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 Front Cover
 Introduction
 Main
 Back Cover






Group Title: UF Law booklets
Title: LL.M. in Comparative Law
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00090856/00006
 Material Information
Title: LL.M. in Comparative Law
Series Title: UF Law booklets
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Levin College of Law, University of Florida
Publisher: Center on Children and Families, Levin College of Law, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 2008
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00090856
Volume ID: VID00006
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Introduction
        Introduction
    Main
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
    Back Cover
        Page 10
Full Text











FREDRIC G. LEVIN COLLEGE OF LAW


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Florida's LL.M. in Comparative Law

DESIGNED EXCLUSIVELY FOR GRADUATES FROM LAW SCHOOLS OUTSIDE

THE UNITED STATES AND TAILORED TO YOUR INTERESTS.


The LL.M. in Comparative Law Program is designed
j exclusively for graduates of foreign law schools who
want to enhance their understanding of the American
legal system and the English common law system from
which it evolved. Unlike other law schools, Florida's
LL.M. program caters to the individual through a
course of study tailored to the needs and objectives of
each student, a limited annual enrollment of between
15 and 20 students, and individualized counseling by
the director, faculty and staff. LL.M. students select
from more than 100 courses and seminars offered each
year.

The program builds on the University of Florida's
renowned international studies programs and decades
of involvement by its law faculty in international legal
issues, including trade, environmental and land use
law, human rights, law revision, and constitutional
reform. The law school has established programs and
relationships in Central and Latin America, Asia, and
Europe, with specific emphasis on Poland, Brazil,
France, Korea, Mexico, China and South Africa.



"My year in the Comparative Law Program

has been the best I have ever had in school.

Every component you need to succeed is

available outstanding, comprehensive

faculty; helpful and warm administration;

friendly and diversified .student body. I only

wish I could stay another year. "


Amine M. Fawzi, Morocco


i- m I .W
Lawyers from around the world who want to enhance their
understanding of the American legal system are attracted to
the UF Law Comparative Law Program. The Class of 2008
(above) hailed from Brazil, Pakistan, Peru, Poland, Tanzania,
France, Nigeria, Venezuela and Bulgaria.

Diverse and Accomplished Student Body
Students accepted to the LL.M. in Comparative Law
program at Florida join a talented and ambitious stu-
dent body with diverse interests, ethnic backgrounds,
ages and experience. Florida's student body includes
approximately 1,200 full-time J.D. students; 100 law-
yers enrolled in the Graduate Tax Program; and up to
20 foreign lawyers in the LL.M. in Comparative Law
Program. Approximately half are female and about 25
percent are minorities.

Numerous opportunities exist to participate in student
organizations and journals, such as the International
Law Society or the Florida Journal of International
Law. Several student organizations, including Moot
Court, Trial Team and Law Review, are recognized
for excellence at state, regional and national levels.
Florida students develop not only the knowledge and
skills needed in today's rapidly changing legal profes-
sion, but the friendships and professional colleagues
that make law study one of life's most rewarding and
empowering experiences.


2 WWW.LAW.UFL.EDU/PROGRAMS/COMPARATIVE











































FACULTY
Florida's faculty is committed to excellence in
teaching and legal scholarship. Their diverse
professional activities and areas of expertise
allow for a wide array of unique and interest-
ing courses and exciting curricular concen-
trations. The involvement of leading private
practitioners helps keep course work on the
cutting edge of developments impacting the
legal profession. Faculty members are known
and respected worldwide, and are leaders in
bar associations, top legal educational orga-
nizations, and many state, national and inter-
national organizations. The faculty is larger
than that of many law schools, and includes
approximately 60 full-time professors and 30
lawyers working as legal writing and clinical
instructors, social policy and environmental
researchers, and law librarians.

CURRICULUM
Florida's comprehensive curriculum prepares
students from around the world for a broad
range of traditional and nontraditional legal
careers. Course work develops students' analyti-


cal ability, knowledge of the theory and practice
of law, communication skills and understanding
of the legal profession's codes of responsibil-
ity, ethics and commitment to professionalism.
Teaching methods include the traditional "case"
and "Socratic" methods as well as problems,
simulations, role-playing, video-taping and
computer-assisted instruction.

More than 100 courses and 30 seminars each
year support a variety of legal practice areas,
including environmental and land use, estates
and trusts, corporate, media, family, intel-
lectual property, tax, and international and
comparative law.

The college's centers and institutes comple-
ment the academic program and bring togeth-
er faculty, students and practitioners with
similar interests in areas such as social policy
and public interest law, children and family
law, dispute resolution, international financial
crimes studies and the study of race relations.

For lists of faculty, courses and seminars visit:
www.law. uf.edu/programs/comparative/
courses.shtml.


Since the program inception in 1994, more than 150 lawyers from Belarus, Belgium, Brazil, Bulgaria,
Cameroon, China, Colombia, Costa Rica, Czech Republic, Ecuador, France, Georgia, Germany, India,
Indonesia, Israel, Italy, Japan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Korea, Lithuania, Mexico, Morocco, Netherlands Antilles,
Nigeria, Pakistan, Panama, Peru, Poland, Sierra Leone, Slovenia, Switzerland, Taiwan, Tanzania, Thailand,
Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, United Kingdom and Venezuela have earned their LL.M. in Comparative Law from
the University of Florida Levin College of Law.


UF LAW LL.M. IN COMPARATIVE LAW 3


A GLOBAL ENVIRONMENT






















LL.M. Degree Requirements

THE LL.M. IN COMPARATIVE LAW PROGRAM OFFERS A CHALLENGING COURSE

OF STUDY TAUGHT BY SOME OF THE COUNTRY'S BEST FACULTY.


Students earn the LL.M. in Comparative Law upon
successful completion of 26 semester hours of work -
including a research paper (two credit hours) supervised
by a faculty member, and four credits for the required
three-week "Introduction to American Law" course
given the summer before fall enrollment.

"Introduction to American Law" introduces students to
various aspects of the study of law in the U.S., includ-
ing the Socratic method of instruction, case briefing,


Professor Jeffrey Davis (above) is a part of the nationally and internationally
renowned faculty of UF Law that is larger and more diverse than the faculties
of many U.S. law schools. The outstanding faculty help the Levin College of
Law earn its ranking each year as the one of the nation's top law schools.


legal research, simulation exercises and final exami-
nations. It also helps prepare students for successful
interaction with American students and professors in
J.D. courses, and helps students acclimate to the law
school and university community prior to the start of
the academic year.

During fall and spring semesters, with the director's
approval, students choose their remaining credits from
more than 100 courses and seminars offered each
year in the J.D. and LL.M. in Taxation curriculums.
Students also benefit from a weekly tutorial session
with the director.

Students receive letter grades in accordance with
University of Florida policy, and must achieve a 3.0
(4.0 scale) grade point average (GPA) to earn the LL.M.
While no specific grade distribution or grading curve for
LL.M. candidates is prescribed, the faculty recognizes
that GPA requirements for the LL.M. differ from the
requirements for a J.D. and that foreign law graduates
for whom English may be a second language may face
difficulties that the typical UF law student does not.


Certificate Programs

UF offers certificate programs for lawyers seeking a
broad-based understanding of United States law in spe-
cific practice areas. Students interested in earning a cer-
tificate must complete at least 15 of the 26 credit hours
required for the LL.M. in Comparative Law degree in
approved course work in a specific certificate area.

A member of the faculty from the program area serves
as the adviser and writing supervisor for students pur-
suing a certificate in that area. Students may pursue
certificates in International Business and Trade Law, or
Environmental and Land Use Law.


4 WWW.LAW.UFL.EDU/PROGRAMS/CO M PARATIVE











































Students at the UF College of Law will enjoy
the benefits of a $25 million expansion project
that creates a legal learning setting second to
none. Located on the wooded western border
of the UF campus, the law school is housed
in state-of-the-art facilities that include an
expanded library, two new education towers
with modern, comfortable classrooms, and a
Ceremonial Classroom that seats up to 160 for
conferences, receptions and special sessions.

As one student put it, "the quality of the law
school's physical appearance matches the
quality of education a student receives here.
The facilities are spacious, bright and ready to
take us into the future."

Most classrooms offer advanced technology
such as wireless Internet access, outlets for
laptop computers, and "smart podia" for pre-
sentations. Faculty members can easily incor-
porate web-based or multi-media instruction
into the classroom.


CHILES LEGAL INFORMATION CENTER
Blending the tradition of the past with the
technology of the future, the Lawton Chiles
Legal Information Center offers rare books
and historic displays alongside high speed
data ports and ergonomic study areas. The
foyer replicates the entrance to Bryan Hall,
home to the UF law school from 1914 to 1969,
and opens up to spacious rooms with leather
arm chairs and floor-to-ceiling views of aza-
leas and moss-draped oak trees.

As the laboratory and social heart of the law
school, the three-story library houses more
than 600,000 volumes in open stack displays.
Students also have access to 3.5 million-plus
volumes in UF libraries and 43 million titles
held by libraries throughout the world as well
as databases that provide access to federal
and state laws, periodicals, news articles and
background materials.


"The College of Law creates a great academic

atlo.,plh're, with a wonderful variety of resources,

small class sizes and excellent teachers."



Martin Blumann, Germany


UF LAW LL.M. IN COMPARATIVE LAW 5


FLORIDA JOURNAL OF
INTERNAL TIONAL LAW






















Admissions


How to Apply
For an application, contact Director David M. Hudson,
LL.M. in Comparative Law Program, University of
Florida Levin College of Law, P.O. Box 117643,
Gainesville, FL 32611-7643, USA. Phone: 352-273-0775,
Fax: 352-392-9419. To download the forms, go to:
ww ...n ... .... '. rams/comparative.

The application form is in two parts. The first part must
be completed and sent, along with official copies of
your transcripts and diploma in the original language
(with certified English translations), TOEFL report and
a nonrefundable $30 application fee (check or money
order payable in U.S. dollars) to: Office of Admissions,
P.O. Box 2946, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL
32611-2946, USA. The second part of the application,
titled "DEPARTMENT COPY," must be completed and
sent, along with transcripts, a personal statement, letters
of recommendation, and TOEFL scores, to Professor
Hudson at the preceding address. Neither the LSAT nor
GRE are required.

Applicants are encouraged to apply as early as possible.
Admission decisions will begin to be made, on a rolling
basis, in January. While the Comparative Law Program
has no absolute application deadline, no guarantee of
consideration is possible for applications not completed
by April 30. An application is not complete until we
receive the application form and all supporting docu-
ments (transcripts, TOEFL report, etc.)


Admissions
The qualified applicant must:

1. Have a law degree with high academic standing
from a recognized foreign university.
2. Have a thorough knowledge of the English lan-
guage. Students whose primary language is not
English are required to take the Test Of English as
a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and should achieve a
minimum score of 600 overall.
3. Submit completed application form, personal state-


ment / proposed study plan, letters of recommenda-
tion, and college and law school transcripts (or nearest
equivalent record of grades and rank). Transcripts
must be in the original language (and if not English,
must be accompanied by a certified English transla-
tion). Two letters of recommendation (in English or
accompanied by a certified English translation) from
law professors or other references commenting in
detail on the scholastic and professional qualifications
of the applicant are required.
4. Prove sufficient financial support in the form of a letter
of credit from a sponsor or bank demonstrating the
ability to pay for expenses.

Personal interviews are not part of the application pro-
cess. However, a typed personal statement recounting
your background and why you have chosen to pursue
the LL.M. in Comparative Law is required. You should
include your areas of special interest and career goals;
consider your written personal statement to be "an inter-
view on paper." Work experience following the first
professional degree is encouraged, and applicants who
demonstrate a commitment to careers in teaching and
public service are preferred. Outstanding achievement in
the legal profession is a positive factor.


6 WWW.LAW.UFL.EDU/PROGRAMS/CO M PARATIVE














































COMPUTER REQUIREMENT
The sophisticated use of computers and
computerized legal research is an essential
component of student life and learning at the
Fredric G. Levin College of Law. Information is
disseminated via e-mail or listserves, faculty
members may utilize Internet-based courses
or make classroom presentations available
on their website, and academic advice and
registration is available online through UF's
ISIS program. Because of this major emphasis
on access to network information, the col-
lege requires that all entering J.D. and LL.M.
students own a portable notebook or laptop
computer with the following:

SMicrosoft Windows XP Professional Edition
or Microsoft Windows Vista Business/Ulti-
mate. Law school computer applications,
including electronic courseware, run under
Microsoft Windows. Several applications
will not run on Macintosh computers,
which do not meet these requirements.


* CD/DVD drive.
* Wireless Ethernet port for network
connectivity at the law school (and
broadband connectivity Cable or DSL
at home), and a modem meeting at
least the v.90 standard for those without
broadband at home. Detailed specifica-
tions are available online at http://www.
law.ufl.edu/services/laptop.shtml.
* Microsoft Office Suite (Word) or Corel
Office Suite (WordPerfect). Electronic
work is often required to be submit-
ted in Word or WordPerfect, which are
standard and commonly used in the
legal profession. (Microsoft Works is not
accepted by many professors.)
* Software for e-mail, updated virus
protection and Internet access, available
on CD-ROM in the UF bookstore at a
nominal cost.
* Letter-quality ink-jet or laser printer.
(Printing at UF and the law school is
provided at 13 cents per page.)


HOUSING INFORMATION


TECHNOLOGY SERVICES

Services available to students include:

Wireless Internet access in classrooms,
library and study areas.
Individual AC power outlets at seats in
most classrooms to facilitate note taking
on laptop computers. (Laptop computer
use in classrooms is at the professor's
discretion.)
University of Florida GatorLink accounts,
which provide 90 hours per month of local
dial-up Internet access, after which a nom-
inal fee is charged. Accounts are available
following registration, and necessary for
wireless access.
UF e-mail addresses (yourname@ufl.edu).
To ensure consistency of information dis-
semination to students, UF will not permit
GatorLink addresses to be forwarded to
third party accounts.
Licenses for the two principal computer-
assisted legal research services: Lexis-
Nexis and Westlaw.
The law school's student financial aid office
budgets up to $2,500 toward the cost of por-
table computer equipment. The Levin College
of Law is not responsible for the maintenance,
upgrade, or loss of equipment.

Additional information is available on the
College of Law Technology Services website
at http://www.law.ufl.edu/services.

UF LAW LL.M. IN COMPARATIVE LAW 7























Law Study at Florida

THE LL.M. IN COMPARATIVE LAW PROGRAM IS A DISTINCTIVE PART OF A

PREEMINENT RESEARCH UNIVERSITY, THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA.


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
The LL.M. in Comparative Law Program
is a distinctive part of a preeminent
research university and of a law school
that is one of the nation's most com-
prehensive. Founded in 1853, the
University of Florida is one of only 30
public universities in the prestigious
Association of American Universities
-which recognizes outstanding North
American graduate research universi-
ties. Professional degrees are offered in
law, dentistry, medicine, pharmacy and
veterinary medicine.

Founded in 1909, the Levin College of
Law is accredited by the American Bar
Association and is a member of the
Association of American Law Schools.
Student and faculty research is sup-
ported by one of the nation's leading
law libraries, the newly expanded
and renovated Lawton Chiles Legal
Information Center.

NATURAL BEAUTY,
WORLD CLASS CULTURAL
OPPORTUNITIES

The University of Florida offers a wide
variety of social and extracurricular
activities, including sporting events,
art and natural history exhibits,
performance arts, several gyms and
pools. A Center for Performing Arts
features Broadway touring productions,
operas, ballet, symphony orchestras


and world-famous performers, while
local venues offer first-class theater
and popular productions.

With a population of approximately
110,000, Gainesville is located between
the Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico,
less than two hours by car from
either coast as well as from major
cities such as Orlando, Tampa and
Jacksonville and is on the
1-75 corridor halfway between
Atlanta and Miami. Its moderate
temperature averages 70 degrees.

Money magazine and other
publications consistently rate the
home of the University of Florida
Levin College of Law as one of
America's most livable cities, and
Outdoor Explorer magazine identified
Gainesville as one of the nation's
top 10 cities for outdoor recreation.
The area is dotted with lakes, rivers
and springs, and offers numerous
opportunities for outdoor sports,
including boating, diving, bicycling
and hiking.

Local historical sites, festivals, special
events, shopping and award-winning
restaurants enhance Gainesville's rich
cultural and entertainment offerings.
UF's Gator football, basketball and
other top-ranked men's and women's
athletic programs offer an exciting
variety of sports activities.


8 WWW.LAW.UFL.EDU/PROGRAMS/CO M PARATIVE















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UF Law:


UF LAW ONLINE
Access the latest
on UF Levin College of
Law faculty, programs
and events, a variety of
legal links and more at

www.law.ufl.edu


* One of the NATION'S LARGEST law schools, with 1,300 students, approximately 60
tenure/tenure track faculty and 40-plus other full-time faculty who support the college
through clinical, research, skills training and administrative programs. It offers J.D.
certificate programs in Environmental and Land Use Law, Estates and Trusts Practice,
Family Law, Intellectual Property Law, and International and Comparative Law; an
extensive array of joint degree programs; specialized centers, institutes and program areas;
and strong clinical offerings.
* A high quality, comprehensive law school, with LEADING PROGRAMS in GRADUATE
TAXATION, ENVIRONMENTAL AND LAND USE LAW, and FAMILY LAW.


Has offered STRONG INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMS for more than three decades,
and many faculty are experts in international legal issues. These programs and its LL.M.
in Comparative Law Program for foreign lawyers expand the school's curriculum and
international offerings and strengthen its ties with programs and scholars around the globe.
Has a LONG-STANDING TRADITION FOR PREPARING ITS GRADUATES FOR
SIGNIFICANT LEADERSHIP ROLES. Its alumni include four presidents of the American
Bar Association, the majority of The Florida Bar presidents, 34 judges in U.S. federal courts,
four governors of Florida, and hundreds of state senators and representatives and Florida
Cabinet members. Nine graduates became college presidents, including at UF. A dozen have
served as deans of law schools.






UF UNIVERSITY of
UF FLORIDA
Levin College of Law
P.O. Box 117625
Gainesville, FL 32611-7625




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