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Pompano Pelican
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00090900/00279
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Title: Pompano Pelican
Uniform Title: Pompano Pelican
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: Pompano Pelican
Place of Publication: Pompano Beach
Publication Date: 12-30-2011
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Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Pompano Beach
Coordinates: 26.234722 x -80.125556 ( Place of Publication )
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00090900:00279

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Friday, December 30, 2011 Vol. XIX, Issue 52 Call 954-783-8700 to Advertise Email: siren2415@gmail.com Pompano Beach • Deer eld Beach • Lighthouse Point • Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Wilton Manors • Oakland Park • Hillsboro Beach • The Galt • Palm Aire The P e l i c a n Pelican Oh, so quotable! Play ball!! After hearing from RMA partners on how to stimulate redevelopment, Commissioner Scot Sasser said it was “a great presentation with great ideas.” He wanted to know what things will cost, so the commission can prioritize what it can get done. “We keep getting to this point, but we can’t get off the ball,” he said.By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFLBTS – This year, 2011, should be remembered for the number of visiting experts, consultants, students and professors who walked the town trying to devise a plan for revitalization. Now all that effort culminates LBTS was under scrutiny in 2011 Town seeks to improve its ambiance in a commission workshop 7 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 17 at Jarvis Hall, when urban designers Correa and Associates will present conceptual designs for Commercial Boulevard from Bougainvilla Drive east to the beach pavilion. “This is the big ticket item for See LBTS RETRO on page 12 Development takes center stage despite economyBy Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach Mayor Lamar Fisher says 2011 was a banner year for his city. The good news came from all directions. In 2010, after property values plummeted with a record 15 percent decrease, 2011 recorded a ve percent decrease. The numbers were at least moving in the right direction. But the big things that got attention in the city were three major areas that had once been deemed “blighted.” Those areas, Martin Luther King Boulevard, Atlantic Boulevard from Northeast 18 Avenue to A1A and Ocean Boulevard, north of Atlantic Boulevard, are now either in redevelopment design, under construction or under discussion. Having been declared blighted several years earlier and approved for CRA, or Community Redevelopment Agency action, these three locales bene t from property taxes collected within the CRA boundaries. The West See DEVELOPMENT on page 4 See DEERFIELD BEACH on page 20What they said in Deer eld Beach about . The Utility Tax“It’s a fair and equitable tax on everyone in the community… We need to come up with money to get our ad valorem taxes down.” Deer eld Beach Mayor Peggy Noland in support of a 10 percent tax on utilities. “I don’t think for one minute, we’ll have any trouble getting that number. “ Rescind the Utility Tax Co-Chair Jean Robb about the 4,200 voter signatures needed to force a referendum. “People need to know the facts. I won’t sit by and let them pass around rumors.” City Manager Burgess Hanson after being criticized for distributing utility tax information where petition signatures were being collected.Florida House“They are creating Freddy Krueger and Elm Street. A drug center is the last place to nd drugs.” Sharief Abu Moustafa, owner of Florida House. “It doesn’t make sense to test the waters here… the courts are sensitive to the rights of the disabled.”City Attorney Andy MaurodisPelican Retro Our annual irreverent look back at the good, bad and simply ridiculous things we did in 2011. We saved lives, changed laws, changed our looks, protested, gave in and stayed in the game. We hope our readers enjoy this issue and to those who didn’t make it in, we are sorry. It’s also a time to thank all the people who helped us make it through this tough year of fewer dollars. We congratulate the businesses who made the right decisions and stuck it out. We will miss those who moved on to other things, but we are sure the 2012 will bring good things for all of us. Anne Siren In 2011, two things remained big favorites: loving the sail and catching the sh. At left, children in the pram sailing summer session in Lighthouse Point prepare for the Mayor’s Cup.At right Jacob Bedwell and Ben Stone show off their catch at the Deliver the Dream shing tournament. [Staff photos]

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2 The PelicanFriday, December 30, 2011 In other news, newcomers were seated at the daisBy Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFHillsboro Beach – This exclusive beach town is well on the way to resolving issues that have dogged it for several years: beach erosion and renovation of its aging water plant. Along the way, in 2011, residents elected two new faces to a commission that is not traditionally comfortable with change and as the new year begins will be adding two more new name plates on the dais. It’s a sea change for a town that has rarely turned a sitting commissioner out and for a commission that seems to play by country-club rules: Don’t challenge the status quo. Both Javier Garcia and Claire Schubert, elected in March, bring new ideas to the board. Schubert, now that the $6 million beach restoration project is done, continues to explore ways of retaining sand, this town’s 2011 beach project secured Hillsboro’s beaches one more time Mother Nature had no respect for the luxury condominiums that lined the beach in Hillsboro Beach which led city of cials to try more than one project until they resolved the erosion with tons of new sand. [Staff Photo] See Hillsboro on page 3

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The Pelican 3 Friday, December 30, 2011 The Pelican 954-783-8700 most precious commodity in terms of real estate values and lifestyle. Schubert has initiated commission workshops to present the latest data on erosion control methods and in this effort is supported by Garcia, an avid scuba diver. Garcia has been intent on containing the cost of a sand “hot spot” study and keeping the town’s beaches clean. He urged the commission to petition the powers that be for a no-wake zone throughout the town but the Coast Guard said “no deal.” Garcia is also pushing the commission to upgrade technology at town hall and to get the town’s records and archives safely stored. Celinda Sawtelle started the turnover by resigning midterm forcing the commission to appoint her replacement in November. After interviewing candidates publicly, they chose restaurateur Jim Lambert, son of one of the island’s longtime residents, to ll her place. As often happens, no one chose to run against the newly-appointed Lambert except Dick Maggiore. Maggiore had served out another unexpired term of about four months on the commission back in 2010 and was eyeing a return. But more unusual, Commissioner Rhea Weiss did not run for re-election, so Lambert and Maggiore found themselves elected. Now the dais is complete for 2012: Mayor Dan Dodge who has served since 2007, Jim Lambert, Javier Garcia, Dick Maggiore and Claire Schubert. These ve will most likely experience ongoing frustrations with renovations to the city’s 50-year-old water plant. Plans and nancing were approved early in 2011, but to date, permitting through the City of Pompano Beach is holding up an of cial groundbreaking. Consulting engineers CH2MHill reported at December’s commission meeting the project was already a month behind schedule causing Mayor Dan Dodge to say, “I nd this unacceptable. We need you to sew this up … no cost overruns will be accepted.” The commission, led by Mayor Dan Dodge, took a tough stand on its contract with Deer eld Beach to provide re/emergency rescue services which resulted in a $216,000 reduction in the original gure of $719,596. In the rst go-round which shaved Hillsboro’s cost by $116,00, Dodge told Fire Chief Chad Brocata, “I appreciate the reduction, but honestly I am looking for more.” Final contract cost is $593,000. Early in the year, the town’s experimental erosion project, the PEM system installed by EcoShore International, was removed. This came about after months of negotiations as to what was contractually owed the rm and discussions as to the PEMs effectiveness in accreting sand to the north beach. The PEM removal paved the way for the nourishment project which pumped 300,000 cubic yards of sand onto the north beach in May. The town made some internal changes administratively and took steps to smooth out some bookkeeping woes. The commission contracted with Coral Springs accountants Severn Trent to handle the job. The culmination of a three-year effort by the police department was recognized in February at the Florida Accreditation Conference. The accreditation brought the department up to state law enforcement standards and was accomplished largely by Maj. Jay Szesnat who collected massive amounts of data and submitted the department’s accreditation application. Not content to exit the commission without establishing a recycling effort in the town, Commissioner Weiss and Waste Management, the town’s garbage collector provider, instituted a program in October that has been embraced by residents. HillsboroContinued from page 2

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4 The PelicanFriday, December 30, 2011 CRA budget in 2011 was about $6.3 million. The East CRA budget was about $1.8 million. On West Atlantic Boulevard, plans are in progress with CRA engineers and county funding to develop a library on a civic campus next to city hall. Plans for a theater, possible educational facilities and use of other outparcels are also under discussion. On Martin Luther King Boulevard, renovation is underway for mixed-use housing, wider sidewalks, a transit station, lighting and landscaping. Old Historic Pompano Beach, the former downtown of the city which lies between the civic campus and MLK, connects the two areas. Says Fisher, “There is a lot of interest from developers to come into this area. The transit center is a key component.” The transit center will be a bus transfer connection point from several areas of the county. Festivals like Pompano GreenMarket, East Village Uncorked and other activities are geared to atrract people to these parts of town to see the improvements and future plans.East side projectsCristina Rati is owner of Cristina’ s Caf on East Atlantic Boulevard, one of the areas under development. Rati says her success comes from her Greek recipes. “Once people come,” she says, “they come back again.” She adds that as the Boulevard’s improvements near completion, there will be more traf c, which is what she and other business owners there need. Construction between A1A and the ocean on the Boulevard added landscaping and removed two traf c lanes. That provided more sidewalk space for pedestrians and more space for outdoor dining, a long awaited boon for beach restaurants. Construction is expected to begin at the Atlantic/A1A terminus with public art, water features and a revitalization of the beachfront community that includes a beachfront restaurant, dune restoration, parking facilities, a beach library and infrastructure improvements such as drainage, storm water, pier development and the possible realignment of Ocean Boulevard. “In 2012, we all want to see the plans and hard work become a reality,” says Fisher. “And we expect the new library with its two-tier cultural center to be another reality.” On the east side of town, CRA projects readjusted streets and sidewalks, and added pizazz to attract business and patrons. [Staff photo] Fisher DevelopmentContinued from page 1

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The Pelican 5 Friday, December 30, 2011 What they were saying about…Sign enforcement“We thought it a bit of a joke,” – Chris Kane, Daily Grind manager of the city’s attempt to crack down on neon “open” signs.Retirement“…I have led you to the Red Sea. Now someone with a new vision will lead you across into the glorious new future. Thank you, dear ones, for everything.” – Doreen Gauthier announcing her retirement as librarian.Lighthouse Point“LHP is a great community and the people who run the city are intelligent, caring people who enjoy having input from the community. They listen to those who have something to say and let you have your moment.” – 2011 “Keeper” Bill Gallo.By Judy WilsonPELICANSTAFFLighthouse Point – Politics as generally pretty easy-going in this city, but a little spice was added this year when City Commissioner Chip LaMarca was elected to the Broward County Commission. Retired newspaper editor Earl Maucker was chosen over a number of other applicants to ll LaMarca’s seat until the March 2011 elections. Since the commission had ruled the temporary appointee could not run for of ce right away, two other candidates emerged and accountant Walter Troast defeated school teacher Becky Lysengen for a three-year term. Mayor Fred Schorr and Commissioner Sandy Johnson were not challenged. In December, with another election set for January 31, Mike Long has turned up unopposed, and Lysengen has decided to take on commission president Susie Gordon, a commissioner for 11 years. Tom Hasis, another veteran of the board with 19 years in the seat, is being challenged by Maucker who must have decided he liked the job. Keepers Days in February honored Allan Burrows, who is known as the city’s ”water commissioner” having served for years on the Waterways Committee and more recently on the Hillsboro Inlet Improvement District Board; architect Bill Gallo, who has contributed his time and talent to renovating city hall, the LHP library and the Sample-McDougald House and who serves on the planning and zoning board; and posthumously to Jeffrey Siegel, a landscape architect who died in 2009 but who worked many years with the Beauti cation Committee and lent his expertise to numerous arbor projects in the city. In April, the unthinkable happened. Doreen Gauthier In LHP, 2011 may be remembered as the “Year Doreen Retired” Hostess of her volunteer appreciation luncheon, Doreen Gauthier, (l) welcomes her guests to the meeting hall at St. Paul the Apostle Church.See LIGHTHOUSE POINT on page 9

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6 The PelicanFriday, December 30, 2011 Deer eld Beach, Pompano Beach, Lighthouse Point, LauderdaleBy-The-Sea, Wilton Manors and Oakland ParkWilton Manors • Oakland Park • Hillsboro Beach The Pompano Pelican is published weekly on FridaysStreet Address: 1500-A E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, FL 33060 Telephone: 954-783-8700 • Fax: 954-783-0093Letters to the Editor are encouraged and accepted for print if signed, although a writer’s name will be withheld on request; letters must also include a daytime telephone number. Advertising rates are available upon request. Subscription rate is $31.80 including tax for one year’s delivery in Greater Pompano Beach; $95.40/per year including tax for others in the United States; call 954-783-8700 for rates abroad. The Pelican is a nonpartisan newspaper and reserves the right to decline advertising. Copyright 2011. Reproduction of this publication in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission of the publisher. The Pelican is a member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, Deer eld Beach Chamber and the LBTS Chamber. The Pelican is a state certi ed woman-owned minority business. The Pelican is delivered to businesses, libraries, schools, of ces, hospitals, news racks and single family homes. All advertising and copy is published at the sole discretion of the publisher. We welcome your critiques and ideas concerning this publication. Anne Siren, publisherExecutive Assistant: Mary Hudson Finance: Peter Pritchard Graphics: Rachel Ramirez Windsheimer and Adriana Bonilla Bookkeeper: John White Classi eds: Fran Shelby Contributing Writers: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Judy Wilson, Malcolm McClintock, Judy Vik Copy editors: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Account Executives: Paul Shroads, Carolyn Mann, Bill Heaton, Bill Fox ESTABLISHED 1993 • Volume XIX, Issue 52 Founding Editor and PublisherAnne Hanby Siren Letters & OpinionsTo the editor, Just a short note to Stanley Turon, who wrote letter about de brillator. Has he thought about who will be trained to use it? What about 24 hour coverage to man it as needed? Will that person/persons be available on the premises at all times? Some things have to be thought out from beginning to end before they can be undertaken. Pam Ericson Pompano Beach As a ten year part-time resident of Palm Aire, I am re ecting on some of the wonderful improvements that have happened here, and one disappointment. First we got a handy new Publix for a neighbor, then the active Solnick Center, and now, the wonderful new George Brummer park, which is off to a great start. It’s great to see so many families taking their children to the park, and how busy the tennis courses are! What a great asset to Palm Aire. That said, I would also like to express my disappointment that all the people living in the Palm Aire high rises still do not have recycling services at their buildings, and not even a drop-off point nearby! How thrilling it was for Palm Aire recyclers when, out of the blue, there was a very handy and accessible drop-off container in the parking lot of the Skolnick Center. For the very short time it was there it was well used, with residents of Palm Aire nally having a place to go to, by foot even! How sad that one day it disappeared, and those of us who live in Palm Aire high rises and feel that recycling is important are forced too, one again, drive our recyclables over to the container at city hall, (or worse, when that one is full which is quite often all the way over to the one at the re station near the airpark.) Why did that wonderful bin disappear? Could it be that a handful of residents would have liked to have seen some landscaping around it? Perhaps just a little row of hedges, and maybe a nicer paint-job on the container. Those small improvements would have been an extremely small percentage of the landscaping budget given to the George Brummer Park. With all the forward thinking that we do have here, what a shame that the thousands of people living in or visiting Palm Aire high rises still don’t have a local drop-off point. T. Marques Pompano BeachOld (Amendment 7) Brought on lawsuits--droppedProposing an amendment to the State Constitution to provide, consistent with the United States Constitution, that no individual or entity may be denied, on the basis of religious identity or belief, governmental bene ts, funding, or other support and to delete the prohibition against using revenues from the public treasury directly or indirectly in aid of any church, sect, or religious denomination or in aid of any sectarian institutionNew (Amendment 8) Language too ambiguous--droppedProposing an amendment to the State Constitution providing that no individual or entity may be denied, on the basis of religious identity or belief, governmental bene ts, funding or other support, except as required by the First Amendment to the United States Constitution, and deleting the prohibition against using revenues from the public treasury directly or indirectly in aid of any church, sect, or religious denomination or in aid of any sectarian institution. Breaking News: On Dec. 12, Leon County Judge Terry Lewis removed the ballot question because of ambiguous language. Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi has since revised the language to get it back on the November 2012 ballot, and it’s back. Beware of amendment that would nance religious schools with tax dollars from public school budgetsBy Anne SirenPUBLISHERAbove are two ballot questions proposed by our state legislature. The rst one [Amendment 7] was removed after lawsuits were led against it. The second, Amendment 8, will be the third attempt to get the question on the ballot as a way to funnel tax dollars into charter schools including those charter schools with religious af liations. In plain language, the Florida legislators are trying to undermine the state’s public school system. Shame on them! Education is the great equalizer in America. Education is the one free opportunity for children to rise to levels of their dreams. This ballot question, perfumed with a ballot title of “Religious Freedom” is the rst step in breaking the back of our public schools. That won’t be so hard to do. Florida schools, like other educational systems in this country are at best average. Last year only 80 percent of Florida students earned diplomas. That’s what our legislators should be concerned about. Eighty percent is not good enough. This and every state in this country should be tuned into getting our children through high school, ready to either go to college or to vocational school to learn life skills. How dare they give up on the most effective tool we have for children, business and a better society? We can have a superior school system. We must build schools and hire the very top teachers and pay them well. But the more our legislators take from our public school budgets, the less we have for our children in public schools. Be assured that charter schools are funded with public school funds. Science, math, reading, languages, theater, music, art and dance must be part of every child’s life. It’s pretty clear that while smaller minds are determining the future of Florida, greater minds are looking at a global community where peaceful trade can be pro table for all of us on this small planet. Yes, it can—but not while we are focused on someone’s religion. Let that rest with the family. Those who can afford private and/or parochial schools have every right to pay those tuitions. But public education is where all children should be able to compete with their peers for top college spots. This is America. This is the country where creativity has always been the solution. Even God loves that. He or she really got into creativity with a big idea or a big bang—take it the way you like it. What’s wrong with us that we would even think about taking money out of the school system to help religious or secular charter schools. Florida is funding a lot of the wrong things these days, and mixing tax dollars and church schools is not just wrong, it’s evil because in the long run, it hurts the most vulnerable of our children—the poor, the immigrant, the abused and neglected, the ones for whom a superior education is the only way out. And a superior school system won’t do any harm to the young geniuses that are a part of them.Ballot questions for Florida voters to decide in November De brillators in condos must come with trained person[s] Recycling in Palm Aire means long drives to do the right thingTo the editor,

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The Pelican 7 Friday, December 30, 2011 Making a Difference Phyllis J. Neuberger wants your suggestions about people who are making a difference. Call 954-783-8700.By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFThe year began with meeting Alan Drouillard who has been a rst responder on the job and as a volunteer for many years. Ted Galatis, Wilton Manors attorney, makes time for Insight for the Blind. Michele Green has a State Farm Insurance Agency but she continues to volunteer for at least four causes. Congratulations to the Big Diamond Hillsboro Lighthouse volunteers who just retired, was an icon as a nursing angel of mercy to ostomy patients. Jean M. McIntyre branch manager of iBERIABANK, reinstated and led the Leadership Program for the Chamber of Commerce in Pompano Beach. Later in the year she was honored by the Chamber of Commerce as a Light of the community. Suzanne Newman became volunteer publicist for the Relay for Life, Deer eld Beach and Lighthouse Point. After 32 devoted years as Director of the Lighthouse Point Library, Doreen Gauthier retired. Volunteer Joanne Goodwin was elected President of North Broward Democratic Club. Frank Congemi Deer eld Beach was named Man of the Year by Boys’ Town of Italy, an American charity. W.J. Riddick accepted position as co-chair of Young Professionals, a branch of Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce. East CRA launched East Village staged a successful 104 year birthday celebration. Thomas D. Stephanis Boys & Girls Club named Patricka M. England Youth of the Year. Director of the club, Greg Jones is never off the clock when it comes to members of his Boys & Girls club. He was later recognized as a Shining Star in the community. Janis Cashette became the Monday morning story lady at the Doreen Gauthier Lighthouse Point Library. At Holy Cross Hospital Sister Genevra A little reminder of the people we’ve met and the things that they did to make a difference in 2011See DIFFERENCE on page 14The Pompano Beach Moms pooled their resources to publish and sell a cookbook to help send their young Pompano Beach Piranha ballplayers to Cooperstown.There will be no cows in the oceanNo cows, but plenty of Pompano Beach Piranha swimmers will compete in the Chick l-A Oceans Series Jan. 7 beginning at 7 a.m. The series consists of swimming and paddle boat races. Chick l-A will present trophies for the top three winners Relay for Life kicks off at Jaco Pastorius ParkThe ght for more cancer research gets a big boost from the many Relay for Life events that continue in Broward County, On Jan. 19 in Oakland Park, another relay will get organized with an evening of food, games, fun and information on how to participate or put a team together. The group meets at 6 p.m. at Jaco Pastorius Park, 1098 NE 40 Ct., Oakland Park. Call 954-564-0880.

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8 The PelicanFriday, December 30, 2011 The Pelican covers Northeast Broward County with your news. Call 954-783-8700. Business matters The Pelican takes a look at local business owners. Call The Pelican to nd out how you can tell your story here because business matters. 954-783-8700. By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFRealtor, Bob Bellemare has been with Re/Max for 11 years representing buyers and sellers. He says, “I’m well aware of the issues that each faces, especially in this economy. I meet with clients at the property involved or in our new, state-of-the-art of ces at 2608 N. Ocean Blvd., just South of the bridge heading into Hillsboro.” Bellemare went on to say, “I’ve taken a special course and hold a designation as a Certi ed Distressed Property Expert. Translated into simple English, it means that I know how to help people with underwater property work out a solution with their banks through a short sale.” He described a short sale. “It simply means the seller is selling a property for less than he owes on the property. The homeowner authorizes me to work in his behalf. This entails me contacting the bank and getting the bank’s permission to sell the property for less than what is owed. We agree on a fair market value.” He created a hypothetical case. “John and Mary are getting a divorce and they must sell their condo which they bought at an all time high for $200,000. It now has a market value of half. I meet with the bank that holds their mortgage and offer to sell the property for them. I would submit the paper work to facilitate the short sale with approval of the bank.” “Recently we had some good news. The banks are becoming more cooperative with home owners in shortening the time frame and paper work necessary to complete the sale of the property. Some are offering relocation assistance or moving allowances in order to expedite their sales. Some banks have actually forgiven the outstanding balance of the loan. I try to make it a win/win for everyone.” Bellemare has helped many clients who have been caught in this distressed market. One of them, Iris Gagliardi of New York says, “Bob Bob Bellemare at Re/Max promises a free estimate of a property based on its true market value LHP candidates debate Jan. 18The Lighthouse Point Gardens North Condo Association is proud to host a city-wide debate for all candidates running for two positions on the commission. There are two candidates running for each position. The event will provide an opportunity for the four candidates to state their positions as well as answer questions and debate the issues. The debate takes place Wednesday, Jan. 18 at 7 p.m. at Dixon Ahl, 2220 NE 28 St. The debate format will be moderated with pre-prepared questions as well as selected written questions submitted from the audience. The Lighthouse Point Gardens North Condo association was founded in 1967 and consists of 135 units and approximately 200 residents. Each election year for over 10 years now the association has hosted a candidate debate forum for its condominium residents. This year due to early voting and as a community service, the Association will be presenting the debate to all city residents. For further information please email the debate host – Dr. David Kluge at Dnkluge@aol.com Realtor Bob Bellemare is delighted with the new Re/Max of ce on A1A just south of the bridge leading into Hillsboro Beach. He’s been with Re/Max for 11 years and likes being part of the company that sells more real estate than anyone else in the world. [Photo courtesy of B. Bellemare] See Bellemare on page 14

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The Pelican 9 Friday, December 30, 2011 announced her retirement after 32 years at the helm of the town’s homegrown library. Gauthier spoke of her decision at the annual luncheon she hosts for the library’s large corps of volunteers saying, “I have led you to the Red Sea. Now someone with a new vision will lead you across into the glorious new future.” Gauthier took the library from one-room to a fullservice facility with 42,000 volumes and 5,000 patrons in quarters that were renovated and rededicated in 2007. Not part of the county system, the library is sustained by private donation, grants and local tax dollars. In June, a $50 annual Technological advances have enabled the LHP Police Department to capture more than the usual number of suspects. Early in January, cameras installed throughout the city photographed a license plate associated with a home burglary. A truck bearing the plate was spied by a LHP police of cer who pulled it over and found the stolen property on the front seat. In a more recent example, the cameras were used to capture two outof towners suspected of burglary and auto theft. Also credited with reducing the crime rate here are Citizens on Patrol volunteers who routinely turn in suspicious activities leading to arrests. The only controversy involving the citizenry arose over the neon “open” signs merchants commonly use. When code of cers began citing these business owners, they protested at a commission meeting. Believing the city may have been too code conscious, Mayor Fred Schorr asked the LHP Chamber of Commerce to come up with recommendations. They did, and the matter was quickly resolved, allowing merchants to show the red or blue signs conforming to size and placement rules only while their establishments are open. One merchant said before he was given a code violation, “We thought it a bit of a joke!” fee for non-residents was instituted. Lighthouse PointContinued from page 5The 50-year-old King sher Canal Bridge is scheduled for a $1.1 million rebuild in 2013. Almost all the city’s 10 waterway bridges are due for repair or complete restoration and Mayor Fred Schorr is on the hunt for state funding to do the job. A community meeting has been set for Feb. 14, 5 to 7 p.m. at DIxon Hall to discuss the King sher project. [Staff photo]

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10 The PelicanFriday, December 30, 2011 Uncorked a monthly social for artists, residents and merchants of Harbor Village. Brett Nein, landscape architect, volunteered his expertise in many projects in Wilton Manors. Wheeler James Brown became the youngest JROTC Cadet of the Year. Volunteer Carolyn Mann became president of the Greater Pompano Beach Republican Club. Nancy Vermillion French teacher at Blanche Ely H.S., and her French Club sent thousands of hygiene products to Haiti after the earthquake turned Haiti into an island of rubble. For the same cause, Rachel Wheeler a 6th grader from Lighthouse Point, amazed the country by raising $175,000 dollars to build 27 houses under the supervision of Food for the Poor, a major contributor to Haiti and other impoverished peoples in the world. Rachel now has a village named in her honor. John Jones tutoring services, volunteered his free time to serve on many city advisory boards and the Blanche Ely Tigers Roar Club. The Business Resource Center opened in CRA renovated store front in Old Pompano Baseball Moms created and sold cookbooks to take Piranhas team to Cooperstown. Teacher Jenifer Gibbon volunteered extra hours to Charles Drew Family Resource Center. Dahlia Brown recruited volunteers to produce outdoor art for Northwest Pompano Beach. Jonathan Seguine bone marrow transplant, Troop 512 earned his Eagle Scout Court of Honor. One local Kiwanis Club held fundraisers for Eliminate Program which hopes to end maternal and neonatal tetanus, the deadly disease that steals 60,000 lives of innocent babies and a signi cant number of women worldwide. American Legion Post 142 sends ve to Boys’ State to experience government at work. Geri Gunderson retired IRS executive, actively volunteered in John Knox Village, the National Active and Retired Federal Employees, Chapter 558 and the North Broward Democratic Club. Diane Dennison volunteered to run the outdoor coffee shop at N.E. Focal Point is Deer eld Beach. Grant Hemingway helped adults at Broward Outreach Center school earn their GEDs. City paid tribute to those who died in 9/11 on 9/11/2011. Sandra King and her staff gave Pompano Beach its voice. Over 400 volunteers honored each other at J ohn Knox Village Toyota of Deer eld Beach put pink heart on wheels to help cure cancer. Barbara Gordon Shine volunteer, provided free health insurance information. American Legion, post 142, honored Roz Karneol and Marion Broadhead for their service to veterans. The Florida Follie s contributed $60,000 to provide wardrobes for 400 needy children who did their shopping at J.C. Penney. The Pompano Beach Chamber honored 12 outstanding contributors to the community at annual luncheon. Women of the Moose contributed monthly to community needs. Sam Townsend and Harriet Mertz gave nancial support to the Young Artists of Florida Grand Opera. Lowe’s store manager, Steve Piszcynski named Business Man of the Year. Roy Rogers received Stewart Kester award for his many years of generosity to the community. Goodyear Blimp and U.S Marines host Toys for Tots drive. M.E. DePalma Wilton Manors, chosen Ms. Florida Senior for her countless achievements. Light of the Community Award went to Michael Orange McLain for his long service to LHP and Pompano Beach Chambers, Rotary club, Appearance Board of LHP and John Knox Village. John Dalsimer, CPA, has donated $85,000 in the past ve years to the New Health Center in the works for John Knox Village. Thank you one and all for everything you have done to make life better for those around you. Recognizing you for your efforts has been a personal pleasure.Difference Continued on page 7

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The Pelican 11 Friday, December 30, 2011 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFLBTS – The rst campaign treasurer’s reports are in for candidates seeking Seat 3 on the Lauderdale-ByThe-Sea Town Commission in the Jan. 31election. The reports cover the period from Oct. 1 to Dec. 9. Mark Brown, a retired Congressional chief of staff, has raised $7,870 and loaned his campaign $8,406.74 for a total of $16,276.74. Realtor Edmund Malkoon has raised $790 in contributions and loaned his campaign $2,150 for a total of $2,940. Brown lists expenditures of $8,414.79, including costs for yard signs, printing and advertising. Malkoon has spent $950 including costs for advertising and printing. They are vying for the seat now held by Birute Ann Clottey who is not seeking re-election. Brown’s contributors include former town commissioners David Wessels and Chuck Clark and 11 of his neighbors in the Corniche condominium. Malkoon’s contributors include Commissioner Chris Vincent and Marjorie Evans, who ran unsuccessfully for the seat two years ago. Brown ahead in fundraising for LBTS commission seatGordon’s campaign attracts support from PB, HB of cialsBy Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFLighthouse Point – Incumbent political veteran Susie Gordon is the only one of four candidates for city commission seats in the January 31 election to have raised campaign funds. Gordon, who serves as the commission president, reported raising $3,500 as of Dec. 9 with her largest donor Pompano Beach Mayor Lamar Fisher who gave her $600. Hillsboro Beach Vice Mayor Dan Dodge has contributed $300, attorney Anne Maclean wrote a check for $500 and Meaghan Troast, daughter of LHP Commissioner Walter Troast, is listed as giving Gordon a $200 donation. Gordon has accepted contributions from 19 supporters and spent less than $500. Her opponent Becky Lysengen opened her campaign account with $100 and reports no contributors. Tom Hasis, seeking to retain his seat, gave his campaign a $750 loan while his challenger Earl Maucker put in $500 of his own money. Election Watch Vote on Jan. 31 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFLBTS – Mayor Roseann Minnet and Vice Mayor Stuart Dodd were re-elected without opposition. Minnet was elected to her third two-year term and Dodd to his second four-year term. “That the two positions were unopposed says a lot for what the commission is doing. That’s historic, to my knowledge,” Minnet said. “That’s a direct correlation to where people feel we’re doing a good job. We may not always agree, but residents feel they have positive representation on the dais.” Asked the major commission accomplishments this year, Minnet said, “We have brought civility to the town and the dais. The master plan has been updated, and we’re moving forward with major infrastructure issues, such as drainage and capital improvement projects. The challenge will be to keep the momentum going in a positive way.” This month the commission has workshops scheduled Jan. 17 on revitalizing Commercial Boulevard and Jan. 19 on sewer rates. Early in the year a Charter Review Board will be created. “It’s important that we get good people who are future thinkers on the board. It’s the blueprint of the town, and it’s important we look at the charter we want to make,” Minnet said. “The big issues have been solved by the teamwork of the whole commission and the town staff combined,” Dodd said. “Finally, we have harmony, teamwork and a very professional staff to provide the material on which the commission can make good decisions to move the town forwards to a great future,” he said. Now, Dodd said, “The biggest challenges are to use our reserves wisely so we don’t have to raise our millage rate while putting enough money into infrastructure repairs. We have drainage projects, downtown sidewalks and the beauti cation of the southern section of A1A to look forward to in the immediate future.” Commissioner Chris Vincent lists the commission’s major accomplishments this year as: 1. Not having to raise the millage rate and continuing to provide the level of service our community expects. 2.The installation of multipay stations (that take credit cards) for parking throughout the town and bringing in private service providers for the building department and code enforcement. 3.Approving capital improvement projects for the year 2012. 4. Maintaining decorum and civility on the dais. Vincent says the challenges in the new year are: 1. Completing the A1A and downtown beauti cation projects. 2. Continuing to be business friendly by creating a quick and expedient turnaround with building and zoning departments. 3. Continuing with Neighborhood Improvement Projects. 4. Maintaining decorum and civility on the dais. Mayor, vice mayor unopposed in Lauderdale-by-the-Sea

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12 The PelicanFriday, December 30, 2011 the historic center of town and the economic engine,” Bud Bentley, assistant town manager, said in presenting Correa’s $185,000 contract to the commission. Construction costs of the project are projected to be $1.8 million, possibly higher if the town selects high-end lighting, paving and landscape features. The designers also met with two focus groups of residents and business people Dec. 3 to present design concepts. Plans included removing the median from the Pelican Square area, changing from angled to parallel parking and planting trees and foliage. Improving the economic vitality and appearance of A1A and Commercial Boulevard are two key components of the town’s master plan, which the commission has worked all year to update. The emphasis on urban design started in January with a visit from David Sucher, a Seattle developer with expertise in urban planning. He walked Commercial Boulevard with residents and town staff and left behind his three rules for quality urban design: 1. Build the sidewalk to the property line. 2. Make the building fronts transparent with no blank walls. 3. Prohibit parking lots in front of buildings.Enhancing and protectingIn April, commissioners heard from consultants hired to come up with a plan for stimulating redevelopment. “The plan is not about changing anything dramatically. It’s about enhancing and protecting and making everything more beautiful,” Redevelopment Management Associates partner Chris Brown said. He and partner Kim Briesemeister concluded the town needs to do more to help retailers and hoteliers and should add staff positions to do so. And they said much work is needed to help a struggling hotel industry as properties age. One of their discoveries was the lack of identity when headed east on Commercial Boulevard when entering Lauderdale-By-The-Sea when heading east on Commercial Boulevard. “There’s not a real bang,” Brown said. Other observations included: Commercial Boulevard facades that need sprucing up. Signage was poor quality. The area south of Commercial and west of A1A appeared blighted, and the pier lacked appeal. They suggested branding the town to establish an image. Establishing a professional marketing program for the town is imperative to future economic growth and prosperity, RMA said, adding the hotel industry is critical to the town’s economic success. The rm also recommends working the the Florida Department of Transportation on roadway designs. RMA is urging the town to adopt a nance plan for the improvements using bond issues or matching grants and suggest hiring a lobbyist/grant writer, marketing director and economic development director. On April 12, commissioners unanimously agreed to hire RMA for $19,900 to assist the town in de ning costs and developing a nance plan for the many projects laid out in a redevelopment plan they had presented. “I think this is the fastest contract ever put together in recent town history,” Hoffmann said. Cost of the new agreement is $19,900. “You can tell Chris was in retail,” Hoffmann quipped, referring to RMA partner Brown. .Town chosen for U of M design projectIn mid-April, the town was invited to be the subject of the University of Miami School of Architecture’s Annual Community Design Project. The invitation came after Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk, dean of the school, gave a lecture here. Commissioners unanimously agreed to accept the invitation and approved payment of $16,500 in professional fees to the university. Focus of the design project was the revitalization of the A1A corridor from Pine Avenue to Palm Avenue and Commercial Boulevard from the Intracoastal Waterway Bridge to the ocean. The program was a workshop combining the School of Architecture’s expertise in livable community planning and design with their master’s program in Urban Real Estate Development. The expertise of 30 architecture, real estate, urban design and hotel industry professionals was involved and after six days of intense work students presented their work at a May 26 meeting. The teams researched the town history before they began. “You have a special history and a special character. We heard loud and clear how much you love this community and want to protect it,” they said. “Everything we’ve done respects the height limits in the charter.”Commercial Boulevard issuesBusiness owners had different concerns, LBTS RetroContinued from page 1 See LBTS RETRO on page 13

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The Pelican 13 Friday, December 30, 2011 depending on location. In Pelican Square, businesses were doing great, but there were issues with traf c congestion. The more central Market Square needs parking and an identity. The Marina Plaza area, along Basin Drive south of Commercial, struggles the most and has a lack of pedestrian activity. In the downtown Pelican Square area, the students recommended eliminating center medians and restricting traf c east of El Mar Drive. They suggested widening sidewalks, planting shade trees and adding overhead lighting to encourage outdoor seating. At the Intracoastal Waterway Bridge they proposed a large welcome sign and a redesigned bridgetender house.Along the A1A CorridorIssues are high traf c congestion, lack of shading and an area that is not pedestrian friendly. The area is visually unappealing, and [discourages] walking. The roadway is wide, and public furnishings are aging and deteriorating.Commissioners urge caution in hiringIn July, commissioners learned that the proposed budget called for adding a business development/ marketing director and capital projects manager and a planning director to ll the former position of development services director. Vice Mayor Stuart Dodd said he favored a more cautious approach and wasn’t in favor of an immediate staff increase. The business development and marketing position also includes administering an incentive program for business. Dodd said he favored the incentive program but doesn’t think it’s needed in the next year the project could be pushed out to the following year. Commissioner Birute Ann Clottey suggested outside contractors but Commissioner Chris Vincent said to move forward the town needs expert services which “will save us money in the long run.” Hoffmann said the town can’t move forward with capital plans with a capital projects manager. Several big projects are planned for next year including drainage improvements on Flamingo Avenue, Harbor Drive and Bougainvilla Drive; improvements on the two eastern blocks of Commercial Boulevard and design of South A1A. “I need clear direction. I need clear consensus on what you want. It’s like we take two steps forward and one back,” Hoffmann said. Commissioner Scot Sasser said he would like to go with contractors “to test the ef cacy” of the plans. “I’d like to take one step forward but not three back.” Mayor Roseann Minnet said she had no problem with contracts. “Let’s take baby steps,” she said. Commissioners agreed to go ahead with contracts for the marketing position and business development and lling those jobs will be on the agenda in the new year. LBTS RetroContinued from page 12

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14 The PelicanFriday, December 30, 2011 helped me with a short sale and I’m happy with the way in which he handled it. Every question I asked got an answer. The result is the best I could hope for.” Another client, Ray Mullaney says “Bob did a fantastic job for me. He sold my property quickly and he got me a fair price, today’s economy being what it is. I am happy with the result.” Bellemare nods in agreement with what these clients had to say and adds, “I’ve sold properties at many different prices ranging from $50,000 to $600,000. The time involved is less than it was and that’s a help. The market is improving and the better properties are being snapped up when they are priced realistically. There are good opportunities for investors because interest rates are so low that good properties are very affordable. For sellers, I like to point out that there are buyers looking for properties at fair market value. We are seeing snowbirds from Canada looking for good values and they are nding them. But there are still some available.” This Realtor says he’s honored to be af liated with Re/Max, the company that sells more real estate than any other in the world. “We bene t from an international referral network,” he claims. “This is still a very popular beach area that is desired by people all over our country and around the world. International clients are not a bit unusual in South Florida.” Any property listed on the internet can be seen in the RE/MAX of ce. Clients save time previewing property on the internet instead of inperson. This means they only inspect those that actually interest them. Bellemare says he adjusts his schedule to accommodate his clients. He’s available seven days a week. Just call 954-557-0744 to set up an appointment. BellemareContinued from page 8 The Pelican • Now Online www.pompanopelican.com

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The Pelican 15 Friday, December 30, 2011 Now Online • www.pompanopelican.com By Malcolm McClintockPELICAN FOOD WRITERThe Hog 147 South Cypress Rd. 954-590-8342 Pompano BeachAnyone who appreciates good barbecue will nd deep satisfaction on a visit to The Hog. Situated at the corner of Atlantic and Cypress, this rustically decorated restaurant will please all appetites. “We have ice cold beer and outstanding BBQ, what else could anyone want?” says Evan, the friendly coproprietor of the latest arrival on the Pompano Beach restaurant scene. Indeed, The Hog offers inexpensive wines, frosty domestic suds and great imported beers like New Castle Brown Ale, Shiner Bock and Stella Artois. “No one puts the love, hard work and soul it takes to make real barbecue like we do!” adds business partner Darren, a native Texan who brings his Lone Star State expertise to the operation. “We don’t hide behind sauces. We have the true spiced rub prepared speci cally for each type of meat. For example, our delicious Cattle Beef Brisket has a dry rub crafted to perfectly suit the cut. It is then smoked for 14 hours to get it just right. It’s probably my favorite item on the menu.” The crispy chicken leg quarter with creamy coleslaw is always a fan favorite.“The Hog” is the newest BBQ hot spot in Pompano Beach These long-time friends have been backyard BBQ specialists for several decades. But after winning multiple awards, they decided it was time to showcase their talents in public. So with the help of their wives Alessandra and Jennifer, these knowledgeable entrepreneurs strategically picked Pompano See THE HOG on page 16

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16 The PelicanFriday, December 30, 2011 as the ideal place to open their restaurant. From the mouthwatering pulled pork to the tasty charbroiled Tri-Tip sandwich, there is pretty much everything to satisfy hard core BBQ a cionados. With regard to the tender, spicy or sweet ribs, says Darren with a knowing smile “We buy only the largest, most high quality baby back ribs on the market, and we smoke them exclusively with mesquite wood,” The “Bucket O’ Bones” delivers two pounds of ngerlickin’ baby back ribs for a mere $9 on Mondays. Other favorites include the tender roasted chicken, the moist smoked white breast of turkey and smoked sausage links served with stone ground mustard. “Our award winning Voodoo chili is also excellent. We make it with Poblano peppers and Tri-Tip,” says Evan. “In fact, it got us invited to the International Chili Society world championships.” The Hog also serves up great side dishes such as the spicy ranch style beans chock full of bacon, the 12 hour slow cooked collard greens and the “Dirty Potato,” an enormous baked spud loaded with every conceivable topping. “We will soon be introducing the Hog Trough sampler to let people get a little taste of everything,” says Darren who is also planning a pig-roast in the parking lot on second Saturdays. The Hog Salad over ows with tender chicken, grape tomato, red onion, cheese, egg, olives, bacon and corn bread croutons accompanied by either house vinaigrette or avocado ranch dressing. “I love this salad. It is absolutely delicious,” says local resident and regular patron Jessica Mooney. Just about everything on the menu is in the $7-$10 range. A huge full rack of ribs is around $20. Beers are $2.50 and wine is $3. Kids eat free on Wednesdays and public servants always bene t from a 10 percent discount. “We also do a lot of catering and on-site pig roasts,” says Darren. The Hog provides sweet or bold BBQ and the outstanding stone ground mustard. “This is truly a passion for us,” says Evan. “That’s why no one ever leaves here disappointed.” Malcolm McClintock holds an MBA and has lived in Thailand, Spain, France, Mexico, Canada and the US where he has developed a deep appreciation for world gastronomy. Manager Alessandra shows off the popular “Bucket O’ Bones” over owing with 2 pounds of tender spicy or sweet, mesquite smoked baby back ribs.The HogContinued from page 15

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The Pelican 17 Friday, December 30, 2011 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach – It’s not a new problem, but it is a vexing one. Homeowners in Pompano Highlands say as many as 10 single men live in the single-family homes in their neighborhoods. Some are recovering drug addicts. “This has been going on for six months,” said Todd Hennen, vice president of the Highlands’ residents say rules for singlefamily home occupancy are being auntedHighlands Civic Improvement Association. “We are trying to attract families into the neighborhood. Ten single men in recovery is not appealing to them.” The situation has been around far longer than six months, says Robin Bird, the city’s director of developmental services. He remembers similar complaints coming from several neighborhoods back in 2006. It seems to occur more frequently in down economies when people need to find the money to pay their mortgages or property taxes, he said. In this current downswing, real estate prices have dropped to the point investors are buying properties and turning them into boarding houses, Hennen said. The city’s code restricts tenants of single-family homes to no more than three unrelated people. Hennen questions why the city is not enforcing the rule. But Bird said it is nearly impossible to do so and in some cities such restrictions have been overturned by the courts. In November, Highlands Association secretary Walter Syrek spoke at a city commission meeting saying the city is allowing “transient housing.” Syrek said he has even seen beds being advertised on Craigslist. Responding to Syrek’s comments, Mayor Lamar Fisher said, “This is a priority for us.” According to Bird, the difficulty is finding the tools to curtail the trend. The socalled ‘sober homes’ that are marketed to recovering addicts are protected to some degree by the American Disability Act and Fair Housing laws. “Only certain strategies can be used,” Bird said. His senior planner Jennifer Gomez is working on those strategies which will be presented to the planning and zoning board after the first of the year. According to Bird, a new zoning category will be created with a distance requirement and some parking restrictions may be instituted. Dwellings being used for commercial purposes, in this case rentals, are required to have a business tax receipt which allows code enforcement officials inside the building. According to Hennen, the number of property owners now registered is steadily increasing. But he notes that without rules and guidelines, code officers have no a

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18 The Pelican Friday, December 30, 2011

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The Pelican 19 Friday, December 30, 2011 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFOakland Park City commissioners spent a good part of 2011 making moves that would help redevelop Main Street. Among them were land purchases at both ends of the target area paving the way for acquisition of a downtown building that will be replaced with a parking lot. City officials executed a loan agreement for $1.390 million between the city and Broward County to buy the strip shopping center at 37003776 NE 12th Ave, just north of City Hall. The interim public parking lot will support parking needs at Jaco Pastorius Park, the library, city hall and at the In Oakland Park, Main Street was 2011 focus Buy-up of blighted buildings to change sceneproposed “Green Market” at Oakland Park Station. Commissioners also approved an ordinance amending the city’s agreement with the county regarding projects in the Redevelopment Capital Program or RCP. The city has $10.2 million in the RCP fund. One project, improvements to NE 5 Avenue, is already complete and fully funded by local Community Development Block grants. The agreement comes with no interest or payments for five years. Then, if new development occurs in the community redevelopment area, the loan can be turned to a grant, and no money is owed. Cost for demolishing the building, removing underground septic tanks and constructing the parking lot and street improvements is estimated at $397,122. The city will fund $58,892 for landscaping, and the rest will come from the county program. Commission OKs Buying blighted property Commissioners approved purchase of a blighted property at 3148 NE 12 Ave. for $675,000. The purchase removes an old building at the southern entrance of Main Street and completes a large tract of land now available for redevelopment at the corner of Oakland Park Boulevard and Main Street. The building has been in disrepair for years. The 9,559-square-foot property was constructed in 1966 as three small buildings and later joined into one. The northern portion is used as a restaurant-bar occupied by the Big Dog Saloon under lease with the current owner. The southern portion is empty and the city will demolish that portion of the building. Big Dog’s lease runs until 2014 with options to renew. Funding for the purchase, along with soft costs and demolition, will be requested under the county’s “Loan to Grant Program.” Commission hires RMA to develop action plan City commissioners, meeting July 22 as the board of the Community Redevelopment Agency, unanimously approved an agreement with Redevelopment Management Associates, or RMA, to review the city’s CRA plan and develop an actionoriented plan for the next five years. “Staff has met with the firm and reached an agreement,” Ray Lubomski, community and economic development director, told the board. Cost is not to exceed $57,000. In the initial phase, RMA reviewed the city’s CRA plan and its interim plan and met individually with commissioners and CRA stakeholders. They prepared a five-year strategic plan and looked at redevelopment capital plans. In Phase 2, they would provide ongoing services based on the five-year plan and the activities the board decides to pursue. The second phase is not covered in the

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20 The Pelican Friday, December 30, 2011 “It seems to me our due process has been ignored.” Gretchen Thomas, who headed up neighborhood opposition to the detox center.By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach – Changes occurred in 2011 that will permanently affect the lives of residents here. As change tends to do, it created major issues that polarized the populace. But as the year closes, much the controversy has settled. Was it a good year or a bad one? The future will be the judge.Wrong tax, wrong timeThe city manager’s move to impose a 10 percent tax on users of water, electricity and fuels caused the biggest stir. Former mayor Jean Robb and business owner Steve Krevoy set out to obtain 4,200 signatures of registered voters on petitions calling for the tax to be rescinded. They gave their effort the acronym RUT, meaning Rescind the Utility Tax, and picked up a slogan from activist Caryl Berner, “The Wrong Tax at the Wrong Time.” Despite an enthusiastic response from the public, the petition drive fell short, rst in September and then again in November. The city’s rule that petitioners must include their precinct number on the paperwork was a big factor in invalidating many of the signatures. Robb charged the city with providing precinct maps that were hard to read and in some cases, inaccurate.Real jail timeThe arrest in April of Dist. 2 City Commissioner Sylvia Poitier set up another signi cant change. Poitier was re-elected to of ce in March after she refused to vacate her seat when Mayor Peggy Noland called for her to step down based on information disclosed in an audit of city funds. Early in the year, the mayor withdrew her request to Poitier saying the voters could decide the matter. However, in April, Poitier was charged with ve counts of falsifying public records and was removed from of ce by the governor, setting up a special election in July. The vacant seat was won by retired re ghter Ben Preston whose door-to-door campaign style boosted him over four other candidates. Deer eld Beach in 2011:Major change and real progressDeer eldContinued from page 1In March, Poitier and Dist. 1 Commissioner Joe Miller had to run for four year terms and each faced opposition, but both won handily. Another local politician in the news was former city commissioner Steve Gonot who was removed from of ce in 2008 and charged with misuse of campaign funds. Gonot went to trial in May, was convicted on three counts and sentenced to one year in prison. That sentence is being appealed. After a three day trial in November, Poitier was found guilty of four counts and awaits sentencing in January. An issue that was expected to cause controversy, passed without ado when commissioners voted in August to merge local re ghter/paramedics with the Broward Sheriff’s Department on the grounds that the trend toward regionalization is one that promotes ef ciencies and saves money. All of the commission seemed predisposed to the concept and there was little discussion.House sweepIn June, Mayor Peggy Noland focused her attention on the Deer eld Beach Housing Authority and called for a revamp of its board of commissioners. An attempt to appoint blogger Chas Stevens, a constant critic of the agency, failed after Stevens continued to post defamatory language about the Authority on his website. Accusations made by Stevens had previously caused the Department of Housing and Urban Development to send inspectors to review the Authority’s records and Cong. Allen West to call for another review. The mayor did name three newcomers to the board, replacing two longstanding members. In the end, no serous infractions were uncovered. HUD issued a report giving Authority Executive Director Pam Davis high marks. The new board of commissioners has, at this time, resolved their issues.House keeperA move by the owner of Florida House, an addiction recovery center on Federal Highway, to add a detox wing to his campus met with erce opposition by residents of The Cove. Gretchen Thomas, whose property abutted the proposed detox center, appealed to the Planning and Zoning Board in July to deny See DEERFIELD on page 24

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The Pelican 21 Friday, December 30, 2011 Rev. Hyvenson Joseph WORSHIP DIRECTORY: Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad. Michael J. O’Neill, 54 of Oakland Park went to be with the Lord on Monday, Dec. 26. Mike spent most of his life building the Miami-Fort Lauderdale skyline, having worked for Harmon Contracting and the Enclos Corporation. He was a lifetime member of the International Union of Painters and Allied Trades (IUPAT). Mike was a friend of Bill W. and a member of the Dry Dock group. Surviving are his loving wife Virginia, owner of P.F.S Barber and Hairstyling of Pompano Beach; son Daniel; daughter Angela; his father Donald O’Neill, and two sisters Diane Johnson and Donna O’Neill. He was preceded in death by his mother Mary O’Neill and a brother William Sutter. A memorial service will be held at a later date. Arrangements by the ABC @ Jennings Funeral Home.Michael J. ONeill, contractor who built skylinesObituaries RussellRussell, Eva Mae 77 of Pompano Beach passed away Dec. 17. Services were held Dec. 23 at Antioch Baptist Church.HarrisHarris, Martin Sr., 69 of Deerfield Beach passed away Dec. 24. Services will be held Dec. 31 at 11 a.m. at Word of the Living God, 149 NW 26 Ave., Pompano Beach. 954970-4200. Services entrusted to L.C. Poitier Funeral Home, 317 NW 6 St., Pompano Beach. 954-943-7050.

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22 The Pelican Friday, December 30, 2011 Classi eds Call 954-545-0013 Get to know your local Merchants HELP WANTEDBEAUTY!!! HAIR STYLIST, Nail Tech. – Massage – Facial. Guaranteed Start With 100% Commission. Call In Boca 954415-4937. 12-30 LATIN DANCING LADY INSTRUCTOR NEEDED – Part Time In Boca. Approx 2-3 Hours Per Week. Pay $25 Per Hour. Private Lessons. 954-415-4937. 12-30 SHAMPOO ASSISTANT – PART TIME. POMPANO LOCATION. PLEASE CALL 954-942-4367. 12-30 LOCAL PEST CONTROL CO Looking For Quality Sales/Service Tech. Must Be Dependable, Team Player, Good Drivers License & People Skills. Will Train Right Person. ALSO Of ce Assistant – Computer – People & Phone Skills Needed. Fax Resume 954418-3982. 1-13 SEEKING EMPLOYMENTADULT AIDE – Warm and caring bilingual person with extensive experience in private care and hospital adult sitting. Over 15 years of experience. Excellent references. Own transportation. 781-325-6383. 12-30 BRINGING HOME BABY? RN With 15+ Years Experience. NICU/PEDS. AHA/CPR Instructor Here To Help You & Your Family Transition Baby To Home. Please Call 954-7077079. 1-6 CNA/HHA – MANY YEARS OF EXPERIENCE. Reliable. Available For Hourly Or Live-in. Please Call Verona At 954-635-0558. 12-30 HHA/CAREGIVER – English Speaking, Caring, Compassionate, Honest & Reliable. Many Years Of Experience. Excellent Cook, Will Clean, Run Errands, Own Transportation. Excellent References. For Great Care Call Lea 561-633-3583. 12-30 EXPERIENCED CERTIFIED CAREGIVER Of 19 Years Seeks Job With Elderly. In Home Or Assisted Living/ Certi ed Free Lance Writer, Mentor. 786-419-9099. 12-30 HONEST MALE With References Seeking Position As A Caregiver. Call Chris 954-290-7344. 12-30SERVICES RETIRED PLUMBING CONTRACTOR Looking For Work. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. CFC 027532. Low Rates. 954-496-6420. 12-30 DANNY BOY ELECTRIC – Lic & Insured. Lic. #EC13004811. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. 24/Hr Service. 954-290-1443. Beat Any Written Estimate. Sr, Discount. 1-13 HONEST PC EXPERT – Setups, Viruses, Repairs, Upgrades, Networking, Tutoring. Call Andy For A FREE Estimate. 954-8574846. 1-20 HANDYMAN – PAINTING – CARPENTRY – Pressure Cleaning. Decks! Everything Around The House. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. Call 561-350-3781. 1-20 ELECTRICIAN FOR HIRE – Low Rates. 24 Hour Emergency Service. Call 954404-1150. License EC-0001684. APEX ELECTRIC.. 12-30 AIRPORT TRANSPORTATION – Pickup & Drop-off. Dr. Visits, Shopping, Tours, Etc. Speak Spanish, Portuguese, English. Madeline 754-2340617. 12-30 PLUMBING SERVICES – Big Jobs – Small Jobs. We Do It All. Remodeling & Repairs. Lic. & Insured. C.C. Accepted. Call 954-772-4600. 1-6 EMERALD IRISH CLEANING – Est. 20 Yrs. English Speaking. Cleaning Supplies. Hand Scrubbed Floors. SPECIAL!!! 3 HRS $55 – 4 HRS $70. Service Guaranteed. www. emeraldirishcleaning.com. 954-524-3161. You Will Do An Irish Jig. 12-30 HONEST HANDYMAN – HOME & BUILDING Maintenance/Improvements. No Job Too Small. Fast Friendly Service. Reasonable Rates. Local Resident/Homeowner. Call Today For Your FREE Upfront Quote. No Deposit Required. 754-366-1915 12-30 HOME/OFFICE REPAIRS By State Certified G.C. Reasonable. CGC025802. More Information Call 954815-1007. GOT JUNK? DUMP TRUCK – CLEANUPS Trees/ Landscape, Yard Fill. Paint/ Pressure Wash/ Roofs/Home Repairs – Welding, Etc. Dave 954-818-9538. 1-13THRIFT STORELUCKY STAR THRIFT & GIFTS. 5130 N Federal Hwy (2nd Floor) Fort Lauderdale. 954-839-8182. Great Items At Low Prices Starting From $2 & Up. 12-30 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIESNew GREEN technology. New defroster control saves energy in home refrigerators, commercial chillers. Patented. All optical. Simple mfg. Strategic partners needed..www.NewAvionics.Com. 954-568-1991.MUSICIANS WANTEDThe American Legion Symphonic Band is now accepting new members for the 2011-2012 season. College age to “seasoned seniors” are welcome. Rehearsals are held on Wed. evenings at American Legion Post 142 in Pompano. Percussionists, euphonium and clarinet players are especially needed. If you enjoy “making music,” call Jim McGonigal, Music Director at 954-647-0700 for more info.DEEP WATER VILLA – DOCKPOMPANO BEACH 2/2 1700 SQ FT. Screened Fla Room. Private Yard. W/D. 4 Park. No Fixed Bridges. Community Pool. Deeded Dock.. 2 Blocks Beach. $285,000. Call 954-6291324. 1-20HOMES FOR SALEPOMPANO LEISUREVILLE 55+ This 2/2 Furnished House Is For You! Very Clean. Monthly Maintenance $175. Priced To Sell $105,000. Owner 954-943-0250. 12-30 LEISUREVILLE – REDUCED $94,900. ATTACHE MODEL. 2/2, Garage, Front Porch. Very Private. 2 Active Clubs & Heated Pools. FREE Golf. New Water & Sewer System. 55+. Realty 3000. 561-8663839. 1-6

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The Pelican 23 Friday, December 30, 2011 We Mean Business! Classi eds Call 954-545-0013 TOWNHOME FOR RENTPOMPANO 2/2.5 Waterfront Key West Style. Remodeled, Travertine & Wood Floors, Granite. Dock Available. W/D. Pool. Off 14th Causeway. $1490 Month. 954-632-2592. 12-30HOMES FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH 3/2 – CENTRAL AIR. Screened Porch. Small Utility Room. $1100 Mo. 620 NE 35 Street. Call Darci 954783-3723. 12-30CO-OP SALESPOMPANO BEACH 1/1 On Water, Dockage Available At Your Door. $59,500. Coldwell Banker – Barbara – 954-6291324. 1-20SEASONAL RENTALSPOMPANO BEACH – 2/2 Beautifully Furnished 9th Floor Corner Apt. Great Views. All Amenities. $2,000 A Month. Call 954-785-0177. 1-6REAL ESTATE WANTEDI BUY HOUSES!! CASH!! AS IS! QUICK CLOSE! ANY AREA – ANY CONDITION! NO EQUITY OK. CALL NOW 954-914-2355. 1-20 CONDOS FOR SALEPALM AIRE 105 – Split 2/2 King, Upgrades. Largest Kitchen. W/D. Breakfast Room. Piano. Ultra Furnished. Shopping, Pool Close By. 9th Floor. Low Maintenance/Taxes. $134K – Offers. No Brokers! 954-895-4596. 1-20 LEISUREVILLE $25,900 – 2/2 Fully Furnished With Upgraded Appliances & Carpet. Absentee Owner Wants Immediate Sale. A Rare Find! Call Broker Joe Ryan 954-638-9656. 12-30 POMPANO BEACH 2/2 – Best Deal On A1A, Fully Renovated – No Expense Spared. Private Beach Access. Dockage Available For 30’ Boat. Beautiful Bldg. SPECTACULAR $196K. Solid Rock Realty. Lonnie Brooks 954-709-2523. For Detailed Description, Pictures & Virtual Tour Go To www.rioespana318. com. 12-30 LAUDERDALE BY THE SEA – Furnished 1/1.5 Condo $115,000. Heated Pool. Ocean Access. On Canal. 1481 S Ocean Blvd. Apt 228. Call 586549-5223. 1-6CONDOS FOR RENTPOMPANO 1/1 E OF FEDERAL – Small Complex – Very Clean. No Pets. $650 Month Yearly. Call Barbara 954-263-7129. 12-30 POMPANO LEISUREVILLE 55+ 2/1 – Completely Furn. Sunroom On Golf Course. 2 Pools, 2 Clubs. $875 Month Yearly. 954-788-9312. 12-30APTS FOR RENTDEERFIELD/POMPANO BEACH 1 BR & 2 BR APTS FOR RENT. Remodeled, Paint, Tile, Etc. W & D On Site. Pool. Pet Friendly. Call George 954-809-5030. 1-13 POMPANO MCNAB ROAD & NE 18 AVENUE – 1 & 2 Bedrooms Furnished/ Unfurnished. $675 $950 And Up. Pool, Tile Floors. Central A/C. 954-610-2327. 12-30 POMPANO BEACH Unique Quiet 1/1 Apt. Just Painted. Off Street Parking. 1/2 Block To Beach. $725 Month 1st & Last. 239-898-4799. 12-30 EFFICIENCY AVAILABLE WITH FULL KITCHEN. Includes: Electric, Cable, Wi-Fi, Water, Pool. 2nd Floor End Unit. Clean – Move-in Condition. 2 Blocks From Ocean – North Of Atlantic. Owner Agent. $669 Month – Lease. 954-608-7368. 1-6 POMPANO BEACH 2/2 Furnished. Large Ef ciency With Kitchen. Fully Furnished. Cable, Internet, Pool, Laundry. 500’ To The Beach. Weekly – Monthly – Yearly. 954-2948483 Or 248-736-1533. 1-6 POMPANO – JUST OFF FEDERAL. 1/1, Pool, Laundry. Close To Shopping & Transportation. $700 Per Mo. 1st Mo + Security To Move In. Call Anthony 954-857-5207. 12-30 POMPANO GARDENS $795 – 1/1 $200 Deposit. Nice Area – Minutes To Beach – Pet OK. Please Call 954-515-2554. 1-20 POMPANO BEACH 1/1 NW $650 – 2/1 $750 SW 1/1 $725 – 2/1 $925 – NE 1/1 $675 2/1 NE $950 – TH 2/1.5 $1095 – All FREE Water. Rent + $70 MovU-In. 954-781-6299. 12-30 POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 Bedroom From $495. Easy Movein. 1/2 OFF DEPOSIT. Remodeled. Great Location. 954-783-1088 For More Info. 1-6 STUDIOS – EFFICIENCIESDEERFIELD BEACH A1A – Live at the beach off season. Ef ciencies available for $550 Weekly, pay as you go, no deposit or security, cable, pool, laundry, wireless. Ocean Villa 954-427-4608. 12-30OUTDOOR STORAGEDEERFIELD BEACH OUTDOOR STORAGE For Boats, RV’s, Commercial Vehicles & More. Call Chris At 954-520-1777. 1-6COMMERCIAL FOR RENT-SALEPOMPANO COMMERCIAL OFFICE Spaces Available. Ranging From As Low As $500 To $700 Depending On Square Footage. Please Call Darci At 954783-3723. 12-30 DEERFIELD BEACH – Retail Of ce Warehouse – 700 Sq Ft With Loft. A/C, Bathroom. $575 Per Month. Call For More Info 561-654-1331 Or 561-9985681. 1-13MUSICAL ITEMSBABY GRAND PIANO $1,200 FIRM. CALL 954-783-8700. ORGAN for SALE – Excellent condition. $400. Call 9542950194.FURNITUREBEDSETS – King $180 – Queen $130 – Full $110 – Twin $90. 5 Pc. Bedroom Set $399. Frames $39. 954-465-6498. 1-13MEDICAL SUPPLIESTURNY ELECTRIC SEAT – For Handicapped. Like New! Paid $6,000!! Asking $2995!! Front Passenger Seat. Also Caregiver Available. 954-9201873. 12-30

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24 The Pelican Friday, December 30, 2011 the Florida House petition. As owner Sharief AbuMoustafa prepared to bring his case before the city commission, city planners called a halt to his project saying it was located within 1000 feet of another such facility, his own. Moustafa argued that the detox center was an extension of his facility, not a new facility and should be allowed. When commissioners failed to agree, he requested two hearings and at the same time threatened a civil rights lawsuit citing the American Disabilities Act and Fair Housing Act regulations. The city withdrew its objections earlier this month on the advice of its attorney saying plans for the detox center could move forward. On the brighter side of 2011, the owner of the former Tam ‘O Shanter Country Club donated 50 acres of land to the city for ball elds in return for approval of his plans for a cemetery and mausoleum. The acreage is larger than all the city’s current parks put together. When money became an issue and the Founders’ Days Committee thought they would have to cancel the annual February festival, the business community came forward with $32,000 in donations. The committee tightened its belts and staged a successful four-day affair.CRA saves the dayAnd after several years of discussion, and then construction, two major projects have been completed by the Community Redevelopment Agency: Beauti cation of Hillsboro Boulevard between Federal Highway and A1A has been completed as has the re gured and landscaped Cove Shopping Center parking lot. Earlier this year, the CRA allotted $7 million to purchase property within its boundaries including the Riverview Restaurant site adjacent to Sullivan Park, the DB Chamber of Commerce building, the vacant lot on the Intracoastal Waterway next to the Two Georges restaurant and buildings on the NE corner of A1A and Hillsboro Boulevard. Its intent is to expand Sullivan Park and beautify the entrance to the city’s beach.City declines prince on chamber buildingAcquisition of the chamber building stalled when the city’s offer of $250,000 was rejected.Gone shin’The CRA began restoration of the International Fishing Pier November 1 and intends to have that facility up and running by the end of 2012. These are as many of 2011’s highlights as we have room for in this issue. Readers with other thoughts are welcome to write siren2415@ aol.com. Their remarks will be published in Letters to the Editor.Deer eldContinued from 20 The Pelican -part of doing business. Call us at 954-783-8700. Sailor’s ValentinesBy Carole P. MarshallBROWARD SHELL CLUBIn the early 1800s, British seamen traveled the world. Along with whale oil, spices, silks, sugar and other goods, they brought back seashells from the Pacific. The English women of that era bought the shells and made fancy tables and knick-knacks out of them. Thus, in England the sailor’s valentine first was conceived. As the designs got more elaborate, a cabinetmaker made octagonal boxes to house some of the fancy creations. As the octagonal shape lent itself to even partitions, symmetry of design was adopted for the valentines. From England, the making of the valentines moved to Barbados via an enterprising B. H. Belgrave. He and his brother migrated from England and began a sea curio shop on the island with crafts made by local ladies. Belgrave had cases made and patterns that could be copied. He also sold specimen shells, crabs, preserved local fish and other sea creatures. The valentines of that area were quite crude compared to the elaborate ones of today. Sailors, knowing Barbados See VALENTINES on page 25

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The Pelican 25 Friday, December 30, 2011 initial cost. The city has already spent $25 million on the downtown area, and Mayor Suzanne Boisvenue said, “We’re not where we should be. I’m very concerned about this. I will support this, but by God at the end of the day, there better be something for me to look at.”Culinary Arts Center proposed RMA presented its ideas for a five-year strategic plan to get redevelopment started in the CRA at a public meeting Sept. 13. Neil Fritz, an RMA consultant, said they looked at a dozen sites, including Oakland Park Station at the northern gateway to the area. “You have to develop a niche or it’s not going to happen,” Fritz said of redevelopment plans. For this area Fritz said, “We think we could bring things together in a culinary arts district with food, wine and kitchen businesses. He compared it to the Miami Design District. “As I drove around Oakland Park, something kept telling me kitchens,” said RMA communications director Sharon McCormick. City staff and RMA officials will be having discussions with Broward County on how to best reprogram some or all of the $10.2 million to support the new culinary arts concept.Oakland ParkContinued from page was one of the ports on their way home, bought these valentines as souvenirs. An erroneous story has it that bored sailors made the designs, so the “sailor’s valentines” name came into being. While the story was not true, the fact that these sailors brought many of the valentines home kept the name alive. Sailor’s valentines had a revival in the 1960s which has led to an increase in artistry particularly on Florida’s West Coast. Some valentine artists get upwards of $20,000 for their creations. Today, sailor’s valentines have specific criteria. There are single valentines and double valentines and if one is to win an award, no empty space can show on the bottom of the valentine. The center is rounded with a theme of hearts, flowers or a love saying. Flowers made from shells or other natural sea objects are placed on the form, and colored foil paper is shaped to form partitions on the bottom of the case. Brandy Llewellyn is one of the prominent valentine makers of today. After taking a valentine class in the spring of 2007, she entered her first show competition at the “professional” level the following year and won first and second place ribbons. In 2010, the West Chester, PA, public television station devoted a 30-minute segment to Llewellyn and her sailor’s valentines. In 2011, she was the recipient of the “Best of Show Valentine” and the Artistic “Peoples’ Choice” Award at the Broward Shell Show. Sailor’s valentines will be displayed at the Broward Shell Show Saturday Jan.21 at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center. Call 305-467-4412. ValentinesContinued from page 24

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Friday, December 30, 2011 Vol. XIX, Issue 52 Call 954-783-8700 to Advertise Email: siren2415@gmail.com Pompano Beach Deer eld Beach Lighthouse Point Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Wilton Manors Oakland Park Hillsboro Beach The Galt Palm Aire The Pelican Pelican Oh, so quotable! Play ball!! After hearing from RMA partners on how to stimulate redevelopment, Commissioner Scot Sasser said it was a great presentation with great ideas. He wanted to know what things will cost, so the commission can prioritize what it can get done. We keep getting to this point, but we cant get off the ball, he said.By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFLBTS This year, 2011, should be remembered for the number of visiting experts, consultants, students and professors who walked the town trying to devise a plan for revitalization. Now all that effort culminates LBTS was under scrutiny in 2011 Town seeks to improve its ambiance in a commission workshop 7 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 17 at Jarvis Hall, when urban designers Correa and Associates will present conceptual designs for Commercial Boulevard from Bougainvilla Drive east to the beach pavilion. This is the big ticket item for See LBTS RETRO on page 12 Development takes center stage despite economyBy Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach Mayor Lamar Fisher says 2011 was a banner year for his city. The good news came from all directions. In 2010, after property values plummeted with a record 15 percent decrease, 2011 recorded a ve percent decrease. The numbers were at least moving in the right direction. But the big things that got attention in the city were three major areas that had once been deemed blighted. Those areas, Martin Luther King Boulevard, Atlantic Boulevard from Northeast 18 Avenue to A1A and Ocean Boulevard, north of Atlantic Boulevard, are now either in redevelopment design, under construction or under discussion. Having been declared blighted several years earlier and approved for CRA, or Community Redevelopment Agency action, these three locales bene t from property taxes collected within the CRA boundaries. The West See DEVELOPMENT on page 4 See DEERFIELD BEACH on page 20What they said in Deer eld Beach about . The Utility TaxIts a fair and equitable tax on everyone in the community We need to come up with money to get our ad valorem taxes down. Deer eld Beach Mayor Peggy Noland in support of a 10 percent tax on utilities. I dont think for one minute, well have any trouble getting that number. Rescind the Utility Tax Co-Chair Jean Robb about the 4,200 voter signatures needed to force a referendum. People need to know the facts. I wont sit by and let them pass around rumors. City Manager Burgess Hanson after being criticized for distributing utility tax information where petition signatures were being collected.Florida HouseThey are creating Freddy Krueger and Elm Street. A drug center is the last place to nd drugs. Sharief Abu Moustafa, owner of Florida House. It doesnt make sense to test the waters here the courts are sensitive to the rights of the disabled.City Attorney Andy MaurodisPelican Retro Our annual irreverent look back at the good, bad and simply ridiculous things we did in 2011. We saved lives, changed laws, changed our looks, protested, gave in and stayed in the game. We hope our readers enjoy this issue and to those who didnt make it in, we are sorry. Its also a time to thank all the people who helped us make it through this tough year of fewer dollars. We congratulate the businesses who made the right decisions and stuck it out. We will miss those who moved on to other things, but we are sure the 2012 will bring good things for all of us. Anne Siren In 2011, two things remained big favorites: loving the sail and catching the sh. At left, children in the pram sailing summer session in Lighthouse Point prepare for the Mayors Cup.At right Jacob Bedwell and Ben Stone show off their catch at the Deliver the Dream shing tournament. [Staff photos]

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2 The PelicanFriday, December 30, 2011 In other news, newcomers were seated at the daisBy Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFHillsboro Beach This exclusive beach town is well on the way to resolving issues that have dogged it for several years: beach erosion and renovation of its aging water plant. Along the way, in 2011, residents elected two new faces to a commission that is not traditionally comfortable with change and as the new year begins will be adding two more new name plates on the dais. Its a sea change for a town that has rarely turned a sitting commissioner out and for a commission that seems to play by country-club rules: Dont challenge the status quo. Both Javier Garcia and Claire Schubert, elected in March, bring new ideas to the board. Schubert, now that the $6 million beach restoration project is done, continues to explore ways of retaining sand, this towns 2011 beach project secured Hillsboros beaches one more time Mother Nature had no respect for the luxury condominiums that lined the beach in Hillsboro Beach which led city of cials to try more than one project until they resolved the erosion with tons of new sand. [Staff Photo] See Hillsboro on page 3

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The Pelican 3 Friday, December 30, 2011 The Pelican 954-783-8700 most precious commodity in terms of real estate values and lifestyle. Schubert has initiated commission workshops to present the latest data on erosion control methods and in this effort is supported by Garcia, an avid scuba diver. Garcia has been intent on containing the cost of a sand hot spot study and keeping the towns beaches clean. He urged the commission to petition the powers that be for a no-wake zone throughout the town but the Coast Guard said no deal. Garcia is also pushing the commission to upgrade technology at town hall and to get the towns records and archives safely stored. Celinda Sawtelle started the turnover by resigning midterm forcing the commission to appoint her replacement in November. After interviewing candidates publicly, they chose restaurateur Jim Lambert, son of one of the islands longtime residents, to ll her place. As often happens, no one chose to run against the newly-appointed Lambert except Dick Maggiore. Maggiore had served out another unexpired term of about four months on the commission back in 2010 and was eyeing a return. But more unusual, Commissioner Rhea Weiss did not run for re-election, so Lambert and Maggiore found themselves elected. Now the dais is complete for 2012: Mayor Dan Dodge who has served since 2007, Jim Lambert, Javier Garcia, Dick Maggiore and Claire Schubert. These ve will most likely experience ongoing frustrations with renovations to the citys 50-year-old water plant. Plans and nancing were approved early in 2011, but to date, permitting through the City of Pompano Beach is holding up an of cial groundbreaking. Consulting engineers CH2MHill reported at Decembers commission meeting the project was already a month behind schedule causing Mayor Dan Dodge to say, I nd this unacceptable. We need you to sew this up no cost overruns will be accepted. The commission, led by Mayor Dan Dodge, took a tough stand on its contract with Deer eld Beach to provide re/emergency rescue services which resulted in a $216,000 reduction in the original gure of $719,596. In the rst go-round which shaved Hillsboros cost by $116,00, Dodge told Fire Chief Chad Brocata, I appreciate the reduction, but honestly I am looking for more. Final contract cost is $593,000. Early in the year, the towns experimental erosion project, the PEM system installed by EcoShore International, was removed. This came about after months of negotiations as to what was contractually owed the rm and discussions as to the PEMs effectiveness in accreting sand to the north beach. The PEM removal paved the way for the nourishment project which pumped 300,000 cubic yards of sand onto the north beach in May. The town made some internal changes administratively and took steps to smooth out some bookkeeping woes. The commission contracted with Coral Springs accountants Severn Trent to handle the job. The culmination of a three-year effort by the police department was recognized in February at the Florida Accreditation Conference. The accreditation brought the department up to state law enforcement standards and was accomplished largely by Maj. Jay Szesnat who collected massive amounts of data and submitted the departments accreditation application. Not content to exit the commission without establishing a recycling effort in the town, Commissioner Weiss and Waste Management, the towns garbage collector provider, instituted a program in October that has been embraced by residents. HillsboroContinued from page 2

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4 The PelicanFriday, December 30, 2011 CRA budget in 2011 was about $6.3 million. The East CRA budget was about $1.8 million. On West Atlantic Boulevard, plans are in progress with CRA engineers and county funding to develop a library on a civic campus next to city hall. Plans for a theater, possible educational facilities and use of other outparcels are also under discussion. On Martin Luther King Boulevard, renovation is underway for mixed-use housing, wider sidewalks, a transit station, lighting and landscaping. Old Historic Pompano Beach, the former downtown of the city which lies between the civic campus and MLK, connects the two areas. Says Fisher, There is a lot of interest from developers to come into this area. The transit center is a key component. The transit center will be a bus transfer connection point from several areas of the county. Festivals like Pompano GreenMarket, East Village Uncorked and other activities are geared to atrract people to these parts of town to see the improvements and future plans.East side projectsCristina Rati is owner of Cristina s Caf on East Atlantic Boulevard, one of the areas under development. Rati says her success comes from her Greek recipes. Once people come, she says, they come back again. She adds that as the Boulevards improvements near completion, there will be more traf c, which is what she and other business owners there need. Construction between A1A and the ocean on the Boulevard added landscaping and removed two traf c lanes. That provided more sidewalk space for pedestrians and more space for outdoor dining, a long awaited boon for beach restaurants. Construction is expected to begin at the Atlantic/A1A terminus with public art, water features and a revitalization of the beachfront community that includes a beachfront restaurant, dune restoration, parking facilities, a beach library and infrastructure improvements such as drainage, storm water, pier development and the possible realignment of Ocean Boulevard. In 2012, we all want to see the plans and hard work become a reality, says Fisher. And we expect the new library with its two-tier cultural center to be another reality. On the east side of town, CRA projects readjusted streets and sidewalks, and added pizazz to attract business and patrons. [Staff photo] Fisher DevelopmentContinued from page 1

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The Pelican 5 Friday, December 30, 2011 What they were saying aboutSign enforcementWe thought it a bit of a joke, Chris Kane, Daily Grind manager of the citys attempt to crack down on neon open signs.RetirementI have led you to the Red Sea. Now someone with a new vision will lead you across into the glorious new future. Thank you, dear ones, for everything. Doreen Gauthier, announcing her retirement as librarian.Lighthouse PointLHP is a great community and the people who run the city are intelligent, caring people who enjoy having input from the community. They listen to those who have something to say and let you have your moment. 2011 Keeper Bill Gallo.By Judy WilsonPELICANSTAFFLighthouse Point Politics as generally pretty easy-going in this city, but a little spice was added this year when City Commissioner Chip LaMarca was elected to the Broward County Commission. Retired newspaper editor Earl Maucker was chosen over a number of other applicants to ll LaMarcas seat until the March 2011 elections. Since the commission had ruled the temporary appointee could not run for of ce right away, two other candidates emerged and accountant Walter Troast defeated school teacher Becky Lysengen for a three-year term. Mayor Fred Schorr and Commissioner Sandy Johnson were not challenged. In December, with another election set for January 31, Mike Long has turned up unopposed, and Lysengen has decided to take on commission president Susie Gordon, a commissioner for 11 years. Tom Hasis, another veteran of the board with 19 years in the seat, is being challenged by Maucker who must have decided he liked the job. Keepers Days in February honored Allan Burrows, who is known as the citys water commissioner having served for years on the Waterways Committee and more recently on the Hillsboro Inlet Improvement District Board; architect Bill Gallo, who has contributed his time and talent to renovating city hall, the LHP library and the Sample-McDougald House and who serves on the planning and zoning board; and posthumously to Jeffrey Siegel, a landscape architect who died in 2009 but who worked many years with the Beauti cation Committee and lent his expertise to numerous arbor projects in the city. In April, the unthinkable happened. Doreen Gauthier In LHP, 2011 may be remembered as the Year Doreen Retired Hostess of her volunteer appreciation luncheon, Doreen Gauthier, (l) welcomes her guests to the meeting hall at St. Paul the Apostle Church.See LIGHTHOUSE POINT on page 9

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6 The PelicanFriday, December 30, 2011 Deer eld Beach, Pompano Beach, Lighthouse Point, LauderdaleBy-The-Sea, Wilton Manors and Oakland ParkWilton Manors Oakland Park Hillsboro Beach The Pompano Pelican is published weekly on FridaysStreet Address: 1500-A E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, FL 33060 Telephone: 954-783-8700 Fax: 954-783-0093Letters to the Editor are encouraged and accepted for print if signed, although a writers name will be withheld on request; letters must also include a daytime telephone number. Advertising rates are available upon request. Subscription rate is $31.80 including tax for one years delivery in Greater Pompano Beach; $95.40/per year including tax for others in the United States; call 954-783-8700 for rates abroad. The Pelican is a nonpartisan newspaper and reserves the right to decline advertising. Copyright 2011. Reproduction of this publication in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission of the publisher. The Pelican is a member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, Deer eld Beach Chamber and the LBTS Chamber. The Pelican is a state certi ed woman-owned minority business. The Pelican is delivered to businesses, libraries, schools, of ces, hospitals, news racks and single family homes. All advertising and copy is published at the sole discretion of the publisher. We welcome your critiques and ideas concerning this publication. Anne Siren, publisherExecutive Assistant: Mary Hudson Finance: Peter Pritchard Graphics: Rachel Ramirez Windsheimer and Adriana Bonilla Bookkeeper: John White Classi eds: Fran Shelby Contributing Writers: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Judy Wilson, Malcolm McClintock, Judy Vik Copy editors: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Account Executives: Paul Shroads, Carolyn Mann, Bill Heaton, Bill Fox ESTABLISHED 1993 Volume XIX, Issue 52 Founding Editor and PublisherAnne Hanby Siren Letters & OpinionsTo the editor, Just a short note to Stanley Turon, who wrote letter about de brillator. Has he thought about who will be trained to use it? What about 24 hour coverage to man it as needed? Will that person/persons be available on the premises at all times? Some things have to be thought out from beginning to end before they can be undertaken. Pam Ericson Pompano Beach As a ten year part-time resident of Palm Aire, I am re ecting on some of the wonderful improvements that have happened here, and one disappointment. First we got a handy new Publix for a neighbor, then the active Solnick Center, and now, the wonderful new George Brummer park, which is off to a great start. Its great to see so many families taking their children to the park, and how busy the tennis courses are! What a great asset to Palm Aire. That said, I would also like to express my disappointment that all the people living in the Palm Aire high rises still do not have recycling services at their buildings, and not even a drop-off point nearby! How thrilling it was for Palm Aire recyclers when, out of the blue, there was a very handy and accessible drop-off container in the parking lot of the Skolnick Center. For the very short time it was there it was well used, with residents of Palm Aire nally having a place to go to, by foot even! How sad that one day it disappeared, and those of us who live in Palm Aire high rises and feel that recycling is important are forced too, one again, drive our recyclables over to the container at city hall, (or worse, when that one is full which is quite often all the way over to the one at the re station near the airpark.) Why did that wonderful bin disappear? Could it be that a handful of residents would have liked to have seen some landscaping around it? Perhaps just a little row of hedges, and maybe a nicer paint-job on the container. Those small improvements would have been an extremely small percentage of the landscaping budget given to the George Brummer Park. With all the forward thinking that we do have here, what a shame that the thousands of people living in or visiting Palm Aire high rises still dont have a local drop-off point. T. Marques Pompano BeachOld (Amendment 7) Brought on lawsuits--droppedProposing an amendment to the State Constitution to provide, consistent with the United States Constitution, that no individual or entity may be denied, on the basis of religious identity or belief, governmental bene ts, funding, or other support and to delete the prohibition against using revenues from the public treasury directly or indirectly in aid of any church, sect, or religious denomination or in aid of any sectarian institutionNew (Amendment 8) Language too ambiguous--droppedProposing an amendment to the State Constitution providing that no individual or entity may be denied, on the basis of religious identity or belief, governmental bene ts, funding or other support, except as required by the First Amendment to the United States Constitution, and deleting the prohibition against using revenues from the public treasury directly or indirectly in aid of any church, sect, or religious denomination or in aid of any sectarian institution. Breaking News: On Dec. 12, Leon County Judge Terry Lewis removed the ballot question because of ambiguous language. Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi has since revised the language to get it back on the November 2012 ballot, and its back. Beware of amendment that would nance religious schools with tax dollars from public school budgetsBy Anne SirenPUBLISHERAbove are two ballot questions proposed by our state legislature. The rst one [Amendment 7] was removed after lawsuits were led against it. The second, Amendment 8, will be the third attempt to get the question on the ballot as a way to funnel tax dollars into charter schools including those charter schools with religious af liations. In plain language, the Florida legislators are trying to undermine the states public school system. Shame on them! Education is the great equalizer in America. Education is the one free opportunity for children to rise to levels of their dreams. This ballot question, perfumed with a ballot title of Religious Freedom is the rst step in breaking the back of our public schools. That wont be so hard to do. Florida schools, like other educational systems in this country are at best average. Last year only 80 percent of Florida students earned diplomas. Thats what our legislators should be concerned about. Eighty percent is not good enough. This and every state in this country should be tuned into getting our children through high school, ready to either go to college or to vocational school to learn life skills. How dare they give up on the most effective tool we have for children, business and a better society? We can have a superior school system. We must build schools and hire the very top teachers and pay them well. But the more our legislators take from our public school budgets, the less we have for our children in public schools. Be assured that charter schools are funded with public school funds. Science, math, reading, languages, theater, music, art and dance must be part of every childs life. Its pretty clear that while smaller minds are determining the future of Florida, greater minds are looking at a global community where peaceful trade can be pro table for all of us on this small planet. Yes, it canbut not while we are focused on someones religion. Let that rest with the family. Those who can afford private and/or parochial schools have every right to pay those tuitions. But public education is where all children should be able to compete with their peers for top college spots. This is America. This is the country where creativity has always been the solution. Even God loves that. He or she really got into creativity with a big idea or a big bangtake it the way you like it. Whats wrong with us that we would even think about taking money out of the school system to help religious or secular charter schools. Florida is funding a lot of the wrong things these days, and mixing tax dollars and church schools is not just wrong, its evil because in the long run, it hurts the most vulnerable of our childrenthe poor, the immigrant, the abused and neglected, the ones for whom a superior education is the only way out. And a superior school system wont do any harm to the young geniuses that are a part of them.Ballot questions for Florida voters to decide in November De brillators in condos must come with trained person[s] Recycling in Palm Aire means long drives to do the right thingTo the editor,

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The Pelican 7 Friday, December 30, 2011 Making a Difference Phyllis J. Neuberger wants your suggestions about people who are making a difference. Call 954-783-8700.By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFThe year began with meeting Alan Drouillard, who has been a rst responder on the job and as a volunteer for many years. Ted Galatis, Wilton Manors attorney, makes time for Insight for the Blind. Michele Green has a State Farm Insurance Agency but she continues to volunteer for at least four causes. Congratulations to the Big Diamond Hillsboro Lighthouse volunteers who just retired, was an icon as a nursing angel of mercy to ostomy patients. Jean M. McIntyre, branch manager of iBERIABANK, reinstated and led the Leadership Program for the Chamber of Commerce in Pompano Beach. Later in the year she was honored by the Chamber of Commerce as a Light of the community. Suzanne Newman became volunteer publicist for the Relay for Life, Deer eld Beach and Lighthouse Point. After 32 devoted years as Director of the Lighthouse Point Library, Doreen Gauthier retired. Volunteer Joanne Goodwin was elected President of North Broward Democratic Club. Frank Congemi, Deer eld Beach was named Man of the Year by Boys Town of Italy, an American charity. W.J. Riddick accepted position as co-chair of Young Professionals, a branch of Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce. East CRA launched East Village staged a successful 104 year birthday celebration. Thomas D. Stephanis Boys & Girls Club named Patricka M. England Youth of the Year. Director of the club, Greg Jones is never off the clock when it comes to members of his Boys & Girls club. He was later recognized as a Shining Star in the community. Janis Cashette became the Monday morning story lady at the Doreen Gauthier Lighthouse Point Library. At Holy Cross Hospital Sister Genevra A little reminder of the people weve met and the things that they did to make a difference in 2011See DIFFERENCE on page 14The Pompano Beach Moms pooled their resources to publish and sell a cookbook to help send their young Pompano Beach Piranha ballplayers to Cooperstown.There will be no cows in the oceanNo cows, but plenty of Pompano Beach Piranha swimmers will compete in the Chickl-A Oceans Series Jan. 7 beginning at 7 a.m. The series consists of swimming and paddle boat races. Chickl-A will present trophies for the top three winners Relay for Life kicks off at Jaco Pastorius ParkThe ght for more cancer research gets a big boost from the many Relay for Life events that continue in Broward County, On Jan. 19 in Oakland Park, another relay will get organized with an evening of food, games, fun and information on how to participate or put a team together. The group meets at 6 p.m. at Jaco Pastorius Park, 1098 NE 40 Ct., Oakland Park. Call 954-564-0880.

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8 The PelicanFriday, December 30, 2011 The Pelican covers Northeast Broward County with your news. Call 954-783-8700.Business matters The Pelican takes a look at local business owners. Call The Pelican to nd out how you can tell your story here because business matters. 954-783-8700. By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFRealtor, Bob Bellemare has been with Re/Max for 11 years representing buyers and sellers. He says, Im well aware of the issues that each faces, especially in this economy. I meet with clients at the property involved or in our new, state-of-the-art of ces at 2608 N. Ocean Blvd., just South of the bridge heading into Hillsboro. Bellemare went on to say, Ive taken a special course and hold a designation as a Certi ed Distressed Property Expert. Translated into simple English, it means that I know how to help people with underwater property work out a solution with their banks through a short sale. He described a short sale. It simply means the seller is selling a property for less than he owes on the property. The homeowner authorizes me to work in his behalf. This entails me contacting the bank and getting the banks permission to sell the property for less than what is owed. We agree on a fair market value. He created a hypothetical case. John and Mary are getting a divorce and they must sell their condo which they bought at an all time high for $200,000. It now has a market value of half. I meet with the bank that holds their mortgage and offer to sell the property for them. I would submit the paper work to facilitate the short sale with approval of the bank. Recently we had some good news. The banks are becoming more cooperative with home owners in shortening the time frame and paper work necessary to complete the sale of the property. Some are offering relocation assistance or moving allowances in order to expedite their sales. Some banks have actually forgiven the outstanding balance of the loan. I try to make it a win/win for everyone. Bellemare has helped many clients who have been caught in this distressed market. One of them, Iris Gagliardi of New York says, Bob Bob Bellemare at Re/Max promises a free estimate of a property based on its true market value LHP candidates debate Jan. 18The Lighthouse Point Gardens North Condo Association is proud to host a city-wide debate for all candidates running for two positions on the commission. There are two candidates running for each position. The event will provide an opportunity for the four candidates to state their positions as well as answer questions and debate the issues. The debate takes place Wednesday, Jan. 18 at 7 p.m. at Dixon Ahl, 2220 NE 28 St. The debate format will be moderated with pre-prepared questions as well as selected written questions submitted from the audience. The Lighthouse Point Gardens North Condo association was founded in 1967 and consists of 135 units and approximately 200 residents. Each election year for over 10 years now the association has hosted a candidate debate forum for its condominium residents. This year due to early voting and as a community service, the Association will be presenting the debate to all city residents. For further information please email the debate host Dr. David Kluge at Dnkluge@aol.com Realtor Bob Bellemare is delighted with the new Re/Max of ce on A1A just south of the bridge leading into Hillsboro Beach. Hes been with Re/Max for 11 years and likes being part of the company that sells more real estate than anyone else in the world. [Photo courtesy of B. Bellemare] See Bellemare on page 14

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The Pelican 9 Friday, December 30, 2011 announced her retirement after 32 years at the helm of the towns homegrown library. Gauthier spoke of her decision at the annual luncheon she hosts for the librarys large corps of volunteers saying, I have led you to the Red Sea. Now someone with a new vision will lead you across into the glorious new future. Gauthier took the library from one-room to a fullservice facility with 42,000 volumes and 5,000 patrons in quarters that were renovated and rededicated in 2007. Not part of the county system, the library is sustained by private donation, grants and local tax dollars. In June, a $50 annual Technological advances have enabled the LHP Police Department to capture more than the usual number of suspects. Early in January, cameras installed throughout the city photographed a license plate associated with a home burglary. A truck bearing the plate was spied by a LHP police of cer who pulled it over and found the stolen property on the front seat. In a more recent example, the cameras were used to capture two outof towners suspected of burglary and auto theft. Also credited with reducing the crime rate here are Citizens on Patrol volunteers who routinely turn in suspicious activities leading to arrests. The only controversy involving the citizenry arose over the neon open signs merchants commonly use. When code of cers began citing these business owners, they protested at a commission meeting. Believing the city may have been too code conscious, Mayor Fred Schorr asked the LHP Chamber of Commerce to come up with recommendations. They did, and the matter was quickly resolved, allowing merchants to show the red or blue signs conforming to size and placement rules only while their establishments are open. One merchant said before he was given a code violation, We thought it a bit of a joke! fee for non-residents was instituted. Lighthouse PointContinued from page 5The 50-year-old King sher Canal Bridge is scheduled for a $1.1 million rebuild in 2013. Almost all the citys 10 waterway bridges are due for repair or complete restoration and Mayor Fred Schorr is on the hunt for state funding to do the job. A community meeting has been set for Feb. 14, 5 to 7 p.m. at DIxon Hall to discuss the King sher project. [Staff photo]

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10 The PelicanFriday, December 30, 2011 Uncorked, a monthly social for artists, residents and merchants of Harbor Village. Brett Nein, landscape architect, volunteered his expertise in many projects in Wilton Manors. Wheeler James Brown became the youngest JROTC Cadet of the Year. Volunteer Carolyn Mann became president of the Greater Pompano Beach Republican Club. Nancy Vermillion French teacher at Blanche Ely H.S., and her French Club sent thousands of hygiene products to Haiti after the earthquake turned Haiti into an island of rubble. For the same cause, Rachel Wheeler a 6th grader from Lighthouse Point, amazed the country by raising $175,000 dollars to build 27 houses under the supervision of Food for the Poor, a major contributor to Haiti and other impoverished peoples in the world. Rachel now has a village named in her honor. John Jones, tutoring services, volunteered his free time to serve on many city advisory boards and the Blanche Ely Tigers Roar Club. The Business Resource Center opened in CRA renovated store front in Old Pompano. Baseball Moms created and sold cookbooks to take Piranhas team to Cooperstown. Teacher Jenifer Gibbon volunteered extra hours to Charles Drew Family Resource Center. Dahlia Brown recruited volunteers to produce outdoor art for Northwest Pompano Beach. Jonathan Seguine, bone marrow transplant, Troop 512 earned his Eagle Scout Court of Honor. One local Kiwanis Club held fundraisers for Eliminate Program which hopes to end maternal and neonatal tetanus, the deadly disease that steals 60,000 lives of innocent babies and a signi cant number of women worldwide. American Legion Post 142 sends ve to Boys State to experience government at work. Geri Gunderson, retired IRS executive, actively volunteered in John Knox Village, the National Active and Retired Federal Employees, Chapter 558 and the North Broward Democratic Club. Diane Dennison volunteered to run the outdoor coffee shop at N.E. Focal Point is Deer eld Beach. Grant Hemingway helped adults at Broward Outreach Center school earn their GEDs. City paid tribute to those who died in 9/11 on 9/11/2011. Sandra King and her staff gave Pompano Beach its voice. Over 400 volunteers honored each other at J ohn Knox Village Toyota of Deer eld Beach put pink heart on wheels to help cure cancer. Barbara Gordon, Shine volunteer, provided free health insurance information. American Legion, post 142, honored Roz Karneol and Marion Broadhead for their service to veterans. The Florida Follie s contributed $60,000 to provide wardrobes for 400 needy children who did their shopping at J.C. Penney. The Pompano Beach Chamber honored 12 outstanding contributors to the community at annual luncheon. Women of the Moose contributed monthly to community needs. Sam Townsend and Harriet Mertz gave nancial support to the Young Artists of Florida Grand Opera. Lowes store manager, Steve Piszcynski named Business Man of the Year. Roy Rogers received Stewart Kester award for his many years of generosity to the community. Goodyear Blimp and U.S Marines host Toys for Tots drive. M.E. DePalma Wilton Manors, chosen Ms. Florida Senior for her countless achievements. Light of the Community Award went to Michael Orange McLain for his long service to LHP and Pompano Beach Chambers, Rotary club, Appearance Board of LHP and John Knox Village. John Dalsimer, CPA, has donated $85,000 in the past ve years to the New Health Center in the works for John Knox Village. Thank you one and all for everything you have done to make life better for those around you. Recognizing you for your efforts has been a personal pleasure.Difference Continued on page 7

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The Pelican 11 Friday, December 30, 2011 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFLBTS The rst campaign treasurers reports are in for candidates seeking Seat 3 on the Lauderdale-ByThe-Sea Town Commission in the Jan. 31election. The reports cover the period from Oct. 1 to Dec. 9. Mark Brown, a retired Congressional chief of staff, has raised $7,870 and loaned his campaign $8,406.74 for a total of $16,276.74. Realtor Edmund Malkoon has raised $790 in contributions and loaned his campaign $2,150 for a total of $2,940. Brown lists expenditures of $8,414.79, including costs for yard signs, printing and advertising. Malkoon has spent $950 including costs for advertising and printing. They are vying for the seat now held by Birute Ann Clottey who is not seeking re-election. Browns contributors include former town commissioners David Wessels and Chuck Clark and 11 of his neighbors in the Corniche condominium. Malkoons contributors include Commissioner Chris Vincent and Marjorie Evans, who ran unsuccessfully for the seat two years ago. Brown ahead in fundraising for LBTS commission seatGordons campaign attracts support from PB, HB of cialsBy Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFLighthouse Point Incumbent political veteran Susie Gordon is the only one of four candidates for city commission seats in the January 31 election to have raised campaign funds. Gordon, who serves as the commission president, reported raising $3,500 as of Dec. 9 with her largest donor Pompano Beach Mayor Lamar Fisher who gave her $600. Hillsboro Beach Vice Mayor Dan Dodge has contributed $300, attorney Anne Maclean wrote a check for $500 and Meaghan Troast, daughter of LHP Commissioner Walter Troast, is listed as giving Gordon a $200 donation. Gordon has accepted contributions from 19 supporters and spent less than $500. Her opponent Becky Lysengen opened her campaign account with $100 and reports no contributors. Tom Hasis, seeking to retain his seat, gave his campaign a $750 loan while his challenger Earl Maucker put in $500 of his own money. Election Watch Vote on Jan. 31 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFLBTS Mayor Roseann Minnet and Vice Mayor Stuart Dodd were re-elected without opposition. Minnet was elected to her third two-year term and Dodd to his second four-year term. That the two positions were unopposed says a lot for what the commission is doing. Thats historic, to my knowledge, Minnet said. Thats a direct correlation to where people feel were doing a good job. We may not always agree, but residents feel they have positive representation on the dais. Asked the major commission accomplishments this year, Minnet said, We have brought civility to the town and the dais. The master plan has been updated, and were moving forward with major infrastructure issues, such as drainage and capital improvement projects. The challenge will be to keep the momentum going in a positive way. This month the commission has workshops scheduled Jan. 17 on revitalizing Commercial Boulevard and Jan. 19 on sewer rates. Early in the year a Charter Review Board will be created. Its important that we get good people who are future thinkers on the board. Its the blueprint of the town, and its important we look at the charter we want to make, Minnet said. The big issues have been solved by the teamwork of the whole commission and the town staff combined, Dodd said. Finally, we have harmony, teamwork and a very professional staff to provide the material on which the commission can make good decisions to move the town forwards to a great future, he said. Now, Dodd said, The biggest challenges are to use our reserves wisely so we dont have to raise our millage rate while putting enough money into infrastructure repairs. We have drainage projects, downtown sidewalks and the beauti cation of the southern section of A1A to look forward to in the immediate future. Commissioner Chris Vincent lists the commissions major accomplishments this year as: 1. Not having to raise the millage rate and continuing to provide the level of service our community expects. 2.The installation of multipay stations (that take credit cards) for parking throughout the town and bringing in private service providers for the building department and code enforcement. 3.Approving capital improvement projects for the year 2012. 4. Maintaining decorum and civility on the dais. Vincent says the challenges in the new year are: 1. Completing the A1A and downtown beauti cation projects. 2. Continuing to be business friendly by creating a quick and expedient turnaround with building and zoning departments. 3. Continuing with Neighborhood Improvement Projects. 4. Maintaining decorum and civility on the dais. Mayor, vice mayor unopposed in Lauderdale-by-the-Sea

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12 The PelicanFriday, December 30, 2011 the historic center of town and the economic engine, Bud Bentley, assistant town manager, said in presenting Correas $185,000 contract to the commission. Construction costs of the project are projected to be $1.8 million, possibly higher if the town selects high-end lighting, paving and landscape features. The designers also met with two focus groups of residents and business people Dec. 3 to present design concepts. Plans included removing the median from the Pelican Square area, changing from angled to parallel parking and planting trees and foliage. Improving the economic vitality and appearance of A1A and Commercial Boulevard are two key components of the towns master plan, which the commission has worked all year to update. The emphasis on urban design started in January with a visit from David Sucher, a Seattle developer with expertise in urban planning. He walked Commercial Boulevard with residents and town staff and left behind his three rules for quality urban design: 1. Build the sidewalk to the property line. 2. Make the building fronts transparent with no blank walls. 3. Prohibit parking lots in front of buildings.Enhancing and protectingIn April, commissioners heard from consultants hired to come up with a plan for stimulating redevelopment. The plan is not about changing anything dramatically. Its about enhancing and protecting and making everything more beautiful, Redevelopment Management Associates partner Chris Brown said. He and partner Kim Briesemeister concluded the town needs to do more to help retailers and hoteliers and should add staff positions to do so. And they said much work is needed to help a struggling hotel industry as properties age. One of their discoveries was the lack of identity when headed east on Commercial Boulevard when entering Lauderdale-By-The-Sea when heading east on Commercial Boulevard. Theres not a real bang, Brown said. Other observations included: Commercial Boulevard facades that need sprucing up. Signage was poor quality. The area south of Commercial and west of A1A appeared blighted, and the pier lacked appeal. They suggested branding the town to establish an image. Establishing a professional marketing program for the town is imperative to future economic growth and prosperity, RMA said, adding the hotel industry is critical to the towns economic success. The rm also recommends working the the Florida Department of Transportation on roadway designs. RMA is urging the town to adopt a nance plan for the improvements using bond issues or matching grants and suggest hiring a lobbyist/grant writer, marketing director and economic development director. On April 12, commissioners unanimously agreed to hire RMA for $19,900 to assist the town in de ning costs and developing a nance plan for the many projects laid out in a redevelopment plan they had presented. I think this is the fastest contract ever put together in recent town history, Hoffmann said. Cost of the new agreement is $19,900. You can tell Chris was in retail, Hoffmann quipped, referring to RMA partner Brown. .Town chosen for U of M design projectIn mid-April, the town was invited to be the subject of the University of Miami School of Architectures Annual Community Design Project. The invitation came after Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk, dean of the school, gave a lecture here. Commissioners unanimously agreed to accept the invitation and approved payment of $16,500 in professional fees to the university. Focus of the design project was the revitalization of the A1A corridor from Pine Avenue to Palm Avenue and Commercial Boulevard from the Intracoastal Waterway Bridge to the ocean. The program was a workshop combining the School of Architectures expertise in livable community planning and design with their masters program in Urban Real Estate Development. The expertise of 30 architecture, real estate, urban design and hotel industry professionals was involved and after six days of intense work students presented their work at a May 26 meeting. The teams researched the town history before they began. You have a special history and a special character. We heard loud and clear how much you love this community and want to protect it, they said. Everything weve done respects the height limits in the charter.Commercial Boulevard issuesBusiness owners had different concerns, LBTS RetroContinued from page 1 See LBTS RETRO on page 13

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The Pelican 13 Friday, December 30, 2011 depending on location. In Pelican Square, businesses were doing great, but there were issues with traf c congestion. The more central Market Square needs parking and an identity. The Marina Plaza area, along Basin Drive south of Commercial, struggles the most and has a lack of pedestrian activity. In the downtown Pelican Square area, the students recommended eliminating center medians and restricting traf c east of El Mar Drive. They suggested widening sidewalks, planting shade trees and adding overhead lighting to encourage outdoor seating. At the Intracoastal Waterway Bridge they proposed a large welcome sign and a redesigned bridgetender house.Along the A1A CorridorIssues are high traf c congestion, lack of shading and an area that is not pedestrian friendly. The area is visually unappealing, and [discourages] walking. The roadway is wide, and public furnishings are aging and deteriorating.Commissioners urge caution in hiringIn July, commissioners learned that the proposed budget called for adding a business development/ marketing director and capital projects manager and a planning director to ll the former position of development services director. Vice Mayor Stuart Dodd said he favored a more cautious approach and wasnt in favor of an immediate staff increase. The business development and marketing position also includes administering an incentive program for business. Dodd said he favored the incentive program but doesnt think its needed in the next year the project could be pushed out to the following year. Commissioner Birute Ann Clottey suggested outside contractors but Commissioner Chris Vincent said to move forward the town needs expert services which will save us money in the long run. Hoffmann said the town cant move forward with capital plans with a capital projects manager. Several big projects are planned for next year including drainage improvements on Flamingo Avenue, Harbor Drive and Bougainvilla Drive; improvements on the two eastern blocks of Commercial Boulevard and design of South A1A. I need clear direction. I need clear consensus on what you want. Its like we take two steps forward and one back, Hoffmann said. Commissioner Scot Sasser said he would like to go with contractors to test the ef cacy of the plans. Id like to take one step forward but not three back. Mayor Roseann Minnet said she had no problem with contracts. Lets take baby steps, she said. Commissioners agreed to go ahead with contracts for the marketing position and business development and lling those jobs will be on the agenda in the new year. LBTS RetroContinued from page 12

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14 The PelicanFriday, December 30, 2011 helped me with a short sale and Im happy with the way in which he handled it. Every question I asked got an answer. The result is the best I could hope for. Another client, Ray Mullaney says Bob did a fantastic job for me. He sold my property quickly and he got me a fair price, todays economy being what it is. I am happy with the result. Bellemare nods in agreement with what these clients had to say and adds, Ive sold properties at many different prices ranging from $50,000 to $600,000. The time involved is less than it was and thats a help. The market is improving and the better properties are being snapped up when they are priced realistically. There are good opportunities for investors because interest rates are so low that good properties are very affordable. For sellers, I like to point out that there are buyers looking for properties at fair market value. We are seeing snowbirds from Canada looking for good values and they are nding them. But there are still some available. This Realtor says hes honored to be af liated with Re/Max, the company that sells more real estate than any other in the world. We bene t from an international referral network, he claims. This is still a very popular beach area that is desired by people all over our country and around the world. International clients are not a bit unusual in South Florida. Any property listed on the internet can be seen in the RE/MAX of ce. Clients save time previewing property on the internet instead of inperson. This means they only inspect those that actually interest them. Bellemare says he adjusts his schedule to accommodate his clients. Hes available seven days a week. Just call 954-557-0744 to set up an appointment. BellemareContinued from page 8 The Pelican Now Online www.pompanopelican.com

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The Pelican 15 Friday, December 30, 2011 Now Online www.pompanopelican.com By Malcolm McClintockPELICAN FOOD WRITERThe Hog 147 South Cypress Rd. 954-590-8342 Pompano BeachAnyone who appreciates good barbecue will nd deep satisfaction on a visit to The Hog. Situated at the corner of Atlantic and Cypress, this rustically decorated restaurant will please all appetites. We have ice cold beer and outstanding BBQ, what else could anyone want? says Evan, the friendly coproprietor of the latest arrival on the Pompano Beach restaurant scene. Indeed, The Hog offers inexpensive wines, frosty domestic suds and great imported beers like New Castle Brown Ale, Shiner Bock and Stella Artois. No one puts the love, hard work and soul it takes to make real barbecue like we do! adds business partner Darren, a native Texan who brings his Lone Star State expertise to the operation. We dont hide behind sauces. We have the true spiced rub prepared speci cally for each type of meat. For example, our delicious Cattle Beef Brisket has a dry rub crafted to perfectly suit the cut. It is then smoked for 14 hours to get it just right. Its probably my favorite item on the menu. The crispy chicken leg quarter with creamy coleslaw is always a fan favorite.The Hog is the newest BBQ hot spot in Pompano Beach These long-time friends have been backyard BBQ specialists for several decades. But after winning multiple awards, they decided it was time to showcase their talents in public. So with the help of their wives Alessandra and Jennifer, these knowledgeable entrepreneurs strategically picked Pompano See THE HOG on page 16

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16 The PelicanFriday, December 30, 2011 as the ideal place to open their restaurant. From the mouthwatering pulled pork to the tasty charbroiled Tri-Tip sandwich, there is pretty much everything to satisfy hard core BBQ a cionados. With regard to the tender, spicy or sweet ribs, says Darren with a knowing smile We buy only the largest, most high quality baby back ribs on the market, and we smoke them exclusively with mesquite wood, The Bucket O Bones delivers two pounds of ngerlickin baby back ribs for a mere $9 on Mondays. Other favorites include the tender roasted chicken, the moist smoked white breast of turkey and smoked sausage links served with stone ground mustard. Our award winning Voodoo chili is also excellent. We make it with Poblano peppers and Tri-Tip, says Evan. In fact, it got us invited to the International Chili Society world championships. The Hog also serves up great side dishes such as the spicy ranch style beans chock full of bacon, the 12 hour slow cooked collard greens and the Dirty Potato, an enormous baked spud loaded with every conceivable topping. We will soon be introducing the Hog Trough sampler to let people get a little taste of everything, says Darren who is also planning a pig-roast in the parking lot on second Saturdays. The Hog Salad over ows with tender chicken, grape tomato, red onion, cheese, egg, olives, bacon and corn bread croutons accompanied by either house vinaigrette or avocado ranch dressing. I love this salad. It is absolutely delicious, says local resident and regular patron Jessica Mooney. Just about everything on the menu is in the $7-$10 range. A huge full rack of ribs is around $20. Beers are $2.50 and wine is $3. Kids eat free on Wednesdays and public servants always bene t from a 10 percent discount. We also do a lot of catering and on-site pig roasts, says Darren. The Hog provides sweet or bold BBQ and the outstanding stone ground mustard. This is truly a passion for us, says Evan. Thats why no one ever leaves here disappointed. Malcolm McClintock holds an MBA and has lived in Thailand, Spain, France, Mexico, Canada and the US where he has developed a deep appreciation for world gastronomy. Manager Alessandra shows off the popular Bucket O Bones over owing with 2 pounds of tender spicy or sweet, mesquite smoked baby back ribs.The HogContinued from page 15

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The Pelican 17 Friday, December 30, 2011 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach Its not a new problem, but it is a vexing one. Homeowners in Pompano Highlands say as many as 10 single men live in the single-family homes in their neighborhoods. Some are recovering drug addicts. This has been going on for six months, said Todd Hennen, vice president of the Highlands residents say rules for singlefamily home occupancy are being auntedHighlands Civic Improvement Association. We are trying to attract families into the neighborhood. Ten single men in recovery is not appealing to them. The situation has been around far longer than six months, says Robin Bird, the citys director of developmental services. He remembers similar complaints coming from several neighborhoods back in 2006. It seems to occur more frequently in down economies when people need to find the money to pay their mortgages or property taxes, he said. In this current downswing, real estate prices have dropped to the point investors are buying properties and turning them into boarding houses, Hennen said. The citys code restricts tenants of single-family homes to no more than three unrelated people. Hennen questions why the city is not enforcing the rule. But Bird said it is nearly impossible to do so and in some cities such restrictions have been overturned by the courts. In November, Highlands Association secretary Walter Syrek spoke at a city commission meeting saying the city is allowing transient housing. Syrek said he has even seen beds being advertised on Craigslist. Responding to Syreks comments, Mayor Lamar Fisher said, This is a priority for us. According to Bird, the difficulty is finding the tools to curtail the trend. The socalled sober homes that are marketed to recovering addicts are protected to some degree by the American Disability Act and Fair Housing laws. Only certain strategies can be used, Bird said. His senior planner Jennifer Gomez is working on those strategies which will be presented to the planning and zoning board after the first of the year. According to Bird, a new zoning category will be created with a distance requirement and some parking restrictions may be instituted. Dwellings being used for commercial purposes, in this case rentals, are required to have a business tax receipt which allows code enforcement officials inside the building. According to Hennen, the number of property owners now registered is steadily increasing. But he notes that without rules and guidelines, code officers have no a

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18 The Pelican Friday, December 30, 2011

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The Pelican 19 Friday, December 30, 2011 By Judy VikPELICAN STAFFOakland Park City commissioners spent a good part of 2011 making moves that would help redevelop Main Street. Among them were land purchases at both ends of the target area paving the way for acquisition of a downtown building that will be replaced with a parking lot. City officials executed a loan agreement for $1.390 million between the city and Broward County to buy the strip shopping center at 37003776 NE 12th Ave, just north of City Hall. The interim public parking lot will support parking needs at Jaco Pastorius Park, the library, city hall and at the In Oakland Park, Main Street was 2011 focus Buy-up of blighted buildings to change sceneproposed Green Market at Oakland Park Station. Commissioners also approved an ordinance amending the citys agreement with the county regarding projects in the Redevelopment Capital Program or RCP. The city has $10.2 million in the RCP fund. One project, improvements to NE 5 Avenue, is already complete and fully funded by local Community Development Block grants. The agreement comes with no interest or payments for five years. Then, if new development occurs in the community redevelopment area, the loan can be turned to a grant, and no money is owed. Cost for demolishing the building, removing underground septic tanks and constructing the parking lot and street improvements is estimated at $397,122. The city will fund $58,892 for landscaping, and the rest will come from the county program. Commission OKs Buying blighted property Commissioners approved purchase of a blighted property at 3148 NE 12 Ave. for $675,000. The purchase removes an old building at the southern entrance of Main Street and completes a large tract of land now available for redevelopment at the corner of Oakland Park Boulevard and Main Street. The building has been in disrepair for years. The 9,559-square-foot property was constructed in 1966 as three small buildings and later joined into one. The northern portion is used as a restaurant-bar occupied by the Big Dog Saloon under lease with the current owner. The southern portion is empty and the city will demolish that portion of the building. Big Dogs lease runs until 2014 with options to renew. Funding for the purchase, along with soft costs and demolition, will be requested under the countys Loan to Grant Program. Commission hires RMA to develop action plan City commissioners, meeting July 22 as the board of the Community Redevelopment Agency, unanimously approved an agreement with Redevelopment Management Associates, or RMA, to review the citys CRA plan and develop an actionoriented plan for the next five years. Staff has met with the firm and reached an agreement, Ray Lubomski, community and economic development director, told the board. Cost is not to exceed $57,000. In the initial phase, RMA reviewed the citys CRA plan and its interim plan and met individually with commissioners and CRA stakeholders. They prepared a five-year strategic plan and looked at redevelopment capital plans. In Phase 2, they would provide ongoing services based on the five-year plan and the activities the board decides to pursue. The second phase is not covered in the

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20 The Pelican Friday, December 30, 2011 It seems to me our due process has been ignored. Gretchen Thomas, who headed up neighborhood opposition to the detox center.By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFDeer eld Beach Changes occurred in 2011 that will permanently affect the lives of residents here. As change tends to do, it created major issues that polarized the populace. But as the year closes, much the controversy has settled. Was it a good year or a bad one? The future will be the judge.Wrong tax, wrong timeThe city managers move to impose a 10 percent tax on users of water, electricity and fuels caused the biggest stir. Former mayor Jean Robb and business owner Steve Krevoy set out to obtain 4,200 signatures of registered voters on petitions calling for the tax to be rescinded. They gave their effort the acronym RUT, meaning Rescind the Utility Tax, and picked up a slogan from activist Caryl Berner, The Wrong Tax at the Wrong Time. Despite an enthusiastic response from the public, the petition drive fell short, rst in September and then again in November. The citys rule that petitioners must include their precinct number on the paperwork was a big factor in invalidating many of the signatures. Robb charged the city with providing precinct maps that were hard to read and in some cases, inaccurate.Real jail timeThe arrest in April of Dist. 2 City Commissioner Sylvia Poitier set up another signi cant change. Poitier was re-elected to of ce in March after she refused to vacate her seat when Mayor Peggy Noland called for her to step down based on information disclosed in an audit of city funds. Early in the year, the mayor withdrew her request to Poitier saying the voters could decide the matter. However, in April, Poitier was charged with ve counts of falsifying public records and was removed from of ce by the governor, setting up a special election in July. The vacant seat was won by retired re ghter Ben Preston whose door-to-door campaign style boosted him over four other candidates. Deer eld Beach in 2011:Major change and real progressDeer eldContinued from page 1In March, Poitier and Dist. 1 Commissioner Joe Miller had to run for four year terms and each faced opposition, but both won handily. Another local politician in the news was former city commissioner Steve Gonot who was removed from of ce in 2008 and charged with misuse of campaign funds. Gonot went to trial in May, was convicted on three counts and sentenced to one year in prison. That sentence is being appealed. After a three day trial in November, Poitier was found guilty of four counts and awaits sentencing in January. An issue that was expected to cause controversy, passed without ado when commissioners voted in August to merge local re ghter/paramedics with the Broward Sheriffs Department on the grounds that the trend toward regionalization is one that promotes ef ciencies and saves money. All of the commission seemed predisposed to the concept and there was little discussion.House sweepIn June, Mayor Peggy Noland focused her attention on the Deer eld Beach Housing Authority and called for a revamp of its board of commissioners. An attempt to appoint blogger Chas Stevens, a constant critic of the agency, failed after Stevens continued to post defamatory language about the Authority on his website. Accusations made by Stevens had previously caused the Department of Housing and Urban Development to send inspectors to review the Authoritys records and Cong. Allen West to call for another review. The mayor did name three newcomers to the board, replacing two longstanding members. In the end, no serous infractions were uncovered. HUD issued a report giving Authority Executive Director Pam Davis high marks. The new board of commissioners has, at this time, resolved their issues.House keeperA move by the owner of Florida House, an addiction recovery center on Federal Highway, to add a detox wing to his campus met with erce opposition by residents of The Cove. Gretchen Thomas, whose property abutted the proposed detox center, appealed to the Planning and Zoning Board in July to deny See DEERFIELD on page 24

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The Pelican 21 Friday, December 30, 2011 Rev. Hyvenson Joseph WORSHIP DIRECTORY: Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad. Michael J. ONeill, 54 of Oakland Park went to be with the Lord on Monday, Dec. 26. Mike spent most of his life building the Miami-Fort Lauderdale skyline, having worked for Harmon Contracting and the Enclos Corporation. He was a lifetime member of the International Union of Painters and Allied Trades (IUPAT). Mike was a friend of Bill W. and a member of the Dry Dock group. Surviving are his loving wife Virginia, owner of P.F.S Barber and Hairstyling of Pompano Beach; son Daniel; daughter Angela; his father Donald ONeill, and two sisters Diane Johnson and Donna ONeill. He was preceded in death by his mother Mary ONeill and a brother William Sutter. A memorial service will be held at a later date. Arrangements by the ABC @ Jennings Funeral Home.Michael J. ONeill, contractor who built skylinesObituaries RussellRussell, Eva Mae, 77 of Pompano Beach passed away Dec. 17. Services were held Dec. 23 at Antioch Baptist Church.HarrisHarris, Martin Sr., 69 of Deerfield Beach passed away Dec. 24. Services will be held Dec. 31 at 11 a.m. at Word of the Living God, 149 NW 26 Ave., Pompano Beach. 954970-4200. Services entrusted to L.C. Poitier Funeral Home, 317 NW 6 St., Pompano Beach. 954-943-7050.

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22 The Pelican Friday, December 30, 2011 Classi edsCall 954-545-0013 Get to know your local Merchants HELP WANTEDBEAUTY!!! HAIR STYLIST, Nail Tech. Massage Facial. Guaranteed Start With 100% Commission. Call In Boca 954415-4937. 12-30 LATIN DANCING LADY INSTRUCTOR NEEDED Part Time In Boca. Approx 2-3 Hours Per Week. Pay $25 Per Hour. Private Lessons. 954-415-4937. 12-30 SHAMPOO ASSISTANT PART TIME. POMPANO LOCATION. PLEASE CALL 954-942-4367. 12-30 LOCAL PEST CONTROL CO Looking For Quality Sales/Service Tech. Must Be Dependable, Team Player, Good Drivers License & People Skills. Will Train Right Person. ALSO Of ce Assistant Computer People & Phone Skills Needed. Fax Resume 954418-3982. 1-13 SEEKING EMPLOYMENTADULT AIDE Warm and caring bilingual person with extensive experience in private care and hospital adult sitting. Over 15 years of experience. Excellent references. Own transportation. 781-325-6383. 12-30 BRINGING HOME BABY? RN With 15+ Years Experience. NICU/PEDS. AHA/CPR Instructor Here To Help You & Your Family Transition Baby To Home. Please Call 954-7077079. 1-6 CNA/HHA MANY YEARS OF EXPERIENCE. Reliable. Available For Hourly Or Live-in. Please Call Verona At 954-635-0558. 12-30 HHA/CAREGIVER English Speaking, Caring, Compassionate, Honest & Reliable. Many Years Of Experience. Excellent Cook, Will Clean, Run Errands, Own Transportation. Excellent References. For Great Care Call Lea 561-633-3583. 12-30 EXPERIENCED CERTIFIED CAREGIVER Of 19 Years Seeks Job With Elderly. In Home Or Assisted Living/ Certi ed Free Lance Writer, Mentor. 786-419-9099. 12-30 HONEST MALE With References Seeking Position As A Caregiver. Call Chris 954-290-7344. 12-30SERVICES RETIRED PLUMBING CONTRACTOR Looking For Work. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. CFC 027532. Low Rates. 954-496-6420. 12-30 DANNY BOY ELECTRIC Lic & Insured. Lic. #EC13004811. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. 24/Hr Service. 954-290-1443. Beat Any Written Estimate. Sr, Discount. 1-13 HONEST PC EXPERT Setups, Viruses, Repairs, Upgrades, Networking, Tutoring. Call Andy For A FREE Estimate. 954-8574846. 1-20 HANDYMAN PAINTING CARPENTRY Pressure Cleaning. Decks! Everything Around The House. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. Call 561-350-3781. 1-20 ELECTRICIAN FOR HIRE Low Rates. 24 Hour Emergency Service. Call 954404-1150. License EC-0001684. APEX ELECTRIC.. 12-30 AIRPORT TRANSPORTATION Pickup & Drop-off. Dr. Visits, Shopping, Tours, Etc. Speak Spanish, Portuguese, English. Madeline 754-2340617. 12-30 PLUMBING SERVICES Big Jobs Small Jobs. We Do It All. Remodeling & Repairs. Lic. & Insured. C.C. Accepted. Call 954-772-4600. 1-6 EMERALD IRISH CLEANING Est. 20 Yrs. English Speaking. Cleaning Supplies. Hand Scrubbed Floors. SPECIAL!!! 3 HRS $55 4 HRS $70. Service Guaranteed. www. emeraldirishcleaning.com. 954-524-3161. You Will Do An Irish Jig. 12-30 HONEST HANDYMAN HOME & BUILDING Maintenance/Improvements. No Job Too Small. Fast Friendly Service. Reasonable Rates. Local Resident/Homeowner. Call Today For Your FREE Upfront Quote. No Deposit Required. 754-366-1915 12-30 HOME/OFFICE REPAIRS By State Certified G.C. Reasonable. CGC025802. More Information Call 954815-1007. GOT JUNK? DUMP TRUCK CLEANUPS Trees/ Landscape, Yard Fill. Paint/ Pressure Wash/ Roofs/Home Repairs Welding, Etc. Dave 954-818-9538. 1-13THRIFT STORELUCKY STAR THRIFT & GIFTS. 5130 N Federal Hwy (2nd Floor) Fort Lauderdale. 954-839-8182. Great Items At Low Prices Starting From $2 & Up. 12-30 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIESNew GREEN technology. New defroster control saves energy in home refrigerators, commercial chillers. Patented. All optical. Simple mfg. Strategic partners needed..www.NewAvionics.Com. 954-568-1991.MUSICIANS WANTEDThe American Legion Symphonic Band is now accepting new members for the 2011-2012 season. College age to seasoned seniors are welcome. Rehearsals are held on Wed. evenings at American Legion Post 142 in Pompano. Percussionists, euphonium and clarinet players are especially needed. If you enjoy making music, call Jim McGonigal, Music Director at 954-647-0700 for more info.DEEP WATER VILLA DOCKPOMPANO BEACH 2/2 1700 SQ FT. Screened Fla Room. Private Yard. W/D. 4 Park. No Fixed Bridges. Community Pool. Deeded Dock.. 2 Blocks Beach. $285,000. Call 954-6291324. 1-20HOMES FOR SALEPOMPANO LEISUREVILLE 55+ This 2/2 Furnished House Is For You! Very Clean. Monthly Maintenance $175. Priced To Sell $105,000. Owner 954-943-0250. 12-30 LEISUREVILLE REDUCED $94,900. ATTACHE MODEL. 2/2, Garage, Front Porch. Very Private. 2 Active Clubs & Heated Pools. FREE Golf. New Water & Sewer System. 55+. Realty 3000. 561-8663839. 1-6

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The Pelican 23 Friday, December 30, 2011 We Mean Business! Classi edsCall 954-545-0013 TOWNHOME FOR RENTPOMPANO 2/2.5 Waterfront Key West Style. Remodeled, Travertine & Wood Floors, Granite. Dock Available. W/D. Pool. Off 14th Causeway. $1490 Month. 954-632-2592. 12-30HOMES FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH 3/2 CENTRAL AIR. Screened Porch. Small Utility Room. $1100 Mo. 620 NE 35 Street. Call Darci 954783-3723. 12-30CO-OP SALESPOMPANO BEACH 1/1 On Water, Dockage Available At Your Door. $59,500. Coldwell Banker Barbara 954-6291324. 1-20SEASONAL RENTALSPOMPANO BEACH 2/2 Beautifully Furnished 9th Floor Corner Apt. Great Views. All Amenities. $2,000 A Month. Call 954-785-0177. 1-6REAL ESTATE WANTEDI BUY HOUSES!! CASH!! AS IS! QUICK CLOSE! ANY AREA ANY CONDITION! NO EQUITY OK. CALL NOW 954-914-2355. 1-20 CONDOS FOR SALEPALM AIRE 105 Split 2/2 King, Upgrades. Largest Kitchen. W/D. Breakfast Room. Piano. Ultra Furnished. Shopping, Pool Close By. 9th Floor. Low Maintenance/Taxes. $134K Offers. No Brokers! 954-895-4596. 1-20 LEISUREVILLE $25,900 2/2 Fully Furnished With Upgraded Appliances & Carpet. Absentee Owner Wants Immediate Sale. A Rare Find! Call Broker Joe Ryan 954-638-9656. 12-30 POMPANO BEACH 2/2 Best Deal On A1A, Fully Renovated No Expense Spared. Private Beach Access. Dockage Available For 30 Boat. Beautiful Bldg. SPECTACULAR $196K. Solid Rock Realty. Lonnie Brooks 954-709-2523. For Detailed Description, Pictures & Virtual Tour Go To www.rioespana318. com. 12-30 LAUDERDALE BY THE SEA Furnished 1/1.5 Condo $115,000. Heated Pool. Ocean Access. On Canal. 1481 S Ocean Blvd. Apt 228. Call 586549-5223. 1-6CONDOS FOR RENTPOMPANO 1/1 E OF FEDERAL Small Complex Very Clean. No Pets. $650 Month Yearly. Call Barbara 954-263-7129. 12-30 POMPANO LEISUREVILLE 55+ 2/1 Completely Furn. Sunroom On Golf Course. 2 Pools, 2 Clubs. $875 Month Yearly. 954-788-9312. 12-30APTS FOR RENTDEERFIELD/POMPANO BEACH 1 BR & 2 BR APTS FOR RENT. Remodeled, Paint, Tile, Etc. W & D On Site. Pool. Pet Friendly. Call George 954-809-5030. 1-13 POMPANO MCNAB ROAD & NE 18 AVENUE 1 & 2 Bedrooms Furnished/ Unfurnished. $675 $950 And Up. Pool, Tile Floors. Central A/C. 954-610-2327. 12-30 POMPANO BEACH Unique Quiet 1/1 Apt. Just Painted. Off Street Parking. 1/2 Block To Beach. $725 Month 1st & Last. 239-898-4799. 12-30 EFFICIENCY AVAILABLE WITH FULL KITCHEN. Includes: Electric, Cable, Wi-Fi, Water, Pool. 2nd Floor End Unit. Clean Move-in Condition. 2 Blocks From Ocean North Of Atlantic. Owner Agent. $669 Month Lease. 954-608-7368. 1-6 POMPANO BEACH 2/2 Furnished. Large Ef ciency With Kitchen. Fully Furnished. Cable, Internet, Pool, Laundry. 500 To The Beach. Weekly Monthly Yearly. 954-2948483 Or 248-736-1533. 1-6 POMPANO JUST OFF FEDERAL. 1/1, Pool, Laundry. Close To Shopping & Transportation. $700 Per Mo. 1st Mo + Security To Move In. Call Anthony 954-857-5207. 12-30 POMPANO GARDENS $795 1/1 $200 Deposit. Nice Area Minutes To Beach Pet OK. Please Call 954-515-2554. 1-20 POMPANO BEACH 1/1 NW $650 2/1 $750 SW 1/1 $725 2/1 $925 NE 1/1 $675 2/1 NE $950 TH 2/1.5 $1095 All FREE Water. Rent + $70 MovU-In. 954-781-6299. 12-30 POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 Bedroom From $495. Easy Movein. 1/2 OFF DEPOSIT. Remodeled. Great Location. 954-783-1088 For More Info. 1-6 STUDIOS EFFICIENCIESDEERFIELD BEACH A1A Live at the beach off season. Ef ciencies available for $550 Weekly, pay as you go, no deposit or security, cable, pool, laundry, wireless. Ocean Villa 954-427-4608. 12-30OUTDOOR STORAGEDEERFIELD BEACH OUTDOOR STORAGE For Boats, RVs, Commercial Vehicles & More. Call Chris At 954-520-1777. 1-6COMMERCIAL FOR RENT-SALEPOMPANO COMMERCIAL OFFICE Spaces Available. Ranging From As Low As $500 To $700 Depending On Square Footage. Please Call Darci At 954783-3723. 12-30 DEERFIELD BEACH Retail Of ce Warehouse 700 Sq Ft With Loft. A/C, Bathroom. $575 Per Month. Call For More Info 561-654-1331 Or 561-9985681. 1-13MUSICAL ITEMSBABY GRAND PIANO $1,200 FIRM. CALL 954-783-8700. ORGAN for SALE Excellent condition. $400. Call 9542950194.FURNITUREBEDSETS King $180 Queen $130 Full $110 Twin $90. 5 Pc. Bedroom Set $399. Frames $39. 954-465-6498. 1-13MEDICAL SUPPLIESTURNY ELECTRIC SEAT For Handicapped. Like New! Paid $6,000!! Asking $2995!! Front Passenger Seat. Also Caregiver Available. 954-9201873. 12-30

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24 The Pelican Friday, December 30, 2011 the Florida House petition. As owner Sharief AbuMoustafa prepared to bring his case before the city commission, city planners called a halt to his project saying it was located within 1000 feet of another such facility, his own. Moustafa argued that the detox center was an extension of his facility, not a new facility and should be allowed. When commissioners failed to agree, he requested two hearings and at the same time threatened a civil rights lawsuit citing the American Disabilities Act and Fair Housing Act regulations. The city withdrew its objections earlier this month on the advice of its attorney saying plans for the detox center could move forward. On the brighter side of 2011, the owner of the former Tam O Shanter Country Club donated 50 acres of land to the city for ball elds in return for approval of his plans for a cemetery and mausoleum. The acreage is larger than all the citys current parks put together. When money became an issue and the Founders Days Committee thought they would have to cancel the annual February festival, the business community came forward with $32,000 in donations. The committee tightened its belts and staged a successful four-day affair.CRA saves the dayAnd after several years of discussion, and then construction, two major projects have been completed by the Community Redevelopment Agency: Beauti cation of Hillsboro Boulevard between Federal Highway and A1A has been completed as has the re gured and landscaped Cove Shopping Center parking lot. Earlier this year, the CRA allotted $7 million to purchase property within its boundaries including the Riverview Restaurant site adjacent to Sullivan Park, the DB Chamber of Commerce building, the vacant lot on the Intracoastal Waterway next to the Two Georges restaurant and buildings on the NE corner of A1A and Hillsboro Boulevard. Its intent is to expand Sullivan Park and beautify the entrance to the citys beach.City declines prince on chamber buildingAcquisition of the chamber building stalled when the citys offer of $250,000 was rejected.Gone shinThe CRA began restoration of the International Fishing Pier November 1 and intends to have that facility up and running by the end of 2012. These are as many of 2011s highlights as we have room for in this issue. Readers with other thoughts are welcome to write siren2415@ aol.com. Their remarks will be published in Letters to the Editor.Deer eldContinued from 20 The Pelican -part of doing business. Call us at 954-783-8700. Sailors ValentinesBy Carole P. MarshallBROWARD SHELL CLUBIn the early 1800s, British seamen traveled the world. Along with whale oil, spices, silks, sugar and other goods, they brought back seashells from the Pacific. The English women of that era bought the shells and made fancy tables and knick-knacks out of them. Thus, in England the sailors valentine first was conceived. As the designs got more elaborate, a cabinetmaker made octagonal boxes to house some of the fancy creations. As the octagonal shape lent itself to even partitions, symmetry of design was adopted for the valentines. From England, the making of the valentines moved to Barbados via an enterprising B. H. Belgrave. He and his brother migrated from England and began a sea curio shop on the island with crafts made by local ladies. Belgrave had cases made and patterns that could be copied. He also sold specimen shells, crabs, preserved local fish and other sea creatures. The valentines of that area were quite crude compared to the elaborate ones of today. Sailors, knowing Barbados See VALENTINES on page 25

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The Pelican 25 Friday, December 30, 2011 initial cost. The city has already spent $25 million on the downtown area, and Mayor Suzanne Boisvenue said, Were not where we should be. Im very concerned about this. I will support this, but by God at the end of the day, there better be something for me to look at.Culinary Arts Center proposed RMA presented its ideas for a five-year strategic plan to get redevelopment started in the CRA at a public meeting Sept. 13. Neil Fritz, an RMA consultant, said they looked at a dozen sites, including Oakland Park Station at the northern gateway to the area. You have to develop a niche or its not going to happen, Fritz said of redevelopment plans. For this area Fritz said, We think we could bring things together in a culinary arts district with food, wine and kitchen businesses. He compared it to the Miami Design District. As I drove around Oakland Park, something kept telling me kitchens, said RMA communications director Sharon McCormick. City staff and RMA officials will be having discussions with Broward County on how to best reprogram some or all of the $10.2 million to support the new culinary arts concept.Oakland ParkContinued from page was one of the ports on their way home, bought these valentines as souvenirs. An erroneous story has it that bored sailors made the designs, so the sailors valentines name came into being. While the story was not true, the fact that these sailors brought many of the valentines home kept the name alive. Sailors valentines had a revival in the 1960s which has led to an increase in artistry particularly on Floridas West Coast. Some valentine artists get upwards of $20,000 for their creations. Today, sailors valentines have specific criteria. There are single valentines and double valentines and if one is to win an award, no empty space can show on the bottom of the valentine. The center is rounded with a theme of hearts, flowers or a love saying. Flowers made from shells or other natural sea objects are placed on the form, and colored foil paper is shaped to form partitions on the bottom of the case. Brandy Llewellyn is one of the prominent valentine makers of today. After taking a valentine class in the spring of 2007, she entered her first show competition at the professional level the following year and won first and second place ribbons. In 2010, the West Chester, PA, public television station devoted a 30-minute segment to Llewellyn and her sailors valentines. In 2011, she was the recipient of the Best of Show Valentine and the Artistic Peoples Choice Award at the Broward Shell Show. Sailors valentines will be displayed at the Broward Shell Show Saturday Jan.21 at the Emma Lou Olson Civic Center. Call 305-467-4412. ValentinesContinued from page 24

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28 The Pelican Friday, December 30, 2011