Title: Report of the Board of Control of the state educational institutions of Florida for the period ..
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00090515/00025
 Material Information
Title: Report of the Board of Control of the state educational institutions of Florida for the period ..
Series Title: Report of the Board of Control of the state educational institutions of Florida for the period ...
Alternate Title: Report of the Board of Control of the state educational institutions of Florida for the biennium ending ..
Report of the Board of Control of the state institutions of higher learning of Florida for the biennium ending ..
Report of Board of Control, state of Florida
Physical Description: 29 v. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Board of Control
University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: T.J. Appleyard, State Printer
Place of Publication: Tallahassee
Publication Date: 1919
Frequency: biennial
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Education, Higher -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: 1905/1907-1962/64.
Numbering Peculiarities: Reporting period for reports 1905/1907-1907/1909 ends Jan. 1; for 1909/1910-1911/1912 ends Dec. 31; for 1912/1914-1962/64 ends June 30.
Numbering Peculiarities: Report for 1907/1909 mistakenly dated 1908/1909.
General Note: Includes the report of the president of the University of the State of Florida, later the University of Florida, and of the presidents of the other state institutions of higher education.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00090515
Volume ID: VID00025
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 50135007
lccn - 2002229051
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Report of Florida Board of Regents

Full Text
rft 0


~ GFj








REPORT
OF THE


BOARD OF


CONTROL


OF Til E


State Institutions


of


Higher Learning of Florida


FOR THE


Bienni
June


um Ending
30, 1918
f


1191
T. J. A'ILIKY.\R I), I'NINTELR,
I \1 A I, I %, I I FLA.




























































































66)












) xi ,














































































































t

























BOARD OF CONTROL

JOE L. E.\ M.\N, ('hlair nl t ........................Jacksonville
J. T. DIAMOND .........................................M ilton
J. B. HODGES ...................................... Lake City
T. B. K ING ...........................................A rcadia
E. L. WA .\NN .................................... ........Citra



BRYAN MACK, N-c'r'lur .......................... Tallahassee




























































a3


























LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL

Jianiary 15, 1919.

To His E-,,r Ilb, r-y,
Sirld, J. Catts,
G(r' nor SIR:
In c'miii i;ni 'e with the ipri\ iionis of ('llllter .:71 4, LT;\\-. of
Fliriill, lirwi\\iitl is uiill iiilled report for the hi iiiiall period
from July 1, 1916, to Jlllnie .:"l, 1!,1, covering the acts and diniii
of the State Board nf (',tni 1r,1, bthI-eii-ir with detailed sl;tl'-ii<'nts
of all receipts ;1nd di)l'iir 'iiiriit' bly ;ad1 under its direction, ;Ia
;ls o rI'lls from each of their four Si;1il institutions n11iulerI the
.:uprli.i.ii, and l ..'11; -.I.11i i ii f this Iloard, viz: The University
of Florida, Floriii State (C,1lI,_ for Women, Flri;i Sc1iii
for the Deaf and the llind, Floridla Agri-ii.lnr;il and .Mii;iiiral
College for Negloes.
TIs -lcIffull]y sul)biitted,
BOARI ) OF (CONT1 I1L,
By .Jii: L. Ei.\IM.%N, Chairman.

















































































































































































































































I












SEVENTH BIENNIAL REPORT OF THE BOARD
OF CONTROL


INTRODUCTORY.

During the period covered by this report the inemnbertship of
this Board has fully realized the great responsibilities resting
upon it and the ilmp ortaInce of the trust inilpos-d in directing the
affairii of the State Institutions of Higher Learning of Florida.
Not only ihas this responsibility been impriessed upon us by a
realization that in these institttiions are being trained the young
men and young wom ien of our state, who will in the near future
begin to fill many of the iii'port;nt slttiioin in the life of the com-
l.lmon\e;llth, socially, (econom'lically and politically, but also on
account of the increased bpuriden laid upon the finances provided
for the operation and I ;inlt;ining of tllese institutions, caused
by the enoiIhiusii adva;lnc in price of all (l;.sses of materials and
conInodlities, necessitating a most conservative distribution of
expend i tures.
It is, however, deeply gratifying to this oa,;rd to be able to
report that a continued progress has been mtiintained in the
several instilttimns during the biennium, as is evidenced by
detailed reports herein set out.
To the patriotic devotion to duty on the part of the presidents
and members of the faculties of Tlihse insititioni is due in large
mIealllsure the successful ;id:iiii isirailion of tlhei affairs, and this
on salariess fixed ildriiig norima;Il times when normal prices ob-
tained. In other enterpri-ses and businesses salaries were in-
creasve to meet the greatly increased cost of living, yet those
engaged in carmryingi oi Florid;-i' Institutions of Higher Lear ning
could not be granted an incr-ease of salary coniniensurnte with
prevailing cost of living b ec.;nse the appropriitiilons, were not
sllffi tllnt.
In all war work no body of pe1(ple evidenced a greater patriot-
ism and devotion to country than the ieI tcersi of the fa;rulties of
the stafe educational institutions. They were amo:,ng the le:Idler.
in promoting every 1movemeut looking to the early winning of
the war.











.1N1,l'..I HU.: ILSlIl P

Sinlri the last report, tih terms of three members of the Boatrl
-Mr. P. K. Y.nge,. of PeNiisi.ol 1;; Mr. Frank E. Jen.ings, of
Jacksonville, aiid Mr. W. 1). Finlay.,uiln, of Old Town-ha\ve ex-
jIir.il. aniid His Excellency, Sidney J. CatIt, Goverunor, appo ,intec
in their places. Mr. Joe L. Earman, of Jacksol tnville; Mr. J. B.
Hodges, of Like City, mill Mr. H. J. Brett, of DeFuniiak Splrings.
On ;el.a until of his lut its as a niinl'ii'e of the Disitict ExVepntion
Board of Northern Florida cmonliiing g with his duties ;s a mem-
ber of the Boaii.d of Control, Mr. Brett lendered his resiglnationl
as a iiieinlier of this Board, and Mr. J. T. Diamond,1. of Milton,
was apolintediil in his plaice.

BUILDINGS AND I11MPO)VEMENTS.

Buildings have 1eeini constructed and improvements made dur-
ing the hieniniuml which have addedl Iniaterially to the efficiency
of the instilnliiins. Ciosidleriing the high prices prevailing, the
Board feels especially gratified that it was able to secure con-
tracts for iew bUnildings within the ~pl'ri1niati,'ns mad, by the
legi.slat;~ lre of 1917.
At tlhe University of Floriida the third floor of the En1ineering
Bnlildin g lis lbenl rt11.emodeledl and completed; an annex to the
slanc building for Work Sholp has been added. Science iTall has
been reiim(uled el aui completed, .and a Kitchlen ha1s beeln added
to the )ining Hall. A ne\\ A.-seniihly Buildling has lbeen erected.
At the Florila State College for Women an Eduvatitonal Build-
ing and D1)rviitryii have been completely. East TTiall Ihas been
renovatedd, new windows have been added anil the buililiing other-
wise tiadle more attractive. Three tracts of land ,esing i '.l,.i(t
have lbeen purchliased for this institutiion, mialking its farm larger
and more productive. A Dairy H vorn and Herd have lbeen added.
Fire d1est ioye one of the barns at the A. & M. College for
Negres,. which las lbeen rebuilt with the insnianlce money re-
ceived. A Dairy l;rni, an liiiilenient Slill and an additional
wing to tlif Mechanical Arts liuiling li;hve also been erected.
.A\liplpria tions made for iiprove\ir ients at tlhe S'-li ool for the
Deaf arid the Blind have ino all been Imide at fthe time of this
report. A iri;ai.gu:iin lot citing into tile Srhool's property has
been lpur'ch.-asedl, cois ing :,5iil.1i1o, which is a decided a I'lit ion to











the instil i ion. Tiling the I)iniiii i~oom floors, erecting the D)ry-
ing RIniiii and lci'ccliiiiing the I.;Land will in all Iprl;babli!ily be
compl,',ltd or .iiiI ,a:c.el for by the time of the enlvilVeing of the
legisltiiurie. lThese illprel.m eIn..li ts \\nuil. i have been mI;iile sooner,
but Lb;t,( ;lan materials were too high to accomplish the results
with the limited fundll available.

FINANCES.

A compil-i record of receipts and expenditures for the bien-
niuni is shown in the Fii lil.i;iil lReport of J. (. ,Keill in. Secre-
tary, friiin July 1, 1916(, to June ::.1, 1917, and in tlie Financial
RReport of B .in Mal;k, S-crt,.iary, fI'r'ii July 1, 1917, to Jiunl1
:11;. 1918.
The itemized details of our xpr allitiurt '. are shown by the wa \r-
r.its drawn b)y us on the State Treasurer, iHon. J. (. LuniniL.
aidi1 pa idi by himi and set forth iln detail in his pllbli-I-'dl report
;iand lilenct we 1are lnot dup(liclting lhiese details 1ir'i.

CO-OEI'IRATIVE I).EMONSTIRATION WOW)IK.

Gratifying inle,.1 have been ith results obt;ainled by lln. Agri-
('1Inlu111 l Ixteniis'.ii l)i\iiiin of the IUniversity of Fl-iid a, and
Home IDemonst ration work cr dlnclrd 1)y tlilt Florida State Col-
..gc fior Women in c.ql.cprattion willh the Unitiled States DlpaItt-
ment of Aglicul ure. T'In'c' agecinic have c,,nl,-.rated with the
Counll ('omnliissioners and School Bn;ild l,,iiihb'ers in every
county w\\1ir' cii(.oir; liii'u was pwissille, a nd as a result there are
today thousands Ir' happier homes in Florida. Fa.iiminig truck-
ing. daii-, in.g cattle ;.-iii.. poultry raising, ;nlld c(';m iillc and
drying 1are il,\\ conducted in a scientific, husiness-like manner.
In addlilion 'to the Federal Funds r'iguil;Irl\ received for carry-
ing on a part of this work, a large amount 'f' Felleral aid in the
form of .a lic'r.niicy Fiundl has been available. This federal ap-
aiproplriattiiin was not deposited with the State ,Treaurer as is the
case withll thle Smitih-Lever Funds, but was paid out from Wash-
iiln FI . Pi.ii \\'\ mw ,-ir, rece'v(ed the benefit, and was (.11enabled
tlhc'tb\ to furnish intr'.i-.d food supplies at a time when n-ir
country wals Ipla.;Ili lg for food prnlctir,.












NEEDS OF THE INSTITUTIONS.

The needs of the several institutions, as seen by the President
and heads of departments, are set forth in detail in their reports,
as follows:

President Murphree's Recommendation for the Biennium 1919-1921:

GENERAL SUMMARY.

1. Running expenses for the biennium.......... $156,000.00
Salaries; janitors; printing; repairs; addi-
ditional instructors in engineering, naval
architecture; three additional agricultural
instructors for disabled soldiers and stu-
dents, including club boys; instructor in
farm mechanics; herdsman; farm foreman;
additional farm laborers; instructor in Eng-
lish; chemical laboratory assistant; assist-
ant librarian; college and technical work for
teachers in summer school, including neces-
sary 10 per cent increase in all regular
salaries.

2. Libraries .................................. 7,800.00
Chemistry; books of reference, etc. ......$ 700.00
English I language and Literature ........ 300.00
Ancient Language ....................... 200.00
Mathematics-books, magazines and charts 500.00
Modern Languages (excluding German
dropped from curriculum) ................ 300.00
Psychology and Philosophy ............... 600.00
Political Science and Sociology .......... 1,200 00
History and Economics .................. 1,000.00
Law Books and Law Librarian............ 3,000.00

3. Current Expenses for Upkeep of Laboratories
and Library ........................... $ 7,700.00
Physics ..................................$ 1,000.00
Chem4%try .......................... ...... 900.00
Zoology and Bacteriology ................. 400.00
Military Department ....... ............. 50.00
Botany ...................... .............. 200.00
Teachers' College and Psychological Labora-
tory .................................... 500.00
Operation and Upkeep of Irrigation Plant on
Farm ................................... 100 00
Fertilizer, Seeds, Upkeep Farm Machin-
ery ............... ............. ...... 500.00
Tile Drainage ............................ 150.00
Creamery and Dairy Laboratory Supplies.. 400.00
Soils Laboratory Supplies................. 300.00
Farms Motors Laboratory ................ 200.00
Civil Engineering ........................ 200.00














Electrical Engineering ................... 200.00
Shop and Mechanical Engineering ......... 600.00
General running expenses of library-
binding of periodicals, library supplies,
shelving, student assistant .............. 2,000.00

4. New Equipment ............................$ 55,490.00
For Biology, Bacteriology, Zoology and Geol-
ogy-Chemicals, Glassware, Charts, Anat-
omical Models, Microscopes and Remodel-
ing Botany Class Room for Bacteriologi-
cal Laboratory ........................ $ 3,350.00

For Botany Laboratory Dissecting Micro-
scopes; Embedding Oven; Charts, etc... 2,095.00
For Chemistry-This Department provides
necessary courses in all colleges, includ-
ing Engineering and Agriculture; and it
sorely needs chemicals and apparatus. It
must have equipment for new department
of chemical engineering and physical
chemistry in demand at all times, more
especially since this country went to
war. In view of the importance of this
department of the entire institution, spe-
cial mention is here made of the con-
servative estimate of the amount named. 8,300.00

For Military Department-Target Range;
B-H Relief Map for Teaching Minor Tac-
tics .................................... 1,095.00
Psychological Laboratory ................. 500.00
Pnysics Laboratory ....................... 1,000.00
For Physical Education; Athletic Equip-
ment and Gymnasium Supplies.......... 300.00
Completion Third Story Agricultural Hall. 2,500.00
Team of Work Mules for Farm .......... 800.00
Tools and Implements' Shed for Farm.... 2,500.00

New irrigation plant on college farm; tools;
plants and seed for field work of students;
spray pumps and material, enlarging and
equipping propagating house; preserving
jars; mounts and mounting material;
storage house for root crops-all for de-
partment of horticulture ................ 1,950.00

For Department of Animal Husbandry and
Dairying-Additions to Herd of Swine;
Meat Products and Laboratory Equip-
ment; Foundation Flock of Sheep...... 1,300.00
Two Shelter Sheds for Dairy Herd; Con-
crete Manure Pit; Fencing; and Portable
Live Stock Shelter .................... 1,700.00
Improvements in Lecture Room and Dairy
Laboratory ............................. 300.00












-:'lliliim nt. and Maintenance of New Poul-
try Department ......................... 3,000.00

For De lat.irtmint of Agronomy and Farm
Mana~-rmennt-Clearing and Draining Bay
Head and Other Lands; Fencing for Ad-
ditional Pastures ...................... 1,200.00
Machinery and Implements, Including Trac-
tor ................................... 900.00
Fertilizers, Seed, etc. .................... 500.00
Scientific Apparatus and Equipment and
Other Laboratory Supplies for Courses in
soils ................................... 900.00
Seed Collection for Purposes on Instruction;
Storace Bins; for Farm Management Lab-
oratories .............................. 600.00

For Department of Farm Mecnanics-Mo-
tors, Cultivators, Plows and Other Equip-
ment ................................. 2,700.00

Laboratory Equipment for Department of
Veterinary Science ..................... 2,200.00

For Engineering Equipment Needed for
War Courses Government Wishes Given. 2,000.00
Laboratory Equipment for Hydraulics; Road
:.l.'.rii;ls; T'-ting and Steam Labora-
tories; Foundry ........................ 5,000.00

General Equipment for Teachers' College;
for Vocational Teacher-Training Work.. 1,000.00

Printing and Supplies for Teachers' College
Correspondence Courses ............... 900.00

Additional Room and Equipment for Li-
brary-Basement in Peabody Hall ......$ 2,000.00

For the State Museum of the University-
Printing Annual Reports ............... 500.00

Exhibition and Storage Cases and Fixtures. 3,400.00

Lilirary Shelving and Office Equipment for
Mounting Specimens .................. 1,000.00

Grand Total .........................

5. Experiment Station.
The enlargement of the work in Animal In-
dustry, to include experiments in cattle
feeding and cattle breeding, in addition to
the work in dairying and hog raising al-
ready carried on by the Experiment Sta-
tion ................................... .. $ 63,150.00











The nlar-,l.me-it and continuation of experi-
ments in fl'i iliz,-r elements produced in
tne State, as well as those found on the
general market, to determine with a view
to preventing, the large annual losses
and iiiilliipr usage of different mate-
rials ................................... 9,600.00

The annual losses suffered from depreda-
tions by insect Ijsi-, are enormous. Much
of this can be prevented pr'Utit.,Ily. Great-
er facilities for stubl inm the insects and
l'rinuwin, the information to the farmers
are tan'L-tli.v needed. Our climate is es-
lt ci;llx i';\Nfavu alil to the il,.v-l[ut,.ut of
insect life, as well as plant life. The dif-
ficulty increases as the farms become
nearer t'l-.-il,.r, making it much easier
for insect pests to spread .............. 11,200.00

Gr--at ly changed conditions in the State, in
the way of production of food, feed and
forage, have :luiLJit up Iany ii rll_-xin".
but most iiii1mintaiit. p ir.,ll u.n- for the
plant iIatloh.-'i.,t. It has been absolutely
iiiips.-ibll to meet all the demands on
this lelal tiniint during the last year. The
introduction of many new .cru-i, has
caused many ic.i jdi-xiliit prl., viiis to arise
in this direction. To keep moderately
in touca with the needs of the State it
will be necessary to enlarge this work... $16,240.00

The introduction of such. crops as castor
beans, peanuts, and large extension of the
plantings of maintenance truck crops,
makes it important that additional work
ba done in the investigation of truck dis-
eases. It is especially desirabel to be
able to take cafe of these truck diseases
in the field, since many of them cause
material deterioration in food after it is
taken from the field ................... 5,400.00

Some of the most profitable work that has
been done in connection with our institu-
tion has been in determining: tne amount
of t'i tilizlis lost through leaching rains.
The information as to what f.rl il;z.r:,
leach out most readily has been of im-
mense saving to our faul: .r: and fruit
growers. No addition to the force is con-
teiniilat. d. but tne salary of niallytic chem-
ists has almost doubled in the last two
years .................................. 3,200.00










During the last twelve years the Experi-
ment Station has introduced hundreds of
new and untried kinds of plants, particu-
larly forage crops. Among these hun-
dreds, about a score are worthy of being
experimented with throughout the great-
er portion of the IState. So strongly has
this work appealed to tne Florida stock-
men, that they donated $2,500 for this
work. I would recommend that this work
be continued .......................... 4,500.00

In order that the Experiment Station de-
partments and the departments of the
Extension Division may at all times be
able to give the most correct and authori-
tative advice on agricultural problems, it
is necessary to keep the publications of
all Experiment Stations of the World
available for their use. We are now need-
ing additional book stacks. We need to
keep tne Experiment Station bulletins
from other institutions bound and in file,
and need to purchase new books as is-
issued, as well as pay for periodicals.... 1,750.00

Continuation of work provided for by last
Legislature:
(a) Clearing of land for enlargement
of dairy pastures and farm lands. $2,000.00
(b) Building of implement sheds....... 1,000.00
(c) Painting and repairs of Station
building and fences ............ 1,000.00
(d) Continuing experiments begun by
former Legislature ............ 4,000.00 $8,000.00


Printing of bulletins and reprinting of bulle-
tins and reports now out of print........ 8,000.00

6. Agricultural Extension Division. To meet
the conditional amount of Smith-Lever
funds from the Federal Government:
For the year ending June 30, 1920..... $28,110.10
$ 61,628.90

$419,658.90


President Conradi's Recommendations for the Biennium 1919-1921:

URGENT NEEDS.

Running expenses for biennium ................ $195,000.00
Infirm ary ....................................... 35,000.00
Broward Hall addition .......................... 25,000.00











Equipment for both the above ................. 4,500.00
Practice House .................... 6,000.00
Additional equipment for same ................ 500.00
Alterations Bryan Hall ......................... 4,000.00
Training School ....................... ......... 20,000.00
Equipment for same ........................... 500.00
Land and Campus ............................. 20,000.00
Library ......................................... 5,000.00
Laboratory apparatus .......................... 3,500.00
Athletic Field .................................. 5,000.00
Home Economics and Chemistry Building........ 60,000.00
Equipment for same ............................ 3,000.00
$387,000.00
OTHER NEEDS.

Central Heating Plant .......................... 25,000.00
Enlargement Dining-Room and Kitchen ......... 40,000.00
New Dormitory ................................. 75,000.00
Library Building ............................... 60,000.00
$200,000.00

EXTENSION WORK.

Vocational Home Economics Needs-
Half salary and travel Vocational Home Econom-
ics Supervisor .............................. 3,000.00
Assistant Vocational Home Economics .......... 1,200.00
Stenographer ................................... 1,500.00
Office Supplies .................................. 300.00
Rent for Practice Cottage .. ...................... 720.00
General upkeep and furniture Practice Cottage. 500.00
$ 7,220.00

Extension Department Needs-
Woman's Institute Fund, so called, used for gen-
eral expenses of office and salary for some
state workers and stenographers .......... 8,500.00
Subject matter specialist as assistant Home Dem-
onstration Agent ........................... 4,000.00

Research assistant to Subject Matter Specialist,
salary $1,000.00 per annum ................ $2,000.00
Janitor service for research work .............. 300.00
* Equipment for research work ................... 500.00
Printing fund .................................. 4,000.00
Dairy Specialist, Travel and Salary ............. 4,400.00
Summer School for Extension Workers .......... 1,600.00 25,300.00

$619,520.0(0
President Walker's Recommendations for the Biennium 1919-1921:

Maintenance .................................... $120,000.00
Building ......................................... 125,000.00
Campus ................... . .. ........ .... .... 5,000.00
Scholarships .................................... 1,000.00
Pianos and Scnool Room Apparatus ............ 2,000.00










New Boilers .................................... 2,500.00
A thlcet s .................................. .... 51 1.
I:El.tri( Time and Program Cloci .............. 1,; u
Library lciolis ................... ................ 2,0i .1111
D airy H erd ..................................... ,.7.11 0 m
Extniis'on Department .......................... 7,3l5 6.00
General Repairs ................................ 2,000.00
S $271,000.00

President Young's Recommendcations for the Biennium 1919-1921:
Current expenses for biennium ............... $24,000.00
A Commons for pr'lparine and sorvihi food for 400
pIr:i.s ............................... 15,000.00
An A. iilitoi iiii of 500 cai; ifcit % .................. l ,IIIIIim l. I
Two dormitories, one each for men and women. 23,0iii.I
$74,000.00

REC A PITULATION.
Recominendationsi by-
Dr. A. A. Murphree, for University .............$"2ti,',:i.1:
Dr. EdL ar.l Conradi, for Florida State ('ollt ~e for
W omen .................................... .5 7,00i .00

Dr. A. H1. Walker, for School for the Deaf and the
Blind ...................................... 271,000.00

President N. B. Young, for A. & M. College for Ne-
groes ..................................... 74,000.00
S$1,158,990.00
Dr. A. A. Murphree and Dir,'-ctor P. H. Rolfs, for
Experinl-nt Station ................. ........ 13Il1,1110.0

Dr. A A. Murphree and Director P. H. Rolfs, for
Extension Division .......................... G1,628.0.
Dr. Edward Conradi, for Extension Division...... 32,520.00

Dr. W. N. Sheats, for Summer Schools.......... 20,000.00

Board of Control expenses ..................... 10,000.00
$1,414,178.90
RIEC( M I'EN NATION.

We h ;i\e carefully cniill.idlr'l the foregoing lccoinineltn tiKns.
;unl from such ,x;iiinatil, and from our kiiowledge of the con-
Ilitidons at the In-lliljtions we feel thli;t in order that the Inustitu-
tions ility t (intinlie a healthy a:i.1 e 'oiin iti gro\\ iil .111n supply the
(1djII;in(ls umiUle upon them by the citizens of our St;ite the follow-
ing l'1 rI1oplnil ios fr the lilniiiuNii will lhe nIe'cssary and respect-
fully rcoliiiwild thalit suillh i 'propriatii,.s be iInide, viz:










RECOMMENDATIONS FOR APPROPRIATIONS.
OPERATING EXPENSES.

University:
Salaries, janitors, printing, repairs, additional
instructors, etc. ............................. $156,1p,ili.nl
Current expenses for Library and Laboratories. 15,000.00
$171,000.00
Florida State College for Women:
Salaries, janitors, printing, additional instruc-
tors, etc. ................................... '1 .,,u ,i0.in
Library and Laboratory ....................... 2,000.00
197,000.00

School for t'e Deaf and the Blind:
Current expenses ............................. 120,000 00

A. & M. College for Negroes:
Current expenses ............................. 21,i110.,01

Experiment Station:
Continuing certain experiments ............... 15,000.00
$527.'iii0.10t

BUILDINGS. IMPROVEMENTS AND EQUIPMENT.

Florida State College for Women:
Central Heating Plant ....... ............... .$30,000.00
Completion of Broward Hall ................... 2 1,111111.0l
Equipment for same ........................ 3,0000.00
Infirm ary Building ............................ .:,,Oii.ii
Equipment for same ........................ 2,111.111
Special repairs to Bryan Hall ................. O., il0i
Extension to Reynolls Hall Dormitory ......... 30,000 00
Equipment for same ......................... 3,000.00
First Unit Training School ................... 1 ,l, 'p.i)
Equipment for same .......................... 500.00
Completion of Kitchen to present Dining Hall.. 10,000.00
For land and preparing ground for outdoor phy-
sical culture ................................ 10,000.00
Building for Industrial Education .............. 4, 11110.11
Equipment for same .......................... 3,500.00
$207,000.00

School for Deaf and Blind:
Building for Primary Pupils .................. $45,000.00
Cam pus ................................ ...... .011.111
Scholarships .................................. 1,000.00
New Boilers .................................. 2,500.00
A athletics ..................................... 500.00
Special repairs ............................... 2,000.00
Library and pianos, school room apparatus.... 2.50i1.I)
Completion of Negro Building ................ 15,000.00
$71,500.00


2-Bd. Con.









18

A. & M. College for Negroes:
Dining Hall ................................... $15,000.00
Auditorium Building .......................... 10,000.00
Two Dormitories ............................. 25,000.00
$50,000.00
Experiment Station:
Clearing land and preparation of pastures...... $2,000.00
Building Tool and Implement Shed............. 1,000.00
3,000.00
Extension Department:
Rent for practice cottage and office supplies for
vocational extension work ................... $1,500.00
W oman's Institute ........................... 6,700 00
Assistant Home Demonstration Agent ......... 4,000.0b
Assistant Research Work .....:............... 2,000.00
Janitor iService ............................... 300.00
Equipment for Research Work ................ 500.00
Printing Fund ................................ 4,000.00
Dairy Specialist .............................. 4,400.00
Summer School for Extension Workers ...... 1,600.00
$25,000.00
Smith-Lever Extension Work:
Amount current expenses ..................... 61,628.90

Board of Control:
Current expenses ............................. $10,000.00

Summer Schools:
Amount for three summer schools ............. 20,000.00

Total ................................... $975,128.90

RECAPITULATION.
University:
Operating Expense ........................... $171,000.00

Florida State College for Women:
Operating expense ............................$197,000.00
Building, improvements and equipment........ 207,000.00
Extension Department ........................ 25,000.00
$429,000.00
School for the Deaf and the Blind:
Operating expense ............................ 120,000.00
Building, improvements and equipment ....... 71,500.00
$191,500.00
A. & 6L College for Negroes:
Operating expense ......... ............... ....... 24,000.00
Building, improvements and equipment......... 50,000.00
$74,000.00
Experiment Station:
Operating expense ........................... $15,000.00
Building and improvements .................. 3,000.00
$18,000.00
Smith-Lever Extension Work:
Operating expense ............................ $61,628.90











Board of Control:
Operating expense ............................ 10,000.00
Summer Schools:
Operating expense ............................ 20,000.00

Total ................................... $975,128.90

REPORTS.

Attached hereto are ilhe reports from the four institutions
under the miani genll(lit of this Board. Tlit-.(s ri.(port by those in
direct charge give the progress, 'onl:ilti'n and needs of each insti-
tution and will doubtless receive your careful c'iisiderati(ln. A
detailed description of the work done at the institutions, courses
of study, degrees offered, attiitdaine, etc., is given in the annual
catalogues of the institutins which we would be glad to have
considered a part of this report.
Page.
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA.
Report of A. A. Murphree, A. M., L.L. D., President .......... 45

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES.
Report of James N. Anderson, M. A. Ph.D., Dean of the Col-
lege of Arts and Sciences and Professor of Ancient Lan-
guages ........................................ ....... 58

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE.
Report of P. H. Rolfs, M. S., Dean of the College of Agri-
culture ..................................... .......... 63

Report of W. L. Floyd, M. S., Professor of Horticulture...... 66

Report of C. L. Willoughby, B. Agr., Professor of Animal Hus-
bandry and Dairying .................................... 71

Report of J. E. Turlington, B. Agr., Ph.D., Professor of Agron-
om y .......................................... ........ 74

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING.
Report of J. R. Benton, B. A., Ph.D., Dean of the College of
Engineering and Professor of Physics and Electrical En-
gineering .............................................. 77

COLLEGE OF LAW.

Report of Harry R. Trusler, A. M., L.L. D., Dean of the Law
College and Professor of Law ........................... 83











TEACHERS' COLLEGE AND NORMAL SCHOOL.

Report of H. We Cox, A. M. Ph.D., Dean of the Teachers' Col-
lege and Professor of Philosophy and Education.......... 87

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION

Report of P. H. Rolfs, M. S., Director ....................... 92
Report of J. M. Scott, B. S., Animal Industrialist .............. 99
Report of B. F. Floyd, A. M., Plant Physiologist ............. 108
Report of J. R. Watson, A. M., Eitomologist ................. 117
Report of H. E. Stevens, M. S., Plant Pathologist............ 119
Report of C. D. Sherbakoff, Ph.D., Associate Plant Patholo-
gist .................................................... 124
Report of S. E. Collison, 1M. S., Chemist...................... 129
Report of J. B. Thompson, B. S., Forage Crop Specialist..... 131
Report of Director's Recommendation ....................... 144

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA EXTENSION DIVISION.

Report of P. H. Rolfs, M. S., Director ....................... 146
Report of O. W. Weaver, B. S., Agricultural Editor.......... 157
Report of C. K. McQuarrie, State Agent ..................... 160
Report of G. L. Herrington, B. S. A., Boys' Agricultural'Club
Agent .............................. ... ..... ......... .167
Report of A. A. Turner, Manager Farm Makers' and Home
Makers' Clubs (negro) .................................. 170
Report of A. I. Logan, D. V. M., Veterinary Field Agent...... 173
Report of Nathan W. Sanborn, M. D., Extension Poultry Hus-
bandman ................................................ 174
Report of Director's Recommendations......................... 185
Report of M. B. Hadley, A. B., Librarian.................. 186
Report of Faculty Library Committee ..................... 188
Report of T. Van Hyning, Director Florida State Museum.. 189
Report of K. H. Graham, Auditor ............................ 194

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA SUPPLEMENTARY REPORT PERTAIN-
ING TO ANIMAL INDUSTRY.
Report of P. H. Rolfs, Dean, transmitting recommendation
of President Florida State Live Stock Association, and
President Florida ,State Swine Growers' Association...... 199

FLORIDA STATE COLLEGE FOR WOMEN.
Report of Edward Conradi, A. M., Ph.D., President......... 205

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES.
Report of William G. Dodd, A. M., Ph.D., Dean of the College
of Arts and Sciences and Professor of English ........... 222









21

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION AND NORMAL SCHOOL.
Report of Nathaniel M. Salley, A. B., Dean of the School of
Education and Normal School and Professor of Education. 225

SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS.
Report of Agnes Ellen Harris, B. S., Dean of t'e School of
Home Economics ....................................... 228
Report of John G. Kellum, Business Manager Florida State
College for W omen ..................................... 223

EXTENSION DIVISION.
Report of Agnes Ellen Harris, State Home Demonstration
A gent .................................................. 237

FLORIDA SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF AND THE BLIND.
Report of A. H. Walker, A. B., Litt. D., President ............ 257
FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE FOR
NEGROES.
Report of N. B. Young, President ........................... 271

RECOMMENDATIONS.

In making recommendations for appropriations from the Legis-
latiire, the Board has tried to be governed by sound business judg-
ment in every way. While we hlave not asked for one item which
was not deemed necessarYi for the continiued growth and emciency
of the institutions, it must be borne in mind that Florida is a
rapidly growing State and that her Institutions of Higher Learn.
ing must grow and improve correspondingly.
No request is made for an appropriation for buildings at the
University of Florida. There it is thought the present facilities
will be adequate for the next biennium, and the small increase
in the appropriation for current expenses, is based, as is the
case with the recommendation at eaich institution, upon the
increaseil attendance and the higher cost of salaries and
commodities.
If Florida is to give to all persons desiring to enter her educa-
tional instit utions an equal opportunity, then improvements must
be made at the Florida State College for WomIen, the School for
the Deaf and Blind. and sonlc made at the A. & M. College for
Negroes.










Already the buildings at the Florida State College for Women
are, and have been for some time, congested, and if other Floriia
yvoi ng women are to enjoy the advantages of this wonderful
institution the Board deems the improvements as outlined here-
with essential.
While the attendance at the School for the Deaf and Blind at
St. Augustine has showed a steady growth from its establish-
ment, there are numbers of deaf and blind children in Florida
today who are not attending this school. These children can be
made into useful citizens, a credit to iheimslves and their state,
if the facilities are increased sufficiently to care for a larger
numiter. Already the dormitories are too crowded.
Printed in this report is a iuppleilentary Relprt of the Depart-
iiient of Animial Inldustry of the Agricultural College and Experi-
lenlt Station, with the recommendations of Dean P. H. Ro1lfs.
This recinmnendation was not included in the "Needs of the
Institutions" as set out in the Board's recomnmendalinn. It must
1e, however, apparent to everyone that the animal industry in
Florida has reached such proportions that more attention and
scientific study should be given to it inimediately.
It should be gratifying to us all to know that our institutions
iare growling ii numbers, strength and eiciency and licic i are able more
and more to give our people what they have the right to expect
from their State Institutions of Higher Learning.
BOARD OF CONTROL,
By JOE L. EA.RMA.N,
Ch1;i i n;n.




















0 3 I u-L I 11 I



8 16 1 f 6 L Y






00
00


--~ -~. -1 -IIH. --- - -
T4 loolp s .1 '11111111,z




z -

6 L -1-:i1i 1
-t4
Ha




H 91(;-21(3jI t








C C 11111





- - - - -
1 6 1- L WTt L JC)


0 16 [-6` lt; L
606 L-() L
806 t- I-OGI













L0 tL -906:tI m' '
X cr
I'll


- - --- -- ---
-i 0- 0 c'






CCZ




H; ___ :
L(iAUU I I -

S M CD
-I.e L- '
E- P~i~~pI ajjos -


0 -
t LOI(i t9 0G1 xr x
Hr r :
cn ~ ~~~ 0)U~UI ; 1
9U( t1 i C-






O rl- C~H












SECRETARY'S REPORT FOR 1916-1917

Tallahassee, Fla., July 31, 1917.
To the Board of Control of Institutions of Higher Learning.
Gentlemen:
The following report of the finances of the Board of Control for the
period beginning July 1, 1916, and ending June 30, 1917, is respectfully
submitted:
SUMMARY
APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES FOR IMPROVEMENTS.

RESOURCES:

For University of Florida............... $ 16,900.10
For Florida State Colege for Women... 9,990.46
For School for the Deaf and the Blind.. 2,692.25
For A. & M. College for Negroes, Educa-
tional Fund Deficit ...............$15.64
University of Florida Fire Loss Fund.. 878.80

Total resources, July j, 1917 ..... $15.64 $30,461.61 $30,445.97
Net resources July 1, 1917.

EXPENDITURES:

For University of Florida.................... $12,729.75
For Florida State College for Women.......... 2,587.06
For School for the Deaf and the Blind......... 2,682.95
For University of Florida, Fire Loss Fund.... 521.23

Total expenditures, yeai ending July 1, 1917 $18,520.49

Total balance July 1, 1917 ............ $11,924.98



STATEMENT FOR EACH INSTITUTION.

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA.
RESOURCES:

Balances brought forward July 1, 1916:
For Erection Engineering Building ........... $ 1,500.00
For General Library ........................ 2,586 28
For Law Library ........................... 234.13
For New Equipment ....................... 2,041.50
For Museum ................................ 4.92
For Repairs and Expenses Experiment Station 4,621.02
For Bulletins ............................... 5,912.25
For Fire Loss Fund ........................ 878.80

Total Resources July 1, 1917.............. $17,778.90
For General Library ....................... 2,586.05
For Law Library ........................... 232.50
For New Equipment ......................... 2,151.84












For M useum ............................... 104.97
For Repairs and Expenses Experiment Station 4,596.49
For Bulletins ............................... 3,057.90
For Fire Loss Fund ........................ 521.23

Total Expenditures for year ending July 1,
1917 ................................. $13,250.98.

Net Balance carried forward July
1, 1917 ..................... $ 4,527.92


EXPENDITURES:
FLORIDA STATE COLLEGE FOR WOMEN.

RESOURCES:

Balance brought forward July 1, 1916:
For Old Organ .............................$ 8,000.00
Appropriation 1915 for Campus............. 1,990.46

Total Resources July 1, 1916 ............ $ 9,990.46

EXPENDITURES:

For Campus Improvement .................. $ 2,587.06

Total Expenditures for year ending July
1, 1917 ............................. 2,587.06

Balance July 1, 1917 ............... $7,403.40


SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF AND THE BLIND.

RESOURCES:

Balances brought forward July 1, 1916:
For Hospital .............................. $ 536.25
For Athletics ............................... 500.00
For Apparatus and Special Equipment....... 1,000.00
For Campus ................................ 284 00
For Library ................................ 372.00

Total Resources July 1, 1917............ $ 2,692.25

EXPENDITURES:
For Special Equipment ..................... $ 1,742.54
For H hospital ............................... 737.61
For Athletics .............................. 202.80

Total Expenditures for year ending July
1, 1917 ............................ $ 2,652.95

Balance carried forward July 1,
1917 ........................ 9.30












A. & M. COLLEGE FOR NEGROES.


RESOURCES:

Appropriation 1915, Deficit .................. $15.64

EXPENDITURES:
None

Deficit Carried Forward July 1, 1917 ........ $15.64



CURRENT EXPENSES.

SUMMARY.
RESOURCES:

For Board of Control.......................$ 2.858.72
For University of Florida ................... 8-,344.63
For Farmers' Institutes ..................... 11,911.35
For Experiment Station .................... 33,620.68
For Florida State College for Women...... 78,057.02
For School for Deaf and Blind.............. 36,151.27
For Extension Work, Florida State College
for W omen ............................ 10,733.29
For A. & M. College for Negroes............ ;2.951.1'
State Colle ,' for W omen .................. li.,7::.2:!
Lever Atricultural Extension Fund, Federal. 21,892.73
Lever Agricultural Extension Fund, State.... 11,892.73

Total Resources for year ending July 1,
1917 ............................... $324,414.03

EXPEN DlITURES:

For Poarl of Control .......................$ ;.0',.7s
For University of Florida .................. .. ,162.:'.
For Farmers' Instil ut( ...................... 11,5;:- 1.
For Florida State College for Women......... 75.22.75
For Expl riment Station .................... 3:.:275.i.;S
For School for Deaf and Blind .............. 34,868.05
For A. & M. College for Negroes ........... 32,871.67
For Extension Work Florida State College for
TWomen ................................. 10,720.05
For Lever Agricultural Extension Fund, Fed-
eral .................................... 21,91".21
For Lever Auriciiltuiral Extension Fund, State 11,'.73

Total Expenditures for year end-
ing July 1, 1917............. $319,650.46

Balance carried forward July 1, 1917 $4,763.57









27

ITEMIZED STATEMENT FOR EACH INSTITUTION

BOARD OF CONTROL.
RESOURCES:

Balance brought forward ...................$ 108.72
Approlriationl for year ...................... 2,77, m>l

Total .................................. $ 2,858.72

EXPENDITURES:

Salary of Secretary ........................$ 1, 7E..7
Postage and Stationery .................... 71.8%
Printiiin Report ............................ lOS.1
Traveling Expenises ......................... 1,149.57
E express ............................ .......... 1.33

Total Expendituir'-s for year ending July
1, 1917 ............................... .. 3.005.7S

Overdraft carried forward July 1, 1917 $ 147.06



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA.
SRESOU RCES:

Educational Fund Receipts for
year .........................$ 45,000.00
Ov nrdlaft July 1, 1916........... l...: 7

Balance ...................... $ 4 '., ;. :;

Morrill & Nl-Ion Fund Rec1iplts
for year ...................... 25,000.00

Agricultural College Fund Re-
ceipts for year .............. 7,7 i.,,I

Seminary Interest Fund It ctil'ts
for year ..................... 2,0;4 00
Balance July 1, 1916 ............ .03

Total ........................ $ 2," 4.

Incidental Fund Receilts for year $ 5,573.97

Total Resources for year ending
July 1, 1T17 ................ $ 1,:4 4.63

EXPENDITURES:

Salary of Teachers and Laborers ........... $ 74,447.02
Equipment, Furniiure and Apparatus........ 2,906.16
Heat, Light and \Wate.r .................... 884.34









28

Postage, Stationery and Office Supplies...... 1,099.64
Advertising and Printing .................... 2,640.60
Buildings and Repairs ...................... 2o5 45
Traveling Expenses ........................ 369.53
Freight and Express ........................ 709.59
Foodstuffs ................................. 209.81
Books and Publications .................... 491.42
Miscellaneous Expenses ..................... 198.80

Total Expenditures for year ending July 1,
1917 ................................... $84,162.36

RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES BY FUNDS.

Educational Fund:
Receipts ................................... $ 43,916.63
Expenditures .............................. 43,916.61

Balance July 1, 1917 ..................... .02

Morrill & Nelson Fund:
Receipts ................................... 25,000.00
Expenditures ............................... 25,000.00

Agricultural College Fund:
Receipts ................................... 7,790.00
Expenditure ............................... 7789.67

Balance July 1, 1917....................... .33
Seminary Interest Fund:
Receipts ................................... 2,064.03
Expenditures ............................... 2,064.00

Balance July 1, 1917 ...................... .03

Incidental Fund:
Receipts ................................. 5,573.97
Expenditures ............................... 5,392.08

Balance July 1, 1917 ...................... $181.89

Total Balance July 1, 1917.............. $182.27


FARMERS' INSTITUTE.
RECEIPTS:

Balance of Appropriation 1915 Brought For-
ward ..................................... $ 11,911.35
EXPENDITURES:
Salaries and Labor .........................$ 6,916.89
Equipment, Furniture and Apparatus.......... 798.37
Postage, Stationery and Office Supplies....... 502.15











Advertising and Printing ................... 1,340.89
Building and Improvements ................ 1,738.80
Traveling Expenses ......................... 291.65
Freight and Express ........................ 4.40

Total Expenditures for year ending July 1,
1917 ................................... $ 11.593.15

Balance carried forward July 1, 1917.. $318.20



EXPERIMENT STATION.

RESOURCES:

Hatch Fund, receipts ........... $ 1.,110
Adams Flund, receipts ........... 1 .,i i.0i)
Incidental Fund, receipts........$ 3,604.61
Balance July 1, 1916 ............ 16.07

Total ....................... $ 2,62ti.

Total receipts for year ending
July 1, 1917 .............. $ 33,62068

EXPENDITURES:

'Salaries and Labor .........................$ 22,495.45
Equijtpment, Furniture and Apparatus......... 4,014.39
Heat, Light and Water...................... 178.20
Postage, Stationery and Office Supplies...... 1,143.91
Advertising and Printing .................. 557:., 1
Buililings and Repairs ....................... 38.80
l'rave:ling Extpen-s- s ........................ 817.85
Freight and Express ....................... :',.:,.
Food-stiuffs ................................... 3,364.69
Miscellaneous Expenses .................... 71.18
Books and Publications ..................... 311.41

Total Expe-nditures for year ending July 1,
1917 ................................... $33,375.68

Balance carried forward July, 1917...... $245.00

RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES BY FINDS.

Hatch Fund:
Receipts ................................... $ 15.',001.0)i'
Expenditures ............................... 15,000.00

Adams Fund:
R eceipts .................................. ).l15,01 'n
Expenditures ............................... 15,000.00












Incidental Fund:
Receipts .................................... 3,620.68
Expenditures ............................... 3,375.68

Balance July 1, 1917 .................... $245.00

Total Balance July 1, 1917 ............... $245.00


LEVER AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION FUND.
FEDERAL.
RESOURCES:
Receipts for the year ........... $ 21,,92.73

EXPENDITURES:
Salaries ...................... $ 14,319.69
Equipment ..................... 287.96
Office Supplies ................. 410.92
Printing ........................ 96.63
Repairs ........................ 3.00
Traveling Expenses ............. 6,795.84
Freight and Express............. 24.70
Miscellaneous .................. 1.50

Total Expenditures for year end-
ing July 1, 1917 .............. $21,940.24

Deficit July 1, 1917 .......... $ 47.51

LEVER AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION FUND.
STATE.
RESOURCES:

Receipts ........................ $ 11,892.73

EXPENDITURES:
Salaries ........................$ 9,236.33
Equipment ..................... 290.40
Postage and Stationery ........ 349.87
Printing ........................ 1,548.37
Traveling Expense .............. 464.52
Freight and Express ........... 3.24

Total Expenditures for year end-
ing July 1, 1917 ........... $ 11,892.73



FLORIDA STATE COLLEGE FOR WOMEN.

RESOURCES:
Educational Fund ..............$ 60,000.00












13alanlc IlruIllibt Forward July 1,
1916 ......................... 2

Total ....................... $ 60,002.S4
Seminary Interest Fund .........$ 2,,$ i.1,i
Balance July 1, 1916 ............. .37

Total ...................... $ 2,064.37
Incidental Fund ................$ 13.: 24 79
Balance July 1, 1916 ........... 2.;65.i 2

Total ............. ......... $ 15,989.81

Total Receipts for year end-
ing July 1, 1917 .......... $ 78,057.02

EXPENDITURES:

Salaries and Labor .............. $ 58,863.34
Eq uilpnjtnt, Furniture and Appa- 6,784.38
ratus ......................... 6,784.38
Heat, Light and Water .........2.4 0
Postage, Statiojiiury and Office
Supplies ...................... 1,167.77
Advertising and Printing ....... 2,253.21
Repairs ........................ 771.48
Traveling Expenses ............ 604.85
Freight and Explress ............ 727.74
Books and Publications........... 1,447.61
Miscellaneous Supplies ......... 194.47

Total Expenditures for year
ending July 1, 1917 ....... $75,220.75

Total Balance July 1,
1917 ................. $2,836.27

STATEMENT BY FUNDS.

Educational Fund:
Receipts .......................$ 60,002.84
Expenditures ................... 60,364.12

Overdraft July 1, 1917........... $ 316.28

Seminary Interest Fund:
Receipts .......................$ 2,064.37
Expenditures ................... 585.80


Balance July 1, 1917 ..........


$1,178.57











Incidental Fund:
Receipts ....................... $ 15,989.81
Expenditures ................... 14,270.83

Balance July 1, 1917.......... $ 1,718.98

Total Balance July 1, 1917... $361.28 $3,197.55
361.2S

Net Balance July 1, 1917 .... $2,836.27



FLORIDA STATE COLLEGE FOR WOMEN.

EXTENSION FUND.
RESOURCES:

Educational Fund:
Printing Bulletin ...................... $ 889.50
Institute for Women ....................... 4,253.58
County Agents' Appropriation .............. 5,590 21

Total Receipts for year ending July 1, 1917 $ 10,733.21

EXPENDITURES:

Salaries .................................... $ 8,685.01
Equipment ................................. 519.59
Heat, Light and Water ..................... 35.26
Post:ige and Office Supplies ................ 297.19
Printing and Advertising .................. 591.70
R epairs .................................... 23.00
Traveling Expenses ........................ 436.13
Freight and Express ....................... 56.61
B ooks ...................................... 1.44
Miscellneous ................................ 74.12

Total Expenses for year ending July 1, 1917 $ 111,720.05

Balance July 1, 1917 .............. $13.21

STATEMENT BY FUNDS

Bulletin Fund:
Appropriation .................$ 889.50
Expenditures ................... 889.44

Balance July 1, 1917 .......... .06

Women's Institute Fund:
Appropriation ....................$ 4,253.58
Expenditures ..................... 4,240.43


$13.15


Balance July 1, 1917 ...........











County Agents' Fund:
Appropriation ..................$ 5,590.21
Expenditures .................. 5,590.18

Balance July 1, 1917 ........ .03

Total Balance July 1, 1917... $13.24


SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF AND THE BLIND.

RESOURCES:

Educational Fund:
Receipts .......................$ 32,500.00
Balance July 1, 1916 ............ 2,014.23
$34,514.23
Incidental Fund:
Receipts ....................... 214.50
Balance July 1, 1916............. 1,422.54 1,637.04

Total Receipts for year end-
ing July 1, 1917 ..........$ 36,151.27

EXPENDITURES:
,Salaries and Labor .........................$ 16,975.30
Equipment, Furniture and Apparatus ........ 4,sl 1 96
Heat, Light and Water ..................... 2,889.96
Postage, Stationery and Office Supplies...... 289.23
R epairs .................................... 58.95
Traveling Expenses ......................... 1,00:3.92
Freight and Express ........................ 111.96
Foodstuffs .................................. 8,561.45
Books and Publications .................... 143.82
Miscellaneous Expenses .................... 18.50

Total Expenditures for year ending July 1,
1917 .............................. .. $ 34,G.....

Balance Carried Forward July 1, 1917... $1,2~:3 22

STATEMENT BY FUNDS.
Educational Fund:
Receipts .......................$ 34,514.23
Expenditures ................... .:,.' i.0;

Balance July 1, 1917 ......... $1,246.18

Incidental Fund:
Receipts .......................$ 1,637.04
Expenditures ................... 1,600.00

Balance July 1, 1917 .......... 7.4

Balance carried forward July
1, 1917 ..................... $ 1,283.22
3-Bd. Con.








34

A. & M. COLLEGE FOR NEGROES.
RESOURCES:

Educational Fund ...............$ 9,000.00
Less Overdraft July 1, 1916 ...... 1,188.89

Total .......................... $ 7,811.11
Morrill Fund:
Receipts .......................$ 25,000.00
Less Overdraft July 1, 1916...... 935.39

Net Receipts ................... $ 24,064.61
Incidental Fund:
Receipts ....................... $740.S6
Balance July 1, 1916 ............ 4.73

Total ........................ $745.59
Slater Fund:
Receipts ........................ 300.00
Balance July 1, 1916 ............ 30.30

Total ........................ $330.30

Total Receipts for year end-
ing July 1, 1917 ........... $32,951.61
EXPENDITURES:
Salaries and Labor ........................$ 25,772.58
Equipm ent ................................. 3,954.11
Heat, Light and Water .................... 1,631.46
Postage .................................... 310.75
Advertising ................................. 1. .9.2,
Buildings and Repairs ...................... 151.92
Traveling Expenses ............;........... 22.88
Freight and Express ....................... 384.79
Feed ...................................... 341.93
Books ...................................... 118.00
M miscellaneous .............................. 26.69

Total Expenditures for year ending July 1,
1917 .................................... $32,871.67

Balance for year ending July 1, 1917.... $79.94


A. & M.'COLLEGE FOR NEGROES.
STATEMENT BY FUNDS.
Educational Fund:
Receipts .........................$ 7,811.11
Expenditures ..................... 7,762.35


Balance July 1, 1917 .............


$48.70












Morrill & Nelson Fund:
Receipts .........................$ 24,064.61
Expenditures .................... 24,047.97

Balance July 1, 1917 ............ $16.64

Incidental Fund:
Receipts ......................... $745.59
Expenditures ............... .. 741.35

Balance July 1, 1917 ......... $4.24
Slater Fund:
R -ceilits .........................$ 330.30
Expentlitures ..................... 320.00

Balance July 1, 1917 ............ $10.30

Total Net Balance July 1, 1917.. $79.94



SECRETARY'S REPORT FOR 1917-1918

Tallahassee, Fla., August 1, 1918.

To the Board of Contr'il of Institutions of Higher Learning:
Gentllenen-
The follow ing report of the finances of the Board of Control for the
period beginning July 1, 1917, and ending June 30, 1918, is herewith re-
spectfully submitted.
BRYAN MACK, Secretary.

SU1MM1ARY OF AMOUNTS AVAILABLE AND EXPENDITURES FOR
YEAR BEGINNING JULY 1, 1917 AND ENDING JUNE 30, 1918.
TOTAL RESOURCES.

Board of Control ...............................$ 6,000 00
University of Florida .......................... 24i;,.17.03
Experiment Station ............................. 114,770.94
Florida State Coll'gH. for Women .............. :;,P:i.621.01
Florida School for the Deaf and Il;irl ........... 100,613.20
Florida A. & M. College for Negr,-es .............. 57,1 :: .2
$ 2S, 19..8 O

TOTAL EXPENLITI'RES.

Board of Control ..............................$ 2.722. 19
University of Finriha ........................... 121,51:2.,7
Experiment Station ............................ 95,856.08
Florida State C'llcge for Women ............. 155,914.39
Florida School for the Deaf and Blind ........... 40,939.41
Florida A. & M. College for Negroes........... 46,174 60
$463,121.84


Unexpended Balance July 1, 1918 ..........


$365,076.96












RESOURCES AND EXPENDITURES FOR EACH INSTITUTION.
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA.

Total Resources .................... $246,007.03
Total Expenditures ................. 121,513.87

Balance July 1, 1918 ........... $124,493.16
EXPERIMENT STATION.

Total Resources .................... $114,770.94
Total Expenditures ................ 95,856.08
Balance July 1, 1918 ............ $ 18,914.86
FLORIDA STATE COLLEGE FOR WOMEN.

Total Resources .................... $303,624.01
Total Expenditures ................. 155,914.39

Balance July 1, 1918 ............ $147,709.62
SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF AND BLIND.

Total Resources ................... $100,613.20
Total Expenditures ................ 40,939.41

Balance July 1, 1918 ............ $ 59,673.79

A. & M. COLLEGE FOR NEGROES.

Total Resources ....................$ 57,183.63
Total Expenditures ................. 46,174.60

Balance July 1, 1918 ............ $ 11,009.02

BOARD OF CONTROL.

Total Resources ..................... .. $ 6.00n.00
Total Expenditures ........ ......... 2,723.49

Balance July 1, 1918 ............ $ 3.276.51

Grand Total Resources .............................. ..... $828,198 80
Grand Total Expenditures ................................ 463,121.84

Balance July 1, 1918 ............... ................ $365,076.96


BUILDING FUNDS.

Total Resources.

University of Florida ...........................$ 79,300.00
Florida State College for Women................ ll!,~03.40
Florida A. & M. College for Negroes........... 6,484.36
Florida School for the Deaf and Blind.......... 23.,09.30
$228,697.06









37

Total Expenditures.

University of Florida ........................... $ 22,867.16
Florida State College for Women............... 60,903.57
A. & M. College for Negroes ................... 6,484.36
Florida School for the Deaf and Blind.......... 3,489.54
$ 93,744.63

Unexpended Balance July 1, 1918 .......... $134,952.43



CURRENT EXPENSE FUNDS.

Total Resources.

Board of Control ............................... $ 6,000.00
University of Florida ........................... 166,707.03
Experiment Station ........................... 114,770.94
Florida State College for Women ............... 1P:,720).6l
Florida School for the Deaf and Blind ........ 77,603.90
Florida A. & M. College for Negroes........... 50,699.26
$599,501.74

Total Expenditures.

Board of Control .......................... .... $ 2,723.49
University of Florida ........................... 98,646.71
Experiment Station ............................. 95,856.08
Florida State College for Women ............... 95,010.82
Florida School for the Deaf and Blind ........... 37,449.87
Florida A. & M. College for Negroes............ 39,690.24
$369,377.21

Unexpended Balance July 1, 1918 .......... $230,124.53



ITEMIZED STATEMENT FOR EACH INSTITUTION.



BOARD OF CONTROL

Resources ............... ................................. $ 6,000.00
Expenditures-
For Salaries ... ...................... ........ .. $ 1,628.44
For Postdge and Stationery and Office Supplies. 203.25
For Traveling Exl:enses ......................... 741.96
For Freight and Expriss ............ .......... 1.90
For Miscl llane ui Expenses ................... .90
For Deficit from Previous Year ................. 147.06
$ 2,72::.49

Balance July 1, 11 .1 ....................... $ :,27 1 ..










38


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA.

Educational Fund.

Resources ............................................... $127,700.02
Expenditures-
For Salaries ................................... $ 49,029.23
For Equipment, Furniture and Apparatus........ 3,604.34
For HYat, Light and Water .................... 1,562.02
For Postage, Stationery, Office Expenses........ 1,963.76
For Advertising and Printing .................. 2,664.83
For Buildings and Repairs ..................... 1,288.52
For Traveling Expenses ........................ 1,170.21
For Freight and Express ....................... 1,191.57
For Feed Stuffs ................................ 524.39
For Books and Publications .................... 309.73
For Miscellaneous Expenses .................... 488.11
$ 63,796.71

Unexpended Balance July 1, 1918 ........... $ 63,903.31



Morrill Fund.

Resources .............................................. 25,000.00
Expenditures-
For Salaries .................................. $ 25,000.00
$ 25,000.00



Agricultural College Fund.

Resources ................................................. $ 7,790.33
Expenditures-
For Salaries ................................... $ 7,790.00
$ 7,790.00

Unexpended Balance July 1, 1918 .......... $ .33


Incidental Fund.

R sources ................................. ............. $ 4,152.65
No Expenditures.
Unexpended Balance July 1, 1918 ................... $ 4,152.65


Seminary Interest Fund.

Resources ............................................... $ 2,06403
Expenditures-
For Salaries .................................. $ 2,060.00
$ 2,060.00
Unexpended Balance July 1, 198 ......... $ 4.03
t













Building Fund.

Resources .............................................. $ 79,300.00
Expenditures-
For Erecting, Remodeling and Equipping Build-
ings and Campus ........................... $ 22,867.16
$ 22,867.16

Unexpended Balance July 1, 1918 ......... $ 56,432.84



EXPERIMENT STATION.



Adams Fund.

Resources ................................................ $ 15,000.00
Expenditures-
For Salaries ................................... $ 12,399.09
For Equipment. Furniture and Apparatus ...... 1..:2.1..6
For, Heat, Light and Water ................... 81.79
For Postage, Stationery and Office Expenses...... 55.39
For Advertising and Printing ....... ........... 1 .:.
For Buildings and Relp;irs ..................... .
For Traveling Expenses. ........................ 904.00
For Freight and Express ....................... 111.55
For Feed Stuffs ................................ 1.20
For Books and Publications..................... 36.08
For Miscellaneous Exl,:nses .. .................. 130.11
$ 15,000.00



Hatch Fund.

Resources ........................................ ........ $1 1.
Expenditures-
For Salaries ..................................$ 11,270.15
For Equipment, Furniture and Apli:Lrditus ........ 551.07
For Heat, Light and Water .................... 154.32
For Postage, St;Ltioncry and Office Expins,.-.. ... 523.52
For Advertising and Printing .................. 1, I 1'.
For Buildings and Repairs ...................... 49.72
For Traveling Expenses ................ ......... 5.81
For Freight and Express ....................... 157.56
For Feed Stuffs ................................ 614.20
For Books and Publications .................... 1~ 4
For Miscellaneous Expenses ................... 42.47
$ 15,000.00









40

Incidental Fund.

Resources ............................................... $ 8,327.78
Expenditures-
For Salaries ............................ $..... $ 2,186.37
For Equipment, Furniture and Apparatus.......... 915.50
For Heat, Light and Water ..................... 78.78
For Postage, Stationery and Office Supplies...... 95.84
For Advertising and Printing ................... 42.43
For Buildings and Repairs ....................... 34.26
For Traveling Expenses ........................ 277.16
For Freight and Express ....................... 197.36
For Feed Stuffs ................................ 3,420.02
For Books and Publications .................... 152.68
For Miscellaneous Expenses .................... 99.13
$ 7,499.53

Unexpended Balance July 1, 1918 ........... $ 828.25

Farmers' Institutes, Bulletins, Etc. Fund.



Resources ............................................... $ 31,488.55
Expenditures-
For Current Expenses .........................$ 4,605.00
For Clearing Land ............................. 14.25
For Bulletins ................................... 4,013.99
Farmers' Institutes ............................. 5,046.22
$ 13,679.46

Unexpended Balance July 1, 1918 .......... $ 17,809.09


Fire Loss Fund.

Resources ................................................ $ 357.57
Expenditures-
For Postage, Stationery and Office Expenses.... $ 80.05
$ 80.05

Unexpended Balance July 1, 1918............ $ 277.52



Smith-Lever State Fund-Extension Work.

Resources ................... .. .......................... $ 17,298.52
Expenditures-
For Salaries, Traveling Expenses and Incidental
Expenses for Carrying on Extension Work..$ 17,298.52
$ 17,298.52












Smith-Lever Federal Fu-nd-Extension Work.

R sources ................................................
Expenditures-
For Salaries, Traveling and Incidental Expenses
for Carrying on Extension Work ..........$ 27,298.52


FLORIDA STATE COLLEGE FOR WOMEN.



Educational Fund.

R sources .................... ..........................
Expenditures-
For Salaries .................................... $ 53,801.81
For Equipment, Furniture and Apparatus ........ 6,799.20
For Heat, Light and Water ..................... 1,213.69
For Postage, Stationery and Office Supplies...... 1,553.77
For Advertising and Printing ................. 2,319.87
For Buildings and Repairs ...................... 3,167.42
For Traveling Expenses ........................ 776.83
For Freight and Express ........................ 835.21
For Feed Stuffs ............................... 6.00
For Books and Publications .................... 1,844.39
For Miscellaneous Expenses ..................... 564.63


Unexpended Balance July 1, 1918 ...........


Incidental Fund.

Resources ................................................ $ 15,126.08
Expenditures-
For Salaries .................................. $ 9,094.47
For Equipment, Furniture and Apparatus........ 222.11
For Heat, Light and Water .................... 119.06
For Postage, Stationery and Office Supplies.... 189.19
For Advertising and Printing .................. 196.89
For Buildings and Repairs .................... 100.00
For Traveling Expnnses ....................... 284 81
For Freight and Express ....................... 17.33
For Books and Publications .................... 75.74
For Miscellaneous Expenses ...................... 77.38
$ 10,376.99


Unexpended Balance July 1, 1918 ..........


$ 27,298 52


$ 27,298.52


$146,638.72


-- $ 72,882.82


$ 73,755.90


$ 4,749.10












Building Fund.

Resources ............. .. ......... ..............$ 23,009.30
Expenditures-
For Reclamation of Land .......................$ 402.57
For Scholarships ................................ 200.00
For Campus, Purchase of Land ................ 2,500.00
For Pianos and Furniture ...................... 300.00
For Library ..................................... 86.97
$ 3,489.51

Unexpended Balance July 1, 1918 .......... $ 19,519.76



Incidental Fund.

Resources ............................................... $ 357.54
No Expenditures.
Unexpended Balance July 1, 1918 .......... $ 357.54


A. & M. COLLEGE FOR NEGROES.


Educational Fund.

Resources ............................................... $ 22,048.78
Expenditures-
For Salaries .................................. $ 6,680.68
For Equipment, Furniture and paiiratus ........ 1,283.93
For Heat, Light and W ater ..................... 1,24'.48
For Postage, Stationery and Officy Supplies....... 4n11.25
For Printing and Advertising .................... 110.55
For Buildings and Repairs ..................... 657.86
For Traveling Expenses ....................... 280.36
For Freight and Express ....................... -.'.;4
For Feed Stuffs .... ........................... 23.00
For Books and Publications .................... 50.00
For Miscellaneous Expenses ................... 61.00
$ 11,048.75

Unexpended Balance July 1, 1918 ......... $ 11,000.01


Morrill Fund.

R sources ..................... .......................... $ 25,016.64
Expenditures-
For Salaries ................... ............... $ 19,445.54
For Equipment, Furniture and Apparatus....... 2,782.55
For Heat, Bight and Water ..................... 862.74
For Postage, Stationery and Office Siiplles ...... 352.79
For Printing and Advertising .................. S.:;5
For Buildings and Repairs ............ ....... 194.71











For Freight and Express ....................... 159.19
For Feed Stuffs ................................ 743.30
For Books and Publications .................... 226.48
For Miscellaneous Expenses .................... 241.08
$ 25,016.73

Deficit on July 1, 1918 ..................... $ .09


Slater Fund.

Resources .................... ............................ $ 310.30
Expenditures-
For Salaries ................................... $ 305.00
$ 305.00

Unexpended Balance July 1, 1918 .......... $ 5.30


Incidental Fund.

Resources ................................................ $ 993.16
Expenditures-
For Salaries ........................... ..... $ 817.67
For Equipment, Furniture and Apparatus......... 7.50
For Postage, Stationery and Office Supplies...... 13.50
For Printing and Advertising ................. 24.00
For Buildings and Repairs ...................... 9006
For Miscellaneous Expenses .................... 37.88
$ 990.61

Unexpended Balance July 1, 1918 ........... $ 2.55


Building Fund.

Resources ........................................ $ 6,484.36
Expenditures-
For Mechanical Arts Shop, Barns and Implement
Sheds .................... ................. $ 6,484.36
$ 6,484.36


Fire Loss Fund.
Resources ............................................ $ 2,330.40
Expenditures-
For Barn, Furnishihg and Equipping Same, Imple-
ments .............. ........................ $ 2,313.55
For Heat, Light and Water ..................... 8.7o
For Advertising ....................... ......... 3.00
For Freight and Express ....................... 2.35
For Miscellaneous Expenses ..................... 1.50
$ 2,329.15

Unexpended Balance July 1, 1918 ........... $ 1.25











PRESIDENT'S BIENNIAL REPORT, UNIVERSITY
OF FLORIDA

Gainesville, July 1, 1918.
To the Honorable Board of Control:

Gentlemen:

I have the honor to present for your consideration the following bien-
nial report of the University of Florida for the period beginning July 1st,
1916, and ending June 30th, 1918.
Supplementary to this report, I submit detailed statements from
the Deans of the College of Arts and Sciences, College of Agriculture,
College of Engineering, College of Law, Teachers' College and Normal
School, and Director's Report of the Experiment Station and Agricul-
tural Extension Division, also report from the University Librarian, the
Director of the State Museum of the University and the Auditor's report
on the University Commons or Dining Hall.
In considering the progress and needs of the University of Florida,
it will be kept in mind that this higher high school of the State is a dis-
tinct part of, and an essential factor in, the free school system of the
commonwealth. The graded schools are scattered state-wide, placing pri-
mary and intermediate education within easy reach of every child. For
secondary education, the high schools are maintained in every county
of the State. For the higher education of Florida's young men and
young women, there are the State University for men and the State Col-
lege for Women, which complete and round out the system of education
as a whole. The school district is the unit for the graded and intermedi-
ate schools. The county is the unit of the high school for the secondary
education of our, boys and girls, while the State is the unit for the two
higher high schools, the University of Florida and the State College for
Women. These two State institutions are the only free schools offering
higher education to young men and young women free of cost save that
of the actual living expenses. Thus we have the filfillinl nt of Thomas
Jefferson's ideal of a system of state-supported education in all its
branches from primary to university, "So necessary," said he, "for the
success and perpetuation of our democratic institutions." In this con-
nection, Thomas Jefferson, the founder of the University of Virginia, the
oldest state university in America, said: "I look to the diffusion of light
and education as the resource most to be relied upon for ameliorating
conditions, promoting virtue, and advancing the happiness of men. A
system of general instruction which shall reach every doicriiltion of our
citizens, from the richest to the poorest, as it was the earliest, so it will be
the latest of all the public concerns in which I shall permit myself to
take an interest. Educate and inform the whole mass of the, people. No
other sure foundation can be devised for the preservation of freedom
and happiness."











Florida is fortunate in not having to divide her strength and re-
sources among more higher institutions of learning. This policy ought
to be continued and carefully safeguarded. Every policy which tends
otherwise must be weeded out; and every individual who is not big
enough to work towards this end is, to say the least, inconsiderate of
the best interests of the State and of her institutions. With this policy
in view, the usefulness and effectiveness of the State College for Women
and the University of Florida must be state-wide. The usefulness and
helpfulness of these institutions must reach every county, every com-
munity and every individual as far as possible.
It should be understood, therefore, that the tabulations of attendance
below, by no means indicate the number of people who receive instruc-
tion and other direct benefits from this institution. For example, the
number of people who have been addressed or taught in one way or an-
other at high school commencements, teachers' institutes, farmers' in-
stitutes, farm and home demonstrations, including corn clubs, pig clubs,
peanut clubs, correspondence courses, etc., approximate upwards of
100,000 citizens.


I. STATISTICS OF ATTENDANCE.

Summary, 1916-1917.
Graduate School ................... .................... 18
College of Arts and Sciences ............................ 95
College of Agriculture.
College .......................................... 77
Two-Year Course in Agriculture........................ 26
One-Year Course in Agriculture ........................ 2
Four-Months' Course in Agriculture.................... 5
One-Week Citrus Course ............................ 17
Ten-Day Course for Farmers ........... .............. 10
137
College of Engineering .................................... 59
College of Law ........................................... 82
Teachers' College and Normal School ..................
College ................... ...... ................ . 18
Normal School ....................................... 18
Special and Review Courses ........................ 13
Practice High School ............................... 20
Summer School (Coeducational) ....................... 539
608

Total Enrollment for 1916-1917 .......................... 999-
Counted twice (Enrolled both in regular session and Sum-
m er School) ......................................... 46

N et Total ................................. ...... .. 953
Number enrolled in Correspondence Courses ............... 172

Grand Total ......................................... 1,125










In 1916-17, fifty-one Florida counties were represented as follows:
Alachua, 195; Baker, 4; Bay, 3; Bradford, 22; Brevard, 19; Broward, 2;
Calhoun, 2; Citrus, 5; Clay, 6; Columbia, 21; Dade, 14; DeSoto, 48; Du-
val, 44; Escambia, 12; Franklin, 6; Gadsden, 11; Hamilton, 5; Hernando,
7; Hillsborough, 50; Holmes, 4; Jackson, 5; Jefferson, 1; Lafayette, 10;
Lake, 29; Lee, 11; Leon, 15; Levy, 20; Liberty, 4; Madison, 16; Man-
atee, 14; Marion, 48; M'onroe, 19; Nassau, 4; Orange, 17; Osceola, 5;
Palm Beach, 12; Pasco, 20; Pinellas, 41; Polk, 57; Putnam, 12; St. Johns,
7; St. Lucie, 11; Santa Rosa, 13; Seminole, 17; Sumter, 14; Suwannee,
7; Taylor, 2; Volusia, 17; Wakulla, 1; Walton, 6; Washington, 6.
The District of Columbia, sixteen States and two foreign countries
were represented by 953 students as follows: Alabama, 9; Connecticut, 1;
Cuba, 3; District of Columbia, 1; Florida, 941; Georgia, 10; Illinois, 4;
Indiana, 1; Kentucky, 2; Massachusetts, 2; Michignin. 3; Minnesota, 2;
Missishiplpi 1; Missouri, 1; New York, 6; Paraguay, 1; South Carolina,
6; Tennis ssee, 4; Virginia. 1.
The total from 51 Florida counties was 941 and the total from other
States and foreign countries was 58, making a total enrollment of 999.
Subtracting those counted twice as they were enrolled both in the regu-
lar session and the Summer School, leaves a net total of 953 students,
the number attending the University of Florida during the year, 1916-17,
not including students taking correspondence courses.

Summary 1917-18.

Graduate School ......................................... 5
College of Arts and Sciences ............................. 92
College of Agriculture-
College ........................................ ...... 54
Two-Year Course in Agriculture....................... 27
One-Year Course in Agriculture ....................... 6
Four-Month Course in Agriculture ................. 1
One-Week Citrus Course .............................. 23
Ten-Day Course for Farmers .......................... 21
132

College ............................................. 66
School for Radio Operators .......................... 38
*- 104
College of Law ................ .... ... ........... ...... 46
Teachers' College and Normal School-
College ............................................. 12
Normal School ........................................ 24
Practice High School ................................. 7
Summer School (Coeducational) ....................... 433
476

Total Enrollment for 1917-18 .............................. 855
Counted twice (enrolled in regular session and Summnier
School) ................. .. ..... .. .. ... ............... 52

Net total ..................... ............................ 803
Number attenlin, Club Boys' Short Courses in Acriuiltlir.? 112
Number enrolled in Correspond'ence Courses................ 122

Grand Total .................... .. . ..... .......... 1,037










In 1917-18, 49 Florida counties were represented as follows:
Alachua, 149; Baker, 2; Bay, 1; Bradford, 16; Brevard, 18; Broward, 1;
Citrus, 10; Columbia, 21; Dade, 19; DeSoto, 33; Duval, 33; Escambia.
12; Flagler, 3; Franklin, 2; Gadsden, 11; Hamilton, 2; Hernando, 9;
Hillsborough, 55; Holmes, 4; Jackson, 6; Jefferson, 4; Lafayette, 3;
Lake, 36; Lee, 9; Leon, 13; Levy, 20; Liberty, 1; Madison, 2; Manatee,
11; Marion, 32; Monroe, 11; Nassau, 3; Okaloosa, 1; Orange, 11; Osceola,
5; Palm Beach, 23; Pasco, 16; Pinellas, 26; Polk, 47; Putnam, 8; St.
Johns, 13; St. Lucie, 14; Santa Rosa, 5; Seminole, 12; Sumter, 18; Su-
wannee, 8; Volusia, 33; Walton, 4; Washington, 2.
Eighteen States and three foreign countries were represented as fol-
lows: Alabama, 5; Arkansas, 1; Brazil, 1; California, 2; China, 2; Cuba,
2; Florida, 798; Georgia, 15; Illinois, 7; Indiana, 1; Kansas, 1; Ken-
tucky, 2; Michigan, 2; Missouri, 1; New York, 3; Ohio, 3; Pennsylvania,
1; South Carolina, 4; Virginia. 1; West Virginia, 2; Wisconsin, 1.
The total from 49 Florida counties was 798 and the total from other
States and foreign countries, 57; making a total enrollment of 855. Sub-
tracting those counted twice, leaves a net total of 803 students, giving
the number attending the University of Florida during the year 1917-18,
not including those taking courses by correspondence.



It will be noted, from tabulations, that the enrollment in 1916-17 was
1,125, while in 1917-18 the enrollment was 1,037, or 88 less than in the
previous year. This decrease in numbers we attributed to the toll taken
by tae war and are gratified that the decrease in enrollment at the Uni-
versity of Florida has been so much less thtn that of other similar insti-
tutions of the country.


II. THE UNIVERSITY AND THE WAR.

At the opening of hostilities the University of Florida immediately
placed itself on a war basis and placed all its facilities at the command
of the President of the United States. In pursuance of this policy, a
resolution of general faculty gave academic credit to students in good
standing who enlisted in the country's service prior to expiration of the
last term. The schedule has been changed to give precedence and double
time to the military department.
The University's Agricultural College is heading Florida's agricil-
tural preparedness movement. Leaders on the faculty, the Experiment
Station staff and the Extension staff are on preparedness committees.
The College uives full credits to students prepared to take up agricultural
work who leave before the expiration of a term. County demonstration
agents give practically their entire time toward the production of staple
food and forage crops. County home demonstration agents give prac-
tically their entire time to the production and preservation of staple
food crops.
Professors of the University of Florida are members of the Naval
Consulting Board of the United States and assist in ascertaining Florida's













resources for war purposes. The Intelligence Bureau of the University
has made a military census of students, alumni and faculty as to per-
sonal qualifications and personal ownership of such property as automo-
biles, motorcycles, wireless plants, boats, etc. Members of the faculty
of the University College of Law assist the draft board. Professor H. R.
Trusler, Dean of the College of Law, is on tne legal advisory committee
of Florida, a committee appointed to give advice and legal assistance
to enlisted men and to the Government.
The University of Florida has furnished more students and alumni
and former undi-rraaduates, in proportion to its total attendance since
the establishment of the University, than has any other university in the
South. Over 400 University of Florida men are now in active service
in the various branches of the Army, Navy, Aviation Corps, Quartermas-
ter Corps, Engineering Corps, etc. An ambulance corps unit, composed
of 35 University of Florida men, is now doing duty at the front. In the
spring, of 1917 the University of Florida Band volunteered as a unit and
enlisted as the 124th Infantry Band. Recently this band was officially
given the verdict of being the best in the entire Dixie Division at Camp
Wheeler. Some of our men have already given their lives on the battle
fields of France. We are endeavoring to keep a card record of every for-
mer student now in tne service so that, after the war, we shall have
material for a Roll of Honor of the deeds of valor and sacrifice per-
formed by University of Florida men.
This year, whunl the session opened, there was no band; but, upon
my recommendation, I was authorized by you to employ a Band Direc-
tor. The efficient musician who was engaged organized a new cadet
band and the young men entered into the movement with such spirit
and enthusiasm that the University of Florida now has an excellent
musical organization and the military band of this year is the equal, if
not the superior, of any of its pridelecessos
All students who are not in the CulleL of Law are required to take
military training unless physically :incapacitatel for such duty. Tht se
cadets entered into military training, during the past year, with more
interest and zeal than ever before. The Government insplcting officer
from the U. S. Army was much pleased last April with the military
efficiency of the University of Florida Battali',IL and made a most favor-
able report to the War Department. Major E. S. Walker, U. S. A., Ret'd.,
Commandant, of Cadets, Professor of Military Science and Tactics, is
one of the instructors in the Reserve Officers' Training Corps at Platts-
burg Barracks, Plattsburg, N. Y. He is assisting with the instruction
of the young men during the summer and will return to his duties at
the University during the regular academic session. Thirty-three picked
men from the R. O. T. C. of this University are receiving special in-
tensive military training at Plattsburg barracks.
Another quota of 23 men will be sent to Plattsburg on the 18th in-
stant. These men will go to Plattsburg in cliarg.- of Profp.-sor A. L.

4-Bd. Con.












Buser, Professor of Physical Training and Director of Athletics. These
University of Florida men hold their own alongside college and univer-
sity men from every State in the Union.
The College of Emniirerinig of the Univ\:rsit:. is training men for
the EnginleeliNg Corps. The Government, recounizinu the high stand-
ard maintained by this school, admits students making an average equal
to the highest one-thirr of the averages made by Univ.r.-iti of Florida
eiigiieerin, students within the last ten years, to registration. upon
rea(inCinl draft age, in the Reserve Enginieerini Corps of the United
States and permits these students to continue their studies until grad-
uated. Then, they have the choice of entering the Enuiip,.-rinz Corps
for active service or of being placed under the draft regulations.
The Department of Chemistry has reorganized its courses to equip
students to assist in working out the chemical and industrial problems
incidental to winning the war.
The students and faculty of the IUniversity subscribed substantial
sums to the war work of the Y. M. C. A. and to the War Liberty Fund,
and, also, to the Red Cross, as well as to Liberty Bonds and Thrift
Stamps. Members of the Faculty ha\e, this year, made 104 nldross-s in
which appeals for support of war activities have been made. Thirty-
four of these addresses were commencement speeches; seventy of them
were general addresses for the Liberty Loan, Thrift Stamps, Y. M. C. A.
War Work and Red Cross.
In Florida the only institution with which the Government placed a
contract for the training of white soldiers is this University. By your
authority a contract was made in May, 1918, between the Committee on
Education and SplL'ial Traininu of the U. S. War D. pairtnrnt with the
University of Flm,ida; providiitg that men of the national army be
trained in the following trades: army truck drivers, radio operators,
electricians, carlpentors, bench woodworkers, and machinists. It was,
also, ageed that no one be allowed to take this training except men in-
ducted into military service. Only Florida boys have been trained here.
So eager were these Flnrida boys to get this training at their own uni-
versity that a large number in deferred classes, many of whom would
not have been called, volunteered. On the niciiinm of June 15 the train-
ing b,:in in earnest. To look at the men today and to see them at drill,
a casual observer would think they had been in the service six months
or a year instead of less than six weeks.
Two hundred and eighty-three men were contracted for by the first
rgrePment to be trained for the first two months. The second contract
provides for the training of 330 men for the next two months, and for
each succeeding two nioni li until June, 1919, the agreement provides
for the training of 400 men. The Government allows $1.40 per enlisted
man in the army school for board and lodging and for instruction and
necessary equipment. Thus the Federal Government is bearing almost
all the expense incident to the enterprise. The inspectors from the War











Department have carefully gone over the work Dean Benton and his as-
sistants have been dlinil- and have given the school the highest rating
which can be made-a rating of "Al." Tilis is a tribute to the
qualifications and efficiency of our professors on the faculty of the Col-
lege of Engineering, to their assistants and to the 'ni\v-r ity as a whole.
Though concentration on Iiiies of the mind has been hard for the stu-
dent-body in these war times, HII essential work of the c --ll .... has
never been more earnestly and ably performed. Scholarship statistics
show that the record for the a,'ill,-ii* year is as good as any record
ever made, and far better than a gr,-al many of the previous records.
This sip'aak well for t'.: patriotism of the students and faculty and signi-
fies that there have been no "slackers" at the University.
The I'niv \ -ity of Flinid:I is leaving no stone untillr'nd to help save
and build the world's best civilization.




III. BUDGET FOR NEXT IIIENNII'M.


0 During Thi. last two years there have been some changes in the
faculty, as you will note in rli. various reports of the deans. Such
changes as have been made are due, mainly, to two facts: First: Some
of our men have gone into war work while (oheci-, have been call I to
other institutions. In every instance, however, l'r.. i s-'i who have ac-
cepted positions elsewhere will receive from 500 to 1,i in dollars more
salary per annum than the University of Florida p.i1. them. There is,
therefore, this serious problem to face, namely, whether to paL,- our pro-
fessors the salaries that approximate the level of similar institutions
in the South or soon be constrained to accept the services of less able
and less experienced men. The deans' r.'-i'r-, allude to the ina;l'.pqit.'
salaries paid our professors and express ti- hope that the salary sched-
ule here may soon be ,r iin-lit up to an (<1111 basis with other universi-
ties. To quote from Dean Benton's report on this subject, he says:
"There has been an excessive increase in tir. cost of living, which
for most persons, however, has been I.irt;ially offset by increased in-
come. N.i increase has been granted to the r ; :lhi r- of the University
whose salaries are accorlingil more seriously inadequate tliii before.
It has been estimated that the purchasing pIower of the dollar has fallen
40 per cent below its value before the war; so that our pr.r,'s.,ir,,'
salaries ($2,000) would have to be raised to $2, iili to approximate the
schedule of living thouahlt appropriate before the war; so much we do
not ask or 'expect. as to wish to bear our full share of the war's Ir.,il-in;
but some ineiil.:: must be granted if we are not to bear an unai'rli share
of the burden.
"We would emnphasiz'e. therefore, the ilnportaiuic of increasing the
salaries of our professors, instructors and other employees."







52

The various supplementary reports attached hereto set forth in an
impressive way the need of additional funds for other purposes. These
funds are needed first and foremost to support the University's usual
and accepted aims and to enable it to develop its capacity to bear its
share of the war's obligations, particularly as they relate to the training
of engineers, scientists, agriculturists and military men. The College of
Engineering and the College of Agriculture particularly need to be ex-
panded more than ever before. The Experiment Station and Extension
Division need increased incomes in order to be able to fulfill their re-
sponsibilities to promote the greatest supply of food possible in the State.
For further discussion and details as to how the increases called for
would be used, reference must be made to the deans' reports. If in-
creases there suggested should not seem to any one to be justified at a
time when the nation is calling upon us for great sacrifices, I would sug-
gest to that one that in this extreme national crisis, retrenchment in what
has been called the vital section of the Nation's first line of defense,
would be sucidal if not criminal; to let the efficiency of our Nation's
educational interest to suffer is to invite disaster. "The welfare of public
education is a pressing problem of the first magnitude."
It was a pregnant message that Commissioner Finley, of the New
York Department of Education, brought back from France less than a
year ago-"The advice which France, out of her physical anguisan, but
unabated aspiration, sends to us from her 'scholastic front.' ":
"Do not let the needs of the hour, however demanding, or its burdens
however heavy, or its perils however heart-breaking, make you unmindful
of the defense tomorrow, of those disciplines through which an individual
may have freedom, through which an efficient democracy is possible,
through which the institutions of civilization can be perpetuated and
strengthened. Conserve, endure taxation and privation, suffer and sac-
rifice, to assure those whom you have brought into tne world that it shall
be not only a safe but also a happy place for tnem."
If the war has shown so unmistakably the positive relation between
universal education and a nation's strength, it has proved no less con-
clusively tnot a nation's greatest peril lies in the neglect of its schools.
On both sides of the great conflict nations have weakened or fallen
almost precisely as they have failed in the past to provide education
for all of their children.
We in America have not been heedless of wnat universal educa-
tion means to an effective democracy; but we, too, like France and Eng-
land, must recognize that what may have seemed to be sufficient in the
past is not sufficient now, and will be far from sufficient in the future.
Upon the ruins of the older order a new and worthier social structure
is even now being built. One would be rash, indeed, to predict what this
will ultimately mean to our economic, industrial and political systems;
but if worthy and enduring changes are to come in any phase of our na-
tional life they must have full expression in our system of education. Our











first and obvious duty is to see that this system is freshly adjusted to the
new needs that even now press upon it, and strengthened to bear the still
greater burdens that the coming years will bring."-From a recent bulle-
tin of the N. E. A.
To encourage, as far as possible, the youth of the country, not drafted
for war, to continue their education, Secretary Lane of the Department
of the Interior wrote:
"Tne experience of the allied countries has proved that the service
of highly trained men are needed to a greater degree in this war than in
any preceding conflict, and that large numbers of scientists and en-
gineers especially are essential to success.
"It is, therefore, of the utmost importance that a continuous, and, if
possible, a constantly increasing, supply of trained men should be sent
out by our higher institutions."
President Wilson has written as follows:
"It would seriously impair American prospects of success in this war
if the supply of highly trained men were unnecessarily diminished. Such
persons will be needed both during the war and after its close. I,
THEREFORE, HAVE NO HESITANCY IN URGING COLLEGES AND
UNIVERSITIES TO ENDEAVOR TO MAINTAIN THEIR COURSES AS
FAR AS POSSIBLE ON THE USUAL BASIS. There will be many young
men from these institutions who will serve in the armed forces of the
country. These who fall below the age of selective conscription and who
do not enlist should feel that by pursuing tneir courses at our colleges
and universities, they are preparing themselves for valuable service to
the nation. I would urge the young people who are leaving the high
schools to avail themselves this year of the opportunities offered by the
colleges to the end that the country may not lack an adequate supply of
trained men and women."
Doctor P. P. Claxton, U. S. Commissioner of Education, says:
"It would be an economic and scientific waste, unpardonable in war
times, if the equipment of our universities should lie partially idle as
concerns instruction or research. Even if there should be a decrease in
the number of students, universities should be encouraged to MAINTAIN
THEIR INSTRUCTION STAFF AT LEAST AT NORMAL SIZE."
President Lowell of Harvard issued the following statement on the
relation of liberal studies to the present crisis:
"This country will need educated men no less during and after this
war than it has needed them before. If education, not specifically di-
rected to military use, is a luxury, enabling men to find a source of re-
laxation and enjoyment, but not essential to tne welfare of the commun-
ity as a whole, then the college had better close its doors permanently.
SBut if, on the other hand, education is essential to modern civilization
and to the United States, then the college certainly can not cease to im-
part it.
"France, which, on the side of the Allies, has borne by far the












heaviest part in the war, has insisted lint her young men should pursue
their ordinary courses of study until they come to the age for ll!einnin:ii
military instruction. We cannot do better than follow that example."
The U1iv-rsiry must help our young men to train themselves to clear
thought, to steady aliplic;tion, and to persistent purpose. Now the coun-
try is facing a war on a titanic scale and for an indefinite piioil it be-
comes more and more evident that the nation can not afford to have de-
ilut-'tle its suTiilly of young men who would normally become officers or
enter some specialized branch of the civil or military service. The Uni-
versity must give traiinin. to our yniin men so that they will not be
forced to serve in any c:parily that offers; but will be .-liuipp.-d to ren-
der service of the maximum efficiency when their turn comes.
In the light of these aiplIal-. a -ynillath-tic reading of the following
iplortl. will, I feel sure, convince all 1patriotic and ri-ht-thinl.inx men that
the following tabulated filur' s are not extravagant or unreasonable.




1. Runni ineu Exp,.ns's for the Biennium .......... $15I, i.1i. i
Salaries; janitors; printing: rlpairs; ad-
litional instructors in engineering, naval
architecture; three addition nal agricultural
instructors for disabled soldiers and stu-
dents, including club boys; instructor in
farm mechanics; licr-'in:in; farm foreman;
additional ai in laborers; instructor in
English: chemical laboratory assistant;
assistant librarian. college and t--lihnical
work for teachers in Summer School, in-
cllinilii ni1~c-anry 10 per cent increase in
all r'-L.ilar salaries.

. 2. L libraries ................................... $ 7, i .0
Chemistry; books of reference, etc. ....$ 700.00
El:n li, hl T.annl ua1 e and I.ireratIur- ........ 300.00
Ancient L.:eaii-.,s ...................... 0.)
M;~ath[ ialie:- .- books, magazine -,s and
charts .................................. 500.00
M~rl, rn T.LanImlin-,s (- xe-l lling German
dropped from curriculum) .............. 300.00
l':1\ (lIcol ,gy and Piiiliosr lhy ............ 600.00
I'l,;icIal Science and Sociology ........ 1,200.00
History and Economics ................. 1,00000
Law Books and Law Librarian ......... 3,000.00

3. Current Expcnsi,- for [Ulieep of Laborato-
ries and Library ........................ $ 7,700.00
Physics ................................ $ 1,000.00
('ht-nim-try ............................. 900.00
Zoology and Bnatpriolo.gy .............. 400.00
Military Department .................... 50.00
Botany ................................. 200.00












Teaclrr.s' College and Psychological Lab-
oratory ................................. 500.00
Operation and Upkeep of Irrigation
Plant on Farm ......................... 100.00
Fertilizer, Seeds, Upkeep Farm Machin-
ery ..................................... 500.00
Tile Drainage .......................... 150.00
Creamery and Dairy Lab. Suipli.- ...... 1... I.
Soils Laboratory Supplies .............. ::.. m. ,
Farms M\otorI.s Laboratory ............... 200.00
C iv il E ir- iin Iin '.r ....................... 2 il 111
Electrical l:Enn-in ,.ini ................. 200.00
Shop and Mechanical Enuin,-ii ii, ....... 600.00
General running ,-.l'. usi~s of Library-
!linliir- of periodicals, library supplies,
sl-.lvii i,. student assistance ............ 2,000.00

4. New EiIiijii-nt ........... ......... ....... $..., 1.u'
For Biology, B:irti riol,'.y, Zoology and
G.'i-*liv y-Chemicals, Glassware, Chart-.
Anatomical .~1MIl-l11, .Ic(l-lI' u..r and Re-
Jiil lin.i Botany Class I.-,iiil for Bac-
t, iil,: ical Laboratory .................$ ;;,.;$ ,'.ii

For Blit:;iny Laboratory, I i.- ;inig Micro-
scopes; EnTili..'linh Oven; Cli:ril., etc... -' ..

For Cnemistry-This Dr.lartment pro-
vides necessary courses in all colleges, in-
clllinl EIu-'in'.-rii: and Agriculture; and
it sorely needs chemicals and apparatus.
It must have equipment for new depart-
ment of chemical I nailn, rini and physi-
cal chemistry in <1. iii; il .it all ii!l ,-,
more especially since this country went to
war. In view of the irijl)rlb;I':- of this de-
partment to the entire institution, special
mention is here made of the conservative
estimate of the amount named ......... lilt,-n

For Military Department-Target Range;
B-H I{tli.-t' Map for Teaching Minor Tac-
tics ...................... .............. '.i ...

Psychological Laboratory ............... .:..,..lI

Physics Laboratory .................... 1,,.n,.,

For Physical Education; athletic equip-
ment and gymnasium soiii- ........... 300.00

Completion third story agricultural hall 2,.iI,.iI

Team of work mules for farri ......... .IIII

Tools and implements shed for farm.... 2,500.00
N\i-\ in Ui'_-; ini plant on college farm;
tools; plants and seed for field work of











students; spray pumps and material; en-
larging and equipping, propagating
house; preserving jars; mounts and
mounting material; storage house for
root crops-all for the department of nor-
ticulture ................................ 1,950.00
For Department of Animal Husbandry and
Dairying-Additions to Herd of Swine;
Meat Products and Laboratory Equip-
ment; Foundation Flock of Sheep....... 1,300.00

Two Shelter Sheds for Dairy Herd; Con-
crete Manure Pit; Fencing; and Portable
Live Stock Shelter ..................... 1,700.00

Improvements in Lecture Room and Dairy
Laboratory ............................. 300.00

Equipment and Maintenance of New
Poultry Department .................... 3,000.00

For Department of Agronomy and Farm
Management-Clearing and Draining Bay
Head and Other Lands; Fencing for Ad-
ditional Pastures ....................... 1,200.00

Machinery and Implements, including
Tractor ................................. 900.00
Fertilizers, Seed, etc. .................. 500.00

Scientific Apparatus and Equipment and
other Laboratory Supplies for courses in
soils .................................... 900.00

Seed collection for purposes of instruc-
tion; storage bins; for farm management
laboratories ............................ 600.00

or Department of Farm Mechanics-Mo-
tors, Cultivators, Plows and other equip-
m ent ................................... 2,700.00

Laboratory Equipment for Department of
Veterinary Science .................... 2,200.00
For Engineering Equipment needed for
War Courses Government wishes given. 2,000.00
Laboratory Equipment for Hydraulics;
Road Materials; Testing and Steam Labo-
ratories; Foundry ....................... 5,000.00
General Equipment for Teachers' College;
for Vocational Teacher-Training Work... 1,000.00
Printing and Supplies for Teachers' Col-
lege Correspondence Courses ........... 900.00
Additional Room and Equipment for Li-
brary-Basement in Peabody Hall....... 2,000.00








57

For the State Museum of the University-
Printing Annual Reports ................ 500.00
Exhibition and Storage Cases and Fixtures 3,400.00
Library Shelving and Office Equipment
and Equipment for Mounting Specimens.. 1,000.00
Grand Total for Instruction of Regular Students;
Short Course Students; Corn Club Boys; Ex-
tension Teaching by Correspondence; Summer
School Students ............................ $226,990.00

Budget of the. Experiment Station.

For summary of much-needed funds for agricultural investigation
called for by many sections of the State, reference should be made to the
recommendations of the Director. See Director's Report on the Experi-
ment Station.
A careful reading of the Director's Report will, I think, convince any
candid mind that the State needs to spend this sum of money on agricul-
tural research. While the sum may seem large, it is believed the State
will reap manifold returns on the investment. I, therefore, approve the
recommendations made by the Director and the Experiment Station
Staff.
Budget of the Agricultural Extension Division.

The Director of tne Extension Division points out that the Florida
Federal fund under the Smith-Lever Act for farm demonstration and
Home Economics work in this State will be $28,110.10 for the fiscal year
beginning July 1st, 1919, and $33,518.80 for fiscal year beginning July 1,
1920, making a total for the biennium of $61,628.90 available for farm
and home demonstration work. But this sum will not be available except
on condition the Legislature aprilpriat s an equal amount for the two
years beginning July 1, 1919. In addition to this sum, and -for the same
purposes, there will be $20,000 for the biennium granted by the Federal
Government without any condition whatsoever. It is recommended that
the work of agricultural extension be increased and enlarged and that the
State appropriate the necessary funds to make available the large amounts
conditionally provided by the Federal Government.
The above report is respectfully submitted with grateful apprecia-
tion of the generous consideration and effective help given the University
of Florida by every member of your Honorable Body.
Very respectfully,
A. A. MURPHREE, President.












DEAN'S BIENNIAL REPORT, COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES,
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA.

To the President:

In these abnormal times it is difficult to make a satisfactory report
on the conditions and needs of the College of Arts and Sciences. So far
tne work of the college has been affected less by the great war than was
anticilmlt-1 by many of us. For instance, the number of students reg-
istered in this college in 1917-18 is 92, almost the same as registered in
1916-17, when the total was 95, and in 1915-16, when it was 96. But we
have lost more men during the year than ever before. I call your atten-
tion to the following table:
Withdrew
Year. Total Registered. Before End of Year.
1915-16 96 21
1916-17 95 21
1917-18 92 32

(Those who withdrew near the close of tne year without forfeiting
their credits are not included in these statistics.)
What is the significanii' of these figures? As very few of those who
drop out before the end of the year ever return, it seems to me that we
can not rea-onabl'y xi|-ct any large number in the upper classes next
year. We nmny expect a few upper classmen to transfer from otner col-
leges as usual, but if we are to maintain our numbers, we must have a
large freshman class.
But no matter what the numbers may be, it seems to me exc -linily
important tb keep the machinery of the University in good working or-
der. Even with small classes, we may render valuable services in the
present and by keeping our work goini as well as possible, we shall be
in a better position after the war to increase the usefulness of the Uni-
versity. Therefore, I earnestly recommend that eacn and every d ,airt-
ment of the College of Arts and Sciences be siIp:'Irt.(d as liberally as the
circumstances piirmit.
Here is a brief report on the several dciliartments:

Department of Ancient Languages.

In 1917-18 this (lel,;artlm:-nt was much affected by the war. Some of the
students took up arms, others entered upon other lines of work whereby
0li liop'd to prepare themselves sooner to render valuable service to
tneir country in the Ipre,-nt crisis. Whether this effect on the depart-
ment is merely minlrary and, more or less accidental or not, only time
will show. Be that as it may, during the past year only two courses in
Greek and one in Latin were given in this department. However, the pro-
fessor was able to render some much needed assistance to the depart-
I












ment of Modern Laianiuagps by teaching good-sized classes in French and
Spanish in addition to his own work.
Furthermore, the professor is now able, for the first time, to offer
some more elementary courses in Latin. There has been some demand
for such courses since tlhe University was founded, :anll they seem es-
pecially called for by our clhan c-ll entrance rerqiiii.'nii.ns. Hitherto,
there has been an unfilled gap here.
For the coming biennium the :irncrs-uir merely asks that the library
appropriation (say $200) be continued.

Department of Biology and Geology.

Dr. H. S. Davis, the head-professor of this department, estimates his
needs as tllJu.w.:
For Biology................... ... $1,300
For Bacteriology............... 2.. 1i

Total .......................... $..:;:.2 .

His estimate is .i.-IL in d.ainil and includes dissecting material,
chemicals, glassware, charts and anatomical models, iirIj':cii n ap-
paratus, mi 'r,-i o -Ih41r)111i]i ;|l, i :iftI and -Tipl.li1 -.. breeding
(c;-'r:- and aquaria, insect boxes, etc., as well as the expense, : of remodeling
the botany class-room for a iactt riol:'iald laboratory.

Department of Botany.

Major W. S. Floyd, 1i.wl of the d(1.:,irtment of Botany, asks for $2,095,
nimitti i g a .l t.:il-,l estimate for the various courses n,;fi' r-I This es-
timate includes compound ini-i r, .-i lp' -. dissecting iii Iri-, 'i.i-. chemical
and botanical apparatus, rotary Iier',ltini,,. embedding oven, herbarium
mntl -ial. charts, photographic and micro-jPloat',-,ll. ;I ,1 ili ii-ll t, glass-
ware a;in, general maintenance.

Department of Chemistry.

The head of this department, Dr. J. L. .11' ;Ij, asks for O -,:12. Of
this sum, 'he says that :..:.ini is sorely needed for chemicals and ap-
paratus, including the equipment necessary to give the courses in ('lI i ]i-
cal Engin.eriunL and Physical Chemistry and also iiclilrlin, books for the
library. Besides, he asks for $800 lCr half-time of a caretaker for the
laboratories and apparatus. In addition he asks for $2_,.'>1, for ten new
desks and other furniture.
The professor il ints out tli great increase in the price of chemicals
and he insists that the courses can not be .saisuf:i.tirily 'iv,.ti without
the chemicals and aiJlaratii.4. for which he thinks he has made a moderate
estimate.











Department of English.

Doctor Jas. M. Farr, the Professor of English, merely asks that the
present arrangements be continued.
A moderate appropriation for this department would be:

For an instructor ................ $800
For books, etc. .................. 300

Total ....................... $1,100

Department of History and Economics.

The professor, Mr. O. C. Ault, asks for $1,000 for books. He also
points out that we give too few courses in history and asks that an addi-
tional instructor be provided as soon as normal conditions return. He
also recommends that an instructor in accounting be secured in order
to offer a course in business administration. This matter will be taken
up in another part of my report.

Department of Mathematics and Astronomy.

Under the present circumstances $500 would be a reasonable appro-
priation for this department. Most of this would doubtless be spent in
making additions to the mathematical library.

Department of Military Science and Tactics.

The professor, Major E. S. \Valker, states his urgent need of assist-
ance. No doubt what the Government has done and is doing at Platts-
burg will give him some help in his outdoor work, but he also needs as-
sistance in his office. He believes 'e could find some capable student
who could give part time to this work. It would seem, advisable to make
this or some other satisfactory arrangement.
He also asks for a B-H relief map (which costs $95) for teaching
minor tactics. The target range also needs improving. Perhaps $1,000
would meet his most urgent needs.

Department of Modern Languages.

The work in this department has been heavy because certain modern
languages are required of many students and elected by many others.
Some relief has been afforded this year by assistance from the de-
partment of ancient languages. Further relief is promised for next year
by removing German from our curriculum.












The main need for the coming biennium will doubtless be an appro-
priation for books. Perhaps $300 would be sufficient at this time.
When normal conditions return, an additional instructor will doubt-
less be needed.

Department of Philosophy.

Dr. H. W. Cox, Professor of Philosophy, estimates his needs for the
biennium as follows:

Laboratory supplies ............. $500
Books and journals .............. 600
Student assistant ................ 300

Total ....................... $1,40v

Department of Physics.

The professor, Dr. J. R. Benton, requests that the maintenance al-
lowance be continued for the Physical Laboratory equipment, as this has
proved to be of great advantage to the department. He states, more-
over, that he could use a large appropriation to good advantage, and 'he
hopes that even under present conditions $1,000 will be allowed. This
is a modest request compared to the other scientific departments and
considering the cost of apparatus at the present time.

Department of Sociology and Political Science.

In a long report the professor, Dr. N. L. Sims, emphasizes two
things:
1st. The urgent need of better library facilities, not only more books
and periodicals, but also more room and a better place for reference
library work, and library assistants to aid and guide the student in this
work.
2d. The need of an additional instructor that more courses may be
given, e. g., more rural sociology, a course on the negro problem, a course
in international law, courses in anthropology, and courses in modern so-
cial problems.
No doubt; eventually, both these needs will be met by the authori-
ties of the University, but whether or not they can or ought to be met
at the present time is a question which I leave in your hands and in the
hands of the Board.
I would recommend that at least $300 be appropriated for the library
needs.
Department of Athletics.

I 'have also a brief report from the director of athletics. Coach A. L.
Buser, asking for a small appropriation for athletic equipment and gym-








62

nasium supplies. He mentioned $150 for the year 1918-19. Perhaps that
sum should be doubled for the biennium.

Proposed Course in Business Administration.

I have also the report of a special committee consisting of Profes-
sors Ault, Sims and Crandall, appointed to outline a tentative course
in business administration and to consider what would be needed to es-
tablish such a course here.
According to this committee, the chief need would be an additional
Irit.s.ror to give courses in accounting and business methods. The com-
mittee is of the oinion, however, that additional instructors in the de-
partments of the social sciences would soon be needed.
The cost of oilqippin., a room with suitable desks, cabinet, etc., is
estimated at $200. The total cost of the course for the biennium would
be ,lilmo-.thing like $4,000.00.
The course outlined is a four-year course and consists mainly of
courses already offered at the University.
The various reports nmentioned above are on file in my office and
may be seen when desired.
For your convenience I here give a summary of the requests for this
college:
Total for the
Two Years.
Department of Ancient Lan'; uaa:es .........................$ 200
Department of Iiolnuy and Geology ........................ 3,350
Department of Botany ................. ................ 2,095
Deprl rtmint of Chemistry ................................. 8,300
Dppl. rtillent of En-lish (,:stirnated) ......................... 1,100
Department of History and Economics ..................... 1,000
Delpart nihnt of Mathematics and Astronomy (estimated).... 500
Department of Military Science and Tactics (estimated).... 1,000
Department of Modern LaIngiuaige (':.-tium;t:id) .............. 300
Department of Philosophy ................. ............... 1,400
Department of Physics .................................... 1,000
Department of Sociology and Political Science (asked about). 3,000
Department of Athletics .... ................... ............ 300
Proposed course in Busiiiess Admniiii.tralion................ 4,000

Total ................................................. $27,545

Respectfully submitted,
(Signed) JAMES N. ANDERSON,
July 23, 1918. Dean, College of Arts and Sciences.










DEAN'S BIENNTAL, REPORT, COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE,
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA.

To the President:

I have the honor to submit herewith the fo1llnw in- biennial reports
of the College of Agriculture, Univcrsity of Florida. The reports from
the Teaching Division, the Experiment Station lMi\i-iii and the Agricul-
tural Extension Division are given s -.!,a i; -ly for convenience in hand-
ling the subject. The recommendations and ,-rim.lt. of the necessary
expenditures under each division are given separately.
All of the thr-- divisions have felt the stimulus given to agriculture
by the rapid development of the State. This is especially true in the
Extension I);..iion, where Li.rct amounts of Federal funds, both for gen-
eral working purposes and for war elni:t !L,-ne\, have been expended co-
operatively with this Division.
Respectfully submitted,
P. H. ROLFS, Dean.



IEI',(JlIIT OF INSTRUCTIONAL DIVISI')N.

To the President:

I have the honor to submit h,.~ivwithl the f.Illoiiin' Lui-nninl Report
of Instructional Division of the College of Agriculture.
The Ilpri'-i as in the work of the Agricultural College during the past
biennium has been more than satisfactory. In spiti of the demands of
the war, and thl- readjustment necessary for war ciiilitinii-, the num-
ber of students enroll, d in the Agricultural C11l.-,. has kept f.hi pace
with pre-war (ciiIliti.ll,.. So many of our graduates have -taken their
positions under the colors that it is almost inilj-ild. to obtain the
necessary men for advanced agricultural work in hli.- State. The able-
bodied men in our student body have all joined the colors, but in spite
of this fact such a l rt' number of yln-. men have enrolled in the
college that thli attendance has remained normal.
The conditions referred to above make it most imperative for us to
give the highest d- Lree of attention pis-ibll for dv\. Ipine the young
men who are Iermittl d to attend the institution. There will be a most
serious l. ficiorncy in our agriculturists, continuing at least a -1'calde
after peace conditions have returned.
The cost of materials, labor and other tlinie:- necessary to the run-
ning of the institution, has so a'.ifly increased that it has been impos-
sible to maintain TrI. high degree of efficiency established before the war
times. It becomes more necessary than ever heretofore that the institu-
tion produce all the maintenance crops possible.











Rehabilitation of Disabled Sailors and Soldiers.


Agriculture has been severely affected by war conditions. Large
numbers of our able-bodied young men from the farms have volunteered
for the army and navy, and larger numbers have been called out by the
draft. Agriculturists were not exempted as a class, and very few of those
who were in situations such as foremen, managers, or places of that kind,
who were of draft age, have remained on the farms.
In addition to this the country has needed a much larger food sup-
ply than ever before. Disabled men are now being returned to us and
will be returned in increasingly large numbers. Florida is the most favor-
able State in the Union for the rehabilitation and convalescence of sol-
diers and sailors. It is generally assumed, however, that the disabled
man is not capable of doing agricultural work. This is a most serious
mistake. In European countries, where many disabled soldiers have been
rehabilitated, it was found entirely feasible to rehabilitate these disabled
men for farm work. With the proper appliances and proper training, they
dig, plow, reap and do other work with a fair degree of efficiency. Many
thousands of young men who would have remained on the farms will
have learned other trades during their enlistment. Farming, from tne
nature of the work, is one of the lines of employment that a man cannot
be taught during the period of his enlistment. We will have a great de-
ficiency in agricultural lines for at least a decade after normal conditions
are restored.
The experience of European institutions, in Italy, France and Eng-
land shows that dairying, poultry, truck gardening, bee keeping and sim-
ila. lines of agricultural work can readily be mastered and carried on to
splendid advantage by the students.
Nearly every Agricultural College in the United States is preparing to
receive these disabled soldiers and sailors, and rehabilitate them, es-
pecially for farm work. Those who were raised on the farm and have
had special training in this line should take up the agricultural line of
studies and thus avoid the congestion that will naturally follow the in-
flux of disabled men into the various arts, trades and commercial em-
ployments.
It is of highest importance, and our patriotic duty, to give a course
of instruction in tne Agricultural College that will cover nearly all of the
lines of specialized work. Bee keeping has always been profitable. Truck
raising is such an enmpoyment as lends itself readily to the disabled.
Poultry raising, citrus growing and general farming can readily be car-
ried on by a disabled man if he receives proper training during his
period of rehabilitation. Agricultural machinery is one of the lines of
endeavor that would prove especially attractive.
It is our duty as a State and as a Nation to make these disabled men
more than self-supporting. They should become an asset to the State










and to the Nation, and in this way will come the greatest happiness to
the individual.
All of such disabled men will receive a pension, but they should be
encouraged to become productive citizens. Instruction to the disabled
would necessarily be more of an individual matter than is the case with
the able bodied. The classes would have to be smaller and the amount
of attention given to each individual much greater. These rehabilitated
men will be able to command a considerable amount of working capital
through the Rural Land Bank if capital is not available from other
sources.
Thousands of these disabled men will return to Florida for a liveli-
hood and for life's happiness. Florida must give them the opportunity
of making the best of their handicap. Our most serious need in Florida
agriculture during the last decade has been trained foremen, in the
grove, the field or the garden. In nearly all of these positions a disabled
man, properly rehabilitated, will prove entirely satisfactory. The length
of time required for the course of study will vary with the individual.
The course should be made sufficiently flexible to admit varying degrees
of education. By far the greater part of the disabled will be those who
have had only a grammar school education.

General Maintenance.

The rapid growth of agriculture in the State of Florida during the
last decade has called for thorough and extended instruction in various
departments. Buildings that were entirely adequate ten years ago are
now so congested that the work has to be carried on with decreasing ef-
ficiency. Very important rooms and laboratories have had to be aban-
doned to accommodate class rooms. This ill effect will be more greatly
accentuated in the coming biennium.
When Agricultural Hall was erected it was only partially completed
for agricultural purposes. The plan of the Board of Control was to com-
plete the third story of Agricultural Hall at such a time as the space
would be needed. This space is now being used to some extent in spite
of the fact that no work has been done toward completing it. The neces-
sity for seed storage room, storage room for apparatus and supplies needs
only to be mentioned to be appreciated. ,Some of the classes that were
formerly taught in Science Hall are now taught in Agricultural Hall owing
to the crowded condition of Science Hall.
In so rapidly growing an institution as ours it becomes necessary to
make some initial expenditures that cannot be charged regularly to the
maintenance of any department, but are rather applicable to the college
and farm as a whole. At the present time the amount of area available
for farming purposes is barely sufficient to provide enough feed and for-
age for the maintenance of the work stock during a normal year. Dur-
ing an adverse year it becomes difficult and expensive to produce a suf-

5--Bd. Con.











ficient amount of feed and forage on so small an area. New lands must
be brought into cultivation and the old lands handled in proper rotation
to have these increase in productivity. Much of the land under cultiva-
tion was originally medium of low grade farm land. These are being
gradually brought up to a greater state of productivity. Some of the land
used was at one time abandoned farms.
The farm buildings and other structures belonging to the College
have been so recently erected that the expenditure for upkeep is small
in comparison with what it is for older buildings. Road construction,
building of new fences and clearing of land, however, come in to mate-
rially augment the general maintenance cost.

General Maintenance-
Team of work mules ........................$ 800.00
Farm foreman at $1,500 .................... 3,000.00
Five farm laborers (2 years) ............. 5,600.00
Tools and Implement Shed................ 2,500.00
Clerical Assistance (2 years) ............... 1,600.00
Stationery and Supplies ..................... 750.00
Painting, Repairs, Road Construction........ 2,200.00
$16,450.00
Completion of third story of Agricultural Hall .... $ 2,500.00

Appended hereto please find detailed reports from the various De-
partments. At the close of the Department reports you will find a gen.
eral resume and recommendations covering the budgets for different
departments and general maintenance.



DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY AND HORTICULTURE.

P. H. Rolfs, Dean:

At the time of preparing this report the Assembly Hall has not be-
come available for use by the Department of Botany and Horticulture.
It will probably become so in a short while, and as we have funds for
altering and equipping it that will doubtless be done promptly. We are,
therefore, making our plans with the use of these new quarters in view.
It is desirable that a collection of Florida fruits be made and pre-
served in as nearly their natural condition as possible for study and il-
lustration. Prepared mounts of typical forms of leaves, twigs and buds
of economic plants and of the common diseases and insect pests which
attack them will also be of much value for instructional purposes.
Students in field work need to be well supplied with ordinary tools
and implements for practical work. There are many others they should
have an opportunity to see, learn the use of and handle; samples of these










6t7

should be on exhibition in cases in the laboratory.. As we have not had
a special laboratory up to this time, such a collection has not heretofore
been made.
It is, perhaps, not wise to ask for funds for the construction of a
greenhouse at this time because of its cost, but an addition should be
made to our small propagation house, and additional late, pots, tables and
benches be supplied for same.













































































i



~2' ~,-
P
aC~air;iP~d~-, ~~LB~f I;





















KIa


7-f'f


+~ a
S
i
-L
r(.


II











































































i ,






















i:.;4*'







?':
r



pi








71

Our irrigating plant is giving splendid service, and should be ex-
tended to cover at least two additional acres.
A small but carefully constructed storage house, with proper ven-
tilation and insulation, in which sweet potatoes, rutabagas and otaer
root crops may be kept is very much needed.
Below is an estimate of the needs for the next biennium:

Extending irrigation plant to cover additional area...........$ 400.00
Upkeep and operation of irrigation plant .................... 150.00
Implements, plants and seed for field work with students.... 400.00
Spray pumps and material ................................. 150.00
Tools for illustration and instruction........................ 100.00
Enlarging and repairing propagating house........................ 200.00
Additional equipment for propagating house................. 100.00
Preserving jars and fluid for specimens ..................... 100.00
Mounts and mounting material ............................... 50.00
Storage house for root crops ............................. 500.00
Salary, Professor of Horticulture (2 years) .................. 4,200.00

$6,350.00

Respectfully submitted,
W. L. FLOYD,
Professor of Horticulture.



DEPARTMENT OF ANIMAL HUSBANDRY AND DAIRYING.

P. H. Rolfs, Dean:

The work in the Department of Animal Husbandry and Dairying has
been continued along the same lines as in previous years. The number
of students in the various classes shows the increased demand for in-
struction and the popularity of this branch of agriculture. In the session
of 1916-17 there were 106 students enrolled in the first term and 212 in the
second; for the session of 1917-18 the enrollment was 123 in the first term
and 176 in the second. The undersigned 'nas taken the best care pos-
sible under the circumstances, of 22 to 28 hours per week of class room
and laboratory Instruction, with the help of one student assistant in lab-
oratory work, four to six hours per week. This rather heavy work has
prevented stressing some of the practical field work, and compelled more
class room and text book instruction than is best for our students. We
are very much gratified, however, at the response of the students, and re.
peat the conviction that Florida is preparing to do a great deal more along
live stock lines in the near future. We hope that this department of the
College will be able to keep pace with the needs of the State and aid
in this great development










The demands upon the Department in correspondence have been re.
lieved to some extent by t'e work of the new Livestock Sanitary Board
cooperating with the Federal Bureau of Animal Industry in cattle tick
eradication and hog cholera control. The Florida State Livestock Asso-
ciation and affiliated organizations for dairy and swine production have
required some time, especially following the death of the secretary, P. L.
Sutherland, until a new secretary could be elected.
We have had the fortune to secure a good foundation of Poland
China swine through the aid of Mr. Z. C. Herlong by purchase at the sale
conducted by the American Poland China Association. These animals
are doubtless the equal of any in the South.
On the matter of recommendations and requests for the future needs
for this department, I would again state that we need additional work-
ers in the department, particularly assistants at moderate salaries.
We also need to improve our equipment in dairying, and add additional
breeds of animals for stock judging purposes as rapidly as funds are
provided. We hope for much improvement through the services of the
professors of Veterinary Science and Poultry Husbandry, who are ex-
pected to begin work in September.
Last fall the College sent a team of six students for competition
with other Southern colleges in judging livestock at the Southeastern
Fair, Atlanta, Ga. This was done by the help of funds from the State
Livestock Association and from the President, Dean, and members of
the college faculty and the students themselves. The result of this trip
was so successful that we urge the continuance of such efforts in future
years, and providing the Department with sufficient funds from the Uni-
versity to aid at least part of the expense of such trips each year. After
returning from Atlanta, members of the team assisted in livestock judg-
ing at various County Fairs of Florida, and conducted a good contest at
the Jacksonville State Fair.
May I repeat a statement made in the report for 1913-14 that we have
an excellent opportunity for the college to serve its students and the
State by establishing on its premises some commercial factories, such
as a small creafery or milk shipping station and a model slaughtering
and meat curing plant. There is considerable interest in the local'com-
munity on both these matters, and some of the large corporations that
have successfully established such plants in Jacksonville are anxious
and willing to establish branches in other parts of the State. If the Uni-
versity would supply the land necessary, some of the labor for operation,
and perhaps a part of the funds for building, it is evident that these in-
dustries could be secured in the near future.
We desire to have this department grow more useful each year, and
hope for a continued interest and aid from all authorities concerned.
I submit herewith an estimate of some of the most important needs
for the ensuing two years:












Additions to herd of swine and maintenance ................. $ 500.00
Meat products' laboratory equipment........................ 300.00
Foundation flock of sheep .................................. 500.00
Salary of Herdsman, at $720 (two years) .................. 1,440 00
Fencing and portable livestock shelters..................... 500.00
Two shelter sheds for dairy herd (40x60).................... 800.00
Concrete Manure Pit ..................... ................. 400.00
Alterations in lecture rooms and laboratory .................. 300.00
Travel expenses, stock judging team (two years) .......... 300.00
Salary, Professor of Animal Husbandry and Dairying (two
years) ............................. .. . ........... 4,000.00

$ 9,040.00
Poutry Section.

Poultry raising in Florida is one of the most important lines of ani-
mal husbandry. It is a specialized line of work. It has developed rapidly
in the State and more attention is being given to poultry than ever here-
tofore. Formerly poultry raising on the farm was considered of only
minor importance. The total poultry crop of the State now shows that
it is among the most important of animal husbandry. It certainly reaches
the homes more closely than any other line of animal production. It
is one of the most specialized lines of agricultural teaching that we have
in the State. So much attention has been given to the finer points of
the work that it requires a high degree of specialization to be able to
give instructive discourses on this subject.
In spite of the fact that poultry raising in Florida has been aug-
mented in the last decade, we are still importing annually over $10,000,000
worth of poultry and poultry products from other States, and exporting
a very small amount. The success attained by poultry farmers in the
State shows that this can be made a profitable line of animal husbandry.
Estimate of needs for ensuing two years:

Salary of poultryman (two years) ......................... $ 3,500.00
Travel expenses in State .................................. 500.00
Equipment and maintenance ................................. 3,000.00

$7,000.00
Respectfully submitted,
C. L. WILLOUGHBY,
Professor of Animal Husbandry and Dairying.










DEPARTMENT OF AGRONOMY.
P. H. Rolfs, Dean:

The year just closing has been a very successful one for the Depart-
plowed deeply at the beginning of the rainy season and cultivated
at least once each week thereafter until fall. The ground must be
kept free from all vegetation and any surface crust completely
broken up. This method will appeal most strongly to truckers and
home gardeners.
Forage Insects.

The studies of the velvet bean caterpillar have been continued. An
intensive quantitative study of the insect damage to corn has been car-
ried on in co-operation with the Bureau of Entomology, U. S. D. A.

Citrus Insects.
These have included studies in the amount of damage done by thrips,
ment of Agronomy, and in nearly every case the registration in the ele-
mentary classes has been greater than in any previous year. This is
doubtless due to our elective system and the great demand made for in-
creased production of staple crops in Florida.
Owing to the increase in the price of chemicals and scientific ap-
paratus we have been unable to carry on many experiments in soils that
are essential. The demand during the past year for advanced work in
soils has also caused us to include another course in this subject. There
is, therefore, need for considerable additions to the scientific equipment
and supplies for both the elementary and advanced work in soils.
Field work is used to a large extent in teaching crops, but we should
have more laboratory material and also additional storage bins for the
seeds. We have cleared approximately five acres and put about half of
the untillable area into pasture. This has materially improved the ap-
pearance of the farm as well as added to its usefulness. We need to put
the rest of the waste land into pasture and clear and drain other bay
heads still existing in our fields.
The subject of Farm Management has developed within the last few
years and is now one of the most important and most practical subjects
offered in our agricultural Colleges. We changed the course a year ago
from one semester to a full year course, and those undergraduates who
took the course this year are asking for still further advanced work.
It is impossible with our present teaching force to include additional
courses, although it would be highly desirable. To teach Farm Man-
agement efficiently requires the visiting, during the year, of several
farms of the various types, and this entails considerable expense. It is
a legitimate laboratory expenses which should be borne by the College. I
know of no other institution in which the instructor must bear his own
expenses for this work.
Below is an estimate of the needs for the next biennium:









Farm-
Clearing and draining bay heads and other land..$ 900.00
Fencing for additional pasture .................. 300.00
Machinery and implements, including one tractor. 900.00
Fertilizers, seeds, etc. ........................ 500.00
$ 2,600.00
Soils-
Scientific apparatus and equipment................ 500.00
Laboratory materials, chemicals, etc. ........... 400.00
900.00
Crops-
Seed collections for instructional purposes...... 150.00
Storage bins ................................... 250.00
400.00
Farm Management-
Trips and laboratory material.................... 200.00
Salary, Professor of Agronomy (two years) ...... 4,400.00

$ 8,500.00
Section of Agricultural Engineering.

The Agricultural Engineering section is in a depleted condition. In
the past we have depended on loans from the various manufacturing es-
tablishments to supply us with motors, plows, etc., for instructional pur-
poses. The companies loaning them have sold them from our laboratories
and we have only our farm equipment, which is entirely inadequate even
for the farm. We should have up-to-date motors, plows, cultivators and
tractors at the disposal of our students. Inquiries from the outside are
also numerous and our boys are all clamoring for information on this
subject. The need and the demand in Florida is ample to justify a large
expenditure for equipment, and the services of a well-trained full-time
teacher. Our sister States have full-time men in this department with
full rank of professors, and several of them have two. Certainly ma-
chinery on the farm is as important in Florida as in any other Southern
State.
Estimate of needs:

Farm motors, tractors, cultivators, plows, etc...............$ 2,500.00
Drainage equipment .......... .................... 200.00
Salary of professor (two years) ........................... 4,000.00

$ 6,700.00
Courses for Disabled Soldiers and Short Courses.

The Short Courses are requiring more attention than ever heretofore.
The proportion of this class of instruction has greatly increased and will
continue to demand more attention owing to the need of the Government











for crop production. This class of students require much more individual
attention than students prepared for the regular courses. The instruc-
tion to these students is among the most important of our services to
the State. They return to the farm immediately after the ten days'
course, tie four months and the eight months' course, thus making the
results of their instruction more quickly productive.
Estimate of needs for the work during the biennium:

Assistant in Horticulture ................................. 1,200.00
Assistant in Agronomy ................................... 1,200.00
Assistant in Animal Husbandry ............................. 1,200.00
Laboratory and office supplies .......... ................. 500.00

$4,100.00
Respectfully submitted,
J. E. TURLINGTON,
Professor of Agronomy.

Department of Veterinary Science.

The department of Veterinary Science has been established during
the past biennium, This subject is one of highest Importance in the
Agricultural College-especially is this true with the present rapid devel-
opment of the cattle and hog crop in the State.
The eradication of the tick in the State and the control of hog cholera
has made it increasingly necessary for the Agricultural College to give
extended instruction in this line of work. As a matter of fact, instruction
by a specialist in this line should have been given during the last decade.
This department will need to be greatly enlarged and more direct at'
tention given to the work. The large number of trained veterinarians
that have been drafted from the State makes the situation more impera-
tive than ever heretofore.
Estimate of expenses:

Salary, Veterinarian (two years) ...........................$ 4,200.00
Traveling expenses .................................... ... 1,000.00-
Equipment for class and instructional material.............. 2,200.00

$7,4 1)1.0')

Recommendations of the Dean.

(1) General running expenses and upkeep of the college as
a whole, and not chargeable to any department, but
applicable as a whole ............................. $ 16,450.00
(2) Owing to the congested condition of class rooms and
laboratories, the third story in Agricultural Hall should
be completed ...................................... 2,500.00










(3) That the Department of Horticulture be given adequate
support for carrying on this important industry in the
State ..............................................
(4) That the Department of Animal Husbandry be support-
ed to meet the growing demand of animal industry in
the State ................................... ......
(5) That the section of Poultry Husbandry be enlarged, and
the poultry plant increased, to make this a full depart-
ment by the end of the next biennium...............
(6) That the Department of Agronomy, be given the sup-
port that it deserves at this time when the production
of food, feed and forage is so imperative ............
(7) That the section of Agricultural Engineering be en-
larged to meet the needs and improvements of farm
machinery ........................................
(8) That provision be made for the equipment of the de-
partments, and instruction given, to rehabilitate dis-
abled soldiers and sailors, and also to meet the needs
of the Short Course students .......................
(9) That the Veterinary Department be enlarged and the
necessities of the State more nearly met in this di-
rection ............................................


6,350.00


9,040.00


7,000.00


8,500.00


6,700.00



4,100.00


7.400.00


Total for the biennium ........................ $68,040.00
Respectfully submitted,
P. H. ROLFS, Dean.



DEAN'S BIENNIAL REPORT, COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING,
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA.

To the President:
I respectfully submit the following report from the College of En-
gineering of the University of Florida, which has been prepared in col-
laboration with the Faculty of Engineering, and has its approval:

GENERAL STATEMENT OF PROGRESS SINCE THE LAST
BIENNIAL REPORT.

Effeots of the War.

War conditions have affected the College of Engineering differently
from other departments of the University in three particulars: (1)
the enrollment of students has increased, due to the unprecedented de-
mand for engineers in the army, navy and war industries; (2) the War
and Navy Departments have admitted our engineering students to the
Engineer Enlisted Reserve and thus have made formal recognition of the
direct importance of our regular engineering courses for the national
defense; and (3) the College of Engineering is giving some special war
training courses at the suggestion of the Signal Corps of the U. S. Army
and under its supervision.












Recognition by War and Navy Departments.

The U. S. War Department has recognized the College of Engineering
as one of the approved technical schools at which a proportion of the
students may carry on technical studies as members of the Engineer
Enlisted Reserve of the United States Army. Such students are relieved
from the draft until they complete their engineering studies, at which
time they are taken into the United States Army Engineer Corps. En-
gineering students at the University of Florida are also admissible to
the United States Naval Reserve under similar regulations.

War Activities.

At the suggestion of the Signal Corps of the U. 8. Army, the last
semester's work of the senior year in Electrical Engineering has been de-
voted to Radio Communication, instead of the branches formerly taught.
The Signal Corps has furnished a large part of the apparatus required
for teaching this course.
At the request of the Federal Board for Vocational Education, a
School for Radio Operators was started at the University of Florida last
December. This was to train drafted men as operators in the Radio serv-
ice of the U. S. Army. Not making the University requirements for admis-
sion, it has been carried on as a project distinct from the University,
although it has used the University buildings and equipment, and has
been financed in large part by the University, some part of the ex-
penses, however, being borne by the Federal funds for Vocational Educa-
tion. The instruction has been open to any drafted men fit for military
service and not claiming exemption; and no fee has been charged. The
School has enrolled 59, of whom 32 were men from a distance who came
to put their whole time on the work of the course; 14 were drafted men
carrying on their usual business in Gainesville and attending the School
at nights; and 13 were students of the University putting part time on
the work of the Radio School.

Enrollment.

The number of students enrolled in the College of Engineering was
66 for the present year, of whom 62 were of full college grade, meeting
entrance requirements equivalent to graduation from a standard four-
year high school, while the remaining four were "adult specials" and
not candidates for a degree.
This enrollment is the largest the College of Engineering has yet had
and represents an increase over the preceding year, notwithstanding that
over 20 per cent of the students enrolled in that year entered the army
as volunteers before graduating.











Quality of Work.

From year to year the students entering the College of Engineering
have appeared to be better prepared, and the quality of work accom-
plishd has shown a gradual improvement up to the time that war was
declared. But since then the war has naturally distracted the thoughts
of the students greatly, and the character of their work has not been
quite as good as before.
Degrees Conferred.

Since the last report the degrees conferred have been as follows:
C. E., 1; E. E., 1; B. S. C. E., 4; B. S. E. E., 1; B. S. M. E., 1.

Curriculum in Chemical Engineering.

In accordance with my recommendation in the last report, a four-
year curriculum in Chemical Engineering is now offered, leading to the
degree, B. S. Ch. E., in addition to the curriculums in Civil, Electrical
and Mechanical Engineering.
Faculty.

Beginning with the fall of 1917 an assistant professor of chemistry
has been employed who has assumed charge of the recently founded De-
partment of Chemical Engineering. There has been no other addition to
the teaching force. The Professor of Military Science who formerly gave
the first-year instruction in Mechanical Drawing and Descriptive Geome-
try has been obliged to drop these courses, which are now given by an
instructor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering. Accordingly,
the teaching force in the College of Engineering is now smaller than it
used to be in proportion to the work being offered, notwithstanding the
increased enrollment.

Equipment.

Maintenance of Equipment.-Much benefit has been derived from the
provision in the last Univeristy budget of definite fixed sums for the cur-
rent expenses of tne various departments which maintain laboratories.
As was provided, these allowances have been kept just as inviolate as
the amounts set aside for salaries; and since they can be relied on, it
has been possible to plan definitely for the care and upkeep of the equip-
ment and to produce better results in its upkeep than ever before.
New Equipment.-Since the last report, new equipment has been
bought with the residue (about $400) of the equipment appropriation on
hand at that time; and about $1,000 has been spent for new equipment
since July 1st, 1917. This has been for a large number of miscellaneous
small items in all of the departments occupying the Engineering Building.







80

Relations with State Road Department.

The State Road Department has continued to maintain its branch
office and its testing laboratory in the Engineering Building. The con-
tact with this work has been of great benefit to our civil engineering
students has amply repaid the University for putting some of its rooms
and equipment at the disposal of the Road Department.

Engineering Experiment Station.

The efforts to secure an appropriation from Congress for Engineering
Experiment Stations in the several States have been continued, but as
yet have not borne fruit. Such experiment stations have been established
by Stat action in a number of States; they stand in the same relation
to the industries of manufacturing, transportation and public utilities, as
the Agricultural Experiment Stations do to the industry of agriculture.

NEEDS.

Need for Janitor Service.

The Engineering Building 'has hitherto had a janitor on duty for half-
time a little more than eight months of the year. As pointed out in
previous reports, it should have a full-time janitor for 12 months in the
year-twelve months-because the building is in use for the Summer
School during the summer. Half-time has been barely sufficient for tne
mere sweeping and cleaning of the building, but not for assistance in the
care of machinery and equipment and other duties that could be ren-
dered by a full-time Janitor. When the unused third story is put into
use and the wing for shops is built, all of which should take place by next
fall, it will be absolutely indispensibe to have a janitor on duty all the
time, even to keep up with the mere sweeping and cleaning. Provision
should also be made for better pay to the janitor than in the past; the
pay has been that for common labor, but a competent janitor should be
a man of more skill and a great deal more capacity for responsibility
than a common laborer, and his pay should be that which is customary
for the best class of negro employees. The pay of a janitor is so small
as compared with that of instructors that it would be a mistaken econ-
omy not to provide the slight increase which will assure a competent
man for the janitor work.

Need for More Office Assistance.

For the last few years an office assistant has been provided for the
College of Engineering, giving twelve hours per week. Under this part-
time arrangement, of course, the assistance has had to come from stu-
dents giving a part of their'time. I have always found them most faith-








81

ful and efficient when on duty; but the value of their services has been
greatly diminished by the facts that they are available only at hours not
conflicting with their schedule of classes, and that they graduate or leave
about as soon as they become thoroughly familiar with their work. The
office work of the College of Engineering has now increased beyond the
capacity of a quarter-time assistant, and there is need for a full-time
stenographer, such as has been provided for the College of Agriculture
and for the Teachers' College.

Need for Larger Teaching Force.

The teaching duties required from the faculty here have always been
heavier than in most American colleges, with the result that we are
prevented from doing as good quality of work, since we have less time
to keep ourselves informed on current progress in our specialties, or to
carry on work of research, authorship or lecturing, which are usually ex-
pected from college professors. With the increasing number of students
the teaching work is becoming still heavier, especially as the number of
Freshmen is now reaching the point where efficient teaching requires
the division of the class into two or more sections. This situation is
aggravated by the fact that assistance which was formerly given by the
Professor of Military Science is no longer available. This situation could
be greatly relieved by providing even a single additional instructor in
engineering. I regard it as an urgent need that at least one additional
Instructor be employed.

Need for a Department of Naval Architecture.

With the extraordinary activity in shipbuilding throughout the United
States, and especially in Florida, there has been an unprecedented de-
mand for technical graduates in Naval Architecture. In the absence of a
professor in this subject the University of Florida has not been able to
contribute towards meeting this demand. A department in this subject
should be established as a war measure.

Salaries.

My last report pointed out the benefits which the institution should
receive by the payment of adequate professors' salaries, and expressed
the hope that our salary scale might in due time be brought up to equal-
ity with that of the State universities in neighboring States. Since then
there has been an excessive increase in the cost of living, which for most
persons (including the public school teachers of Florida) has been par-
tially offset by increased income. No increase has been granted to the
teachers at the University, whose salaries are accordingly more seri-
ously inadequate than before. It has been estimated that the purchasing
power of a dollar has fallen 40% below its value before the war; so that

6-Bd. Con.








W2

Otr professors' salaries ($2,000) would have to be raised to $2,800 to per-
mit the scale of living thought appropriate before the war. So mfch
we do not ask~ or expect, as we wiah to bear our fair share of the war's
burdens; but some increase must be granted it we are not to beat an
unfair share of the burden.

Need for an Appropriation for War Work.

Several times we have been approached by War Department authori-
ties with reference to giving special tMinling in connection with the war
and have found ourselves at a disadvantage through lack of any fund in-
tended to provide even preliminary expenses for work of this kind. I
am reliably informed that the University of Texas received $300,000.00
from that State for the special purpose of war training. Some appro-
priation should be made for that purpose here also, even though the War
Department proposes to pay the greater part of the expenses for such
training.

Need for Improved Library Facilitles.

The general library of the University of Florida has comparatively
few technical books available for use. It has about 5,000 volumes of gov-
ernment documents, over half of which are technical books of the great-
est value; but the librarian has never found time to put these hooks in
order, and at present it is impossible to locate volumes which may be
needed among them. The librarian has even refused offers of gifts of
technical periodicals on account of lack of time to take care of them.
Enough assistance should be provided in the library to enable it to get
the use out of the technical books it has, as well as out of its general
literature.
Additional Engineering Equipment.

All of the engineering laboratories need to add to their equipment,
and will always need to do so in order to keep up with progress. It
would be impossible to state any definite sum to represent the exact
needs of a good laboratory, since it is always possible to improve its
work by adding to its equipment; but liberal appropriation should be
made from time to time for adding equipment to the various laboratories.

Recommendations.

The College of Engineering is a part of the University from which
the war has demanded increased activity through the increase of its
enrollment, the formal recognition of its work by the War Department
as of direct military importance, and the giving of new courses under the
supervision of the Army. It is, therefore, hoped that especial effort will
be made to enable it to fill properly the field of usefulness before it.









88

For this purpose, I recommend that, In addition to continuance of
the present salary list and current maintenance allowances to the depart-
ments, increased appropriations be obtained to meet, as far as possible,
tle following needs, which are arranged in the order of their urgency:

1. For an adequately paid, full-time janitor for Engineer-
ing Hall, Shops and Physics Department, $960 for the
biennium. The present allowance for our half-time jani-
tor being $280, for the biennium, this requires increase
of appropriations of ........ ................. ........$ 680.00

2. To purchase new equipment, to meet needs of such war
courses as the government from time to time calls on
us to give, not less than ............................. 2,000.00
3. For an additional instructor in engineering; $1,500 per
annum ................................... ............ 3,000.00
4. For a professor of Naval Architecture at $2,000 per
annum ................... ...................... 4,000.00
5. For a full-time stenographer, as already provided in
some of the other colleges-for two years, $1,800. The
present allowance for quarter-time office help being
$240, the increased appropriation needed would be...... 1,560.00
6. To partially meet increased living cost for our teachers
below the rank of full professor. 20% increase of salary
for three, about ..................................... 1,500.00
7. To partially meet increased living cost for teachers of
full professional rank, 10% increase of salary for three.. 1,200.00
8. Assistant to the librarian, in order to make the now
unarranged technical government documents (about 5,-
000 in number) available, and also assist in general
library work at $75 monthly........................... 1,800.00
9 For additions to laboratory equipment, especially in hy-
draulics, road materials, testing, and steam laboratory-
whatever can be spared, say .......................... 5,000.00

Total increase for two years ..................... $20,740.00
Respectfully submitted,
J. R. BENTON,
Dean of the College of Engineering.



DEAN'S BIENNIAL REPORT, COLLEGE OF LAW, UNIVERSITY
OF FLORIDA.

To tne President:

I respectfully submit herewith the following report upon the con-
dition, progress and needs of the College of Law:











The Three-Year Course.

Our three-year course went into operation with the beginning of the
scholastic year 1917-18. This places the State Law School on a parity
witn the leading law schools of the country and removes the last sub-
stantial reason why the young men of the State should study law else-
where. The superior thoroughness and power of the enlarged curriculum
are being demonstrated and undoubtedly will contribute to higher stand-
ards and efficiency on the part of the future bar of the State.

The Juris Doctor Degree.

Because of its extended curriculum and consistent with the prece-
dents of other three-year law schools, the College now offers the degree
of Juris Doctor (J. D.) upon the following conditions:
"Students who have complied with all the requirements for the de-
gree of Bachelor of Laws (LL. B.), who have maintained an average
standard in their law studies 10% above the passing mark, and who have
obtained the degree of A. B., or an equivalent degree, from an approved
college or university, or who secure such degree the same year they com-
plete their law course will be awarded the degree of Juris Doctor
(J. D.)."
Through this degree the College is enabled to confer merited dis-
tinction upon such students as pursue their legal studies with superior
legal training and maintain high standards therein. It enables us to com-
pete for students with other institutions offering this degree. And it
furnishes additional inducement for graduates of two-year law schools
to spend another year in legal study at the University.

The Law Faculty.

The three men who were devoting their full time to law instruction
at the time of my last biennial report 'have continued to serve the Col-
lege. However, the youngest member of our Faculty, Professor Walter
L. Summers, has accepted a law professorship in the University of Ken-
tucky at a salary of $2,500.00.
Beginning with the academic year 1917-18, Professor Earl C. Arnold,
A. B. (Baker University), LL. B. (Northwestern Univ'rsity), was added
to the Faculty. Professor Arnold has had three years of experience in
teaching law at the University of Idaho. For five years prior to suc'n
service he was engaged in the practice. He is an earnest and energetic
worker and is rendering the College practical and valuable assistance.
Beginning with the academic year 1919-20, all the courses offered by
the College must be given, as there will then be a regular class in each
year of the course, and in consequence it will be necessary then to have
five law professors on our Faculty.










The Law Library.

There are at present, May 22, 1918, 4,521 bound volumes in the law
library. This year 998 volumes have been contracted for at a cost of
$3,456.50, to be paid for on delivery. Seven hundred and twenty-five
volumes are yet to be received. Deducting the cost of the books con-
tracted for, the price of certain bookcases and the current expenses of
the upkeep of the library to date, there remains an unexpended balance
of $614.00 from the $5,000 law book fund given us by the Legislature
of 1917.
As the Law Library already had the less expensive books, we were
obliged to purchase the more rare and costly volume out of our last
appropriation. This explains the higher cost per volume we were forced
to pay. We secured competitive bids, however, from the leading law
book dealers, and purchased from the lowest bidder, condition of books
considered.

The War and Legal Education.

In the present war, as in past, a high percentage of lawyers and law
students have responded to the call to the colors. At the close of the
war, in consequence, the legal profession will be seriously depleted. As
the number of lawyers decreases the volume of legal business increases.
Our graduates are not now sufficient to supply the State's demand. After
the war the problems of social, industrial and governmental readjust-
ments will increase further the demand for men of legal training. The
future welfare of the State vitally depends upon an adequate supply of
men, thoroughly familiar with the law of the State. Hence, the College
vigorously is exerting itself to attract students not subject to military
service. The war necessitates the temporary abnegation of an ambition,
already partly realized, for a premier attendance; and, with equal im-
perativeness, requires unflagging and patriotic devotion to the duty of
preparing men for the administration of law and justice and the main-
tenance of democratic government.

The Law Enrollment.

The law enrollment of the present academic year is forty-six (46), a
reduction of 44% from that of last year. In view of war conditions, this
is a comparatively light loss. According to the American Law School
Review for December, 1917, the decline in attendance of law students
at Columbia University, the University of Missouri and the University
of Oklahoma is 50%; at the University of Michigan 52%; at the Univer-
sity of Texas 60%; at Harvard University 66%; and at the University of
Pennyslvania 69%. Viewing the situation in the South, we find a decline
in the number of law students at the Lebanon Law School, the Chatta-
nooga Law School, the University of Kentucky and the University of








86

West Virginia of 50%; at Washington & Lee University of 54%; and
at the Atlanta Law School and the University of Virginia of 60%. Our
College has faced not only war conditions, but also the fact that its three-
year course became effective this year. At Valparaiso University, un-
der similar circumstances, the law attendance declined 70%. It is thus
apparent that our College is on a firm foundation and that the extension
of its curriculum was in response to a real demand.

The Secretary and Librarian.

The College has been furnished a secretary and librarian, whose ap-
pointment I recommended in my last report. This position has been most
efficiently and acceptably filled by Mrs. Carrie T. Jackson, who also has
acted as Clerk of the Practice Court. The benefits of this assistance
have exceeded expectations. The library has been mucn more orderly
and serviceable to students, the books have been accessioned, cataloging
according td the Dewey system is under way, examination questions and
pleadings have been typewritten, and an extensive correspondence with
prospective students has been carried on. The publicity given the Col-
lege has been out of all proportion to anything possible in the past.
Under present conditions no service is of more vital importance.

Recommendations.

The following recommendations are conservative and cannot be re-
duced without decided injury to the College. Under normal conditions
some items would be substantially increased:

(1) Equipment and upkeep of the College Building.......... 200.00
(2) Stationery, stamps and descriptive literature............. 600.00
(3) Maintenance of library ................................. 1,500.00
(4) As the purchasing power of a dollar has declined about
49%, the present salaries of professors and employees
should be substantially increased.
(5) The Faculty should be enlarged to five professors, begin-
ning with the academic year 1919-20.
(6) The Legislature should be asked to appropriate two ad-
ditional sets of Florida Reports and their continuations
for the use of the law library. The Legislature also
should be asked to appropriate thereto three sets of the
next and all subsequent Session Laws. in order to save
the College the expense of buying them, as it now is
obliged to do. If the Legislature adopts a revision of the
laws of the State, the College is desirous of being sup-
plied with sufficient copies to enable it to exchange witn
other State law schools for the laws of their respective
States.











(7) Since women have applied to enter this College, are admit-
ted to the bar of this State, are participating more and
more in the industrial and political life of the Nation, and
are entitled to a knowledge of the law, it is most earnest-
ly recommended if any modification whatever of the
past policy of segregated education at this institution is to
be affected, that the Legislature be urged to open the
doors of this College to women.
Respectfully submitted,
HARRY R. TRUSLER, Dean.



DEAN'S BIENNIAL REPORT, TEACHERS' COLLEGE AND NORMAL
SCHOOL, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA.

To the President:

During the past biennium the work of teacher-training in the Uni-
versity has, to a great extent, been reorganized to meet the demands that
have been made upon us. The call for trained men to take positions
as teachers and principals in our high schools is becoming more and more
insistent, and to meet this call the work of practice teaching and super-
vision has been more completely organized. At the beginning of the last
biennium Professor J. W. Norman was secured to take charge of this
work, in addition to the teaching of mathematics, which had been in
charge of Professor Cawthon previous to that time. In November, 1917,
Professor J. J. Grimm, who had charge of the Science work in Teach-
ers' College, was released to take Science work in the College of Arts
and Sciences. Dr. Joseph R. Fulk was secured to carry on the Science
work, and, in addition to this, take charge of courses in Education and
Practice Teaching. By this method we are not only getting the same
amount of work done, but, at the same time, are training our students
as teachers and supervisors so that when they finish they will be com-
petent to begin actual work in the public schools of Florida. The serious
drain upon our young manhood by war conditions has crippled our work
to a great extent and compelled us to change our plans in some ways.
However, it is the purpose of the College to carry out the plan of teach-
er-training as above indicated, and to extend the work along the same
lines as soon as the war is over and normal conditions once more ob-
tain.
At no time in the history of tae University has the call for teachers
been so insistent as at present. We have calls for more than thirty
men to fill positions as principals in our Junior and Senior High Schools,
and our supply of trained men is entirely exhausted. Most of our grad-
uates from Teachers' College have gone into thg service, and the others
have already accepted positions as teachers and principals in the Florida











schools. The demand for college-trained teachers and principals is so
constant that we believe some plan should be originated to meet this
demand. The future of Florida depends upon the trained citizenship, and
unless we have strong men and women to direct and instruct the chil-
dren of today we cannot hope to have a strong citizenship in) the future.
Our course of study for teacher-training is better organized and extended
to meet the demands in the State, and to carry out this work will re-
quire some outlay in excess of the past biennium.

Scholarships.

To meet this serious shortage of teachers and principals, I would
suggest that the University set aside a loan, or scholarship fund, of $15,-
000 for t'e biennium. This fund to be used in giving a loan or scholar-
ship to one or more pupils from each county, which should not exceed
$150 per annum to any one individual. In case of a direct loan, the note
should be at a very low rate of interest and mature one year after the
borrower graduates; but in no case should the note be for more than five
years from date of issuance. In case the fund is awarded as a scholar-
ship, then t'ne pupil should be obliged to teach at least three years in
the public schools of Florida. Should a scholarship be awarded to an
individual who fails to teach during the first three years after leaving
the Teachers' College, then such scholarship should become a loan, and
the individual should be held just the same as if the money were a direct
loan. In this way, I believe, a strong teaching force could be built up
within the next few years. Unless some plan is carried out whereby our
teaching force is strengthened, the school system of Florida is sure to
suffer, as other occupations offer so much better returns than the teach-
ing profession.

Fellowships.

The teaching fellowships continue to prove a success. Some of the
best men we have sent out were secured by means of these teaching fel-
lowships. I would recommend tnat we have five fellowships for the next
biennium, instead of the three which we have had during the past bien-
nium. These fellowships should carry a stipend of about $150 per an-
num.

High School Inspection.

The office of Hig' School Inspection has, under the able management
of Professor W. S. Cawthon, done much towards standardizing the high
schools of the State; in creating higher ideals for the schools, and in
engendering and stimulating a healthy spirit of rivalry in schools and
communities. Ninety-seven (97) high schools were visited by the In-
spector in 1916-17, and ninety-six (96) in 1917-18. When deemed ad-












visable suggestions were made to principals, teachers, county and local
school officers relative to needed improvements in the physical plant,
the administration, the curriculum and the literary, social and athletic
activities of the high school. Every encouragement possible was offered
to high school pupils individually and collectively to do thorough work
and to continue their education in some standard college. Detailed re-
ports of visits were made to the State Superintendent of Public Instruc-
tion, and copies of these reports filed in the Inspector's office at the Uni-
versity. These reports furnish valuable data for the study of the progress
of high school education from year to year. When not in tne field the
Inspector's time is largely occupied with the correspondence incident to
the standardization and accreditation of high schools. Suggested lists of
books for high school libraries and of apparatus for the laboratory
sciences are mailed upon requests of principals who contemplate adding
to the equipment of their schools. Near the end of each school year the
Inspector assists the State Superintendent in making up a list of schools
meeting the standards set up by the State Board of Education.

Correspondence Courses.

The Correspondence Work of the Teachers' College has not been en-
tirely satisfactory on account of the fact that most of the instructors
have had such heavy class work that they have been unwilling to take.
charge of the correspondence courses that belong to their departments.
Sufficient funds are needed to employ a man for part of the time, at
least, for this work, if it is to give the most efficient service to the teach-
ers of the State. However, under present war conditions, it may be
wisest to carry on the work as;best we can without any added expense.

Teachers' Employment Bureau.

During the past year more than two hundred and fifty teachers have
secured positions in the schools of our State through the help of the
Teachers' College Employment Bureau. In addition to this, many re-
quests for information concerning teachers registered with the Bureau
have given opportunities to assist other communities in securing good
teachers. The Bureau has already assisted in locating about one hundred
and fifty teachers for next year, and more than that many calls have come
from school officials, which we have not been able to answer because of
lack of teachers. Each year the school officials of the State are depend-
ing upon us more and more to help them in securing principals and
teachers for their schools, and it is the purpose of the Bureau to do all
it can in giving this assistance.

University Summer School.

During the past biennium the plan of carrying on the University
Summer School has been modified to a great extent. It has been my pur-











pose to encourage the teachers to do advanced academic and professional
work, instead of putting in their time going over the same grade sub-
jects from year to year in order to get a certificate, or to have their
certificate extended. The enrollment for the year 1917 was four hun-
dred and tairty-three (433). Of this number, 163 were taking work for
normal credit; 112 were taking college work, and 26 were taking grad-
uate work leading to a Master's degree. The enrollment for 1918 is four
hundred and thirty-four (434). Of this number, 169 are taking work
for normal credit; 124 are taking college work, and 19 are taking grad-
uate work leading to a Master's degree. From the experience of the past
two years we believe that other college and normal courses should be
added in order to better prepare our teachers for their work. To this
end I would recommend that the Summer School Budget be increased
from $5,000 to $7,000 for the next biennium. I would further suggest
that a plan be worked out with the Summer School Board whereby the
regular college work in the Summer Session may be carried on for
twelve weeks, if such a plan could be put in operation without interfering
with the regular courses under the direction of the Summer School
Board. These courses should be given by well-trained men and women,
and, as far as possible, professors from the regular departments of the
University should be retained. Where this is not possible professors from
other high grade colleges and universities should be secured. In addi-
tion to the advanced work along professional lines, it has seemed wise to
give the teachers the benefit of good instructors in Public School Music,
Art and Physical Education. The teachers of these courses have had
large and enthusiastic classes, and I believe, as a result, our teachers will
go out better equipped to develop our boys and girls into good citizens.
During the present session Dr. Hiram Byrd, of the State Board of Health,
with an efficient corps of helpers, held a demonstration clinic for one
week. During this clinic three hundred and thirty-six (336) children
were examined in the presence of the students of the Summer School,
and lectures were given explaining how toe various defects and diseases
encountered might be detected, and, tu many cases, prevented. During
this session the teachers have also had the benefit of listening to some
of the best educators in the United States.

Educational Museum.

During the past biennium an Educational Museum has been estab-
lished. It is the purpose of the Museum to display various types and
grades of work carried on in the schools of the State, in order that the
student may be able to compare good work with indifferent and poor
work. In addition to this, much material along geographic, historical and
commercial lines can be secure at very little expense. There is also a
great deal of material available showing the defects and diseases common
i our public schools. Some of this material has been collected here
at the University, and much more can be secured from the State Board











of Health, and from other institutions at no great expense. Much other
valuable educational material can also be secured at small cost. The
main outlay needed for this work will be for cases, frames and charts
in order that the material may be properly taken care of and displayed.
I would recommend that $250 be given to this wokr.

Vocational Education.

Under the bill providing for the acceptance of the Federal Appro-
priation for training of teachers in Vocational Education, the University
was designated as the institution at which teachers in Agriculture and
Trades and Industries should be trained. Two Instructors have been
secured for this work, which is now being organized for next year. This
work will require an additional outlay for fixing up class rooms and of-
flees, as the money given by the State and Federal Governments only
provides for the salaries of the teachers and the general running ex-
penses, and does not pay for office and class room fixtures. To meet
this need, I would suggest that $250 be set aside for the biennium.

General Equipment and Supplies.

Several class rooms in Peabody Building have never been properly
equipped for class work. On account of added classes and depart-
ments, these rooms are necessary. A number of chairs, tables and other
equipment will be needed for this purpose. The Science laboratories are
not adequately equipped; most of the material on hand is second-hand
material cast off by other departments, and is all but useless. In addi-
tion to this, new supplies will be needed for all the science departments,
as well as some of the other departments, if efficient work is to be done.
To furnish' suitable equipment and supplies for the different depart-
ments in Teachers' College, not less than $750 should be set aside for
the biennium.

Office Work.

The office work in the Teachers' College is becoming much heavier
each year until it is almost impossible for one person to do all the work
and carry on the correspondence, and, with the addition of the voca-
tional work, it will be almost imperative to have further assistance at
times. I, therefore, recommend that $500 be added for office work, and
$250 be given for stationery and postage for the biennium.

Traveling Expenses.

During the past year extension work has been greatly increased.
Instructors have gone out to various communities and given, lectures
and conducted institutes for the teachers and people in various parts











of the State. Several communities were not visited because they were
not able to pay the expenses of one of our instructors, and as there was
no traveling expense fund for that purpose, it was impossible to visit
these places, although the need was as great as in any other of the places
that were visited. This kind of work is as valuable as any work that
can be done in the State, and I recommend that $200 be set aside for the
biennium to meet traveling expenses where the communities are not able
to do so.

Summary of Recommendations.

1. Sufficient funds to sustain a strong teaching force to give the
work offered in the College.
2. Fifteen thousand dollars, appropriated for the biennium, as
a loan or scholarship fund, to strengthen the teaching force in the public
schools of the State.
3. Five $150 Teaching Fellowships for each year, instead of the
three that have been given in the past.
4. A special summer school fund of $7,000 for the biennium in order
to give additional special advanced courses to the teachers desiring
them.
5. A general equipment and supply fund of $750 and a special fund
for Vocational Education of $250 for the biennium.
6. An additional fund of $700 for office help, fixtures, supplies and
postage.
7. A fund of $200 for the biennium to carry on Educational Exten-
sion work.
Respectfully submitted,
H. W. COX,
Dean of Normal School and Teachers' College.



DIRECTOR'S BIENNIAL REPORT, AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT
STATION, UNIVERSITY OF FLORI-DA.

To the President:
I have the honor to submit herewith the report of the Experiment
Station for the biennium closing June 30th, 1918.
The Agricultural Experiment Station has seen the most prosperous
and busy biennium in the history of the institution. The thirtieth an-
nual report has been issued, which shows a steady and well-rounded
growth for the institution. The correspondence with the people of the
State shows that much more work is expected of the Experiment Station
than ever heretofore.
The following is a list of the bulletins published during the biennial
period covered by this report:














Title.


Edition


132 Loss of Fertilizers by Leaching ...... 25,000
133 Irish Potatoes in Florida (rev.)...... 20,000
134 Florida Truck and Garden Insects .... 15,137
135 The Utilization of Cull Citrus Fruits
in Florida ....................... 5,361
136 Control of Root-Knot'by Calcium Cyan-
amid and Other Means ......... 15,212
137 Some Cases of Injury to Citrus Trees
Apparently Induced by Ground


Limestone ......................
138 Rhodes Grass ......................
139 Some Important Diseases of Truck
Crops in Florida ...............
140 Dieback or Exanthema of Citrus
Trees ..........................
141 Pork Production in Florida...........
142 Dairying in Florida ................
143 Feeding for Milk Production........
144 Fertilizers for Japanese Cane ......
145 Melanose II ........................
146 Tomato Diseases ...................
147 Diseases and Insect Pests of the Pe-
can ............................
148 Insects of a Citrus Grove...........


10,280
15,305

15,000

15,000
15,000
20,000
20,000
15,000
15,000
15,000


S Pages.
20
12
96


Total
Pages.
500,000
240,000
1,453,152


16 85,776

16 243,392


20 205,600
10 153,050

88 1,320,000


480,000
360,000
400,000
240,000
180,000
240,000
240,000


15,000 32 480,000
20,000 104 2,080,000


Totals .......................271,295 546
Annual Report, 1916 ..................... 4,000 122
Annual Report, 1917 .................... 4,000 114

8,000 236


In addition to the above, 64 Press Bulletins have
during tne biennium.


also been published


There has been a greater increase in agricultural work, stock rais-
ing and horticultural work in the State during the last biennium than
in any previous biennium. This has called for a very largely increased
correspondence and a very largely increased distribution of bulletins
and annual' reports.
The Experiment Station finds itself in the most trying situation
that has occurred during the thirty years of its existence. During the
last year of the biennium a large number of the younger men have left
the institution to take up war work, directly or indirectly, either by en-
listment or for filling the places of those who have enlisted. No impor-
tant change 'has occurred in the personnel of the leaders of the depart-


8,900,970
488,000
456,000

944,000










94

ments during this time. The loss of so many; assistants has made the
work doubly difficult for the older men, since much work that was done
by the assistants has now to be done by the head of the department, or
left undone.
The Experiment Station is constantly being called upon to a greater
extent by the Extension Division and by the Teacning Division for exact
knowledge on agriculture and agricultural operations. The value of the
Experiment Station lies mainly in the large aecumnlation of scientific
data. That the work done by the Experiment Station is appreciated
by the State is shown in many ways. most notably in that the agricul-
tural people of the State are constantly referring the more difficult and
abstract problems to this institution. It 'has accomplished much in cer-
tain lines, but with the funds available it is impossible to cover, even
approximately, the new lines of development in the State. Florida is
peculiarly a State unto itself. Much of the research carried on here is
different from that carried on anywhere else in the United States or in
the world. Nowhere do we meet exactly the same problems.

Muck Land Branch Station.

The State owns more than a million acres of so-called muck lands.
Nowhere else in a subtropical region has there been an equal body of
good agricultural lands reclaimed from a swampy condition. A soil sur-
vey made of a small portion of it shows that the land is much more
variable than is ordinarily recognized. Basic technical studies of the
muck lands would aid greatly in securing a knowledge of how to handle
the different types of soils. A branch Experiment Station for carrying
on investigations is the most economical way of obtaining the necessary
basic truths.
Velvet Beans.

The velvet bean has been for years so notably a Florida product that
it is generally referred to as the Florida velvet bean. The exact data
regarding this crop has had to be worked out by our Experiment Sta-
tion. Up to five years ago practically no work was done on this crop
outside of our State. So thoroughly was this work done in Florida that
last year over five million acres of velvet beans were grown in South-
eastern United States, with immense profit to that section. Only ten
years ago but one variety of velvet bean (the Florida velvet bean) was
known to the agricultural people of Southeastern United States. The
Florida Experiment Station has distributed more than a dozen varieties
of velvet bean equal to, and in some respects superior, to the old Florida
velvet bean during the last ten years. The larger number of those varie-
ties were produced at the Experiment Station by hybridization. ,Some
of these have become popular in other States as well as in Florida. The
total value of this crop to the farmers of Florida amounts to several mil-








95

lion dollars. It does for Florida what the alfalfa does for the Far West
or red clover for the North.
A number of other forage plants have been introduced that would
be worthy of note if space permitted.

Dairy 14erd.

In 1907, when tne Experiment Station was moved to its present loca-
tion, the dariy herd consisted of twelve cows. Two of these were pure-
bred Jerseys, the others grades of various kinds, some of them having
Jersey blood in them. The average annual milk production of the cows
in the herd at that time was 311.6 gallons Over 14 per cent above the
present State average, wnich is about 265 gallons. During the fiscal
year ending June 30, 1917, the average annual milk production of the 21
milch cows in the herd was 571.6 gallons, 151 per cent above the
State average. The herd has now increased to 69 head, 24 of which are
pure-bred Jerseys, about all we can take care of with our present facili-
ties. The development of this herd illustrates the value of carrying out
a consistent policy over a long period of years. Less than $2,000 has
been spent for the purchase of dairy animals. Nearly half of this amount
has been returned to the institution by sales of pure-bred calves. These
sales and the sale of milk has contributed very largely to the mainte-
nance of the 'herd. From the nature of the work an experiment dairy
herd cannot be expected to be run for profit. The dairymen of the State
are benefited more by knowing what quantity of velvet beahs, pea-
nuts, sweet potato silage, cassava silage, or other home-grown products
can be fed profitably to these animals than to know that our animal in-
dustrialist is able to run a commercial dairy successively. The dairyman
in the State wants to know what quantity of velvet bean meal can be
fed economically to his animals; he wants to know how much milk a
ton of Florida grown dairy feed may be expected to produce. He also
wishes to know what are the best and most economical materials to form
the dairy ration. A considerable number of these problems have been
worked out and bulletins issued on the subjest, giving the exact cost
per gallon of milk when calculated on the basis of the feed consumed.
The dairy industry in the State is one of the most rapidly growing in
the animal husbandry line. Florida is destined to be a great milk-pro-
ducing State. It is one of the best lines of animal husbandry that can
be carried on with the intensive crop production, such as trucking.
The Florida Experiment Station has the honor of having the first
Florida bred and raised cow that has been placed on the Register of
Merit. This cow, Creole's Lassie Sue, when four years old produced
in one year 7,708.6 pounds (896 gallons) of milk, or more than ten times
her own weight. She produced 374 pounds of butterfat, approximately
half her own weight.











Pork Production.

During the biennium several very important questions in pork pro-
duction have been worked out, and the matter made of public record by
publishing in bulletins or press bulletins. These experiments cannot well
be carried out by the hog raisers in the State without too great cost for
any one individual to bear. Some of the most important work done along
this line has been the determination of the exact ration in which peanut
meal can be used in fattening hogs without producing pork that will chill
soft. The experiments show clearly that it is unwise for a farmer to
use more than one part peanut meal to six parts corn if he desires pork
that shall chill hard. Packers uniformly discriminate in favor of pork
that chills hard, and usually pay 2c per pound more for such hogs. The
work on feeding velvet beans and velvet bean meal to hogs has been
continued during the present biennium.

Beef Cattle.

Florida is rapidly coming to the front in the production of beef cat-
tle. This is shown by the fact that we have the only packing house es-
tablished, by any of the large meat packing concerns in Southeastern
United States. The fact that this packing house was established within
our borders shows that the meat packers, who understand the situation,
are confident that Florida will become a large beef-producing State in
the very near future. As a matter of fact, development has gone on so
rapidly that the packing house had to be remodeled in less than a year's
time.
There are many problems in beef production that Florida has to
solve for herself. Our mild winters make it especially attractive to cat-
tlemen. Heretofore the range cattle have supplied nearly all the beef
that has been produced in the State. With the rapid increase in the
value of land, the owners are fencing in more of this and excluding the
general range cattle. The rise in the price of beef has also made it de-
sirable to give greater care to the stock on the range.
Florida has so many problems peculiar to herself that it is impossible
to get data from the other Southern States that are applicable or re-
liable when used by us.
The introduction of the velvet bean and other forage crops has made
it possible to grow a large quantity of nutritious and fattening crops in
the State. There is no other kind of work that has been so insistent in
its demand upon the Experiment Station as the beef production. Unfor-
tunately the amount of land owned by the University is not sufficient
to permit the establishment of a herd or permit the maintenance of
stock feeding experiments. It is absolutely necessary that this work
be taken up on a comprehensive scale to meet the rapidly growing de-
mand in the State.











The Experiment Station also has a cow and bull of the Shorthorn
breed, and also a bull of the Polled Angus breed.

Fertilizer Experiments.

During the present biennium it has become increasingly more diffi-
cult to secure fertilizer materials. Different members of our staff have
called attention to the fact that many people were using much more
potash than was necessary. This had been brought out by numerous
instances. During the last biennium the shortage of potash has forced
itself upon the attention of our farmers in the State. In spite of the
fact that our potash supply has been but very low, the State has pro-
duced a crop equal to any ever produced heretofore. This could not con-
tinue indefinitely on a soil so low in potash as is our soil. During the
last biennium a number of carefully planned experiments have been con-
ducted, showing the potash need of the potato crop when planted on
new land. We have also carried on experiment with Irish potatoes to
show the availability of phosphorous in soft phosphate and pebble phos-
phate.
Similar experiments are being conducted with citrus groves. The
value of these experiments to the farmer, fruit grower or trucker in the
State can hardly be overestimated.

Insect Pests.

The work by the various entomologists of the Experiment Station
in the last thirty years, and published in the various bulletins and annual
reports, forms a very formidable volume of literature. It has been the
means of saving millions of dollars to the State of Florida. Some very
abstract problems have been worked out that have saved great sums of
money to our people. The discovery of the parasitic fungi, which kill
scale insects and whitefly in its incipiency, seemed to be purely of scien-
tific interest. The technical studies of the question have made it pos-
sible for the fruit growers and others to make use of these helpful
agencies. If our entomologists had done no other work than make these
helpful agencies available to our people, it would have more than paid
for the running of the entire institution. That work, however, has been
only a portion of what has been accomplished. The work has grown so
rapidly that it is no longer possible for the Entomologist and his assist-
ants to satisfy the demands of the State. New lines of work are coming
in and requiring a readjustment of our lines of research.
With the increased value of the forage crops it becomes increasing-
ly more necessary to study the insect pests affecting these. This has
been illustrated by the amount of time given to the study of the velvet
bean caterpillar. Other forage crops are being introduced to us, and na-
tive pests are adapting themselves to the new crops. This calls for ad-

7-Bd. Con.




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs