Florida Youth Orchestra. She is a member of Soroptimist Club, the Keepers Days Committee, Lighthouse Aglow and is a soccer coach. She holds degrees from the University of Florida and Florida Atlantic University. The Pelican editorial board met with all four candidates and posed these questions. Does the town shuttle provide a signi cant bene t and should public funds continue to be used for so few riders? Hasis -I was an early proponent of the shuttle. Without it, senior citizens were trapped in their homes. The route needs expanding, and perhaps the bus could be put in service for community events like the Taste of LHP, but we dont need to serve a lot of people to be doing the right thing. That is what government is all about. Maucker The city needs to market it more. It is a worthwhile and essential service.Gordon -Id like to see it continue. I dont know why there are not more riders. I thought everyone would jump on it. Id like to see the route posted on the outside of the bus.Lysengen- I am a big supporter of the shuttle and we need to communicate more about this service, maybe with a community letter to get that information out to the condominiums. The city is becoming younger demographically. Will there be enough athletic elds to support this generation? Any thoughts on changes in the recreation programs? Hasis- We may have to adjust the schedulesmore hours rather than more space. The recreation programs are well regarded and our tennis facility gets raves. If people want something new, well provide it. Maucker-We are limited on space so we need to use it effectively develop new programs that would do that. But I hear nothing but good things about our recreation program. GordonI cant see us nding more property but there are ways to do things, like the $2,000 I found in the travel budget for our Halloween party. I would like to see the hours of the summer program extended for working parents from 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Lysengen -We should look at the times elds are not in use. There are ways to play soccer on short elds which would be a more ef cient use of space. We could host tournaments which would bring in money. Also, our fees are low. Outsiders should be charged more to play here. What about the library? What are your thoughts on expanding services there? Hasis We need access to cyberspace. Well evolve. We should keep our ear to the ground to best serve the residents. Maucker- We must continue to get digitized and move very quickly into the 22nd Century. There are grants around for this. The new librarian has to be a futurist. Gordon-The library is my baby. I still read books, but we need to tap into technology so patrons can rent books. That could be a revenue raiser. I would never support our library going into the county system. LysengenI write grants and there are all sorts of literary grants available. We should get more Kindles. They save space. The library should be a lifelong learning center. What can the city do to stimulate business on US 1? Hasis-We should seek out the kind of businesses wed like to see come here and offer nancial incentives. We should market the town showing our demographic. Personally, Id like to see more restaurants and retail services. Maucker- The city is not marketing itself successfully. It could be more proactive needs to create a helpful environment for business. Gordon- I butt heads on this one. When every building is occupied, then we can restrict signage again. I am okay with banner signs and neon. I voted for the blue signs Carpet Mills wanted. I am proud the Gordons bought a building here for their family insurance business. We went where we lived. Lysengen-I hear there are problems in the building department. It may be worth the money to get our own department. We should market LHP via social networks Twitter, Facebook and YouTube. I think businesses that appeal to youngsters would do well here. Is it time to term-limit city commissioners? Hasis-I am term limited every three years. It takes time to learn the issues, put a plan in place and carry it out. Change is not always positive. Maucker-Being a city commissioner should not be a lifelong occupation. Im not for mandatory rules. People should limit themselves. I am looking at two terms. New life brings vibrancy (to a board). Gordon-Maybe it is; on the other hand, if everyone gets along and is doing a good job, why? The machine is going well and I have a direct connection to department heads. Let the voters decide. Lysengen- There are talented people in the city. New faces force more civic activity and involvement. I think two terms are enough. What particular expertise do you, or would you, bring to the dais? HasisMy experience and knowledge of the citys history and what works here. Maucker- I have been immersed in local government all my life. I know I can be effective. I want to bring my spirit of service to the community. I know how to be an effective leader. I know budgets. I will be visible and accessible to the public. Gordon- I have contact with state and county of cials. When I need to, I can reach out to them I have a name and a number. I know ways to get things done. Lysengen I am a teacher. I can multitask. I do a lot with less money. At school I have come up with nancial solutions. I think about the long term effects of actions. I am also a business owner and understand customer service. I have energy. I get a lot done. GordonOur infrastructure is 54 years oldthe seawall, canals, drainage we need to keep up the maintenance. I am running because I like it (being a commissioner.) I enjoy being tapped to solve a problem. I have deep roots here. LHP adopted me. I want to give something back. Lysengen- We need street lights and sidewalks particularly on the north end. Street closures might deter crime, but neighborhoods should decide that. We should plan for obsolescence, plan for underground utilities, keep taxes low, increase our property values. I grew up here. I want to be a community leader and think about our future, how to protect and improve it. LHP candidate interviewsContinued from page 6

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8 The PelicanFriday, January 20, 2012 Business matters The Pelican takes a look at local business owners. Call The Pelican to nd out how you can tell your story here because business matters. 954-783-8700. Lets do some business!Do potential customers know of your existence?By Ted SmithMARKETING EXECUTIVEIn business, it seems ironic that the sector needing marketing the most is the most neglected. Owners of highpowered marketing agencies or public relations agencies fail to consider the small business sector a viable market in terms of pro tability. But equally, owners of small businesses shy away from agencies either because they are pre-occupied with staying open during the current economic crisis or distrust the consulting process. Marketing is not an exact science rather a discipline, and its unique virtue is inherent in its personalization Marketing begins with a sound foundation very much like a building does. Marketing starts with a check-up for businesses similar to your annual physical. So lets get going. Pull out your rst business plan. If for some reason you never did a plan then you should do one now. This exercise will probably reap havoc, so put on your army boots rst. If you think its too late to write a plan now, I can promise you that it is an enlightening exercise. There is more to owning a business than just being the owner. See LETS DO BUSINESS on page 18 James Gotzman, Jimmy Lindo, Luther Gray, Gary Lanham, owner of Real Estate Recovery, Spencer Jennings, Anthony Mas, Richard RogowskiBy Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFOakland Park Spend ve minutes with Gary Lanham, and it is clear that this is a man with a new and powerful approach for people who want to buy and sell property today. Lanham, the creative owner of Real Estate Recovery, 3242 NE 12 Ave., Oakland Park is a licensed Realtor and broker with several additional designations. He is also a certi ed residential specialist, a certi ed international specialist and an E-Pro which means he is technologically knowledgeable with clients using the internet. Real Estate Recovery offers new technology power to buyers and sellers facing todays real estate challengesHe has a staff of eight licensed Realtors and one broker assistant who is also a licensed real estate attorney in Florida and New York. I have chosen a team that deals in numbers as I do, and my approach works well for us, Lanham says. Our lawyer, Jeff Yunis is very important and reassuring to New York clients who are accustomed to a lawyer writing the contract. Three of my staff members speak English and Spanish. Wed love to add a quali ed speaker of Portuguese, Creole or French. We are huge in social media. Our Facebook business page brings us many clients from South America and New York who want a property in our paradise. We have Google click-through ads which are producing many listings and buyers. In fact, we have used technology for listing and buying campaigns. He continues with an example. Lets say we have a New Yorker who wants to sell a Florida property. Our ad will show up whenever a prospective buyer checks the internet for available South Florida properties for sale. This campaign has brought buyers to us helping the seller maximize the nal sales amount. Our internet campaigns have made our See REAL ESTATE on page 23

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The Pelican 9 Friday, January 20, 2012 Advertise with The Pelican 954-783-8700 categories. The cost is $25 for singles and $30 per team. Entry fee includes a t-shirt, gift bag and barbecue. A portion of the proceeds will go to help fund the restoration and upkeep of the tennis courts. 954-390-2132. SightingsContinued from page 4 See SIGHTINGS on page 111-21 The Oakland Park Historical Society is hosting its second annual Highwaymen Show from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Jaco Pastorius Community Center, 4000 N. Dixie Highway, Oakland Park. Admission is free. 1-21 There will be a park cleanup event at Exchange Club Park, 2800 NE 24 St., Pompano Beach, from 8 to 11 a.m. Gloves, trash bags and water will be provided for volunteers. The event is organized by the Recycling and Solid Waste Advisory Committee for Pompano Beach. 954-7864111. 1-22 The South Florida Chamber Ensemble, SFCE, will present Mirror Images at 2 p.m. at Zion Lutheran, 959 SE 6th Ave., Deer eld Beach. The program will feature Farrenc, Fasch, Doppler, Vinee, and Chaminade. SFCE is made up of six musicians from the brass, woodwind, string and percussion families. 954-803-3762. 1-23 Deer eld Beach Commissioner Bill Ganz and Police Chief Pete Sudler will hold a Dist. 4 crime watch meeting at Constitution Park, 2841 W. Hillsboro Blvd., at 7 p.m. All residents are invited to attend. 954-4804417. 1-23 The Library Advocate General Barbara Correll will be at the Friends of the Century Plaza Library Annual Meeting, 1856A West Hillsboro Blvd, Deer eld Beach, at 2:45 p.m. She will be speaking about What the Public Should Expect From Public Libraries, and the Role of Citizens Advocates. Light refreshments will be served. 954-360-1330. 1-24 The Benevolent Patriotic Order of DOES Drive 142 will hold a pancake breakfast from 9 a.m. to noon at the Elks lodge, 700 N.E. 10 St., Pompano Beach. Cost is $5 for adults and $2.50 for children. 954-725-5192 1-25 The NE Focal Point 14th Annual Fashion Show will be held from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the Lighthouse Point Yacht & Racquet Club, 2701 NE 42 St. Tickets are $50. 954-4804460. 1-25 The Wilton Drive Task Force will meet at 7 p.m. in the Emergency Operations Conference room at city hall, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. The Task Force was formed in 2010 to come up with recommendations regarding Wilton Drive.

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10 The PelicanFriday, January 20, 2012 Making a DifferencePhyllis J. Neuberger wants your suggestions about people who are making a difference. Call 954-783-8700. Philly/Jersey Shore reunionLighthouse Point Join fellow Philly and Jersey Shore friends at JC Wahoos Sports Bar on Jan. 28 at 6 p.m., 3110 N. Federal Highway, Lighthouse Point for a good time and a good bene t. Frankie Fats Montana, Phillys #1 World Famous Banjo Player and his showmen start the evening and are followed by The Human Percolator at 9 p.m. On Sunday, Jan. 29 from 3 to 6 p.m., enjoy the Broward County Mummers, a Philly tradition. Tickets for each event are $5. Proceeds bene t the Wounded Warriors, a project to assist severely wounded U.S. militarymen and women. Call 954410-5536.Days of Capone recalled in history tourDeer eld Beach -The 53.3 acres that make up Deer eld Island Park in Deer eld Beach are full of history. In the early 1930s the land was labeled Capone Island after gangster Al Capone even though Capone himself never actually owned it. The area at that time was a peninsula, not an island. Find out more about the county park systems true island park when it hosts an Intracoastal History Tour, from 10 to 11:30 a.m. on Sunday, Jan. 29. A boat shuttle to the island is provided. Participants should arrive at Sullivan Park dock by 9:30 a.m. Sullivan Park is on Riverview Road off Hillsboro Boulevard on the west side of the Intracoastal Waterway. Tickets are $5. Call 954-357-5100 BriefsBy Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFAnn Brummer is much more than that beautiful lady on the arm of Pompano Beach Vice Mayor, George Brummer. Theyre a team, married for 63 years, with two children, six grandchildren and one great grand child. Ann, who has had her own career and still keeps a busy schedule, says, We listen to each other, offer suggestions but in the end, we must make up our own minds and our own decisions. Right now, she and her committee are focusing on making the second gala fundraiser, planned for March 31, a big success. Last year, we gave four scholarships to graduating students who are pursuing a career in the arts. Each of our two high schools recommended the students and we were thrilled to present them with their checks. This year we hope to raise even more money at our gala so that we can give even more scholarships. She continued. Those of us who support the arts including music, Ann Brummer and team plan second gala fundraiser on March 31 for Herb Skolnick Cultural Arts Foundation This playful young couple, George and Ann Brummer [left] are dressed as Maurice Chevalier and GiGi for a costume party in the 70s with friends. Above George and Ann are on another outing. Strong proponents of theater and entertainment, Ann promises lots of fun at the upcoming fund raiser for the Herb Skolnick Foundation of the arts.dance, art and theater are devastated to see that in a bad economy, the arts always face the rst cuts. So we do what we can to help students in the arts. Our Gala tries to help ll that gap. The self appointed Gala committee includes Suzan Fisher, Debbi Beach, Amy Harden, Cynthia Portier and Ann Brummer. The Gala event will include cocktails and dinner at the Oaks Club in Palm Aire. The music and entertainment will be provided by Pompano Beach High School. Last year the Blanche Ely High School jazz band performed, and it was a delight, Ann says. Additional entertainment came from the students at the Fort Lauderdale School of Ballet. They performed vignettes from the ballet classics. This years program promises to be very exciting with a musical variety from show tunes to opera. We want to make this spectacular evening affordable to many Pompano residents. (Last years tickets were $75. The Gala price for this year was not determined at press time.) Ann referred The Pelican to her husband to explain how it works. George said, These women, volunteering to have a Gala to raise funds for the Herb Skolnick Cultural Arts Foundation, are a self appointed group. The actual Foundation committee which controls the funds in this foundation is the city commission. When we function as a foundation committee we must See GALA on page 18

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The Pelican 11 Friday, January 20, 2012 Our plan is to provide a sense of camaraderie among all ethnic communities, races, religions and the ve distinct districts of Pompano Beach. Admission is free, and the event will feature free food and drinks. DJ Jim Balistreri is managing stage entertainment. Performers include: Blanche Ely High School Jazz Band, Elvis Presley impersonator David Morin and dancers from the Polynesian Cultural Association. Also taking part are professional skateboarders from Rocketown, clowns, a facepainter and representatives from Swim with Mr. Blue, a swimming school. The Broward Sheriffs Of ce will have a display, and there will be bounce houses for the youngsters. Businesses, cultural groups, religious organizations, civic and homeowners associations are invited to take part. Participants must bring their own 10 x 10-foot tent, sixfoot table and two chairs. No selling of articles or food will be allowed but materials can be displayed to promote businesses. No alcohol, tobacco or adult entertainment will be allowed. Also planned are a raf e and a 50-50 drawing. Presenting sponsor of the event is 1-800-411-PAIN. Other sponsors are Rodriguez Charities, Bobby Rubinos, Chickl-A, Minuteman Press, BB&T, Pompano Has Heart, Cresthaven Civic Association and David Morin. Rev. Clark is a former pastor of the Unity Church in Pompano Beach. Serving with him on the Unity in the Community Board are Ronald Boehl, Diana Thomas, Robert Holmes, Paul Laya, and Carol Waldrop. UIC is on Facebook. For more information on the event, call 954-899-5557 or 954-941-6364. Those who want a free space should contact Mark Beaudreau at 954-786-4111 or e-mail mark.beaudreau@ copb .com. Unitycontinued on page 1 LBTS Candidate Mark Brown continues his lead in fundraising over opponent Edmund Malkoon in the contest for Seat 3 on the Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Town Commission. The election is Jan. 31. In the latest reporting period, from Dec. 24 to Jan. 6, Brown has two new $100 contributions. One is from an LBTS resident, and the other from an out-of-state friend. He listed no expenses for the period. Browns total contributions are $18,671.74 and expenses $8,714. Malkoon reports $450 in new contributions. They are from three people, none from LBTS. His expenses are $941.25 for yard signs, an invitation to a fund-raiser and advertising in The Pelican newspaper. Malkoons total contributions are $3,840, and expenses are $2,216.88. Registered voters in LBTS will choose one commissioner on Jan. 31. Registered Republicans will vote for their presidential choice along with the commission seat.Browns funding more than triples Malkoon in LBTS

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12 The PelicanFriday, January 20, 2012 Stonewall organizer pulls out of 2012 eventBy Michael dOliveiraPELICAN STAFFWilton Manors One and done. Wedner & Friends, which organized the Stonewall Street Festival and the citys Halloween event in 2011, has decided not to take on Stonewall in 2012. Last year was the only time Wedner ran the event. After careful consideration I have chosen . not to continue with the remaining two years of our three year contract, wrote Ellen Wedner in a letter to the city. While this was a hard decision to make after the success of the 2011 Stonewall Street Festival and Parade, moving forward within the current situation is not favorable to the interests of Wedner & Friends. Wedner did not return a call by The Pelican in time for publication. Mayor Gary Resnick said the city is in negotiations with the Rainbow Business Coalition, or RBC, a group of about 100 countywide Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender business owners, to take over the event. Its part of our identity. We are determined to have the Stonewall Street Festival, said Resnick. The event stretches back to 2000, just as the city was starting to develop its identity as a gay enclave. During its rst year, an estimated 7,000 attended. Now, the citys biggest event attracts tens of thousands from around South Florida and the country. The name comes from the Stonewall Street Riots, a series of violent protests by gays and lesbians in New York City in June of 1969 that occurred in response to harassment by police. We wish to make this a true city event, said Reece Darham, owner of Island City Health & Fitness in Wilton Manors and a member of the RBC. If negotiations are successful with RBC, it would be the third organization to take over Stonewall in as many years. In 2010, Pride of Greater Fort Lauderdale took the helm. Pride, which has since been dissolved, ended the event without paying the $5,114 they owed to police of cers they hired to work security. And two years later, said Assistant City Manager Leigh Ann Henderson, of cers who worked the event still havent been paid. According to Bob Mays, nance director, the city made $2,500 from last years Stonewall. Krishan Manners, Main Street president and CEO, said he supports the RBC taking over the event. No major event like that is going to succeed in Wilton Manors without bar support and RBC certainly has that. I will throw [Wilton Manors] Main Street behind them to help in any way I can. Dont forget to VOTE on Jan. 31.By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach When she was younger, Kiani Collins, 16, thought she wanted to be a fashion designer. Like most little girls she liked to get decked out in fancy garb. Now her career goals have changed to the more practical arts: law or criminal justice or journalism, but when she had to organize a fundraiser for her community service hours, a fashion show seemed like a good idea. So Saturday, Jan. 21 at 2 p.m., Kiani is staging Winter IB student single-handedly organizing fashion show to bene t Make-A-Wish Wishes Fashion Show at First Presbyterian Church to bene t the Make-A-Wish Foundation of South Florida. Along with clothes from Bealls Department Store and Island Water Sports, there will be a silent auction of goodie baskets from Macys and the Dolphins, and refreshments. Classmates will model the fashions which will range from party dresses to beachwear. Kiani is in the International Baccalaureate program at Deer eld Beach See FASHION on page 16Decked in yellow, Kiani Collins is ready to put the fashions on the runway.

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The Pelican 13 Friday, January 20, 2012 Oakland Park The city of Oakland Park plans a citywide Yard Sale from 7 a.m. to noon Saturday, Jan. 21, at Jaco Pastorius Park, 4000 N. Dixie Hwy. Vendors must provide their own tables, chairs and tents. No food or beverages will be sold in the yard sale area. Cost for Oakland Park residents is $20 for one space and $40 for non-residents. Cost for each additional space is $15 for residents and $20 for non-residents. Call Parks and Leisure Services at 954-6304500.Oakland Park yard sale planned for Jan. 21 Jacobs to speak at local Democratic ClubPompano Beach Broward County Commissioner Kristin Jacobs will speak at the North Broward Democratic Club Wednesday, Jan. 25 at 7:30 p.m. at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6 St., Pompano Beach. Jacobs, elected in 1998 to represent the residents of Pompano Beach, Coconut Creek, Deer eld Beach and Margate, has previously served as Broward Countys vice mayor in 2004 and mayor in 2005. Jacobs who has served on numerous county boards dealing with climate, energy and transportation, was recently appointed chair of President Obamas White House National Ocean Council Governance Coordinating Committee. Refreshments will be served. The meeting is free and open to the public. Call 954-783-8232, or email jgoodwinnbdc@aol. com.

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14 The PelicanFriday, January 20, 2012 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFOakland Park The Oakland Park Historical Society is hosting its 2nd annual Highwaymen Show with three of the Hall of Fame Highwaymen artists from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 21. Admission is free with donations accepted. The show will be at Jaco Pastorius Community Center, 4000 N. Dixie Highway.. A specially commissioned Highwaymen-style painting of an Oakland Park scene will be raf ed for the bene t of the Oakland Park Historical Society. The Highwaymen are a loose association of AfricanAmerican artists from Fort Pierce. Originally there were 26 of them, some painting under the supervision of the more famous Beanie Bacchus. Nine are still living. Throughout the 1950s and 1960s they painted about 200,000 paintings and sold them out of their cars. At the end of the 1960s, the artists ceased painting and slipped into obscurity. They were reHighwaymen return Saturday for Oakland Park art showdiscovered in the mid-1990s and have since become known for their idyllic landscapes of rural Florida. The Highwaymen were inducted into the Florida Artists Hall of Fame in 2004. Last year R.L. Lewis, an historian, artist and entertainer, talked about the history of the Highwaymen, painted two paintings at the show and reviewed personal pieces of art attendees brought from home. A video of his appearance can be seen at www.youtube.com and type in RL Lewis Highwaymen. Lewis is one of the artists returning for Saturdays event along with R.A. McClendon and Willie Reagan. Their paintings will be for sale. Seven of their paintings line the walls of the City Commission Chambers here; Several are at the Oakland Park Library. For more information on the event, call 954-566-9957. Deer eld Beach Dennis Max opened one of his three new restaurants this week in completely remodeled space formerly Marciellos on S. Federal Highway, Deer eld Beach. Attending to give him a hand with the ribbon-cutting were members of the Deer eld Beach Chamber and other local dignitaries. Pictured from left are Chamber Chair Kiku Martinson, City Commissioner Joe Miller, interior designer Adolfo Galvez, Dennis Max, Mayor Peggy Noland, Chef Patrick Broadhead (behind), Silvana Broadhead. Other principals of the company in attendance were Fred Stampone and John Williams.Deer eld Chamber welcomes Frank & Dinoscutline cutline cutline cutline cutline cutline cutline cutline cutline cutline

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The Pelican 15 Friday, January 20, 2012 Now Online www.pompanopelican.com By Malcolm McClintockPELICAN STAFFTedescos2460 E. Commercial Blvd. Fort-Lauderdale954-493-9233Situated minutes from Lauderdale-By-The-Sea, the ber-quaint Tedescos Restaurant adds a ne new alternative on this busy Commercial Boulevard. This well appointed eatery delivers outstanding cuisine, superlative service and cozy old world charm surrounded by the sounds of Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin and New owner of Tedescos Restaurant introduces some of the nest Italian fare to Fort Lauderdale and surrounding communities other crooners from musics golden epoch. Owner Fiore Casale is always on hand to greet patrons to his newly renovated trattoria. We specialize in fresh seafood, says the mildmannered restaurateur. But we also have a great selection of chicken, steak, veal and pasta dishes. Indeed, Tedescos menu is replete with all the quintessentially Italian favorites that turn rst time visitors into life-long customers. Seductive appetizers such as the beef Carpacio Di Manzo with shaved parmesan, the sweet baby clams in white wine sauce, the prosciutto stuffed artichokes or the Calamari Fritte with marinara sauce are just a few of the tantalizing options that will help kickstart a well-rounded meal. My family has been in the restaurant business for over 50 years, says Casale. People just have to visit us once and they become friends for life. On the entre front, a cornucopia of mouthwatering specialties titillates the senses. Seafood lovers can blissfully gorge on the Linguine al Vongole with baby clams, the lemon fuelled snapper Francaise, the grilled salmon with basil oil or the sauted Shrimp Fra Diavolo with garlic, white wine, fresh basil and diced cherry tomatoes. This is the best Italian restaurant in Broward. Plus the service is great. Honestly, I wouldnt go anywhere else, says Lighthouse Point resident George Miner who popped in to buy gift certi cates for friends and family. Meat a cionados can luxuriate in a hearty portion of veal Marsala, Ribeye steak, fettuccini Carbonara or the always reliable spaghetti with meatballs. Our meatballs are made from an old Neapolitan A Tedescos specialty, the Frutti di Mare over ows with fresh seafood smothered in a zesty marechiare sauce. See TEDESCOs on page 29

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16 The PelicanFriday, January 20, 2012 The Pelican 954-783-8700If I asked you what business you are in, could you answer in one sentence in ve seconds? If you cant, dont feel bad, most people I interview have trouble answering the question. The interview process asks some tough questions. Here are basic questions that business owners should be able to answer. How do you judge the success or failure of your business? What percentage of your business comes from a radius of 10 miles? How long have you been in business? Is this your rst business? Describe your ideal or target market? What percent of your business comes from repeat clients? How do you attract new business? How you retain your clients? If you have these answers, you are ready to develop an effective marketing strategy. We will discuss those steps next week. For marketing questions, email Ted Smith at ted@ neweyesmarketing.com or call 561-310-0109. Lets Do BusinessContinued from page 8 Each child is an individual at LHP Christian School By Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFLighthouse Point Rita OLeary, principal of Lighthouse Christian School, 2331 NE 26 Ave., recently took The Pelican on a quick tour of her school in Lighthouse Point. We visited Sharalyn Cazels second grade class where students were listening to each other read from their journals. Today, the journal writing had been about their daydreams. Madison was sharing his daydream when we arrived. Around the brightly decorated classroom, children listened, some of them contemplating whether or not they would share. Over their clothes, they all wore lab coats with words written on them in bright colors.Wearing their vocabulary lab coats, students in Sharalyn Cazels second grade class, listen to Dylan read from his journal. Those are our vocabulary lab coats, said Cazel, who pointed to the board. Todays word is re ect. Back in her of ce, OLeary talked about her school. Were the neighborhood school over here, she says. Most of our families are very close. We even have some who drive their children to school in their electric carts. Classes here are for students in kindergarten through eighth grades and are limited to 20 in a class. But OLeary says if the numbers get close to that in the lower grades, she hires an assistant. We try to bring everybody to be the best they can be, she says. We also believe that children do not t into a mold or learn the same thing on the same day.See SCHOOL on page 22 High School. Her required community service project is turning out to be a challenge. Im really excited about it, but it is a lot of work, she said. Organizing the affair without the help of a committee she said, I am the one who has to have everything in place. But it has been a good learning experience. She chose Make-AWish because, I truly respect what they aim to accomplish delivering hope and happiness to children with life-threatening medical conditions. I think they really do help achieve miracles. Tickets for Winter Wishes are $8 and can be purchased at the door. First Presbyterian Church is at 2331 NE 26 Avenue, Pompano Beach.FashionContinued from page 12

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The Pelican 17 Friday, January 20, 2012

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18 The Pelican Friday, January 20, 2012 wear different hats. Herb [Skolnick] was my predecessor as commissioner of District 5. He persuaded the commission at that time to establish the foundation as an entity separate from the commission. Occasionally this foundation receives contributions, and it also has distributed funds to city art programs like the citys piano competition which creates a venue for children to showcase their talents. The gala team raises scholarship funds for students in the arts. Those funds will be donated to the foundation which, in turn, will be awarded to students from the citys two high schools. It is rather confusing, he added. The commission as a foundation committee has limited power. We designate distribution of funds, but we cannot raise them. If we had more money in the foundation, we would meet and distribute more frequently. Gala plans have been in the works for about six months but Ann says, I dont mind because it is so worthwhile. George and I love the theater and attend as much as we can. Im a member of the Friends of the Arts, a Palm Aire volunteer group that supports the arts with year round activities. We attend many of their sponsored programs. In fact this past New Years Eve we were with the group. We dined at the Oaks Club and then went on to the Stage Theatre where we saw I Love A Piano. It was a delightful evening. Before she rushed off to rehearse for a fashion show at the Herb Skolnick Center, she told us a little about her career. I attended the Fashion Institute in New York City until I left to earn my MRS degree. While raising our family, I pursued my love of the arts by painting. A few of my paintings still hang in our home. I hope to resume painting soon. It is a relaxing and rewarding experience to me. Once their children were in the school system, Ann became a milliner in a bridal department. She soon took over as a bridal consultant which became a 20-year career. After the couple settled in Florida, Ann managed Peacock, a boutique in Boca Raton. She gave it up to work with George on Currents, a Palm Aire paper which he published until he became a commissioner eight years ago. And now, on with the gala! The Pelican thanks this busy lady and her volunteer group who invest in the future of the arts in Pompano Beach.GalaContinued from page 10

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The Pelican 19 Friday, January 20, 2012 Wine, cheese reception for solo exhibitionWilton Manors Los Angeles artist, Maxwell Britton, will be featured in a solo exhibition, The Fifth Column, Jan. 20 through Feb. 12 at Ellen Charapko Gallery, 2374 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. The public is invited to a wine and cheese reception Jan. 20 from 7 to 10 p.m. New works by Britton include both acrylic on canvas and framed works on paper. Britton is known for his intuitive use of intense color even when depicting landscapes. Many of Brittons artwork is in various private and corporate collections in the United States and abroad. Call 954-547-9014 or visit www.ellencharapkogallery.com SightingsContinued from page 91-26 The Wilton Manors Business Association will be holding a networking lunch from 12 to 1 p.m. at Bona Italian Restaurant, 2468 Wilton Drive. 1-26 The Westside Association of Wilton Manors will be holding a meeting from 7 to 9 p.m. at Somerset Academy, 225 NW 29 Street. 1-27 St. Jude Classic Golf Tournament at Woodlands Country Club, Tamarac. 954-323-8405. 1-28 The LauderdaleBy-The-Sea Garden Club Super Rummage, Plant and Bake Sale will be held from 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Jarvis Hall, 4505 Ocean Drive, Lauderdale-By-The-Sea. 954 393 2008. 1-28 & 29 Curtain Call Playhouse presents A Funny Thing Happened on the way to the Forum at the Herb Skolnick Center, 800 SW 36th Ave., Pompano Beach. Tickets are $23. Call 954-7840768 for times. 1-28 & 29 The Nautical Flea Market will be held from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center 1801 NE 6 St. Cost is $5. Children 12 and under are free. Parking is free. Boating, diving gear, nautical clothing, anchors, mooring products, arts and crafts and other nautical themed items will be for sale. 954-786-4111.See SIGHTINGS on page 21

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20 The Pelican Friday, January 20, 2012 ADVERTISING? ITS PART OF DOING BUSINESS. CALL US. 954-783-8700. By Judy WIlsonPELICAN STAFFDeerfield Beach The 32nd Annual Festival of the Arts will be held Saturday and Sunday, Jan. 28-29, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. with a lineup of 130 extraordinary artists and craftsmen. Among them will be underwater photographer Chris Gug who won Best in Show in 2009. Gug has been expanding his portfolio in Papua, New Guinea for the past two years and will show this new work here. Other artists using water as inspiration are EJ Espinal who works in mixed media and silversmith Rick Heard. The event includes continuous live music, food from local restaurants, ethnic vendors, beer and wine, all with the beach as a backdrop. The Festival is staged by the Deerfield Beach Cultural Committee and proceeds go to art scholarships. Opening ceremonies include the Deerfield Beach High School Marching Band, The Starlight Twirlers, The Cathedral Church of God Gospel Choir and a special surprise. The event location is on the beach, south of the Pier. Saturday entertainment schedule: 10 to 11:30 a.m.Marcus Howell Jazz BandArt Festival returns to the beach Jan. 28 to 291to 3 p.m.South Bound Train 3:30 to 5:30 p.m.Ernie Southern and the Deltaholics Sunday : 10 a.m. to noon Pit Bull of Blues Band 1to 2:45 p.m.Smugglin Yo Yos 3:15 to 5 p.m.Amber Leigh In addition street entertainers Kraig Kenning, Phill Fest and Walt Rooney will appear. Rick Heards piece will be part of the show.

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The Pelican 21 Friday, January 20, 2012 By Malcolm McClintockPELICAN STAFFLauderdale-By-The-Sea As is customary, January is the month when the new Board of Directors convenes to set its goals and objectives for the upcoming year. Composed of local business leaders, the LBTS Chamber is eagerly preparing for the numerous events (i.e. Taste of the Beach), after hours socials and a wealth of initiatives Lauderdale By The Sea Chamber welcomes newly elected board of directorsdesigned to promote the interests of the many talented men and women of the local business community. Working closely with City officials and other area business associations, the LBTS Chamber is wholly committed to developing a blueprint for success that will attract increased commerce and visibility for all its members in what can be considered challenging economic times. Newly installed president Mark Silver encouraged his board to seek a bold approach in 2012. Our goal should be to not only maintain our excellent reputation, but to build upon it. It is my hope to deliver bold, innovative new ideas and help market businesses throughout Lauderdale By The Sea to new audiences, Silver said. Elected Directors for 2012: Shevaun Steward-Kuhn, Better Homes and Gardens FL 1st Realty; Amy Weiss, Coastal Computer Systems; Mindy Correa, Tours to You; Jim Richards, Richards Tax Returns and Accounting Solutions; Ed White, Croton Arms Resort Apartments; Mark Silver, Argenti Designer Jewelers; Chuck Maxwell, Dr. Gs Pharmacy By The Sea; Malcolm McClintock, Alabaska/Pelican Newspaper; Guy Contrada, Aruba; Paul Novak, High Noon; Dorothy Hacker, Away Inn; Bob Eckblad, By The Sea Realty; Greg Anderson, Suntrust Bank and Leann Barber, Edward Jones. For more information or to join the Chamber, please visit www.lbts.com. Back Row Jim Richards, Ed White, Mark Silver, president; Chuck Maxwell, Malcolm McClintock [Front] Shevaun Steward-Kuhn Mindy Correa and Amy Weiss. 1-29 A Clarinet trio of Beethoven and more will be presented by the Chameleon Chamber Music Series at the Leiser Center, 221 SW 3 Ave., Fort Lauderdale. Tickets are $35. 954-761-3435. 2-2 A classical concert will be held at 7 p.m. at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors. 954-390-2130 2-2 The Naked Grape, 2163 Wilton Drive will host a fundraiser for the Pet Project from 7 to 9 p.m. There will also be discounts on wine. 954-563-5631 2-2 The Broward Sierra Club Meeting will be held at 7:30 p.m. at the Fern Forest Nature Center, 201 Lyons Rd. S., Coconut Creek. 954-946-7359. SightingsContinued from page 19 See SIGHTINGS on page 22

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22 The Pelican Friday, January 20, 2012 We Mean Business 954-783-8700 OLeary adds that when children jump ahead in math or science, they have an opportunity to further explore those subjects in the math lab. At the lab, they meet Linda Hinkle, former Broward County Teacher of the Year, who encourages the student to push a little more. But the lab is also for students who need a little extra help, she adds. There are other experiences open to students after the school day ends at this school. Im always open to ideas, OLeary says. One parent wanted a chess club. We started it, and it will continue next semester. Other opportunities besides the academic classes include lessons in voice, piano, guitar, theater and cooking. The school has three choirs that perform for special events at the church. Lighthouse Christian School is a ministry of the First Presbyterian Church, known locally as The Pink Church. Christian ethics are part of the schools philosophy, and children of all denominations are welcome. SchoolContinued from page 16As soon as you walk in the door, you feel a good spirit here, says OLeary. We want our parents to know that we nurture the children just as they would. We greet them in the morning, and we place them in their cars in the afternoon. The school also offers soccer and tennis, using elds within the city for practice. OLeary has been in the education eld for 35 years and in administration for 31 years. That experience has been part of the success of Lighthouse Christian School. All eighth-grade graduates have been accepted into the high schools of their choices. The school measures academic achievement through the California Test of Basic Skills, or CTBS. OLeary says the children exceed those skills and explains that private schools do not participate in the FCAT, a state test required in public schools. Lighthouse Christian School will host an Open House Jan. 25 and 26. Prospective families will have a chance to talk to the faculty and principal that evening, and tours will be offered. For more information, call 954-941-7501. Republicans gather for primary debateThe Greater Pompano Republican Club will host a debate watching party Thursday, Jan. 26 at 7:30 p.m. at Galuppis Restaurant, 1103 N. Federal Highway, Pompano Beach. All presidential candidate campaigns are welcome to present their candidates. Cost is $5. Refreshments will be served. Call 954-785-0226.VOTE ON Jan.. 31 2-3 & 4 Curtain Call Playhouse presents A Funny Thing Happened on the way to the Forum at 8 p.m. at the Herb Skolnick Center, 800 SW 36 Ave., Pompano Beach. 2-4 The Boca Raton Symphonia Saturday Night concert at 8 p.m. at Parents Association Performing Arts Center, Pine Crest School, 2700 St. Andrews Road, Boca Raton The program includes Hayden, Beethoven and Barber. 561-376-3848. 2-6 The American Association of University Women Pompano Beach Branch meets at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center, 1801 NE 6th St., at 12:30 p.m. 954-524-2938. 2-18 The 7th Annual Dr. Carter G. Woodson Festival runs from 12 to 9 p.m. at Jaco Pastorius Park, 1098 NE 40 Court, Oakland Park. 954630-4500. 2-25 & 3-3 Two CERT classes will be provided from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Fort Lauderdale Fire-Rescue Station #53, 2200 Executive Airport Way, Fort Lauderdale. CERT SightingsContinued from page 21 See SIGHTINGS on page 24

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The Pelican 23 Friday, January 20, 2012 We Mean Business! company very attractive to buyers and sellers and is allowing us to contribute to our South Florida real estate recovery. Kim and Bill Caruthers recently purchased a home in Coral Ridge Isles from Real Estate Recovery. Kim, an executive with Kaplan University, wanted to be nearer to work, the beach and friends. We were referred to Gary by several friends who had dealt with him and liked the way they were handled. He found us a house that needed a lot of work on the interior and was priced right considering what needed to be done. Were very pleased with the company and the way things worked out. Another happy client is Al Landsberger, a Chicago resident. He and his wife, Diana Chrissis recently bought a home in Oakland Park. Landsberger said, We were referred to Gary by several friends and found him to be very easy to deal with and very knowledgeable. We took advantage of the market and bought the place before we can actually live in it. Im a graphics designer and my wife is in marketing. We have teen children and are not ready to retire, so we will rent our home in the interim. Gary was very professional. The transaction was nished in just six weeks. Garys rm will manage it and nd a responsible renter for us. It has been a great experience. According to Lanham, the market is greatly improved. He suggests that a property, priced correctly, should be in contract within 30 days. We have no inventory right now, he claims. This should encourage sellers to be realistic and take advantage of the current market to sell their properties. He reminds buyers that interest rates are at historic lows, saying There will never be a better time to buy. The banks are lending to credit worthy clients. Real Estate Recovery services Oakland Park, Pompano Beach, Fort Lauderdale, Plantation and Pembroke Pines. Being adjacent to Wilton Manors, Lanham makes a point of saying, We welcome gay and lesbian clients as well as anybody. Ours is a truly non-discriminatory business. Visitors are frequent to the of ces of this company. And no wonder. Drop-ins can get up-to-the minute daily foreclosure listings giving buyers a heads up on new listings as they appear. Asked why he opened his of ce in Oakland Park, Lanham answers, Its one of the few, if not the only city in South Florida, that has a master plan which is followed. It was clear to see the work of Main Street Oakland Parks efforts. The infrastructure has been redone. New pipes now allow for better drainage. Parks and vignette seating with fountains headline the new Oakland Park Main Street effort. We have Jaco Pastorius Park for concerts, major events, and movie nights. I view this town as an up-and-coming place for a real estate business. Growth is all around us, and it is being done according to the master plan.Gary LanhamReal Estate is a second career for Lanham who moved to Oakland Park 12 years ago when he decided to retire after 25 years in the health care eld. He holds a masters degree in hospital administration. He says, By the end of my rst career as sales manager for a group health insurance company, I had become very savvy with technology. This knowledge translated very well into my Real Estate business. Im an active volunteer with the Board of Realtors, serving on several committees. I also serve on the board of directors for the Master Chorale which performs in Miami/Dade, Broward and Palm Beach counties. Lanham makes a point of attending the city commission meetings and willingly makes presentations to church and community organizations. His presentations are helpful to areas with high foreclosure properties. Call 954-530-8198 for further information.RecoveryContinued from page 8 Applicants sought for three boardsLBTS The Town of Lauderdale-By-The-Sea is seeking applications from residents to fill upcoming vacancies on the Board of Adjustment, Planning and Zoning Board and Charter Review Board. Deadline to apply is Friday, Feb. 3. The Board of Adjustment, which meets as needed, conducts quasi-judicial hearings on applications for variances from the towns land development regulations. The P&Z Board meets once a month and advises the Town Commission on planning matters. The Charter Review Board will recommend updates and revisions to the towns charter. The boards recommendations will be given to the commission. If approved, recommendations will be placed before voters. Applicants for all three boards must be town residents and registered voters. Application forms are available at the town clerks office at 4501 Ocean Drive, LBTS. Forms also are found on the towns web site at www.lbts-fl.gov under Documents in the left-hand column of the homepage. For more information, call 954-640-4200.

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24 The Pelican Friday, January 20, 2012 up in front of an existing apartment building. Gilbert Galeano, one of Bier Gardens partners, said he chose the city because, Im gay, and I wanted to bring something new to our community. Were proud to be here and a part of Wilton Manors. He estimated theyve invested $500,000 in the property. Asked if lack of parking worried the owners, Galeano said theyve hired a private valet service. Even though we knew [about parking issues] we took a chance. Heidi Shafran, community services department director, said the city averages about 12 new business tax licenses a month. A lot of those are for existing buildings, she said. One recent application came from the owners of Shushi Rock Restaurant proposed for The old Wings n Things property, 2199 Wilton Drive. But the slew of new businesses comes after the city has lost an almost equal number of businesses last year. At least four establishments long Wilton Drive, Urban Dwell, a furniture store; Painted Pickle, a deli; Crema D Roma, an Italian restaurant; and The Mix, a piano bar, have all closed shop. But unlike The Mixs former digs, which remain closed, the void created by Urban Dwell and Painted Pickle has been lled by two established concerns, Naked Grape and Copy This. While Copy This expanded, Naked Grape moved from one spot on Wilton Drive to another. We couldnt grow anymore, said Naked Grape co-owner Caleb Ben-Avram. Before moving, BenAvram said he and his partner looked at possibly moving to Las Olas Boulevard, the beach or Oakland Park. We talked to Krishan [Manners, Wilton Manors Main Street director of marketing and sales] and Heidi [Shafran]. They convinced us to stay, said Ben-Avram. A lot of our customers are very local, said co-owner Tim Slivinski. Unlike their old location, Ben-Avram and Slivinski have added an outside dining area and can now serve more than just wine. Food has been a huge asset to us, said Slivinski. Along with the citys commercial prospects, residential opportunities are also attracting attention. Larry Baum of Stellar Homes Group, Inc., has purchased ve apartment complexes along Powerline Road: 2412, 2500 and 2509 Powerline Road, 807 NW 24 St., 925 and 1007 NW 30 St., and renovated and rented 98 apartments. All but one of the buildings, he said, had been boarded up. The units range from onetotwo -bedroom apartments and rent for between $700 and $1,000 a month. That whole area was really rife with drug problems before these guys came in. Theyre doing a great service towards unity and cleaning that area up, said Manners. Baum said he and his partners have invested close to $6 million in the buildings. They are also looking to build apartments on the site of the Center for Spiritual Living at the corner of Northeast 15 Avenue and Northeast 26 Street. We are long term investors that keep properties for long periods of time, therefore we like to outreach into the community and become more involved. Before we invest in a particular community, we make sure we feel comfortable being there for at least 10 years, he wrote in an email. Baum added that he and his partners see a lot of potential in the city. The government is involved and the city takes pride in itself. Wilton Manors on the upswingContinued from page 2 members are trained to assist law enforcement and emergency personnel in the aftermath of a disaster. Pre-registration is required. No cost to attend. 954828-6700. 3-11 The Skolnick Sunday Jazz & Arts Fest will be held at 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Skolnick Center at 800 SW 36th Ave., Pompano Beach. The event is free and features live jazz music and giveaways. Artists can reserve a 6 ft. table for $10 or a 15 ft. table for $15. 954-786-4590. ArtCall to Artists Artists in all media are invited to submit a sampling of their work to be considered for inclusion in the March 11th Lighthouse Point Arts Exhibition. The Arts panel will view artists work Jan. 26 from 2 to 5 p.m. at the LHP Yacht & Racquet Club, 2701 NE 42nd Street. 954806-4749 or 954-376-0538. Food Drive NE Focal Point. Drop off non-perishable donations from 8:20 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at 227 SightingsContinued from page 21 See SIGHTINGS on page 24

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The Pelican 25 Friday, January 20, 2012 Rev. Hyvenson Joseph WORSHIP DIRECTORY: Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad. Oakland Park A funeral mass was held Tuesday for Moni Mackinaw Zimmerman, 64, of Oakland Park, who died Jan. 4. Services were at St. Elizabeth of Hungary Catholic Church, Pompano Beach. Mackinaw was born March 28, 1947 in Birmingham, Ala. She graduated from John Carroll High School and attended Montevallo College. Soon after moving to Fort Lauderdale, she met and married the love of her life, her husband of 40 years, Leigh Zimmerman. They had one son David Leigh Zimmerman, who was the light of her life. While raising her family and working in the banking industry, she also found time to serve as president of Royal Palm Isles and contribute to her city, Oakland Park. Moni leaves behind, Leigh; David (Gina); eight brothers; three sisters; many nieces and nephews; and too many friends and great memories to count. Her infectious smile, open heart and southern accent will be missed by anyone who had the gift to know her. The Oakland Park City Commission observed a moment of silence in her memory Wednesday. She was preceded in death by her parents and one brother. Burial was at Pompano Beach Cemetery. Arrangements by All Faith Funeral Chapel, Deerfield Beach.Moni Mackinaw Zimmerman, contributor to her city, served as president of Royal Palm NW 2 St., Deer eld Beach. 954-480-4449. Wilton Manors Green Market Saturdays and Sundays at Hagen Park 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. fresh produce, baked goods, herbs, spices, doggie treats, pickles, jams, infused vinegars, pasta and more are available at the Green Market. 954-531-5383. Pompano Beach Green Market Every Saturday at the corner of West Atlantic Boulevard and North Dixie Highway from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., fresh vegetables, crafts, plants, food and music are available at the Green Market. 954-292-8040. Call to Artists Artists in all media are invited to submit a sampling of their work to be considered for inclusion in the March 11th Lighthouse Point Arts Exhibition. The Arts panel will view artists work Jan. 26 from 2 to 5 p.m. at the LHP Yacht & Racquet Club, 2701 NE 42nd Street. 954-806-4749 or 954376-0538. Wilton Manors Green Market Saturdays and Sundays at Hagen Park 2020 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. fresh produce, baked goods, herbs, spices, doggie treats, pickles, jams, infused vinegars, pasta and more are available at the Green Market. 954-531-5383. Pompano Beach Green Market Every Saturday at the corner of West Atlantic Boulevard and North Dixie Highway from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., fresh vegetables, crafts, plants, food and music are available at the Green Market. 954-292-8040.Fashion Show2/4 Wishing on a Star a fashion show and luncheon sponsored by the St. Gabriel Council of Catholic women at the Royal Fiesta at The cove of Deer eld beach at 11:30 a.m. Donation is $35. 954-786-0667. Fishing Piers The Pompano Beach Fishing Pier extends more than SightingsContinued from page 21 See SIGHTINGS on page 30

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26 The Pelican Friday, January 20, 2012 Advertise with The Pelican 954-783-8700 The Pelican 954-783-8700 Classi edsCall 954-545-0013 Get to know your local Merchants HELP WANTEDFULL SERVICE NAIL TECHNICIAN Needed. With Or Without Following. Pompano Beach The Orange Room Salon. 954-782-8838. 1-27 DRIVER/TOUR GUIDE/ PART TIME. Have Happy & Relaxed Disposition. Good Speaking Voice & Good Driving Record. 954-784-4064. Fort Lauderdale. 1-20 BEAUTY HAIR STYLIST NAIL TECH MASSAGE, FACIALIST. GUARANTEED START WITH 100% COMMISSION. BOCA 954415-4937. 1-20 SEEKING FOR CONDO MAINTENANCE WORKER. If You Have A Strong Commitment To High Level Of Service & Quality Standards, The Ability To Work Well Under Pressure, Meet Deadlines & Strong Sense Of Urgency Please Apply By Faxing Your Resume To 954942-7685. This Is A 40 Hour Full Time Position With Varied Hours (Evenings, Weekends & Holidays) Bene ts Paid 100%, Paid Vacation & Holidays. Rate Of Pay Commensurate With Experience. EOE. 2-3 ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT For Property Management Firm. Data Entry, Client Contact, Assist Executive. FT / PT. 954-7727012. 2-10 LOCAL PEST CONTROL CO Looking For Quality Sales/Service Tech. Must Be Dependable, Team Player, Good Drivers License & People Skills. Will Train Right Person. ALSO Of ce Assistant Computer People & Phone Skills Needed. Fax Resume 954418-3982. 2-10 WATSON PAINTING & WATERPROOFING CO. Interior/Exterior Painting. Res/Comm Pressure Clean Roofs/Decks. Lic/Ins. 954-6500488 Or 954-552-9457. 2-3 FLASH MOVERS FREE ESTIMATES/ FLAT Rates By Owner 30 Years Experience Moving Done The Right Way! Small Or Large Jobs. No Job Too Dif cult! Additional Home Pickup Service Available Will Take Good Condition Furniture, Working Order Appliances & Electronics, Knick Knacks, Household Items, Etc, AT NO EXTRA CHARGE Applied To The Move, Call Anytime 954832-6802. 1-20 D & R RESCREENING POOL PATIO RESCREENING.. $.75 SQ FT. Minimum 300 Sq Ft. Window Sliding Door Repair. Call 954-650-1566. 1-27 MIKE THE GARDENER THE ALL AMERICAN YARDMAN Yard And Garden Care Get The Best For Less! Call 561-543-6337. 2-10 HONEST PC EXPERT Setups, Viruses, Repairs, Upgrades, Networking, Tutoring. Call Andy For A FREE Estimate. 954-857-4846. 1-20 SEEKING EMPLOYMENTCOMPUTER PROBLEMS? CALL MIKE For Fast 24 Hr Service. Excellent Computer Skills. Hands On Lessons From MBA. Printed Instructions For Problems Provided. 10% Off For 1st Time Customer. Mike Will Make It Happen Or The Service Is FREE! Call 954-6835607. 1-20 I NEED YOUR HELP! You Need Me. I Am A Chef, Dining Room Helper, Bartender, Manager + If You Need My Care Or Dog Care Try Me 2 Days NO CHARGE. Concetta 754-245-1446. 1-20 HONEST MALE WITH References Seeking Position As A CAREGIVER.Call Chris 954-290-7344. 1-27DOMESTIC SERVICESYOUNG MALE ADULT Needs A Furnished Bedroom And Some Minimal Care. Prefer Pompano Area. Call 954-942-9172. 1-20SERVICES RETIRED PLUMBING CONTRACTOR Looking For Work. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. CFC 027532. Low Rates. 954-496-6420. 1-20 DANNY BOY ELECTRIC Lic & Insured. Lic. #EC13004811. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. 24/Hr Service. 954-290-1443. Beat Any Written Estimate. Sr, Discount. 2-10 COMPUTER TUTOR COMPUTER REPAIR FREE Estimate! 9 Computer Certifications. 25 Years Experience. Call Bill 954-4493681. 2-3 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIESNew GREEN technology. New defroster control saves energy in home refrigerators, commercial chillers. Patented. All optical. Simple mfg. Strategic partners needed..www.NewAvionics.Com. 954-568-1991. OPEN HOUSESHILLSBORO MILE 1045 HILLSBORO MILE #9 Sun 1-4pm. Small Complex Directly On The Sand. Beautiful Ocean & Intracoastal Views. Pool Dockage Available. Low Maintenance. $262K. Call Ruthie Brooks Balistreri Realty. 954-803-4174. 1-20 HANDYMAN PAINTING CARPENTRY Pressure Cleaning. Decks! Everything Around The House. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. Call 561-350-3781. 1-20 MOORE PLUMBING PLUMBING SERVICES Big Jobs Small Jobs. We Do It All. Remodeling & Repairs. Lic. & Insured. C.C. Accepted. Call 954-772-4600. 2-3 HONEST HANDYMAN HOME & BUILDING Maintenance/Improvements. No Job Too Small. Fast Friendly Service. Reasonable Rates. Local Resident/Homeowner. Call Today For Your FREE Upfront Quote. No Deposit Required. 754-366-1915. 1-20 HOME/OFFICE REPAIRS By State Certified G.C. Reasonable. CGC025802. More Information Call 954815-1007. GOT JUNK? DUMP TRUCK CLEANUPS Trees/ Landscape, Yard Fill. Paint/ Pressure Wash/ Roofs/Home Repairs Welding, Etc. Dave 954-818-9538. 2-10THRIFT STORELUCKY STAR THRIFT 5130 N Federal Hwy. 2ND Floor. Ft Lauderdale. Great Items At Low Prices From $2 Up. (No Clothing) 954-839-8182, 1-20MUSICIANS WANTEDThe American Legion Symphonic Band is now accepting new members for the 2011-2012 season. College age to seasoned seniors are welcome. Rehearsals are held on Wed. evenings at American Legion Post 142 in Pompano. Percussionists, euphonium and clarinet players are especially needed. If you enjoy making music, call Jim McGonigal, Music Director at 954-647-0700 for more info.DEEP WATER VILLA DOCKPOMPANO BEACH 2/2 1700 SQ FT. Screened Fla Room. Private Yard. W/D. 4 Park. No Fixed Bridges. Community Pool. Deeded Dock.. 2 Blocks Beach. $285,000. Call 954-6291324. 1-20 Call Us!!

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The Pelican 27 Friday, January 20, 2012 Classi edsCall 954-545-0013 SUPERB DIRECT INTRACOASTAL VIEW 2/2 Updated Condo. Low Maintenance. No Realtors Please. 954-304-4518 J Peasley / Better Homes & Garden RE. 2-3 LAUDERDALE BY THE SEA Furnished 1/1.5 Condo $115,000. Heated Pool. Ocean Access. On Canal. 1481 S Ocean Blvd. Apt 228. Call 586549-5223. 2-3CONDOS FOR RENTPOMPANO DIRECT WATER ANNUAL RENTAL: 2/2, 1438 sf, $1,600/Mo. Call Walt 954461-1012. Others Available. Blacksmith Realty. 1-27 LAUDERDALE BY THE SEAAcross From Beach. Near Sea Watch. 1 Bedroom Den 2 Baths. Pool, W/D In Unit. $1175 Per Mo. Yrly. 1st Last Sec. Or Seasonal 5 Mo min. $1595/Mo. No Smoking. Call 954-942-5642. 1-20 DEERFIELD BEACH Waterfront Furnished 2/2, Huge Balcony. Awesome View! Heated Pool, Cable, Covered Parking. No Pets Or Realtors. Good Credit Required. Annual $1100. Also NON Waterfront Annual. 2/2 $800 $825. Call 631-885-3342. 1-20 POMPANO BEACH 1/1 UNFURNISHED APT. $700 Per Month. 1st And Security. Call 954-785-7270. 1-20 WALK TO BEACH? GOT BOAT? Nicest 1/1 In NE Pompano. Annual, Unfurnished $925 Month. Call 954-614-8428. 1-27 EAST DEERFIELD / WATER 1/1 1st Floor, 55+. Furnished $1200 Mo. Unfurnished $1,000 Mo. Completely Remodeled. W/D. Screened Patio. All Amenities. Walk Beach & Shops. Dockage When Available. 954-415-9730. 1-20 POMPANO LEISUREVILLE 55+ 2/1 Completely Furn. Sunroom On Golf Course. 2 Pools, 2 Clubs. $875 Month Yearly. 954-788-9312. 1-20APTS FOR RENTDEERFIELD/POMPANO BEACH 1 BR & 2 BR APTS FOR RENT. Remodeled, Paint, Tile, Etc. W & D On Site. Pool. Pet Friendly. Call George 954809-5030. 2-10HOMES FOR RENTPOMPANO 2/2 Cottage Style House. Large Yard With Fish Pond. $1100 Month Company Bills For Electric & Water. 540 NE 34 St. Darci 954-783-3723. 1-27 POMPANO BEACH 3/2 CENTRAL AIR. Screened Porch. Small Utility Room. $1100 Mo. 620 NE 35 Street. Call Darci 954783-3723. 1-27SEASONAL RENTALLAUD BY THE SEA Furn. 1/1, 2nd Floor, Beach Access. Feb March $1,600 Mo Yrly $1,000 Mo. Pool, Gardens, No Smoking/Pets. 954-942-3274 Or 516-474-0951. 1-20CO-OP SALESPOMPANO BEACH 1/1 On Water, Dockage Available At Your Door. $59,500. Coldwell Banker Barbara 954-6291324. 1-20REAL ESTATE WANTEDI BUY HOUSES!! CASH!! AS IS! QUICK CLOSE! ANY AREA ANY CONDITION! NO EQUITY OK. CALL NOW 954-914-2355. 1-20CONDOS FOR SALEPALM AIRE 105 Split 2/2 King, Upgrades. Largest Kitchen. W/D. Breakfast Room. Piano. Ultra Furnished. Shopping, Pool Close By. 9th Floor. Low Maintenance/Taxes. $134K Offers. No Brokers! 954-895-4596. 1-20 LIGHTHOUSE POINT 2/1.5 CONDO In A GREAT AREA. Pets Allowed. $124,900. Call Barbara Balistreri Realty. 954-263-7129. 1-20 DEERFIELD BEACH 2/2 Completely Redone. Granite Kitchen, New Cabinets. S.S. Appliances. 20 Porcelain Tile Floors. Travistine Stone Baths. Freshly Painted. 1st Floor. Less Than A Mile To Beach. $84,900. Call 631-873-8715. 1-20 POMPANO DIRECT WATER CONDOS Magni cent 2007 sf, 3/2.5 $339,900. Estate Sale 1430 sf, 2/2 $259,900. Others Available. Call Walt 954-461-1012, Blacksmith Realty. 1-27 POMPANO MCNAB ROAD & NE 18 AVENUE 1 & 2 Bedrooms Furnished/ Unfurnished. $675 $950 And Up. Pool, Tile Floors. Central A/C. 954-610-2327. 1-27 DEERFIELD BEACH Retail Of ce Warehouse 700 Sq Ft With Loft. A/C, Bathroom. $575 Per Month. Call For More Info 561-654-1331 Or 561-9985681. 2-10 FURNITURE BEDSETS King $180 Queen $130 Full $110 Twin $90. 5 Pc. Bedroom Set $399. Frames $39. 954-465-6498. 2-10GARAGE SALESMULTI FAMILY GARAGE SALE Fri & Sat Jan 20 & 21. 8am-1pm. 1100 SE 5 Court Deer eld. Household, Furniture, Clothes, Electronics, Records & Collectibles + Much Misc. Items. 1-20 SEA HAVEN CONDO 2731 NE 14 St. Causeway Pompano Beach. Sat. Jan 28 8am1pm. Linens, Jewelry, Books, Lamps, Baskets, Furniture, Pots & Pans, Dishes & Much More. 1-27 POMPANO BEACH GARAGE SALE Saturday 8am 2pm. 412 NE 12 Avenue. Furniture, PIANO & Misc. Items. Great Bargains. 954-601-7791. 1-20COLLECTIBLESJAEGER AND LE COULTRE WATCHES, CLOCKS, Any Kind Any Condition Wanted By Collector. Call Dirk 954709-0191. 1-20MUSICAL INSTRUMENTSVintage Rogers 3 piece drum set, snare, mounted tom and bass drum. $300 obo. 954-647-0700 2-3 POMPANO GARDENS $795 1/1 $200 Deposit. Nice Area Minutes To Beach Pet OK. Please Call 954-515-2554. 1-20 POMPANO BEACH 1/1 NW $650 2/1 $750 SW 1/1 $725 2/1 $925 NE 1/1 $675 2/1 NE $950 TH 2/1.5 $1095 All FREE Water. Rent + $70 MovU-In. 954-781-6299. 1-27 POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 Bedroom From $495. Easy Movein. 1/2 OFF DEPOSIT. Remodeled. Great Location. 954-783-1088 For More Info. 3-9 STUDIOS EFFICIENCIESDEERFIELD BEACH A1A Live at the beach off season. Ef ciencies available for $500 Weekly, pay as you go, no deposit or security, cable, pool, laundry, wireless. Ocean Villa 954-427-4608. 1-27OUTDOOR STORAGEDEERFIELD BEACH OUTDOOR STORAGE For Boats, RVs, Commercial Vehicles & More. Call Chris At 954-520-1777. 2-3COMMERCIAL FOR RENT-SALEPOMPANO COMMERCIAL OFFICE Spaces Available. Ranging From As Low As $500 To $700 Depending On Square Footage. Please Call Darci At 954-7833723. 1-27 POOL BUILDING BLOCK FROM BEACH. Bright Spacious Apartments w/Tile Flooring, Newer Kitchens. 1 Bedroom Apt $999/Month & Extra Large 1 Bedroom Apt. $1075/Month. Include: WI-FI, Cable, Water & Coin Laundry. Also Available Studio Unit, Unfurnished Includes Electric: $689/Month Small Pet Considered. Owner/ Agent Contact 954-608-7368. Seasonal Rates Are Available In Deer eld Beach Building. 1-20 EFFICIENCY AVAILABLE WITH FULL KITCHEN. Includes: Electric, Cable, Wi-Fi, Water, Pool. 2nd Floor End Unit. Clean Move-in Condition. 2 Blocks From Ocean North Of Atlantic. Owner Agent. $669 Month Lease. 954-608-7368. POMPANO JUST OFF FEDERAL. 1/1, Pool, Laundry. Close To Shopping & Transportation. $700 Per Mo. 1st Mo + Security To Move In. Call Anthony 954857-5207. 1-20 What Can We Do For You?The Pelican. 954.783.8700

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28 The Pelican Friday, January 20, 2012 The Pelican We Mean Business Advertise with The Pelican 954-783-8700 Capt. RJ Boyle is an experienced angler in South Florida. His studio is located in Lighthouse Point. Call 954-420-5001. RJ BoyleRJ BOYLE STUDIOSThey always say things come full circle over time. Some things just take longer than others. Since the introduction of daytime swordfishing some years back, not many people had been night fishing for swords. The new fishery overshadowed the old one with tales of bigger fish, epic battles with giants and the ability to come in at a normal hour to get some sleep. I have spent so much time out there in the day that I really started to miss night fishing. Though daytime sword fishing can be great, its technical and requires concentration 100 percent of the time. Lately, I have been in the mood to swordfish but without the stress of the daytime attention, so I broke out the night rods. There is nothing cooler than turning off the engines and putting out a spread of swordfish baits under the moon. The sound of the clicker going off during a conversation with your buddies is so exciting. I had really missed night fishing until I went a couple weeks ago and caught two in an hour. I cant wait to go again. Just nothing like puttin on the sword bait under the moonBy Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFNext weekend Community Park, 2001 NE 10 St., will resemble a boat yard more than a sports field as the Annual Nautical Flea Market launches on Jan. 28 and 29. Visitors will find boats, Nautical Flea market calls for mariners at Community Park to pick up great dealsfishing and diving gear, art, boat wear, anchors and much more. This event has also been a favorite among boaters not only for the inexpensive buys but also for the significant finds. Lots of people show up seeking items that are hard to find or out of production. The market opens at 8 a.m. on both days. Closings times are 5 p.m. on Saturday and 3 p.m. on Sunday. Entrance fees for both days are $5. Many people consider the day at the park a family event with lots of food vendors, music and games. Vendor applications are still being accepted. Call 954-786-4111.

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The Pelican 29 Friday, January 20, 2012 family recipe, says Casale who also enjoys the unwavering support of his wife, Rose Ann. Equally noteworthy are the zesty chicken wings with either mild or tear-inducing hot sauce. Other poultry favorites include the chicken Piccata with wine and capers, the Sinatra with prosciutto and spinach or the balsamic roasted half-bird with seasoned rub. One more unexpected Tedescos surprise is the One Pound Flame Burger. Speaking of outrageous sandwiches, Tedescos offers belt-busting lunch classics such as the roasted turkey, the rare roast beef, eggplant ParTedescoContinued from page 15migiana, Philly cheesesteak, hot pastrami and the Italian sausage. We are also known for our great pizzas, adds Casale just as two large Meat Lover pies head out the door for hungry clients on the Galt Mile. And just so people know, we will soon be introducing our 20 pizza. All salads, sandwiches, burgers and appetizers are under $10. Large entres are priced between $12 and $22. There is an Early Bird menu and half-price Happy Hour at the bar from 4 to 7 p.m. Financially-friendly lunch and dinner specials can be found on the website. An outstanding selection of wines is offered with bottles starting at $16 and carafes at $18. Many of our wines are imported from Italy and cannot be found anywhere else, says Casale. All major credit cards are accepted. There is ample parking. Delivery is free. A catering menu is the perfect choice for large parties and of ce functions. For a sweet ending, the convivial Tedescos unveils tasty desserts such as cannoli, tiramisu and a truly divine cheesecake. Buon appetito! Malcolm McClintock holds an MBA and has lived in Thailand, Spain, France, Mexico, Canada and the US where he has developed a deep appreciation for world gastronomy. The tangy Caprese salad with fresh mozzarella, tomatoes and basil is always a crowd pleaser. The healthy grilled salmon let with Portobello ravioli is a fan favorite. Fiore Casale welcomes all to enjoy ne Italian cuisine at Tedescos.

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30 The Pelican Friday, January 20, 2012 Pompano Beach The Broadway hit, A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum opens Jan. 28 at the Herb Skolnick Center, 800 SW 36 Ave., Pompano Beach. The production runs through Feb. 5. Call 954-784-0768 for specific times and dates.Curtain Call Playhouse presents A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum opens this month at the Herb Skolnick Center1,000 feet into the Atlantic, 222 N Pompano Beach Blvd., Pompano Beach. 954-7864073 Anglins Pier at Commercial Blvd., Lauderdale-by-theSea. 954-491-9403 Deer eld Beach International Pier 200 NE 21st Ave., Deer eld Beach. 954426-9206 or 954-943-1488.LeisureBingo The American Legion Auxiliary Unit 142 has Bingo on Tuesdays at 7 p.m. at 171 SW 2 St., Pompano Beach. Food is available from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. 954942-2448. Free Support Group See SIGHTNGS on page 31SightingsContinued from page 25

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The Pelican 31 Friday, January 20, 2012 The NE Focal Point Alzheimers Day Care Center, located at 301 N.W. 2nd Avenue in Deer eld Beach, offers a weekly Caregivers Support Group every Wednesday from 10 a.m. to noon. MeetingsToastmasters The Gold Coast Toastmasters meet in the second and fourth Mondays of each month at Panera Bread, 1762 N. Federal Highway, Fort Lauderdale from 7 to 9 p.m. 954-895-3555.ServiceZonta International meets on the third Tuesday of the month at Duffys Diner, 401 N. Federal Hwy., Deer eld Beach at 11:15 a.m. Zonta International is a classi ed service organization of executives and professionals working together to advance the status of women locally and worldwide through service and advocacy. 561-392-2223. Senior Citizens The Greater Pompano Beach Senior Citizens Club meets on the second Wednesday of the month at the Emma Lou Olson Community Center on NE 6th Street, Pompano Beach at 10 a.m. Activities focus on the general welfare, health, education and security of senior citizens. We welcome people of all ages. HealthYoga A Yoga class is available for all levels at Hagen Park, 2020 Wilton Drive in Wilton Manors, on Tuesday nights from 6:30 to 8 p.m. and Saturday mornings from 10:30 a.m. until noon. The cost is $7. 305-607-3520.TheaterThe Producers The Tamarac Theatre of Performing will be showing The Producers until Jan. 29 at its theater, 7143 Pine Island Road. Tickets are $25. 954-726-7898.VolunteerHospice volunteers needed VITAS Innovative Hospice Care of Broward needs volunteers who can make friendly visits to terminally ill patients and their families, provide relief for caregivers, visit veterans and more. A two-day orientation is required. 954777-5396. Disaster relief Pompano Has Heart, a volunteer group that assists people impacted by disasters, meets monthly. Volunteers are needed to man tables at the City of Pompano Beach Health Fair on Wednesday and Aug. 10 and 11 from 9 a.m. to 3 p. SightingsContinued from page 30

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32 The Pelican Friday, January 20, 2012 Theirs is not only a partnership in business but a partnership in life, as well. They are the Doctors Hecker Melanie and David a married couple who operate Hecker Dermatology Group in Pompano Beach. Not all couples would choose to spend so much time together, but the Heckers enjoy it and say its an advantage in their medical practice. Theres no challenge in working together, says Melanie. Im working with someone I trust. David says they want the practice to succeed, so were on the same page. These doctors love what they do. The beauty of dermatology is that we do everything, explains Melanie. We see men, women and children, and the situation in each examination room is different. The doctors may remove a skin cancer from one patient and perform a cosmetic procedure on the next. The variety makes for an interesting day, Melanie says. Besides taking much satisfaction in helping people, the Hecker doctors like the size and personal nature of their practice, which is at 3500 NE 5 Ave., just off Sample Road near Dixie Highway, in Pompano Beach. They call it a mom and pop or boutique operation. The doctors entered careers in dermatology from different directions. As a teenager growing up in Hollywood, Florida, David was impressed by his dermatologist, who became a role model and mentor. He decided then to pursue such a medical career himself. During his medical residency at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City, David trained with an internationally recognized expert on psoriasis, and he developed a special interest in that disease. He did research and published professional papers on the subject. He is excited about a big revolution in the treatment of psoriasis a new class of medication called biologics. Psoriasis is a chronic disease, he explains. There is no cure. Patients must stay on the drug forever, but their skin is clear. Weve never gotten someone clear before, he says. This is exciting because I can help people in a way that I never could before. Melanies path to health care is probably not surprisrst practicing in Boca Raton. He still sees patients part-time in Boynton Beach. But it was always their hope to practice together, and he joined Melanie in Pompano Beach a couple of years ago. Despite their busy medical practice and the demands of parenting three children, the Doctors Hecker make time for community service. They have participated in numerous free cancer screening events sponsored by various community groups, distributing information, providing advice and screening hundreds of people for signs of cancer. They are quick to stress the importance of these screening events. Routine body checks can prevent you from having cancer down the road, Melanie says. Its important because one person in the U.S. dies every hour from melanoma, one of the fastest growing cancers in the U.S. She explains that 80 percent of the damage to your skin is done before you are 18 years old, so its important to educate children. Thats why we like to see families, she adds. The realities and economics of practicing medicine today result in many dermatologists joining larger group practices. But the Heckers plan to stay right where they are to continue their mom and pop approach to serving patients for just as long as they can. Hecker Dermatology Group, 3500 NE 5th Avenue, Pompano Beach 954-783-2323Pompano Beach dermatologists share life and work togethering, considering that her father and three brothers are medical doctors. But she did not take a direct route to her medical practice. After earning an MBA in nance, she began a career on Wall Street. While she enjoyed Wall Street, it wasnt as satisfying as shed like, so she headed for medical school and a career based on helping people directly. Her education led her to research dermatology at Weill Cornell Medical Center in New York City at the same time David was studying there. They met while making rounds at the hospital. The rest, as they say, is history a meeting that led to marriage, three children, a medical practice together in Pompano Beach and a home in Lighthouse Point. They began their medical careers in 1999 with David Together Husband and wife physicians in Pompano Beach, Drs. Melanie and David Hecker. Pompano Beach Hecker Dermatology Group, focuses on diseases of the skin and cosmetic procedures.