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Pompano Pelican
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00090900/00278
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Title: Pompano Pelican
Uniform Title: Pompano Pelican
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: Pompano Pelican
Place of Publication: Pompano Beach
Publication Date: 12-23-2011
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Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Broward -- Pompano Beach
Coordinates: 26.234722 x -80.125556 ( Place of Publication )
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00090900:00278

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Friday, December 23, 2011 Vol. XIX, Issue 51 Call 954-783-8700 to Advertise Email: siren2415@gmail.com Pompano Beach • Deer eld Beach • Lighthouse Point • Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Wilton Manors • Oakland Park • Hillsboro Beach • The Galt • Palm Aire The P e l i c a n Pelican By Bill JohnsonPELICAN WRITEROakland Park -Before reaching into a bag, he asks if anyone present has ophidophobia. Seeing some blank expressions, he explains that ophidophobia is the fear of snakes. He then puts on a protective glove, reaches into a canvas bag and pulls out what appears to be a brightly colored coral snake, one of the most dangerous snakes in Florida. In fact, the “snake” he is holding is fake, a rubber model. “Do you think I’m crazy?” he asks. This is one of the light-hearted moments in Michael Brennan’s educational presentation to an audience at Fern Forest Nature Center in Coconut Creek. Brennan is a self-proclaimed lover of snakes and spiders who believes the public should know more about them and has dedicated decades to such Snake lover strives to educate the publicSanta Claus celebrates his arrival at the Pompano Beach Aquatic Center with members of the Pompano Piranhas who revived a long standing tradition Saturday and hosted the Santa Swim Meet. More than 200 young swimmers participated. Hundreds of toys were collected that were d onated to the Broward Children’s Center.. See story on page 5. Districts are shuf ed for north Broward commissionersBy Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFBroward County Commissioners approved a district voting map that gives north Broward commissioners Chip LaMarca and Kristin Jacobs new constituencies. LaMarca, (Dist. 4) lost the largely Republican Deer Creek community in Deer eld Beach and gained territory in south Deer eld as far west as Powerline Road. The district now takes in a chunk of Pompano Beach that includes the Highlands and Cresthaven. He lost Wilton Manors and gained some precincts in Oakland Park. He also lost a strip of the coastline below SE 17 Street in Fort Lauderdale. LaMarca’s Deer eld Beach loss is Dist. 2 Commissioner Kristin Jacob’s gain. She now takes in all Deer eld Beach precincts west of Northwest 3 Avenue and then moves south into Pompano Beach, except for the Highlands and Cresthaven. Her district now includes all voters in Coconut Creek, Margate and those in eastern Coral Springs north of Sample Road. Wilton Manors now falls into District 7 represented by Broward County Mayor John Rodstrom. LaMarca shares Oakland Park with Dale Holness, Dist.9. The map that won the commission’s support by a 63 vote, was a modi cation of a plan that had been rejected 9-3 in previous commission discussions, Commissioner LaMarca said. It not only changed his district substantially, but eliminated a possible third minority district in a county that is 56 percent minority populations.See SNAKES on page 23 Snake charmer Michael Brennan plays with his “pets.”See DISTRICTS on page 14

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2 The PelicanFriday, December 23, 2011 SightingsA local calendar for events, meetings and more in North Broward County. Please email calendar items to siren2415@gmail. com or fax to 954-783-0093.By Judy VikPELICAN STAFF LBTS – Four downtown restaurants and the town of Lauderdale-By-The-Sea are teaming up on a New Year’s Eve celebration. Aruba Beach Caf, Athena’s By the Sea, Village Grille and 101 Ocean will all have outdoor dining that evening. The party gets under way at 6 p.m., and the music stops at 1:30 a.m. A stage will be set up in Pelican Square, where a live band will perform. “It’s a nice event, and we’ve worked for a couple months to be sure there are no problems,” said Guy Contrada, general manager of Aruba’s. In the interest of safety and crowd and traf c control, starting at 3 p.m. Pelican Square, Commercial Boulevard east of A1A will be shut down to traf c except for valet parking, according to Broward Sheriff’s Of ce District Chief Oscar Llerena. “Last year the turnout was so overwhelming, it became unsafe for pedestrians,” he said. The road had to be shut down during the event. An even bigger turnout is expected this year, but a traf c plan is now in place. A ball will drop at midnight at Village Grille to mark the start of the new year. The outdoor music is free. Food and drink will be for sale at the various restaurants.LBTS restaurants team up for New Year’s Through Dec. 31 – Holiday Fantasy of Lights – Drive through Tradewinds Park, 3600 W. Sample Rd., Coconut Creek, for the holiday light show. Gate Entrance Fee. $1.50 per person. 954-357-8870. 1-7-12 – Martin Luther King Junior Interfaith Prayer Breakfast at the E. Pat Larkins Center, 520 MLK Blvd., Pompano Beach. Cost is $12 per person. Call 954871-6353. 1-9 to 12 – Three on three basketball clinic for children ages 12 to 14 and 15 to 17 at the Mitchell Moore Gym, 901 NW 10 St., Pompano Beach, starting at 6 p.m. Cost is $60. Call 954-786-4131. 1-14-12 – State of the Dream Banquet at 6:30 p.m. at the E. Pat Larkins Civic Center, 520 MLK Blvd., Pompano Beach. 1-16-12 – MLK Parade begins at 8 a.m. at Mitchell Moore Park, 901 NW 10 St., Pompano Beach. Line-up at 8 a.m. 1-16-12 – MLK Celebration at 10:30 a.m. at Blanche Ely High School Gymnasium, 1201 NW 6 St., Pompano Beach. Speaker is William McCormick. Call 954-254-1170. 1/27 – St. Jude Classic Golf Tournament Woodlands Country Club, Tamarac. 954-323-8405. 1-18 – Our Art By The Sea meets at 7 p.m. at Lauderdale-By-TheSea Community Church Friedt Family Fellowship Hall, 4433 Bougainvillea Drive, Lauderdale-By-TheSea. Lee Sky will discuss See SIGHTINGS on page 12

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The Pelican 3 Friday, December 23, 2011 SPECIAL BUSINESS NEWSThis month, Mr. Squeaky Car Wash unveiled the extensive renovations they have been working on over the past few months. In addition to landscape improvements and repainting the entire property to match the color of Mr. Squeaky’s logo, a one-of-a-kind, artistic shade canopy with colors to match the building was completed. In the days since the shade canopy was installed, it has already drawn a great deal of positive attention to Mr. Squeaky Car Wash. “We have received so many compliments from our customers,” says Lucas Carreira, Manager of Mr. Squeaky Car Wash. “They love the very unique design, the size and height, and the bright colors of the fabrics and columns,” Carreira continued. “I knew the canopy was going to be very impressive as it was being built, but when it was nally completed, it was breathtaking,” explained Carreira. A visit to the site and speaking with Mr Squeaky’s customers con rmed the excitement. “I really love the new shade canopy they Mr. Squeaky’s Renovations a Big Hit With Fans have just installed,” said Sal Lonano of Let’s Go Limo in Deer eld. “Mr. Squeaky has always had the best service and quality of any local car wash. That’s why I bring all of my vehicles to them,” said Lonano. “The new canopy adds to this rst class facility,” Lonano continued. In addition to the big changes onsite from these renovations, Mr. Squeaky Car Wash is also offering a limited time, Happy Hour special for the rst time ever. “Lucas and I wanted to offer our loyal customers a special gift this holiday season,” said Richard Sasso, owner of Mr. Squeaky Car Wash. “We have never offered any similar promotional pricing, and with the holiday season here, we decided to offer a limited time, Happy Hour special on Mondays through Thursdays from 5 to 7 p.m. ” Sasso continued. “This Happy Hour special pricing will give our customers $2 off any car wash,” said Sasso. “It is our special way of saying thanks to our great customers this holiday season,” Sasso explained. “We have been selected as one of the Top 50 car washes in the entire country, the only South Florida car wash to receive this honor, and this is our way of giving back to the customers that made this all possible,” said Sasso. With the new renovations onsite and the limited time discounted pricing, now is the perfect time to start off the New Year with a squeaky clean car. Richard Sasso, owner [top] and ]Lucas Carreira, manager [Right]

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4 The PelicanFriday, December 23, 2011 Street patrolPompano Beach Commissioner Charlotte Burrie in the community working the streets on the burglary residence prevention campaign. She is accompanied by BSO Captain Mick Wiener. The community-wide event included leaving crime prevention door hangers throughout Cresthaven to alert residents to criminal activity during the holidays and to offer advice on crime prevention. [Photo courtesy of BSO] Pompano man arrested for November shootingBroward Sheriff’s Of ce detectives arrested a suspect in the Nov. 18 shooting of a taxi cab driver, Williamson Joseph, who survived gunshot wounds to the head and torso. Detectives said Joseph was dispatched to a convenience store on Northeast 3 Avenue in Fort Lauderdale to pick up a fare. At the store, the suspect, Semie Robinson, 30, entered the cab, carrying a small cooler bag, and said he wanted to go to Pompano Beach. Joseph drove to 2937 NW 7th Street.When Joseph parked the cab in the driveway Robinson shot him, without warning or provocation, one time in the head and once in the right armpit. After the shooting Robinson exited the cab and ed, leaving his cooler bag in the car. Joseph was rushed to North Broward Medical Center. BSO Crime Scene detectives processed the taxi and the cooler bag left by the suspect. Inside the cooler was a partial bottle of Mountain Dew and a baseball cap. From the mouthpiece of the soda bottle BSO Crime Lab investigators recovered DNA matching Semie Robinson and from an emblem on the ball cap they lifted two of Robinson’s ngerprints. Robinson has a violent criminal history and was paroled from prison 10 months ago. A warrant was obtained for his arrest and he was charged with attempted murder on Dec. 12. He is being held without bond at BSO’s main jail.

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The Pelican 5 Friday, December 23, 2011 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach – Mayor Lamar Fisher brought the spirit of Christmas to the City making major upgrade to the aquatic center, Santa tests the waterPompano Beach Aquatic Center in a real way Saturday. The mayor announced the city will install a $100,000 timing system and scoreboard at the city pool, an improvement he hopes will attract major swim competitions. “I’m excited about it,” the mayor said. “We already have international swimmers training here. We hope this will bring in more of these kinds of tourists.” The money is being allocated from the capital improvement projects fund. Fisher’s good news came during a swim meet hosted by the Pompano Piranhas that brought 200 young swimmers to town. Piranhas’ president Barry Connell said the scoring upgrade will enable the team to attract major swim competitions. “Some clubs are self sustaining by holding invitational meets,” Connell said. The day brought the Piranhas another gift. A $700 check was donated by Jim Wolff, former director of the city’s former swim club, the Pompano Pirates. Wolff said the money had been laying around in the Pirates’ bank account for years. He hopes it can be used to help deserving See AQUATICS on page 15 Santa takes a dip at the Pompano Beach Aquatic Center. And to all a good night!

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6 The PelicanFriday, December 23, 2011 Deer eld Beach, Pompano Beach, Lighthouse Point, LauderdaleBy-The-Sea, Wilton Manors and Oakland Park The Pompano Pelican is published weekly on FridaysStreet Address: 1500-A E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, FL 33060 Telephone: 954-783-8700 • Fax: 954-783-0093Letters to the Editor are encouraged and accepted for print if signed, although a writer’s name will be withheld on request; letters must also include a daytime telephone number. Advertising rates are available upon request. Subscription rate is $31.80 including tax for one year’s delivery in Greater Pompano Beach; $95.40/per year including tax for others in the United States; call 954-783-8700 for rates abroad. The Pelican is a nonpartisan newspaper and reserves the right to decline advertising. Copyright 2011. Reproduction of this publication in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission of the publisher. The Pelican is a member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, Deer eld Beach Chamber and the LBTS Chamber. The Pelican is a state certi ed woman-owned minority business. The Pelican is delivered to businesses, libraries, schools, of ces, hospitals, news racks and single family homes. All advertising and copy is published at the sole discretion of the publisher. We welcome your critiques and ideas concerning this publication. Anne Siren, publisherExecutive Assistant: Mary Hudson Finance: Peter Pritchard Graphics: Rachel Ramirez Windsheimer and Adriana Bonilla Bookkeeper: John White Classi eds: Fran Shelby Contributing Writers: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Judy Wilson, Malcolm McClintock, Judy Vik Copy editors: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Account Executives: Paul Shroads, Carolyn Mann, Bill Heaton, Bill Fox ESTABLISHED 1993 • Volume XIX, Issue 51 Founding Editor and PublisherAnne Hanby Siren Letters & OpinionsTo the editor, In response to Gerard K’s letter this week, about women’s choice, I would like to point out to him that pregnancy is not always a choice. For him to call rape or incest an “excuse and BS” is an insult to all woman, especially those who have suffered from such vicious attacks.. Gerard and all men should stay out of a women’s uterus. Joanne Goodwin Pompano BeachChoice must remain the woman’s prerogative says reader Condos should update to AEDs for safety and healthTo the editor Fifty ve and over buildings should have a de brillator or two. A de brillator is a vital unit when waiting for emergency health care. The instrument is not dif cult to use. Public buildings like city halls and airports generally have Automatic External De brillators, or AEDs, that can be manipulated easily by the layperson. The AED can analyze the heart rhythm and dictate instructions for further use like a shock to get the heart beating again. Lives can be saved with a purchase of an AED, and training in its use is easily done. Many of our buildings on the barrier island don’t have a budget to buy AEDs. I suggest that any building with more than 99 units should have a volunteer funding effort to purchase one and include a training course I would recommend that our city commission pass a law after reviewing this subject that would require a unit to be installed with training. Respectfully, Stanley F. Turon Pompano Beach City Commissioner Charlotte Burrie installed of cers at the holiday party of the Cresthaven Civic Association. John Mead, left, is the new president, and Ron Boehl, right is outgoing president. Members brought gifts for the Citizen Observer Patrol holiday party for children. (Staff photo by Judy Vik) Deck the halls in CresthavenA bene t hosted by owners, Shawn Bombard & Nick Berry of the Courtyard Cafe at 2211 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors, on Saturday Dec. 17 raised 46 bikes, $500 in checks, and many toys, donor’s John & Cheryl McCully along with Cheryl’s sister Marsha Milot donated 14 bikes Kids in Distress won’t have a shortage of new bikes, thanks to a local restaurant in Wilton Manors Chanukah and other celebrations share much in historyBy Rabbi David MarkTHE JEWISH CENTER AT TEMPLE SHOLOM OF POMPANO BEACHChanukah is a festival which has taken on many different identities and roles since it juxtaposes a major Christian holiday at this time of year. It represents a struggle for religious freedom, a subject dear to American hearts; an armed rebellion against a cruel colonizing power, also re ecting a theme popular in our history. Were the Maccabees, the priestly citizen-soldiers of the Chanukah saga, conservative traditionalists ghting a newfangled foreign culture, or liberal— sorry, progressive—warriors taking up arms in the name of diversity? Yes, and yes. Just as there can be no objective telling of a country’s history—every historian has an ax to grind or a mold into which to cast his theories—so can the Chanukah story be adapted to different worldly outlooks. In the end, we Jews have the homely miracle of a single bottle of consecrated oil, barely suf cient to last for one night, yet burning steadily for eight, which gave the Jewish victors time to crush fresh olives and make new oil for the menorah, the sacred candelabra which stood in the Holy Temple in Jerusalem. But wait! Isn’t there an alternate reading to the tale? Yes: in the Apocrypha, the books which were not accepted into either the Hebrew or Protestant Bibles as Holy Writ (our Catholic neighbors do accept them as such, and preserved them through the centuries), Chanukah lasts for eight days, because it was a delayed celebration of Sukkot, the Festival of Booths. Which version ought we to accept? We can believe both, but the oil story is the more famous, leading us to the particular foods served on this holiday: latkes, or potato pancakes, are the common fare for European-derived Jews, while Jews from the Arab countries prefer sufganiyote (Hebrew, “little sponges,”) or jelly doughnuts. Any food fried in vegetable oil is acceptable, so, bring on the tempura! Don’t expect to nd latkes mentioned in the Chanukah story, though: Judah Maccabee never saw a potato in his life; they derive from South America. Of course, there is the dreidel, the four-sided top which, according to legend, saved Torah study during the persecutions of the time. During Hebrew School, a lookout would keep guard against enemy soldiers. If they approached, the lesson would end abruptly, and the soldiers would only nd children and a teacher betting on the spins of a top. Yet, the dreidel derives from the Middle Ages, long after the Chanukah period, which was about 168 BCE. Chanukah is, decidedly no “minor” holiday, for had there been no Chanukah, I believe there might never have been a Christmas. Consider: had the Hellenistic Greek culture succeeded in eradicating Judaism, then, when Jesus was born in 4 BCE, he would not have been born a Jew, but a Greek—and Christianity as we know it today might never have begun. And so, as our Christian neighbors deck their halls in red and green, perhaps they might consider adding a bit of blue and white. So much strife and anger in today’s world threatens to divide us—let us, rather, focus on what unites us: a common love of the One Who made us in His/ Her image, and a common love of peace. Happy Holidays!

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The Pelican 7 Friday, December 23, 2011 Making a Difference Phyllis J. Neuberger wants your suggestions about people who are making a difference. Call 954-783-8700. Advertise with The Pelican 954.783.8700 By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFJohn Dalsimer is well known for many things, his love for wife, Diane, his energetic leadership and generosity to John Knox Village and an almost obsessive love of travel. When the husband/wife team moved into the Village in 2005, they were among the youngest of the 800-plus residents. Asked why they chose to move into a CCRC, or Continuing Care Retirement Community, and why this particular one, John replied. “I was very familiar with the concept which was quite successful in the Northeast. We believed in the idea and felt it was the best setting for us who planned to do extensive traveling. We felt it also had great advantages for meeting our future health needs whatever they might be. We visited 24 different CCRCs throughout the country and decided on Florida for the warm weather and John Knox Village because it was the best one of them all.” With an impressive resume as a CPA and top executive in the Philadelphia area, John’s talents, generously offered, were utilized by the many activities of the Village. He has served on and chaired the Village Long Range Planning, Fiscal and Library LBTS -State Road A1A and El Mar Drive in the town of Lauderdale-By-The-Sea were temporarily closed to vehicle and pedestrian traf c Tuesday morning after a plastic bag was found on the beach containing an unknown but suspicious substance. The incident occurred shortly after 10 a.m., when a small, plastic bag containing a white or off-white colored substance was found on the beach. Since what was in the sealed bag could not be identi ed, the volunteer re department called for assistance. The Broward County and Fort Lauderdale Hazardous Materials teams responded to the beachfront parking lot of the Minto Group sales trailer on El Mar Drive. The trailer is next to El Prado Park, across from Town Hall, 4501 Ocean Drive. The bag was removed from the town for analysis by the Broward County HazMat squad. There were no reported injuries. The substance was found to be non-hazardous. The Broward Sheriff’s Of ce closed A1A to vehicle traf c for about 30 minutes. El Mar Drive was closed to vehicle and pedestrian traf c for about two hours. Fire personnel from all three re departments cleared the scene shortly after noon.Suspicious bag in LBTS gets full attention John Dalsimer, CPA, raises the benchmark for leadership skills and extensive community service committees. For several years he has prepared the income tax returns for over 75 of the Village residents in exchange for their fee donations to the new Health Center Fund. In the short time that he has been a resident, John’s nancial contributions to the Village Health Center totals about $85,000. As one resident said, ”How’s that for translating personal skills into community service?” To raise funds for that same future Health Center, John and Diane have co-chaired the annual holiday bazaar which raised $25,000 each year for the past four years thanks to their dedication and that of over 200 resident volunteers. Asked why he has focused so much of his efforts on the Health Center which will be a state-of-the-art facility built within the next few years, he replies, “because at sometime in the future, many residents, including Diane and me, will need this center and we want it to be the best in South Florida.” Asked if his brand of leadership and big city experience have been well received in the Village, See DIFFERENCE on page 11 John and Diane prepare for a tour of India using the common mode of transportation.

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8 The PelicanFriday, December 23, 2011

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The Pelican 9 Friday, December 23, 2011 A shepherd trio These angelic faces belong to Gabriella, Rosey and Abigail, young dancers from the Expressions of Joy Dance Studio at First Baptist Church in Deer eld Beach. The girls, dressed as shepherds, were waiting to go onstage at the city’s tree lighting ceremony held in The Cove Shopping Center. [Photo courtesy Maureen Kenny] Pompano Beach Brigette Dorio has been hired as vice president and marketing manager at Florida Shores Bank Southeast’s Pompano Beach locationWith 22 years of banking and nancial services experience, Doria will be responsible for managing the branch operations and growing the bank’s customer base in the market. Prior to joining Florida Shores, Doria was a branch manager for BB&T, and BankUnited prior to that. “Florida Shores is pleased to have such a proven performer as Brigitte on our team” said Robert Sewick, President and CEO of Florida Shores Bank Southeast. “Her experience and motivation will be a winning combination for our growing bank.” Pompano Beach-based Florida Shores Bank Southeast was founded in 2006 by a team of experienced bankers. The bank has $186 million in assets with locations in Pompano Beach, Boca Raton and Fort Lauderdale. Florida Shores Bank offers market-leading, interest-bearing deposit products, capital to support local businesses, and convenient online services. The associates, who are owners of the bank, are dedicated to meeting the banking needs of their community. To learn more, visit www. oridashoresbank.com.Florida Shores names new vice president/ manager, Brigitte Doria

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10 The PelicanFriday, December 23, 2011 ADVERTISING? IT’S PART OF DOING BUSINESS. CALL US. 954-783-8700.

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The Pelican 11 Friday, December 23, 2011 John admits he might have ruf ed a few feathers along the way. He says, “When one is active, there are times that one knocks heads with management, but I have to hope and think that management has seen mine as constructive criticism.” John has also represented the village in FLiCRA, or Florida Lifecare Residents’ Association, serving on its board of directors, being the region director and the president of the state organization. While serving in those capacities he says, “We accomplished rewriting the law that regulates CCRC’s to provide more information and protection for both residents and management.”The traveling pairAll of these accomplishments have been achieved side by side with an amazing travel schedule. John reports that “Our commitments here in the Village, plus our travels, keep us on a very tight schedule. Travel has been a real joy to both of us and we feel very fortunate to have been able to share this strong, almost addiction, to seeing the world. Grinning at the prospect of talking about some of their extraordinary adventures, he adds, “We have traveled together with Road Scholar, formerly Elder Hostel, and on our own, to all seven continents and all 50 states. “Diane and I have been married almost 20 years and have seven children and 13 grandchildren in our combined families,” he explains. “ So in addition to seeing the world, we also drive every summer to see most of our families, sharing each of their lives and interests for a short time.” Having visited so many countries already, The Pelican wondered if there were any destinations left on their list. “Oh yes,” he says. “Right now in the planning stages are trips to the Canadian Maritimes, Brittany and Normandy.” With countless world wide adventures does anything stand out? John’s eyes sparkle as he nods yes. “Our visit to 18 caves in southern France stands out in my mind. We worked our way deep into the caves to see pre-historic cave paintings from 15,000 to 27,000 years old. It’s hard to imagine anything done that long ago. The hand prints in ochre and the black line drawings of various animals are almost engraved in my brain. It makes one wonder what life then could possibly have been like.”Life in PennsylvaniaThis man’s business career has been a success ever since he graduated from the Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania and earned his CPA shortly after. Paralleling that career is a long list of volunteer and commission appointments, indicating years of volunteer service for community and charitable organizations. Dalsimer has written books, booklets and been published in a variety of print publications. He has received community service awards from John Knox Village, Swathmore College, Bread and Roses Community Fund and Distinguished Public Service Award given by the Pennsylvania Institute of Certi ed Public Accountants. He says he is most proud of starting the Community Accountants in Philadelphia which he says, “is now 37 years old. This organization provides free accounting services to those who cannot afford to purchase them in the market place using volunteer CPAs and accountants. Our good work has bene ted individuals, small businesses and not-for-pro ts.” Thank you, John Dalsimer, for your long service and nancial support of the community past and present.DifferenceContinued from page 7 In South Africa, the couple took an unforgettable ride, and like smart Floridians, Diane and John found a spot to cool off inside a glacier on the Jungfrau in Switzerland. [Photos from Dalsimar collection]

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12 The PelicanFriday, December 23, 2011 Woodworking. The meeting is free and open to the public. Call 954-594-0444.OngoingFood Drive – NE Focal Point. Drop off nonperishable donations from 8:20 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at 227 NW 2 St., Deer eld Beach. Call 954-480-4449.Wilton ManorsStudent Government Day at Wilton Manors Elementary School gave fourth grade students a behind-thescenes look at local government. Early in the morning, the students were welcomed to city hall by Commissioner Julie Carson. They were then given a tour of city hall and the police station. Following that, they attended a mock commission meeting conducted by Vice Mayor Tom Green. The day was a unique opportunity for the young people to meet city employees and see rsthand how their government works. Coordinating the day with city employees Patrick Cann and Bridgette Pierce was teacher Jan Crouse. Wilton Manors Elementary is an International Baccalaureate World School. Civics class in Wilton Manors SightingsContinued from page 2 See SIGHTINGS on page 15

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The Pelican 13 Friday, December 23, 2011 By Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach While the party had a cheery Christmas theme, the focus was on three Pompano Beach personalities who have spent most of their lives helping the community. The Kiwanis Club of Pompano Beach Westside honored its members, Joseph A. Smith, Carl Jefferson and the late Catherine G. Johnson as “legendary community servants.” Smith, who served as tennis coach and vice principal at Blanche Ely High School, is a long time member of Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, a member of Bethel A.M.E. Church and Kiwanis. Jefferson, a dedicated teacher and vice principal of Ely High School, has also served as a volunteer coach for Pompano Beach Parks and Recreation. The late Catherine G. Johnson was an elementary teacher for 36 years, a Diamond Life member of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority and member of Kiwanis. All were honored this month at the annual holiday luncheon meeting with a proclamation declaring Dec. 17 as Eliminate Day. Commissioner Woody Poitier read the proclamation. The project “Eliminate,” a joint effort with Kiwanis International and UNICEF is dedicated to saving lives of babies and their mothers by eliminating Maternal Neonatal Tetanus, or MNT, a disease that kills 60,000 newborn and 30,000 mothers each year. The event was held at the E. Pat Larkins Civic Center in Pompano Beach. For more information on Kiwanis, call 954-942-8108. Local educators honored for community serviceJoseph Smith with wife Ruby and Marie Johnson, President of the Kiwanis Club Pompano Beach Westside Carl Jefferson Gwen Leys, past chair of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce and long time member of the Coast Guard Auxiliary, will be recognized as Citizen of the Year for Pompano Beach. In a unanimous vote of the city commission, Leys, received the honor for her continuous community service. Mayor Lamar Fisher will present the award at the Jan. 10 city commission meeting. Gwen Leys to be honored by city

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14 The PelicanFriday, December 23, 2011 After ve months of public input, at least four other maps had been considered. The nal map was only made public on Dec. 13. ”This map is anything but “fair and equitable,” LaMarca said. “And the public had never seen it.” The districts go into effect the November. Voting districts are reworked every 10 years after the US Census is taken. In the past decade, population changes in Broward County caused the districts to fail the equalsize criteria set by the courts. With the new map, population in each of the districts varies by less than seven percent. DistrictsContinued from page 1 Now Online www.pompanopelican.com

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The Pelican 15 Friday, December 23, 2011 youngsters pay their swim club expenses. Saturday, the Piranhas had a good day in the water. The size of the club has tripled since Head Coach Jesse Vassallo was hired in AquaticsContinued from page 5June and the swimmers are consistently bringing down their times, Connell said. The Piranhas’ next big event is the 7th Ocean Series which takes place just south of the Pompano Beach Pier, A1A and Atlantic Boulevard. The competition includes a onemile ocean swim, a 500 meter kids’ race and one-half-mile standup and one-halfmile prone paddleboard races. Registration fees are $35; $25 for the kids’ race. Major sponsor is Chick lA. All swimming levels are welcome. Check in begins at 7 a.m. Races start at 8 a.m. Information is available at pompanobeachpiranhas.com, or by calling 954-372-5029. First, second and third place winners of each event receive a Chick l-A trophy.SightingsContinued from page 12 Green Market, Wilton Manors Saturdays and Sundays at Hagen Park 2020 Wilton Drive from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. fresh produce, international baked goods, herbs/spices, doggie treats, pickles, jams, infused vinegars, pasta and more. Call 954-531-5383. Pompano Beach Green Market – The Market moves to Founders Park for Dec. 24, 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. and will include fruit, vegetables, fresh squeezed juice and fresh sh. Founders Park is located at 215 NE 4 Ave.Fishing PiersPompano Beach Fishing Pier extends more than 1,000 feet into the Atlantic, 222 N Pompano Beach Blvd., Pompano Beach, Anglin’s Pier Commercial Blvd. Lauderdale-by-the-Sea, 954491-9403 Deer eld Beach International Pier 200 NE 21st Ave., Deer eld Beach. 954426-9206. 954-943-1488LeisureThe American Legion Auxiliary Unit 142 has Bingo on Tuesdays at 7 p.m. at 171 SW 2 St., Pompano Beach. Call 954-942-2448. The NE Focal Point Alzheimer’s Day Care Center, located at 301 N.W. 2nd Avenue in Deer eld See SIGHTINGS on page 17

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16 The PelicanFriday, December 23, 2011

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The Pelican 17 Friday, December 23, 2011 Beach. Support group every Wednesday from 10 a.m. to noon. MeetingsGold Coast Toastmasters – Meet in the second and 4th Mondays of each month at Panera Bread, 1762 N. Federal Highway, Fort Lauderdale from 7 to 9 p.m.. Call 954-895-3555. Zonta International meets on the third Tuesday of the month at Duffy’s Diner, 401 N. Federal Hwy., Deer eld Beach at 11:15 a.m. Zonta International is a classi ed service organization of executives and professionals working together to advance the status of women locally and worldwide through service and advocacy. Call 561-392-2223. The Greater Pompano Beach Senior Citizens Club meets on the second Wednesday of the month at the Emma Lou Olson Community Center on NE Sixth Street Pompano Beach at 10 a.m. Activities focus on the general welfare, health, education and security of senior citizens. We welcome people of all ages. Music12-29 – Pulse Chamber Music presents Holiday Concert : Savor the Holidays. All Saints Episcopal Church, 333 Tarpon Drive, Fort Lauderdale. Call 305-283-9152. 1-14 – The Boca Raton Symphonia “Saturday Night” concerts at 8 p.m. at Roberts Theater, Saint Andrews School, 3200 Jog Road, Boca Raton. The program includes Turkin, Beethoven and Mendelssohn. Tickets at 561-376-3848. 1-22Chamber Ensemble Mirror Images at 2 p.m. at Zion Lutheran, 959 SE 6 Ave., Deer eld Beach in the chapel. Featured on this program are Farrenc, Fasch, Doppler, Vinee, and Chaminade. The South Florida Chamber Ensemble features six musicians from the brass, woodwind, string and percussion families. Call 954-803-3762.Lectures1-4-12 – Myrna Goldberger – “It’s a Hoax, Folk,” lecture to focus on individuals such as Charles Van Buren, Clifford Irving and others. Tickets $10. Tamarac Theater of The Performing Arts, 7143 Pine Island Road, Tamarac Square West Shopping Center. Call 954-724-1110.SightingsContinued from page 15 Call The Pelican 954-783-8700

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18 The Pelican Friday, December 23, 2011 We Mean Business 954-783-8700 Classi eds Call 954-545-0013 Get to know your local Merchants HELP WANTEDBEAUTY!!! HAIR STYLIST, Nail Tech. – Massage – Facial. Guaranteed Start With 100% Commission. Call In Boca 954415-4937. 12-23 LATIN DANCING LADY INSTRUCTOR NEEDED – Part Time In Boca. Approx 2-3 Hours Per Week. Pay $25 Per Hour. Private Lessons. 954-415-4937. 12-23 LOCAL PEST CONTROL CO Looking For Quality Sales/Service Tech. Must Be Dependable, Team Player, Good Drivers License & People Skills. Will Train Right Person. ALSO Of ce Assistant – Computer – People & Phone Skills Needed. Fax Resume 954418-3982. 1-13 SEEKING EMPLOYMENTADULT AIDE – Warm and caring bilingual person with extensive experience in private care and hospital adult sitting. Over 15 years of experience. Excellent references. Own transportation. 781-325-6383. 12-30 BRINGING HOME BABY? RN With 15+ Years Experience. NICU/PEDS. AHA/CPR Instructor Here To Help You & Your Family Transition Baby To Home. Please Call 954-707-7079. CNA/HHA – MANY YEARS OF EXPERIENCE. Reliable. Available For Hourly Or Live-in. Please Call Verona At 954-635-0558. 12-23 HHA/CAREGIVER – English Speaking, Caring, Compassionate, Honest & Reliable. Many Years Of Experience. Excellent Cook, Will Clean, Run Errands, Own Transportation. Excellent References. For Great Care Call Lea 561-633-3583. 12-30SERVICES RETIRED PLUMBING CONTRACTOR Looking For Work. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. CFC 027532. Low Rates. 954-496-6420. 12-23 DANNY BOY ELECTRIC – Lic & Insured. Lic. #EC13004811. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. 24/Hr Service. 954-290-1443. Beat Any Written Estimate. Sr, Discount. 1-13 TRASH/JUNK PICKUPS – APT. Complexes Dumpster Areas, Furniture, Appliances, Cabinets. Boxes/Bags. 10% Sr. Discount $75/Up. Shed Demo. Carpet Tear Up, Garage Clutter. Greg 954-731-7247. 12-23 HANDYMAN – PAINTING – CARPENTRY – Pressure Cleaning. Decks! Everything Around The House. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. Call 561-350-3781. 12-23 CALL BRENDAN THE HANDYMAN – Construction & Repairs. Carpentry, Plumbing, Roo ng, Masonry, Windows, Painting, Decking, Tile. Free Estimates. 954773-6134. Emergency Calls. 12-23 ELECTRICIAN FOR HIRE – Low Rates. 24 Hour Emergency Service. Call 954-404-1150. License EC-0001684. APEX ELECTRIC.. 12-30 AIRPORT TRANSPORTATION – Pickup & Drop-off. Dr. Visits, Shopping, Tours, Etc. Speak Spanish, Portuguese, English. Madeline 754-2340617. 12-30 EMERALD IRISH CLEANING – Est. 20 Yrs. English Speaking. Cleaning Supplies. Hand Scrubbed Floors. SPECIAL!!! 3 HRS $55 – 4 HRS $70. Service Guaranteed. www. emeraldirishcleaning.com. 954-524-3161. You Will Do An Irish Jig. 12-23 SEMI RETIRED ELECTRICIAN – Call If Your Desire Is To Pay Less Than “The Real Price” For Electrical Work Done Right! 954-554-8520. Beach Electrical Corp. 12-23 PLUMBING SERVICES – Big Jobs – Small Jobs. We Do It All. Remodeling & Repairs. Lic. & Insured. C.C. Accepted. Call 954-772-4600. 1-6 HONEST HANDYMAN – HOME & BUILDING Maintenance/Improvements. No Job Too Small. Fast Friendly Service. Reasonable Rates. Local Resident/Homeowner. Call Today For Your FREE Upfront Quote. No Deposit Required. 754-366-1915. 12-23 HOME/OFFICE REPAIRS By State Certified G.C. Reasonable. CGC025802. More Information Call 954815-1007. GOT JUNK? DUMP TRUCK – CLEANUPS Trees/ Landscape, Yard Fill. Paint/ Pressure Wash/ Roofs/Home Repairs – Welding, Etc. Dave 954-818-9538. 1-13BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIESNew GREEN technology. New defroster control saves energy in home refrigerators, commercial chillers. Patented. All optical. Simple mfg. Strategic partners needed..www.NewAvionics.Com. 954-568-1991.THRIFT STORELUCKY STAR THRIFT & GIFTS. 5130 N Federal Hwy (2nd Floor) Fort Lauderdale. 954-839-8182. Great Items At Low Prices Starting From $2 & Up. 12-30 MESSAGESMY DEAREST STEPHANIE, I LOVE YOU More Than You Will Ever Know. You Are A Shining Star, The Light Of My Life. Cheers To 2012! KEVIN. 12-23 MUSICIANS WANTEDThe American Legion Symphonic Band is now accepting new members for the 2011-2012 season. College age to “seasoned seniors” are welcome. Rehearsals are held on Wed. evenings at American Legion Post 142 in Pompano. Percussionists, euphonium and clarinet players are especially needed. If you enjoy “making music,” call Jim McGonigal, Music Director at 954-647-0700 for more info.

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The Pelican 19 Friday, December 23, 2011 We Mean Business! Classi eds Call 954-545-0013 Pelican Classi eds Can Save You Time& Money 954.783.8700 DEEP WATER VILLA – DOCKPOMPANO BEACH 2/2 1700 SQ FT. Screened Fla Room. Private Yard. W/D. 4 Park. No Fixed Bridges. Community Pool. Deeded Dock.. 2 Blocks Beach. $285,000. Call 954-6291324. 12-23 HOMES FOR SALEPOMPANO LEISUREVILLE 55+ This 2/2 Furnished House Is For You! Very Clean. Monthly Maintenance $175. Priced To Sell $105,000. Owner 954-943-0250. 12-30ROOMS FOR RENTE DEERFIELD BEACH – E OF A1A – 1st Floor Furnished. Large Refrigerator, Kitchen, Micro, Laundry, Own Bath, TV, A/C. $175 Week.. 954-7259680. 12-23HOMES FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH 3/2 – CENTRAL AIR. Screened Porch. Small Utility Room. $1100 Mo. 620 NE 35 Street. Call Darci 954783-3723. 12-30CO-OP SALESPOMPANO BEACH 1/1 On Water, Dockage Available At Your Door. $59,500. Coldwell Banker – Barbara – 954-6291324. 12-23 SEASONAL RENTALSPOMPANO BEACH – 2/2 Beautifully Furnished 9th Floor Corner Apt. Great Views. All Amenities. $2,000 A Month. Call 954-785-0177. 12-23 DEERFIELD BEACH 1/1 – Ideal Location – Steps To Beach, Fishing Pier, Restaurants & Shops. $600 Per Week. Available Dec – April. 561-394-4449. 12-23 REAL ESTATE WANTEDI BUY HOUSES!! CASH!! AS IS! QUICK CLOSE! ANY AREA – ANY CONDITION! NO EQUITY OK. CALL NOW 954-914-2355. 1-20CONDOS FOR SALEPALM AIRE 105 – Split 2/2 King, Upgrades. Largest Kitchen. W/D. Breakfast Room. Piano. Ultra Furnished. Shopping, Pool Close By. 9th Floor. Low Maintenance/Taxes. $134K – Offers. No Brokers! 954-895-4596. 12-23 LAUDERDALE BY THE SEA – Furnished 1/1.5 Condo $115,000. Heated Pool. Ocean Access. On Canal. 1481 S Ocean Blvd. Apt 228. Call 586549-5223. 1-6CONDOS FOR RENTLAUDERDALE BY THE SEA – Across From Beach. Near Sea Watch. 1 Bedroom – Den – 2 Baths. Pool, W/D In Unit. $1075 Per Mo. Yrly. 1st – Last – Sec. Or Seasonal 5 Mo Min. $1595/Mo. No Smoking. 954942-5642. 12-23 POMPANO 1BR/DEN 2 BATH FURN. $1,000 Mo. Yrly – 1st – Last – Security Or Seasonal 4 Mo. Min. $1,400/Mo. 954-6005467. 12-23 POMPANO 1/1 E OF FEDERAL – Small Complex – Very Clean. No Pets. $650 Month Yearly. Call Barbara 954-263-7129. 12-23 POMPANO LEISUREVILLE 55+ 2/1 – Completely Furn. Sunroom On Golf Course. 2 Pools, 2 Clubs. $875 Month Yearly. 954-788-9312. 12-30APTS FOR RENTDEERFIELD/POMPANO BEACH 1 BR & 2 BR APTS FOR RENT. Remodeled, Paint, Tile, Etc. W & D On Site. Pool. Pet Friendly. Call George 954809-5030. 1-13 POMPANO MCNAB ROAD & NE 18 AVENUE – 1 & 2 Bedrooms Furnished/ Unfurnished. $675 $950 And Up. Pool, Tile Floors. Central A/C. 954-610-2327. 12-30 POMPANO BEACH Unique Quiet 1/1 Apt. Just Painted. Off Street Parking. 1/2 Block To Beach. $725 Month 1st & Last. 239-898-4799. 12-30 POMPANO BEACH 2/2 Furnished. Large Ef ciency With Kitchen. Fully Furnished. Cable, Internet, Pool, Laundry. 500’ To The Beach. Weekly – Monthly – Yearly. 954-2948483 Or 248-736-1533. 1-6 POMPANO – JUST OFF FEDERAL. 1/1, Pool, Laundry. Close To Shopping & Transportation. $700 Per Mo. 1st Mo + Security To Move In. Call Anthony 954-857-5207. 12-30 POMPANO GARDENS $795 – 1/1 $200 Deposit. Nice Area – Minutes To Beach – Pet OK. Please Call 954-515-2554. 12-23 POMPANO BEACH 1/1 NW $650 – 2/1 $750 SW 1/1 $725 – 2/1 $925 – NE 1/1 $675 2/1 NE $950 – TH 2/1.5 $1095 – All FREE Water. Rent + $70 Mov-U-In. 954-781-6299. 12-30 EFFICIENCY AVAILABLE WITH FULL KITCHEN. Includes: Electric, Cable, Wi-Fi, Water, Pool. 2nd Floor End Unit. Clean – Move-in Condition. 2 Blocks From Ocean – North Of Atlantic. Owner Agent. $699 Month. 2 Weeks Free With Annual Lease. $699 Security. 954-6087368. 12-23 POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 Bedroom From $495. Easy Move-in. 1/2 OFF DEPOSIT. Remodeled. Great Location. 954-783-1088 For More Info. 1-6 STUDIOS – EFFICIENCIESDEERFIELD BEACH A1A – Live at the beach off season. Ef ciencies available for $550 Weekly, pay as you go, no deposit or security, cable, pool, laundry, wireless. Ocean Villa 954-427-4608. 12-30COMMERCIAL FOR RENT-SALEPOMPANO COMMERCIAL OFFICE Spaces Available. Ranging From As Low As $500 To $700 Depending On Square Footage. Please Call Darci At 954-7833723. 12-30 DEERFIELD BEACH – Retail Of ce Warehouse – 700 Sq Ft With Loft. A/C, Bathroom. $575 Per Month. Call For More Info 561-654-1331 Or 561-9985681. 1-13OUTDOOR STORAGEDEERFIELD BEACH OUTDOOR STORAGE For Boats, RV’s, Commercial Vehicles & More. Call Chris At 954-520-1777. 1-6MUSICAL ITEMSBABY GRAND PIANO $1,200 FIRM. CALL 954-783-8700. ORGAN for SALE – Excellent condition. $400. Call 9542950194. FURNITUREMOVING SALE – Patio Furniture & Chairs. 46” Kitchen Table With Chairs. White Couch. Golf Clubs. Assorted Other Furniture. 561-637-4271. 12-23 BEDSETS – King $180 – Queen $130 – Full $110 – Twin $90. 5 Pc. Bedroom Set $399. Frames $39. 954-465-6498. 1-13SPORTSBOWFLEX EXTREME $750. Excellent Condition. More Information Call 954525-2860. Ft Lauderdale. 12-23 Call us!

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20 The Pelican Friday, December 23, 2011 Rev. Hyvenson Joseph WORSHIP DIRECTORY: Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad. Christmas servicesCOMPILED BY ANNE SIRENCommunity Church of Lauderdale-by-the Sea, 4433 Bougainvillea Drive, Lauderdale-By-The-Sea. Christmas Eve Candlelight service at 7 p.m. and Christmas Day at 10 a.m.BAPTISTFirst Baptist Church, 138 NE 1 St., Pompano Beach. Christmas Eve family candlelight service 6 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Christmas Day 10:30 a.m. 954-745-6100.ECUMENICAL CATHOLIC The Parish of Sts. Francis and Clare 101 NE 3 Street just N of Broward Blvd & E of Andrews Avenue, Fort Lauderdale. Christmas Eve at 5 p.m. and Christmas Day at 10:30 a.m. 954-731-8137.EPISCOPALAll Saints Episcopal Church 333 Tarpon Drive, Fort Lauderdale. Christmas Eve 4 p.m. 10:30 choral concert and mass. Christmas day service is at 10:30 a.m. 954-467-6496. St. Marks Episcopal Church, 1750 E. Oakland Park Blvd., Fort Lauderdale. Christmas Eve 2 p.m., Children’s Pageant & Holy Eucharist; 7 p.m. Festival Candlelight Eucharist with Full Choir and String Quartet; 10:30 p.m. Festival Candlelight Eucharist with Full Choir and String Quartet. Christmas Day, Holy Eucharist – Rite II. 954-5634508. St. Martin’s Episcopal Church 140 SE 28 Ave., Pompano Beach 954-9414843. St. Nicholas Episcopal Church 1111 Sample Road, Pompano Beach – Christmas Eve, 5:30 p.m. and 11 p.m.; Christmas Day 10 a.m. Spanish Services – Christmas Eve at 7:30 p.m.; Portuguese Services, Christmas Day at 1 and 7 p.m. 954-942-5887.LUTHERANPompano Lutheran Church 109 SE 10 Ave., Pompano Beach. Christmas Eve at 7:45 p.m. and Christmas day at 10 a.m. 954942-1216.PRESBYTERIANCommunity Presbyterian Church 1920 4 St., Deerfield Beach. Christmas Eve Candlelight service at 6 p.m. and Christmas Day services at 8:30 a.m. and 11 a.m. 954427-0222. New Presbyterian Church 600 NE 13 Ave., Pompano Beach. Christmas Eve candlelight service at 7 p.m. and Christmas Day service at 11 a.m. 954-946-4380.ROMAN CATHOLICAssumption Catholic Church 2001 S. Ocean Blvd., Lauderdale-By-TheSea. Dec. 20, 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. Confession; 5:30 p.m. Advent Reconciliation Service with Confession; Dec. 24, Vigils, 4 and 5:30 and Midnight. Midnight mass with carols; Dec. 25, 9:15 and 10:45 a.m., 12:15 p.m. Spanish Mass. 954-941-7647. St. Coleman Roman Catholic Church 1200 S. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. Christmas Eve 4;30 p.m., 6:30 p.m. 8:30 p.m. and midnight mass. On Christmas Day, services are at 7:30, 9 and 11 a.m. and 12:30 p.m. Call 954-942-3533. Pompano Beach Phil Kassees, owner of Heavenly Pizza, 2647 E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, is firing up his ovens for Christmas Day dinners this year, and you are invited. Kassees says he plans to serve the meals following the 10 a.m. Bible studies until 4 p.m. The dinners are offered to Heavenly Pizza cooks Christmas dinner for allanyone who does not have a place to go this year on Christmas Day. The Heavenly Pizza team will start cooking the night before so dinner will be served on time. Visitors to Pompano Beach are welcome. Everyone is welcome. There is no charge for the Christmas dinners.

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The Pelican 21 Friday, December 23, 2011 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach – The Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce provides a number of New networking group links young professionalsnetworking opportunities, but for busy young professionals there is one group designed specifically for them. Under the leadership of financial planner Bill Riddick and accountant Lauryn Charles, the upwardly mobile in their 20s and 30s gather the fourth Wednesday of each month to mix and mingle over cocktails at a local lounge. Purpose is threefold: to business network, to learn new marketing strategies and to make a difference in the community. Once a quarter the Young Professionals meet for lunch to consider new ways of doing business: using social media for instance, or methods of getting their message to an older generation. For public service, the group which numbers about 30 regulars, has donated to Food for the Poor, Broward Children’s Center and Relay for Life. So far, in existence about 18 months, the group is unstructured. Members don’t pay dues, but often become interested in joining the Chamber as a result of their exposure to it through the Young Professionals. “We feel we benefit the Chamber when we take in new blood,” Riddick said who has been a member of the larger organization since 2008. Chamber CEO Ric Green said the young professionals group was “something I had seen as missing from the Chamber” when he came aboard three years ago. “As an organization, we need to grow young leaders. It is very important for the Chamber to encourage upand -coming business leaders and to get young people involved in the Chamber and to realize its benefits.” On Riddick’s team are Jennifer Kovacs, owner of op2web, a web design firm; Mike Borkowski, an accountant with Ahern & Jasco and Kristin Opst, general manager of the Deerfield Beach Hilton. Along with Charles, who is president of Accountants Financial Services Group, they form the nucleus of the new organization. As for the all work he has put in organizing the Young Professionals, Riddick, owner of W.J. Riddick Financial Services Group, feels it has “definitely helped” his business. “I have gotten a number of clients,” he said. “Since I grow only through referrals and networking, Young Professionals has paid off for me.” The Pelican 954-783-8700

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22 The Pelican Friday, December 23, 2011 Advertise in The Pelican for coverage in nine North Broward cities. Capt. RJ Boyle is an experienced angler in South Florida. His studio is located in Lighthouse Point. Call 954-420-5001.. The weather is going to be nice enough on Christmas to go out and catch a sailfish. When you’re done opening your presents under the tree load up the boat up and go bend a rod. We have been selling quite a few sailfish rods and reels this season. With the introduction of the circle hook into live bait fishing years ago we realized the need for a change to the action of the rods we were using. Because we are not setting the hook aggressively anymore, we started making the rods extremely light or bendy in the tip. As the fish eats the bait and swims away with the circle hook we now simply lower the rod tip and begin to wind slowly allowing the circle hook to find its way to corner of the fishes’ mouth. If the rod is too stiff the fish will feel the line and hook in his mouth and he will simply let the bait go. It took a few years for guys to get use to hooking a fish without aggression but we have turned the corner and our hook up ratio has never been better. Come by the shop and check out the new sailfish rods. We are actually making custom rods for four different teams for the upcoming sailfish season. They may all have different wraps but they are very similar in their action. Merry Christmas to All RJ BoyleSanta is sail shing

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The Pelican 23 Friday, December 23, 2011 presentations to various groups, schools and colleges. He wants to build public respect for nature, an understanding of these animals, and, along the way, inform Floridians of what snakes and spiders pose some danger. “People ought to know what snakes and insects can hurt them,” he says. There’s no doubt that Brennan has an unusual relationship with these animals. “It’s been a passion of mine since I was a child and saw my rst snake, before I even knew what it was,” he says. “They’re aesthetic. They’re beautiful, if you can overcome your fear. I’m a veritable Dr. Doolittle. To this day, working with snakes and spiders is still like being a kid.” His passion explains why the patio and one-time laundry room at his Oakland Park home are now home for twodozen reptiles and spiders. He once had a 100-pound tortoise. Holding the fake coral snake, he informs his audience that this snake’s venom actually decays the human esh when infected by a bite. But because the snake is shy and tends to hide, it’s unlikely a person would encounter one. In any event, the snake is identi ed by red, black and yellow bands around its body. The coral snake can easily be mistaken for a harmless look-alike called the scarlet king snake. It, too, wears the colored bands – probably as its defense mechanism so that predators will mistake it for the dangerous coral snake. The difference, Brennan, explains, is that the dangerous snake has red stripes next to yellow. Naturalists have a saying to remember that – “Red next to yellow, kill the fellow.” The timber rattlesnake is another dangerous snake. “It has a horrid disposition,” says Brennan, and there’s a greater chance of coming upon one of these than the coral snake. While getting bitten by such a snake is unlikely, it can happen when you invade their habitat. In the United States, for example, approximately 5,000 snakes bites are reported each summer, Brennan says. And what if you were bitten? Brennan advises that you forget what you saw in those old western movies when a victim cut the infected area with a knife, sucked out the venom and tied a tourniquet on the arm or leg to stop the blood ow. Brennan says blood ow is actually helpful to help wash the venom from the wound. And cutting the wound only spreads the venom. If bitten, the rst thing to do, says Brennan, is call 911. Reaching into his pocket, Brennan says, “This is the best tool you can have for snake bite,” as he holds up his car key and says “get yourself to a hospital.” If you have the presence of mind and a pen or marker, he advises that you circle the swollen area every 20 minutes or so and write the time in the circle. This provides valuable information to medical personnel about how much venom there is and how fast it’s spreading. Here in Florida, spiders can also hurt you. One of the most venomous is called the brown recluse. As the name suggests, it’s reclusive. It likes to stay in dark cool places and may bite if it’s disturbed. The bite is a harmful one. The venom decays human tissue and likely requires surgery to remove it. The brown recluse is roughly the size of a quarter and has a design on its back in the shape of a violin. Among the most famous dangerous spiders is the black widow, which is smaller than a pea. Females are identi ed by a red hourglass on their belly. Males have a red spot on their back, near the tail. Like the brown recluse, a black widow bite requires medical treatment, Brennan says. In the decades Brennan has handled snakes and spiders, he has suffered only two serious bites – one from an Argentinean horned frog and one from a huge lizard. “My hand swelled up and I got pretty sick,” he says. He has been bitten a number of times by tarantulas, but the bite – while painful – doesn’t have serious effects on a human. As a past president of the Herpetological Society, he is dedicated to its goals: encouraging conservation of wildlife, preserving wildlife habitats, promoting proper husbandry and health care of reptiles and amphibians, and educating the public. Some of those animals among us are surely dangerous. But unless they are invasive species brought here from elsewhere, they have a role to play in the ecology. Ask Michael Brennan what animal in Florida is most dangerous and his answer is short and clear: “The most dangerous to you is other human beings.” “Red next to yellow, kill the fellow.” SnakesContinued from page 1

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24 The Pelican Friday, December 23, 2011



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Friday, December 23, 2011 Vol. XIX, Issue 51 Call 954-783-8700 to Advertise Email: siren2415@gmail.com Pompano Beach Deer eld Beach Lighthouse Point Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Wilton Manors Oakland Park Hillsboro Beach The Galt Palm Aire The Pelican Pelican By Bill JohnsonPELICAN WRITEROakland Park-Before reaching into a bag, he asks if anyone present has ophidophobia. Seeing some blank expressions, he explains that ophidophobia is the fear of snakes. He then puts on a protective glove, reaches into a canvas bag and pulls out what appears to be a brightly colored coral snake, one of the most dangerous snakes in Florida. In fact, the snake he is holding is fake, a rubber model. Do you think Im crazy? he asks. This is one of the light-hearted moments in Michael Brennans educational presentation to an audience at Fern Forest Nature Center in Coconut Creek. Brennan is a self-proclaimed lover of snakes and spiders who believes the public should know more about them and has dedicated decades to such Snake lover strives to educate the publicSanta Claus celebrates his arrival at the Pompano Beach Aquatic Center with members of the Pompano Piranhas who revived a long standing tradition Saturday and hosted the Santa Swim Meet. More than 200 young swimmers participated. Hundreds of toys were collected that were donated to the Broward Childrens Center.. See story on page 5. Districts are shuf ed for north Broward commissionersBy Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFBroward County Commissioners approved a district voting map that gives north Broward commissioners Chip LaMarca and Kristin Jacobs new constituencies. LaMarca, (Dist. 4) lost the largely Republican Deer Creek community in Deer eld Beach and gained territory in south Deer eld as far west as Powerline Road. The district now takes in a chunk of Pompano Beach that includes the Highlands and Cresthaven. He lost Wilton Manors and gained some precincts in Oakland Park. He also lost a strip of the coastline below SE 17 Street in Fort Lauderdale. LaMarcas Deer eld Beach loss is Dist. 2 Commissioner Kristin Jacobs gain. She now takes in all Deer eld Beach precincts west of Northwest 3 Avenue and then moves south into Pompano Beach, except for the Highlands and Cresthaven. Her district now includes all voters in Coconut Creek, Margate and those in eastern Coral Springs north of Sample Road. Wilton Manors now falls into District 7 represented by Broward County Mayor John Rodstrom. LaMarca shares Oakland Park with Dale Holness, Dist.9. The map that won the commissions support by a 63 vote, was a modi cation of a plan that had been rejected 9-3 in previous commission discussions, Commissioner LaMarca said. It not only changed his district substantially, but eliminated a possible third minority district in a county that is 56 percent minority populations.See SNAKES on page 23 Snake charmer Michael Brennan plays with his pets.See DISTRICTS on page 14

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2 The PelicanFriday, December 23, 2011 SightingsA local calendar for events, meetings and more in North Broward County. Please email calendar items to siren2415@gmail. com or fax to 954-783-0093.By Judy VikPELICAN STAFF LBTS Four downtown restaurants and the town of Lauderdale-By-The-Sea are teaming up on a New Years Eve celebration. Aruba Beach Caf, Athenas By the Sea, Village Grille and 101 Ocean will all have outdoor dining that evening. The party gets under way at 6 p.m., and the music stops at 1:30 a.m. A stage will be set up in Pelican Square, where a live band will perform. Its a nice event, and weve worked for a couple months to be sure there are no problems, said Guy Contrada, general manager of Arubas. In the interest of safety and crowd and traf c control, starting at 3 p.m. Pelican Square, Commercial Boulevard east of A1A will be shut down to traf c except for valet parking, according to Broward Sheriffs Of ce District Chief Oscar Llerena. Last year the turnout was so overwhelming, it became unsafe for pedestrians, he said. The road had to be shut down during the event. An even bigger turnout is expected this year, but a traf c plan is now in place. A ball will drop at midnight at Village Grille to mark the start of the new year. The outdoor music is free. Food and drink will be for sale at the various restaurants.LBTS restaurants team up for New Years Through Dec. 31 Holiday Fantasy of Lights Drive through Tradewinds Park, 3600 W. Sample Rd., Coconut Creek, for the holiday light show. Gate Entrance Fee. $1.50 per person. 954-357-8870. 1-7-12 Martin Luther King Junior Interfaith Prayer Breakfast at the E. Pat Larkins Center, 520 MLK Blvd., Pompano Beach. Cost is $12 per person. Call 954871-6353. 1-9 to 12 Three on three basketball clinic for children ages 12 to 14 and 15 to 17 at the Mitchell Moore Gym, 901 NW 10 St., Pompano Beach, starting at 6 p.m. Cost is $60. Call 954-786-4131. 1-14-12 State of the Dream Banquet at 6:30 p.m. at the E. Pat Larkins Civic Center, 520 MLK Blvd., Pompano Beach. 1-16-12 MLK Parade begins at 8 a.m. at Mitchell Moore Park, 901 NW 10 St., Pompano Beach. Line-up at 8 a.m. 1-16-12 MLK Celebration at 10:30 a.m. at Blanche Ely High School Gymnasium, 1201 NW 6 St., Pompano Beach. Speaker is William McCormick. Call 954-254-1170. 1/27 St. Jude Classic Golf Tournament, Woodlands Country Club, Tamarac. 954-323-8405. 1-18 Our Art By The Sea meets at 7 p.m. at Lauderdale-By-TheSea Community Church Friedt Family Fellowship Hall, 4433 Bougainvillea Drive, Lauderdale-By-TheSea. Lee Sky will discuss See SIGHTINGS on page 12

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The Pelican 3 Friday, December 23, 2011 SPECIAL BUSINESS NEWSThis month, Mr. Squeaky Car Wash unveiled the extensive renovations they have been working on over the past few months. In addition to landscape improvements and repainting the entire property to match the color of Mr. Squeakys logo, a one-of-a-kind, artistic shade canopy with colors to match the building was completed. In the days since the shade canopy was installed, it has already drawn a great deal of positive attention to Mr. Squeaky Car Wash. We have received so many compliments from our customers, says Lucas Carreira, Manager of Mr. Squeaky Car Wash. They love the very unique design, the size and height, and the bright colors of the fabrics and columns, Carreira continued. I knew the canopy was going to be very impressive as it was being built, but when it was nally completed, it was breathtaking, explained Carreira. A visit to the site and speaking with Mr Squeakys customers con rmed the excitement. I really love the new shade canopy they Mr. Squeakys Renovations a Big Hit With Fans have just installed, said Sal Lonano of Lets Go Limo in Deer eld. Mr. Squeaky has always had the best service and quality of any local car wash. Thats why I bring all of my vehicles to them, said Lonano. The new canopy adds to this rst class facility, Lonano continued. In addition to the big changes onsite from these renovations, Mr. Squeaky Car Wash is also offering a limited time, Happy Hour special for the rst time ever. Lucas and I wanted to offer our loyal customers a special gift this holiday season, said Richard Sasso, owner of Mr. Squeaky Car Wash. We have never offered any similar promotional pricing, and with the holiday season here, we decided to offer a limited time, Happy Hour special on Mondays through Thursdays from 5 to 7 p.m. Sasso continued. This Happy Hour special pricing will give our customers $2 off any car wash, said Sasso. It is our special way of saying thanks to our great customers this holiday season, Sasso explained. We have been selected as one of the Top 50 car washes in the entire country, the only South Florida car wash to receive this honor, and this is our way of giving back to the customers that made this all possible, said Sasso. With the new renovations onsite and the limited time discounted pricing, now is the perfect time to start off the New Year with a squeaky clean car. Richard Sasso, owner [top] and ]Lucas Carreira, manager [Right]

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4 The PelicanFriday, December 23, 2011 Street patrolPompano Beach Commissioner Charlotte Burrie in the community working the streets on the burglary residence prevention campaign. She is accompanied by BSO Captain Mick Wiener. The community-wide event included leaving crime prevention door hangers throughout Cresthaven to alert residents to criminal activity during the holidays and to offer advice on crime prevention. [Photo courtesy of BSO] Pompano man arrested for November shootingBroward Sheriffs Of ce detectives arrested a suspect in the Nov. 18 shooting of a taxi cab driver, Williamson Joseph, who survived gunshot wounds to the head and torso. Detectives said Joseph was dispatched to a convenience store on Northeast 3 Avenue in Fort Lauderdale to pick up a fare. At the store, the suspect, Semie Robinson, 30, entered the cab, carrying a small cooler bag, and said he wanted to go to Pompano Beach. Joseph drove to 2937 NW 7th Street.When Joseph parked the cab in the driveway Robinson shot him, without warning or provocation, one time in the head and once in the right armpit. After the shooting Robinson exited the cab and ed, leaving his cooler bag in the car. Joseph was rushed to North Broward Medical Center. BSO Crime Scene detectives processed the taxi and the cooler bag left by the suspect. Inside the cooler was a partial bottle of Mountain Dew and a baseball cap. From the mouthpiece of the soda bottle BSO Crime Lab investigators recovered DNA matching Semie Robinson and from an emblem on the ball cap they lifted two of Robinsons ngerprints. Robinson has a violent criminal history and was paroled from prison 10 months ago. A warrant was obtained for his arrest and he was charged with attempted murder on Dec. 12. He is being held without bond at BSOs main jail.

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The Pelican 5 Friday, December 23, 2011 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach Mayor Lamar Fisher brought the spirit of Christmas to the City making major upgrade to the aquatic center, Santa tests the waterPompano Beach Aquatic Center in a real way Saturday. The mayor announced the city will install a $100,000 timing system and scoreboard at the city pool, an improvement he hopes will attract major swim competitions. Im excited about it, the mayor said. We already have international swimmers training here. We hope this will bring in more of these kinds of tourists. The money is being allocated from the capital improvement projects fund. Fishers good news came during a swim meet hosted by the Pompano Piranhas that brought 200 young swimmers to town. Piranhas president Barry Connell said the scoring upgrade will enable the team to attract major swim competitions. Some clubs are self sustaining by holding invitational meets, Connell said. The day brought the Piranhas another gift. A $700 check was donated by Jim Wolff, former director of the citys former swim club, the Pompano Pirates. Wolff said the money had been laying around in the Pirates bank account for years. He hopes it can be used to help deserving See AQUATICS on page 15 Santa takes a dip at the Pompano Beach Aquatic Center. And to all a good night!

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6 The PelicanFriday, December 23, 2011 Deer eld Beach, Pompano Beach, Lighthouse Point, LauderdaleBy-The-Sea, Wilton Manors and Oakland Park The Pompano Pelican is published weekly on FridaysStreet Address: 1500-A E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, FL 33060 Telephone: 954-783-8700 Fax: 954-783-0093Letters to the Editor are encouraged and accepted for print if signed, although a writers name will be withheld on request; letters must also include a daytime telephone number. Advertising rates are available upon request. Subscription rate is $31.80 including tax for one years delivery in Greater Pompano Beach; $95.40/per year including tax for others in the United States; call 954-783-8700 for rates abroad. The Pelican is a nonpartisan newspaper and reserves the right to decline advertising. Copyright 2011. Reproduction of this publication in whole or in part is prohibited without written permission of the publisher. The Pelican is a member of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce, Deer eld Beach Chamber and the LBTS Chamber. The Pelican is a state certi ed woman-owned minority business. The Pelican is delivered to businesses, libraries, schools, of ces, hospitals, news racks and single family homes. All advertising and copy is published at the sole discretion of the publisher. We welcome your critiques and ideas concerning this publication. Anne Siren, publisherExecutive Assistant: Mary Hudson Finance: Peter Pritchard Graphics: Rachel Ramirez Windsheimer and Adriana Bonilla Bookkeeper: John White Classi eds: Fran Shelby Contributing Writers: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Judy Wilson, Malcolm McClintock, Judy Vik Copy editors: Phyllis J. Neuberger, Account Executives: Paul Shroads, Carolyn Mann, Bill Heaton, Bill Fox ESTABLISHED 1993 Volume XIX, Issue 51 Founding Editor and PublisherAnne Hanby Siren Letters & OpinionsTo the editor, In response to Gerard Ks letter this week, about womens choice, I would like to point out to him that pregnancy is not always a choice. For him to call rape or incest an excuse and BS is an insult to all woman, especially those who have suffered from such vicious attacks.. Gerard and all men should stay out of a womens uterus. Joanne Goodwin Pompano BeachChoice must remain the womans prerogative says reader Condos should update to AEDs for safety and healthTo the editor Fiftyve and over buildings should have a de brillator or two. A de brillator is a vital unit when waiting for emergency health care. The instrument is not dif cult to use. Public buildings like city halls and airports generally have Automatic External De brillators, or AEDs, that can be manipulated easily by the layperson. The AED can analyze the heart rhythm and dictate instructions for further use like a shock to get the heart beating again. Lives can be saved with a purchase of an AED, and training in its use is easily done. Many of our buildings on the barrier island dont have a budget to buy AEDs. I suggest that any building with more than 99 units should have a volunteer funding effort to purchase one and include a training course I would recommend that our city commission pass a law after reviewing this subject that would require a unit to be installed with training. Respectfully, Stanley F. Turon Pompano Beach City Commissioner Charlotte Burrie installed of cers at the holiday party of the Cresthaven Civic Association. John Mead, left, is the new president, and Ron Boehl, right is outgoing president. Members brought gifts for the Citizen Observer Patrol holiday party for children. (Staff photo by Judy Vik) Deck the halls in CresthavenA bene t hosted by owners, Shawn Bombard & Nick Berry of the Courtyard Cafe at 2211 Wilton Drive, Wilton Manors, on Saturday Dec. 17 raised 46 bikes, $500 in checks, and many toys, donors John & Cheryl McCully along with Cheryls sister Marsha Milot donated 14 bikes Kids in Distress wont have a shortage of new bikes, thanks to a local restaurant in Wilton Manors Chanukah and other celebrations share much in historyBy Rabbi David MarkTHE JEWISH CENTER AT TEMPLE SHOLOM OF POMPANO BEACHChanukah is a festival which has taken on many different identities and roles since it juxtaposes a major Christian holiday at this time of year. It represents a struggle for religious freedom, a subject dear to American hearts; an armed rebellion against a cruel colonizing power, also re ecting a theme popular in our history. Were the Maccabees, the priestly citizen-soldiers of the Chanukah saga, conservative traditionalists ghting a newfangled foreign culture, or liberal sorry, progressivewarriors taking up arms in the name of diversity? Yes, and yes. Just as there can be no objective telling of a countrys historyevery historian has an ax to grind or a mold into which to cast his theoriesso can the Chanukah story be adapted to different worldly outlooks. In the end, we Jews have the homely miracle of a single bottle of consecrated oil, barely suf cient to last for one night, yet burning steadily for eight, which gave the Jewish victors time to crush fresh olives and make new oil for the menorah, the sacred candelabra which stood in the Holy Temple in Jerusalem. But wait! Isnt there an alternate reading to the tale? Yes: in the Apocrypha, the books which were not accepted into either the Hebrew or Protestant Bibles as Holy Writ (our Catholic neighbors do accept them as such, and preserved them through the centuries), Chanukah lasts for eight days, because it was a delayed celebration of Sukkot, the Festival of Booths. Which version ought we to accept? We can believe both, but the oil story is the more famous, leading us to the particular foods served on this holiday: latkes, or potato pancakes, are the common fare for European-derived Jews, while Jews from the Arab countries prefer sufganiyote (Hebrew, little sponges,) or jelly doughnuts. Any food fried in vegetable oil is acceptable, so, bring on the tempura! Dont expect to nd latkes mentioned in the Chanukah story, though: Judah Maccabee never saw a potato in his life; they derive from South America. Of course, there is the dreidel, the four-sided top which, according to legend, saved Torah study during the persecutions of the time. During Hebrew School, a lookout would keep guard against enemy soldiers. If they approached, the lesson would end abruptly, and the soldiers would only nd children and a teacher betting on the spins of a top. Yet, the dreidel derives from the Middle Ages, long after the Chanukah period, which was about 168 BCE. Chanukah is, decidedly no minor holiday, for had there been no Chanukah, I believe there might never have been a Christmas. Consider: had the Hellenistic Greek culture succeeded in eradicating Judaism, then, when Jesus was born in 4 BCE, he would not have been born a Jew, but a Greekand Christianity as we know it today might never have begun. And so, as our Christian neighbors deck their halls in red and green, perhaps they might consider adding a bit of blue and white. So much strife and anger in todays world threatens to divide uslet us, rather, focus on what unites us: a common love of the One Who made us in His/ Her image, and a common love of peace. Happy Holidays!

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The Pelican 7 Friday, December 23, 2011 Making a Difference Phyllis J. Neuberger wants your suggestions about people who are making a difference. Call 954-783-8700.Advertise with The Pelican 954.783.8700 By Phyllis J. NeubergerPELICAN STAFFJohn Dalsimer is well known for many things, his love for wife, Diane, his energetic leadership and generosity to John Knox Village and an almost obsessive love of travel. When the husband/wife team moved into the Village in 2005, they were among the youngest of the 800-plus residents. Asked why they chose to move into a CCRC, or Continuing Care Retirement Community, and why this particular one, John replied. I was very familiar with the concept which was quite successful in the Northeast. We believed in the idea and felt it was the best setting for us who planned to do extensive traveling. We felt it also had great advantages for meeting our future health needs whatever they might be. We visited 24 different CCRCs throughout the country and decided on Florida for the warm weather and John Knox Village because it was the best one of them all. With an impressive resume as a CPA and top executive in the Philadelphia area, Johns talents, generously offered, were utilized by the many activities of the Village. He has served on and chaired the Village Long Range Planning, Fiscal and Library LBTS -State Road A1A and El Mar Drive in the town of Lauderdale-By-The-Sea were temporarily closed to vehicle and pedestrian traf c Tuesday morning after a plastic bag was found on the beach containing an unknown but suspicious substance. The incident occurred shortly after 10 a.m., when a small, plastic bag containing a white or off-white colored substance was found on the beach. Since what was in the sealed bag could not be identi ed, the volunteer re department called for assistance. The Broward County and Fort Lauderdale Hazardous Materials teams responded to the beachfront parking lot of the Minto Group sales trailer on El Mar Drive. The trailer is next to El Prado Park, across from Town Hall, 4501 Ocean Drive. The bag was removed from the town for analysis by the Broward County HazMat squad. There were no reported injuries. The substance was found to be non-hazardous. The Broward Sheriffs Of ce closed A1A to vehicle traf c for about 30 minutes. El Mar Drive was closed to vehicle and pedestrian traf c for about two hours. Fire personnel from all three re departments cleared the scene shortly after noon.Suspicious bag in LBTS gets full attention John Dalsimer, CPA, raises the benchmark for leadership skills and extensive community service committees. For several years he has prepared the income tax returns for over 75 of the Village residents in exchange for their fee donations to the new Health Center Fund. In the short time that he has been a resident, Johns nancial contributions to the Village Health Center totals about $85,000. As one resident said, Hows that for translating personal skills into community service? To raise funds for that same future Health Center, John and Diane have co-chaired the annual holiday bazaar which raised $25,000 each year for the past four years thanks to their dedication and that of over 200 resident volunteers. Asked why he has focused so much of his efforts on the Health Center which will be a state-of-the-art facility built within the next few years, he replies, because at sometime in the future, many residents, including Diane and me, will need this center and we want it to be the best in South Florida. Asked if his brand of leadership and big city experience have been well received in the Village, See DIFFERENCE on page 11 John and Diane prepare for a tour of India using the common mode of transportation.

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8 The PelicanFriday, December 23, 2011

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The Pelican 9 Friday, December 23, 2011 A shepherd trio These angelic faces belong to Gabriella, Rosey and Abigail, young dancers from the Expressions of Joy Dance Studio at First Baptist Church in Deer eld Beach. The girls, dressed as shepherds, were waiting to go onstage at the citys tree lighting ceremony held in The Cove Shopping Center. [Photo courtesy Maureen Kenny] Pompano Beach Brigette Dorio has been hired as vice president and marketing manager at Florida Shores Bank Southeasts Pompano Beach locationWith 22 years of banking and nancial services experience, Doria will be responsible for managing the branch operations and growing the banks customer base in the market. Prior to joining Florida Shores, Doria was a branch manager for BB&T, and BankUnited prior to that. Florida Shores is pleased to have such a proven performer as Brigitte on our team said Robert Sewick, President and CEO of Florida Shores Bank Southeast. Her experience and motivation will be a winning combination for our growing bank. Pompano Beach-based Florida Shores Bank Southeast was founded in 2006 by a team of experienced bankers. The bank has $186 million in assets with locations in Pompano Beach, Boca Raton and Fort Lauderdale. Florida Shores Bank offers market-leading, interest-bearing deposit products, capital to support local businesses, and convenient online services. The associates, who are owners of the bank, are dedicated to meeting the banking needs of their community. To learn more, visit www. oridashoresbank.com.Florida Shores names new vice president/ manager, Brigitte Doria

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10 The PelicanFriday, December 23, 2011 ADVERTISING? ITS PART OF DOING BUSINESS. CALL US. 954-783-8700.

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The Pelican 11 Friday, December 23, 2011 John admits he might have ruf ed a few feathers along the way. He says, When one is active, there are times that one knocks heads with management, but I have to hope and think that management has seen mine as constructive criticism. John has also represented the village in FLiCRA, or Florida Lifecare Residents Association, serving on its board of directors, being the region director and the president of the state organization. While serving in those capacities he says, We accomplished rewriting the law that regulates CCRCs to provide more information and protection for both residents and management.The traveling pairAll of these accomplishments have been achieved side by side with an amazing travel schedule. John reports that Our commitments here in the Village, plus our travels, keep us on a very tight schedule. Travel has been a real joy to both of us and we feel very fortunate to have been able to share this strong, almost addiction, to seeing the world. Grinning at the prospect of talking about some of their extraordinary adventures, he adds, We have traveled together with Road Scholar, formerly Elder Hostel, and on our own, to all seven continents and all 50 states. Diane and I have been married almost 20 years and have seven children and 13 grandchildren in our combined families, he explains. So in addition to seeing the world, we also drive every summer to see most of our families, sharing each of their lives and interests for a short time. Having visited so many countries already, The Pelican wondered if there were any destinations left on their list. Oh yes, he says. Right now in the planning stages are trips to the Canadian Maritimes, Brittany and Normandy. With countless world wide adventures does anything stand out? Johns eyes sparkle as he nods yes. Our visit to 18 caves in southern France stands out in my mind. We worked our way deep into the caves to see pre-historic cave paintings from 15,000 to 27,000 years old. Its hard to imagine anything done that long ago. The hand prints in ochre and the black line drawings of various animals are almost engraved in my brain. It makes one wonder what life then could possibly have been like.Life in PennsylvaniaThis mans business career has been a success ever since he graduated from the Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania and earned his CPA shortly after. Paralleling that career is a long list of volunteer and commission appointments, indicating years of volunteer service for community and charitable organizations. Dalsimer has written books, booklets and been published in a variety of print publications. He has received community service awards from John Knox Village, Swathmore College, Bread and Roses Community Fund and Distinguished Public Service Award given by the Pennsylvania Institute of Certi ed Public Accountants. He says he is most proud of starting the Community Accountants in Philadelphia which he says, is now 37 years old. This organization provides free accounting services to those who cannot afford to purchase them in the market place using volunteer CPAs and accountants. Our good work has bene ted individuals, small businesses and not-for-pro ts. Thank you, John Dalsimer, for your long service and nancial support of the community past and present.DifferenceContinued from page 7 In South Africa, the couple took an unforgettable ride, and like smart Floridians, Diane and John found a spot to cool off inside a glacier on the Jungfrau in Switzerland. [Photos from Dalsimar collection]

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12 The PelicanFriday, December 23, 2011 Woodworking. The meeting is free and open to the public. Call 954-594-0444.OngoingFood Drive NE Focal Point. Drop off nonperishable donations from 8:20 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at 227 NW 2 St., Deer eld Beach. Call 954-480-4449.Wilton ManorsStudent Government Day at Wilton Manors Elementary School gave fourth grade students a behind-thescenes look at local government. Early in the morning, the students were welcomed to city hall by Commissioner Julie Carson. They were then given a tour of city hall and the police station. Following that, they attended a mock commission meeting conducted by Vice Mayor Tom Green. The day was a unique opportunity for the young people to meet city employees and see rsthand how their government works. Coordinating the day with city employees Patrick Cann and Bridgette Pierce was teacher Jan Crouse. Wilton Manors Elementary is an International Baccalaureate World School. Civics class in Wilton Manors SightingsContinued from page 2 See SIGHTINGS on page 15

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The Pelican 13 Friday, December 23, 2011 By Anne SirenPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach While the party had a cheery Christmas theme, the focus was on three Pompano Beach personalities who have spent most of their lives helping the community. The Kiwanis Club of Pompano Beach Westside honored its members, Joseph A. Smith, Carl Jefferson and the late Catherine G. Johnson as legendary community servants. Smith, who served as tennis coach and vice principal at Blanche Ely High School, is a long time member of Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, a member of Bethel A.M.E. Church and Kiwanis. Jefferson, a dedicated teacher and vice principal of Ely High School, has also served as a volunteer coach for Pompano Beach Parks and Recreation. The late Catherine G. Johnson was an elementary teacher for 36 years, a Diamond Life member of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority and member of Kiwanis. All were honored this month at the annual holiday luncheon meeting with a proclamation declaring Dec. 17 as Eliminate Day. Commissioner Woody Poitier read the proclamation. The project Eliminate, a joint effort with Kiwanis International and UNICEF is dedicated to saving lives of babies and their mothers by eliminating Maternal Neonatal Tetanus, or MNT, a disease that kills 60,000 newborn and 30,000 mothers each year. The event was held at the E. Pat Larkins Civic Center in Pompano Beach. For more information on Kiwanis, call 954-942-8108. Local educators honored for community serviceJoseph Smith with wife Ruby and Marie Johnson, President of the Kiwanis Club Pompano Beach Westside Carl Jefferson Gwen Leys, past chair of the Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce and long time member of the Coast Guard Auxiliary, will be recognized as Citizen of the Year for Pompano Beach. In a unanimous vote of the city commission, Leys, received the honor for her continuous community service. Mayor Lamar Fisher will present the award at the Jan. 10 city commission meeting. Gwen Leys to be honored by city

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14 The PelicanFriday, December 23, 2011 After ve months of public input, at least four other maps had been considered. The nal map was only made public on Dec. 13. This map is anything but fair and equitable, LaMarca said. And the public had never seen it. The districts go into effect the November. Voting districts are reworked every 10 years after the US Census is taken. In the past decade, population changes in Broward County caused the districts to fail the equalsize criteria set by the courts. With the new map, population in each of the districts varies by less than seven percent. DistrictsContinued from page 1 Now Online www.pompanopelican.com

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The Pelican 15 Friday, December 23, 2011 youngsters pay their swim club expenses. Saturday, the Piranhas had a good day in the water. The size of the club has tripled since Head Coach Jesse Vassallo was hired in AquaticsContinued from page 5June and the swimmers are consistently bringing down their times, Connell said. The Piranhas next big event is the 7th Ocean Series which takes place just south of the Pompano Beach Pier, A1A and Atlantic Boulevard. The competition includes a onemile ocean swim, a 500 meter kids race and one-half-mile standup and one-halfmile prone paddleboard races. Registration fees are $35; $25 for the kids race. Major sponsor is ChicklA. All swimming levels are welcome. Check in begins at 7 a.m. Races start at 8 a.m. Information is available at pompanobeachpiranhas.com, or by calling 954-372-5029. First, second and third place winners of each event receive a Chickl-A trophy.SightingsContinued from page 12 Green Market, Wilton Manors, Saturdays and Sundays at Hagen Park 2020 Wilton Drive from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. fresh produce, international baked goods, herbs/spices, doggie treats, pickles, jams, infused vinegars, pasta and more. Call 954-531-5383. Pompano Beach Green Market The Market moves to Founders Park for Dec. 24, 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. and will include fruit, vegetables, fresh squeezed juice and fresh sh. Founders Park is located at 215 NE 4 Ave.Fishing PiersPompano Beach Fishing Pier extends more than 1,000 feet into the Atlantic, 222 N Pompano Beach Blvd., Pompano Beach, Anglins Pier Commercial Blvd. Lauderdale-by-the-Sea, 954491-9403 Deer eld Beach International Pier 200 NE 21st Ave., Deer eld Beach. 954426-9206. 954-943-1488LeisureThe American Legion Auxiliary Unit 142 has Bingo on Tuesdays at 7 p.m. at 171 SW 2 St., Pompano Beach. Call 954-942-2448. The NE Focal Point Alzheimers Day Care Center, located at 301 N.W. 2nd Avenue in Deer eld See SIGHTINGS on page 17

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16 The PelicanFriday, December 23, 2011

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The Pelican 17 Friday, December 23, 2011 Beach. Support group every Wednesday from 10 a.m. to noon. MeetingsGold Coast Toastmasters Meet in the second and 4th Mondays of each month at Panera Bread, 1762 N. Federal Highway, Fort Lauderdale from 7 to 9 p.m.. Call 954-895-3555. Zonta International meets on the third Tuesday of the month at Duffys Diner, 401 N. Federal Hwy., Deereld Beach at 11:15 a.m. Zonta International is a classi ed service organization of executives and professionals working together to advance the status of women locally and worldwide through service and advocacy. Call 561-392-2223. The Greater Pompano Beach Senior Citizens Club meets on the second Wednesday of the month at the Emma Lou Olson Community Center on NE Sixth Street Pompano Beach at 10 a.m. Activities focus on the general welfare, health, education and security of senior citizens. We welcome people of all ages. Music12-29 Pulse Chamber Music presents Holiday Concert: Savor the Holidays. All Saints Episcopal Church, 333 Tarpon Drive, Fort Lauderdale. Call 305-283-9152. 1-14 The Boca Raton Symphonia Saturday Night concerts at 8 p.m. at Roberts Theater, Saint Andrews School, 3200 Jog Road, Boca Raton. The program includes Turkin, Beethoven and Mendelssohn. Tickets at 561-376-3848. 1-22Chamber Ensemble Mirror Images at 2 p.m. at Zion Lutheran, 959 SE 6 Ave., Deer eld Beach in the chapel. Featured on this program are Farrenc, Fasch, Doppler, Vinee, and Chaminade. The South Florida Chamber Ensemble features six musicians from the brass, woodwind, string and percussion families. Call 954-803-3762.Lectures1-4-12 Myrna Goldberger Its a Hoax, Folk, lecture to focus on individuals such as Charles Van Buren, Clifford Irving and others. Tickets $10. Tamarac Theater of The Performing Arts, 7143 Pine Island Road, Tamarac Square West Shopping Center. Call 954-724-1110.SightingsContinued from page 15 Call The Pelican 954-783-8700

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18 The Pelican Friday, December 23, 2011 We Mean Business 954-783-8700 Classi edsCall 954-545-0013 Get to know your local Merchants HELP WANTEDBEAUTY!!! HAIR STYLIST, Nail Tech. Massage Facial. Guaranteed Start With 100% Commission. Call In Boca 954415-4937. 12-23 LATIN DANCING LADY INSTRUCTOR NEEDED Part Time In Boca. Approx 2-3 Hours Per Week. Pay $25 Per Hour. Private Lessons. 954-415-4937. 12-23 LOCAL PEST CONTROL CO Looking For Quality Sales/Service Tech. Must Be Dependable, Team Player, Good Drivers License & People Skills. Will Train Right Person. ALSO Of ce Assistant Computer People & Phone Skills Needed. Fax Resume 954418-3982. 1-13 SEEKING EMPLOYMENTADULT AIDE Warm and caring bilingual person with extensive experience in private care and hospital adult sitting. Over 15 years of experience. Excellent references. Own transportation. 781-325-6383. 12-30 BRINGING HOME BABY? RN With 15+ Years Experience. NICU/PEDS. AHA/CPR Instructor Here To Help You & Your Family Transition Baby To Home. Please Call 954-707-7079. CNA/HHA MANY YEARS OF EXPERIENCE. Reliable. Available For Hourly Or Live-in. Please Call Verona At 954-635-0558. 12-23 HHA/CAREGIVER English Speaking, Caring, Compassionate, Honest & Reliable. Many Years Of Experience. Excellent Cook, Will Clean, Run Errands, Own Transportation. Excellent References. For Great Care Call Lea 561-633-3583. 12-30SERVICES RETIRED PLUMBING CONTRACTOR Looking For Work. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. CFC 027532. Low Rates. 954-496-6420. 12-23 DANNY BOY ELECTRIC Lic & Insured. Lic. #EC13004811. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. 24/Hr Service. 954-290-1443. Beat Any Written Estimate. Sr, Discount. 1-13 TRASH/JUNK PICKUPS APT. Complexes Dumpster Areas, Furniture, Appliances, Cabinets. Boxes/Bags. 10% Sr. Discount $75/Up. Shed Demo. Carpet Tear Up, Garage Clutter. Greg 954-731-7247. 12-23 HANDYMAN PAINTING CARPENTRY Pressure Cleaning. Decks! Everything Around The House. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. Call 561-350-3781. 12-23 CALL BRENDAN THE HANDYMAN Construction & Repairs. Carpentry, Plumbing, Roo ng, Masonry, Windows, Painting, Decking, Tile. Free Estimates. 954773-6134. Emergency Calls. 12-23 ELECTRICIAN FOR HIRE Low Rates. 24 Hour Emergency Service. Call 954-404-1150. License EC-0001684. APEX ELECTRIC.. 12-30 AIRPORT TRANSPORTATION Pickup & Drop-off. Dr. Visits, Shopping, Tours, Etc. Speak Spanish, Portuguese, English. Madeline 754-2340617. 12-30 EMERALD IRISH CLEANING Est. 20 Yrs. English Speaking. Cleaning Supplies. Hand Scrubbed Floors. SPECIAL!!! 3 HRS $55 4 HRS $70. Service Guaranteed. www. emeraldirishcleaning.com. 954-524-3161. You Will Do An Irish Jig. 12-23 SEMI RETIRED ELECTRICIAN Call If Your Desire Is To Pay Less Than The Real Price For Electrical Work Done Right! 954-554-8520. Beach Electrical Corp. 12-23 PLUMBING SERVICES Big Jobs Small Jobs. We Do It All. Remodeling & Repairs. Lic. & Insured. C.C. Accepted. Call 954-772-4600. 1-6 HONEST HANDYMAN HOME & BUILDING Maintenance/Improvements. No Job Too Small. Fast Friendly Service. Reasonable Rates. Local Resident/Homeowner. Call Today For Your FREE Upfront Quote. No Deposit Required. 754-366-1915. 12-23 HOME/OFFICE REPAIRS By State Certified G.C. Reasonable. CGC025802. More Information Call 954815-1007. GOT JUNK? DUMP TRUCK CLEANUPS Trees/ Landscape, Yard Fill. Paint/ Pressure Wash/ Roofs/Home Repairs Welding, Etc. Dave 954-818-9538. 1-13BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIESNew GREEN technology. New defroster control saves energy in home refrigerators, commercial chillers. Patented. All optical. Simple mfg. Strategic partners needed..www.NewAvionics.Com. 954-568-1991.THRIFT STORELUCKY STAR THRIFT & GIFTS. 5130 N Federal Hwy (2nd Floor) Fort Lauderdale. 954-839-8182. Great Items At Low Prices Starting From $2 & Up. 12-30 MESSAGESMY DEAREST STEPHANIE, I LOVE YOU More Than You Will Ever Know. You Are A Shining Star, The Light Of My Life. Cheers To 2012! KEVIN. 12-23 MUSICIANS WANTEDThe American Legion Symphonic Band is now accepting new members for the 2011-2012 season. College age to seasoned seniors are welcome. Rehearsals are held on Wed. evenings at American Legion Post 142 in Pompano. Percussionists, euphonium and clarinet players are especially needed. If you enjoy making music, call Jim McGonigal, Music Director at 954-647-0700 for more info.

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The Pelican 19 Friday, December 23, 2011 We Mean Business! Classi edsCall 954-545-0013 Pelican Classi eds Can Save You Time& Money 954.783.8700 DEEP WATER VILLA DOCKPOMPANO BEACH 2/2 1700 SQ FT. Screened Fla Room. Private Yard. W/D. 4 Park. No Fixed Bridges. Community Pool. Deeded Dock.. 2 Blocks Beach. $285,000. Call 954-6291324. 12-23 HOMES FOR SALEPOMPANO LEISUREVILLE 55+ This 2/2 Furnished House Is For You! Very Clean. Monthly Maintenance $175. Priced To Sell $105,000. Owner 954-943-0250. 12-30ROOMS FOR RENTE DEERFIELD BEACH E OF A1A 1st Floor Furnished. Large Refrigerator, Kitchen, Micro, Laundry, Own Bath, TV, A/C. $175 Week.. 954-7259680. 12-23HOMES FOR RENTPOMPANO BEACH 3/2 CENTRAL AIR. Screened Porch. Small Utility Room. $1100 Mo. 620 NE 35 Street. Call Darci 954783-3723. 12-30CO-OP SALESPOMPANO BEACH 1/1 On Water, Dockage Available At Your Door. $59,500. Coldwell Banker Barbara 954-6291324. 12-23 SEASONAL RENTALSPOMPANO BEACH 2/2 Beautifully Furnished 9th Floor Corner Apt. Great Views. All Amenities. $2,000 A Month. Call 954-785-0177. 12-23 DEERFIELD BEACH 1/1 Ideal Location Steps To Beach, Fishing Pier, Restaurants & Shops. $600 Per Week. Available Dec April. 561-394-4449. 12-23 REAL ESTATE WANTEDI BUY HOUSES!! CASH!! AS IS! QUICK CLOSE! ANY AREA ANY CONDITION! NO EQUITY OK. CALL NOW 954-914-2355. 1-20CONDOS FOR SALEPALM AIRE 105 Split 2/2 King, Upgrades. Largest Kitchen. W/D. Breakfast Room. Piano. Ultra Furnished. Shopping, Pool Close By. 9th Floor. Low Maintenance/Taxes. $134K Offers. No Brokers! 954-895-4596. 12-23 LAUDERDALE BY THE SEA Furnished 1/1.5 Condo $115,000. Heated Pool. Ocean Access. On Canal. 1481 S Ocean Blvd. Apt 228. Call 586549-5223. 1-6CONDOS FOR RENTLAUDERDALE BY THE SEA Across From Beach. Near Sea Watch. 1 Bedroom Den 2 Baths. Pool, W/D In Unit. $1075 Per Mo. Yrly. 1st Last Sec. Or Seasonal 5 Mo Min. $1595/Mo. No Smoking. 954942-5642. 12-23 POMPANO 1BR/DEN 2 BATH FURN. $1,000 Mo. Yrly 1st Last Security Or Seasonal 4 Mo. Min. $1,400/Mo. 954-6005467. 12-23 POMPANO 1/1 E OF FEDERAL Small Complex Very Clean. No Pets. $650 Month Yearly. Call Barbara 954-263-7129. 12-23 POMPANO LEISUREVILLE 55+ 2/1 Completely Furn. Sunroom On Golf Course. 2 Pools, 2 Clubs. $875 Month Yearly. 954-788-9312. 12-30APTS FOR RENTDEERFIELD/POMPANO BEACH 1 BR & 2 BR APTS FOR RENT. Remodeled, Paint, Tile, Etc. W & D On Site. Pool. Pet Friendly. Call George 954809-5030. 1-13 POMPANO MCNAB ROAD & NE 18 AVENUE 1 & 2 Bedrooms Furnished/ Unfurnished. $675 $950 And Up. Pool, Tile Floors. Central A/C. 954-610-2327. 12-30 POMPANO BEACH Unique Quiet 1/1 Apt. Just Painted. Off Street Parking. 1/2 Block To Beach. $725 Month 1st & Last. 239-898-4799. 12-30 POMPANO BEACH 2/2 Furnished. Large Ef ciency With Kitchen. Fully Furnished. Cable, Internet, Pool, Laundry. 500 To The Beach. Weekly Monthly Yearly. 954-2948483 Or 248-736-1533. 1-6 POMPANO JUST OFF FEDERAL. 1/1, Pool, Laundry. Close To Shopping & Transportation. $700 Per Mo. 1st Mo + Security To Move In. Call Anthony 954-857-5207. 12-30 POMPANO GARDENS $795 1/1 $200 Deposit. Nice Area Minutes To Beach Pet OK. Please Call 954-515-2554. 12-23 POMPANO BEACH 1/1 NW $650 2/1 $750 SW 1/1 $725 2/1 $925 NE 1/1 $675 2/1 NE $950 TH 2/1.5 $1095 All FREE Water. Rent + $70 Mov-U-In. 954-781-6299. 12-30 EFFICIENCY AVAILABLE WITH FULL KITCHEN. Includes: Electric, Cable, Wi-Fi, Water, Pool. 2nd Floor End Unit. Clean Move-in Condition. 2 Blocks From Ocean North Of Atlantic. Owner Agent. $699 Month. 2 Weeks Free With Annual Lease. $699 Security. 954-6087368. 12-23 POMPANO BEACH 1 & 2 Bedroom From $495. Easy Move-in. 1/2 OFF DEPOSIT. Remodeled. Great Location. 954-783-1088 For More Info. 1-6 STUDIOS EFFICIENCIESDEERFIELD BEACH A1A Live at the beach off season. Ef ciencies available for $550 Weekly, pay as you go, no deposit or security, cable, pool, laundry, wireless. Ocean Villa 954-427-4608. 12-30COMMERCIAL FOR RENT-SALEPOMPANO COMMERCIAL OFFICE Spaces Available. Ranging From As Low As $500 To $700 Depending On Square Footage. Please Call Darci At 954-7833723. 12-30 DEERFIELD BEACH Retail Of ce Warehouse 700 Sq Ft With Loft. A/C, Bathroom. $575 Per Month. Call For More Info 561-654-1331 Or 561-9985681. 1-13OUTDOOR STORAGEDEERFIELD BEACH OUTDOOR STORAGE For Boats, RVs, Commercial Vehicles & More. Call Chris At 954-520-1777. 1-6MUSICAL ITEMSBABY GRAND PIANO $1,200 FIRM. CALL 954-783-8700. ORGAN for SALE Excellent condition. $400. Call 9542950194. FURNITUREMOVING SALE Patio Furniture & Chairs. 46 Kitchen Table With Chairs. White Couch. Golf Clubs. Assorted Other Furniture. 561-637-4271. 12-23 BEDSETS King $180 Queen $130 Full $110 Twin $90. 5 Pc. Bedroom Set $399. Frames $39. 954-465-6498. 1-13SPORTSBOWFLEX EXTREME $750. Excellent Condition. More Information Call 954525-2860. Ft Lauderdale. 12-23Call us!

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20 The Pelican Friday, December 23, 2011 Rev. Hyvenson Joseph WORSHIP DIRECTORY: Call 954-783-8700 to place your ad. Christmas servicesCOMPILED BY ANNE SIRENCommunity Church of Lauderdale-by-the Sea, 4433 Bougainvillea Drive, Lauderdale-By-The-Sea. Christmas Eve Candlelight service at 7 p.m. and Christmas Day at 10 a.m.BAPTISTFirst Baptist Church, 138 NE 1 St., Pompano Beach. Christmas Eve family candlelight service 6 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Christmas Day 10:30 a.m. 954-745-6100.ECUMENICAL CATHOLIC The Parish of Sts. Francis and Clare, 101 NE 3 Street just N of Broward Blvd & E of Andrews Avenue, Fort Lauderdale. Christmas Eve at 5 p.m. and Christmas Day at 10:30 a.m. 954-731-8137.EPISCOPALAll Saints Episcopal Church, 333 Tarpon Drive, Fort Lauderdale. Christmas Eve 4 p.m. 10:30 choral concert and mass. Christmas day service is at 10:30 a.m. 954-467-6496. St. Marks Episcopal Church, 1750 E. Oakland Park Blvd., Fort Lauderdale. Christmas Eve 2 p.m., Childrens Pageant & Holy Eucharist; 7 p.m. Festival Candlelight Eucharist with Full Choir and String Quartet; 10:30 p.m. Festival Candlelight Eucharist with Full Choir and String Quartet. Christmas Day, Holy Eucharist Rite II. 954-5634508. St. Martins Episcopal Church, 140 SE 28 Ave., Pompano Beach 954-9414843. St. Nicholas Episcopal Church, 1111 Sample Road, Pompano Beach Christmas Eve, 5:30 p.m. and 11 p.m.; Christmas Day 10 a.m. Spanish Services Christmas Eve at 7:30 p.m.; Portuguese Services, Christmas Day at 1 and 7 p.m. 954-942-5887.LUTHERANPompano Lutheran Church, 109 SE 10 Ave., Pompano Beach. Christmas Eve at 7:45 p.m. and Christmas day at 10 a.m. 954942-1216.PRESBYTERIANCommunity Presbyterian Church, 1920 4 St., Deerfield Beach. Christmas Eve Candlelight service at 6 p.m. and Christmas Day services at 8:30 a.m. and 11 a.m. 954427-0222. New Presbyterian Church, 600 NE 13 Ave., Pompano Beach. Christmas Eve candlelight service at 7 p.m. and Christmas Day service at 11 a.m. 954-946-4380.ROMAN CATHOLICAssumption Catholic Church, 2001 S. Ocean Blvd., Lauderdale-By-TheSea. Dec. 20, 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. Confession; 5:30 p.m. Advent Reconciliation Service with Confession; Dec. 24, Vigils, 4 and 5:30 and Midnight. Midnight mass with carols; Dec. 25, 9:15 and 10:45 a.m., 12:15 p.m. Spanish Mass. 954-941-7647. St. Coleman Roman Catholic Church, 1200 S. Federal Hwy., Pompano Beach. Christmas Eve 4;30 p.m., 6:30 p.m. 8:30 p.m. and midnight mass. On Christmas Day, services are at 7:30, 9 and 11 a.m. and 12:30 p.m. Call 954-942-3533. Pompano Beach Phil Kassees, owner of Heavenly Pizza, 2647 E. Atlantic Blvd., Pompano Beach, is firing up his ovens for Christmas Day dinners this year, and you are invited. Kassees says he plans to serve the meals following the 10 a.m. Bible studies until 4 p.m. The dinners are offered to Heavenly Pizza cooks Christmas dinner for allanyone who does not have a place to go this year on Christmas Day. The Heavenly Pizza team will start cooking the night before so dinner will be served on time. Visitors to Pompano Beach are welcome. Everyone is welcome. There is no charge for the Christmas dinners.

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The Pelican 21 Friday, December 23, 2011 By Judy WilsonPELICAN STAFFPompano Beach The Greater Pompano Beach Chamber of Commerce provides a number of New networking group links young professionalsnetworking opportunities, but for busy young professionals there is one group designed specifically for them. Under the leadership of financial planner Bill Riddick and accountant Lauryn Charles, the upwardly mobile in their 20s and 30s gather the fourth Wednesday of each month to mix and mingle over cocktails at a local lounge. Purpose is threefold: to business network, to learn new marketing strategies and to make a difference in the community. Once a quarter the Young Professionals meet for lunch to consider new ways of doing business: using social media for instance, or methods of getting their message to an older generation. For public service, the group which numbers about 30 regulars, has donated to Food for the Poor, Broward Childrens Center and Relay for Life. So far, in existence about 18 months, the group is unstructured. Members dont pay dues, but often become interested in joining the Chamber as a result of their exposure to it through the Young Professionals. We feel we benefit the Chamber when we take in new blood, Riddick said who has been a member of the larger organization since 2008. Chamber CEO Ric Green said the young professionals group was something I had seen as missing from the Chamber when he came aboard three years ago. As an organization, we need to grow young leaders. It is very important for the Chamber to encourage upand -coming business leaders and to get young people involved in the Chamber and to realize its benefits. On Riddicks team are Jennifer Kovacs, owner of op2web, a web design firm; Mike Borkowski, an accountant with Ahern & Jasco and Kristin Opst, general manager of the Deerfield Beach Hilton. Along with Charles, who is president of Accountants Financial Services Group, they form the nucleus of the new organization. As for the all work he has put in organizing the Young Professionals, Riddick, owner of W.J. Riddick Financial Services Group, feels it has definitely helped his business. I have gotten a number of clients, he said. Since I grow only through referrals and networking, Young Professionals has paid off for me. The Pelican 954-783-8700

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22 The Pelican Friday, December 23, 2011 Advertise in The Pelican for coverage in nine North Broward cities. Capt. RJ Boyle is an experienced angler in South Florida. His studio is located in Lighthouse Point. Call 954-420-5001.. The weather is going to be nice enough on Christmas to go out and catch a sailfish. When youre done opening your presents under the tree load up the boat up and go bend a rod. We have been selling quite a few sailfish rods and reels this season. With the introduction of the circle hook into live bait fishing years ago we realized the need for a change to the action of the rods we were using. Because we are not setting the hook aggressively anymore, we started making the rods extremely light or bendy in the tip. As the fish eats the bait and swims away with the circle hook we now simply lower the rod tip and begin to wind slowly allowing the circle hook to find its way to corner of the fishes mouth. If the rod is too stiff the fish will feel the line and hook in his mouth and he will simply let the bait go. It took a few years for guys to get use to hooking a fish without aggression but we have turned the corner and our hook up ratio has never been better. Come by the shop and check out the new sailfish rods. We are actually making custom rods for four different teams for the upcoming sailfish season. They may all have different wraps but they are very similar in their action. Merry Christmas to All RJ BoyleSanta is sail shing

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The Pelican 23 Friday, December 23, 2011 presentations to various groups, schools and colleges. He wants to build public respect for nature, an understanding of these animals, and, along the way, inform Floridians of what snakes and spiders pose some danger. People ought to know what snakes and insects can hurt them, he says. Theres no doubt that Brennan has an unusual relationship with these animals. Its been a passion of mine since I was a child and saw my rst snake, before I even knew what it was, he says. Theyre aesthetic. Theyre beautiful, if you can overcome your fear. Im a veritable Dr. Doolittle. To this day, working with snakes and spiders is still like being a kid. His passion explains why the patio and one-time laundry room at his Oakland Park home are now home for twodozen reptiles and spiders. He once had a 100-pound tortoise. Holding the fake coral snake, he informs his audience that this snakes venom actually decays the human esh when infected by a bite. But because the snake is shy and tends to hide, its unlikely a person would encounter one. In any event, the snake is identi ed by red, black and yellow bands around its body. The coral snake can easily be mistaken for a harmless look-alike called the scarlet king snake. It, too, wears the colored bands probably as its defense mechanism so that predators will mistake it for the dangerous coral snake. The difference, Brennan, explains, is that the dangerous snake has red stripes next to yellow. Naturalists have a saying to remember that Red next to yellow, kill the fellow. The timber rattlesnake is another dangerous snake. It has a horrid disposition, says Brennan, and theres a greater chance of coming upon one of these than the coral snake. While getting bitten by such a snake is unlikely, it can happen when you invade their habitat. In the United States, for example, approximately 5,000 snakes bites are reported each summer, Brennan says. And what if you were bitten? Brennan advises that you forget what you saw in those old western movies when a victim cut the infected area with a knife, sucked out the venom and tied a tourniquet on the arm or leg to stop the blood ow. Brennan says blood ow is actually helpful to help wash the venom from the wound. And cutting the wound only spreads the venom. If bitten, the rst thing to do, says Brennan, is call 911. Reaching into his pocket, Brennan says, This is the best tool you can have for snake bite, as he holds up his car key and says get yourself to a hospital. If you have the presence of mind and a pen or marker, he advises that you circle the swollen area every 20 minutes or so and write the time in the circle. This provides valuable information to medical personnel about how much venom there is and how fast its spreading. Here in Florida, spiders can also hurt you. One of the most venomous is called the brown recluse. As the name suggests, its reclusive. It likes to stay in dark cool places and may bite if its disturbed. The bite is a harmful one. The venom decays human tissue and likely requires surgery to remove it. The brown recluse is roughly the size of a quarter and has a design on its back in the shape of a violin. Among the most famous dangerous spiders is the black widow, which is smaller than a pea. Females are identi ed by a red hourglass on their belly. Males have a red spot on their back, near the tail. Like the brown recluse, a black widow bite requires medical treatment, Brennan says. In the decades Brennan has handled snakes and spiders, he has suffered only two serious bites one from an Argentinean horned frog and one from a huge lizard. My hand swelled up and I got pretty sick, he says. He has been bitten a number of times by tarantulas, but the bite while painful doesnt have serious effects on a human. As a past president of the Herpetological Society, he is dedicated to its goals: encouraging conservation of wildlife, preserving wildlife habitats, promoting proper husbandry and health care of reptiles and amphibians, and educating the public. Some of those animals among us are surely dangerous. But unless they are invasive species brought here from elsewhere, they have a role to play in the ecology. Ask Michael Brennan what animal in Florida is most dangerous and his answer is short and clear: The most dangerous to you is other human beings. Red next to yellow, kill the fellow. SnakesContinued from page 1

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24 The Pelican Friday, December 23, 2011