Title: Workforce watch
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00090862/00002
 Material Information
Title: Workforce watch
Series Title: Workforce watch
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: Center on Personnel Studies in Special Education, College of Education, University of Florida
Publisher: Center on Personnel Studies in Special Education, College of Education, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: February 2004
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00090862
Volume ID: VID00002
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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Measuring Beginning Teacher

Quality in Special Education

A Summary of Research Models


There is no single definition or mea-
sure of beginning teacher quality
in either general or special education.
However, as inquiry into teaching and
teacher education has grown and ma-
tured, a variety of models and mea-
Ssures has emerged that helps us better
understand beginning special education
is essential teacher quality. The following models
and sample measures represent different
ement- research genres. In all cases, potential
inning relevance to special education research
has been established.
teacher
measured.
Process-Product Measures
In a typical process-product study, teach-
ing interactions are observed and de-
scribed in a series of low-inference be-
havioral categories. Code frequencies
are aggregated across teachers, then re-
lated to student achievement measures.
Example: Classroom Observation Keyed
for Effectiveness Research (COKER) pro-
FEBRUARY2004 vides a process for observing the ongo-
PB-2 ing flow of student-teacher interaction.


STUDIES IN SPECIAL
EDUCATION


Overall assessment: Process-product
measures are well suited to comparison
studies, longitudinal studies of change,
and experiments. Strengths include:
* Potential for reliable measurement.
* Relationships between items on the


observation system and key criterion
variables can be established.
Users should be aware of the following
considerations:
* Conceptions of teacher quality de-
rived from process-product measures
are limited to observations of teach-
ers' actions.
* Extensive training for administration
and repeated observations over time
are required.

Checklists
Detailed low-inference checklists have
been used to evaluate teaching expe-
rience. Trained assessors observe and
make judgments about quality.
Example: In 1992, Englert, Tarrant, and
Marriage developed checklists forevaluat-
ing students during field experience. The
checklists derived from process-product
relationships and concerned classroom
management, time management, lesson
presentation, and seatwork.
Overall assessment: Checklists may be
appropriate for use in comparative stud-
ies, experiments, and case studies of
change. Strengths of checklists include:
* Comprehensiveness of coverage.
* Ability to assess elements of effective


-- teacher quality
to student achieve
Find out how beg
special education
quality can be me









I = SPEIA EDUCATION WORKFORCEWATC INSIGHTS FRO RESARC


teaching from varied theoreti-
cal perspectives.

Users should be aware of the fol-
lowing considerations:
* Sufficient time may not be
available to complete check-
lists accurately and completely.
* Standardized procedures for
administration usually are not
available.


Standards

Assessments that are based on
standards document the work of
teachers. Standards are devel-
oped in an iterative process with
input from key stakeholders.

Example: Two examples of stan-
dards for special educators are:
* Council for Exceptional
Children Standards for the
Preparation of Special Edu-
cators. Narrative descriptions
of 10 content standards are
provided.
* Interstate New Teacher As-
sessment and Support Con-
sortium (INTASC) Standards.
Standards are offered for gen-
eral education and special ed-
ucation teachers.

Overall assessment: Assessment
processes for standards are be-
ing developed. Standards may be
most useful in follow-up studies
and in interviews used during lon-
gitudinal studies of change.

Large-Scale Surveys

Beginning teacher quality may
be represented in survey items.
Evidence is generated quickly and
relatively inexpensively through
large-scale sampling.

Example: Examples of large-scale
surveys of special educators are:


* Schools and Staffing Sur-
veys (SASS). The National
Center for Educational Sta-
tistics has collected informa-
tion from teachers periodically
since 1987 on such things as
demographics, practice, at-
titudes, preparation, and pro-
fessional development.

* Study of Personnel Needs
in Special Education (SPeN-
CE). The SPeNCE survey asks
teachers to share percep-
tions in the areas of preservice
preparation, professional de-
velopment, and practice.

Overall assessment: Representa-
tions gleaned from large-scale
surveys are used in follow-up re-
search. Users should be aware of
the following considerations:

* Conceptions of beginning
teacher quality inferred from
surveys may be incomplete.

* The self-report format limits the
credibility of the information.


Commercially Available
Materials

Teacher educators may turn to
commercially available measures
for assessing beginning teacher
quality.

Example: PRAXIS III is the Educa-
tional Testing Service's observa-
tion system for assessing begin-
ning teachers.

PRAXIS III involves three data col-
lection processes:
* Direct observation of class-
room practice.
* Written materials (e.g., lesson
plans).
* Interviews before and after the
observation.

Overall assessment: Observation
systems may be used in compara-


tive studies and in longitudinal
studies of change. Users should


be aware of the
following con-
siderations:

* Administration
is expensive.

* Administration
is labor inten-
sive.


For More
Information


Because of dif-
ferent teaching
contexts, several
areas-serving
students with
severe disabilities,
working in tran-
sition programs,
and instructing
culturally and lin-
,:- :- 11.. I: ......


Information re- learnerslwc
learners-we
ported in this special consi
brief was based ation when
on the COPSSE during begin
research syn- teacher qual
thesis, Concep-_
tions of Begin-
ning Teacher Quality: Models
for Conducting Research, by
Linda Blanton, Paul T. Sindelar,
Vivian Correa, Mike Hardman,
John McDonnell, and Karen
Kuhel. This document can be
found on the COPSSE web site at
www.copsse.org.

-Ip CENTER ON
PERSONNEL
STUDIES IN SPECIAL
EDUCATION
About COPSSE
The Center on Personnel Studies in Spe-
cial Education is funded by the Office of
Special Education Programs of the U.S.
Department of Education [cooperative
agreement #H325Q000002]. COPSSE
research is designed to inform scholars
and policymakers about beginning teach-
er quality, effective initial preparation, and
the effects of preparation alternatives. The
Center is directed by Drs. Paul Sindelar
and Mary Brownell. The policy briefs were
produced by Warger, Eavy & Associates.
University of Florida, 300 Norman Hall,
PO. Box 117050, Gainesville, FL 32611
352-392-0701 (X283), www.copsse.org

Opnonsexpressed herein
Sdo not necessarily reflect the
Views oftheUS Department
;ihMrij,- of Education


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