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Levin College of Law P.O. Box 117622 Gainesville, FL 32611-7622 NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATION U.S. POSTAGE PAIDGAINESVILLE, FL PERMIT NO. 94 YOUR FUTUREBEGINS AT UF LAWwww.law.ufl.edu LEGAL LEADERSHIP: YESTERDAY, TODAY AND TOMORROW LEVIN COLLEGE OF LAW | PROSPECTUS 2010

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INSIDEThe study of law should enrich the rest of your life as well as the lives of those you touch. The educational opportunities offered at UF Law, Florida’s oldest public and most prestigious law school, will provide that experience and prepare you for legal excellence in nearly any setting, in any part of the world. As a student, you will be among accomplished peers, professors and practitioners. As a graduate, you will add to the strength of an alumni network with a 100-year legacy of leadership and public service. Become a member of the UF Law tradition. Photograph the QR code at left with your mobile device to take a virtual tour of the Levin College of Law campus. (To download the app, visit www.mobile-barcodes.com/qr-code-software/.) WWW.LAW.UFL.EDULET THIS BE IN YOUR FUTURE LEGAL LEADERSHIP: YESTERDAY, TODAY AND TOMORROW

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4 welcome 6 tradition 8 alumni 14 facilities 18 campus 20 community 22 students 24 academics—degrees certi cates, enrichment, clinics, centers & institutes 36 career development 38 faculty 46 admissions 53 nancial aidUF LAW LEVIN COLLEGE OF LAW

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Our college’s vision and mission statement succinctly states our aspirations at the Levin College of Law. We are “dedicated to advancing human dignity, social welfare and justice through knowledge of the law,” and we are committed to “excellence in educating professionals, advancing legal scholarship, serving the public and fostering justice.” To these ends, we have assembled an exceptional faculty, staff, and student body who are committed to legal teaching, learning, and scholarship. WELCOME Statistics and facts cannot provide a complete picture of UF Law, but they are impressive nonetheless.  Florida’s only top-50 law school— ranked No. 47 overall by U.S. News and World Report and No. 24 among all public law schools  Internationally recognized faculty known for excellence in teaching and scholarship  A diverse curriculum with a broad range of opportunities for study  Facilities are expansive and technology is state-of-the-art, yet comfortable and designed around a central courtyard to foster personal connections  One of only ve law schools in the country to house an academic research and resource center devoted to the study of race and race relations 4 UF LAW

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 Consistently ranked within the top 10 law schools nationwide by the Hispanic Business Review  Graduate Tax Program is ranked rst among public law schools and No. 3 overall by U.S. News and World Report  Children and Family Law program considered among the nation’s best  Enviro nmental and Land Use Law Program ranked No. 16 overall and tied for No. 7 among public law schools by U.S. News and World Report ; the program is now the nation’s rst to offer a combined environmental and land use law LLM  Oldest public and the most prestigious law school in Florida with nearly 19,000 dedicated alumni  One of the best values in the country “You will nd a stimulating intellectual environment here that nurtures who you are now and the type of professional you want to become. You will acquire the foundation you need to practice at the highest level of competency, and you will begin to tackle fundamental questions related to justice, service and the rule of law. A great many of our alumni have reached the highest levels of professional accomplishment and I can assure you they deeply value their law degrees from the University of Florida.”— DEAN ROBERT H. JERRY IIDean and Levin Mabie & Levin Professor of La wYOUR FUTURE PROSPECTUS 5

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Times have changed since 1909. Today’s student body possesses rstrate quali cations and a broad range of backgrounds and experiences.  The student body during the 2009-10 academic year was comprised of 1,228 students, with 1,106 of them JD students from throughout the Southeast and nation  36 students are earning joint JD/ master’s or PhD degrees  306 students in the 2009 fall entering JD class were divided into three sections  122 students are enrolled in LLM and SJD programs  The school also has approximately 17 students in its LLM in Comparative Law Program, with these students hailing from countries that include South Africa, China, Saudi Arabia, India, and Peru 100 YEARS OF TRADITION. When the College of Law was founded in 1909 only 38 students were enrolled. Tuition, room and board were $165 a year. It was the rst public law program in Florida. Today, the Levin College of Law has a total enrollment of more than 1,200 students and is recognized as one of the nation’s most comprehensive, highly regarded public law schools as well as one of the best values available. U.S. News and World Report consistently ranks UF in the top quarter of public and private law schools in the nation, and it is Florida’s only top-50 law school. 100 YEARS OF UF LAW6 UF LAW

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 Of the combined student body in 2009, minority enrollment was 24 percent: 6 percent African-American; .7 percent Native Americans/ Alaskans; 7 percent Asian Americans; and 9.67 percent Hispanics  There were 52 percent men and 48 percent women in the combined student body  Students with undergraduate degrees representing more than 70 institutions are enrolled at the Levin College of Law. These include Bowdoin, Columbia, Cornell, Duke, Harvard, Northwestern, University of Florida, University of Michigan, University of Southern California and University of Wisconsin  Many students come directly from earning a bachelor’s degree, while others have experience in their rst eld of choice, including accounting, journalism, education, and businessFALL 2010 ENROLLED CLASS Class size 309 Median LSAT/GPA 162/3.67 LSAT 75th/25th% 164/160 GPA 75th/25th% 3.84/3.45 Women 43% Minorities 27% Out-of-state students 10% Average age 23 Age range 20-37UF LAW TODAY PROSPECTUS 7

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100 YEARS OF GATOR LAWYERS. Alumni at the Levin College of Law are leaders in the legal profession, the judiciary, business, government, public service and education at state, national and international levels. Each year, these legal professionals are cited as the nation’s best in publications such as The National Law Journal and Best Lawyers in America as they make their mark on society and the legal profession. Among them are more ABA presidents than from any other law school in the past 30 years, hundreds of state and federal judges, state and federal legislators, Florida governors, and nationally prominent lawyers, business executives and academicians.LEADERSALUMNI UF’s law school has been proli c in graduating legal leaders.  The Levin College of Law has produced ve American Bar Association presidents, including the ABA’s current president, Stephen Zack (JD 71)—more than any other U.S. law school since 1973  The Levin College of Law is ranked No. 4 among public law schools (No. 8 overall) in terms of the number of its graduates serving as federal district and circuit court judges in 2010, according to the Federal Judicial Center UF Law graduates who have served as ABA presidents include, from left, the late Chester eld Smith (JD 48), 1973-74; Talbot “Sandy” D’Alemberte (JD 62), 1991-92; Stephen Zack (JD 71), current; Martha W. Barnett (JD 73), 2000-01; and W. Reece Smith (JD 49), 1980-81. 8 UF LAW PHOTO COURTESY OF JENSEN LARSON PHOTOGRAPHY

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 Eighteen Levin College of Law alumni have served or are serving on the Florida Supreme Court, and 16 of the 18 have been chief justice  Four graduates have served as governors of Florida. Hundreds more have served as state senators and representatives (including in the role of Speaker of the House and President of the Senate) and in the Florida Cabinet  Seven graduates became presidents of Florida colleges, including UF, and one was president of two  Thirteen graduates have served as deans of law schools, including three who led their alma mater  Since The Florida Bar’s creation in 1950, nearly 60 percent of its presidents, including the rst four, its current president, Mayanne Downs (JD 87), and its president-elect, Scott G. Hawkins (JD 83), have been Levin College of Law graduates  Students bene t from many opportunities for interaction with distinguished alumni, who get involved in mentoring and externship programs and as guest lecturers and symposia speakers on campus. DEFEND“When this country experiences social upheaval, it turns to its courts rather than its generals. It is this connection between our justice system and the strength of our democracy that make the legal profession so essential to preserving our way of life. The future of the legal profession depends on attracting students who understand and appreciate the values of fairness and justice—students who aspire to be more than good lawyers who make a good living, but to be great lawyers who make a difference. I invite you to make a difference by being part of this noble profession.”— STEPHEN N. ZACK (JD 71)Administrative Partner, Bois, Schiller & Flexner LLP; President, The Florida Bar, 1989-90; President, American Bar Association, 2010-11 PROSPECTUS 9

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WORLD CLASS LEADERS. Levin College of Law is Florida’s oldest public and most prestigious law school. The accomplishments and support of alumni have helped distinguish the Levin College of Law as one of the best in the nation. Nearly 19,000 alumni have graduated since the college’s founding in 1909, representing UF throughout Florida, the nation, and more than 30 countries worldwide. ALUMNI Strong Alumni Ties. While most Levin College of Law alumni practice with law rms throughout Florida and the nation, many also serve as counsel to government agencies, corporations, and a wide array of public service organizations. Strong alumni ties in these areas of the law provide excellent intern/externship and clerking opportunities for Levin 10 UF LAW

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College of Law students. In addition, Levin College of Law alumni play a key role in the provision of quality and affordable legal education at UF, mentoring students and sharing their areas of expertise as adjunct instructors, guest speakers, jurists in residence, journal advisors, and as coaches for trial team. Several hundred dedicated Levin College of Law alumni volunteer their leadership and expertise in service on the Law Alumni Council and Law Center Association Board of Trustees. Alumni participation in these boards closes the feedback loop between legal education and the practical, hands-on realities of legal practice. It also facilitates alumni involvement necessary to fundraising efforts that support academic programs and facilities, enhancing legal education at the Levin College of Law. ACHIEVE“The education I received at the University of Florida opened the doors to my future and provided the tools I needed to succeed in an increasingly competitive world. Not only did I have an excellent academic experience, but as important, I met lifelong friends, mentors and colleagues who have enriched my life in countless ways. Thanks to the University of Florida, I have been able to be a partner in one of the nation’s great law rms, to travel the world and to give back to my profession and community.”— MARTHA W. BARNETT (JD 73) Holland & Knight LLP, Partner and Chair of Directors Committee; American Bar Association President, 2000 – 01, PROSPECTUS 11

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Strength on the Bench. When one considers the characteristics of a good judge, the words and phrases that immediately come to mind may include “Loyalty to the Law,” “Wisdom,” “Fidelity,” and “Integrity.” These are the attributes society seeks in its judges and magistrates. As the alma mater of hundreds of federal, state and county judges, the Levin College of Law takes enormous pride in the accomplishments and wisdom of its graduates serving on the bench. Not only do these individuals dedicate their lives in service to society, they also serve on the judging panels of trial team and moot court competitions to educate the next generation of UF lawyers in the subtleties of oral advocacy. Alumni judges collaborated to establish the Peter T. Fay Jurist-In-Residence Program at the Levin College of Law in honor of the Hon. Peter T. Fay (JD 56), senior judge on the U.S. 11th Circuit LEAD“In addition to receiving an excellent legal education, I met some great people who went on to make a difference in our state. Many of them helped me in my judicial career. I never would have achieved my goal of becoming a federal judge but for the legal training at the University of Florida.”—STEPHAN P. MICKLE (JD 70)Chief Judge, U. S. District Court, Northern District of Florida 12 UF LAW

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HIGH CALIBER LEGAL GUESTS. The Levin College of Law is proud to have hosted eight U.S. Supreme Court justices— ve in the last ve years—and other top legal thinkers from across the country, including federal judges, Florida State Supreme Court justices, American Bar Association presidents, leading legal academicians, and successful practitioners. Every year, Levin College of Law students learn the value of being well-prepared as they stand before moot and trial court panels made up of sitting federal judges. Every semester students are exposed to new faces and fresh ideas—gaining the legal knowledge and practical skills that will propel them on their courses as the future leaders of the profession. Court of Appeals. The Jurist-In-Residence Program brings a working judge to the Levin College of Law campus for a week each year to interact with and instruct Levin College of Law students. Through this interaction, students gain rst-hand instruction on a broad array of issues relating to judicial process, substantive law, trial and appellate advocacy, and the day-to-day practice of law. In addition to the many Levin College of Law alumni serving on the bench, Levin College of Law alumni also serve their nation as legislators, congressmen and public servants. Levin College of Law graduates serve in the highest level of our nation’s government. Carol M. Browner (JD 79), President Barack Obama’s “climate and energy czar,” is director of the White House Of ce of Energy and Climate Change. Esther Olavarria (JD 86) serves as the Obama Administration’s deputy assistant secretary for policy within the Department of Homeland Security, and will be in uential in formulating the nation’s immigration policy. And, Osvaldo Gratacs (JD 00) serves as the Obama Administration’s inspector general for the Export/ Import Bank of the United States. Today’s Levin College of Law graduates distinguish themselves and their alma mater by their achievements, but their path to success has been laid over the course of 100 years of College of Law trailblazers. They are following in the footsteps of the Levin College of Law tradition, as will the generations of UF lawyers to come. ALUMNI & GUESTS PROSPECTUS 13

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RECENT MULTI-MILLION-DOLLAR EXPANSIONS have transformed the Levin College of Law into a state-of-the-art legal learning center. The new facilities include: A free-standing legal advocacy center with expansive courtroom; the largest legal information center in the Southeast and among the top 20 in the country; comfortable, modern classrooms equipped with advanced technology; and a ceremonial classroom for conferences, receptions and special sessions. FACILITIES The Martin H. Levin Advocacy Center. Levin College of Law faculty, staff and students enjoy a new legal advocacy center second to none. The Martin H. Levin Advocacy Center (pictured at right) expands legal advocacy education and provides state-of-the-art trial facilities for the college. The advocacy center is a stand-alone, 20,000 sq. foot building boasting an impressive twostory grand foyer and glass entry with an open staircase that rises south of Bruton-Geer Hall. It houses a fully functional trial and appellate courtroom on the rst oor with a 98-seat gallery, bench for seven judges, a jury box and attorneys’ tables. The courtroom also accommodates judge’s chambers and a jury deliberation room. The second oor will house of ces and classrooms following its completion in fall of 2010. Named in honor of Martin H. Levin, son and former colleague of Pensacola attorney and college namesake Fredric G. Levin, the center places the Levin College of Law at the forefront of major law colleges in providing students with sophisticated facilities and services. EXPANDED FACILITIES14 UF LAW

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FOUNDATIONThe facilities are built around the Marcia Whitney Schott Courtyard, where students meet daily to exchange information, attend events and, most importantly, make lifelong friends and colleagues. PROSPECTUS 15

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The Levin College of Law has the largest legal information center in the Southeast, and among the top 20 nationwide. Students also have access to 3.5 million-plus volumes in other UF libraries and 43 million titles held by libraries throughout the world, and to databases that provide federal and state laws, periodicals, news articles and background materials. Other features of the 100,000 square-foot Lawton Chiles Legal Information Center include:  As the laboratory of the law school, the information center houses more than 600,000 volumes in open stack displays  An open reserve area to give students direct access to exams and study aids  The Richard B. Stephens Tax Research Center—named for the co-founder and rst director of the school’s nationally prominent Graduate Tax Program—featuring nearly 70 carrels for tax LLM students, a graduate lounge, meeting room and of ces for the Florida Tax Review  Thirteen conference rooms that accommodate as many as a dozen students for team study and LLM researchWORLD CLASS LIBRARY. Designed to blend the tradition of the past with the technology of the future, the Lawton Chiles Legal Information Center is a library that offers rare books and historic displays alongside high-speed data ports and ergonomic study areas. The foyer replicates the entrance to Bryan Hall, home to the College of Law from 1914 to 1969, and opens to spacious rooms with leather arm chairs and oor-to-ceiling views of azaleas and moss-draped oak trees. EXPANDED FACILITIES16 UF LAW

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STEP INSIDEMore than 300 individual study carrels equipped for wireless computers, with playback carrels available for review of taped classes, negotiations and trial skills. Seating for another 300 students is provided throughout. PROSPECTUS 17

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FLORIDA’S FLAGSHIP UNIVERSITY. As the fourth-largest public university in the United States, the University of Florida has 16 colleges and nearly 200 graduate programs that draw a diverse group of students from more than 130 countries and every U.S. state. CAMPUS UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA18 UF LAW

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THE GATOR NATION As a top-tier university, UF consistently attracts world-class orchestras, plays, operas, ballet performances and art exhibits. Students also can join in numerous casual events such as barbecues, game nights, student carnivals, service trips, pep rallies, sporting events, and an amazing assortment of extracurricular activities ranging the gamut of intramural team sports, recreational clubs, and outdoor activities. In addition, the university offers students health and tness programs in spacious, clean and well-equipped facilities. PROSPECTUS 19

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A Great Place to Be. Gainesville consistently ranks as one of the best values and best places to live in the nation, thanks to a dynamic art community, lush natural environment and the bene ts of being the hometown of a major university. The city has been named as “Where to Live Next” by Smithsonian magazine, as one of National Geographic’s “50 Best Places to Live and Play,” and one of the “Top 20 Best Places to Live and Retire” by Black Enterprise magazine. LOCALE GAINESVILLE 20 UF LAW

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EVERY PATH STARTS WITH PASSION With a population of about 125,000 (and 250,000 in the county), Gainesville is a busy college town with lots to do on campus and off. Nearly 65 percent of the county is dotted with scenic lakes, wetlands and trails, which give students numerous opportunities for cycling, canoeing, hiking, golf, camping, bird-watching and shing. You also can enjoy: festivals and performing arts programs; national caliber theatres; museums and performing arts; the largest collection of crystal clean springs in the world; sandy beaches just two hours away; nearby cities such as Orlando, Jacksonville and Tallahassee; and year-round moderate temperatures, with summer highs averaging in the 90s and winter lows in the 40s. PROSPECTUS 21

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AT YOUR SERVICE. The Of ce of Student Affairs provides assistance in nearly every area of student life, including orientation, nancial aid, registration, academic and educational counseling, and even personal matters. The of ce promotes the development of the whole person, not simply the intellectual aspects.STUDENTSKey offerings include:  “Introduction to Law School & the Profession,” a multi-day orientation program that provides an introduction to legal education, basic legal structures, professional responsibilities of lawyers-to-be, and University of Florida information  “Academic Success Program” provides ongoing tutoring, individual counseling and workshops on topics such as exam preparation, time and stress management, communication skills and study methods  Because more diversity results in a better legal system, the school offers a highly supportive environment to help minorities excel and strongly STUDENT AFFAIRS22 UF LAW

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encourages students of all backgrounds to apply. Special counseling programs offer guidance with academics, while other practical support is available in the form of minority internships and clerkship programs, student organizations and mentoring with students, faculty and practicing attorneys. Many of these programs are overseen by the Of ce of Student Affairs, which is responsible for extending comprehensive services that familiarize students with the campus and faculty and then nurturing them throughout their legal schooling  The Levin College of Law is committed to providing leadership, modeling the highest standards of professional and public service, that enables students to succeed in law school and beyondPROSPECTUS 23 SUCCEED“Through my experiences at the University of Florida Levin College of Law, I have learned how to multitask while dedicating my all to each individual undertaking, and when times are hard, I have learned how to persevere. In retrospect, UF Law has given me the recipe for success at anything I choose to do. It is easy being a passenger on a plane, but it is very hard for one to truly grab the rudder and take control. UF Law has given me the preparation, inspiration, and con dence I needed to earn my wings and y.” —BRANDON SAPP (3L) HOMETOWN: Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. ACTIVITIES: 2010-11 President, Law College Council; 2009-10 President, Black Law Students Association; Gainesville Public Defender’s Of ce Externship, Summer 2010; Lexis Associate, LexisNexis; Student Recruitment Team; UF Law Student Ambassador

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LEGAL STUDIES TAILORED TO YOU. The law school provides courses of study leading to the following:  Juris Doctor, including certi cate programs in Environmental and Land Use Law, Estates and Trusts Practice, Family Law, Intellectual Property Law, and International and Comparative Law  Joint degree by combining a JD with either a master’s or doctorate degree in just about any discipline  LLM in Taxation  LLM in International Taxation  SJD in Taxation  LLM in Environmental and Land Use Law  LLM in Comparative Law for foreign law students Current Degree Requirements.  Completion with a passing grade of courses totaling at least 88 semester credit hours, of which at least 59 must have been completed through the College of Law. No more than four of those credits can be earned through co-curricular activities  With permission of the associate dean for students, upon good cause shown, work up to 29 semester hours taken at another ABA-accredited law school may be counted toward this requirement. (Note: Grades in transferred courses will not be gured into the student’s GPA.)  Completion with a passing grade for Legal Research and Writing (LAW 5792) and Appellate Advocacy (LAW 5793)  Completion with a passing grade for all required 1L courses and Legal Drafting (LAW 6955)  Achievement of 2.0 cumulative GPA on all graded work attempted  Ful llment of prescribed course requirements  Satisfaction of the advanced writing requirement These requirements must be ful lled within 24-84 months of matriculation as a law student.DEGREES J.D. PROGRAMComprehensive curriculum for more opportunities. The three-year JD program is carefully designed to develop students’ analytical abilities, practical knowledge, communications skills and understanding of the codes of responsibility and ethics central to the practice of law. Students bene t from a variety of teaching methods, including the traditional “case” and “Socratic” methods, as well as simulations, videotaping, computer-assisted instruction and role-playing. The required rst-year curriculum places an emphasis on practical lawyering by teaching students to read and analyze cases, research points of law ef ciently and express those points clearly. 24 UF LAW

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SERVE“I chose to attend Levin College of Law, because the school and the community offered me the opportunity to learn and practice while also serving the unrepresented people in our society. I have always wanted to give back to others through my chosen academic profession. UF has helped me further my passion by surrounding me with an amazing group of people who share my interests and by offering academic and volunteer programs that focus on public interest.” —MIREDYS GONZALEZ (3L) HOMETOWN: Belle Glade, Fla. ACTIVITIES: 2010-11 Articles Editor, Florida Journal of International Law ; 2009 Summer Study Abroad, Costa Rica; 2009-10 Vice-President, Hispanic Latino/a Law Student Association; 200910 Secretary, International Law Society; Student Recruitment Team; 2009-10 Student Ambassador; 2010 Summer Associate, Powers, McNalis, Torres & Teebagy, West Palm, Fla.; Florida Bar Public Interest Fellow, 2010-11; Dean’s List Secondand third-year students can tailor studies to speci c interests and career plans through more than 100 elective courses, advanced courses, seminars, certi cate programs, joint degrees and study abroad opportunities. Required courses develop and re ne students’ writ ing abilities, while clinical programs (simulated and live) allow students to develop skills in the context of real cases. Seminars and advanced courses provide individualized research opportunities and close interaction with faculty. In combining a top-notch JD curriculum with a well-rounded selection of extra-curricular opportunities for professional development, the Levin College of Law seeks to graduate young lawyers who are ethical, competent, and enthusiastic about the law.PROSPECTUS 25

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ADVANCED WORK HONES LEGAL SKILLS Advanced Writing Requirement. All JD candidates must complete—under close faculty supervision—a major nished product that shows evidence of original systematic scholarship based on individual research. This typically is ful lled through enrollment in an advanced course or seminar. Advanced Courses and Seminars. Advanced courses and seminars provide supplementary opportunities to learn key skills in a small group setting under the close supervision of faculty. Advanced courses—for topics such as bankruptcy and debtorcreditor law, family law and environmental law—create opportunities for sequential learning, complex problem-solving and development of writing and drafting skills. Seminars allow thorough study and research of a topic, which may result in a “senior paper” to satisfy the advanced writing requirement. Skills Training. Strong writing skills are crucial to professional success. Dedicated faculty members hone student skills in each class year through required courses in legal research and writing, appellate advocacy, and the nationally acclaimed Legal Drafting Program, the rst in the nation and now a model for other schools. In addition, respected lawyers and judges serve as educators to help develop students’ practical skills in trial and appellate advocacy. Observation and critique by these professionals quickly improve students’ abilities to “think on their feet.” Order of the Coif. The Levin College of Law is in a select group of law schools with a chapter of the Order of the Coif, the national academic law honor society. Students who meet requirements are eligible for election at the conclusion of their studies. Field work externships. The college works closely with numerous organizations, agencies and legal service groups—in and outside Florida—to provide law students with practical experience and professional contacts. These opportunities may include pro bono work, part-time jobs, summer internships and externships. Externships enable students to earn as many as six credits while gaining hands-on experience and knowledge of the law. Because placements are with local, state and federal government agencies, judges and other public service organizations, students also provide a valuable service. For instance, more than 40 students have gained experience as judicial clerks in the college’s Florida Supreme Court Externship Program.DEGREES First Year Appellate Advocacy (2 credits) Civil Procedure (4) Constitutional Law (4) Contracts (4) Criminal Law (3) Legal Research & Writing (2) Professional Responsibility (3) Property (4) Torts (4) Second Year Legal Drafting (2) Corporations* (3) Estates and Trusts* (3) Evidence* (4) Third Year Trial Practice* (4) Registration-priority courses; not required, but faculty recommended. JURIS DOCTOR REQUIRED COURSE PROGRESSION: 26 UF LAW

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ADVOCATE“I chose UF because of the joint degree program [JD and MA Latin American Studies] and the ability for me to combine my interest in eventually practicing immigration law with a better understanding of the reasons why people come to this country and the challenges they face after arriving. With both degrees I feel I will have a better understanding of the situation and can be a better advocate for immigrants.” —WILLIAM HUMMEL (2L) HOMETOWN: Richmond, Va. ACTIVITIES: 2010-11 President, Immigration Law Association; 2010 Summer Externship with Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) in Orlando, Fla. JOINT DEGREES For students interested in other elds, joint degree programs can be established in nearly any area. Some joint degrees awarded to date have included: Agribusiness  Anthropology  Building Construction  Business Administration  Counselor Education  Criminology  Decision and Information Sciences  Doctorate of Medicine  Educational Leadership  Electrical and Computer Engineering  Environmental Engineering  Exercise and Sport Sciences  Food and Resource Economics  Forest Resources and Conservation  Gender Studies Certi cate  History  Interdisciplinary Ecology  Latin American Studies  Mass Communications  Materials Science and Engineering  Medical Sciences  Pharmacy  Political Science  Psychology  Public Health  Real Estate  Sociology  Urban and Regional Planning  Veterinary Medicine  Women’s StudiesPROSPECTUS 27

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CERTIFICATES EXPAND KNOWLEDGE BASEEnvironmental and Land Use Law Certi cate. The Levin College of Law’s Environmental and Land Use Law Certi cate Program enables students to demonstrate concentration and accomplishment in these two important elds. Certi cate requirements were developed by faculty in consultation with an advisory board of leading practitioners from private rms, government agencies and non-pro t organizations. Enrolled students take eight credit hours above their JD requirements to graduate. Thus, unlike similar programs elsewhere, students in this personalized curriculum enjoy both breadth and depth in their studies. Estates & Trusts Practice Certi cate. This area of the law is of considerable practical importance since it involves counseling clients on how to effectively provide for themselves and dispose of property during their lifetimes or at death. The practice involves planning, drafting and administering gratuitous transfers of property, thus implicating the law of gifts, trusts, future interests, intestate succession, wills, probate, duciary law and taxation. Perhaps more importantly, the practice involves counseling clients on the many complex issues confronting the elderly. Family Law Certi cate. The increasing complexity of divorce law and children’s law and the rise of the nontraditional family make family law one of the fastest growing and most intricate practice specialties. One new demand, for example, was created by a Florida Supreme Court mandate that established the “Uni ed Family Court” to handle all family, juvenile and delinquency matters. Administered by the Center on Children and Families, the certi cate program offers sequential clinical and classroom experiences for effective training in areas such as child development, family economics, negotiation and drafting, and courtroom advocacy. Intellectual Property Law Certi cate. Traditionally, intellectual property law encompasses several different bodies of law, including patents, trade secrets, copyrights and trademarks. The technology boom has expanded the need for patent lawyers as well as those trained in related elds such as antitrust, media, cyberlaw and general commercial law. The demand also continues to grow for those who can adapt or create doctrines in new elds—such as genetic engineering, accessing and downloading Internet materials, and disputes involving domain names, metatags and hyperlinks—as well as for those who can apply these laws in more traditional industries and the creative arts. International and Comparative Law Certi cate. Every eld of law that involves commerce—civil procedure, business associations, securities regulation, intellectual property, trade regulation, taxation, immigration and environmental law, among others—is affected by globalization. Equally important is the development of human rights laws, domestically and internationally. This certi cate program helps prepare students for practice in this new global legal environment by teaching international aspects of every area of the law.CERTIFICATES During this decade, Levin College of Law graduates, when measured class by class, have exceeded the pass rates of all other takers from all other law schools, both inside and outside Florida, by 7 to 14 percent every year. No other law school in Florida has a more consistent, more sustained record of success on the Florida Bar Exam.FLORIDA BAR EXAM28 UF LAW

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 The International Commercial Arbitration Moot (ICAM) team competed in the Wilhem C. Vis International Commercial Arbitration Moot in Vienna in 2010  First place winners of The Florida Bar Chester Bedell Memorial Mock Trial Competition in 2010  Regional Champion in the ABA Law Student Division National Apellate Advocacy Competition in 2008-09  National Champion Manne Moot Court Competition in Law and Economics in 2007  National Champion in the National Civil Rights Trial Competition in 2007  The Justice Campbell Thornal Moot Court Board—one of the “Elite Eight” moot court teams in the nation in 2008Levin College of Law students lead the nation. PROSPECTUS 29 SUPPORT“In addition to Levin’s reputation, endless resources, and extensive network, I chose UF because of the comfortable atmosphere. I knew law school would be challenging and competitive, but I wanted a genuine support system. After my rst year of law school, I can sincerely say I have happily found that—peers to study with, seasoned law students who eagerly give advice, faculty who care, and even alumni who encourage continuous communication because of our Gator connection. This list is just a snippet of those simple things that, when combined, amount to an authentic support system.” —ANITRA F. RAIFORD (2L) HOMETOWN: Gainesville, Fla. ACTIVITIES: 2009-10 Director of Communications, Honor Code Committee; Parliamentarian, Southern Region Black Law Student Association; Student Recruitment Team

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ENRICHMENT PROGRAMS SHARPEN SKILLS JD students can enhance their skills, earn credit and gain experience through the following organizations:  Environmental Moot Court teams compete in national and international environmental competition  International Commercial Arbitration Moot (ICAM) team members compete each spring against law schools from throughout the world in the Wilhelm C. Vis International Competition in Austria  The Jessup Moot Court Team explores issues of public international law and international humanitarian law and competes in national and international competitions  Justice Campbell Thornal Moot Court Team participates in intramural, state and national appellate competitions sponsored by organizations and rms  The Trial Competition Team competes in intramural, state, regional and national competitions sponsored by individuals, groups and law rms  Florida Journal of International Law publishes three issues per year and contains scholarly works with global perspectives by students, professors and practitioners on public and private international law topics  Florida Law Review publishes as many as ve times a year and includes articles by students and legal scholars who are specialists in various areas of the law  Journal of Technology Law and Policy is a student-edited journal published twice annually (also online) that focuses on legal and policy aspects of technology issues  University of Florida Journal of Law and Public Policy is an interdisciplinary student publication devoted to public policy implications of legal issues. Students publish three issues annually and sponsor a spring symposium Conferences, Seminars and Speakers. The Levin College of Law sponsors valuable conferences, seminars and speakers throughout the year to keep practitioners, students and others informed on current issues such as environmental law, music law and international legal issues. The college has hosted eight U.S. Supreme Court justices over the years, including U.S. Chief Justice John G. Roberts and Associate Justice John Paul Stevens in 2008, and Associate Justice Clarence Thomas in 2010. International Exposure. Through programs offered on campus and abroad, University of Florida law students gain international exposure and a distinguishing edge in the job market. Students can travel across the world through ABA-approved exchange programs such as: Ponti cia Universidade, Catolica in Rio de Janeiro; Leiden University in the Netherlands; University of Montpellier in France; Johann Wolfgang Goethe University in Germany; Monash University in Melbourne, Australia; and Warsaw University in Poland. The law school also jointly sponsors summer law programs in France, South Africa and Costa Rica. Students bene t from decades of international experience and involvement by faculty as well as enrichment courses that bring to campus leading foreign professors, judges, attorneys and government of cials to teach courses dealing with timely law issues.ENRICHMENTADVANCED DEGREES LLM in Taxation. Graduate Tax is the college’s premier program. It is widely recognized by tax scholars and practitioners nationwide as one of the best, and consistently ranks in the top three in U.S. News and World Report’s annual ranking of tax programs. UF’s renowned graduate tax faculty members are authors of some of the most widely used textbooks and treatises, and lecture at numerous conferences and institutes in the United States and abroad. They have been leaders in professional organizations and consultants for the Internal Revenue Service and other major public and private entities. The Graduate Tax Program also publishes The Florida Tax Review, a faculty-edited journal that has become one of the country’s leading tax reviews. Its publication is aided by extensive tax library holdings in the Richard B. Stephens Tax Research Center  LLM in International T axation. To meet the growing demand for international tax experts in the globalizing economy, the Levin College of Law began offering a Master of Laws in International Taxation in fall 2005. The one-year course of study features a renowned tax faculty, superb curriculum of great breadth and depth, distinguished students from around the world, and the many bene ts and opportunities stemming from the Graduate Tax Program  SJD in Taxation. A very limited number of students are enrolled in the Doctor of Juridical Science (SJD) in Taxation Program—the rst program of this kind in the country. The degree involves extensive study, research and writing over a threeto ve-year period  LLM in Comparative Law. The LLM in Comparative Law Program is for foreign law school graduates seeking to enhance their understanding of the American legal system. Applicants must 30 UF LAW

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EMPOWER“Law School is a unique experience that can transform your ability to understand what interests you, in addition to all the competing interests of our world. It empowers you to become part of a solution that is desperately needed. It does not give to you a voice, but helps you learn how to recognize and use your own. I want to be the kind of leader who is able to improve upon what has come before me, and the Levin College of Law is helping me develop that ability.” —MICHAEL C. KELLEY (2L) HOMETOWN: Orlando, Fla. ACTIVITIES: 2009-10 President, Gators for Alternative Dispute Resolution; 2010-11 President, UF Student Chapter of the Federalist Society; 2010 Study Abroad Program, France; Organized a 2010 Student Mediation Training/Workshop,“Attorney as Peacemaker”have a law degree with high academic standing from a recognized foreign university and thorough knowledge of English. The one-year program builds on UF’s renowned international studies programs and decades of involvement in global legal issues, including trade, environmental and land use law, human rights and constitutional reform  LLM in Environmental and Land Use Law. This one-year post-JD degree provides an opportunity to spend an academic year full-time on the UF campus developing in-depth expertise in environmental and land use law. The program adopts an innovative approach that combines the study of land use law with environmental law. The program also capitalizes on the many outstanding programs at UF in disciplines related to environmental and land use law practice, including wildlife ecology, environmental engineering, urban and regional planning, and interdisciplinary ecology Students admitted to the program work with the LLM program director to design an individual course of study tailored to their particular interests. LLM students are eligible to participate in the Conservation Clinic and to apply for a seat in the Summer Environmental Law Study Abroad Program in Costa Rica PROSPECTUS 31

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CLINICAL PROGRAMS ADD PRACTICAL EXPERIENCE. Clinical programs at the Levin College of Law provide students with extensive opportunities to represent actual clients under the close supervision of faculty or attorneys. This practical experience enhances the understanding of the law learned in classrooms and can give graduates the advantage of earning credits and Florida Supreme Court certi cation as certi ed legal interns. Clinical programs include: Virgil Hawkins Clinics. The Virgil Hawkins Clinics— the Full Representation Clinic, County Court Mediation Clinic, and Pro Se Clinic—are named in honor of the Florida civil rights activist whose efforts to be admitted to the UF College of Law in the late 1950s paved the way for integration of all Florida public universities in the early 1960s. Conservation Clinic. Under faculty supervision, Conservation Clinic students work in teams to serve clients on issues such as land acquisition and conservation, ordinance and comprehensive plan drafting, protected area management planning, legislative reform proposals, institutional framework design and dispute resolution systems design, and conservation mediations. Each summer the clinic also offers a for-credit program jointly with the University of Costa Rica Environmental Law Clinic, with cross-cultural teams working on Latin America/Caribbean region law and policy projects onsite in Costa Rica. The Conservation Clinic is housed at the Center for Governmental Responsibility to ensure an interdisciplinary focus is applied. Criminal Clinic: Public Defender State Attorney. The criminal clinics enable students to receive credit for working with either the prosecution or defense. There is a classroom component, assignments with clinic faculty, and work as certi ed legal interns in either the public defender or state attorney of ces. Under supervision, participating students handle criminal cases—including hearings and trials—and gain valuable experience by working with clients, witnesses, law enforcement and practicing attorneys.DEGREES VIRGIL HAWKINS CLINICSThe Full Representation Clinic offers intensive training in family law and practice, with students serving as rst chair counsel to low-income citizens of Alachua County who could not otherwise afford representation. Under faculty supervision, students deal with legal matters such as divorce, custody and visitation of children, domestic violence, division of property and debts, child support, alimony and establishment of paternity. Students also have the opportunity to provide legal counseling, draft legal documents such as pleadings, motions, orders and judgments, and represent clients in negotiations, mediations, hearings and trials. The Gator TeamChild Juvenile Advocacy Clinic provides free legal services to North Central Florida’s indigent youth. This interdisciplinary juvenile advocacy clinic trains lawyers, social workers and other professionals in skills necessary to be advocates for children. Through their work in the clinic, students practice fundamental advocacy skills such as interviewing, counseling and negotiation, are trained to operate effectively in a law of ce, and become skilled at navigating bureaucracies, agencies and court systems. The Intimate Part ner Violence Assistance Clinic is a collaboration between the Levin College of Law, the College of Medicine, Shands Teaching Hospital and Peaceful Paths Domestic Abuse Network. The clinic provides low-income intimate partner violence victims with comprehensive and coordinated legal, medical and social services focusing on victim and family safety. Certi ed legal interns trained to address domestic violence issues 32 UF LAW

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PREPARE“UF Law pushes you to the limit— ‘tough love’ is what I might call it. I cried before my rst exam, and considered leaving halfway through many others. In the end, I nished every time and was rewarded for my work. Through it, I learned that God’s grace, my family’s love and my own perseverance are more than enough. UF has made me stronger, more con dent and determined. I’m excited about my future as a lawyer because I know that UF Law has prepared me. I am proud of the education I have received here.” —LEYDYLUZ SYMPHORIENRESTREPO (3L) HOMETOWN: Clermont, Fla. ACTIVITIES: Dean’s List; Professional Responsibility Book Award; International Criminal Law Book Award; Judicial extern for 5th Circuit; Extern, Gainesville State Attorney’s of ce; Study Abroad, South Africa; Student Recruitment Team will join a holistic team including Shands social workers and domestic violence outreach counselors. Certi ed legal interns will be onsite in the pediatrics and obstetrics/gynecology clinics at Shands, providing legal counseling to victims and representing them in civil court on matters such as injunctions for protection. The County Court Mediation Clinic enables students to observe and volunteer to co-mediate Small Claims Court matters under the auspices of the law school’s Institute for Dispute Resolution and its faculty. Disputes may include those involving landlords and tenants, auto repairs, credit cards and other debts, and neighbor con icts. An intensive instructional seminar complying with Florida Supreme Court requirements for mediator certi cation eligibility is required of each participating student. Clinic completion allows students to apply to the court for certi cation as county court mediators. In the Pro Se Clinic, certi ed legal interns can practice on the cutting edge of family law through the new approach of “unbundling,” which allows clients to represent themselves before the court pro se (“for self”) on some issues of their cases but have legal representation for other aspects. Students, under the supervision of skills training professors, may provide legal advice, mediation assistance and/ or limited court representation after rst receiving instruction in the most common Florida family law issues—custody, visitation, paternity, child support, domestic violence and jurisdictional issues.PROSPECTUS 33

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CENTERS OPEN UP THE WORLDCenter on Children and Families.The Center on Children and Families (CCF) is comprised of a team of UF faculty—with expertise in criminal law, juvenile justice, psychology, con ict resolution and human rights—who promote quality advocacy, teaching and scholarship in children’s law and policy. Students have the opportunity to work with systems for protecting children from abuse and neglect in the center’s Child Welfare Clinic, participate in family law externships, earn a certi cate in Family Law and/or serve as children’s fellows. Fellows can work on friend of the court briefs and research papers, assist with CCF’s annual interdisciplinary conference, and help build a library of children’s legal resources. CCF is active in international human rights work, works collaboratively with the government and judiciary on law reform and professional education, and helps educate children on their rights and responsibilities.Camp Center for Estate and Elder Law Planning. The Camp Center for Estate and Elder Law Planning integrates teaching, training, research, scholarship and public service with the goals of advancing estate planning and elder law knowledge, professionalism, skills and policy. Student opportunities include participation in community service programs to the elderly through the Estates, Trusts and Elder Law Society and judicial externships for academic credit, which have been established in probate divisions of several judicial circuits. The center also works closely with the Graduate Tax Program and the UF Institute for Learning in Retirement to provide courses in adult education on estate planning and elder law issues.Center for Governmental Responsibility. The Center for Governmental Responsibility (CGR) is Florida’s senior legal and public policy institute. Faculty and students conduct grantand contract-funded research—often interdisciplinary in nature—on issues relating to public policy development and implementation at the local, state, federal and international levels. CGR also houses specialized programs such as the Conservation Clinic, Costa Rica Summer Program, Center for American Law Studies at Warsaw (Poland) University, International Trade Law Program, and the Law and Policy in the Americas Program. Students can learn and research issues that include environmental law, land use, bioethics, poverty law, emerging democracies, historic preservation, con ict resolution, European community law, international trade law, and election and campaign nance law.International Center for Automated Information Research. The International Center for Automated Information Research (ICAIR) is an interdisciplinary international information policy research center among UF’s Levin College of Law, the College of Engineering, and the Warrington College of Business. In ful lling its mission to fund innovative research on information technologies and knowledge management bene tting students, faculty and professionals in legal, accounting and nancial services professions, ICAIR engages in research related to information technology and its intersection with information policy, with a particular focus on data security issues. Institute for Dispute Resolution.The Institute for Dispute Resolution combines classroom training, interaction with practicing attorneys and intheeld assignments to help prepare students for an important trend in the legal profession: alternative dispute resolution. Courses in mediation, negotiation, collective bargaining and international litigation and arbitration are featured.Center for the Study of Race and Race Relations. The Levin College of Law is one of only ve law schools in the nation housing an academic research and resource center devoted to the study of race and race relations. The Center for the Study of Race and Race Relations works with groups engaged in a wide range of activities to create and foster dialogue on race and race relations and promote historically and empirically based thinking, talking, research, writing and teaching.Center for International Financial Crimes Studies. This academic research center provides graduate instruction, research and policy analysis, academic symposia, grant supervision and consulting services on money laundering, forfeiture, corporate security, offshore nances, cybercrime, organized crime and international nancial crimes. The center also co-sponsors the annual International Symposium on Economic Crime at Cambridge University, England. Institute for Human Rights, Peace and Development. This institute is an outgrowth of work done through the Levin College of Law project for the Advanced Study of Human Rights and Peace established in the early 1990s. It is directed by Professor Winston Nagan, former board chairman of Amnesty International USA, and was launched in part to enhance understanding of governance and human rights in East Africa.CENTERS & INSTITUTES 34 UF LAW

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NETWORK“At UF Law, there are unlimited opportunities to interact with fellow students and professors both inside and outside of the classroom. Through involvement in several organizations during law school, I have not only deepened my understanding of the academic side of the law, but also developed friendships and professional relationships that will last a lifetime. This spirit of camaraderie is what makes our school special and helps make graduates from the Levin College of Law better attorneys and better people.” —KATIE KELLAM (3L) HOMETOWN: Belle Haven, Va. ACTIVITIES: 2010 Summer Intern, Of ce of the Chief Staff Attorney, Supreme Court of Virginia; Managing Editor, Journal of Technology Law & Policy ; Student Works Editor, Florida Journal of International Law ; 2010-11 Secretary, John Marshall Bar Association; Student Recruitment Team PROSPECTUS 35

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CAREERCAREER DEVELOPMENTResources help chart a course. Almost as soon as the law school experience begins, professional counselors in the Center for Career Development—all of whom have law degrees— offer a wide variety of resources and programs to help students develop their professional identities, plan their self-directed career searches and establish marketing techniques that will serve them throughout their careers. Resources include:  Workshops on practical career skills, from polishing a resume to “working a room,” to handling call-back interviews as well as seminars on career path exploration and becoming a successful professional  Individual counseling to formulate a career path and determine appropriate jobsearch strategies. Interview skills development, including mock interviews  Networking events onand offcampus to meet, network with and learn from legal professionals from law rms, government agencies, public interest organizations, corporations, the judiciary and the military. Employer directories, job search aids, career exploration materials, and employment and salary data nationally and from recent graduates to help assess various career options  Job search tips and news about CCD programs through the center’s listserv and blog, with updates in the center’s weekly publication  The Small Firm Project and the mentor program  The Judicial Clerkship Program  A Web-based job bank with part-time and full-time positions for students and alumni  A website with downloadable resource materials, samples and forms Employer Resources. The Center for Career Development offers many services to employers to make it easy for them to interview and hire Levin College of Law students and alumni. Employers are actively encouraged to post their hiring needs with the Levin College of Law. The Levin College of Law brings employers—including many top national law rms—to campus to interview students in one of the largest on-campus recruiting programs in the southeast. For those unable to visit campus, the Levin College of Law also has the facilities to conduct videoconference interviews. In addition, the center coordinates more than a dozen off-campus recruiting events in cities such as Atlanta, Washington, D.C., Chicago and New York City to help students market themselves to potential employers out of state. Employer diversity initiatives coordinated through the center include providing information to students about summer associate diversity programs, employer receptions, and providing diverse employment resources. Practical Experience. Nothing strengthens a resume like experience. The Center for Career Development helps students gain practical, hands-on skills through a variety of programs:  The Pro Bono and Community Service Projects connect law students with organizations seeking volunteers for public interest projects. Participants gain valuable work experience and earn recognition certi cates honoring them for their accomplishments  Part-time or summer employment opportunities in law rms, businesses or as teaching or research assistants  The 1L Shadow Program enables rst-year law students to shadow attorneys in private practice, the court system or legal services and experience the legal environment in those areas rst-hand  Internships provide valuable volunteer opportunities in every level of government agency and the judiciary  The CCD also strongly encourages students to participate in one of the many for-credit externship opportunities and one of the clinical programs offered by the Levin College of Law.36 UF LAW

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EMPLOYMENT INFORMATIONHistorically about 80 percent of Levin College of Law graduates work in Florida. For the Class of 2009, 76 percent remained in Florida. The remainder are scattered throughout 19 states. The strongest concentrations of Levin College of Law graduates employed outside Florida, (in descending order) were in Washington, D.C. metro area, New York, Georgia and California. The sixto nine-month rate of employment for Class of 2009 graduates who wished to work and who were working or pursuing a graduate degree was 99.5 percent compared to the national average of 94 percent. The Levin College of Law’s unemployment rate for the Class of 2009 was only .5 percent whereas nationally it was 6 percent. During the past decade or so, the Levin College of Law also has witnessed an uncharacteristically strong number of graduates who are accepted into full time graduate programs following their JD. From the Class of 2009, 10 percent of the graduates pursued this option while the national average was only 3.1 percent, in part due to the Levin College of Law’s highly regarded LLM in Tax program. The graduates were employed in the following categories within six to nine months after graduation:  51 percent in private practice  24.5 percent in government and judicial clerkships  15.5 percent in public interest law and academics  8.4 percent in business and industryPROSPECTUS 37 CONNECT“Being a member of the Gator Nation—having that relationship with people all over the world, and so many who came before us—has been an invaluable inspiration for me. Gators aren’t just alums; there’s something broad and deep about the connection we make with this university that forever links us to other Gators. I’ve always had this bond with the University of Florida, and that was underscored as a law student because I just don’t see how you can get a better legal education. That shared experience and love for the university binds me to other Gators and helps with business people, clients, judges, and other lawyers. It’s a gift I think about all the time.”—MAYANNE DOWNS (JD 87) Shareholder, King, Blackwell, Downs & Zehnder, P.A.; City Attorney, Orlando, Fla., 2007 to present; President, The Florida Bar, 2010-11

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Remarkable classroom experience. The foundation of the Levin College of Law is comprised of highly accomplished scholars, practitioners and educators whose broad knowledge base and passion for teaching challenge each student to reach new heights of intellectual achievement.FACULTYFACULTY The Levin College of Law is a vigorous and vibrant educational environment where students acquire the knowledge and skills they need to succeed in their careers. The Levin College of Law’s faculty is larger and more comprehensive than that of most schools with 51 tenured or tenure-track faculty, which includes 19 (37 percent) women, and 11 (22 percent) minorities. In addition, more than 36 other faculty members support the college through clinical, research, writing, information and administrative programs. The in uence of Levin College of Law faculty goes far beyond campus, however. Many faculty members are:  Authors of treatises, casebooks or major books used by law schools and practitioners throughout the nation  Cited by the U.S. Supreme Court  Expert witnesses before policy-making bodies  Consultants to branches of state, federal and international governments  In leadership roles on American and Florida bar committees and task forces or other prestigious associations such as Amnesty International, the United Nations Institute for Training and Research, and the International Society of Family Law  On editorial boards of national publications and authors of hundreds of articles in law reviews and specialty journals Y Y 38 UF LAW

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Levin College of Law faculty members serve as consultants to branches of state, federal and international governments. Many faculty members graduated at the top of their classes and were editors or members of their respective law reviews. More than 20 clerked at the appellate level (half in federal court) and two for the U.S. Supreme Court, and approximately 30 were associates or partners at law rms. About a dozen earned PhD degrees, nearly 50 hold LLM or master’s degrees, and ve have received Fulbright awards. The pursuit of scholastic distinction is not at the expense of quality instruction, however. As teachers, they work hard to engage students intellectually and maintain an accessible, supportive environment that guides students toward success. Student evaluations re ect high satisfaction with professors, with virtually all professors scoring well over four on a vepoint scale. The involvement of leading private practitioners—including federal and state court judges and attorneys involved in public agencies, private practice and leading business ventures—who teach in specialty areas and lead seminars help bring current, practical and critical issues and events into the classroom. The result is a true academic community that nurtures students into ethical lawyers who are tributes to the profession. INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY“The technological revolution that we have experienced in the last few years has tremendous implications for intellectual property law. The issues that arise at the intersection of intellectual property law and technology lead to countless dif cult and important questions. The area continues to be fertile ground for both teaching and scholarly inquiry. The Internet alone pushes the boundaries of our long established methods of legal regulation. Moreover, technology in general poses many challenges to existing intellectual property paradigms and doctrines. These challenges are re ected, for example, in the complex issues presented by software and patenting, search engines and trademarks, digital technology and copyright, and the Internet and trade secrets. My research explores the dynamic combination of human and technological variables affecting the protection of intellectual property, particularly emerging issues in trade secret law. I explore these issues with an eye toward assisting courts and legislators achieve a reasonable balance when weighing or assessing policy and doctrinal approaches to these problems.” —ELIZABETH ROWE Associate ProfessorPROSPECTUS 39

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Mary Jane Angelo Professor BACKGROUND: B.S., Rutgers University; M.S. and J.D., University of Florida. EXPERTISE: Environmental, Water, Administrative, Biotechnology and Pesticides Law, Dispute Resolution, Professional Responsibility. Yariv Brauner Professor BACKGROUND: LL.B., Hebrew University School of Law; LL.M., J.S.D., New York University School of Law. EXPERTISE: Tax, International Law, International Trade, International Taxation. Dennis A. Calfee Professor; Alumni Research Scholar BACKGROUND: B.B.A., J.D., Gonzaga University; LL.M., University of Florida. Former faculty, Academy of International Taxation, Republic of China. EXPERTISE: Taxation. Jonathan R. Cohen Professor; Associate Director, Institute for Dispute Resolution BACKGROUND: A.B., A.M., M.A., J.D., Ph.D. (Economics), Harvard University. EXPERTISE: Negotiation, Dispute Resolution, Ethics, Evidence. Stuart R. Cohn Associate Dean for International Studies; John H. and Mary Lou Dasburg Professor; Director of International and Comparative Law Certi cate Program BACKGROUND: B.A., University of Illinois; B.A., Oxford University; LL.B., Yale University. EXPERTISE: Corporate and Securities Law, Jurisprudence. Charles W. Collier Professor; Af liate Professor of Philosophy BACKGROUND: B.A., Reed College; M.A., M.Phil., Ph.D., Yale University; J.D., Stanford University EXPERTISE: Constitutional Law, Jurisprudence, Legal Theory. Elizabeth Dale Af liate Professor; Associate Professor of History BACKGROUND: B.A., DePauw University; Ph.D., J.D., Chicago-Kent College of Law. EXPERTISE: U.S. Legal and Constitutional History. Jeffrey Davis Professor; Gerald A. Sohn Research Scholar BACKGROUND: B.S., University of California, Los Angeles; J.D., Loyola University, Los Angeles; LL.M., University of Michigan. EXPERTISE: Contracts, Bankruptcy, Debtor-Creditor Relations, Commercial Law. George L. Dawson Professor BACKGROUND: A.B., Princeton University; J.D., University of Chicago. EXPERTISE: Contracts, Estates and Trusts, Payment Systems. Patricia E. Dilley Professor BACKGROUND: B.A., Swarthmore College; M.A., University of Pennsylvania; J.D., Georgetown University; LL.M., Boston University. EXPERTISE: Social Security, Deferred Compensation, Individual Income/Corporate Taxation, International Taxation, Advanced Employee Bene t Law, Retirement Income Policy. Nancy E. Dowd David H. Levin Chair in Family Law; Director, Center on Children and Families BACKGROUND: B.A., University of Connecticut; M.A., University of Illinois; J.D., Loyola University of Chicago. EXPERTISE: Constitutional Law, Family Law, Gender and the Law. Mark A. Fenster Associate Dean for Faculty Development; Professor; Sam T. Dell Research Scholar BACKGROUND: B.A., University of Virginia; M.A., University of Texas at Austin; Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; J.D., Yale University. EXPERTISE: Land Use, FOIA and Public Access to Government Information, Property, Legal Theory, Administrative Law, Contemporary Cultural Theory. Alyson Craig Flournoy Professor; Director of Environmental and Land Use Law Program; Alumni Research Scholar BACKGROUND: B.A., Princeton University; J.D., Harvard University. EXPERTISE: Environmental Law, Property and Administrative Law. Michael K. Friel Associate Dean and Director, Graduate Tax Program; Professor BACKGROUND: B.A., J.D., Harvard University; LL.M., New York University. EXPERTISE: Federal Income Taxation. Jeffrey L. Harrison Stephen C. O’Connell Chair BACKGROUND: B.S., M.B.A., Ph.D., University of Florida; J.D., University of North Carolina. EXPERTISE: Antitrust, Contracts, Copyright, Law and Economics. Berta Esperanza Hernndez-Truyol Levin Mabie and Levin Professor; Associate Director, Center on Children and Families BACKGROUND: A.B., Cornell University; J.D., Albany Law School, Union University; LL.M., New York University. EXPERTISE: International Law, International Human Rights, Issues of Race, Gender, and Culture in the Law, Dispute Resolution. David M. Hudson Professor; Director of LL.M. in Comparative Law Program BACKGROUND: B.S., Wake Forest University; J.D., Florida State University; LL.M., University of Florida; LL.M., University of London. EXPERTISE: State and Local Taxation, International Taxation, Immigration Law. Michelle S. Jacobs Professor BACKGROUND: A.B., Princeton University; J.D., Rutgers University. Visiting Professor, Columbia University and Howard University. EXPERTISE: Criminal Law, International Criminal Law, Critical Race Theory, Women and the Criminal Justice System. Robert H. Jerry, II Dean; Levin Mabie and Levin Professor BACKGROUND: B.A., Indiana State University; J.D., University of Michigan. EXPERTISE: Insurance Law, Contracts, Health Care Finance and Access. E. Lea Johnston Assistant Professor BACKGROUND: A. B., Princeton University; J.D., Harvard University. EXPERTISE: Criminal Law, Immigration, Criminal Procedure, Administrative Law and Civil Procedure. Dawn Jourdan Assistant Professor; Assistant Professor, Urban and Regional Planning (joint appointment) BACKGROUND: B.S., Bradley University; J.D./M.U.P., University of Kansas; Ph.D., Florida State University. EXPERTISE: Growth Management Law, Land Use Law, and Affordable Housing. Shani M. King Associate Professor; Co-Director, Center on Children and Families BACKGROUND: B.S., Brown University; J.D., Harvard University. EXPERTISE: Family Law and Children’s Rights. Christine A. Klein Chester eld Smith Professor BACKGROUND: B.A., Middlebury College; J.D., University of Colorado; LL.M., Columbia University School of Law. EXPERTISE: Natural Resources, Property, Water Law. Elizabeth T. Lear Professor BACKGROUND: B.A., University of North Carolina; J.D., University of Michigan. EXPERTISE: International Litigation, Federal Courts. FACULTYLEADERS IN LEGAL SCHOLARSHIP. 40 UF LAW

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PROSPECTUS 41 BUSINESS LAW“I love being a professor because it allows me to pursue cutting edge research that has real world application. Business law and regulation are increasingly global. Globalization adds complexity to business planning. In my scholarship, I have focused on issues of corporate compliance, international and comparative antitrust, and capacity building for developing world legal regimes. The nature of my scholarship has allowed me to present my work to academic, private sector and government agency audiences around the world. As co-editor of a new book series with Stanford University Press on global antitrust, I hope to create an outlet for new academic thinking on international and comparative legal and economic issues in the eld. As a teacher, my goal is to train the next generation of business counselors. I want my students to understand the law in context—what is the underlying business problem that needs to be solved and how can legal tools be used to provide a variety of possible solutions.” ——D. DANIEL SOKOLAssistant Professor

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FACULTY LEADERS IN LEGAL SCHOLARSHIP. Lyrissa Barnett Lidsky Stephen C. O’Connell Professor BACKGROUND: B.A., Texas A&M University; Fulbright Scholar, Cambridge University; J.D., University of Texas. EXPERTISE: Internet Law, Torts (specializing in Defamation and Invasion of Privacy), Mass Media Law, Jurisprudence, Professionalism. Tom Lin Assistant Professor BACKGROUND: B.A., New York University; J.D., University of Pennsylvania Law School. EXPERTISE: Business Law, Securities Regulation, and Behavioral Law and Economics. Charlene Luke Associate Professor BACKGROUND: B.A., J.D., Brigham Young University. EXPERTISE: Income, Corporate and Partnership Taxation. Pedro A. Malavet Professor; Af liate Professor of Latin American Studies BACKGROUND: B.B.A., Emory University; J.D., LL.M., Georgetown University. EXPERTISE: Comparative Law, Civil Law, Civil Procedure, Critical Race Theory, European Union, Evidence, United States Territorial Possessions, United States-Puerto Rico relationship. Amy R. Mashburn Professor BACKGROUND: B.A., Eckerd College; J.D., University of Florida. EXPERTISE: Civil Procedure, Professional Responsibility, Administrative Law. Diane H. Mazur Professor; Gerald A. Sohn Term Professor BACKGROUND: B.A., State University of New York; M.S., Pennsylvania State University; J.D., University of Texas. EXPERTISE: Civil/Military Relations, Constitutional Law, Evidence, Professional Responsibility. Martin J. McMahon, Jr. Stephen C. O’Connell Professor BACKGROUND: B.A., Rutgers College; J.D., Boston College; LL.M., Boston University. EXPERTISE: Individual Income Taxation, Corporate Taxation, Partnership Taxation, Tax Policy. C. Douglas Miller Professor BACKGROUND: B.S., J.D., University of Kansas; LL.M. in Taxation, Rudick Memorial Award, New York University. EXPERTISE: Federal Taxation, Estates and Trusts, Estate Planning, Sports Law. Jon L. Mills Professor; Director, Center for Governmental Responsibility; Dean Emeritus BACKGROUND: B.A., Stetson University; J.D., University of Florida; Honorary Doctor of Laws, Stetson University. EXPERTISE: Florida Constitutional Law, International Trade, Environmental Law, Legislative Drafting, Free Press and Speech Privacy Issues. Robert C. L. Moffat Professor; Af liate Professor of Philosophy; Af liate Professor of Sociology and Criminology Law BACKGROUND: B.A., M.A., LL.B, Southern Methodist University; LL.M., University of Sydney, Australia. EXPERTISE: Jurisprudence, Criminal Law, Law and Morality, Law and Public Policy. Winston P. Nagan Professor; Samuel T. Dell Term Professor; Director, Institute of Human Rights and Peace Development; Af liate Professor of Anthropology BACKGROUND: B.A., University of South Africa; B.A., M.A., Oxford University; LL.M., M.C.L., Duke University; J.S.D., Yale University. EXPERTISE: International Law, Human Rights and Legal Theory. Lars Noah Professor; Alumni Research Scholar BACKGROUND: A.B., J.D., Harvard University. EXPERTISE: Administrative Law, Medical Malpractice, Medical Technology, Products Liability, Torts. Kenneth B. Nunn Professor; Associate Director, Center on Children and Families BACKGROUND: A.B., Stanford University; J.D., University of California-Berkeley. EXPERTISE: Race and its Impact on Criminal Justice System, Criminal Law and Procedure, Race Relations, Civil Rights, Public Interest Law, Critical Race Theory, Legal Semiotics, Sociology of Law, Law and Cultural Studies. William H. Page Senior Associate Dean for Academic Affairs; Marshall M. Criser Eminent Scholar in Electronic Communications and Administrative Law; Professor BACKGROUND: B.A., Tulane University; J.D., University of New Mexico; LL.M., University of Chicago. EXPERTISE: Antitrust Law, Procedure, and Economics; Microsoft Litigation. Juan F. Perea Cone, Wagner, Nugent, Johnson, Hazouri and Roth Professor BACKGROUND: B.A., University of Maryland; J.D., Boston College. EXPERTISE: Race and Race Relations, Social Construction of Race and History, Constitutional Law, Employment Law, Employment Discrimination. Rachel Rebouch Assistant Professor BACKGROUND: B.A., Trinity University; J.D., Harvard Law School; LL.M., Queen’s University, Belfast. EXPERTISE: Family Law and Comparative Family Law. Leonard L. Riskin Chester eld Smith Professor BACKGROUND: B.S., University of WisconsinMadison; J.D., New York University; LL.M., Yale University. EXPERTISE: Negotiation, Mediation, Dispute Resolution. Elizabeth A. Rowe Associate Professor BACKGROUND: B.A., M.A., University of Florida; J.D., Harvard University. EXPERTISE: Workplace Intellectual Property Disputes, Trade Secrets, Trademark Litigation, Patent Litigation. Sharon E. Rush Irving Cypen Professor; Associate Director, Center on Children and Families BACKGROUND: B.A., J.D., Cornell University. EXPERTISE: Constitutional Law, Civil Procedure, Federal Courts, Fourteenth Amendment, Race Relations. Katheryn Russell-Brown Chester eld Smith Professor; Director, Center for Study of Race and Race Relations BACKGROUND: B.A., University of CaliforniaBerkeley; J.D., University of California-Hastings; Ph.D., University of Maryland. EXPERTISE: Criminal Law, Sociology of Law, Race and Crime. Michael L. Seigel Professor; Alumni Research Scholar BACKGROUND: A.B., Princeton University; J.D., Harvard University. EXPERTISE: Evidence, Criminal Law, White Collar Crime. Michael R. Siebecker Associate Professor BACKGROUND: B.A., Yale; J.D., LL.M., M.Phil, Ph.D. (candidate), Columbia. EXPERTISE: Corporate Law, Securities Regulation, Internet Law, Jurisprudence. D. Daniel Sokol Assistant Professor BACKGROUND: A.B., Amherst College; M.S., University of Oxford; J.D., University of Chicago; LL.M., University of Wisconsin Law School. EXPERTISE: Antitrust, Commercial, Corporate, International and Comparative Business and Regulation. 42 UF LAW

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CRIMINAL PROCEDURE“Over the last few decades, psychology has left an indelible mark on criminal law and procedure. The advent of battered woman’s syndrome, the prohibition against executing mentally retarded defendants, and the ban on sentencing juvenile offenders to life without parole for non-homicidal crimes all stem from psychological understandings of decisionmaking, judgment, and development. In my research, I draw upon insights from psychology to debunk arguments supporting the legal system’s current treatment of the mentally ill. Courts routinely treat mentally ill individuals differently, limiting some constitutional rights such as self-representation and even subjecting them to wholly new structures of supervision and punishment. Research reveals that persons with mental illness or disability are largely capable of rational thought and action, and I believe the legal system should recognize and promote their autonomy. This commitment to preserving and promoting the autonomy of disaffected persons permeates my research and informs classroom discussions on topics as diverse as competency to stand trial, self-representation, and excuses and justi cations in criminal law.” ——E. LEA JOHNSTONAssistant Professor 43

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John F. Stinneford Assistant Professor BACKGROUND: B.A., University of Virginia; M.A., J.D., Harvard University. EXPERTISE: Criminal Law, Criminal Procedure, the Eighth Amendment, Sentencing Law and Policy, and Evidence. Lee-ford Tritt Associate Professor; Director, Camp Center for Estate and Elder Law Planning and Estates and Trusts Practice Certi cate Program; Associate Director, Center on Children and Families BACKGROUND: B.A., University of the South; J.D., LL.M. (Taxation), New York University. EXPERTISE: Wealth Management, Estate Planning, Administration of Trusts and Estates, Transfer Tax Matters and Charitable Giving. Steven J. Willis Professor; Associate Director, Center on Children and Families BACKGROUND: B.S., J.D., Louisiana State University; LL.M., New York University. EXPERTISE: Taxation. Michael Allan Wolf Richard E. Nelson Chair in Local Government Law; Professor BACKGROUND: B.A., Emory University; J.D., Georgetown University Law Center; A.M., Harvard University; Ph.D., Harvard University. EXPERTISE: Land Use Planning, Environmental Law, Property, Local Government, Urban Revitalization, Legal and Constitutional History. Danaya C. Wright Clarence J. TeSelle Endowed Professor BACKGROUND: B.A., Cornell University; M.A., University of Arizona; J.D., Cornell University; Ph.D. (Political Science), Johns Hopkins University. EXPERTISE: Property, Estates and Trusts, Legal History, Jurisprudence, Railroad and Trail Law. CENTER FOR GOVERNMENTAL RESPONSIBILITYThomas T. Ankersen Director, CGR Conservation Clinic and Costa Rica Law Program; Legal Skills Professor. B.A., M.A., University of South Florida; J.D., University of Florida. Joan D. Flocks Director, Social Policy Division; Af liate Faculty with the Center for Latin American Studies and the School of Natural Resources and Environment. B.S., M.A., J.D., University of Florida. Ewa Gmurzynska Director, Center for American Law Studies at Warsaw University, Poland. M.B.A., J.D., Ph.D., Warsaw University; LL.M., University of Florida. Richard Hamann Associate in Law. B.A., J.D., University of Florida. Clifford Jones Lecturer/Associate in Law Research. B.A., Southern Illinois University; M.Phil., Ph.D., University of Cambridge (England); J.D., University of Oklahoma, College of Law. Timothy E. McLendon Staff Attorney. A.B., Duke University; J.D., University of Florida. Stephen J. Powell Senior Lecturer in Law; Director, International Trade Law Program. B.A., J.D., University of Florida. Jeffry S. Wade Director, Environmental Division. B.A., University of Alabama; M.Ed., J.D., University of Florida. CLINICS Iris A. Burke Senior Legal Skills Professor; Associate Director, Center on Children and Families. B.A., Brooklyn College; J.D., Brooklyn Law School. Robin Davis Legal Skills Professor; Associate Director, Institute for Dispute Resolution. B.A., Michigan State University; J.D., University of Florida. George R. “Bob” Dekle Senior Legal Skills Professor; Director, Criminal Law Clinic-Prosecution. B.A., J.D., University of Florida. Teresa Drake Director, Intimate Partner Violence Assistance Clinic. B.S., Drexel University; J.D., University of Florida. Jeffrey T. Grater Senior Legal Skills Professor; Associate Director, Center on Children and Families. B.A., J.D., University of Florida. Monique Haughton Worrell Senior Legal Skills Professor; Supervising Attorney, Child Welfare Clinic; Associate Director, Center on Children and Families. B.A., St. Johns University; J.D., University of Florida. Meshon Rawls Senior Legal Skills Professor; Director, Gator TeamChild Program; Associate Director, Center on Children and Families. B.A., J.D., University of Florida. Peggy F. Schrieber Senior Legal Skills Professor; Associate Director, Center on Children and Families. B.A., J.D., University of Florida. Jennifer Zedalis Director, Trial Practice; Senior Legal Skills Professor; Coordinator, Gerald T. Bennett Prosecutor/ Public Defender CLE Course. B.A., Duke University; J.D., University of Florida. LEGAL RESEARCH WRITING AND APPELLATE ADVOCACYHenry T. Wihnyk Director, Legal Research and Writing and Appellate Advocacy, Senior Legal Skills Professor. B.A., Florida Atlantic University; J.D., Nova University; LL.M., Columbia University. Mary Adkins Senior Legal Skills Professor. B.S. Journalism, J.D., University of Florida. Senior Executive Editor, Florida Law Review. Joseph S. Jackson Senior Legal Skills Professor. A.B., Princeton University; J.D., University of Florida. Leanne J. P aum Senior Legal Skills Professor. B.D., University of Florida; J.D., Florida State University. Teresa J. Reid Rambo Master Legal Skills Professor. B.A., University of Florida; J.D., Santa Clara University. Betsy L. Ruff Senior Legal Skills Professor. B.A., J.D., University of Florida. Patricia A. Thomson Senior Legal Skills Professor. B.A., Hollins College; J.D., University of Florida. Diane A. Tomlinson Senior Legal Skills Professor. B.S., B.A., J.D., University of Florida. LEGAL DRAFTING Deborah Cupples Legal Skills Professor. J.D., University of Florida. Leslie H. Knight Senior Legal Skills Professor; of Counsel, University of Florida. B.S., Florida State University; J.D., Duke University. Margaret Temple-Smith Senior Legal Skills Professor. B.A., J.D., Wake Forest University. Gaylin G. Soponis Director, Senior Legal Skills Professor. A.B., Mount Holyoke College; J.D., George Washington University. LEADERS IN LEGAL SCHOLARSHIP. FACULTY44 UF LAW

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FAMILY LAW“We recently celebrated the 20th anniversary of the Convention on the Rights of the Child—the United Nations’ most widely rati ed human rights treaty— which articulates comprehensive civil, political, cultural and economic rights for children. Since the convention was rati ed, we have seen marked progress on children’s rights. The convention has helped societies conceptualize children’s rights as a holistic concept and extends to children who are affected by armed con ict, child labor, domestic violence and child traf cking. Despite this progress, there is still much to be done to protect and advance children’s human rights. An overwhelming number of children lack access to medical care, food, adequate shelter, and primary education. Children from marginalized communities, children with disabilities, and girls face disproportionate discrimination. Through our curriculum, study abroad programs, clinical work, speaker series, and conferences, UF Law’s Center on Children and Families seeks to advance children’s rights by supporting students who are working toward legal reform and social change that bene t children.” ——SHANI M. KINGAssociate Professor; Co-Director, Center on Children and Families PROSPECTUS 45

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YOUR FIRST CASE STARTS HERE. PREPARE IT WELL. Law is a diverse eld that requires professionals to work with and represent individuals and organizations in every part of society. Therefore, we seek students with a range of interests, backgrounds, experiences and perspectives. ENTRANCEPreparation for Law School. Law is a diverse profession that requires practitioners to work with and represent individuals and organizations in every part of society. Because legal careers are so varied, law schools do not recommend any particular major, but instead expect students to possess the skills necessary for effective written and oral communication and critical thinking. For additional information about pre-law study, law school and the legal profession, we recommend you refer to the Of cial Guide to U.S. Law Schools, published annually by the Law School Admission Council (LSAC) and the American Bar Association. The guide is available at www.lsac.org. ADMISSIONS46 UF LAW

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PROSPECTUS 47 JURIS DOCTOR APPLICANTSJ.D. APPLICATION DEADLINE – FALL 2011 ADMISSION  File and complete by March 15  Noti cation by mid-to-late April  Applicants must take the LSAT no later than February 2011

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STANDARDS FOR ADMISSION AND GEN ERAL INFORMATION Faculty Admissions Policy The admissions policy of the University of Florida Levin College of Law furthers the mission of the college: excellence in educating professionals, advancing legal scholarship, serving the public and fostering justice. The Levin College of Law has a responsibility as a state institution to educate lawyers who will serve the legal needs of all citizens and communities in Florida. The Levin College of Law seeks to admit and enroll students who will distinguish themselves in serving the state, region and nation through the practice of law, formulation of public policy, legal scholarship, and other law-related activities. Legal education is enhanced in a student body composed of people with different backgrounds who contribute a variety of viewpoints to enrich the educational experience. This diversity is important because lawyers must be prepared to analyze and interpret the law, understand and appreciate competing arguments, represent diverse clients and constituencies in many different forums, and develop policies affecting a broad range of people. Thus, the Levin College of Law seeks to admit and enroll students who, collectively, bring to its educational program a wide range of backgrounds, experiences, interests and perspectives. The breadth and variety of perspectives to which graduates of the Levin College of Law are exposed while in law school will enable them to provide outstanding service in many different public and private capacities. Through its admissions process, the Levin College of Law seeks to admit and enroll students who will excel academically, attain the highest standards of professional excellence and integrity, and bring vision, creativity and commitment to the legal profession. The Levin College of Law gives substantial weight to numerical predictors of academic success (undergraduate grade point average and LSAT scores). Numbers alone, however, are not the only consideration. The Levin College of Law considers all information submitted by applicants. Factors such as the dif culty of prior academic programs, academic honors, letters of recommendation from instructors, or graduate training may provide additional information about academic preparation and potential. In some cases, demonstrated interest, prior training, or a variety of experiences may indicate that an applicant is particularly well-suited to take advantage of specialized educational opportunities. Information about work experience, leadership, community service, overcoming prior disadvantages or commitment to serve those for whom legal services have been unavailable or dif cult to obtain may show that an applicant is in a unique position to add diversity to the law school community or to make signi cant contributions to the practice of law. Selection Process The admissions staff and the Faculty Admissions Committee base their selection on the applicant’s academic credentials, including LSAT score, UGPA, level of writing ability, breadth of studies, and on other criteria, including, but not limited to, the applicant’s work and other life experiences, leadership experience, depth of particular interest, and any other aspect of an applicant’s background suggesting a suitability for the study and practice of law. Timing of Admissions Decisions The Faculty Admissions Committee makes nal decisions for all candidates by mid-to-late April. Applicants are immediately noti ed in writing upon nal decision. The Levin College of Law begins notifying applicants from the time the rst decision is made (late November or early December) and until the class is lled using a modi ed “rolling admissions” process— les are reviewed in the order in which they are completed, but decisions are not necessarily made in the order in which applications are received. The Levin College of Law’s online Application Status Check allows applicants to view their current application status, contact information, receipt of materials such as the resume, admissions statement, and letters of recommendation, and provides applicants with a record of announcements from the Levin College of Law Of ce of Admissions. Please visit the Application Status Check at www.law.u .edu/ admissions/applicationcheck.shtml Ineligibility for Admission Applicants who have received a law degree (or bachelor’s degree combined with a law program) from a U.S. institution are not eligible for admission to the Levin College of Law. In addition, credit is not given for correspondence courses or other work completed in residence at a non-ABA accredited law school. Prior Law School Attendees Applicants who have attended another law school must submit a written statement about their attendance, a complete transcript, and a statement from their dean indicating class rank and certifying they are in good standing and eligible to return to the institution as a continuing student. Those not in good standing or ineligible to return as a continuing student are not eligible to apply to the Levin College of Law. Petitioning for Reconsideration Applicants who have been denied admission can request reconsideration only in cases where the applicant has learned of signi cant additional information that was not available at the time of the original application. The Faculty Admissions Committee’s original decision would have been based upon all academic and non-academic information included in the original application. Information about events, such as grades or awards, occurring after the March 15th le completion deadline cannot be considered. Reconsideration must be requested within 30 days of the date of the denial letter. The committee’s decision on a petition for reconsideration is nal and is not subject to further appeal. A written request must include an explanation of the new information as well as valid reasons warranting reconsideration, and should be submitted to the Assistant Dean for Admissions, University of Florida Levin College of Law, 141 Bruton-Geer Hall, P. O. Box 117622, Gainesville, FL 32611-7622. The request should be plainly marked “Request for Reconsideration.” ADMISSIONS 48 UF LAW

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JD APPLICATION PROCESSLevin College of Law Electronic Application J.D. applicants are required to use the Levin College of Law LSAC electronic application available at www.LSAC.org. LSAC will mail the Levin College of Law a hard copy of your electronic application via UPS. Please do not send us an additional copy. Students with visual impairments may obtain accessible PDF application forms from our website www.law.u .edu. Within 10 business days of submitting the LSAC electronic application, applicants will receive an email acknowledgement from the Levin College of Law Of ce of Admissions which is generated after the Of ce of Admissions accesses the electronic application from LSAC. This email will include separate instructions for submitting the UF Supplemental Data Form and the residency form, paying the application fee and processing your UF ID number (for non-UF undergraduate applicants). Please contact our of ce if you have not received an email acknowledgement of your application within 10 business days of submission of your application. The Levin College of Law Of ce of Admissions does not process fee waiver applications for the LSAT and LSDAS. In addition, the $30 application fee is a State of Florida charge and cannot be waived by the Levin College of Law. LSAT/CAS All applicants are required to take the Law School Admission Test (LSAT). LSAT scores are valid for ve years. In the absence of documentation that a candidate was ill, or that some other unusual condition occurred during one of the tests, all LSAT scores are considered. Applicants should discuss score differentiation in an addendum. Applicants are required to register with LSAC’s Credential Assembly Service (CAS), which centralizes and standardizes undergraduate academic records and provides them to the law schools to which candidates apply. Registration is valid for ve years from the date that the LSAT/CAS registration form is processed. Applicants must ensure that undergraduate transcripts from each college, university or high school/ university dual enrollment program attended are on le at the CAS, and that they have selected the University of Florida Levin College of Law as one of the law schools to which the LSAT Law School Report should be sent. Sending a transcript from only one institution attended is not suf cient even if the transcript contains grades from previous institutions. The law school code for the University of Florida Levin College of Law is 5812. Upon submission of your electronic application, your Law School Report will be requested automatically and once your CAS le is complete, your Law School Report will arrive at the College of Law one to two weeks after the date of electronic ling of the Levin College of Law application. To update the Law School Report, applicants should send updated transcripts to CAS well in advance of the College of Law’s March 15th completion deadline. The Credential Assembly Service requires two to three weeks to process transcript updates. Important Note for Foreign-Educated Applicants: The University of Florida Levin College of Law requires that foreign transcripts be submitted through LSAC’s Credential Assembly Service (CAS) which will authenticate and evaluate your transcripts. Foreign-educated applicants must take the LSAT; the Levin College of Law does not require the TOEFL for the JD program. Applicants who completed any postsecondary work outside the U.S. (including its territories) or Canada, must use the CAS for the evaluation of foreign transcripts. The one exception to this requirement is foreign work completed through a study abroad, consortium, or exchange program sponsored by a U.S. or Canadian institution, and where the work is clearly indicated as such on the home campus transcript. Please see www.LSAC.org for more details about the CAS. Admissions Statement The Levin College of Law seeks to enroll a class with varied backgrounds and interests. Such diversity contributes to the learning environment of the law school, and historically has produced graduates who have served all segments of society and who have become leaders in many elds of law. To better assess these qualities, the Levin College of Law requires each applicant to submit an Admissions Statement not to exceed four doublespaced pages in a font no smaller than 12 pt. This statement should focus on academic abilities and experiences and may include, but is not limited to, information regarding career goals, interests, unique abilities, academic experiences and activities, and public service. The Admissions Statement should provide academic information not found in any other part of your le. Although interviews are not part of the admissions process, the admissions statement can serve as an “interview on paper.” Optional Diversity Statement Lawyers serve critical roles in our society. As our society becomes increasingly diverse, the College of Law requires a broadly diverse student body to achieve its mission of excellence in education, research and service. Broad diversity encompasses experiences, socioeconomic background, talents, race, gender and other attributes and provides multicultural learning opportunities. Applicants are encouraged, but not required, to submit a statement describing the multi-cultural skills that they have developed, including their most relevant speci c life experiences, and how those skills and experiences would foster diversity at the College of Law. The Diversity Statement should not exceed two double-spaced pages and should FALL 2010 ENROLLED CLASS PROFILE Class size 309 Median LSAT/GPA 162/3.67 LSAT 75th/25th% 164/160 GPA 75th/25th% 3.84/3.45 Women 43% Minorities 27% Out-of-state students 10% Average age 23 Age range 20-37 Out of college 1 to 4 years 40% Out of college 5+ years 6% Undergrad colleges represented 75CLASS PROFILEPROSPECTUS 49

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ADMISSIONSbe in a font no smaller than 12 pt. Please do not repeat text from the Admissions Statement in the Diversity Statement. Rsum All applicants are required to submit a professional rsum or curriculum vitae (CV) which should include speci c, factual information about education, honors and awards, extracurricular or community activities, publications, work history, military service and/or foreign language pro ciencies. Please de ne time frames and be as detailed as possible. Letters of Recommendation The College of Law strongly encourages candidates to submit up to four letters of recommendation. Recommenders should evaluate in detail the applicant’s academic performance and skills, extracurricular activities, community service, and/or employment. Please note that the College of Law does not consider personal recommendations (for example, those from family, friends or persons who have never taught or supervised the applicant in a professional setting). Candidates have two options for submitting letters of recommendation: € LSAC Letter of Recommendation (LOR) Service: The College of Law strongly prefers that letters be submitted through the LOR Service included with the CAS registration. € Submit directly to the College of Law: Letters of recommendation may be submitted directly to the law school; they should be on letterhead and in standard business letter format and accompanied by the cover form located on the LSAC electronic application web site. Credential packets from career planning of ces are acceptable in lieu of individually submitted letters. Please note that the College of Law does not accept unsolicited letters of recommendation. Letters sent directly to the College of Law must be accompanied by the College of Law’s recommendation cover form with the applicant’s signature. Letters of recommendation are not required; therefore, action will proceed with or without letters once all required materials are received. Addendums and Other Materials Applicants who wish to discuss any unique issue may include a separate one-page addendum with their application. This document may include, but need not be limited to, information about poor grade progression, history of standardized testing, linguistic barriers, or a personal or family history of educational or socioeconomic disadvantage. Please do not include with your application writing samples, newspaper/magazine articles, photographs, CDs, DVDs, audio cassettes or videotapes. These items will not be evaluated as part of the application and will not be returned to the applicant. We strongly recommend that applicants keep copies of their applications for their reference. Additional Personal Information Questions 1 and 2 in section C of the application require candidates to report any disciplinary action taken against them at any college or university (#1), and/or academic probation and suspension (#2). Question 3 is about speci c violations of law. Applicants answering “yes” to any question must attach an explanation for each response and provide of cial documentation from the college/ university, or court, documenting the nal disposition of each occurrence. It is the responsibility of the applicant to provide all documentation for each “yes” response. Any student uncertain about his or her academic and/or disciplinary history should contact the Student Judicial Affairs of ce at each college or university attended. (Current or former UF students should contact Student Judicial Affairs at 202 Peabody Hall, P.O. Box 114075, Gainesville, FL 32611, phone 352-392-1261). Admission to the University of Florida Levin College of Law is contingent upon the accuracy of information required to be furnished as part of the application process. Intentional failure to furnish required information or misrepresentation of such information can result in the withdrawal of an offer of admission prior to matriculation, dismissal from the college after matriculation, rescission of the student’s degree after graduation, and/ or forfeiture of all fees and charges paid and academic credit earned. Any such failure to disclose or any misrepresentation may result in an investigation by the Law School Admission Council’s Misconduct and Irregularities in the Admission Process Subcommittee and may also affect admission to a state bar. Character and Fitness and the Need for Full Disclosure Applicants must respond completely and accurately to all questions on the law school application. After submitting the application, applicants are required to immediately notify the College of Law of any changes in data that occur either prior to a decision or matriculation. This includes information required by questions 1, 2 and 3 in section C of the application. Applicants should be aware that, in conducting character and tness investigations, state bar authorities frequently request copies of candidates’ applications for admission to law school to determine if the information is accurate and demonstrates full disclosure. Discrepancies and/ or omissions may call into question the applicant’s tness for admission to a state bar, since they re ect on the applicant’s character and ability to follow directions, trustworthiness, honesty, and reliability. Each state establishes bar registration and admissions standards for individuals who wish to practice in that state. One important aspect of admission to practice is an evaluation of an applicant’s character and tness to practice law. States subject applicants to the bar to a rigorous character and tness investigation before admission to practice. Applicants are strongly encouraged, prior to matriculation, to contact the Board of Bar Examiners in the states where they intend to practice to determine the rules that will apply to their bar admission in those states, including what constitutes proof of suf cient character and tness.TRANSFER/VISITOR APPLICANTSGeneral Requirements for all Transfer and Visitor Applicants: Students attending a law school accredited by the American Bar Association (ABA) may apply for transfer or to visit the Levin College of Law. Levin College of Law LSAC Electronic Application All transfer and visitor candidates are required to use the Levin College of Law LSAC electronic 50 UF LAW

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application available at www.LSAC.org. LSAC will mail the College of Law a hard copy of your electronic application via UPS. Please do not send us an additional copy. Students with visual impairments may obtain accessible PDF application forms from our web site www.law.u .edu. Within 10 business days of submitting the LSAC electronic application, applicants will receive an email acknowledgement from the Levin College of Law Of ce of Admissions which is generated after the Of ce of Admissions accesses the electronic application from LSAC. This email will include separate instructions for submitting the UF Supplemental Data Form and the residency form, paying the application fee and processing your UF ID number (for non-UF undergraduate applicants). Please contact our of ce if you have not received an email acknowledgement of your application within 10 business days of submission of your application. Please note that the Levin College of Law Of ce of Admissions does not process fee waiver applications for the LSAT and LSDAS. In addition, the $30 application fee is a State of Florida charge and cannot be waived by the College of Law. The College of Law’s Application Status Check allows applicants to view their current application status, contact information, receipt of materials such as the resume, statement, and letters of recommendation, and provides applicants with a record of announcements from the Levin College of Law Of ce of Admissions. Please visit Application Status Check at www.law.u .edu/admissions/applicationcheck.shtml. LSAT Law School Report By applying through the Levin College of Law LSAC electronic application process, the Law School Report is automatically requested and included with all transfer and visitor applications. Statement and Rsum Transfer and Visitor applicants must submit an Admissions Statement indicating their reasons for wanting to attend the Levin College of Law. This statement should focus only on the law school academic experience and should not exceed four double-spaced pages in a font no smaller than 12 pts. Applicants are encouraged, but not required, to submit a Diversity Statement describing the multi-cultural skills that they have developed, including their most relevant speci c life experiences, and how those skills and experiences would foster diversity at the College of Law. The Diversity Statement should not exceed two double-spaced pages and should be in a font no smaller than 12 pt. Please do not repeat text from your Admissions Statement in the Diversity Statement. In addition, all applicants are required to submit a professional rsum or curriculum vitae (CV) which should include speci c, factual information about items such as education, honors and awards, extracurricular or community activities, publications, work history, military service and/or foreign language pro ciencies. Please de ne time frames and be as detailed as possible. Additional Personal Information Questions 1 and 2 in section C of the application require candidates to report any disciplinary action taken against them at any college or university (No. 1), and/or academic probation and suspension (No. 2). Question No. 3 concerns speci c violations of law. Applicants answering “yes” to any question must attach an explanation for each response and provide of cial documentation from the college/university, or court, documenting the nal disposition of each occurrence. It is the responsibility of the applicant to provide all documentation for each “yes” response. Any student uncertain about his or her academic and/or disciplinary history should contact the Student Judicial Affairs of ce at each college or university attended. (Current or former UF students should contact Student Judicial Affairs at 202 Peabody Hall, P.O. Box 114075, Gainesville, FL 32611, phone (352) 392-1261). Admission to the College of Law is contingent upon the accuracy of information required to be furnished as part of the application process. Intentional failure to furnish required information or misrepresentation of such information can result in the withdrawal of an offer of admission prior to matriculation, dismissal from the college after matriculation, rescission of the student’s degree after graduation, and/or forfeiture of all fees and charges paid and academic credit earned. Any such failure to disclose or any misrepresentation may result in an investigation by the Law School Admission Council’s Misconduct and Irregularities in the Admission Process Subcommittee and may also affect admission to a state bar. Character and Fitness and the Need for Full Disclosure Applicants must respond completely and accurately to all questions on the law school application. After submitting the application, applicants are required to immediately notify the College of Law of any changes in data that occur either prior to a decision or matriculation. This includes information required by questions 1, 2 and 3 in section C of the application. Applicants should be aware that, in conducting character and tness investigations, state bar authorities IMPORTANT DEADLINES*: JD Applicants: File and complete by March 15, 2011 Transfer Applicants:  Spring 2011 entry—File and complete by October 1, 2010  Summer 2011 entry—File and complete by March 1, 2011  Fall 2011 entry—File by July 1, 2011; complete by July 15, 2011 Visitor Applicants:  Spring 2011 entry—File and complete by December 1, 2010  Summer 2011 entry—File and complete by April 1, 2011  Fall 2011 entry—File and complete by July 1, 2011 Any deadline falling on a weekend or holiday automatically moves forward to the next business day. Please note that all deadlines are “in-hand” deadlines.PROSPECTUS 51

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UF LAW For More Information Contact Admissions: (352) 273-0890 (877) 429-1297 Admissions@law.u .edu W W LEVIN COLLEGE OF LAW ADMINISTRATION:  Robert H. Jerry II, Dean  Bill Page, Senior Associate Dean, Academic Affairs  Stuart Cohn, Associate Dean, International Studies  Michael Friel, Associate Dean and Director, Graduate Tax Program  Rachel Inman, Associate Dean, Student Affairs  Mark Fenster, Associate Dean, Faculty Development  Kathleen Price, Associate Dean, Library & Technology  Michelle Adorno, Assistant Dean, Admissions  Debra Staats, Associate Dean, Administrative and Fiscal Affairs  Linda Calvert Hanson, Assistant Dean, Career Development  Debra Amirin, Director, Communications  Kelley Frohlich, Senior Director, Development & Alumni Affairs LEVIN COLLEGE OF LAW: Mailing address: P.O. Box 117622, Gainesville, FL 32611-7622 Street address: 2500 SW 2nd Avenue, Gainesville, FL 32611 STUDENT AFFAIRS/ FINANCIAL AID: (352) 273-0620 students.svc@law.u .edu DEAN’S OFFICE: (352) 273-0600 Rules, policies, fees, dates and courses described herein are subject to change without notice. The university is committed to non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, national origin, political opinions or af liations, and veteran status as protected under the Vietnam Era Veterans’ Readjustment Assistance Act.The Prospectus is available in an alternate format. Call Levin College of Law Admissions Of ce at (352) 273-0890. For TDD phone access, call Florida Relay Service at (800) 9558771 (TDD). Produced by the Communications Of ce, Levin College of Law Lindy Brounley, Editor Photography courtesy of Charles Roop and Joshua Lukman of the Law Communications Of ce  Design by JS Design Studio  Printing by The Hartley Press, Inc. Cert no. SCS-COC-001376

PAGE 53

FINANCIAL AIDThe Financial Aid Of ce works closely with students to ensure they make the most of available aid. Entering rst-year students may qualify for a scholarship or grant based upon merit, need or merit/need as determined by a Financial Aid Committee. (Students selected for more than one scholarship will receive the award of greatest value.) Most students qualify for Federal Stafford Loans and Federal Graduate PLUS loans, which must be applied for annually using the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Private loans also may be available, based upon credit. Transfer students are eligible for federal aid, but not for law school aid until they have been evaluated at the Levin College of Law for at least one semester. SCHOLARSHIPS: Merit-Based: Awards for entering students are based on information collected in the application for admission. Scholarship decisions are made starting in December and completed by April. Recipients are noti ed by letter. Merit/Need-Based: To qualify, an applicant must show high achievement. In addition, the Levin College of Law must have received the electronic FAFSA results and the need-based scholarship and grant application by one of the following deadlines if admitted: € Prior to Jan. 15, 2011—by Feb. 7 € Jan. 16–Feb. 15, 2011—by March 7 € After Feb. 15, 2011—by April 7 Need-Based Grants: To be considered for a need-based grant, an applicant must have the electronic FAFSA results and the additional aid application on le by one of the following deadlines if admitted: € Prior to Jan. 15, 2011—by Feb. 7 € Jan. 16–Feb. 15, 2011—by March 7 € After Feb. 15, 2011—by April 7 Continuing Student Scholarships. Students will be noti ed when scholarship applications are available. Continuing students can apply for these scholarships after completion of their rst year. LOANS: Federal. Law students are eligible to apply for Federal Direct Subsidized Stafford Loans, Federal Direct Unsubsidized Stafford Loans, and Federal Direct PLUS Loans through the Federal Direct Student Loan Program (FDSLP). Students applying must complete a Free Application for Federal Student Aid. Completion quali es the student for consideration in federal loan and employment programs. Apply electronically—“FAFSA on the Web”—at www.fafsa.ed.gov. The application period begins Jan. 1 and results should be received electronically from the federal processor (no photocopies) by April 7 to ensure timely processing of loans. Students attending at least half-time may qualify for as much as $8,500 in subsidized and $12,000 in unsubsidized funds, for a total of $20,500 each academic year. Students also may apply for the Federal Graduate Plus Loan to help cover the cost of attendance. For more information on these loans, visit www.law.u .edu/students/ nancial. Private. The interest rate and/or guarantee fee on private loans vary according to the lender and are credit-based. You may borrow as much as the cost of attendance minus any other nancial aid you are receiving.Florida Residents $16,386.60* Non-Residents $35,751.30* Books/Supplies: $1,000 Clothing/Maintenance: $730 Computer: $910 Food: $3,340 Personal/Insurance: $1,650 Room: $6,770 Transportation: $530 New Student Orientation Fee: $150 Total for Florida Residents $31,467 Total for Non-Residents: $50,831FEES & EXPENSES 2010-11FINANCIAL AID PROSPECTUS 53 *Based on 30 credit hours ($546.22 per credit for Florida residents; $1,191.71 per credit for non-residents) as de ned by UF undergraduate catalog.

PAGE 54

UF LAW For More Information Contact Admissions: (352) 273-0890 (877) 429-1297 Admissions@law.u .edu W W LEVIN COLLEGE OF LAW ADMINISTRATION:  Robert H. Jerry II, Dean  Bill Page, Senior Associate Dean, Academic Affairs  Stuart Cohn, Associate Dean, International Studies  Michael Friel, Associate Dean and Director, Graduate Tax Program  Rachel Inman, Associate Dean, Student Affairs  Mark Fenster, Associate Dean, Faculty Development  Kathleen Price, Associate Dean, Library & Technology  Michelle Adorno, Assistant Dean, Admissions  Debra Staats, Associate Dean, Administrative Affairs  Linda Calvert Hanson, Assistant Dean, Career Development  Debra Amirin, Director, Communications  Kelley Frohlich, Senior Director, Development & Alumni Affairs LEVIN COLLEGE OF LAW: Mailing address: P.O. Box 117622, Gainesville, FL 32611-7622 Street address: 2500 SW 2nd Avenue, Gainesville, FL 32611 STUDENT AFFAIRS/ FINANCIAL AID: (352) 273-0620 students.svc@law.u .edu DEAN’S OFFICE: (352) 273-0600 Rules, policies, fees, dates and courses described herein are subject to change without notice. The university is committed to non-discrimination with respect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, national origin, political opinions or af liations, and veteran status as protected under the Vietnam Era Veterans’ Readjustment Assistance Act.The Prospectus is available in an alternate format. Call Levin College of Law Admissions Of ce at (352) 273-0890. For TDD phone access, call Florida Relay Service at (800) 9558771 (TDD). Produced by the Communications Of ce, Levin College of Law Lindy Brounley, Editor Photography courtesy of Charles Roop and Joshua Lukman of the Law Communications Of ce  Design by JS Design Studio  Printing by The Hartley Press, Inc. Cert no. SCS-COC-001376

PAGE 55

INSIDEThe study of law should enrich the rest of your life as well as the lives of those you touch. The educational opportunities offered at UF Law, Florida’s oldest public and most prestigious law school, will provide that experience and prepare you for legal excellence in nearly any setting, in any part of the world. As a student, you will be among accomplished peers, professors and practitioners. As a graduate, you will add to the strength of an alumni network with a 100-year legacy of leadership and public service. Become a member of the UF Law tradition. Photograph the QR code at left with your mobile device to take a virtual tour of the Levin College of Law campus. (To download the app, visit www.mobile-barcodes.com/qr-code-software/.) WWW.LAW.UFL.EDULET THIS BE IN YOUR FUTURE LEGAL LEADERSHIP: YESTERDAY, TODAY AND TOMORROW

PAGE 56

Levin College of Law P.O. Box 117622 Gainesville, FL 32611-7622 NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATION U.S. POSTAGE PAIDGAINESVILLE, FL PERMIT NO. 94 YOUR FUTUREBEGINS AT UF LAWwww.law.ufl.edu LEGAL LEADERSHIP: YESTERDAY, TODAY AND TOMORROW LEVIN COLLEGE OF LAW | PROSPECTUS 2010


Prospectus
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00090518/00006
 Material Information
Title: Prospectus
Series Title: Prospectus
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: Levin College of Law, University of Florida
Publisher: Levin College of Law, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: 2010
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00090518:00006

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LEGAL LEADERSHIP: YESTERDAY, TODAY AND TOMORROW














































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Statistics and facts cannot provide A diverse curriculum with a broad
a complete picture of UF Law, but range of opportunities for study
they are impressive nonetheless. Facilities are expansive and
technology is state-of-the-art, yet
SFlorida's only top-50 law school-- comfortable and designed around a
ranked No. 47 overall by U.S. central courtyard to foster personal
News and World Report and connections
No. 24 among all public law One of only five law schools in
schools the country to house an academic
S Internationally recognized faculty research and resource center
known for excellence in teaching devoted to the study of race and

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100 YEARS OF TRADITION.


Times have changed since 1909.
Today's student body possesses first-
rate qualifications and a broad range
of backgrounds and experiences.
* The student body during the
2009-10 academic year was com-
prised of 1,228 students, with 1,106
of them JD students from through-
out the Southeast and nation
* 36 students are earning joint JD/
master's or PhD degrees


* 306 students in the 2009 fall
entering JD class were divided
into three sections
* 122 students are enrolled in
LLM and SJD programs
* The school also has approximately
17 students in its LLM in
Comparative Law Program,
with these students hailing
from countries that include
South Africa, China, Saudi
Arabia, India, and Peru

























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P R 0 S P E C T U S






ALUMNI


100 YEARS OF GATOR LAWYERS. Alumni at the Levin

College of Law are leaders in the legal profession, the

judiciary, business, government, public service and

education at state, national and international levels. Each

year, these legal professionals are cited as the nation's

best in publications such as The National Law Journal

and Best Lawyers in America as they make their mark

on society and the legal profession. Among them are

more ABA presidents than from any other law school in the

past 30 years, hundreds of state and federal judges, state

and federal legislators, Florida governors, and nationally

prominent lawyers, business executives and academicians.



UF's law school has been prolific in
graduating legal leaders.
SAQ* The Levin College of Law has
produced five American Bar Associa-
tion presidents, including the ABA's
current president, Stephen Zack (JD
71)-more than any other U.S. law
school since 1973
t The Levin College of Law is ranked
No. 4 among public law schools (No.
0 8 overall) in terms of the number of its
graduates serving as federal district
and circuit court judges in 2010, ac-
UF Law graduates who have served as ABA presidents include, from left, the late Chesterfield Smith (JD48), 1973-74; cording to the Federal Judicial Center
Talbot "Sandy" D'Alemberte (JD 62), 1991-92; Stephen Zack (JD 71), current; Martha W. Barnett (JD 73), 2000-01; and
W. Reece Smith (JD 49), 1980-81.


U F LAW








































































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ALUMNI


WORLD CLASS LEADERS. Levin College of Law is

Florida's oldest public and most prestigious law

school. The accomplishments and support of alumni

have helped distinguish the Levin College of Law as

one of the best in the nation. Nearly 19,000 alumni

have graduated since the college's founding in

1909, representing UF throughout Florida, the

nation, and more than 30 countries worldwide.











"/."/. Strong Alumni Ties.
While most Levin College of Law
alumni practice with law firms through-
out Florida and the nation, many
also serve as counsel to government
agencies, corporations, and a wide
array of public service organizations.
Strong alumni ties in these areas of the
law provide excellent intern/externship
and clerking opportunities for Levin


U F LAW




































































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Strength on the Bench.


When one considers the characteris-
tics of a good judge, the words and
phrases that immediately come to
mind may include "Loyalty to the Law,"
"Wisdom," "Fidelity," and "Integrity."
These are the attributes society seeks in
its judges and magistrates.
As the alma mater of hundreds of
federal, state and county judges, the
Levin College of Law takes enormous
pride in the accomplishments and


wisdom of its graduates serving on the
bench. Not only do these individuals
dedicate their lives in service to society,
they also serve on the judging panels
of trial team and moot court competi-
tions to educate the next generation
of UF lawyers in the subtleties of oral
advocacy.
Alumni judges collaborated to establish
the Peter T. Fay Jurist-In-Residence
Program at the Levin College of Law in
honor of the Hon. Peter T. Fay (JD 56),
senior judge on the U.S. 11th Circuit







ALUMNI & GUESTS


HIGH CALIBER LEGAL GUESTS. The Levin College of Law is

proud to have hosted eight U.S. Supreme Court justices-

five in the last five years-and other top legal thinkers from

across the country, including federal judges, Florida State

Supreme Court justices, American Bar Association presidents,

leading legal academicians, and successful practitioners.

Every year, Levin College of Law students learn the value of

being well-prepared as they stand before moot and trial court

panels made up of sitting federal judges. Every semester

students are exposed to new faces and fresh ideas-gaining

the legal knowledge and practical skills that will propel them

on their courses as the future leaders of the profession.


Court of Appeals. The Jurist-In-Resi-
dence Program brings a working judge
to the Levin College of Law campus for
a week each year to interact with and
instruct Levin College of Law students.
Through this interaction, students gain
first-hand instruction on a broad array
of issues relating to judicial process,
substantive law, trial and appellate
advocacy, and the day-to-day practice
of law.
In addition to the many Levin College
of Law alumni serving on the bench,


Levin College of Law alumni also serve
their nation as legislators, congress-
men and public servants. Levin College
of Law graduates serve in the highest
level of our nation's government. Carol
M. Browner (JD 79), President Barack
Obama's "climate and energy czar," is
director of the White House Office of
Energy and Climate Change. Esther
Olavarria (JD 86) serves as the Obama
Administration's deputy assistant secre-
tary for policy within the Department of
Homeland Security, and will be influen-
tial in formulating the nation's immigra-


tion policy. And, Osvaldo Gratac6s (JD
00) serves as the Obama Administra-
tion's inspector general for the Export/
Import Bank of the United States.
Today's Levin College of Law graduates
distinguish themselves and their alma
mater by their achievements, but their
path to success has been laid over the
course of 100 years of College of Law
trailblazers. They are following in the
footsteps of the Levin College of Law
tradition, as will the generations of UF
lawyers to come.


PROSPECTUS







EXPANDED FACILITIES


The Martin H. Levin
Advocacy Center.

Levin College of Law faculty, staff and
students enjoy a new legal advocacy
center second to none. The Martin H.
Levin Advocacy Center (pictured at
right) expands legal advocacy educa-
tion and provides state-of-the-art trial
facilities for the college. The advocacy
center is a stand-alone, 20,000 sq. foot
building boasting an impressive two-
story grand foyer and glass entry with
an open staircase that rises south of
Bruton-Geer Hall. It houses a fully func-


tional trial and appellate courtroom
on the first floor with a 98-seat gallery,
bench for seven judges, a jury box and
attorneys' tables. The courtroom also
accommodates judge's chambers and
a jury deliberation room. The second
floor will house offices and classrooms
following its completion in fall of 2010.
Named in honor of Martin H. Levin,
son and former colleague of Pensacola
attorney and college namesake Fredric
G. Levin, the center places the Levin
College of Law at the forefront of major
law colleges in providing students with
sophisticated facilities and services.



















































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EXPANDED FACILITIES


The Levin College of Law has the
largest legal information center in
the Southeast, and among the top 20
nationwide. Students also have access
to 3.5 million-plus volumes in other
UF libraries and 43 million titles held
by libraries throughout the world, and
to databases that provide federal and
state laws, periodicals, news articles and
background materials. Other features of
the 100,000 square-foot Lawton Chiles
Legal Information Center include:
* As the laboratory of the law school,
the information center houses more
than 600,000 volumes in open stack
displays


* An open reserve area to give
students direct access to exams and
study aids
* The Richard B. Stephens Tax
Research Center-named for the
co-founder and first director of
the school's nationally prominent
Graduate Tax Program-featuring
nearly 70 carrels for tax LLM students,
a graduate lounge, meeting room
and offices for the Florida Tax Review
* Thirteen conference rooms that
accommodate as many as a dozen
students for team study and LLM
research






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GAINESVILLE















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STUDENT AFFAIRS


AT YOUR SERVICE. The Office of Student Affairs

provides assistance in nearly every area of student life,

including orientation, financial aid, registration, aca-

demic and educational counseling, and even personal

matters. The office promotes the development of the

whole person, not simply the intellectual aspects.


Key offerings include:
* "Introduction to Law School &
the Profession," a multi-day orienta-
tion program that provides
an introduction to legal education,
basic legal structures, professional
responsibilities of lawyers-to-be,
and University of Florida information


* "Academic Success Program"
provides ongoing tutoring, individual
counseling and workshops on topics
such as exam preparation, time and
stress management, communication
skills and study methods

* Because more diversity results in a
better legal system, the school offers
a highly supportive environment to
help minorities excel and strongly


U F LAW























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DEGREES


LEGAL STUDIES TAILORED TO YOU.


The law school provides
courses of study leading to
the following:

* Juris Doctor, including certifi-
cate programs in Environmen-
tal and Land Use Law, Estates
and Trusts Practice, Family
Law, Intellectual Property Law,
and International and Com-
parative Law
* Joint degree by combining
a JD with either a master's
or doctorate degree in just
about any discipline
* LLM in Taxation

* LLM in International Taxation

* SJD in Taxation

* LLM in Environmental and
Land Use Law


* LLM in Comparative Law for
foreign law students

Current Degree Requirements.

* Completion with a passing
grade of courses totaling at
least 88 semester credit hours,
of which at least 59 must have
been completed through the
College of Law. No more than
four of those credits can be
earned through co-curricular
activities
* With permission of the associ-
ate dean for students, upon
good cause shown, work up
to 29 semester hours taken
at another ABA-accredited
law school may be counted
toward this requirement.
(Note: Grades in transferred
courses will not be figured
into the student's GPA.)


* Completion with a passing
grade for Legal Research
and Writing (LAW 5792)
and Appellate Advocacy
(LAW 5793)

* Completion with a passing
grade for all required 1 L
courses and Legal Drafting
(LAW 6955)
* Achievement of 2.0 cumula-
tive GPA on all graded work
attempted
* Fulfillment of prescribed
course requirements
* Satisfaction of the advanced
writing requirement

These requirements must be
fulfilled within 24-84 months of
matriculation as a law student.


J.D. PROGRAM

Comprehensive curriculum for
more opportunities.

The three-year JD program is carefully
designed to develop students' analyti-
cal abilities, practical knowledge, com-
munications skills and understanding of
the codes of responsibility and ethics
central to the practice of law. Students
benefit from a variety of teaching


methods, including the traditional
"case" and "Socratic" methods, as
well as simulations, videotaping,
computer-assisted instruction and
role-playing.

The required first-year curriculum places
an emphasis on practical lawyering by
teaching students to read and analyze
cases, research points of law efficiently
and express those points clearly.


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Second- and third-year students can
tailor studies to specific interests and
career plans through more than 100
elective courses, advanced courses,
seminars, certificate programs, joint
degrees and study abroad opportunities.

Required courses develop and refine
students' writing abilities, while clinical
programs (simulated and live) allow
students to develop skills in the
context of real cases. Seminars and


advanced courses provide individual-
ized research opportunities and close
interaction with faculty.

In combining a top-notch JD cur-
riculum with a well-rounded selection
of extra-curricular opportunities for
professional development, the Levin
College of Law seeks to graduate
young lawyers who are ethical,
competent, and enthusiastic about
the law.


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DEGREES


ADVANCED WORK HONES LEGAL SKILLS


Advanced Writing Requirement.

All JD candidates must com-
plete-under close faculty super-
vision-a major finished product
that shows evidence of original
systematic scholarship based on
individual research. This typically
is fulfilled through enrollment in
an advanced course or seminar.

Advanced Courses and Seminars.

Advanced courses and seminars
provide supplementary opportu-
nities to learn key skills in a small
group setting under the close
supervision of faculty.

Advanced courses-for topics
such as bankruptcy and debtor-
creditor law, family law and
environmental law-create oppor-
tunities for sequential learning,
complex problem-solving and de-
velopment of writing and drafting
skills. Seminars allow thorough
study and research of a topic,
which may result in a "senior
paper" to satisfy the advanced
writing requirement.


Skills Training.

Strong writing skills are crucial to
professional success. Dedicated
faculty members hone student
skills in each class year through
required courses in legal research
and writing, appellate advocacy,
and the nationally acclaimed
Legal Drafting Program, the first
in the nation and now a model
for other schools. In addition, re-
spected lawyers and judges serve
as educators to help develop
students' practical skills in trial
and appellate advocacy. Observa-
tion and critique by these profes-
sionals quickly improve students'
abilities to "think on their feet."

Order of the Coif.

The Levin College of Law is in
a select group of law schools
with a chapter of the Order of
the Coif, the national academic
law honor society. Students who
meet requirements are eligible for
election at the conclusion of their
studies.


Field work externships.

The college works closely
with numerous organizations,
agencies and legal service
groups-in and outside
Florida-to provide law students
with practical experience and
professional contacts. These
opportunities may include
pro bono work, part-time
jobs, summer internships and
externships.

Externships enable students
to earn as many as six credits
while gaining hands-on
experience and knowledge of
the law. Because placements
are with local, state and federal
government agencies, judges
and other public service
organizations, students also
provide a valuable service. For
instance, more than 40 students
have gained experience as
judicial clerks in the college's
Florida Supreme Court
Externship Program.


JURIS DOCTOR REQUIRED COURSE PROGRESSION:


First Year
Appellate Advocacy (2 credits)
Civil Procedure (4)
Constitutional Law (4)
Contracts (4)
Criminal Law (3)
Legal Research & Writing (2)
Professional Responsibility (3)
Property (4)
Torts (4)


Second Year
Legal Drafting (2)
Corporations* (3)
Estates and Trusts* (3)
Evidence* (4)

Third Year
Trial Practice* (4)

* Registration-priority courses; not
required, but faculty recommended.


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CERTIFICATES


CERTIFICATES EXPAND KNOWLEDGE BASE


Environmental and Land Use
Law Certificate.

The Levin College of Law's Envi-
ronmental and Land Use Law Cer-
tificate Program enables students
to demonstrate concentration and
accomplishment in these two im-
portant fields. Certificate require-
ments were developed by faculty
in consultation with an advisory
board of leading practitioners
from private firms, government
agencies and non-profit organiza-
tions. Enrolled students take
eight credit hours above their JD
requirements to graduate. Thus,
unlike similar programs elsewhere,
students in this personalized cur-
riculum enjoy both breadth and
depth in their studies.

Estates & Trusts Practice
Certificate.

This area of the law is of consider-
able practical importance since it
involves counseling clients on how
to effectively provide for them-
selves and dispose of property
during their lifetimes or at death.
The practice involves planning,
drafting and administering gra-
tuitous transfers of property, thus
implicating the law of gifts, trusts,
future interests, intestate suc-


cession, wills, probate, fiduciary
law and taxation. Perhaps more
importantly, the practice involves
counseling clients on the many
complex issues confronting the
elderly.

Family Law Certificate.

The increasing complexity of
divorce law and children's law
and the rise of the nontraditional
family make family law one of the
fastest growing and most intricate
practice specialties. One new
demand, for example, was created
by a Florida Supreme Court
mandate that established the
"Unified Family Court" to handle
all family, juvenile and delinquency
matters. Administered by the
Center on Children and Families,
the certificate program offers se-
quential clinical and classroom ex-
periences for effective training in
areas such as child development,
family economics, negotiation and
drafting, and courtroom advocacy.

Intellectual Property Law
Certificate.

Traditionally, intellectual property
law encompasses several different
bodies of law, including patents,
trade secrets, copyrights and


trademarks. The technology boom
has expanded the need for patent
lawyers as well as those trained
in related fields such as antitrust,
media, cyberlaw and general
commercial law. The demand also
continues to grow for those who
can adapt or create doctrines
in new fields-such as genetic
engineering, accessing and down-
loading Internet materials, and
disputes involving domain names,
metatags and hyperlinks-as well
as for those who can apply these
laws in more traditional industries
and the creative arts.

International and Comparative
Law Certificate.

Every field of law that involves
commerce-civil procedure,
business associations, securities
regulation, intellectual property,
trade regulation, taxation, im-
migration and environmental law,
among others-is affected by
globalization. Equally important is
the development of human rights
laws, domestically and internation-
ally. This certificate program helps
prepare students for practice in
this new global legal environment
by teaching international aspects
of every area of the law.


FLORIDA BAR EXAM

During this decade, Levin College of Law graduates, when measured
class by class, have exceeded the pass rates of all other takers from
all other law schools, both inside and outside Florida, by 7 to 14
percent every year. No other law school in Florida has a more consis-
tent, more sustained record of success on the Florida Bar Exam.


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Levin College of Law students lead the nation.


* The International Commercial Arbitration
Moot (ICAM) team competed in the
Wilhem C. Vis International Commercial
Arbitration Moot in Vienna in 2010
* First place winners of The Florida Bar
Chester Bedell Memorial Mock Trial
Competition in 2010
* Regional Champion in the ABA Law
Student Division National Apellate
Advocacy Competition in 2008-09


* National Champion Manne Moot
Court Competition in Law and
Economics in 2007
* National Champion in the National
Civil Rights Trial Competition
in 2007
* The Justice Campbell Thornal
Moot Court Board-one of the
"Elite Eight" moot court teams in
the nation in 2008







ENRICHMENT


ENRICHMENT PROGRAMS SHARPEN SKILLS.


JD students can enhance their skills,
earn credit and gain experience
through the following organizations:
* Environmental Moot Court teams
compete in national and interna-
tional environmental competition
* International Commercial Arbitra-
tion Moot (ICAM) team members
compete each spring against law
schools from throughout the world
in the Wilhelm C. Vis International
Competition in Austria
* The Jessup Moot Court Team
explores issues of public interna-
tional law and international humani-
tarian law and competes in national
and international competitions
* Justice Campbell Thornal Moot
Court Team participates in intra-
mural, state and national appellate
competitions sponsored by organi-
zations and firms
* The Trial Competition Team
competes in intramural, state,
regional and national competitions
sponsored by individuals, groups
and law firms
* Florida Journal of International Law
publishes three issues per year and




ADVANCED DEGREES

* LLM in Taxation. Graduate Tax is the
college's premier program. It is widely
recognized by tax scholars and practi-
tioners nationwide as one of the best,
and consistently ranks in the top three
in U.S. News and World Report's annual
ranking of tax programs. UF's renowned
graduate tax faculty members are
authors of some of the most widely
used textbooks and treatises, and
lecture at numerous conferences and
institutes in the United States and
abroad. They have been leaders in
professional organizations and consul-
tants for the Internal Revenue Service


contains scholarly works with global
perspectives by students, profes-
sors and practitioners on public
and private international law topics
* Florida Law Review publishes as
many as five times a year and
includes articles by students and
legal scholars who are specialists in
various areas of the law
* Journal of Technology Law and
Policy is a student-edited journal
published twice annually (also
online) that focuses on legal and
policy aspects of technology issues
* University of Florida Journal of Law
and Public Policy is an interdisci-
plinary student publication devoted
to public policy implications of
legal issues. Students publish three
issues annually and sponsor a
spring symposium
Conferences, Seminars and Speakers.
The Levin College of Law sponsors
valuable conferences, seminars and
speakers throughout the year to keep
practitioners, students and others
informed on current issues such as
environmental law, music law and
international legal issues. The college
has hosted eight U.S. Supreme Court




and other major public and private
entities. The Graduate Tax Program
also publishes The Florida Tax Review, a
faculty-edited journal that has become
one of the country's leading tax reviews.
Its publication is aided by extensive
tax library holdings in the Richard B.
Stephens Tax Research Center
SLLM in International Taxation. To
meet the growing demand for inter-
national tax experts in the globalizing
economy, the Levin College of Law
began offering a Master of Laws in
International Taxation in fall 2005.
The one-year course of study features
a renowned tax faculty, superb cur-
riculum of great breadth and depth,


justices over the years, including U.S.
Chief Justice John G. Roberts and
Associate Justice John Paul Stevens in
2008, and Associate Justice Clarence
Thomas in 2010.
International Exposure.
Through programs offered on campus
and abroad, University of Florida law
students gain international exposure
and a distinguishing edge in the job
market. Students can travel across
the world through ABA-approved
exchange programs such as: Pon-
tificia Universidade, Catolica in Rio
de Janeiro; Leiden University in the
Netherlands; University of Montpellier
in France; Johann Wolfgang Goethe
University in Germany; Monash Uni-
versity in Melbourne, Australia; and
Warsaw University in Poland.
The law school also jointly sponsors
summer law programs in France,
South Africa and Costa Rica.
Students benefit from decades of
international experience and involve-
ment by faculty as well as enrich-
ment courses that bring to campus
leading foreign professors, judges,
attorneys and government officials
to teach courses dealing with timely
law issues.




distinguished students from around
the world, and the many benefits and
opportunities stemming from the
Graduate Tax Program
* SJD in Taxation. A very limited number
of students are enrolled in the Doctor
of Juridical Science (SJD) in Taxation
Program-the first program of this kind
in the country. The degree involves
extensive study, research and writing
over a three- to five-year period
* LLM in Comparative Law. The LLM
in Comparative Law Program is for
foreign law school graduates seeking
to enhance their understanding of the
American legal system. Applicants must


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have a law degree with high academic
standing from a recognized foreign
university and thorough knowledge of
English. The one-year program builds
on UF's renowned international studies
programs and decades of involvement
in global legal issues, including trade,
environmental and land use law, human
rights and constitutional reform
*LLM in Environmental and Land Use
Law. This one-year post-JD degree
provides an opportunity to spend an
academic year full-time on the UF
campus developing in-depth expertise
in environmental and land use law.
The program adopts an innovative
approach that combines the study of


land use law with environmental law.
The program also capitalizes on the
many outstanding programs at UF in
disciplines related to environmental
and land use law practice, including
wildlife ecology, environmental engi-
neering, urban and regional planning,
and interdisciplinary ecology
Students admitted to the program
work with the LLM program director
to design an individual course of
study tailored to their particular
interests. LLM students are eligible to
participate in the Conservation Clinic
and to apply for a seat in the Summer
Environmental Law Study Abroad
Program in Costa Rica







DEGREES


CLINICAL PROGRAMS ADD PRACTICAL EXPERIENCE.


Clinical programs at the Levin
College of Law provide students
with extensive opportunities to
represent actual clients under
the close supervision of faculty
or attorneys. This practical
experience enhances the under-
standing of the law learned in
classrooms and can give gradu-
ates the advantage of earning
credits and Florida Supreme
Court certification as certified
legal interns. Clinical programs
include:

Virgil Hawkins Clinics.

The Virgil Hawkins Clinics-
the Full Representation Clinic,
County Court Mediation Clinic,
and Pro Se Clinic-are named in
honor of the Florida civil rights
activist whose efforts to be
admitted to the UF College of
Law in the late 1950s paved the


way for integration of all Florida
public universities in the early
1960s.

Conservation Clinic.

Under faculty supervision, Con-
servation Clinic students work
in teams to serve clients on
issues such as land acquisition
and conservation, ordinance
and comprehensive plan
drafting, protected area man-
agement planning, legislative
reform proposals, institutional
framework design and dispute
resolution systems design, and
conservation mediations. Each
summer the clinic also offers a
for-credit program jointly with
the University of Costa Rica
Environmental Law Clinic, with
cross-cultural teams working on
Latin America/Caribbean region
law and policy projects onsite


in Costa Rica. The Conservation
Clinic is housed at the Center
for Governmental Responsibil-
ity to ensure an interdisciplinary
focus is applied.

Criminal Clinic: Public
Defender State Attorney.

The criminal clinics enable
students to receive credit for
working with either the pros-
ecution or defense. There is a
classroom component, assign-
ments with clinic faculty, and
work as certified legal interns
in either the public defender or
state attorney offices. Under su-
pervision, participating students
handle criminal cases-includ-
ing hearings and trials-and
gain valuable experience by
working with clients, witnesses,
law enforcement and practicing
attorneys.


VIRGIL HAWKINS CLINICS

The Full Representation Clinic offers intensive
training in family law and practice, with students
serving as first chair counsel to low-income
citizens of Alachua County who could not
otherwise afford representation. Under faculty
supervision, students deal with legal matters
such as divorce, custody and visitation of
children, domestic violence, division of property
and debts, child support, alimony and estab-
lishment of paternity. Students also have the
opportunity to provide legal counseling, draft
legal documents such as pleadings, motions,
orders and judgments, and represent clients in
negotiations, mediations, hearings and trials.
The Gator TeamChild Juvenile Advocacy
Clinic provides free legal services to North
Central Florida's indigent youth. This interdis-


ciplinary juvenile advocacy clinic trains lawyers,
social workers and other professionals in
skills necessary to be advocates for children.
Through their work in the clinic, students
practice fundamental advocacy skills such as
interviewing, counseling and negotiation, are
trained to operate effectively in a law office,
and become skilled at navigating bureaucra-
cies, agencies and court systems.
The Intimate Partner Violence Assistance
Clinic is a collaboration between the Levin
College of Law, the College of Medicine,
Shands Teaching Hospital and Peaceful Paths
Domestic Abuse Network. The clinic provides
low-income intimate partner violence victims
with comprehensive and coordinated legal,
medical and social services focusing on victim
and family safety. Certified legal interns
trained to address domestic violence issues


U F LAW






































PREPARE


will join a holistic team including Shands
social workers and domestic violence
outreach counselors. Certified legal
interns will be onsite in the pediatrics and
obstetrics/gynecology clinics at Shands,
providing legal counseling to victims
and representing them in civil court on
matters such as injunctions for protection.
The County Court Mediation Clinic
enables students to observe and volun-
teer to co-mediate Small Claims Court
matters under the auspices of the law
school's Institute for Dispute Resolution
and its faculty. Disputes may include
those involving landlords and tenants,
auto repairs, credit cards and other debts,
and neighbor conflicts. An intensive in-
structional seminar complying with Florida
Supreme Court requirements for mediator


certification eligibility is required of each
participating student. Clinic completion
allows students to apply to the court for
certification as county court mediators.
In the Pro Se Clinic, certified legal interns
can practice on the cutting edge of
family law through the new approach of
unbundlingg," which allows clients to rep-
resent themselves before the court pro se
("for self") on some issues of their cases
but have legal representation for other
aspects. Students, under the supervision
of skills training professors, may provide
legal advice, mediation assistance and/
or limited court representation after first
receiving instruction in the most common
Florida family law issues-custody, visita-
tion, paternity, child support, domestic
violence and jurisdictional issues.


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CENTERS & INSTITUTES


CENTERS OPEN UP THE WORLD


Center on Children and Families.

The Center on Children and
Families (CCF) is comprised of a
team of UF faculty-with expertise
in criminal law, juvenile justice,
psychology, conflict resolution and
human rights-who promote quality
advocacy, teaching and scholarship
in children's law and policy. Students
have the opportunity to work with
systems for protecting children from
abuse and neglect in the center's
Child Welfare Clinic, participate in
family law externships, earn a certifi-
cate in Family Law and/or serve as
children's fellows. Fellows can work
on friend of the court briefs and
research papers, assist with CCF's
annual interdisciplinary conference,
and help build a library of children's
legal resources. CCF is active in in-
ternational human rights work, works
collaboratively with the government
and judiciary on law reform and
professional education, and helps
educate children on their rights and
responsibilities.
Camp Center for Estate and
Elder Law Planning.

The Camp Center for Estate and
Elder Law Planning integrates
teaching, training, research, scholar-
ship and public service with the
goals of advancing estate planning
and elder law knowledge, profes-
sionalism, skills and policy. Student
opportunities include participation
in community service programs to
the elderly through the Estates,
Trusts and Elder Law Society and
judicial externships for academic
credit, which have been established
in probate divisions of several
judicial circuits. The center also
works closely with the Graduate Tax
Program and the UF Institute for
Learning in Retirement to provide
courses in adult education on estate
planning and elder law issues.


Center for Governmental
Responsibility.
The Center for Governmental Re-
sponsibility (CGR) is Florida's senior
legal and public policy institute.
Faculty and students conduct grant-
and contract-funded research-often
interdisciplinary in nature-on issues
relating to public policy develop-
ment and implementation at the
local, state, federal and international
levels. CGR also houses specialized
programs such as the Conservation
Clinic, Costa Rica Summer Program,
Center for American Law Studies at
Warsaw (Poland) University, Inter-
national Trade Law Program, and
the Law and Policy in the Americas
Program. Students can learn and
research issues that include envi-
ronmental law, land use, bioethics,
poverty law, emerging democra-
cies, historic preservation, conflict
resolution, European community law,
international trade law, and election
and campaign finance law.
International Center for
Automated Information Research.

The International Center for Auto-
mated Information Research (ICAIR)
is an interdisciplinary international
information policy research center
among UF's Levin College of Law,
the College of Engineering, and the
Warrington College of Business. In
fulfilling its mission to fund innovative
research on information technologies
and knowledge management benefit-
ting students, faculty and profession-
als in legal, accounting and financial
services professions, ICAIR engages
in research related to information
technology and its intersection with
information policy, with a particular
focus on data security issues.
Institute for Dispute Resolution.

The Institute for Dispute Resolution
combines classroom training, interac-
tion with practicing attorneys and in-


the-field assignments to help prepare
students for an important trend in the
legal profession: alternative dispute
resolution. Courses in mediation, ne-
gotiation, collective bargaining and
international litigation and arbitration
are featured.

Center for the Study of Race and
Race Relations.

The Levin College of Law is one of
only five law schools in the nation
housing an academic research and
resource center devoted to the study
of race and race relations. The Center
for the Study of Race and Race Rela-
tions works with groups engaged in
a wide range of activities to create
and foster dialogue on race and race
relations and promote historically and
empirically based thinking, talking,
research, writing and teaching.
Center for International Financial
Crimes Studies.

This academic research center
provides graduate instruction,
research and policy analysis,
academic symposia, grant supervi-
sion and consulting services on
money laundering, forfeiture,
corporate security, offshore finances,
cybercrime, organized crime and
international financial crimes.
The center also co-sponsors the
annual International Symposium on
Economic Crime at Cambridge Uni-
versity, England.
Institute for Human Rights,
Peace and Development.

This institute is an outgrowth of work
done through the Levin College of
Law project for the Advanced Study of
Human Rights and Peace established
in the early 1990s. It is directed by Pro-
fessor Winston Nagan, former board
chairman of Amnesty International
USA, and was launched in part to
enhance understanding of governance
and human rights in East Africa.


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CAREER DEVELOPMENT


Resources help chart a course.

Almost as soon as the law school
experience begins, profes-
sional counselors in the Center
for Career Development-all
of whom have law degrees-
offer a wide variety of resources
and programs to help students
develop their professional identi-
ties, plan their self-directed career
searches and establish marketing
techniques that will serve them
throughout their careers.

Resources include:

* Workshops on practical career
skills, from polishing a resume
to "working a room," to
handling call-back interviews as
well as seminars on career path
exploration and becoming a
successful professional
* Individual counseling to
formulate a career path and
determine appropriate job-
search strategies. Interview
skills development, including
mock interviews
* Networking events on- and off-
campus to meet, network with
and learn from legal profes-
sionals from law firms, govern-
ment agencies, public interest
organizations, corporations,
the judiciary and the military.
Employer directories, job
search aids, career exploration
materials, and employment
and salary data nationally and
from recent graduates to help
assess various career options
* Job search tips and news
about CCD programs through


the center's listserv and blog,
with updates in the center's
weekly publication
* The Small Firm Project and the
mentor program
* The Judicial Clerkship Program
* A Web-based job bank with
part-time and full-time posi-
tions for students and alumni
* A website with downloadable
resource materials, samples
and forms

Employer Resources.

The Center for Career Develop-
ment offers many services to
employers to make it easy for
them to interview and hire Levin
College of Law students and
alumni. Employers are actively
encouraged to post their hiring
needs with the Levin College of
Law. The Levin College of Law
brings employers-including
many top national law firms-to
campus to interview students in
one of the largest on-campus
recruiting programs in the south-
east. For those unable to visit
campus, the Levin College of Law
also has the facilities to conduct
videoconference interviews. In
addition, the center coordinates
more than a dozen off-campus
recruiting events in cities such
as Atlanta, Washington, D.C.,
Chicago and New York City to
help students market themselves
to potential employers out of
state.

Employer diversity initiatives
coordinated through the center


include providing information to
students about summer associate
diversity programs, employer
receptions, and providing diverse
employment resources.

Practical Experience.

Nothing strengthens a resume
like experience. The Center
for Career Development helps
students gain practical, hands-on
skills through a variety of
programs:

* The Pro Bono and Community
Service Projects connect law
students with organizations
seeking volunteers for public
interest projects. Participants
gain valuable work experience
and earn recognition certifi-
cates honoring them for their
accomplishments
* Part-time or summer employ-
ment opportunities in law
firms, businesses or as teaching
or research assistants
* The 1 L Shadow Program
enables first-year law students
to shadow attorneys in private
practice, the court system or
legal services and experience
the legal environment in those
areas first-hand
* Internships provide valuable
volunteer opportunities in
every level of government
agency and the judiciary
* The CCD also strongly encour-
ages students to participate in
one of the many for-credit ex-
ternship opportunities and one
of the clinical programs offered
by the Levin College of Law.


U F LAW





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EMPLOYMENT INFORMATION

Historically about 80 percent of Levin
College of Law graduates work in Florida.
For the Class of 2009, 76 percent remained
in Florida. The remainder are scattered
throughout 19 states. The strongest concen-
trations of Levin College of Law graduates
employed outside Florida, (in descending
order) were in Washington, D.C. metro area,
New York, Georgia and California.
The six- to nine-month rate of employment
for Class of 2009 graduates who wished to
work and who were working or pursuing a
graduate degree was 99.5 percent compared
to the national average of 94 percent. The
Levin College of Law's unemployment rate for
the Class of 2009 was only .5 percent whereas


nationally it was 6 percent. During the past
decade or so, the Levin College of Law also
has witnessed an uncharacteristically strong
number of graduates who are accepted into
full time graduate programs following their
JD. From the Class of 2009, 10 percent of
the graduates pursued this option while the
national average was only 3.1 percent, in
part due to the Levin College of Law's highly
regarded LLM in Tax program. The graduates
were employed in the following categories
within six to nine months after graduation:
* 51 percent in private practice
* 24.5 percent in government and
judicial clerkships
* 15.5 percent in public interest law and
academics
* 8.4 percent in business and industry


37







FACULTY


Remarkable classroom experience. The foundation

of the Levin College of Law is comprised of highly

accomplished scholars, practitioners and educa-

tors whose broad knowledge base and passion

for teaching challenge each student to reach new

heights of intellectual achievement.


The Levin College of Law is a vigorous
and vibrant educational environment
where students acquire the knowledge
and skills they need to succeed in their
careers.
The Levin College of Law's faculty is larger
and more comprehensive than that of most
schools with 51 tenured or tenure-track
faculty, which includes 19 (37 percent)
women, and 11 (22 percent) minorities.
In addition, more than 36 other faculty
members support the college through
clinical, research, writing, information and
administrative programs.
The influence of Levin College of Law faculty
goes far beyond campus, however. Many
faculty members are:


* Authors of treatises, casebooks or major
books used by law schools and practitio-
ners throughout the nation
* Cited by the U.S. Supreme Court
* Expert witnesses before policy-making
bodies
* Consultants to branches of state, federal
and international governments
* In leadership roles on American and
Florida bar committees and task forces
or other prestigious associations such
as Amnesty International, the United
Nations Institute for Training and
Research, and the International Society
of Family Law
* On editorial boards of national publica-
tions and authors of hundreds of articles
in law reviews and specialty journals


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Levin College of Law faculty members
serve as consultants to branches of state,
federal and international governments.
Many faculty members graduated
at the top of their classes and were
editors or members of their respective
law reviews. More than 20 clerked
at the appellate level (half in federal
court) and two for the U.S. Supreme
Court, and approximately 30 were as-
sociates or partners at law firms. About
a dozen earned PhD degrees, nearly
50 hold LLM or master's degrees, and
five have received Fulbright awards.
The pursuit of scholastic distinction is
not at the expense of quality instruc-
tion, however. As teachers, they work
hard to engage students intellectually


and maintain an accessible, support-
ive environment that guides students
toward success. Student evalua-
tions reflect high satisfaction with
professors, with virtually all professors
scoring well over four on a five-
point scale.
The involvement of leading private
practitioners-including federal and
state court judges and attorneys
involved in public agencies, private
practice and leading business
ventures-who teach in specialty areas
and lead seminars help bring current,
practical and critical issues and events
into the classroom. The result is a true
academic community that nurtures
students into ethical lawyers who are
tributes to the profession.








FACULTY


LEADERS IN LEGAL SCHOLARSHIP.


Mary Jane Angelo
Professor
BACKGROUND: B.S., Rutgers University; M.S.
and J.D., University of Florida. EXPERTISE:
Environmental, Water, Administrative, Biotech-
nology and Pesticides Law, Dispute Resolu-
tion, Professional Responsibility.

Yariv Brauner
Professor
BACKGROUND: LL.B., Hebrew Univer-
sity School of Law; LL.M., J.S.D., New York
University School of Law. EXPERTISE: Tax,
International Law, International Trade, Inter-
national Taxation.

Dennis A. Calfee
Professor; Alumni Research Scholar
BACKGROUND: B.B.A., J.D., Gonzaga Uni-
versity; LL.M., University of Florida. Former
faculty, Academy of International Taxation,
Republic of China. EXPERTISE: Taxation.

Jonathan R. Cohen
Professor; Associate Director, Institute for
Dispute Resolution
BACKGROUND: A.B., A.M., M.A., J.D., Ph.D.
(Economics), Harvard University. EXPERTISE:
Negotiation, Dispute Resolution, Ethics, Evi-
dence.

Stuart R. Cohn
Associate Dean for International Studies;
John H. and Mary Lou Dasburg Professor;
Director of International and Comparative
Law Certificate Program
BACKGROUND: B.A., University of Illinois;
B.A., Oxford University; LL.B., Yale University.
EXPERTISE: Corporate and Securities Law,
Jurisprudence.

Charles W. Collier
Professor; Affiliate Professor of Philosophy
BACKGROUND: B.A., Reed College; M.A.,
M.Phil., Ph.D., Yale University; J.D., Stanford
University EXPERTISE: Constitutional Law,
Jurisprudence, Legal Theory.

Elizabeth Dale
Affiliate Professor; Associate Professor
of History
BACKGROUND: B.A., DePauw University;
Ph.D., J.D., Chicago-Kent College of Law.
EXPERTISE: U.S. Legal and Constitutional His-
tory.

Jeffrey Davis
Professor; Gerald A. Sohn Research Scholar
BACKGROUND: B.S., University of California,
Los Angeles; J.D., Loyola University, Los An-
geles; LL.M., University of Michigan. EXPER-
TISE: Contracts, Bankruptcy, Debtor-Creditor
Relations, Commercial Law.


George L. Dawson
Professor
BACKGROUND: A.B., Princeton University;
J.D., University of Chicago. EXPERTISE: Con-
tracts, Estates and Trusts, Payment Systems.

Patricia E. Dilley
Professor
BACKGROUND: B.A., Swarthmore Col-
lege; M.A., University of Pennsylvania; J.D.,
Georgetown University; LL.M., Boston Uni-
versity. EXPERTISE: Social Security, Deferred
Compensation, Individual Income/Corporate
Taxation, International Taxation, Advanced
Employee Benefit Law, Retirement Income
Policy.

Nancy E. Dowd
David H. Levin Chair in Family Law; Director,
Center on Children and Families
BACKGROUND: B.A., University of Connecti-
cut; M.A., University of Illinois; J.D., Loyola
University of Chicago. EXPERTISE: Constitu-
tional Law, Family Law, Gender and the Law.

Mark A. Fenster
Associate Dean for Faculty Development; Pro-
fessor; Sam T. Dell Research Scholar
BACKGROUND: B.A., University of Virginia;
M.A., University of Texas at Austin; Ph.D., Uni-
versity of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; J.D.,
Yale University. EXPERTISE: Land Use, FOIA
and Public Access to Government Informa-
tion, Property, Legal Theory, Administrative
Law, Contemporary Cultural Theory.

Alyson Craig Flournoy
Professor; Director of Environmental and Land
Use Law Program; Alumni Research Scholar
BACKGROUND: B.A., Princeton University;
J.D., Harvard University. EXPERTISE: Environ-
mental Law, Property and Administrative Law.

Michael K. Friel
Associate Dean and Director, Graduate Tax
Program; Professor
BACKGROUND: B.A., J.D., Harvard University;
LL.M., New York University. EXPERTISE: Fed-
eral Income Taxation.

Jeffrey L. Harrison
Stephen C. O'Connell Chair
BACKGROUND: B.S., M.B.A., Ph.D., Uni-
versity of Florida; J.D., University of North
Carolina. EXPERTISE: Antitrust, Contracts,
Copyright, Law and Economics.

Berta Esperanza Hernandez-Truyol
Levin Mabie and Levin Professor; Associate Direc-
tor, Center on Children and Families
BACKGROUND: A.B., Cornell University; J.D.,
Albany Law School, Union University; LL.M., New
York University. EXPERTISE: International Law, In-


ternational Human Rights, Issues of Race, Gender,
and Culture in the Law, Dispute Resolution.

David M. Hudson
Professor; Director of LL.M. in Comparative
Law Program
BACKGROUND: B.S., Wake Forest University;
J.D., Florida State University; LL.M., Univer-
sity of Florida; LL.M., University of London.
EXPERTISE: State and Local Taxation, Interna-
tional Taxation, Immigration Law.

Michelle S. Jacobs
Professor
BACKGROUND: A.B., Princeton University; J.D.,
Rutgers University. Visiting Professor, Columbia
University and Howard University. EXPERTISE:
Criminal Law, International Criminal Law, Critical
Race Theory, Women and the Criminal Justice
System.

Robert H. Jerry, II
Dean; Levin Mabie and Levin Professor
BACKGROUND: B.A., Indiana State University;
J.D., University of Michigan. EXPERTISE: Insur-
ance Law, Contracts, Health Care Finance and
Access.

E. Lea Johnston
Assistant Professor
BACKGROUND: A. B., Princeton University;
J.D., Harvard University. EXPERTISE: Criminal
Law, Immigration, Criminal Procedure, Admin-
istrative Law and Civil Procedure.

Dawn Jourdan
Assistant Professor; Assistant Professor, Urban
and Regional Planning (joint appointment)
BACKGROUND: B.S., Bradley University;
J.D./M.U.R, University of Kansas; Ph.D.,
Florida State University. EXPERTISE: Growth
Management Law, Land Use Law, and Afford-
able Housing.

Shani M. King
Associate Professor; Co-Director, Center on
Children and Families
BACKGROUND: B.S., Brown University; J.D.,
Harvard University. EXPERTISE: Family Law
and Children's Rights.

Christine A. Klein
Chesterfield Smith Professor
BACKGROUND: B.A., Middlebury College;
J.D., University of Colorado; LL.M., Columbia
University School of Law. EXPERTISE: Natural
Resources, Property, Water Law.

Elizabeth T. Lear
Professor
BACKGROUND: B.A., University of North Car-
olina; J.D., University of Michigan. EXPERTISE:
International Litigation, Federal Courts.


U F LAW





















hi1


I i


BUSINESS LAW


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FACULTY


LEADERS IN LEGAL SCHOLARSHIP.


Lyrissa Barnett Lidsky
Stephen C. O'Connell Professor
BACKGROUND: B.A., Texas A&M University;
Fulbright Scholar, Cambridge University; J.D.,
University of Texas. EXPERTISE: Internet Law,
Torts (specializing in Defamation and Invasion
of Privacy), Mass Media Law, Jurisprudence,
Professionalism.

Tom Lin
Assistant Professor
BACKGROUND: B.A., New York University;
J.D., University of Pennsylvania Law School.
EXPERTISE: Business Law, Securities Regula-
tion, and Behavioral Law and Economics.

Charlene Luke
Associate Professor
BACKGROUND: B.A., J.D., Brigham Young
University. EXPERTISE: Income, Corporate and
Partnership Taxation.

Pedro A. Malavet
Professor; Affiliate Professor of Latin American
Studies
BACKGROUND: B.B.A., Emory University;
J.D., LL.M., Georgetown University. EXPER-
TISE: Comparative Law, Civil Law, Civil Proce-
dure, Critical Race Theory, European Union,
Evidence, United States Territorial Posses-
sions, United States-Puerto Rico relationship.

Amy R. Mashburn
Professor
BACKGROUND: B.A., Eckerd College; J.D.,
University of Florida. EXPERTISE: Civil Proce-
dure, Professional Responsibility, Administra-
tive Law.

Diane H. Mazur
Professor; Gerald A. Sohn Term Professor
BACKGROUND: B.A., State University of New
York; M.S., Pennsylvania State University; J.D.,
University of Texas. EXPERTISE: Civil/Military
Relations, Constitutional Law, Evidence, Pro-
fessional Responsibility.

Martin J. McMahon, Jr.
Stephen C. O'Connell Professor
BACKGROUND: B.A., Rutgers College; J.D.,
Boston College; LL.M., Boston University. EX-
PERTISE: Individual Income Taxation, Corpo-
rate Taxation, Partnership Taxation, Tax Policy.

C. Douglas Miller
Professor
BACKGROUND: B.S., J.D., University of
Kansas; LL.M. in Taxation, Rudick Memorial
Award, New York University. EXPERTISE: Fed-
eral Taxation, Estates and Trusts, Estate Plan-
ning, Sports Law.


Jon L. Mills
Professor; Director, Center for Governmental
Responsibility; Dean Emeritus
BACKGROUND: B.A., Stetson University; J.D.,
University of Florida; Honorary Doctor of Laws,
Stetson University. EXPERTISE: Florida Consti-
tutional Law, International Trade, Environmen-
tal Law, Legislative Drafting, Free Press and
Speech Privacy Issues.

Robert C. L. Moffat
Professor; Affiliate Professor of Philosophy; Affili-
ate Professor of Sociology and Criminology Law
BACKGROUND: B.A., M.A., LL.B, Southern
Methodist University; LL.M., University of
Sydney, Australia. EXPERTISE: Jurisprudence,
Criminal Law, Law and Morality, Law and Public
Policy.

Winston P Nagan
Professor; Samuel T. Dell Term Professor; Direc-
tor, Institute of Human Rights and Peace Devel-
opment; Affiliate Professor of Anthropology
BACKGROUND: B.A., University of South
Africa; B.A., M.A., Oxford University; LL.M.,
M.C.L., Duke University; J.S.D., Yale University.
EXPERTISE: International Law, Human Rights
and Legal Theory.

Lars Noah
Professor; Alumni Research Scholar
BACKGROUND: A.B., J.D., Harvard University.
EXPERTISE: Administrative Law, Medical Mal-
practice, Medical Technology, Products Liability,
Torts.

Kenneth B. Nunn
Professor; Associate Director, Center on Chil-
dren and Families
BACKGROUND: A.B., Stanford University; J.D.,
University of California-Berkeley. EXPERTISE:
Race and its Impact on Criminal Justice System,
Criminal Law and Procedure, Race Relations,
Civil Rights, Public Interest Law, Critical Race
Theory, Legal Semiotics, Sociology of Law, Law
and Cultural Studies.

William H. Page
Senior Associate Dean for Academic Affairs; Mar-
shall M. Criser Eminent Scholar in Electronic Com-
munications and Administrative Law; Professor
BACKGROUND: B.A., Tulane University; J.D.,
University of New Mexico; LL.M., University of
Chicago. EXPERTISE: Antitrust Law, Procedure,
and Economics; Microsoft Litigation.

Juan F. Perea
Cone, Wagner, Nugent, Johnson, Hazouri
and Roth Professor
BACKGROUND: B.A., University of Maryland;
J.D., Boston College. EXPERTISE: Race and
Race Relations, Social Construction of Race and


History, Constitutional Law, Employment Law,
Employment Discrimination.

Rachel Rebouche
Assistant Professor
BACKGROUND: B.A., Trinity University; J.D.,
Harvard Law School; LL.M., Queen's University,
Belfast. EXPERTISE: Family Law and Compara-
tive Family Law.

Leonard L. Riskin
Chesterfield Smith Professor
BACKGROUND: B.S., University of Wisconsin-
Madison; J.D., New York University; LL.M., Yale
University. EXPERTISE: Negotiation, Mediation,
Dispute Resolution.

Elizabeth A. Rowe
Associate Professor
BACKGROUND: B.A., M.A., University of
Florida; J.D., Harvard University. EXPERTISE:
Workplace Intellectual Property Disputes, Trade
Secrets, Trademark Litigation, Patent Litigation.

Sharon E. Rush
Irving Cypen Professor; Associate Director,
Center on Children and Families
BACKGROUND: B.A., J.D., Cornell University.
EXPERTISE: Constitutional Law, Civil Procedure,
Federal Courts, Fourteenth Amendment, Race
Relations.

Katheryn Russell-Brown
Chesterfield Smith Professor; Director,
Center for Study of Race and Race Relations
BACKGROUND: B.A., University of California-
Berkeley; J.D., University of California-Hastings;
Ph.D., University of Maryland. EXPERTISE: Crim-
inal Law, Sociology of Law, Race and Crime.

Michael L. Seigel
Professor; Alumni Research Scholar
BACKGROUND: A.B., Princeton University;
J.D., Harvard University. EXPERTISE: Evidence,
Criminal Law, White Collar Crime.

Michael R. Siebecker
Associate Professor
BACKGROUND: B.A., Yale; J.D., LL.M., M.Phil,
Ph.D. (candidate), Columbia. EXPERTISE: Cor-
porate Law, Securities Regulation, Internet Law,
Jurisprudence.

D. Daniel Sokol
Assistant Professor
BACKGROUND: A.B., Amherst College; M.S.,
University of Oxford; J.D., University of Chicago;
LL.M., University of Wisconsin Law School.
EXPERTISE: Antitrust, Commercial, Corporate,
International and Comparative Business and
Regulation.


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CRIMINAL PROCEDURE








FACULTY


LEADERS IN LEGAL SCHOLARSHIP.


John F. Stinneford
Assistant Professor
BACKGROUND: B.A., University of Virginia; M.A.,
J.D., Harvard University. EXPERTISE: Criminal
Law, Criminal Procedure, the Eighth Amendment,
Sentencing Law and Policy, and Evidence.

Lee-ford Tritt
Associate Professor; Director, Camp Center for
Estate and Elder Law Planning and Estates and
Trusts Practice Certificate Program; Associate
Director, Center on Children and Families
BACKGROUND: B.A., University of the South;
J.D., LL.M. (Taxation), New York University. EX-
PERTISE: Wealth Management, Estate Planning,
Administration of Trusts and Estates, Transfer Tax
Matters and Charitable Giving.

Steven J. Willis
Professor; Associate Director, Center on Children
and Families
BACKGROUND: B.S., J.D., Louisiana State
University; LL.M., NewYork University. EXPER-
TISE: Taxation.

Michael Allan Wolf
Richard E. Nelson Chair in Local Government
Law; Professor
BACKGROUND: B.A., Emory University; J.D.,
Georgetown University Law Center; A.M., Har-
vard University; Ph.D., Harvard University. EX-
PERTISE: Land Use Planning, Environmental Law,
Property, Local Government, Urban Revitalization,
Legal and Constitutional History.

Danaya C. Wright
Clarence J. TeSelle Endowed Professor
BACKGROUND: B.A., Cornell University; M.A.,
University of Arizona; J.D., Cornell University;
Ph.D. (Political Science), Johns Hopkins Universi-
ty. EXPERTISE: Property, Estates and Trusts, Legal
History, Jurisprudence, Railroad and Trail Law.

CENTER FOR GOVERNMENTAL
RESPONSIBILITY

Thomas T. Ankersen
Director, CGR Conservation Clinic and Costa Rica
Law Program; Legal Skills Professor. B.A., M.A.,
University of South Florida; J.D., University of
Florida.

Joan D. Flocks
Director, Social Policy Division; Affiliate Faculty
with the Center for Latin American Studies and
the School of Natural Resources and Environ-
ment. B.S., M.A., J.D., University of Florida.

Ewa Gmurzynska
Director, Center for American Law Studies at
Warsaw University, Poland. M.B.A., J.D., Ph.D.,
Warsaw University; LL.M., University of Florida.


Richard Hamann
Associate in Law. B.A., J.D., University of Florida.

Clifford Jones
Lecturer/Associate in Law Research. B.A., South-
ern Illinois University; M.Phil., Ph.D., University of
Cambridge (England); J.D., University of Okla-
homa, College of Law.

Timothy E. McLendon
Staff Attorney. A.B., Duke University; J.D.,
University of Florida.

Stephen J. Powell
Senior Lecturer in Law; Director, International
Trade Law Program. B.A., J.D., University of
Florida.

Jeffry S. Wade
Director, Environmental Division. B.A., University
of Alabama; M.Ed., J.D., University of Florida.

CLINICS

Iris A. Burke
Senior Legal Skills Professor; Associate Director,
Center on Children and Families. B.A., Brooklyn
College; J.D., Brooklyn Law School.

Robin Davis
Legal Skills Professor; Associate Director, Institute
for Dispute Resolution. B.A., Michigan State Uni-
versity; J.D., University of Florida.

George R. "Bob" Dekle
Senior Legal Skills Professor; Director, Criminal
Law Clinic-Prosecution. B.A., J.D., University of
Florida.

Teresa Drake
Director, Intimate Partner Violence Assistance
Clinic. B.S., Drexel University; J.D., University of
Florida.

Jeffrey T. Grater
Senior Legal Skills Professor; Associate Director,
Center on Children and Families. B.A., J.D.,
University of Florida.

Monique Haughton Worrell
Senior Legal Skills Professor; Supervising At-
torney, Child Welfare Clinic; Associate Director,
Center on Children and Families. B.A., St. Johns
University; J.D., University of Florida.

Meshon Rawls
Senior Legal Skills Professor; Director, Gator
TeamChild Program; Associate Director, Center
on Children and Families. B.A., J.D., University
of Florida.

Peggy F Schrieber
Senior Legal Skills Professor; Associate Director,
Center on Children and Families. B.A., J.D.,
University of Florida.


Jennifer Zedalis
Director, Trial Practice; Senior Legal Skills Profes-
sor; Coordinator, Gerald T. Bennett Prosecutor/
Public Defender CLE Course. B.A., Duke Univer-
sity; J.D., University of Florida.

LEGAL RESEARCH WRITING
AND APPELLATE ADVOCACY

Henry T. Wihnyk
Director, Legal Research and Writing and Appel-
late Advocacy, Senior Legal Skills Professor.
B.A., Florida Atlantic University; J.D., Nova Uni-
versity; LL.M., Columbia University.

Mary Adkins
Senior Legal Skills Professor. B.S. Journalism,
J.D., University of Florida. Senior Executive Edi-
tor, Florida Law Review.

Joseph S. Jackson
Senior Legal Skills Professor. A.B., Princeton Uni-
versity; J.D., University of Florida.

Leanne J. Pflaum
Senior Legal Skills Professor. B.D., University of
Florida; J.D., Florida State University.

Teresa J. Reid Rambo
Master Legal Skills Professor. B.A., University of
Florida; J.D., Santa Clara University.

Betsy L. Ruff
Senior Legal Skills Professor. B.A., J.D., University
of Florida.

Patricia A. Thomson
Senior Legal Skills Professor. B.A., Hollins Col-
lege; J.D., University of Florida.

Diane A. Tomlinson
Senior Legal Skills Professor. B.S., B.A., J.D., Uni-
versity of Florida.

LEGAL DRAFTING

Deborah Cupples
Legal Skills Professor. J.D., University of Florida.

Leslie H. Knight
Senior Legal Skills Professor; of Counsel, Univer-
sity of Florida. B.S., Florida State University;
J.D., Duke University.

Margaret Temple-Smith
Senior Legal Skills Professor. B.A., J.D., Wake
Forest University.

Gaylin G. Soponis
Director, Senior Legal Skills Professor. A.B.,
Mount Holyoke College; J.D., George Wash-
ington University.


U F LAW





























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-- - -






ADMISSIONS


YOUR FIRST CASE STARTS HERE. PREPARE IT WELL.

Law is a diverse field that requires professionals to work

with and represent individuals and organizations in every

part of society. Therefore, we seek students with a range

of interests, backgrounds, experiences and perspectives.









Preparation for Law School.
Law is a diverse profession that requires practitioners to work with and represent
individuals and organizations in every part of society. Because legal careers are so
varied, law schools do not recommend any particular major, but instead expect
students to possess the skills necessary for effective written and oral communica-
tion and critical thinking.
For additional information about pre-law study, law school and the legal profes-
sion, we recommend you refer to the Official Guide to U.S. Law Schools, published
annually by the Law School Admission Council (LSAC) and the American Bar Associa-
tion. The guide is available at www.lsac.org.


U F LAW



















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ADMISSIONS


STANDARDS FOR ADMISSION
AND GENERAL INFORMATION

Faculty Admissions Policy. The
admissions policy of the University of
Florida Levin College of Law furthers
the mission of the college: excellence
in educating professionals, advancing
legal scholarship, serving the public
and fostering justice.

The Levin College of Law has a respon-
sibility as a state institution to educate
lawyers who will serve the legal needs
of all citizens and communities in
Florida. The Levin College of Law
seeks to admit and enroll students who
will distinguish themselves in serving
the state, region and nation through
the practice of law, formulation of pub-
lic policy, legal scholarship, and other
law-related activities.

Legal education is enhanced in a stu-
dent body composed of people with
different backgrounds who contribute
a variety of viewpoints to enrich the
educational experience. This diversity
is important because lawyers must be
prepared to analyze and interpret the
law, understand and appreciate com-
peting arguments, represent diverse
clients and constituencies in many
different forums, and develop policies
affecting a broad range of people.

Thus, the Levin College of Law seeks to
admit and enroll students who, collec-
tively, bring to its educational program
a wide range of backgrounds, experi-
ences, interests and perspectives. The
breadth and variety of perspectives to
which graduates of the Levin College
of Law are exposed while in law school
will enable them to provide outstand-
ing service in many different public and
private capacities.

Through its admissions process, the
Levin College of Law seeks to admit
and enroll students who will excel aca-
demically, attain the highest standards
of professional excellence and integ-
rity, and bring vision, creativity and
commitment to the legal profession.

The Levin College of Law gives sub-
stantial weight to numerical predictors
of academic success (undergraduate
grade point average and LSAT scores).
Numbers alone, however, are not the


only consideration. The Levin Col-
lege of Law considers all information
submitted by applicants. Factors such
as the difficulty of prior academic
programs, academic honors, letters
of recommendation from instructors,
or graduate training may provide ad-
ditional information about academic
preparation and potential. In some
cases, demonstrated interest, prior
training, or a variety of experiences
may indicate that an applicant is partic-
ularly well-suited to take advantage of
specialized educational opportunities.

Information about work experience,
leadership, community service,
overcoming prior disadvantages or
commitment to serve those for whom
legal services have been unavailable
or difficult to obtain may show that an
applicant is in a unique position to add
diversity to the law school community
or to make significant contributions to
the practice of law.

Selection Process. The admissions
staff and the Faculty Admissions
Committee base their selection on
the applicant's academic credentials,
including LSAT score, UGPA, level of
writing ability, breadth of studies, and
on other criteria, including, but not
limited to, the applicant's work and
other life experiences, leadership ex-
perience, depth of particular interest,
and any other aspect of an applicant's
background suggesting a suitability for
the study and practice of law.

Timing of Admissions Decisions.
The Faculty Admissions Committee
makes final decisions for all candidates
by mid-to-late April. Applicants are
immediately notified in writing upon
final decision. The Levin College of
Law begins notifying applicants from
the time the first decision is made (late
November or early December) and
until the class is filled using a modified
"rolling admissions" process-files are
reviewed in the order in which they
are completed, but decisions are not
necessarily made in the order in which
applications are received.

The Levin College of Law's online
Application Status Check allows appli-
cants to view their current application
status, contact information, receipt of
materials such as the resume, admis-


sions statement, and letters of recom-
mendation, and provides applicants
with a record of announcements from
the Levin College of Law Office of
Admissions. Please visit the Applica-
tion Status Check at www.law.ufl.edu/
admissions/applicationcheck.shtml

Ineligibility for Admission. Applicants
who have received a law degree (or
bachelor's degree combined with a law
program) from a U.S. institution are not
eligible for admission to the Levin Col-
lege of Law. In addition, credit is not
given for correspondence courses or
other work completed in residence at a
non-ABA accredited law school.

Prior Law School Attendees. Appli-
cants who have attended another law
school must submit a written statement
about their attendance, a complete
transcript, and a statement from their
dean indicating class rank and certify-
ing they are in good standing and
eligible to return to the institution as a
continuing student. Those not in good
standing or ineligible to return as a
continuing student are not eligible to
apply to the Levin College of Law.

Petitioning for Reconsideration.
Applicants who have been denied
admission can request reconsideration
only in cases where the applicant has
learned of significant additional informa-
tion that was not available at the time
of the original application. The Faculty
Admissions Committee's original deci-
sion would have been based upon all
academic and non-academic information
included in the original application. In-
formation about events, such as grades
or awards, occurring after the March
15th file completion deadline cannot be
considered. Reconsideration must be
requested within 30 days of the date of
the denial letter. The committee's deci-
sion on a petition for reconsideration is
final and is not subject to further appeal.

A written request must include an
explanation of the new information as
well as valid reasons warranting recon-
sideration, and should be submitted
to the Assistant Dean for Admissions,
University of Florida Levin College of
Law, 141 Bruton-Geer Hall, P. O. Box
117622, Gainesville, FL 32611-7622.
The request should be plainly marked
"Request for Reconsideration."


U F LAW










JD APPLICATION PROCESS

Levin College of Law Electronic
Application. J.D. applicants are re-
quired to use the Levin College of Law
LSAC electronic application available at
www.LSAC.org. LSAC will mail the Levin
College of Law a hard copy of your
electronic application via UPS. Please
do not send us an additional copy.
Students with visual impairments may
obtain accessible PDF application forms
from our website www.law.ufl.edu.

Within 10 business days of submit-
ting the LSAC electronic application,
applicants will receive an email ac-
knowledgement from the Levin College
of Law Office of Admissions which is
generated after the Office of Admis-
sions accesses the electronic application
from LSAC. This email will include
separate instructions for submitting the
UF Supplemental Data Form and the
residency form, paying the application
fee and processing your UF ID number
(for non-UF undergraduate applicants).
Please contact our office if you have not
received an email acknowledgement of
your application within 10 business days
of submission of your application.

The Levin College of Law Office of
Admissions does not process fee waiver
applications for the LSAT and LSDAS.
In addition, the $30 application fee is a
State of Florida charge and cannot be
waived by the Levin College of Law.

LSAT/CAS. All applicants are required
to take the Law School Admission Test
(LSAT). LSAT scores are valid for five
years. In the absence of documentation
that a candidate was ill, or that some
other unusual condition occurred during
one of the tests, all LSAT scores are
considered. Applicants should discuss
score differentiation in an addendum.

Applicants are required to register with
LSAC's Credential Assembly Service
(CAS), which centralizes and standard-
izes undergraduate academic records
and provides them to the law schools
to which candidates apply. Registration
is valid for five years from the date
that the LSAT/CAS registration form
is processed. Applicants must ensure
that undergraduate transcripts from
each college, university or high school/
university dual enrollment program


attended are on file at the CAS, and
that they have selected the University of
Florida Levin College of Law as one of
the law schools to which the LSAT Law
School Report should be sent. Sending
a transcript from only one institution
attended is not sufficient even if the
transcript contains grades from previous
institutions. The law school code for the
University of Florida Levin College of
Law is 5812.

Upon submission of your electronic
application, your Law School Report will
be requested automatically and once
your CAS file is complete, your Law
School Report will arrive at the College
of Law one to two weeks after the date
of electronic filing of the Levin College
of Law application. To update the Law
School Report, applicants should send
updated transcripts to CAS well in ad-
vance of the College of Law's March 15th
completion deadline. The Credential
Assembly Service requires two to three
weeks to process transcript updates.

Important Note for Foreign-Educated
Applicants: The University of Florida
Levin College of Law requires that for-
eign transcripts be submitted through
LSAC's Credential Assembly Service
(CAS) which will authenticate and evalu-
ate your transcripts.

Foreign-educated applicants must take
the LSAT; the Levin College of Law
does not require the TOEFL for the JD
program.

Applicants who completed any postsec-
ondary work outside the U.S. (including
its territories) or Canada, must use
the CAS for the evaluation of foreign
transcripts. The one exception to this
requirement is foreign work completed
through a study abroad, consortium, or
exchange program sponsored by a U.S.
or Canadian institution, and where the
work is clearly indicated as such on the
home campus transcript.

Please see www.LSAC.org for more
details about the CAS.

Admissions Statement. The Levin Col-
lege of Law seeks to enroll a class with
varied backgrounds and interests. Such
diversity contributes to the learning envi-
ronment of the law school, and historically
has produced graduates who have served


all segments of society and who have
become leaders in many fields of law.

To better assess these qualities, the
Levin College of Law requires each
applicant to submit an Admissions
Statement not to exceed four double-
spaced pages in a font no smaller than
12 pt. This statement should focus on
academic abilities and experiences and
may include, but is not limited to, infor-
mation regarding career goals, interests,
unique abilities, academic experiences
and activities, and public service.

The Admissions Statement should
provide academic information not found
in any other part of your file. Although
interviews are not part of the admissions
process, the admissions statement can
serve as an "interview on paper."

Optional Diversity Statement. Lawyers
serve critical roles in our society. As our
society becomes increasingly diverse,
the College of Law requires a broadly
diverse student body to achieve its
mission of excellence in education, re-
search and service. Broad diversity en-
compasses experiences, socioeconomic
background, talents, race, gender and
other attributes and provides multi-
cultural learning opportunities.

Applicants are encouraged, but not
required, to submit a statement describ-
ing the multi-cultural skills that they have
developed, including their most relevant
specific life experiences, and how those
skills and experiences would foster
diversity at the College of Law. The
Diversity Statement should not exceed
two double-spaced pages and should


PROSPECTUS







ADMISSIONS


be in a font no smaller than 12 pt. Please
do not repeat text from the Admissions
Statement in the Diversity Statement.

R4sume. All applicants are required to
submit a professional r6sum6 or cur-
riculum vitae (CV) which should include
specific, factual information about educa-
tion, honors and awards, extracurricular or
community activities, publications, work
history, military service and/or foreign
language proficiencies. Please define time
frames and be as detailed as possible.

Letters of Recommendation. The
College of Law strongly encourages
candidates to submit up to four letters
of recommendation. Recommenders
should evaluate in detail the applicant's
academic performance and skills, extra-
curricular activities, community service,
and/or employment. Please note that
the College of Law does not consider
personal recommendations (for example,
those from family, friends or persons who
have never taught or supervised the ap-
plicant in a professional setting).

Candidates have two options for submit-
ting letters of recommendation:

* LSAC Letter of Recommendation
(LOR) Service: The College of Law
strongly prefers that letters be submit-
ted through the LOR Service included
with the CAS registration.
* Submit directly to the College of Law:
Letters of recommendation may be
submitted directly to the law school;
they should be on letterhead and in
standard business letter format and
accompanied by the cover form lo-
cated on the LSAC electronic applica-
tion web site. Credential packets from
career planning offices are acceptable
in lieu of individually submitted letters.
Please note that the College of Law
does not accept unsolicited letters
of recommendation. Letters sent
directly to the College of Law must be
accompanied by the College of Law's
recommendation cover form with the
applicant's signature.

Letters of recommendation are not
required; therefore, action will proceed
with or without letters once all required
materials are received.

Addendums and Other Materials. Ap-
plicants who wish to discuss any unique
issue may include a separate one-page
addendum with their application. This
50


document may include, but need not be
limited to, information about poor grade
progression, history of standardized
testing, linguistic barriers, or a personal
or family history of educational or socio-
economic disadvantage.

Please do not include with your applica-
tion writing samples, newspaper/maga-
zine articles, photographs, CDs, DVDs,
audio cassettes or videotapes. These
items will not be evaluated as part of the
application and will not be returned to
the applicant.

We strongly recommend that applicants
keep copies of their applications for
their reference.

Additional Personal Information.
Questions 1 and 2 in section C of the
application require candidates to report
any disciplinary action taken against
them at any college or university (#1),
and/or academic probation and suspen-
sion (#2). Question 3 is about specific
violations of law. Applicants answering
"yes" to any question must attach an ex-
planation for each response and provide
official documentation from the college/
university, or court, documenting the
final disposition of each occurrence.

It is the responsibility of the applicant
to provide all documentation for each
"yes" response. Any student uncertain
about his or her academic and/or
disciplinary history should contact the
Student Judicial Affairs office at each
college or university attended. (Current
or former UF students should contact
Student Judicial Affairs at 202 Peabody
Hall, PO. Box 114075, Gainesville, FL
32611, phone 352-392-1261).

Admission to the University of Florida
Levin College of Law is contingent upon
the accuracy of information required to
be furnished as part of the application
process. Intentional failure to furnish
required information or misrepresenta-
tion of such information can result in the
withdrawal of an offer of admission prior
to matriculation, dismissal from the col-
lege after matriculation, rescission of the
student's degree after graduation, and/
or forfeiture of all fees and charges paid
and academic credit earned. Any such
failure to disclose or any misrepresenta-
tion may result in an investigation by the
Law School Admission Council's Miscon-


duct and Irregularities in the Admission
Process Subcommittee and may also
affect admission to a state bar.

Character and Fitness and the Need
for Full Disclosure. Applicants must
respond completely and accurately to all
questions on the law school application.

After submitting the application, appli-
cants are required to immediately notify
the College of Law of any changes in
data that occur either prior to a decision
or matriculation. This includes informa-
tion required by questions 1, 2 and 3 in
section C of the application.

Applicants should be aware that, in con-
ducting character and fitness investiga-
tions, state bar authorities frequently re-
quest copies of candidates' applications
for admission to law school to determine
if the information is accurate and demon-
strates full disclosure. Discrepancies and/
or omissions may call into question the
applicant's fitness for admission to a state
bar, since they reflect on the applicant's
character and ability to follow directions,
trustworthiness, honesty, and reliability.

Each state establishes bar registration
and admissions standards for individu-
als who wish to practice in that state.
One important aspect of admission to
practice is an evaluation of an applicant's
character and fitness to practice law.
States subject applicants to the bar to a
rigorous character and fitness investiga-
tion before admission to practice. Ap-
plicants are strongly encouraged, prior
to matriculation, to contact the Board of
Bar Examiners in the states where they
intend to practice to determine the rules
that will apply to their bar admission in
those states, including what constitutes
proof of sufficient character and fitness.

TRANSFER/VISITOR APPLICANTS

General Requirements for all Transfer
and Visitor Applicants:

Students attending a law school accred-
ited by the American Bar Association
(ABA) may apply for transfer or to visit
the Levin College of Law.

Levin College of Law LSAC Electronic
Application. All transfer and visitor
candidates are required to use the
Levin College of Law LSAC electronic


U F LAW










application available at www.LSAC.org.
LSAC will mail the College of Law a hard
copy of your electronic application via
UPS. Please do not send us an additional
copy. Students with visual impairments
may obtain accessible PDF application
forms from our web site www.law.ufl.edu.

Within 10 business days of submitting
the LSAC electronic application, ap-
plicants will receive an email acknowl-
edgement from the Levin College
of Law Office of Admissions which is
generated after the Office of Admis-
sions accesses the electronic applica-
tion from LSAC. This email will include
separate instructions for submitting
the UF Supplemental Data Form and
the residency form, paying the ap-
plication fee and processing your UF
ID number (for non-UF undergraduate
applicants). Please contact our office
if you have not received an email
acknowledgement of your application
within 10 business days of submission
of your application.

Please note that the Levin College of
Law Office of Admissions does not
process fee waiver applications for the
LSAT and LSDAS. In addition, the $30
application fee is a State of Florida
charge and cannot be waived by the
College of Law.

The College of Law's Application Status
Check allows applicants to view their
current application status, contact
information, receipt of materials such
as the resume, statement, and letters of
recommendation, and provides appli-
cants with a record of announcements
from the Levin College of Law Office
of Admissions. Please visit Application
Status Check at www.law.ufl.edu/admis-
sions/applicationcheck.shtml.

LSAT Law School Report. By apply-
ing through the Levin College of Law
LSAC electronic application process,
the Law School Report is automatically
requested and included with all transfer
and visitor applications.

Statement and R4sume. Transfer
and Visitor applicants must submit
an Admissions Statement indicating
their reasons for wanting to attend the
Levin College of Law. This statement
should focus only on the law school
academic experience and should not


exceed four double-spaced pages in a
font no smaller than 12 pts.

Applicants are encouraged, but not
required, to submit a Diversity Statement
describing the multi-cultural skills that
they have developed, including their
most relevant specific life experiences,
and how those skills and experiences
would foster diversity at the College of
Law. The Diversity Statement should not
exceed two double-spaced pages and
should be in a font no smaller than 12
pt. Please do not repeat text from your
Admissions Statement in the Diversity
Statement.

In addition, all applicants are required
to submit a professional r6sum6 or cur-
riculum vitae (CV) which should include
specific, factual information about
items such as education, honors and
awards, extracurricular or community
activities, publications, work history,
military service and/or foreign language
proficiencies. Please define time frames
and be as detailed as possible.

Additional Personal Information.
Questions 1 and 2 in section C of the
application require candidates to report
any disciplinary action taken against
them at any college or university (No.
1), and/or academic probation and
suspension (No. 2). Question No. 3
concerns specific violations of law.
Applicants answering "yes" to any
question must attach an explanation
for each response and provide official
documentation from the college/uni-
versity, or court, documenting the final
disposition of each occurrence.

It is the responsibility of the applicant
to provide all documentation for each
"yes" response. Any student uncertain
about his or her academic and/or
disciplinary history should contact the
Student Judicial Affairs office at each
college or university attended. (Current
or former UF students should contact
Student Judicial Affairs at 202 Peabody
Hall, PO. Box 114075, Gainesville, FL
32611, phone (352) 392-1261).

Admission to the College of Law is
contingent upon the accuracy of infor-
mation required to be furnished as part
of the application process. Intentional
failure to furnish required information or
misrepresentation of such information


can result in the withdrawal of an offer
of admission prior to matriculation,
dismissal from the college after matricu-
lation, rescission of the student's degree
after graduation, and/or forfeiture of all
fees and charges paid and academic
credit earned. Any such failure to dis-
















close or any misrepresentation may
result in an investigation by the Law
















School Admission Council's Misconduct
and Irregularities in the Admission Pro-
cess Subcommittee and may also affect
admission to a state bar.


for Full Disclosure. Applicants must
respond completely and accurately to all














questions on the law school application.
After submitting the application, appli-










cants are required to immediately notify
the College of Law of any changes in
data that occur either prior to a decision
or matriculation. This includes informa-
tion required by questions 1, 2 and 3 in










section C of the application.

Applicants should be aware that,
in conducting character and fitness
investigations, state bar authorities


PROSPECTUS






























LEVIN COLLEGE OF LAW
ADMINISTRATION:
* Robert H. Jerry II, Dean
* Bill Page, Senior Associate Dean,
Academic Affairs
* Stuart Cohn, Associate Dean,
International Studies
* Michael Friel, Associate Dean and
Director, Graduate Tax Program
* Rachel Inman, Associate Dean,
Student Affairs
* Mark Fenster, Associate Dean,
Faculty Development
* Kathleen Price, Associate Dean,
Library & Technology
* Michelle Adorno, Assistant Dean,
Admissions
* Debra Staats, Associate Dean,
Administrative and Fiscal Affairs
* Linda Calvert Hanson, Assistant Dean,
Career Development
* Debra Amirin, Director, Communications
* Kelley Frohlich, Senior Director,
Development & Alumni Affairs


LEVIN COLLEGE OF LAW:
Mailing address:
P.O. Box 117622,
Gainesville, FL 32611-7622
Street address:
2500 SW 2nd Avenue,
Gainesville, FL 32611


STUDENT AFFAIRS/
FINANCIAL AID:
(352) 273-0620
students.svc@law.ufl.edu


DEAN'S OFFICE:
(352) 273-0600


Rules, policies, fees, dates and courses
described herein are subject to change
without notice.

The university is committed to non-discrim-
ination with respect to race, creed, color,
religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orienta-
tion, marital status, national origin, political
opinions or affiliations, and veteran status as
protected under the Vietnam Era Veterans'
Readjustment Assistance Act.


The Prospectus
is available in an
alternate format. Call
Levin College of Law
Admissions Office at
(352) 273-0890. For
TDD phone access,
call Florida Relay
Service at (800) 955-
8771 (TDD).

Produced by the
Communications
Office, Levin College
of Law Lindy Brounley,
Editor

Photography courtesy
of Charles Roop and
Joshua Lukman of the
Law Communications
Office Design by
JS Design Studio
* Printing by The
Hartley Press, Inc.


SMixed Sources
Prdu groupfrom well-managed
Sforestsandotheconrolledrsourcs
S C ww fsc.org Cert no. SCS-COC-001376
S019 6ForestStewardshipCundl







FINANCIAL AID


The Financial Aid Office works closely
with students to ensure they make
the most of available aid. Entering
first-year students may qualify for
a scholarship or grant based upon
merit, need or merit/need as deter-
mined by a Financial Aid Committee.
(Students selected for more than one
scholarship will receive the award
of greatest value.) Most students
qualify for Federal Stafford Loans
and Federal Graduate PLUS loans,
which must be applied for annually
using the Free Application for Federal
Student Aid (FAFSA). Private loans
also may be available, based upon
credit. Transfer students are eligible
for federal aid, but not for law school
aid until they have been evaluated at
the Levin College of Law for at least
one semester.
SCHOLARSHIPS:

Merit-Based: Awards for entering
students are based on information
collected in the application for admis-
sion. Scholarship decisions are made
starting in December and completed
by April. Recipients are notified by
letter.


Merit/Need-Based: To qualify, an ap-
plicant must show high achievement. In
addition, the Levin College of Law must
have received the electronic FAFSA
results and the need-based scholarship
and grant application by one of the fol-
lowing deadlines if admitted:
* Prior to Jan. 15, 2011-by Feb. 7
* Jan. 16-Feb. 15, 2011-by March 7
* After Feb. 15, 2011-by April 7

Need-Based Grants: To be considered
for a need-based grant, an applicant
must have the electronic FAFSA results
and the additional aid application on
file by one of the following deadlines if
admitted:
* Prior to Jan. 15, 2011-by Feb. 7
* Jan. 16-Feb. 15, 2011--by March 7
* After Feb. 15, 2011-by April 7

Continuing Student Scholarships. Stu-
dents will be notified when scholarship
applications are available. Continuing
students can apply for these scholarships
after completion of their first year.

LOANS:
Federal. Law students are eligible to
apply for Federal Direct Subsidized
Stafford Loans, Federal Direct Unsub-


sidized Stafford Loans, and Federal
Direct PLUS Loans through the Federal
Direct Student Loan Program (FDSLP).
Students applying must complete a
Free Application for Federal Student
Aid. Completion qualifies the student
for consideration in federal loan and
employment programs. Apply elec-
tronically-"FAFSA on the Web"-at
www.fafsa.ed.gov. The application
period begins Jan. 1 and results should
be received electronically from the
federal processor (no photocopies) by
April 7 to ensure timely processing of
loans.

Students attending at least half-time
may qualify for as much as $8,500 in
subsidized and $12,000 in unsubsi-
dized funds, for a total of $20,500 each
academic year. Students also may apply
for the Federal Graduate Plus Loan to
help cover the cost of attendance. For
more information on these loans, visit
www.law.ufl.edu/students/financial.

Private. The interest rate and/or guar-
antee fee on private loans vary accord-
ing to the lender and are credit-based.
You may borrow as much as the cost of
attendance minus any other financial
aid you are receiving.


FEES & EXPENSES 2010-11


PROSPECTUS






























LEVIN COLLEGE OF LAW
ADMINISTRATION:
* Robert H. Jerry II, Dean
* Bill Page, Senior Associate Dean,
Academic Affairs
* Stuart Cohn, Associate Dean,
International Studies
* Michael Friel, Associate Dean and
Director, Graduate Tax Program
* Rachel Inman, Associate Dean,
Student Affairs
* Mark Fenster, Associate Dean,
Faculty Development
* Kathleen Price, Associate Dean,
Library & Technology
* Michelle Adorno, Assistant Dean,
Admissions
* Debra Staats, Associate Dean,
Administrative Affairs
* Linda Calvert Hanson, Assistant Dean,
Career Development
* Debra Amirin, Director, Communications
* Kelley Frohlich, Senior Director,
Development & Alumni Affairs


LEVIN COLLEGE OF LAW:
Mailing address:
P.O. Box 117622,
Gainesville, FL 32611-7622
Street address:
2500 SW 2nd Avenue,
Gainesville, FL 32611


STUDENT AFFAIRS/
FINANCIAL AID:
(352) 273-0620
students.svc@law.ufl.edu


DEAN'S OFFICE:
(352) 273-0600


Rules, policies, fees, dates and courses
described herein are subject to change
without notice.

The university is committed to non-discrim-
ination with respect to race, creed, color,
religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orienta-
tion, marital status, national origin, political
opinions or affiliations, and veteran status as
protected under the Vietnam Era Veterans'
Readjustment Assistance Act.


The Prospectus
is available in an
alternate format. Call
Levin College of Law
Admissions Office at
(352) 273-0890. For
TDD phone access,
call Florida Relay
Service at (800) 955-
8771 (TDD).

Produced by the
Communications
Office, Levin College
of Law Lindy Brounley,
Editor

Photography courtesy
of Charles Roop and
Joshua Lukman of the
Law Communications
Office Design by
JS Design Studio
* Printing by The
Hartley Press, Inc.


SMixed Sources
Prdu groupfrom well-managed
Sforestsandotheconrolledrsourcs
S C ww fsc.org Cert no. SCS-COC-001376
S019 6ForestStewardshipCundl










































/








UNIVERSITY of
UFFLORIDA

Levin College of Law
P.O. Box 117622
Gainesville, FL 32611-7622


NON-PROFIT
ORGANIZATION
U.S. POSTAGE
PAID
GAINESVILLE, FL
PERMIT NO. 94




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