Title: Report of the Board of Control of the state educational institutions of Florida for the period ..
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00090515/00004
 Material Information
Title: Report of the Board of Control of the state educational institutions of Florida for the period ..
Series Title: Report of the Board of Control of the state educational institutions of Florida for the period ...
Alternate Title: Report of the Board of Control of the state educational institutions of Florida for the biennium ending ..
Report of the Board of Control of the state institutions of higher learning of Florida for the biennium ending ..
Report of Board of Control, state of Florida
Physical Description: 29 v. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Board of Control
University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: T.J. Appleyard, State Printer
Place of Publication: Tallahassee
Publication Date: 1958
Frequency: biennial
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Education, Higher -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: 1905/1907-1962/64.
Numbering Peculiarities: Reporting period for reports 1905/1907-1907/1909 ends Jan. 1; for 1909/1910-1911/1912 ends Dec. 31; for 1912/1914-1962/64 ends June 30.
Numbering Peculiarities: Report for 1907/1909 mistakenly dated 1908/1909.
General Note: Includes the report of the president of the University of the State of Florida, later the University of Florida, and of the presidents of the other state institutions of higher education.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00090515
Volume ID: VID00004
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 50135007
lccn - 2002229051
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Report of Florida Board of Regents

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BIENNIAL


REPORT


OF THE


State Board of Control of Florida


JuLY 1, 1956 to JUNE 30, 1958
TAXLAHASSEE, FLORIDA






"\


LIBRARY


FLORIDA STATE
TALLAHASSEE,


UNIVERSIlY
FLORIDA








CONTENTS



THE REPORT OF THE CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD OF CONTROL


Appendix A


- The Executive Director's Report of the Administered


Funds


Appendix B


The Report of the Architect to the Board of Control


THE


REPORT


OF THE


PRESIDENT


OF THE


UNIVERSITY


FLORIDA


THE


REPORT


OF THE


PRESIDENT


OF THE


FLORIDA


STATE


UNIVERSITY


THE


REPORT


OF THE


PRESIDENT


OF THE


UNIVERSITY


SOUTH FLORIDA


THE


REPORT


OF THE


PRESIDENT


OF THE


FLORIDA


AGRI-


CULTURAL AND MECHANICAL UNIVERSITY

THE REPORT OF THE ADMINISTRATOR OF THE FLORIDA AGRI-


CULTURAL AND


MECHANICAL


UNIVERSITY


HOSPITAL


THE REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR


OF THE


JOHN


AND


MABLE


RINGLING MUSEUM OF


THE REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF THE


FLORIDA SCHOOL


FOR THE DEAF AND THE BLIND













THE STATE BOARD


OF CONTROL


JAMES


J. LOVE,


Chairman... ................... .......... ... Quincy


J. J. DANIEL, Vice Chairman .....-.. .. ............. -Jacksonville
RALPH L. MILLER-- .-.-.-.-........-.. ....---...-.... --....-Orlando
S. KENDRICK GUERNSEY ...---.....-..-.--.._........._ ..- Jacksonville
JAMES D. CAMP, SR. B_...... -.._ -...-...Ft. Lauderdale
WILLIAM C. GAITHER.---....---.. ....._...-...............Miami
JOE K. HA -------- -------- --- --------------Winter. Haven1
JOE K. HAYS ..S.... .... ......................... .... ....... .W inter Haven
J. B. CULPEPPER, Executive Director and Secretary
Tallahassee


THE STATE


BOARD OF EDUCATION


LEROY COLL.Ts, Chairman __.. ....------.--------- ...Governor


GRAY ._.__.---------........... Secretary


of State


J. EDWIN LARSON -.........------............... _....... Treasurer
RIcaAwD W. ERVIN -------.............___---------------........ Attorney General.
TaoMAs D. BAILEY, Secretary.................... State Superintendent of
Public Instruction














LETTER


OF TRANSMITTAL


Quincy, Florida
March 15, 1959


To: His EXCELLENCY, LEROY COLLINS
Governor of Florida


I have the privilege of submitting herewith the biennial report of the Board
of Control of Florida for the period beginning July 1, 1956, and ending June 30,
1958, for transmittal by you to the Legislature.

In addition to a report by the Chairman of the Board of Control, this
volume contains a report made by the head of each of the institutions which


by law


operates


under the Board of Control:


The State University


System


The University of Florida, Gainesville
The Florida State University, Tallahassee
The University of South Florida, Tampa
The Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University, Tallahassee
Other Institutions
The Florida School for the Deaf and the Blind, St. Augustine
The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art, Sarasota
The Florida A. & M. University Hospital, Tallahassee


This report


is handed to you in compliance with the provisions of Chapter


5384, Laws of Florida, 1905.


Respectfully submitted,
THE BOARD OF CONTROL-


OF FLORIDA


By: JAMEs J. LOVE, Chairman









THE REPORT


OF THE


OF THE


BOARD


CHAIRMAN

CONTROL


INTRODUCTION


Continuing expansion and development characterized the State
during the biennial period from July 1, 1956, through June 30,
er port is designed to show some of the ways in which the State


of Florida


University


System and the other institutions under the Board of Control have responded


to the expanding needs of the State and the increasing


that are presented by the growing State
The Board of Control is mindful


opportunities for services


they serve.


I of the fact that there are increased


demands for


services


being made on all public agencies of the State. The Board


is convinced, however, that a necessary condition


for the attainment of the


economic, cultural, and


civic gains to which the people of Florida


aspire is the


further expansion, development, and improvement of collegiate programs of
instruction, research, and service. Under these circumstances the Board of Con-
trol is guided by two primary objectives, i.e., (1) to represent the missions of
its institutions in such a way that the State will provide adequate resources to


permit them to provide necessary services of a high quality, and (
certain that the resources that are provided by the State for its


2) to make
institutions


are utilized to the best possible


advantage for


Florida.


BOARD OF CONTROL MEMBERSHIP


The following changes in the membership of the Board of Control have
occurred during the biennial period: the Honorable J. J. Daniel of Jacksonville
was appointed to succeed the Honorable Fred H. Kent, also of Jacksonville;
the Honorable William C. Gaither of Miami was appointed to complete the
unexpired term of the Honorable Hollis Rinehart of the same city; the Hon-
orable Joe K. Hays of Winter Haven was appointed to complete the unexpired
term of the Honorable Ed H. Price, Jr., of Bradenton who succeeded the


Honorable J. Lee Ballard of


St. Petersburg.


The Honorable Ralph L. Miller of Orlando


served


as Chairman of the


Board of Control through June 30, 1957, at which time the present Chairman
was elected by the Board. Dr. J. Broward Culpcpper of Tallahassee has served
as Executive Director and Secretary of the Board throughout the biennium.


RELATIONSHIP WITH THE STATE BOARD
OF EDUCATION
Throughout the entire period since its establishment by law in 1905 the


Board of Control has operated "


subject to the supervision and control of the


j









REPORT OF CHAIRMAN OF BOARD


Board of Education.


" While the relationship between the two boards


been harmonious, the manifold


agencies
Education:
division 4


has been


in Florida


increase


in the responsibilities of both


such that the staff of the Council for the Study of Higher


proposed


that the informal and somewhat uncertain


authority between the two boards be clarified by formal


the State Board of Education.


action


Representatives


areas in which


of the two boards drafted


the State


review over actions


full memberships of both


Board of Education will


a resolution


that defines the


exercise its state


of the Board of Control. After due consider


boards,


the State


Board of Education


following resolution which now delineates the responsibilities of the


with respect


itory power
ition by the
passed the
two boards


to higher education:


of Education Defining Its


Relationship With the State


The responsibilities for the so
System are increasing in magnitude
grow at an ever-increasing rate.


sibili
versi


The Florida Statutes assign to the Stati
ty for planning, operating, supervising
ty System, subject to the supervision of


Board


of Control


operation of the State Uni
complexity as Florida contir


e


Board
ad con
he Stat


versity
nues to


of Control the respon-
trolling the State Uni-
:e Board of Education.


The Board of Education and the Board of Control
on the need for a proper delineation of their relationships
mutual responsibilities under the Statutes.


It is, therefore, resolved by


in agreement
fulfilling their


the Board of Education that:


1. Specific review and confirmation of the activities and decisions of
the Board of Control by the Board of Education shall be confined
to those acts and requirements expressly provided by law and to
the following instances, wherein the Board of Control shall first
submit recommendations for the review and action of the Board of
Education:
(a) Establishment of basic qualifications of the executive officer of
the Board of Control and the presidents of the institutions in
the State University System, and


(b) Appointment of
University Syste


the presidents
m, and


of the


institutions in


the State


(c) Establishment, location, and naming
higher learning or branches of existing
University System, and


of new institutions of
institutions in the State


(d) Establishment of broad policies under which the Board of
Control shall decide matters relating to admission of students
and types of programs and services to be provided in the
State University System.
2. The Board of Control shall provide in its by-laws for:


(a) Notification of the Board of Education of regular and
meetings.


special


A Resolution of the State Board









8 REPORT OF CHAIRMAN OF BOARD

(b) Filing with the Board of Education of operating policies, by-
laws and amendments thereto.
(c) Filing with the Board of Education, upon request, the minutes
of any regular or special meetings.
3. The executive officer of the Board of Control shall serve in a
liaison capacity between the Board of Education and the
Board of Control.
4. The Board of Control may assign to the executive officer and his
staff such functions as it deems necessary and lawful in order to
meet its full responsibilities for the operation of the State Univer-
sity System.
5. The Board of Control shall carry forward the operation of the
State University System as a coordinated unit in providing high-
quality programs for meeting the educational needs of the citizens
of Florida.

ESTABLISHMENT OF THE UNIVERSITY OF
SOUTH FLORIDA
Upon the receipt of the findings and recommendations of the Council for
the Study of Higher Education in Florida, and under the authority of Chapter
30298, Laws of Florida, 1955, the Board of Control recommended the estab-
lishment of a new four-year degree-granting institution on a site provided by
and through the Board of County Commissioners of Hillsborough County.
Accordingly, the State Board of Education, on December 18, 1956, established
the institution which is now known as the University of South Florida.
The 1957 Session of the Legislature provided funds for the use of the
Board of Control in the development and operation of the new institution. As
one of the first steps in the development of the University of South Florida, the
Board of Control declared its intentions respecting the new institution as
follows:
1. The new institution shall be deemed to be a unit of the State Univer-
sity System.
2. The first semester of the academic year 1960-61 is planned at the time
for inauguration of instructional programs in the institution.
3. Freshman students only shall be enrolled in the institution in 1960-61,
and one additional class of students shall be added each academic year
for the next three years to provide a four-year degree program in
1963-64.
4. The scope of the four-year degree program in 1963-64 shall provide
a program of general education, programs in each of the major divi-
sions of arts and sciences, and offerings in business as an applied social
science as well as necessary offerings for the preparation of teachers.









REPORT OF CHAIRMAN OF BOARD 9

5. The organization of the institution shall be characterized by simplicity
and unity, and the course offerings shall be determined on the basis
of necessity for strong undergraduate programs of high quality.

6. Expansion of programs in the new institution beyond the scope pro-
vided in "4" above shall be governed by demand in relation to the
programs and facilities throughout the State University System.

7. The Council of Presidents shall recommend to the Board through its
Chairman criteria to be used in determining the allocation of programs
in the institutions in the State University System.

8. The new institution shall be planned to take advantage of television
and other instructional devices as are deemed suitable to provide high
quality instructional services and most economical utilization of faculty.

9. The institution shall be developed to provide facilities, except housing,
for an anticipated initial enrollment of approximately 1,500 students;
and planning and development beyond 1960-61 shall be based on
anticipated enrollments of 4,500 in 1962-63, 5,800 in 1965-66, and
9,500 in 1970-71 and on the expectation that student housing facilities
will be provided on campus.

Dr. John Stuart Allen, former Vice President of the University of Florida,
was appointed to serve as the first president of the University of South Florida.
President Allen took office in July 1957, and his first biennial report is a part
of this volume.



CHANGE IN THE PRESIDENCY OF THE
FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY

Dr. Doak Sheridan Campbell, who had assumed the presidency of the
institution that was then the Florida State College for Women on October 1,
1941, retired from the presidency of the Florida State University on July 1,
1957. Dr. Campbell served throughout the period of transition of the institu-
tion from a college for women to a coordinate university in the State University
System. Upon his retirement Dr. Campbell became President Emeritus of the
Florida State University, and he continues to serve Florida and the Southern
Region as well as education throughout the Nation.
Dr. Robert Manning Strozier, former Dean of Students at the University
of Chicago, became the fourth president of the institution that is now the
Florida State University. President Strozier has transmitted a biennial report
that is a part of this volume.










10 REPORT OF CHAIRMAN OF BOARD


NUCLEAR STUDIES AND RESEARCH
Concurrent with the development of interest by industrial concerns and
by other agencies of State government in nuclear power, the Universities under
the Board of Control proposed an increased emphasis on nuclear studies and
research. Prior to the 1957 Session of the Legislature, the Universities presented
special legislative budgets in which provisions were made for an expansion of
the research and teaching programs in this area. These requests were appraised
by the Board of Control and its staff with the able assistance of three eminent
nuclear scientists, viz., Professor Lyle J. Bort of the New York University, Pro-
fessor Henry J. Gomberg of the University of Michigan, and Professor Clifford
Shull from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
The recommendations of the consultants concerning the resources that
could be utilized effectively in each of the Universities were concurred in by
the Board of Control and by the Florida Nuclear Development Commission;
and a legislative appropriation in the amount of $5,200,000 was made to carry
the program forward during the biennium ending June 30, 1959.
Subsequent to the close of the present reporting period the Board of Con-
trol has approved an extension of the nuclear program that is in conformity
with the plan of the consultants.
The Board of Control has created an inter-institutional committee on
nuclear studies and research to provide for a full exchange of information
among the universities and to make recommendations to the Board respecting
an effective and coordinated program in this field.
In view of the fact that the Board of Control and the Florida Nuclear
Development Commission both have statutory responsibilities for some of the
same aspects of the emerging nuclear program in Florida, these two agencies
have entered into a Memorandum of Agreement to facilitate the effective
functioning of both bodies. The text of the agreement follows:
General Agreement Between the Florida Nuclear Development
Commission and the State Board of Control
I. Purpose:
The purpose of this agreement is to insure maximum effective cooper-
ation and establish the desirable working relationship in planning the Uni-
versity aspects of the state nuclear development program. It is intended
specifically to clarify the respective roles and responsibilities of the Florida
Nuclear Development Commission and the State Board of Control in such
planning.
II. Background:
A. The laws of Florida, literally interpreted, authorize both agencies
to enter into activities designed to encourage the development of nuclear
education and training programs at the university level. Should both agen-
des diligently pursue their legal directives there might be duplication of
functions in this area.
B. The respective roles of the two state agencies, therefore, must be
delineated in reference to the job to be done in a spirit of achieving maxi-









REPORT OF CHAIRMAN OF BOARD


mum results, while: (1) minimizing duplication of activities; and (2)
facilitating the work of those who must deal with these State agencies.
C. Eventual conformity of the Laws to this same end would be desir-
able, and should be encouraged.


Primary Responsibilities:


A. Chapter 57-178, Laws of Florida
mission with the following duties:


charge the Nuclear Com-


1. Coordinate all State and local activities dealing with nuclear de-
velopment.
2. Promote an extensive program of education and research relative
to nuclear development in the field of education.
3. Assist educational groups in obtaining maximum benefit from nu-


clear science and


engineering.


4. Make recommendations to the Governor relative to legislation in
the field of nuclear energy.


B. Under Florida Statutes the
of Control include the following:


powers


and duties of the


State


Board


1. "The Board shall exercise effective controls over the development
of programs of nuclear studies and research so that the program of
each university shall contribute to a coordinated and comple-
mentary program of the state university system, and so that un-
necessary duplication will be avoided." (Chapter 57-379, Laws of
Florida 1957)
2. Section 240.04 Florida Statutes of 1957 states that the Board of
Control has complete jurisdiction over and complete management
and control of the state universities.
C. It is recognized from the above cited laws that responsibilities of
the Nuclear Development Commission and the Board of Control are sepa-
rate and do not conflict. It is equally clear that interests do converge.
IV. Inter-Relationships:
A. The Nuclear Development Commission is primarily responsible for
coordination of the higher educational program with the overall state
nuclear program.


B. The Board of Control
institutional coordination of u


primarily responsible for intra- and
ersity educational programs.


inter-


C. The role of the Nuclear Development Commission in the develop-
ment of the specifics of university educational programs shall be advisory.
D. The Board of Control agrees to seek the advice of the Nuclear
Development Commission on University nuclear activities, including finan-
cial matters, affecting the state-wide program.


E. The Nuclear Development Commission agrees
advice on request and may also advise the Board at its
matters involving state-wide objectives and general areas
research and training.


to provide such
own initiative on
of needed nuclear


V. Summary:
A. The Florida Nuclear Development Commission shall act as a
coordinating and advisory agency, creating conditions within which other
State agencies (including the Board of Control) can more effectively and









12 REPORT OF CHAIRMAN OF BOARD

efficiently pursue their traditional roles as they are modified or augmented
by the new nuclear technologies.
B. The Board of Control shall continue to act as the operational arm
of the State in managing the University System, but shall seek the advice
and coordinating services of the Florida Nuclear Development Commission
where basic decisions relating to nuclear programs are involved.


EDUCATIONAL TELEVISION
The long-standing interest of the Board of Control in the use of television
as a medium for increasing the effectiveness of the use of resources in higher
education and the general interest which resulted in the establishment of the
Florida Educational Television Commission have brought Florida to the thresh-
old of a new period in higher education. During the biennium the Board of
Control obtained a permit for an educational television station, WUFT, at
the University of Florida and subsequent to the close of the biennium the
station has gone on the air on channel 5. In conjunction with the Florida
Educational Television Commission steps are underway for another educational
television station which will utilize channel 11 in Tallahassee.
Institutions under the Board of Control are contributing to the develop-
ment by the Florida Educational Television Commission of a network of edu-
cational television stations throughout Florida.


JOURNALISM EDUCATION
As a part of its general effort to determine that effective use is made of
the resources that the State provides for higher education, the Board of Con-
trol has conducted a study in journalism education. The study was conducted
by a team of three consultants selected by the Board on nomination by the
deans and directors of professional schools of journalism throughout the Nation.
The consultants were: Dean Norval Neil Luxon of the School of Journalism
at the University of North Carolina, Dr. Ralph D. Casey of the School of
Journalism at the University of Minnesota, and Mr. Herbert Brucker, Editor
of the Hartford (Connecticut) Courant.
The Board of Control has decided to limit education for journalism to
one institution the University of Florida. It will terminate the operation of
the School of Journalism at the Florida State University in June 1959, and it
will concentrate resources in the qualitative improvement of the undergraduate
program at the University of Florida. The graduate program in journalism at
the University of Florida will be terminated in June 1959 until such time as
the need for it is clearly established and until adequate staff and resources
are available for a graduate program of high quality.









REPORT OF CHAIRMAN OF BOARD 13


CONTINUING STUDIES
The Board of Control considered the work of the Council for the Study
of Higher Education in Florida to be a comprehensive study to initiate a
program of continuing studies to provide data for the guidance of the Board
and of other agencies concerned with higher education in Florida. Through
its own staff, in cooperation with the staffs of the institutions, and with the
staffs of other State agencies, the Board is conducting appropriate and useful
studies.
One of the principal activities in this program is a study of the costs of
providing the programs of the Universities. These cost studies are being con-
ducted with the active cooperation of the State Auditor, the State Budget
Director, and the Legislative Auditing Committee. They are designed to show
the dollar cost of (1) instruction, (2) research, (3) extension services, (4)
services to students, and (5) professional services to the State. The first of
these studies was for the year 1955-56, and they are being continued each year.
The Board of Control has found that these studies are yielding information
that is useful within the institutions as well as to the agencies that are con-
cerned with the control and coordination of the entire program.
The cost studies and the procedures on which they are based are being
utilized in the development of budgetary procedures that are suitable for
building and testing educational and general budgets of the State Universities.
A continuing study of college-age population and of collegiate enrollment
has been used by the Board during the biennium to determine that the area
along the lower east coast will be the next one to require a four-year degree-
granting institution. A site at Boca Raton in Palm Beach County has been
identified as a suitable location for such an institution.
Subsequent to the close of the reporting period the Board of Control has
received a $50,000 grant from the Ford Foundation to finance a planning
project for the Boca Raton institution. The project is being directed with Dr.
John E. Ivey, Jr., Executive Vice President of the New York University, and
the staff of the Board of Control is participating in it.
In addition to general studies that are maintained on a continuing basis
the Board of Control has plans to initiate special studies to serve as a basis
for decisions designed to improve the quality of educational programs and/or
to secure more effective use of resources in the State University System.


EXPANSION OF THE UNIVERSITIES
While the estimates of collegiate enrollment that were made by the
Council for the Study of Higher Education in Florida have held good to this
point, it is expected that the Council's estimate of 132,000 students in 1970
in the Florida colleges and universities will prove to be too small In the fall









REPORT OF CHAIRMAN OF BOARD


of 1957 there


were


49,219 students enrolled in on-campus, college-grade pro-


grams, and 21,146 of these were in the State University
1958 enrollment totaled 54,732 with 22,569 in the State U


System. The fall
universities.


Experience is indicating that the upper limit of enrollment in the State


Universities is being
or in the communities


set by the housing facilities available either on campus
es in which the institutions are located. The Board of


Control is making an effort to determine the optimum size for each of the
institutions in order that the residential and nonresidential facilities for effective
operation of the Universities can be provided on a sound basis.
The Board of Control has initiated a thorough-going inventory of the
physical plants of the Universities and of the utilization that is being made
of them to determine ways in which more effective use of plants can be


obtained and to provide


a basis for planning plant expansion.


The report of the Architect to the Board of Control is appended to
show the plant additions that have been made during the current period.


The planned expansion of the


State University System is


based


on a recog-


nition of the fact that the development of a system of strong community
junior colleges in Florida will tend to shift the emphasis of the State Univer-


to upper division and graduate programs.


THE FLORIDA SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF
AND THE BLIND


During the biennium


study of the role and function of the Florida


School for the Deaf and the Blind has been undertaken. It is expected that
the study will provide information on which future planning for the school
can be undertaken.
The Board of Control has a particular concern for the renovation of the
older buildings on the campus to eliminate any hazards to the handicapped
children who occupy them.


The biennial report of the President


is included elsewhere in this volume.


THE JOHN AND MABLE RINGING MUSEUM OF ART
Mr. A. Everett Austin, Jr., who became the Director of the John and Mable
Ringling Museum of Art in 1946, died in March 1957. Under the directorship
of Mr. Austin the Museum became established as one of the leading art
museums in the South. Mr. Kenneth Donahue, former Curator of the Museum,
became the second Director on July 1, 1957.
Mr. Donahue has filed a biennial report which appears elsewhere in this
volume.


sites










REPORT OF CHAIRMAN OF BOARD


THE FLORIDA A.


& M. UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL


Acting upon a recommendation of the Board of Control, the


of the Legislature created


1


a Board of Trustees for the Florida A.


1957 Session
& M. Uni-


versity Hospital with responsibility, under the Board of Control for the oper-
ation of that hospital. The Governor has appointed the members of this Board


of Trustees,


and they have filed


a biennial report that


a part of this volume.


APPENDED STATEMENTS AND INSTITUTIONAL
REPORTS
Appended to this report of the Chairman of the Board of Control
(1) the Executive Director's Report of the Administered Funds, and (2)
report of the Architect to the Board of Control.


The report of the Chairman is followed


in this volume by


a report from


the head of each of the institutions under the Board of Control. Departmental
and college reports for the universities have been summarized in the institu-
tional reports, and the full text of the departmental and college reports are
on file in the office of the Board of Control in Tallahassee as well as in the


offices of the heads of the


respective


institutions. These departmental reports


are public documents and examination of them


is invited.


CONCLUDING STATEMENT


The Board of Control considers that it serves the


working


for the kinds and quality of


educational services at


of Florida best by
the university level


that will enable the


to achieve the high level of economic, cultural, and


civic attainments to which it aspires. In doing this the Board of Control


mindful of the fact that it works for and in behalf of all of the
Florida, and, to be effective, it needs the continuing support anm


of all who share


citizens


d assistance


in this objective.


The Board of


Control is receiving


an increasing


degree


of cooperation


from the executive and legislative branches of


State government and


from the


people at large. The Board of Control is appreciative of this cooperation, and
it pledges its continuing loyalty and service.
THE BOARD OF CONTROL OF FLORIDA
JAMES J. LOVE, Chairman










REPORT OF CHAIRMAN OF BOARD


APPENDIX


THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR'S REPORT OF THE
ADMINISTERED FUNDS

Tallahassee, Florida
March 15, 1958

To THE STATE BOARD OF CONTROL:
GENTLEMra :
I have the privilege of transmitting to you the financial report of the various
funds administered by the office of the Board of Control for the biennium end-
ing June 80, 1958.


Exhibit


"Summary Statement of Operations


" and reflects trans-


actions during the biennium for the operating and administered funds.
Exhibit "B" is a statement of "Interest and Sinking Fund Balances and
Revenue Certificates Outstanding as of June 30, 1958." This exhibit is pre-
sented for information as to the funded indebtedness of the Board of Control.
Respectfully submitted,
J. BROWARD CiLPEPPER


Executive Director






SUMMARY STATEMENT OF OPERATIONS FOR THE PERIOD JULY 1, 1957, THROUGH JUNE 30,


NaUM OF Fpne


CuasM FuNs
n nlBMa L AlUmnArnON:....
Bx pe A .n .. ,- . .... ... ..... .. . .. .
IItal Ouutly 4 -.
lpenya Appropriaton............. ... ..
oial OAppropriation. ., .. .-..-
Total F ral A. ialnetration. ........... ..
Dhpnamn Or AacmrIz, on:
Inaldental F Aud....... .. .... ... ..
Total DepArtmentof Architaeture.......... .

RflE nl Education Program
Ilm r Appropriattion . ...... ... ... .


For Florid,.


rment to Accredited Medical School ....... ....
gljonl Coundl on Mental Health .. .- .
SAid for Neg, oe.,....... .. ........ .
Fundn-Universlty of Florida:
Hafm m Sholan ahp Income ........
Iee Scbolaip Income......... ... .
ox Memorial Bcholarip Income. ..
G. Oilbt Sholaralp Income...... .
and ani h ge oarhip Income ..........
r In S er 8olar hip Income .... ...... .
tbl a oa hip Income........................
doerate Soldi and allore ome Howmen-nIncome
NuclearEw Eergy Adviawry Co. lt ..................
o tr w I tfot Nw tituto-Eat Cost ...................
itudw tatMM aro ...............
. 8too Unlvttyv...
u. cl Iaort Scholahlp Income..-. ....... .. ...-


KIeMu, &1dOtdp.,.
i d p on i ... .o .e ............... ........


A & M Umn ny
b Stholahlp Income .....................
ihOnj' B ohkleildp Income..................
Ihs utetf md l .Be d B

'o~nin' Bidi:lar:h:oonM- -. -


ChlUaom of Deemaed orld Wat Vatrua
Md Yule Leotmhp ,,..
Jamu D Wutmou Es aes Loome
tfl! Rsiu'ltd CuQrrnt Funds


BchoItr hlpa ..


TotaOl OMb t FunDd


EXHIBIT "A"


BOARD OF CONTROL


$ 2,025.14
836.91
99.88


$ 2,961.73

$ 47,560.43


64,012.00
18,281.00
1,000.00
3,000 00

86,293.00

531,606.48


66,037.14
19,117.91
1,099.68
3,000.00


89,214.73

579,166.91


65,269.17
19,117.43
1,098.77
2,841.21


$ 82,581,00
20,419 00
4,630.00
2,600.06


80,930.98
20,3765.0
4,631,51


1,068:18 '1.87


$ 1,650.02
48.44
98.49


S 88,326.58 $ 928.15 $_............. $ 109,60,600 100,630.00 3 $ 107,806.18 $ 1,823.82


518,230.38


, 47,580.43 1 531,606.48 ) 579,166.91 $ 518,230,38 $..... .....-


3 47,500.00
68,179.85
......11,47283
8,935.63
157.79
203.57
74.26
365.76
529.90
8,951.40
157.31
1,717.45
169,112.39
759.99


328.69
655.90
6,734.69
406.96
96,835.04
285.00
356.78
1,199.37
41,378.86
377.24
314.8

750-00
23.39
377.07
08,630.268


479,000.00
780,000.00
8,000.00
45,150,88
5,350.86
76.18
77.03
63.24
162.89
54419
9,148.72
80 .63
o 'fl A'


$ 526,500.00
838,179.85
8,000.00
56,623.71
14,286 49


233.98
280 60
137.50
528.64
1,074.09
18,100, 12
238.14
A 21 07


$ 447,5
695,6
8,0
39,4
9,5


210,847.50 379,959.89 18
295.00 1,054.99

.*.


164,15
390.49
4,408.57
307.03
120,237.41
295.00
3.56
157.03


492.84
1,046.39
11,143,26
713.99
217,072.45
580.00
360.34
1,356.40


45,78OU a 87,W15.86
85.92 463.16
403 .1 718.49
.,,,.~.~ I.~~~..~.


5,000.00
10.50
66.00
29,720.78


5,750.00
33.89
433,07
93,350.99


00.00
54 49


79,000.00
142,525.36


78.77 17,44.4
09.49 . .


603.67
6,600 00


2,900.00
.9,307.00
300.00


327 00
600 00
3,775 00
400.00
98,373.23
300.00


38,258.62


4,950.00

20,483.15


$ 60,936.53


60,936.53


4,777 00
233.98
280.50
137.50
528 64
470.42
11,500 12
238.14
1.913.07
190,652 89
754 89


165.84
446 39
7,368.26
313.99
118,699.22
280.00
360.34
1,356.40
48,906.24
.66
18.49

800.00
33.89
433 07
72,867.84


$ 484,610.83
$ 484,610.83


5 368,500.00
867,000.00
8,000.00
45,006.42
3,250.00
274.64
426.41
66.74
542.72
534.10
10,265.16
196 62
2,839.38
217,292.78
362.50
5,000 00
25,000 00
25,000 00
20,000.00
531.64
634.017
5,814.10
326.63
136,402.06
287.50
1,045.23
176.61
47,826.62
267.64
687.22
50.82

8,000.00
36.175
170.85
556,225.54


I r.21.772.15 ,,1,748,919.05 $ 2,270,691.20 $ 1,508,482.92 $ 238,670.30 $ 463,37.98 $ 1,856,300.75


5 572 -94.81


I 2,366,818.63


$ 2,939,112.84


5 2,175,039.88


239,698.45


524,474,51


$ 2,450,541.58


$ 545,547.36 S
$ 545,547.86 $


$ 368,500.00 $


867,000.00
8,000.00
45,066.42
8,027.00
508.62
707.01
204.24
1,071.36
1,004.52
21,176.28
434.76
4,752.46
407,945.67
1,117.49
5,000.00
25,00000
25,000.00
20,000.00
697.48
980.46
12.682.38
640,862
255,101.28
667560


443,947,10
448,947.10 $


5566,000.00 $


762,052.59
8,000.00
46,008.60
5,043.02



675.00
526.00
8,6550.00
83,060.87
221,534,00
160.00
8,720.10

2,818.21
380.00
150.00
4,875.00
250.00
118,698.22
800.00


1,405.57 .. ........ ..
1,533.01 . . ....
96,532 86 44,967,76
268.30 162.50
705.71 432.50
50.82 .. ...

8,800.00 3,000-00
70,5.4 33.62
003.92 400.00
128,0938.38 57,992,00
$ 2,319,888.73 $ 1,647,871.49
$ 2,975,016.09 $ 2,199,124,77


-1


101,600.26
101,600.26


13,500.00


104,947.41

2,983.98
508.62
707.01
129.24
8968.86
479.52
18,213
484.17
1,688.08
186,411,67
987.49
65,000.00
21,279,90

17,828.79
367.48

890.62
188,402.00
287,80

1,405.67
1,638.01
51,565.10

106,80
273.21
80.83


5,800,00
208.092
70,101.88
$ 672,407,24
$ 775,891.82


r


* Inludr e $70.00 rm De icines Fund.


or F. Balae Receipt and Total Expenditure Reverted to ud Bans eipt nd Total Expenditu Fund
July I, 1956 Approp-iations Available Gtneral Revenue June 30, 1957 Appropriations Available June 30, 1089


1


I t _I _


2,000,00


i


.. .+++.


.++


9


I


. . . ,
. . . i . 4 p . .









BORDO CNRO SMAR TAEEN O PEAIOSFO TEPEID UY 91,TROG JNE8, 98 Cntnud EHBI


NAnu or FUND


Loan Funds-For University of Florida:
Dudley Beaumont Sholarhip Loan Fund....................
John G. and Faunie F. Rge Loan Fund .........
John and Ida Enashh Loan Fund................... . ..
For Florida State University:
John O. and Fane F. Rue Loan Fund...................
John and Ida English Loan Fund.........,. .,...........
For Flodda A. & M. University
John and Ida Enlh Loan Fund.............................
M lllu CaldwelLoan Fund ................. ...............
Ruby Diamond Loan Fund..................................
Total Loan Fund.................................. ....... .
Endowment Funda:
Pdi lpal l to be Held Inviolate
o Univerdty of Florida:
Arthur E, Hamm scholarship Fund.............. ............
David Yuee Scholarship Fund...............................
David Yule L cturehp Fund..............................
Ramanur Memorial Fund ......................... ........
Call Wlcox Memorial Scholarship Fand..................
Albert W. Oilahriat Sholarhip Fund.........................
For Florida State University:
James D. Wetet Estate Fund............. ...... ........
Albert W. GllhrlatSchlaarship Fund............ ..... ..
For Florida A. & M. University:
J. C. McMullen cholsrnhipFund ...........................
For Florida School for the Deaf and the Blind:
Roy J. Mo Crary Scholarhip Fund...........................
AlbertW. Gilcrit Scholamhip Fund.........................
For Univemity of Florida and Florida State University:
TutS Bcholarship Fund.................................
Total Pdncipal to be Hlod Inviolate ...... ....................
Prinepal May be Used:
For Univerty of Florida:
Wan Lori c hohlraip Fund .......................
Alne PMb Scholarhip FUnd....................... ......
For ilorlda School for the Deaf and Blind:
il For Unveraty of loida and Florida State University:
Ei-Conf derate oldies and Sailor Home Endowment Fund ....
Total Princlpal Which May be Ufed ......... ......... ....
GOlft. f RBtdted Purpofet:
Por Univrsity of Florida:
rank H Wad Eltatte Fund ................................

Total Ofts for RetriDteod Purpose ............................
Total b dowrad t Fun .. .. ...... ...........................
Ttto AU Pwute.^ ...^.......-......... .. .. .. ^ -.. .- -. . ~ ~


Apropriation
or Fund Balance,
July 1, 1956


Receipts and
Appropriations


$.... ....... .. .. . .. .
62,112.19 56,471.10
601.33 4.456


86,230.46
681.38


$


21,411.48
4.45


24.16 1,018.00
15,716.62 1,389.50
502.92 282.64
155,959.06 $ 80,576.62



5,000.00 S... ....
5,000.00 .0........ .
3,000.00 ... .......
700,00 ......... ......
2.500.00 ................
10,000 .00 ....... ........
13,564.65 ................
10,000.00 ..............
1,000.00 .. ..
1,000.00 ................
5,000.00 ........... ..
10,125.12 609.19


Total
Available


I............ .
108,583.20
695.78
107,641.94
685.83
1,037.16
17,106.12
785.56


Expenditures


$.........
79,058.14

15,502.80

630.88
100.00
495.50


Reverted t


Reverted to
General Revenue

I... ... ......


Fund Balances
June 30, 1957

S .. ... ..... .. .
29,525,15
695.78


2,1389.14
685.83
397.28
17,006.12
200.06


3 236,535.68 $ 95,796.32 5............. $ 140,739.386


$ 5,000.00
5,000.00
3,000.00
700.00
2,500.00
10,000.00
13,564.65
10,000.00
1,000.00
1,000.00
5,000.00
10,734.31


. 2,337.15

2,337.15


S .........


$ 5,000.00
5,000.00
3,000,00
700.00
2,500.00
10,000.00
11,227.50
10,000.00
1,000.00
1,000.00
5,000.00


10,734.31


Receipts and
Appropriations

$ 50,601.90
73,518.10
20.82
37,950.79
20.82
163.31
1,893.98
430.46
$ 164,166.27



S.....2......1





2,291.156


811.98


Total
Available

60,661.90
103,043.84
716.60
130,089.93
706.66
560.69
18,400.10
726.52


Expenditures


$. 1...., ...
61,984.86


8,1689.27


110.00
......... .
215.50


Fund Balaunce
June 80,1968


60,081.90
41,108.99
718.60
71,920.66
706.06
460.59
18,400.10
511.02


$ 304,005.63 $ 120,429.12 $ 184,476.81


5,000.00 5..............
6,000.00 ................
3,000.00 ................
700.00 .......... .
2,500.00 ................
10,000.00 ...............

13,618.65 800.00
10,000.00 ...............
1,000.00 ...............
1,000,00 ...............
5,000.00 1,000.00


11,346.27


1 5,000.00
6,000.00
7000.00
2,600.00
10,000.00
12,718.05
10,000.00

1,000.00

4,000,00
4,000.00


11,848.27


$ 66,888.77 $ 609.109 67,498.96 $ 2,337.15 $ ........... $ 65,161.81 2,903.11 5 68,064.92 $ 1,800.00 ,804a0,


$ 3,4 .000 ....... 3400.00 ........... $ ........... 8 3,400.00 5......... $ ,400.00 .............. 8,400.00
23,400.00 900.00 24,300.00 ................ ....... ...... 24,30000 671.32 24,971.82 ............... 24,971.8
13,203.28 175.00 13,378.28 350.00 ................ 13,028.28 ................ 13,028.28 ................ 18,028.28
13,000.00 .............. 13.0 00 00 ....... ..................... 13,000.00 3 ,000.00 48,000.00 1,00000 47,000.00
$ 53,003.28 $ 1,075.00 8 54,078.28 350.00 $ ............ $ 53,728.28 3 35,671.82 $ 89,890.60 $ 1,000.00 $ 88,899.60


$ 14,819.32 $ 275.17 $ 15,094.49 $... ......... $.............. 15,094.49 $ 599.81 S 15,694.80 ............. 16,894.80
$ 14,819.32 $ 275.17 $ 15,094.49 $..... ..... .. ..... ....... 15,094.49 $ 599.81 S 16,894.80 S............ 1 15,894.80
$ 184,712.37 S 1,959.36 3 186,671.73 $ 2,687.15 ........... $ 133,984.58 $ 39,174.24 S 173,168,82 $ 2,800.00 $ 170,868.82


68 2,965.74 3


2 440,854.51


3 8,812,820.25


$ 2,273,623.35


8 230,598.46


799,198.45


$ 2,653,882.09


$ 3,463,080.54


In addition to h and Investmenta there is eal EStatowithan estimated value of $116,781.


$ 2,822,58.809


$ 1,180,726.66





80, 1958


(Continued)


STATEMENT OF OPERATIONS


1.... ... .....


I


. . . . . . . . . . . . .


FOR THE PERIOD JULY 1,


1957, THROUGH JUNE


EXHIBIT "A"


BOARD OF CONTROL


SUMMARY











INTEREST AND SINKING FUND BALANCES


30, 1957, AND JUNE 30, 1958


I I -~----EXHIBIT r


UMroui or FLORIDA:
19JS Dormiorry ameu.... .. .
1M9 Dformitor lat.. .
Florida Fiedd adium... ......
Btudr t H ll .. .. .. ......... .
IOM DorotOTy rlm.......-...
I9M Dormltory lae ............
gtWO Dormitory IMUQ .,,....
Ubaor ohod ........ .
1057 Ap m t Unit ............
Total Unml ity of Florda.......

A i TAs UVmvzarrr:
Dicik Hall and Landb Hall...


--- VO B~ t& ioilu.-,...- -.


01M lbrvenuu CertifiateB Imue... ,..,

TotsF1ord s 8tateUniverty ... ..........


w AoRiOU LArL & MsCHAuIAL
S+Dormit ryl B.. .... ,.... ...
...................
Jgu ...t...............


UmvNTMrIT:


tot lo4 M A,A&M. L Ulvnty..... .........
totl Wer ot Cntrol Revnue Crtas Rend...,


I3NTEREr AND SNuINGo FUND BALANCES


Cnh


3 25,256 28
4,452.70
18,552 08
6,338.15
30,628.44
1,558,29
57,549.08
36,402.00


As or JUmN 30, 1957

Investments


$ 35,000.
370,000
54,000
150,000.
25,000


Total


60,256.28
374.452 70
72,552.08
155,338.15
55,626 44
1,558,29
57,549.08
36,402,00


RVENUE CIwTrFICATEfS


Total Isued


3 457,000.00
3,028,000.00
550,000 00
1,798,000.00
1,000,000.00
600,00.00
3,000,000.00
485,0(.00,00
1,925,000.00


$ 17,785.02 $ 634,000 00 813,735 02 13.443,000.00


% 60,830.45
2,275.00
2,97510
5,412.60
9,052.33
26,713.78
8,460.41


$ 114,819,57


$ 17,534,60
600.61
38,550.96
85,562.52


240,000.00
40,000 0


Sa386,000.00


73,000.00
27,000 00


3 100,000.00
$ 1,120,00000


S 500,319.57


i 90,534 69
606.51
65,550.95
85,562 52
$ 242,314.67
I 1,556,369.26


$ 404,000 00
58,000 00
115,000,00
2,00,0.(100
4.310,000.00
500,000.00
300,000.00
125,000.00

$ 6,012,00.00


S202,000 00
60,000,00
425,000 00
810,000.00
$ 1,497,00000
$20,952,000.00


Total Retired


203,000.00
483,000.00
445,000.00
280,000.00
15,000.00




$ 1,426,000.00


$ 186,000.00
32.000.00
28,000.00
32,00000
310,000 00
5,000.00



$ 593,000 00


$ 102,000.00
23,000.00
64,000.00
28,000.00
$ 215,000.00
I 2,234,000.00J


June 30, 15


$ 254,000
3,145,000
105,000
1,518,000
985 ,000
600,000
3,000,000
485,000
1,925,000


$12,017, 000.00


$ 218,000.00
26.000.00
87,000,00
168,000.00
4,000.000.00
495,000.00
300,000.00
125,000.00

$ 5,419,000.00


3 100,000.00
37,000.00
361,000.00
784,000.00
$ 1,282,000.00
$18,718,000.00


lNT lrrT AND SINKING FUND BALANCWS
AS or JUNE 30, 1958


$ 2,831.34
3,611.43
25,675.58
66.790.24
35.206.83
26,496,97
49.403.15
34.383.34
60,623,67
$ 305,022.55


$ 44,638.01
15,911.66
3,365.10
5,447.50
10,755.83
36,117.78
8,706.27


I I "'-'~"'' I'*"-- - - - -


14,424
111
27,969
34,234


$ 76,740.35


506.703.05


Investment I


S 60,000.00
370,000.00
64,000.00
160,000.00
35,000 00
a0,000.0o0


$ 719,000.00


260,000.00
40,000.00


$ 72,000.00
27,000.00


99,.000.0


$ 1,183.000.00


Total


S 62,831.34
373,611.43
89.675.58
228,790.24
70,2068.83
26,496-97
79.403.15
34,383.34
60,623.87
$ 1,024,022.55


98,0836.01
25,11.866
3,3658.10
6,447-50
270,755.83
76,I17.,78
8.706.27


$ 86,424.83
111,51
54,B0f9.23
34,234.78
$ 175,740.35
5 1,689,703.05


Rlvm.mn Cmanc'rta


Total laued


$ 457,000.00
3,628,000.00
560,000.00
1,798.000.00
1.000,000.00
600,000.00
3.000,000.00
485,000.00
1,.92,000,00
$13,443,000.00


I 404,000.00
58,000.00
200,000.00


soooo.oo
300 000.00
.


Total Rltimd


221,000.00
562,000.00
471,000.00
316,000.00
30,000,00


$ ,159.000.00O


$ 201,000.00
33 ,000.00
87,000,00
420,000.100
fl7,000 ,o0
4,000.00


$1,497,000.00
120,952,000.00


Afl0.O 0 AUthkO$Nd btzt not yet Lwsd.


$ 110,000 00
27,000.00
76,000.W
40,000.00
252,000.00


OutJ m jdh
June 30, t5A


a 23,00000
3.066,000.00
7B 000.00
14300.000
a,0 00000
8 0, 000.0
488.000.00
1,928,000.00
$11,844,000.00


* saom 00,

2,00000
.318 000


5 02,000.00
33,000.00

Sa,,0ooo0o,

I118,365,000.00


142,814.67
430,369.26


BOARD


OF CONTROL


AND REVENUE


CERTIFICATES


OUTSTANDING


AS OF JUNE


EXHIBIT Y B


$ 124.,40.15


365.000.00


034 040 1 5


8 746 000 00








REPORT OF CHAIRMAN OF BOARD


APPENDIX


REPORT OF THE ARCHITECT TO THE
BOARD OF CONTROL

Tallahassee, Florida
March 15, 1959


To THE STATE BOARD OF CONTROL:
GENTLEMEN:


Mr. Guy C. Fulton,


who served


as Architect to the Board of Control


throughout the biennial period which ended June 30, 1958, has prepared the
following report which I have the honor to present to the Board.
The Architect to the Board of Control has, during the 1956-58 biennium,
designed and/or supervised construction of the following buildings at the vari-
ous institutions under the Board of Control and the State Plant Board:


PROJECTS COMPLETED FOR OCCUPANCY DURING THE PERIOD
FROM JULY 1956 TO JULY 1958


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA:


Cost of Project


*Medical


Sciences


Building .......................... $ 3,576,895.33


*Central Power Plant No. 2-Building........
*Central Power Plant No. 2-Mechanical....
*Central Power Plant No. 2-Electrical.......
*Foundations-Teaching Hospital ..............
First Unit-Main Agriculture Building......
*Second Unit-Main Agriculture Building....
Laboratory Equipment-Main Agri. Bldg...
Laboratory School and Industrial Arts
Building ....................... ............. ...-.............
*Physics-Mathematics-Psychology
Classroom Building ... ........... ...............-..
Production Research Building
(Citrus Station ) .......................................
*Office and Laboratory-Immokalee ............
*Equipment Fertilizer Storage-Immokalee
*4-H Club at Cherry Lake-Permanent
D ocks ... ........... -"--.- --..........""
**Alpha Epsilon Phi Sorority, Unit S-11........
**Alpha Epsilon Pi Fraternity, Unit F-5-.......
Tau Epsilon Phi Fraternity, Unit F-6........


141,361.86
1,005,914.83
144,692.13
970,638.72
1,406,241.95
212,521.47
164,518.64

1,015,822.17

927,447.12


72,082.05
16,129.44
4,445.93


21,940.10
122,390.27
124,987.92
165,899.51









REPORT OF CHAIRMAN OF BOARD


Cost of Project


*Superintendent's Cottage and Utilities......
Office Building-Homestead ................. .....
Greenhouse and Head house-Homestead


Small Residence Hall, Unit


S-8..................


Small Residence Hall, Unit S-10................


Small Residence Hall, Unit


S-9..................


*Agronomy Field Laboratory........................


11,532.00
35,268.00
6,002.00
126,196.00
123,489.00
123,976.79
22,700.00


$ 9,543,093.23


FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY:
Men's Gymnasium ......................................$
Home Economics Building ..........................


Small Residence Hall, Unit
Small Residence Hall, Unit


S-1.................
S-3.------... -..


*Classroom for Business Administration......


803,396.02
779,292.89
125,920.00
129,408.95
840,441.41


$ 2,678,459.27


FLORIDA A.


& M. UNIVERSITY:


1956 Alterations to Dining Hall Area........$
Classroom Building ..........-- ......................
Demonstration School ................................
Agriculture and Home Economics
Building ................................................
Student Union Building-First Unit............
Student Union Building-Second Unite........
Underground Electrical Distribution
System ---................................................... ...
Grading at New Athletic Stadium and
Old Hospital Site ..............................
Athletic Stadium:
Structural Steel for Stadium ..................
Foundations and Miscellaneous ............
Campus Paving:
Underground Electrical and Whiteway
Circuits ...........................................
Extensions to Underground Steam
Service . .......-........... .. ............. .........


8,722.00
810,189.00
360,038.33


839,003.94
212,425.85
171,471.00


55,951.20


46,607.20


197,396.00
123,461.76


4,315.82


Water, Storm and Sanitary


Sewers-........


Completion of Top Floor-Classroom
Building ............. .....................................


FLORIDA SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF
AND THE BLIND:
Reclamation of Marsh Land for
Expanding Campus ........... .................$


17,100.00
55,000.00


51,341.75


264,919.80


$ 2,953,023.85


264,919.80









REPORT OF CHAIRMAN OF BOARD


RINGLING MUSEUM OF


ART:


Cost of Project


Addition to Ringling Museum .................... $
Revised Sewage Disposal System for
Addition to Museum ..........................
*Re-roofing Ringling Museum ....................
*Replacement of Cast Stone--Ringling
Museum ....................................................
*Re-roofing Ringling Residence ..................
*Replacement of Architectural
Terra Cotta-Residence ..........................
*Replacement of Cast Stone Balustrade......
*Replacement of Cast Stone Cornice and
Belt Coruse ........-..-................... . ..... ....
*Replacement of Cast Stone for Bridge......
*Replacement of Marble Slabs for the
Promenade .................................................$


239,880.23

8,563.90
12,320.00

11,183.94
7,267.00

9,882.00
7,888.40


4,971.00
3,557.40


3,882.76


309,396.63


STATE PLANT BOARD:


Office and Laboratory-Winter Haven......-$
Greenhouse- Winter Haven .......................


57,801.24
13,600.00


71,401.24


FLORIDA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY:


*Office and Research Building


....................$


347,506.27


347,506.27


GRAND TOTAL-ALL PROJECTS .-----.-


$16,167,800.29


*Project handled in its entirety by the office of the Architect to the Board of
Control; that is, preparation of drawings, specifications and supervision of
construction. On projects not so marked, drawings and specifications were
prepared by other architects, but supervision was done by the Board's
Architect.
**Projects for which the Board's office did not draw the plans nor supervise
construction.

PROJECTS UNDER CONSTRUCTION BUT NOT COMPLETED WITHIN
THE PERIOD FROM JULY 1956 TO JULY 1958

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA:
Women's Dormitory (HHFA) ...............$ 1,150,298.89


Laboratory and Office-Watermelon
Lab-Leesburg..........---------..........---.............----....--
*Auditorium Addition to Physics-
Mathematics-Psychology Building.........


25,602.44

128,151.00









20 REPORT OF CHAIRMAN OF BOARD


Auditorium and Gymnasium-
Laboratory School ................--..................
*College Housing-Married Students
(HHFA) -............ ...... ............................... ...
*Nuclear Service Building Reactor Wing
*Poultry Classroom and Administration
Building ..............--.............................. ...
**Utilities Expansion:
Additions and Improvements to


Electrical


Additions and Alterations to Steam
System ... ...............................................
Additional Sewerage Facilities and


Cost of Project
351,188.77

1,676,405.85
254,516.60


67,240.00


561,235.00


356,801.00


Water


Mains ....................... ...........


591,550.00


*Completion of Meat Laboratory for
Animal Husbandry ..................................
*Teaching Hospital-J. Hillis Miller


Health


*Casework for Teaching Hospital ................
*Men's Dormitory (HHFA) ........................
*Cold Storage and Low Humidity Room....
*Small Grain Crossing and Inoculation
Building .............................................-------....--
*Plastic Covered Greenhouse ......................


*Herbicide Laboratory


117,200.00


7,629,081.33
73,000.00
1,976,189.41
16,200.00


3,500.00
1,000.00
2,000.00


$14,981,159.69


FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY:
Classroom Building for School of
Education ......................- ...-.... .. . ..... -. $
*Delta Gamma Chapter House ....................
*Air Conditioning Home Economics Bldg.
*Air Conditioning School of Business
Administration .....................-..............-- .......
Completion of Education Building............
*Air Conditioning Conradi Hall ..................


FLORIDA SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF
AND THE BLIND:
*Dormitory and Dining Room Unit .........$
*Enclose Existing Swimming Pool .-..........
*Build and Enclose Swimming Pool for
INegroes ..........-----------------*-------
Industrial Building for Negroes . .. ....


893,763.47
134,258.40
70,160.85


81,265.26
185,051.75
14,912.23


343,221.40
86,436.93

77,420.00
88,042.52


$ 1,379,411.96


595,120.85


System ..................................


Center ..........................................








REPORT OF CHAIRMAN OF BOARD


RINGLING MUSEUM OF ART:
*Repairs and Reconstruction to Ringling
Museum (Force Account) Storm
Drains ....................................... ...... ...$


FLORIDA A.


Cost of Project


15,250.00


& M. UNIVERSITY:


Women's Dormitory ....-_ ....-
Demonstration School Cafetorium ............
Extension to Campus Utilities:
Extension of Electric Distribution and


398,280.55
106,524.47


Whiteway


*Revisions to Ice Cream Facilities


109,869.00
19,137.00


633,811.02


GRAND TOTAL-ALL PROJECTS ......................................... $ 17,604,753.52
Respectfully submitted,
FORREST M. KmTsY, JR.
Architect to the Board of Control


System ..............................








REPORT OF CHAIRMAN OF BOARD


BIENNIA L

OF


REPORT

THE


JOHN


AND


MABLE


RINGLING


MUSEUM


ART


- 1958


REPORT OF THE JOHN AND MABLE RINGLING MUSEUM
FOR THE BIENNIUM, JULY 1, 1956-JUNE 30, 1958
To THE STATE BOARD OF CONTROL:
GENTLEMEN:


Following


OF ART


is the report of the development and activities of the Ringling


Museum of Art and its subsidiary institutions for the biennium, 1956-1958:
A. GENERAL ADMINISTRATION
The administrative policies during this biennium have been conditioned
by three objectives:


The physical


rehabilitation


of the museums


to bring


closer to


national museum standards
The reorganization of the staff for greater efficiency and economy and
a higher standard of professional work
The extension of activities of greatest service to the educational system


and the people of Florida


so that the Museum might better fill its role


as the State art museum.
A. Everett Austin, who became the first Director of the Museum in April,


died on March


The present


Director,


who had formerly


served as Curator, was appointed as of July 1, 1957.


Attendance
More than 350,000 people from the United States, Canada, Latin America,
and Europe visited one or all of the three institutions on the Ringling Museum


grounds during this biennium.
these, 57,382 were admitted on


171,181 adults visited
combination tickets,


I


the Art Museum; of
56,892 on individual


tickets to the Art Museum only, and 56,808 free on the 104 free Sundays.


138,657


adults visited the Residence,


57,382


on combination tickets, 81,275


on tickets to the Residence only.


100,085 adults visited the Circus Museum,


57,382 on combination


tickets and


42,703 on


individual admission tickets


to the Circus Museum only.


No exact tabulation was made of the children


under


12 who were admitted free when accompanied by adults,


but spot


checks indicated a ratio of 8 children to 100 adults, or approximately 36,798


admissions during the biennium.


In addition, 12,500 students in 302 school


groups were admitted free to the three Museums.


1956


I _









REPORT OF CHAIRMAN OF BOARD


The most significant trend in attendance during this biennium was the


sharp increase in the number of visitors from all parts of Florida.


See Exhibit


I, Report of Admissions and Receipts.
Repairs and Construction
Repairs and improvements to the Art Museum and Residence were continued
during this biennium under special appropriations.


The 1955 Art Museum appropriation of $150,000


was used to make the


roof supports structurally sound, repair and replace the roof, install ventilation


access


hatches in the roof,


water-proof the exterior and interior court


walls, and rebuild and replace the marble steps and the approaches to the
Art Museum from the front and all access steps of the courtyard.


The 1957


Session


of the Legislature appropriated an additional $211,800


for continued repairs to this building


as follows:


Repairing and replacing the balusters and rails on both the ground and
roof levels, strengthening the roof arches at the west end of each wing
by the use of steel L-beams, repairing several cracked marble columns in
the loggia, repairing and restoring the cast stone cornice belt, removing and


replacing the mosaic tile on both wings and


the bridge, and installing a


new storm drain from the southwest corner of the Museum to the bay.


This


project is still in process and is expected to be completed in approximately
six months.
The Residence appropriation of $50,000, made by the 1955 Session of the
Legislature, was used for complete repair and renovation of the roof, repairing


and reglazing the skylight over the Great Hall,


weatherproofing and water-


proofing all windows and doors, replacement and repairing with terra cotta the
most damaged sills and terrace railings, and painting trim woodwork around
windows and doors.

Plant and Grounds
Significant improvements to the estate were made during this period:
The State Road Department paved the service road to the theater turn-
around and the road which runs from the Art Museum across the estate west
of the pump house and connects with the Residence road at the Circus Museum.


The new public toilets in
completed and opened to the


the north
public. T


wing of


'his installation


the Art Museum


provides


were


adequate


accommodations for visitors to the Museum.
The complete sprinkler system in front of the Art Museum was replaced,
and an extension was added to water the area adjoining the exit road
from the Residence.
A small nursery area with a greenhouse was developed at the barn area
in order to develop small plants into usable stock for landscaping purposes.


tI








REPORT OF CHAIRMAN


OF BOARD


The grounds were cleared, filled and graded to the extent that all areas


are now clearly visible and access


new vistas to the public and
each of the Museums.

Public Relations


gives


ible to the public This has opened up
them a complete view of the estate from


The extensive national press and radio


and its activities,


coverage


especially during the second hi


of the Ringling Museum
alf of the biennium, has


made this institution of increasingly great importance in the total publicity


for the State


as a representative of the cultural environment which Florida


offers to new residents and visitors.


Hundreds of reproductions of works of


art in the Ringling Museum, of the Museum court, the Residence, and the
Asolo Theater have appeared throughout the nation. Articles on the Museum


and its affiliates


published


in Life,


The Saturday


Review


Literature, and Art News as well as in scores of newspapers. Two national
television programs originated at the Museum: the Wide Wide World show


on November
on March 19,


11, 1956, and the three-hour Dave Garroway show,


1958.


The latter


Today,


was presented from the Museum court and


galleries and showed the nation a number of works from the Ringling Col-
lection, the setting in which they are housed, and the methods of conservation
by which their original aspect is restored and preserved.

Members Council


In November,


a nonprofit organization


called


the Members


Council


of the Ringling Museum of Art was formed to increase the participation
of the people of Florida in the activities of the Museum, to encourage use of


the Museum's


services


by the schools of Florida, and to help the Museum


financially in developing its program and activities in areas where State funds
are not available. During the past eight months the latter function has received
greatest emphasis. The Members Council contributed $4,637 to the opening
of the Asolo Theater. The Council has begun a drive to furnish the boxes
in the Asolo Theater with replicas of 18th century Venetian theater chairs.


To the end of the biennium contributions


were


received for 37 chairs at $50


These have been placed in the theater.


As a means of securing contributions, the Council set up four categories


of sponsoring members:


Benefactors, Patrons, Sustaining,


and Contributing


Members.


By the end of the biennium three benefactors, Mr. and Mrs. E. E.


Bishop of Bradenton, Mrs. C. L. Hamilton of Venice, and Mr. and Mrs. W. H.


Colvin of Sarasota had


contributed


$1,000 each;


seven


Patrons had


tribute $100 each; six Sustaining Members $50 each, and seven Contributing
Members $25 each, a total of $4,175.00.
The original members of the Council were drawn from Sarasota and


Manatee Counties only.


As the organization is consolidated, the Council will


be extended first to the surrounding counties on the West Coast and even-
tually to the entire State.


con-






REPORT OF CHAIRMAN OF BOARD


Asolo Theater Opening
The most spectacular event of this biennium was the formal opening of the
Asolo Theater on January 10 and 11, 1958. For the opening, attended by a
number of State officials and Legislators, the New York City Opera Company
presented two performances of Mozart's Abduction from the Seraglio. The
Saturday evening performance was followed by an elaborate Venetian Ball


in the Ringling Residence.


The event received nation-wide publicity, a full


page color plate and five smaller black and


white reproductions in


magazine of February 17, 1958, and pictures of the theater in 74 newspapers
throughout the country, including The New York Times.
Financial Report
See Exhibit II for a statement of the financial operations for the years ending


June 30, 1957


and June 30, 1958.


THE ART MUSEUM


The most significant development in the Art Museum during this biennium
was the beginning of its transformation from a seasonal attraction depending
largely on tourist patronage to a year-round cultural center for the people
of the State. In the second half of the biennium exhibitions, theatrical activi-
ties, films, and art classes were offered in the late spring, summer, and fall


as well as in the winter season.


This extension of activities has been made


necessary


by the greater demand which the increasing population


of the


State of Florida is making for a fuller cultural life.
Conservation and Restoration


The relining, cleaning, and restoration of the four Rubens cartoons, begun in


June, 1954, by Edward O. Korany,


was completed in January, 1958.


project was one of the most extensive ever undertaken in this country, and
the cleaning revealed greater quality in the works than scholars had heretofore


believed.


Christopher Norris, one of the foremost European authorities on


Rubens, who visited the Museum at the completion of the Rubens restoration
project to take reports of the results back to Europe, plans to publish his
opinion that the four Ringling paintings contain more work of Rubens himself
and are of higher quality than the Marie de Medici series in the Louvre, the
most renowned cycle of Rubens paintings.


During the biennium twelve ot
Reynolds Marquis of Granby, the


her paintings were restored including the
Vouet Venus and Mars with Cupid and


Chronos, and the


scenes


of Harlequin paintings by Giovanni Domenico Ferretti.


Restoration of Frames
Restoration of frames of pictures exhibited in


the galleries


was initiated.


during this biennium. A high percentage of the exhibited frames are original
wood carved ones. Many of them had become weakened through age and
had lost their original surface to the detriment of the paintings they surround


The result of the work thus far completed has
in the general appearance of the galleries.


been extremely gratifying










REPORT OF CHAIRMAN


OF BOARD


Acquisitions


Two paintings and a


collection of


18th century furniture were purchased


through


the John


Ringling


endowment


during


biennium.


paintings fill needs in the Ringling Collection.


One, a grisaille sketch depicting


an imaginary monument to James, First Earl of Stanhope, was produced by
the collaboration of three of the leading artists in Venice in the 18th century.
Giovanni Battista Pittoni painted the figures, Antonio Canal (Canaletto) the


architecture,


Giovanni


Battista


Cimaroli


the landscape.


is a rare


finished sketch which combines the freedom of a drawing with the permanence
of an oil painting. The other, a Judgment of Solomon, by Richard Tassel


(1588-1666) was


selected to augment the Museum's


century


French


collection so that upon the completion of restoration of the more important
17th century French paintings in the Ringling Collection, a French gallery
can be opened.
Fifteen pieces of 18th century decorative art were purchased to enhance


the lobby of the Asolo


Theater and the


Venetian 18th Century Gallery of


the Museum.


The Venetian blackamoors, the Sicilian chairs and settees, a


Bavarian


carved


and gilded


rococo


clock,


a pair


of North


Italian


carved


and gilded candelabra, the Venetian chairs with chinoiserie lacquer designs,
and the several Italian console tables are all relatively contemporaneous with


the Asolo


Theater and help give the spectator the experience of visiting an


18th century building.


A seven-piece Sheffield
use at social activities.


tea and coffee service was donated anonymously for
Three works of contemporary graphic art were donated


to the Education Department for circulation to the schools:


Ben-Zion by Mr. and Mrs.
John Henry Macdonnell.


a Marini and a


Walter E. Anderson, and a Ponce de Leon by


Loans


Florida was represented by


Ringling paintings in loan exhibitions in


Man-


chester, England, Bordeaux, France, and in 18 cities in the United States


from New


York to


Los Angeles.


Two paintings were lent to


Europe,


paintings to institutions in other parts of the United States, and 29 paintings
and three sculptures to other institutions in Florida.


From April, 1957


to June, 1958, five paintings from the storeroom were


shown in the Governor's Mansion in


Tallahassee where they


were


seen by


an estimated 10,000 official guests and visitors.


On February 11, 1958, Congressman James A. Haley and Verman Kim-
brough, Director of the Ringling School of Art in Sarasota (not associated in


any way with the Ringling Museum)


brought a suit against the Board of


Control and the State Board of Education to determine whether or not the
Museum could continue its traditional lending policy under the legislative


act of acceptance of the Museum.
of the biennium.


The case was not yet decided at the end









REPORT OF CHAIRMAN OF BOARD


Educational Activities and Services
In keeping with the general Museum policy of this biennium, the Education
Department has made a concerted effort to extend its facilities to the entire


State.


The results have been especially gratifying in the increase in the use


of Museum
the State.


services


by the schools in the northeastern and central part of


Adult Gallery Talks. Adult gallery talks


were


given twice each weekday and


once each Sunday afternoon by trained personnel to approximately 35,000
people during the past biennium. Special lectures were given to adult groups
totaling approximately 9,150 persons, representing church, business and pro-
fessional organizations, clubs, and bus tours.


Student Gallery Talks and Film Programs.


Three hundred and two groups of


students, totaling approximately 12,500 persons, visited the Museum for special
gallery talks and educational film programs. Participating in these programs
were 51 elementary schools, 14 junior high schools, 35 senior high schools, 9
colleges and universities, and 16 educational institutions of a vocational or


specialized nature. Of the total num
from Florida and 400 from other states.


by members of the
Museum.


Education


Depart


ber of


12,500 students,


12,100 came


A number of lectures were also given
ment to school groups outside the


Visual Aids.


The collection of visual aid materials circulated to the schools


of Florida was greatly increased during the past biennium.


Twelve new


circulating exhibitions were prepared,


and 11 new film-


strips and four new films were purchased. Film strips and slides were borrowed


460 teachers during the biennium,


and exhibitions


were


shown in


schools.


New exhibitions are being prepared to meet the increasing demand.


Children's Art Classes.


In addition to the 12-week course which


is given


annually on Saturday mornings during the winter season, a six-week summer
course was introduced in 1958 and sculpture was added to the curriculum.
Seventy-six children registered for the summer class. Enrollment in the regular
winter class in 1957 was 91 and in 1958, 142.
Nine paintings by seven children in the 1958 winter class were chosen
to be included in a group of 100 paintings by U.S. children for the Fourth
World School Children's Art Exhibition sponsored by the UNESCO Art Educa-
tion League of Japan and held in Tokyo in the spring of 1958. Two paintings
by two children from the same class were chosen for a similar exhibition in
Seoul, Korea, which is scheduled for the fall of 1958 under the sponsorship
of the Korean National Commission for UNESCO and the Sook Myung Girls'
Middle and High School.


The Kiwanis Club of Sarasota,


Institute of Architects,


and the Business


the Sarasota branch of the American


and Professional


Woman's Club


contributed scholarship funds to the summer 1958 class.






REPORT OF CHAIRMAN


OF BOARD


Symposium


The first ten of the annual symposia on the history of art, including that
of April, 1957, were sponsored jointly by the Florida State University and the
Ringling Museum. The University of Florida joined these two institutions for
the first time as a sponsor of the eleventh annual symposium. As a result
of the broadening of the sponsorship and the international reputation which


the symposia have achieved, it


was possible to have scholars like Sir Anthony


Blunt, the Director of the Courtauld Institute of the University of London,
Rudolph Wittkower, Deputy Director of the Warburg Institute in London, and
Russell Lynes, Jr., Managing Editor of Harper's Magazine among the speakers


during this


biennium.


Registration


for the


annual symposium, held


from April 23 to


was 430.


Registration the following


year,


21-26, 1958,


was 656, the record to date.


Loan Exhibitions


A year-round schedule of loan exhibition
The most sumptuous show of the period


is was introduced in this biennium.
was an exchange exhibition of more


than $750,000 worth of paintings planned with the Wadsworth Atheneum in


memory of Everett Austin.


Because of the popular demand for contemporary


art, most of the other loan exhibitions


were


in this field.


They brought to


the people of Florida paintings, sculpture, graphic arts, decorative arts, textiles,
and photographs produced in our century in Italy, England, Germany, France,
the Scandinavian countries, India, and the United States.


One of the obvious functions of a state museum of


art is to exhibit


the work of the best professional artists in the state and, if possible, present


it to the Nation.


This was done in an exhibition of the work of Massin,


Pachner, Solomon, and Zerbe, selected by the Director as the foremost repre-


sentatives of professional painting in Florida.


The exhibition


was presented


first at the Ringling Museum and then circulated throughout the country for
a year by the American Federation of Arts under the title, "Four Florida
Painters."
Film Program


Since there is no


"art theater" in the vicinity of the Ringling Museum, it is


incumbent upon the Museum to show the most recent foreign films as well


as the historical films which are more germane to a museum.


In addition to


a winter season of 23 films in 1956-57 and 21 in 1957-58, the Museum initiated


a summer series of


six films in 1957 and twelve films with four performances


each in the summer of 1958.


Almost a thousand people a week attended the


summer movies in 1958.
Special Lectures
Guest lectures by Vincent Price and Adja Yunkers were sponsored jointly by
the Ringling Museum and the Sarasota Art Association in 1958. During both
years, special staff lectures were given in the theater. As a result of changing
the lecture time from Sunday evening to Friday morning, attendance at staff
lectures more than doubled during the first half of the biennium and more
than tripled in the second half.







REPORT OF CHAIRMAN OF BOARD 29


In addition to giving regular and special lectures in the Ringling Museum
the Director and members of the Education Department have lectured through-
out the State and have served on a number of juries of awards during this
biennium.
Art Clinic
During the past biennium opinions concerning authenticity, authorship, and
date and place of origin have been given by the curatorial staff on 827 works
of art brought to the Museum by private owners. This is one of the free
services of the Museum to the people of Florida.
Library
The Library Board of the American Association of University Women began
in the summer of 1958 the complete recataloguing of the Ringling Museum
Library as a volunteer project.
Ford Foundation and Chrysler Competition
In recognition of the Museum's recent activities in promoting the work of
contemporary Florida artists throughout the country, the Ringling Museum
was selected as the regional collecting center of the South Atlantic states
for the Ford Foundation grants of $10,000 each to contemporary American
painters, and for the Walter P. Chrysler annual summer painting competition.
C. THE CIRCUS MUSEUM AND RESIDENCE
Expansion of the Circus Museum
During the latter part of this biennium plans were made to develop the
Museum of the Circus as a historical museum of the American circus and its
antecedents. As part of this project, the Ringling Brothers, Barnum and
Bailey Combined Shows placed on extended loan 12 parade wagons and several
hundred objects used in circus tent shows. The Board of Control subse-
quently approved the construction of a wagon shed to connect the two
existing circus museum buildings. When the building and the planned instal-
lation are completed, the Museum of the Circus will exhibit the largest and
finest collection of circus parade wagons and historical circus memorabilia in
America.
Cage Wagon Gift
Mr. and Mrs. Jim Mitchell, owners of the Sarasota Reptile Farm, donated a
carved and painted cage wagon made for the Ringling Circus in 1908.
Residence
The partial physical rehabilitation of the Ringling Residence has made possible
a considerable amount of refurbishing done to give the visitor the feeling
that the Residence is not a dusty monument but an appropriate setting for
the exuberant life John Ringling lived.
Respectfully submitted,
KENNETH DONAHUE


Director











REPORT OF CHAIRMAN OF BOARD


EXHIBIT I


RINGLING MUSEUMS

ADMISSIONS AND RECEIPTS

FOR FISCAL YEARS JULY 1, 1956 THRU JUNE 30, 1958


1956-57


Admissions


Receipts


Paid Combination Tickets @ $2.00. ..........................
*Paid Combination Tickets @ $2.00 with 15% discount.......
**Paid Combination Tickets @ $2.00 with 50% discount. .. ..
Paid Admissions to Museum @ $1.00 ......................
*Paid Admissions to Museum @ $1.00 with 15% discount. . .
**Paid Admissions to Museum @ $1.00 with 50% discount. ...
Paid Admissions to Residence @ 1.00........ ..............
*Paid Admissions to Residence @ $1.00 with 15% discount. .
**Paid Admissions to Residence @ 31.00 with 50% discount. ...


Paid Admissions to Circus
*Paid Admissions to Circus
*Paid Admissions to Circus
Sales Counter Receipts. .
Movie Receipts.... ......
Special Events ...........
Memberships ............
Miscellaneous..... ......


28,163


27,915


36,960


* 220
. 18,628


M museum @ 50 .. . .. .. .. .. ... .....
Museum @ 50f with 15% discount.
Museum @ 504 with 50% discount.


S. * . . 4 i
. . .. * . ...


26,836 Free Admissions to Art Museum-52 Free Days

1957-58

Paid Combination Tickets @ $2.00 each.................
*Paid Combination Tickets @ 32.00 with 15% discount...
**Paid Combination Tickets @ $2.00 with 50% discount. .
Paid Admissions to Museum @ $1.00...................


*Paid Admissions to Museum @ $1,00 with 15% discount.....


**Paid


Admissions to Museum @ $1.00 with 50% discount . ..


Paid Admissions to


*Paid
*Paid


Residence @ $1.00..... . . . . . . . . .


Admissions to Residence @ $1.00 with 15% discount ....


Admissions to


Paid Admissions to
*Paid Admissions to
**Paid Admissions to


Sales Counter Receipts. ...
Movie Receipts...........
Special Events ............
Memberships .. . . . ....
Miscellaneous..... ........


Residence @ $1.00 with 50% discount . .
Circus Museum @ 50. .... .............
Circus Museum @ 50* with 15% discount.
Circus Museum @ 50< with 50% discount.


$ 56,326.00
873.80
179.00
27,915.00
692.75
198.00
36,960.00
2,322.20
110.00
9,314.00
* . . . . .
4.00
21,126.49
1,532.00
20.60


1,265.00
3,920.21


$162,758.95


.... . . . . . . 27,676


27,001
709
155
38,595
2,592
176
23,999
31


S. . . . . .. .. .. . . . . . . .. . .
. . . . ... . . . . - -- - -- - -


29,972 Free Admissions to Art Museum-52 Free Days


15% discount for groups of 20 or more
** 50% discount allowed for convention groups


$ 56,352.00
256.70
699.00
27,001.00
602.65
77.50
38,595.00
2,203.20
88.00
11,999.50
13.17
7.25
23,185.31
4,478.00
3,600.10
1,740.00
4,581.91

$174,480.29


















SUMMARY STATEMENT OF OPERATIONS FOR THE PERIOD JULY 1, 1956 THROUGH JUNE 30, 1958


EXHIBIT II


NAn


or FUND


General Revenue Appropriations:


Salaries ..............
Expense..............
Capital Outlay........
Total General Revenue...


.. ....


Trust Funds:
Incidental ..... .........
Interest of Trust Funds...
Principal of Trust Funds*.


Total Trust Funds..............
Total Summary of Operations....


Fund
Balance
July 1, 1956


$..........
245,932.38
$ 245,932.38


$ 84,123.86
$ 330,056.24


Receipts
and Appro-
priations


$ 35,000.00
50,000.00


$ 85,000.00


3 193,518.45
$ 278,518.45


Total
Available


,000.00
,000.00
,932.38
.932.38


$ 277,642.31
$ 608,574.69


Total
Expenditures


$ 303,111.65


$ 201,159.88
$ 504.271.53


Reverted
General
Revenue


34.80


* .. .. .. .. .

$ 34.80


Fund
Balances
June 30, 1957


27,785


27,785


$ 76,482
5 104,268


Receipts
and Appro-
priations


$ 310,640.00


$ 174,480
31.465


$ 205,945.29
$ 516,585.29


Total
Available


$ 338,425.93


$ 282,427.72
$ 620,853.65


Expenditures


Fund
Balances
June 30, 1958


S 43,045.67 $ 112.33
55,681.60 .40
153,768.23 85,817.70

$ 252,495.50 $ 85,930.43


$ 170,457.09 $ 31,200.70
33,432.96 42,846.8536
4,490.62 . . . . . . .


$ 208,380.67
$ 460.876.17


$ 74,047.05
$ 159.977.48


Note: Total Investments in addition to


Cash Balance is $1,227,105.53.


* Under the terms of Mr. John Ringling's will, this fund must remain intact and only the interest


used.


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The




University of Florida-




A Report of


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Contents


The President's Report/2


People-The


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University's Greatest Resource/5


Preparation for Tomorrow/8


Research-Where Tomorrow Begins/20


New Worlds of Power and Space/24


Television Goes to College/26


Toward a Healthier Tomorrow/28


The University Serves You/31


Growth at the University/34


Life Beyond the Campus/36


Finances/38
















Biennial Report 1956-1958







The Report (the President for the Biennium Ending June 30, 1958


To the Board of Control and the Citizens of Florida:


A university is like a good citizen.
tIt engages in every activity de-
signed to upbuild the state. It
guides its students into useful ca-
reers. It solves problems. It finds
new or better ways to safeguard the
public's well-being. It seeks the
betterment of mankind while cher-
ishing the values created by the
past.
A university is a vast enterprise
in which excellence is of prime im-
portance and where freedom of in-
quiry is taken for granted. It must
be a training ground for many pro-
ferions. It must be a storehouse
of knowledge and skill on the col-
lege professional school, and gradu-
ate school levels. It must have
classrooms and laboratories, experi-
ment stations and museums. resi-
dence hall and dinine halls, a hospi-
tal and a library. athletic facilities,
and a model school. AI] of these
must contribute to the training of
the student.
A university serves best if it has
the necessary resources. A care-
fully selected faculty must be de-
voted to ideals of scholarly and pro-
fesional ecellence. The courses of
study must bring age-old wisdom to


bear upon the duties of the present
hour while seeking new truths. The
land, buildings, and equipment must
be adequate for the assigned duties.
The University of Florida has
moved forward significantly in the
past two years in fulfilling its re-
sponsibilities. Its strong curricular
offerings have received notable com-
mendation. Its faculty has moved
further into a position of distinction.
Its research achievements have
made it a growing center of dis-
tinguished accomplishment.
The following pages are sugges-
tive of the sound accomplishment
of the University of Florida in the
biennium of 1956-1958. The Col-
lege of Medicine and the College of
Nursing enrolled their first two
classes and thus began the central
operations of the J. Hillis Miller
Health Center. A nuclear science
and engineering program was broad-
ened in scope and developed in
depth so as to compare favorably
with other leading institutions in
this area of study. In agriculture
and engineering, discoveries and in-
ventions have continued to enrich
the economy of the state. In almost
every area of the University there


have been valuable contributions to
knowledge. In its undergraduate,
graduate, research, extension, and
publication programs the University
of Florida has steadily gained
strength. Floridians can be proud
of the University of Florida.
The people of the State of Florida
have encouraged the full develop-
ment of the University of Florida
as a combined state university and
land-grant college. Through their
representatives and senators in the
State Legislature they have said
that they want and are willing to
support an institution of higher
learning that will take its place
among the great universities of the
nation. The University of Florida
today is a monument to this stead-
fast objective.
That the University of Florida is
achieving the stature sought by the
people of Florida is attested to by
the 4,274 graduates during the bi-
ennium, 137 of whom were awarded
doctoral degrees. The quality of
the faculty has not only stimulated
and attracted an increasing propor-
tion of superior students, but foun-
dations and other agencies have
been attracted to the University in
solving technical and economic
problems.
The Ford Foundation, for ex-
ample, asked the University of
Florida to send a team of three pro-
fessors to Burma to help the new
University of Mandalay strengthen
its program in basic sciences. The


Ford Foundation would not have
sought this assistance from the Uni-
versity of Florida had not the Uni-
versity been noted for its strong
basic sciences program to train the
young people of the State of Florida.
The University of Florida has
been engaged for several years in a
program of technical assistance to
the agricultural economy of the
Republic of Costa Rica. Costa Rica
would not have sought this help
from the University of Florida had
not the University a well-developed
program of education and research
in tropical agriculture.
Recently the Fund for the Ad-
vancement of Education asked the
University of Florida to collaborate
with the Encyclopedia Britannica
Films to produce an entire high
school chemistry course on film for
use in the nation's schools. The re-
quest recognized the superior qual-
ity of instruction available in the
Department of Chemistry at the
University of Florida.
The program of General Educa-
tion continues to receive merited
praise. A committee of seven vis-
ited the campus and made an exten-
sive analysis of the courses. Their
report stated: "The University of
Florida is to be congratulated in
having established a strong program
in General Education, and for hav-
ing been able to sustain it at a high
level of efficiency . We believe
the program as a whole is sound."
Former students have pointed out


2 3








the significance of these basic
studies in their later duties as pro-
fessional men. On this foundation of
comprehensive courses their special-
ization has been firmly established
A concern of the past biennium
has been the improvement of our
student counselling program. Too
many students are unable to com-
plete their college education. Some
have financial difficulties. Some
take positions in business or engage
in Agriculture. Academic counsellors
provide guidance in every possible
way. It is gratifying to report that
a larger percentage of students than
formerly are finding it possible, as
a result of the help given them, to
remain in college and finish their
degree programs.
During the biennium further pro-
gress was achieved in utilizing the
residence halls as an effective means
for enhancing the learning process.
At the University of Florida the
residence halls are an important
part of a student's total program.
Not only do they provide a physical
environment favorable to individual
growth and study, but they also
form communities of students with
common goals of self-development.
A number of forums have met regu-
larly to discuss topics in art, music,
literature, and current affairs. Be-
sides exploring interests or issues
raised in the classroom, these forums
strengthen student-faculty relation-
ships and stimulate the idea that
learning is enjoyable for its own
sake.
While a great university cannot
long remain great without a strong
undergraduate program, the ulti-
mate test of greatness is its gradu-
ate program. The past biennium
has given further assurance that
the University of Florida is becom-
ing a prominent center for graduate
studies in the South. All entering
students are now taking the nation-
ally administered Graduate Record


Examination, and it is gratifying to
note the uniformly high standing
which they achieve. The faculty is
being strengthened by the appoint-
ment of Graduate Research Profes-
sors in strategic areas. These are
scholars who have achieved high
distinction in their professional
fields and are able to open new
horizons for faculty and students
alike.
With a strong College of Arts and
Sciences giving support to a wide
range of professional schools, here is
to be found a continuing opportun-
ity for expanding a program of
graduate studies. It is worthy of
note that the University of Florida
is the only institution of higher
learning from the coastal area of
Texas to New England where one
can find on a single campus a Col-
lege of Agriculture, a College of
Engineering, and a College of Medi-
cine. This has tremendous signifi-
cance in developing a sound and
well-rounded program of graduate
work in the biological and physical
sciences. It will go far in assuring
Florida's future scientific and edu-
cational development.
Finally note should be taken of
the fine cooperation which exists
among faculty and the administra-
tive staff as the University moves
forward in meeting its obligations
to the state. There is a feeling of
special significance as each member
of the faculty and staff relates his
work to the total program of the
University. There is a sense of
pride in what is being done, but it
is of such a nature as to renew one's
dedication to the greater tasks and
opportunities which lie ahead.


President



























A class in Far Eastern
Affairs illustrates high
level instruction.


People-

The University's
Greatest Resource


Faculty-More Than
"Bricks and Mortar"


It is generally and increasingly
recognized that the University of
Florida stands for academic excel-
lence-a reflection of the greatness,
the high quality, and the achieve-
ments of the faculty. Some of the
achievements can be documented,
and this documentation provides an
objective measure of the general in-
tangibles of academic accomplish-
ment and a barometer as to the
quality of the institution.
Intellectual activity in the form
of scholarly endeavors and research
frequently results in worthy publi-
cations. In the biennium the faculty
published 405 books and mono-
graphs and 1103 articles in journals.
These figures do not include non-
published papers and speeches.
Many measurements of the qual-
ity of these efforts exist. One is the
amount of non-state appropriated
funds which the research performed
by this outstanding faculty attracts.
From about $300,000 per annum



























Interested students are
key to learning.











Students-
Hope of the Future


ee^ ^ : ** .**"..


of contract research being performed '
in 1950, the amount rose to almost ^
$2,500,000 in 1957.
Another measurement is the
source of the funds, and the story
is one of which the State of Florida
may be proud. Major United States
governmental departments, major
private foundations, and many of
the largest United States corpora-
tions, as well as many smaller ones,
have deemed the quality of work
performed on th-'s campus to be
worthy of financial support.
Still another measure of excel-
lence is the quality and variety of
students, faculty, and distinguished
visitors which the efforts of those
on the scene can attract. The faculty
has responded to calls from through-
out the civilized world. Services
rendered in response to these calls
have ranged from papers delivered
at the Geneva Conference on the
atom, to the University team now
in Mandalay, Burma; from lectures
delivered in South America, to
studies in Portugal; from participa-
tion in a conference in London, to
being the recipient of honors be-
stowed by the Government of Brazil.
Through the years the student
body at the University of Florida
has grown larger. At the same time
the student body has been growing
in size it has improved its stand-
ards of scholarship and academic
attainment.
In September, 1956, the Univer-
sity of Florida established admis-
sion standards which would deny
admission to approximately the
lower 40 per cent of the high school
graduating classes. This was based
upon the recognition that 92 per
cent of those admitted to the Uni-
versity of Florida from this group
have, in the past, failed.
By the end of the biennium more
than half of the freshmen were in
the upper 20 per cent of their high
school graduating classes.
In 1950, the score on the general


























Loyal Alumni help build
a greater university.











Alumni--
The University's Right Arm


j1 y ^- '::'* '- "-


ability test for entering freshmen
was 99; in 1957, the score was 108.4
-significantly above the national
average.
Historically and traditionally
students at the University of Flor-
ida have accepted responsibility for
the direction and promotion of stu-
dent activities and student affairs.
Early in the history of the institu-
ion, the student body, in coopera-
tion with the faculty, entered upon
a program of student self-govern-
ment.
This concept of student life had
its origin in the adoption of the
honor code as the basis of taking
examinations, classroom assign-
ments, and the inculcation of per-
sonal honor and integrity. Around
the honor code a unique form of
student self-government has evolved
which over the years has radiated
into all phases of student life.
The University of Florida is proud
of its alumni who have distinguished
themselves in a multitude of areas
of service to mankind throughout
the world. A roll call of the leader-
ship of the state in government,
business, and the professions will
find the alumni of the University
in the forefront.
Products of the University's edu-
cational program, alumni are con-
tributing vital leadership to their
communities throughout the state
and nation-vital leadership that
finds in its ranks the publisher-editor
of one of the nation's most influen-
tial newspapers; seven members of
Florida's congressional delegation
including both senators; circuit and
federal judges in practically every
district of Florida; executives in na-
tional, industrial, and business firms
too numerous to recount, as well as
countless thousands of successful
business and professional leaders in
small and large communities.
These are the people who are con-
tributing to Florida's cultural, busi-
ness and professional life.









Preparation


FoiT


tomorrow


Humanitce-b~asis
the good life.


a.
f. *. !,''*
-- >'


University College
General education-the backbone
of any university's professional pro-
grams-provides Florida students a
common denominator of under-
standing and communication so
often lacking in this modem age of
specialization.
With 6,080 students enrolled in
the University College in Septem-
ber of 1957, the task of guiding
students has become the largest in


the history of the college.


As well


as preparing some of these students
for later advanced work, the college
also has the civic responsibility of
helping those who spend only one or
two years at the University. A
group of comprehensive courses pro-
vides basic instruction for both
areas.
In today's changing society there
is a positive need for un-to-date in-
striction in general subjects. The
college is continuously at work to
keen its program abreast of new de-
velonments. Working hand in
hand with the University's nrofes-
sional divisions. the University Col-
lege is meeting the challenge of so-
cial, economic, and political change

College of Agriculture
Changing concepts in Florida ag-
riculture are foremost in the pro-
gram of the College of Agriculture.
With much of the state's economy
focused on agricultural production,
the College works constantly to im-
prove methods and results.
Dan McCarty Hall, home of the
College of Agriculture since the fall
of 1956, combines teaching, re-
search, and extension work in one
modern facility.
Recent staff appointments have
strengthened the areas of agricul-
tural economics, agronomy, and
entomology. A program in cytol-
ogy is a joint undertaking of the
Biology Department and the Col-







lege of Agriculture.
Constantly expanding, the Col-
lege includes in areas of new de-
velopments for the future an in-
creased emphasis on "agribusiness."
The proposed program is designed
to extend the scope of the agricul-
turist into fields of marketing and
management. Agricultural econom-
ics, statistical genetics, nematology,
and tropical soil management units
should prove of tremendous aid to
modern-day "agribusinessmen."

College of Architecture and
Fine Arts


"Promoting Building
Research in Florida..."


Reflecting the extraordinary vol-
ume of building in Florida is a
marked expansion of the Univer-
sity's College of Architecture and
Fine Arts.
The College was completely re-
organized in 1956 into divisions of
Building Arts and of Fine Arts, in-
cluding curricula in architecture,
interior design, landscape architec-
ture, community planning, building
construction, art, music, and music
education.
A thorough review of the Col-
lege's curricula and teaching meth-
ods has led to carefully integrated
and cumulative sequences in the
several professional areas.
Active assistance was given by
the College to the formation of the


Florida
vancem
agency
moting
search
tion is


Foundation for the Ad-
ent of Building. a non-profit
of the building industry pro-
and supnortina building re-
in Florida. The Founda-
exoected to work closely


with the Collesze's Bureau of Archi-
tectural and Community Research
programs on the graduate level.
Contributions to the citizens of
Florida were most graphically shown
by the Department of Music's par-
ticipation in 1,377 public programs
before a total audience of almost
three million persons. Although
not so easily demonstrable by mas-

10








Chemistry dramatized
on film.


sive statistics, the programs in art,
architecture, and building made
similar contributions to citizens of
the state.
Representing five per cent of the
total University enrollment, the
College is constantly at work pre-
paring students for the professional
worlds of building arts and fine arts.

College of Arts and Sciences


Sound professional
training begins in the
Arts and Sciences.


Here the student
education in depth.
a broad foundation i
fessional life as a
preacher, teacher, or
he acquires that
knowledge which ir
served to free men'.
serving, enriching,
ting our heritage
wisdom.


and career
College of


it gets general
Here he builds
:or his later pro-
doctor, lawyer,
r scientist. Here
t fundamental
I every age has
s minds by pre-
and transmit-
of accumulated


The College of Arts and Sciences
at the University of Florida offers
elective work in 33 different areas.
Departmental majors are available
in 25 different fields. Qualified stu-
dents may earn the master's degree
in any one of 17 different depart-
ments of the College: 12 depart-
ments are authorized to award the
Doctor of Philosophy degree.
The faculty of the College is an


extremely
search
During 1
299 iour
Reviews
called al
bers fille
During
member
fessiona]
papers,


y
an
th


productive
d professio
e biennium,


one in its re-
nal activities.
62 books and


nal articles were published.
and other publications to-
nother 63, and staff mem-
!d 38 editorial positions.
g the biennium, also, staff
s attended numerous pro-
l meetings, presented 280
and filled 61 major offices.


College of Business
Administration
Modem business and industry in
a democratic economy demand


l




ej.


.
-? 'l
rf


*


N'


" 9a vv'


1rr


*I '?l


'"*f


M Anr
IalJ


ma


d -







"Providing Trained
Business Leadership ...

% , .


trained Ieadership. In a society
that places a premium on ingenuity
and aggressive competitive effort,
there is no substitute for quality
education in business training.
The College of Business Admin-
istration has for years occupied a
position of leadership in the busi-
ness and economic life of Florida.
During the biennium just completed
the College has granted bachelors
degrees to 645 students, masters
degrees to 17, and doctors degrees
to four-most of whom have been
absorbed by the South's fast grow-
ing business firms.
A revised curriculum in the areas
of marketing, sales, and account-
ing has enabled the College to keep
pace with a changing economic pat-
tern.
A staff of 75 faculty members
has maintained a high quality
teaching program.
Quality training, coupled with
service to business, is foremost in
the philosophy of the College of
Business Administration.


College of Education
The primary concern of the Col-
lege of Education is the education
of Florida's youth from the first
day of elementary school to com-
pletion of junior college.
Cooperation is given to other col-
leges of the University that share
in preparing future teachers.
The scope of the College is not
limited to the campus. During the
1956-58 biennium, 5,883 teachers
throughout the state enrolled in ex-
tension courses specifically design-
ed for educators.
Complacency with the status quo
has no place in the thinking of this
unit of the University. The last
biennium found the faculty engaged
in examination and improvement of
the instructional program offered
its students. Experimental pro-
grams for testing even more effec-






























Future teachers
learn by teaching.


tive ways of training professional
teachers also occupies the efforts of
a dynamic faculty.
Aims of the College can be stated
in a six point program. Efforts are
directed toward: selection and


preparation


state's


schoc


structional


of college teachers; preparation of
educational leaders; supplying field
services in the form of consultants,
program leaders, and personnel for
educational leaders; and research on
educational problems.


"Improving Florida's
Schools. ".


of teachers i
ols; preparation
materials; prec


for the
of in-
)aration


College of Engineering


At mid-twentieth c
atom and the Sputnik
lenged the imagination
haps more than any ot
logical advance in mo
This probing of the infi
the interminable has I


centuryy the
have chal-
of man per-
:her techno-
.dern times.
initesimal to
brought into









"The Atom and the
Sputnik Challenge
Man... "

























Linear accelerator converts
atomic particles into projectiles.


sharp focus the science components
of mid-century higher education.
The College of Engineering has
long been aware of its responsibility
to meet the challenge of a changing
technological world. In engineer-
ing, as in other sciences, the close
association of a vigorous research
effort with the teaching disciplines
greatly enhances the value of both
programs.
Testimonial to the value of this
educational approach to engineer-
ing is a growing student body in the
College of Engineering that has
tripled in the past five years. Al-
though this growth in size has mul-
tiplied an already heavy burden on
the faculty and staff, high stand-
ards have been maintained. Among
special accomplishments through
team effort have been the establish-
ment of the Nuclear Engineering
Department and its program lead-
ing to a graduate degree; the auth-
orization of the Department of En-
gineering Mechanics program lead-
ing to a Doctor of Philosophy de-
gree; and a general study of cur-
ricula with recommended changes
for strengthening the entire pro-
gram.
These were significant gains in
the biennium of change. Other
strides were noted in making engi-
neering education available to stu-
dents at Stetson University through
a cooperative exchange plan.


School of Forestry
With sixty per cent of Florida's
land in forests and with forestry
products providing an annual in-
come of $450,000,000 a year, the
need for professionally educated
forest specialists is evident.
Ideally located near both forest
areas and wood products industries,
the School of Forestry utilized lat-
est scientific methods in training
students for forest and game man-


.x: '*** '























Forestry students learn in
outdoor laboratories.


agement and wood products manu-
facturing.
Along with classroom space and
a complete wood products labora-
tory on campus, the School main-
tains a sawmill in Austin Cary Me-
morial Forest near Gainesville and
a Ranger School in Lake City.
Evidencing its increasing popu-
larity, the Ranger School-with fa-
cilities for 60 students-received
more than 100 admission applica-
tions in 1957 and more than 150 in
1958. Addition of new equipment
has greatly improved the ranger
program over the past two years.
Development and production of
more and better wood products,
scientific wildlife management and
protection of vast timber resources
-these are end results of a scientifi-
cally sound Florida forestry pro-
gram.
School of Inter-American Studies
Since its inception in 1951 the
School of Inter-American Studies
has shown gratifying progress.
Proving its world-wide scope are
applications for study from Europe,
Latin America and the Middle East.
For the past eight years Carib-
bean Conferences have been held
on the campus. The 1956 confer-
ence dealt with contemporary inter-
national relations of the Caribbean;
in 1957, British, Dutch, French, and
United States relations in the Carib-
bean.
A listing of persons throughout
the world with interests in the
Caribbean has increased to 6,000.
The school regularly disseminates
information about inter-American
activities of the University. Thus
continuous personal contact is main-
tained with leaders in business, gov-
ernment, and education-to foster
inter-American relations.
The University of Florida has
long recognized its opportunities
and responsibilities to cultivate
inter American understanding







"The Age of


Mass Communications...


Journalism students in the
practice newsroom.


z .
I'.d
ES


: y 1 *
.** "** : :
* ; *.


99


through education. Today the
School of Inter-American Studies
is a world leader in furthering these
aims with its neighbors to the
South.
School of Journalism and
Communications
The School of Journalism and
Communications at the University
of Florida, long recognized as the
fastest growing School of Journal-
ism in the United States, stepped
outside its journalistic sphere in the
last year and attracted national at-
tention.
The School joined with the Uni-
versity's Department of Chemistry
in acquiring a half million dollar
grant from the Ford Fund for the
Advancement of Education for the
filming of a full year's high school
course in introductory chemistry.
This project was started in the sec-
ond half of the 1956-58 biennium
and will be concluded before the
end of 1958.
The School's contribution to the
state, both educationally and pro-
fessionally, was recognized when
the State Board of Control decided
that journalism education in Flor-
ida's institutions of higher learning
shall be centered at the University
of Florida.
In the biennium just ended, the
School was accredited in its third
sequence-the Radio-Television pro-
gram. in addition to its news-edi-
torial and advertising sequences.
In connection with this latest
recognition for superior teaching
and service, the School established
and conducted the first closed cir-
cuit television teaching in Florida.
The School of Journalism and
Communications continued its sen-
sational growth in the last biennium
reaching a peak of 465 per cent in-
crease in individual student regis-
tration compared to the first full
year of the School's operation in
1949-50.







"Imparting A Thorough
Knowledge of Law..."


Law students in the
practice courtroom.


College of Law
Preparation of students for the
practice of law in any state of the
Union is the task undertaken by
the College of Law, although
emphasis is placed on Florida law.
A new requirement for admis-
sion to the College is a minimum
score of 340 on the nation-wide Law
School Admission Test. The policy
is consistent with the setting of
higher standards throughout the
University.
Establishment of a chapter of
the Order of the Coif in the College
in 1955 was a milestone in the
school's academic progress. Of more
than 130 law schools throughout
the nation, only 46 have chapters of
this legal scholarship society.
Enrollment in the College in-
creased 13.7 per cent during the
biennium and apparently will con-
tinue to increase at an accelerated
rate during the next few years.
Graduates of the College have con-
sistently achieved the highest per-
centage of successful completions of
the Florida Bar examination of any
law school in the state.
The College continues to aim at
imparting a thorough, scientific
and practical knowledge of law. It
places emphasis on practice as well
as theory, pleading as well as his-
torical perspective, and skill in
drafting as well as giving legal in-
formation.
College of Physical Education
and Health
The programs of physical fitness
offered by the College of Physical
Education and Health continue to
maintain the responsibility for keep-
ing young Americans physically,
mentally, and emotionally sound.
In terms of national security this is
of utmost importance.
Flexibility of instruction by the
College is demonstrated through
service and instruction to the col-








leges of Business Administration,
" Education, and Nursing, and the
Division of Intercollegiate Athletics.
The College was designed in 1946
to perform three varied yet related
functions: (1) teacher and other
professional training, extension, and
research; (2) programs of physical
fitness, sports, and recreation for
men and women; and (3) preven-
tion and clinical medicine programs
for the protection of the health of
students and non-academic em-
ployees.
Consistent with the University's
over-all program of research and de-
velopment, the College is constant-
ly seeking better methods in the
preparation of leaders of tomorrow
for the all-important task of im-
proving the health of Florida's
youth.
Graduate School
The period 1956-58 has been one
of gradually increasing standards
for the Graduate School. Begin-
ning in 1956 the use of the Gradu-
ate Record Examinations has prov-
ed to be a useful factor in strength-
ening objective selection of students
of improved capacity for graduate
study.
A problem facing all of higher
education, but of particular impact
on graduate schools, is the need to
train large numbers of new teach-
ers for college instruction. Forces
are now being generated that will
lead to an ultimate solution of this
problem.
The first appointments of Gradu-
ate Research Professors were made
in 1957. Dr. K. W. Cooper was
appointed Graduate Research Pro-


fessor of Biology, and Dr. C. W.
Morris was appointed Graduate Re-
search Professor of 'Philosophy. It
is believed that appointments to
this group of distinguished research
leaders should be increased gradu-
ally as individuals of superior tal-
ents may become available. Ulti-
mately each area in which the Doc-
tor of Philosophy degree is awarded
should be covered.


Military Program
As a land-grant college the Uni-
versity of Florida has always had
military training as a regular part
of its curriculum. Since 1921, when
the first graduates who completed
their training received commissions,
over 2690 alumni of this University
have been commissioned in the Uni-
ted States Army and the United
States Air Force as regular, or as
reserve, officers.
University of Florida graduates
have served with honor in both
world wars and in Korea. In World
War II, 412 were killed in action;
in Korea there were 15 killed in
action.
It is expected that enrollment in
the Army R.O.T.C. program and
the Air Force R.O.T.C. program at
this University will continue to in-
crease consistent with the expand-
ing enrollment of the University.
The Military Department will con-
tinue to provide instruction in sub-
ject matter which properly should
be included in the education of
every United States citizen of col-
lege level; and to provide leadership
training, character guidance, and
training in accepting responsibility.


Degrees Awarded, University of Florida, 1956-58 Biennium


1956-57
1957-58


Bachelors
1574
1816


Doctors
381
366


Masters
68
69


~I I ~







Research-Where


tomorrow


Begins


R research seeks through an inter-
play of facts and principles to
create something new and better.
At the University of Florida the
variety and importance of the re-
search projects can merely be sug-
gested in a summary report like
this one.
The important contribution of
agricultural research to the econ-
omy of the State of Florida is well
known and has been further en-
hanced during the biennium. New
varieties of blight-resistant celery,
tomatoes, and tobacco have been
made available to growers.
A mode of shielding yellow lupines
from aphids has been devised. Suc-
cessful methods of profitable utiliza-
tion of low-grade beef calves have


been developed.


Tree improvement


and the kiln-drying of railroad cross
ties have been valuable projects in
forestry.
Equally far-reaching in signifi-
cance are the research projects into
economic, political, and social forces.
Studies in population trends and in
the problems of elder citizens are of


particular value to


Florida.


gional studies of the changing pat-
terns of population and economic


development in


the newly indus-


"'

'* ."* *
'*^- ^.
Listening to '
outer-space.


"Design and Location
Of Industry... "


trialized areas are making possible
better community planning.
Architectural and engineering
studies are providing the basic data
necessary for the design and loca-
tion of desirable industries. The
impact of these changes is being







analyzed to help
interests of the
range programs.


the
State


agricultural
plan long-


i Scanning
the planets.


"In Chemistry
Further Advances... "


Steady advances have been made
in establishing professional pro-
grams for the various forms of serv-
ice provided by the state govern-
ment. During the biennium several
books of highest importance were
published in the area of interna-
tional relations.
Also notable has been the Uni-
versity's leadership in providing
better modes of teaching basic sub-
jects. A new analysis of grammar
is making possible better instruc-
tion in English and in foreign lan-
guages. New procedures in mathe-
matics have been developed in a
series of graded textbooks. In
chemistry the University is creating
filmed high-school courses.

In the natural sciences the Uni-
versity has been increasingly desig-
nated by the federal government
and by private agencies to carry on
research projects. The work in
marine biology looks toward the re-
establishment of commercially prof-
itable species; other activities are
of fundamental significance in dis-
covering the processes in natural
history.
The Florida State Museum, by
linking social and natural scientists
in unified projects, has made exca-
vations of sites of ancient Florida
civilization and has discovered
hitherto unknown specimens of pre-
Columbian culture. In chemistry
further advances were made in many
fields, particularly in terpenes, poly-
mers, water, organic fluorine corn-

22


i '*' "'*Ev: ::* ; *







E:
: */ *",


"High Energy
Fuels ... "


The School of
opened its doors in
has embarked on
gram of research
ment.


Medicine, which
September, 1956,
an extensive pro-
in every depart-


The research projects in engi-
neering have included the discovery
of new metals in Florida sands and
of by-products of phosphate pro-
duction, the development of pre-
stressed concrete, the construction
of a sewage treatment system, and
the prevention of coastal beach
erosion. A substantial nuclear re-
search program is under way with
the cooperation of the Atomic En-
ergy Commission and other agencies
of the federal government.


It is not possible to
direct and indirect b<
the people of Florida
these research active
faculty. In more ways
only realized, the
touches every citizen


estimate the
mnefits which
derive from
ties of the
i than is corn-
University
beneficially.


New Cobalt Source extends
agricultural research.


The continuing expansion of re-
search activities at the University
of Florida must accompany the
state's growth if its full potential is
to be realized. A more complete
story of the research contributions
of the University in the areas of
agriculture, engineering, and the
sciences can be obtained on request.


A '2


; : 1 : : ""ii


pounds, high-energy fuels for rocket
engines, and the new '"wonder"
metals.
In physics there have been sig-
nificant results in the study of
atmospheric optics, gaseous el-r-
tronics, the conduction properties
of metals, and the source of radio
energy from outer space.





New


Worlds of Power


/c:,
". */'
./,
':, .
**, *


Space


active


tracer materials in agricul-


tural research


were expanded


plant and animal nutrition prob-
lems.


The 800


curie Cobalt60 irradiator


in the College of Engineering also
permitted various scientific depart-
ments of the University to conduct
nuclear programs in cancer research,


Trhe development of expanded pro-
Sgrams in nuclear energy and
high energy fuels and construction
of nei. research and educational
facihties occupied the attention of
riery major scientific division of the
Lnnversity during the biennium.
Construction began on the elec-
tron model of the fixed-frequency
sp;rai ndge cyclotron in the Depart-
ment of Physics. Since it is the
hrst of its type to be designed, it is
expected that some of the most sig-
mlcent contributions to the world
of nuclear physics will ultimately
result from the operation of this


chemistry, biology,


engmeerng,


medicine.
Construction also began on the
College of Engineering's new 10 KW


training reactor.
ready recognized
model of design,


training


of real


The reactor, al-
by engineers as a
will permit the
ctor technicians,


-V.





















I" 1 : <:
rd~*


in radioactive


tracer


techniques


equipment


at the University


were initiated in most science de-


Flonds, if funds for its construction


apartments.


The biennium saw the


The addition of


a q quid helium production instal-
larion permitted the expansion of a
program in low temperature physics.


Department of Chemistry inaugu-
rate three nuclear chemistry courses
for the graduate program of that
department and begin a series of


hbaltw irradiator by the Agricultural
;Experiment Station permitted agri-
cultural researchers to expand re-
search programs in food preserva-
tion, and initiate additional pro-
as in the field of genetics. Five re-
search programs were organized and
ready for implementation prior to


research


projects


of considerable


significance.
A nuclear studies program in the
College of Medicine has been inten-
sified to such a degree that at least
one radioactive compound or iso-
topic study is under way in every
department with at least one AEC
licensed investigator in each depart-
ment.


teaching engineering students nu-
clear engineering problems and
techniques, and will be utilized by
a number of other university de-
partments for research and train-
ing projects.
Increased instructional programs


can he obtained.


Completion of


its completion. The University's
pioneer efforts in the use of radio-


a 5000 curie Co-







College


The first state-supported educa-
tional television activity expanding


from a student training function
and closed-circuit teaching neared
completion in 1958 at the Univer-
sity of Florida.
Acquisition of studio equipment
in this biennium made it possible for
the student training program to
come of age and begin feeding grad-
uates into the state's commercial


broadcasting field.


Inauguration in the School of
Journalism and Communications of
the state's first closed-circuit tele-
vision teaching set the groundwork
for experimental teaching, develop-
ment of telecourses, as well as pro-
viding experience for TV teachers.
Five years of planning and con-
struction neared completion during
the biennium. As a result, Univer-
sity of Florida Television, WUFT,
will bring cultural enrichment pro-
grams and college credit courses to
the people of the state. The Uni-


versity of Florida long ago recog-
nized its obligation to explore all
resources, methods, techniques, and
media for meeting the ever-increas-
ing needs of Florida for better edu-
cational facilities.
It also recognized that television


w concepts in
Irng through
uch ri.,nal television.


is a great lorce in communication
which could be used in education as
a powerful media for enriching the
present educational program and
for reaching thousands of adults
and children not now reached by
educational facilities.
The next big step in using this
new media in education will be to
complete the state microwave net-
work which will link the state insti-
tutions of higher learning, junior
colleges, and the ETV stations for
direct teaching and exchange of cul-
tural programs. Already the first
links are being installed.






>TlowardA

Healthier

Tomorrow


There is little that is "traditional"
in the instructional programs of
the J. Hills Miller Health Center.
The various units of the Center are
creating their own traditions as
they rapidly progress in their re-
spective programs toward meeting
the health needs of Florida.
The Health Center, which in-
cludes the colleges of Medicine,
Nursing, Health Related Services,
Pharmacy, Cancer Research Lab-
oratory, and the Teaching Hospi-
tal and Clinics, is rapidly develop-
ing a program which integrates not
only the various teaching responsi-
bilities of the instructional units,
but the entire approach to medical
and health education with the lib-
eral arts and biological sciences pro-


grams of the University.
The College of Medicine
its doors to the first class of
dents in September, 1956.
the primary objective of 1


opened
47 stu-
With
braining


family doctors to practice in the
smaller cities of Florida, the College
is emphasizing the broad approach
to the practice of medicine through-
out its educational program. Two


"Humanistic Approach
To Patient Care ... "


members of the
faculty teach in
tion courses of
lege. By the
members of the
sit as members


College of Medicine
the general educa-
the University Col-
same token, three
University faculty
of the Medical Se-


election Committee.
Students selected by the College
have ranked well into the upper
half nationally on the Medical Col-
lege Admissions Test. They have
also demonstrated an interest in the
humanities and are allowed to en-
roll for course work in other areas
of the University during their four
years of medical instruction.
The College of Nursing empha-
sizes the humanistic approach to
patient care and the carefully de-
veloped curriculum insures nursing
students not only of a full program
of professional nursing education,
but adequate time for other in-
terests.


I





"Health Related
Activities... "























Dedicated to the health
of Florida citizens.


The nursing educational program
requires that nursing students fol-
low a similar program to that of
students enrolled in other colleges
of the University. This permits
students of nursing to combine gen-
eral and professional nursing courses
during the four-year program of
study and participate in the extra-
curricular and cultural programs of
the University.
The College of Health Related
Services was activated by the Board
of Control in January, 1958. The
College will train physical and oc-
cunational therapists, medical tech-
nologists, for the bachelor's degree,
and offer a master's degree program
in rehabilitational counselling.
The Dean of the College of
Health Related Services has been
actively engaged in recruiting a
staff to assist in the development
of curricula for presentation to the
University Curriculum Committee
and to begin teaching students in
the junior vear of specilization in
September. 1959. Plans in the acti-
vation of the College called for
transferring the present graduate





"High Level Cancer
Research... "


program in rehabilitation col
ling in the College of Educati
the newly established college v
the Health Center environme
July, 1959, and physical th
from the College of Physical
cation.
The College of Pharmacy
completed thirty-five years of
ice to Florida in the trainih


unsel-
:on to
within
int in
erapy
Edu-

r has
serv-
ng of


pharmacists for many high positions
in professional and community life.
During the last two years, the new
curriculum which requires two years
of prepharmacy and three years of
professional courses has been given
considerable study by the faculty
and a special committee of the Flor-
ida State Pharmaceutical Associa-
tion.
The College is planning an inte-
grated program with other units of



Radioisotopes-a modern
approach to an old problem.


SS' ,:' .! *' *"
^ ^ ^ *:


During the past bie
Cancer Research Lab
. ..- e ._..-. 1_ 1 _-


continue a nign level program ot
research and graduate training. Due
to the work of the Laboratory's
staff, substantial progress has been
made in understanding carcinogen-
esis and in developing diagnostic
tests.
Construction of the Teaching
Hospital and Clinics progressed in
a rapid manner. The Hospital
planned to open in the fall of 1958
as originally scheduled in order that
medical students might begin their
clinical instruction in this facility
and nursing students might utilize
the many nursing education facili-
ties for professional nursing courses
and patient care instruction.
The building has attracted many
distinguished visitors from the fields
of medical education and architec-
ture. With nearly one-third of the
total floor space devoted to the
teaching function, the Teaching
Hospital and Clinic provide a facility
which will allow medical and nurs-
ing students, as well as pharmacy
students and the students from the
College of Health Related Service.
to pursue their professional instruc-


mnnium,
oratory


tion in an
that which
their later
acute beds,
tion, and off


environment similar to
they will experience in
professional career-
simulated home situa-
ice practice.


r


the Health Center which should go
into effect in 1960 upon completion
of the pharmacy-research wing at
the Health Center site. The Amer-
ican Council on Pharmaceutical
Education reports that this situ-
ation . creates an opportunity
for this College to become one of
the foremost leaders in pharmaceu-
tical education in the United States,
since they will have an opportunity
to integrate the training of the
pharmacist with that of the phy-
sician and the nurse in a high level
program offering many unusual in-
novations."




























Better communication
through improved reading.


The


Univer

Serves


A great university serves far be-
A yond its physical boundaries and


through the years
or another, touch
of the citizens of i
Such an institu
versity of Florida.
ice divisions such
Extension Division
Extension Service,


You


may, m one way
the lives of most
ts state.
tion is the Uni-
Its special serv-
as the General
, the Agricultural
the Florida Cen-


ter of Clinical Services, the Univer-
sity of Florida Press. the Florida
State Museum, the Universary Li-
braries, and Radio Stations WRUF
and WRUF-FM reach into far
corners of Florida to help a farmer
with a soil problem, a high school
graduate earn college credits at


home, or a family enjoy classical
music.
Rapid industrialization has
brought a multitude of problems to
Florida. To help solve these prob-
lems, the General Extension Divi-
sion has conducted numerous con-
ferences and public forums with the
assistance of state agencies, chanm-





45




-^ : '


"Orienting Teen-Agers
To Citizenship..."


^.^"s^' : ^. ii^ *\
/: *


bers of commerce, large corpora-
tions, and interested associations.
The Division's teen clinics and
youth workshops have aided nearly
35,000 young people in solving their
personal problems and accepting the
obligations as well as the privileges
of citizenship in our state.
In the area of farm life, the Agri-
cultural Extension Service con-
tinues to benefit Floridians, and
farm youth activities through 4-H
Club work are now reaching nearly
40,000 farm boys and girls.
The Service is helping the public
determine grades and quality of
beef. It hopes, through a beef cattle
production test, to bring about bet-
ter management practices. Its dairy
herd improvement work, its egg lay-
ing tests, and its farm forestry ac-
tivities promise new horizons in
these areas. Demonstration forests
are now located in approximately
18 counties.
Both marketing and farm man-
agement work have been expanded.
One specialist now devotes full time
to poultry and dairy marketing
work, and another is devoting ma-
jor attention to cooperatives. Two
farm management specialists give
attention to farm and home de-
velopment and rural development,
outlook, and farm records.
Education activities in field crops,
vegetable production, and citrus
have been increased through grower
participation and interest in the
institutes, demonstrations and field
meetings. Efforts are designed to
increase efficiency in management.
plant nutrition, pest control, and
marketing.
Both students and off-campus
citizens of Florida are served
through the Florida Center of Clini-
cal Services. Here persons with
psychological problems, speech and
hearing difficulties, reading short-
comings, or who need advice in the
area of family relations, receive
sympathetic guidance.


i : :`


Es~:i~"


'" "."
::
>4':
/.*1"


4*'* h^



*A*




























Exploring the past
through archeology.


788,731. This
increase of 138
In activities
ies of Florida
Library comply
sentatives into


for establishing
sources of printed
University and in
first microfilming


"Reaching Out Helping
Hands..."


figure represents an
per cent in 10 years.
beyond the boundar-


the nation, the
I sending repre-
, Caribbean area
reliable trade
materials for the
Haiti began its
of Caribbean


newspapers and other resources.
Along the air waves of Florida,
service signifies the work of the
University's radio stations WRUF
and WRUF-FM. These stations
are known for their training of stu-
dents, their farm and home hour-
one of the oldest in the nation, and
their dedication to civic interests.
In all these ways, and many more.
the specialized service divisions of
the University reach out helping
hands to the citizens of Florida.


Foremost among other service
units of the University is the Uni-
versity of Florida Press, which re-
cently released its one hundred and
tenth title as it entered its second
decade of book publishing. During
the biennium the Press has increas-
ed its sales by 27 per cent and was
cited in 1957 for production of one
of the best-designed southern books.
During the biennium, Florida
State Museum displays reached
more Floridians than in any period
in the Museum's history. The re-
sources of the Museum have been
effectively utilized to benefit various
sections of the state through special
historical displays. Five state parks
now house attractive and informa-
tive exhibits, centering around lo-
cally significant chapters of Florida
history, that were designed and con-
structed by the Museum.
The University of Florida also
serves the citizens of the state
through the University libraries.
The University of Florida now
stands sixth in volume holdings
among southern institutions, the
book count for June, 1958, being




aKu









COMPARISON OF ENROLLMENT BY COLLEGE

SEPTEMBER 1937- SEPTEMBER 1957

12i00oo
NI






SEPTEMBER 1937 I
SEPTEMBER 1957





0
0
0
6000




4000 -



ooo
Or


10
N1

20000
O
reU,
1000 -- --




500




400



O re
n1 I






300 m
!0 r
ro
I II In














34.
N N

200 - _- - r-
nI


In I V) il

CD I nlIl





-9 'I, &~,bdI~ b

Li~~ ~ 3'1. 1

0 S "t A







34












University


"Selective Admission...


Wnil~oe in the twenty-year period
from 1937-38 to 1957-58 the
growth of the University student
body has been great, it must be re-
membered that in this same period
there have been increasing demands
for more and better trained college
graduates.
Much attention has been focused
on technological advances in this
period, but the demand for greatly
increased proficiency is present in
every field. This affects the Uni-
versity in many ways. Curricula
must be revised to meet these new
needs and greatly increased effort
on the part of faculty and students
is essential if the graduate is to take
his proper place in a highly com-
petitive world. The quality of the
faculty and the facilities with which
they work are the most important
factors in meeting these increased
demands, but one that is not with-
out significance is the quality of the
student body.
Beginning in 1950, the Univer-
sity's admissions policy included a
procedure whereby students who
had demonstrated by their high
school records and the results they
had achieved on the Florida Twelfth
Grade Testing Program (which had
been in operation since 1936) that
they were inadequately prepared
were counselled against enrolling in
college.
In 1956, the University adopted
a minimum standard of high school
and test achievement which, in ef-
fect, provided for the admission
only of the top sixty per cent of the
high school graduates. At the same
time, careful selection of transfer
students and graduate students
based on achievement tests and pre-
vious college records enlarged the
selective admissions procedure.


: .; A
* ^- *"'M
' /**






LIFE


room


"Extra-Curriculars
with a purpose..."


















College friendships
are lifelong.


3The University of Florida has
many responsibilities to its stu-
dents-not the least of which is to
prepare them to live happily with
themselves.
It is with this responsibility in
mind that the University opens the
door through which they are en-
couraged to explore, avocationally,
the realm of the arts, of ideas, or
adventure.
Through the students' own Ly-
ceum Council, through the Lecture
Series, through the Division of Fine
Arts, and through the Department
of Drama, there are more than one
hundred and sixty staged perform-
ances and exhibits offered during
the academic year, all on campus
and all admission-free to students.
Guest artists from all over the world
perform in concert; great paintings
and other works of art are exhib-
ited; authorities of international
fame in science, government, and
the humanities appear in lecture.
Faculty musicians and artists pre-
sent a series of concerts and exhib-
its, and faculty members from other
fields of endeavor (many of them
distinguished, in their own right, in
the sciences or the world of letters)
speak and conduct panel discus-
sions for the general student body.
And the students themselves appear
as performing artists, musicians, and
thespians in public events through-
out the year.
There are many organized groups
and societies, fraternities, and so-
rorities on campus which offer un-
limited opportunities for service,
social experiences, and scholastic
attainment.
Fraternities and sororities make
a major contribution to student life.
For those who decide to become af-
filiated with the 26 fraternities and
12 sororities, friendships are formed
which enrich their University ca-
reers and follow them into their
later years. The chapters on this
campus represent some of the most


i--." j




z:
*x xx.M'x'xy^xx / .y
4 < ; 4 -- .

Patticipation
^ ^Oi:a
y ^^^^"


--^

prominent and oldest national or-
ganizations on the collegiate scene.
Approximately 25 to 30 percent
of the student body belong to these
fraternal groups which give organ-
ized participation in the general
campus affairs.
Religious Activities On Campus
Work, play, love, and worship
combined in proper proportion con-


Religious centers promote
spiritual values.


stitute
This
believes
the re
churches
Sever


"the good life."
the University of
Sin and gratefully
ligious provision
es for its students.
n student religious


Florida
accepts
of the

centers


thrive in buildings adjacent to the
campus: five protestant-Baptist,
Episcopal, Lutheran, Methodist,
and Presbyterian; one Roman Cath-
olic; and one Jewish. Other groups
are served by local churches and
societies meeting in various places
in Gainesville.
Although not officially a part of
the University of Florida, these stu-
dent religious centers and the local
churches contribute immeasurably
to a richer and fuller life for the
students.
Athletics And The University
Of Florida
A well-rounded program in sports
-a program that complements the
aims and purposes of other areas of


the University
demically and
tive of the Di
iate Athletics.
this program 4
of fielding gooi
recognized bJ
Conference anm


of Florida life, aca-
socially-is the obiec-
vision of Intercolleg-
Special emphasis in
continues to be that
d teams in each sport
y the Southeastern
i serving Florida high


schools through promotion of clin-
ics and tournaments.
Fighting Gator sports teams have
responded to this challenge by
achieving the best over-all record in
all sports of any Southeastern Con-
ference member each of the past two
years.









WHERE
THE
OPERATING
MONEY
CAME
FROM


TOTAL UNIVERSITY DOLLAR


STATE APPROPRIATION.


1957-58


"*:
*t *


4*** **


t' _;*


4s ;" *<* "*.. .


SALES AND SERVICES



STUDENT FEES......


FEDERAL APPROPRIATIONS


GIFTS AND GRANTS FROM PRIVATE


AGRICULTURAL


... 12.2% ...



. ....... 6.2% ......


.. . 3.9%/...

SOURCES.... 2.5%.. .....


SALES. ............. ......


.. o.t
. 0.


+MISCELLANEOUS ............

ENDOWMENT ............ .

TOTAL OPERATING INCOME..


3,415,789


..$ 1,720,999


* .$ 1,097,89e

.. $ 698,7&8


. . . $ 456,98e

. . .... .$ 34,64


. ..........$


...4. . ...


RESIDENT INSTRUCTION............


57-58


ORGANIZED




EXTENSION.


S..37.5% ..


33.7%


RESEARCH........... ..




. .e . .. . .. .. . .. .. .. Ie


OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE OF
PHYSICAL PLANT...........


.. 9.3%


*, .


ADMINISTRATION AND GENERAL............. 5.4% ...


LIBRARIES AND MUSEUM

ORGANIZED ACTIVITIES.

NON-EDUCATIONAL....


1,86( .


.......... $28,026,98


TOTAL ALL-UNIVERSITY EXPENDITU


2^t^
*. 4...-...--- .
. . *- *-S-- *i
...* * * * * * *
. .. . .4^M* *

IRES FOR
+ I


$ 8,881,622


S 7,984,767




$ 2,198,407


$ 1,733,945


,$ 1,294,605


........ $ 799,553

........ .$ 653,185

.... .. $ 143,309

.. ... . $23,689,383


iore O und for program to be implemented during 1958-59


ruha ind lor, pjro|cts coryIng over into suonequent
r*poried li dllbgrflemnt.
NOTE. The obe income and disbursements do not
Oct vi..s ol 1h U nrgrlnly.


fiscl years, thuly not

include self-upporting


The University of Florida dollar is widely disbursed both functionally
and geographically. A portion goes to support the work of County
Agents and Home Demonstration Agents in 66 counties. A portion
goes to operate the 18 branch experiment stations and field abora-
tories. The short courses and conferences of the General Extension
Division are offered the length and breadth of Florida.


TOTAL UNIVERSITY DOLLAR


I InCludel


!


B^ T ''^ '*: --''v- *
^ S<. *'*


*, ..-* *:, .-. '


























Exx-\

xV..





































































































































*<*




































































ii
*i
xp"< -/x

xx3

xx/
























































































xx






A,*
:i:: 2 ,





THE FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY


PRESIDENT'S


REPORT


Years


1956-58


I ."1







r" *
* ..


,. ..
ft~ ~~ *# I,


STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION


*....................................................................... ... .... .................. Governor


R A. GRAY


................................................................................. ......aSecret Lary'


RICHARD W. ERVIN


TKOMAS D. BAnEy


, JR .................................... ........ ................... .......................... Attorney


--- --- ---- - ------------ .... --- ............................... -- tate
r. Secretary ..-......-...........State Superintendent of Public


r


of State
General
reasurer


Instruction


BOARD OF CONTROL


JAMES J. LOVE,
J. J. DANIEL, Vi
S. KENDRIGK Gu
RALPH L. MILLE


JAMES


WILLIAM


Chairm an ...................................... ....- ..-...... ..-........................ Q uincy
ce Chairm an ...'......................................................................... Jacksonville
*ERNSEY .................................................................................Jacksonville
R .......................................................................................................Orlando


D CAMP, SR... ..................................................................... ................. auderdale


C. GAITHER ............................................... .................................................M iami


JOE K.


HAYS .............................................................................. Winter


J. BROWARD CULPEPPER,


Executive


Haven


Director..................................................Tallahassee


ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS

The Florida State University


ROBERT MANNING


STROZIER,


PhD .D........................................................


.......President


ALBERT I
CHARLES
WERNER


OOYNTON
SHEPAR]


MARTIN, Ed.D ................................. ....... ............................ Vice


D


DAVIS, Ph.D. .................................................... Dean


A. BAUM, Ph .D. ................................................Dean


President


the Faculties


the Graduate


RODERICK


R. R.


KIRKPATRICK


SHAW,


B.S .................. ......... Treasurer


and Business


OGLESBY, Ph .D ...... ..................................................................... Dean


Manager
Students


J. PAUL
MODE L.


HORTENSE M.


REYNOLDS, Ph.D .................. ........... .... Dean


the College


STONE, Ph .D ............. ................................ .... Dean


GLENN, Ph.D. ................................Dean


School


of Arts
School


of Home


and Sciences


Education
Economics


KARL OTTO


Louis
COYLE


WILSON


KUERSTEINER, Ph. ......... .......c............................. Dean


SHORES, Ph.D .................................................. ..Dean


E. MOORE


KEYSER


, Ph.D. .........................................Dean
DOYLE, Ph.D. ................Dean of the


School


School


School


the Library


of Social


of Music


School


Welfare


LAURENCE RANDOLPH CAMPBELL, Ph.D. ........................Dean of the


School


of Journalism


CHARLES


A. ROVETTA,


M .B.A .. ................ ........................ .D ean


of the School of Business


VIVIAN M. DUXBURY,


MA ... .............................................. Dean


School


of Nursing


N. ORWIN RUSH,


M .S ......... ............-............................................... .....Director


of Libraries


ANNA MAEz


SIKES,


M.S ...-........................................... State


Home Demonstration Agent


LEROY COu.INS


School


of Public Administration


6^-/ y " '-S '
i** *


J


3


, ~ _ - ,




I....

. "






PRESDmENT's REPORT


*. a .a.
* .. **
. : -'


TABLE OF CONTENTS


"5 'The


College of Arts and


School of


Science s *- --- b---- -- - <-


Education .. ...-....- ---.. ......... .-...... .. .. .. .. ..... -


The School of Home


The School of Music


The School of Social


The School of Busine


Econoiics..... ... ....-.. -.....---------,..----,---.. .....--.......-.. --.--.. ....


Welfare ................................................................................


ss .-.-... ... ........ ..--... . .. ...... .......


The Library School


The School of Public


The School of


Administration ........................ ..............................


Journalism .......... .................. ............................................-.....


The School of Nursing


The Department of Radio Television .............................................


The University Broadcasting Service ............................--............


The Child Development Institute .............-...........------.....--------.................---


The Graduate


School ........................................----


The University Library


Home Demonstration


Work ............------------------ .....-------------


The Division of Student W welfare ..............................---------------------------------.....--------


Finance and Business Management............................----..-. -.----........ .-


Statements of


1'956-1957 ......... .......-.........---.---- .-.-.-......... t...--.---....


Statements of 1957-1958........----------.......------------.-------


%7" ,,***' '** **"
+ c" "ll


^'~ ~~ ,,%^ c:]y












PRESIDENT

For the Years


'S REPORT

1956-58


of Control,


Institutions of Higher Learning,


State of


Florida


GENTLEMEN:


The attached report for the two


stewardship of Dr. Doak


years 1956-1'958 represents the final year of the


Sheridan Campbell and my first year as president of The


Florida


State University.


I take pride in


presenting the account of the final


distinguished predecessor.


My first year as president has been one of great personal s
university innovating, stimulating and exciting. We have in the


which have already attained maturity and distinction.


satisfaction.


I find


University many areas


We have in germ others which


are already far along the road toward distinction and still others which need
couragement and support.


We have taken as our goal that of making of Florida
I believe sincerely that it can be accomplished.


State a


great university, and


The wisdom and vision of the leadership of the Governor, the
the Board of Control and the Legislature have brought to Florida's


learning the envy and attention of the entire United States.


Board


of Education,


institutions of higher


The growth


in population


already accomplished and that forecast for the future of this great state demands that


financial support be given


We are building not
history of this state.


for a


to this and other institutions consonant with their needs.


day, not for a year, but for the next hundred years


The students whom


we prepare for their roles as citizens


in the
will in


large measure answer what the future will be.

I hope that you will read carefully the report of the dedicated men and women


who have assisted me


in telling you briefly what


we are doing.


Respectfully
Robert


submitted,

M. Strozier


President


To the Honorable Board








2 PRESIDENT'S REPORT


THE COLLEGE OF


ARTS AND SCIENCES


To the President of The Florida


During


the 1956-58


State


biennium,


University
the College


of Arts and Sciences


has added


strength to its faculty, has made outstanding contributions in creative and research
activities, has initiated a program in engineering science, and has placed considerable


emphasis on developing a balanced program among the Humanities, the Social


Sciences,


and the Natural


Sciences.


There has been increased enrollment, particularly at the upper


division and the graduate levels, in the liberal arts.


This agrees with a national trend


of emphasizing


the liberal


in both general


and professional


college programs.


General Education
One of the major responsibilities of the College of Arts and Sciences has been its


function in offering for the entire University


a program min gen


eral education.


At the


beginning of the biennium a revised curriculum was instituted.


The revision involved


more strictly prescribed requirements in the various areas and a slight reduction in the


total requirement in general education.


The most radical departure from the previous


program was made in the area of the physical sciences. Instead of attempting to integrate


sciences in a single course, separate departmental courses have been


developed.


A significant effect of this change has been an increased enthusiasm on the part of the
faculty participating in the program.

The Humanities
The Division of Humanities (comprising Art, Classics, English, Modern Languages,
and Philosophy) has counted considerable increase in the number of students majoring in
its departments, has strengthened its graduate program, and has enhanced its creative
and research activities.


The required


courses


in Freshman


English


and in humanities,


which


are ad-


ministered


by the Division of Humanities, make up a substantial part of the entire


general education program. Heavy enrollments in these sections have offset some decrease
in lower division departmental offerings. The increase in the number of students majoring


in the various departments,


however,


has brought higher enrollments in


the upper


division.
The expanded graduate programs of the Division have flourished. In the two-year
period, advanced students increased in number and improved in quality. Four Ph.D. de-


grees


twenty-two


M.A.


degrees


were conferred.


The increasing use of superior


graduate students to instruct freshman or sophomore classes, under supervision, has proved


educationally sound.


tractive stipends, enabling the
available talent.


It has also been so advantageous economically as to warrant at-


University to compete with other schools for the best


At all levels, improvements were made in the curriculum.


The departments con-


tinue to participate in extension and teacher-training programs, as well as to cooperate
in such "area" majors as Literature of Western Cultures, Inter-American Studies,


American


Studies,


and the Humanities


Doctoral


Program.


The Summer


Session


experiment in foreign study, inaugurated in 1956 as "FSU in Mexico," has developed
with such success as to justify expansion of this type of reciprocal international education.
All departments have served the campus community, the city, and the state in a variety
of ways with art exhibits, cultural lectures and symposia, literary coffee hours, public
relations speeches, professional newsletters, visual aids on classical civilization, foreign


language


translations,


technical


consultations,


honor


society


activities,


and effective







FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY


placement of graduates.


A gift of $88,000 worth of


Art has benefited the whole Division.


art treasures


to the Department of


Increased


research


creative activity


evidenced by the larger number of


scholarly books and articles published by the faculty within the last two years.


increase of


The


grants-in-aid, the number of editorships and officerships held, and the caliber


of learned papers delivered before regional and national meetings also bear witness to


progress


in all five departments.


Several members


of the faculty have achieved


national recognition, others have been awarded Fulbright grants, and many have been


actively


engaged


in research


projects.


The emphasis on productive scholarship and


the consequent improved reputation enjoyed by the departments have been largely
responsible for the number and quality of advanced undergraduate and, particularly,
graduate students in the Division.


The Division has several urgent needs: (1) substantial
graduate assistantships and in the stipends authorized for them;


increase


in number of


(2) additional faculty;


adequate


budget


to meet


the responsibilities of


advanced


undergraduate


graduate instruction and research; and (4) adequate physical facilities and space to
house the departments now in crowded or temporary quarters.


The Social


Sciences


The Division


Economics,


of Sc


Geography,


social Sciences (comprising
History, Political Science, I


enrolled 34,240 students in its various courses during


the Departments of Anthropology,
psychology Sociology, and Speech)
the biennium. This is a 24 per cent


gain over the preceding two years and a 51 per cent gain over the 1952-54
with no appreciable increase in faculty.


biennium,


Four of


the departments offer Ph.D.


programs, and,


in addition, three


of these


departments
Control has
1956-58 bie


cooperate


approved
nnium, a


appropriate


a doctoral


total of sixte


school


program n
en Ph.D.


n


Is in doctor;
the History


work.


Department.


degrees were granted


The Board


During the
the Social


within


Science area, twelve of these being in Psychology.


In spite


of the reduced


time left after fulfilling


teaching


assignments,


faculty


members
published


were active


during


in publications


the biennium


and research.


in addition


to a large


A total of


number of


fourteen


books


was


articles, research


reports, and book
research contracts.
U. S. Air Force,


reviews.


Some progress was made by several departments in securing


These were granted by such agencies as the Office


Department of


of Naval Research,


Justice, and the Florida Development Commission.


These contracts have made possible additional financial assistance to graduate students


and have provided


valuable


new materials for instruction.


The Center


for Social


Research has provided the physical and technical facilities necessary in any graduate
program in the Social Sciences, the facilities and technical services to stimulate research


among


the faculty, and service to state and local agencies. A vital need of the Division


additional


support


state and federal


governments,


private


industry,


foundations. Success in research within the academic community also depends upon
the ability of departments to lighten the teaching loads of those who are capable of
effective research.
Social Science faculty members held many important offices in regional professional


associations


during the biennium as well as offices in the national associations. Similarly,


they presented papers at both national and regional



meetings.


The geographic re-


moteness of the Florida


State


University from other centers of academic activity, how-


ever, has made necessary greater travel funds than at present are available.
A beginning has been made toward encouraging interdisciplinary cooperation in









PRESIDENT'S REPORT


research


in the Social


Sciences.


however


the most effective research has


been carried out at the departmental level.


There is great need for a new Social


building, not only to provide adequate office and classroom
inter-departmental research and other collaborative efforts.


space,


Science


but to facilitate


The Biological


Sciences


The Division of Biological Sciences (comprising the single Department of Biological
Sciences, formed by combining the former Departments of Bacteriology, Botany, Physi-


ology,


and Zoology)


has shown rather remarkable growth during this biennium.


growth is evidenced by: (1) an expansion in course offerings and faculty made necessary
by increased undergraduate and graduate enrollment; (2) by an expansion of facilities


and equipment;


(3) by an increasing number of publications resulting from research of


members of the faculty,


their graduate students, and research associates;


and (4) by


increasing


calls on members


of the faculty


to participate in national symposia


and to lecture to scientific groups in many of the major universities of the country.


Several
in Radiation
Physiology,


new faculty appointments have been made.


Genetics,


Invertebrate


Major additions have been


Biochemical-Physiological Genetics, Radiation Physiology, Cellular


Zoology,


and in


the faculty


offering


the General


Biology


course,


in which


the enrollment has averaged


over 1,600 students per year for the


past two years.
Particularly


active


have been research


programs


physics, Endocrinology, Neurophysiology, Ornithology,


in Parasitology, Mycology, Bio-
Vascular Plant Taxonomy, Radia-


tion Genetics,
of publications


Biochemical


of the faculty,


Genetics,


Bryology,


their graduate


and Bacterial


students and


Physiology.


research


The list


associates, for


this two-year period includes 71 titles.


The research facilities, both in usual laboratory


furnishings


and special


research


equipment,


have been considerably


modernized


meet the expanding program and


changing needs.


The Herbarium has grown from


a collection


of 26,114


accessions


two years


ago to its present total


of 40,817.


addition, the Herbarium has distributed over the two-year period to other institutions,


on an exchange


nearly


20,000


specimens.


The study collection of bird and


mammal skins, amphibia, and reptiles has been increased by


specimens.


The fish


collection


has been expanded


The number of


research


with the addition of approximately 8,C
contracts and grants-in-aid made to the


iu specimens.
University to


support the work in Biological


Sciences is increasing at a very satisfactory rate and


exceeded


$150,000 for the


biennium.


These research grants have made


it possible


to procure much needed equipment for research, to employ graduate research assistants,
to employ full-time research associates, and to meet some of the normal expenses of the
research programs.
There has been an increase in the number of graduate students, coming from all
parts of the United States and from several foreign countries, to do graduate work in


the biological sciences.


An increased number of undergraduate students have selected


Biology as a major. During the past biennium nine master's degrees and six doctorates
were awarded in the Division.
The curriculum of the Division has been critically reexamined with modifications


made where


rnF- I. '_


these were indicated in order to meet the demands of our expanding


I 1f-i1 t t a 2- ll - t f l.


program. The quality of teaching, both at the undergraduate and graduate leves,

has been considerably enhanced by the acquisition of new equipment, such as models
and charts.
The Department cooperates with the Oceanographic Institute in the training of


marine


biologists and


participates with


departments


in the physical sciences in the


*:.-." -









FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY


Nuclear Science program.


The Florida


University has become an Institutional


Member of the Highlands Biological Station, located in the North Carolina mountains,


so that now the facilities of this station are available to field
The most critical needs of the Division are:


biologists


of the Division.


1. Increased
expanding


space
gradua


to meet the demands


te


increasing


enrollments


and faculty research programs.


An increase in funds for the purchase of capital equipment and to meet
necessary expenses accompanying this growing activity.
Additional funds to provide for the employment of supporting personnel


such as technical


assistants,


stenographers,


an animal


caretaker,


a departmental scientific artist.


The Physical


Sciences


The Division


of Physical


Sciences


(comprising


the Departments of


Chemistry,


Geology,


Mathematics,


Meteorology,


and Physics)


considers


its most important


velopment within


Science.


The State


ais biennium
Legislature


the beginning


of a substantial


in 1957 appropriated


program


in Nuclear


2.3 million dollars specifically


for the support of nuclear research and instruction during the two years, 1957-58 and
1'958-59. Although the facilities provided by this appropriation will enhance primarily
the Department of Physics and the Department of Chemistry, the related departments
will benefit. At the end of June 1958 plans had been virtually completed for the


-------


- C -- UJ ~ '-*--


building to house the


Van de Graaf accelerator, the major item of equipment,


and to


provide laboratory space for research workers.
A second important development in this biennium was the appropriation of
$1,065,526 for a building to house the Departments of Mathematics and Meteorology.
A third important achievement was the establishment of a Computational Center,


containing an IBM 650 digital computer.


This Center will be of greatest assistance to


the Departments of Mathematics and Meteorology, but all departments of the Division
will share in, and benefit from, its use.


Since


the preceding biennium, enrollment in the


Physical Sciences has increased


greatly in every department.


This has been a result of the national and international


reputation gained by some of the departments, particularly Chemistry and Meteorology.


Although many of the major needs of the


Physical Science departments are begin-


ning to be met, some problems continue. As the remuneration received by workers in
industry continues to rise, and the cost of living continues to climb, salary increases


substantially above those possible within the biennium just ended will be


necessary.


most pressing


need is


Sciences which would include


a centralized group of buildings for the


space


adequate both in amount and in


Physical


type for the


Chemistry and Physics Departments.


in the general vicinity of the


Geology


Plans now being formulated for a Science Center
Building offer promise of a better opportunity for


interdepartmental
but the Chemistry


work.


The needs


of the Physics


Department


are most urgent,


Department also critically needs laboratory space appropriate for


its research activities conducted.


The remodeled or converted laboratories now being


used are crowded with equipment for which the rooms were not designed.
A highly desirable addition to the physical science facilities at this University is a


seismograph


station,


which,


in addition


to recording


earth


tremors


and providing


means for instruction in the important area of geophysics, would be an important unit


m the network


earth.


for detection


of thermonuclear


explosions


on other


of the


No seismograph station is now in operation in the southeastern region of the


United States.









PRESIDENT'S REPORT


The Physical


Sciences


have conducted research projects under the auspices of the


Atomic Energy Commission, the United


States


Air Force, the National Science Founda-


The Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, National Research Council, The United States


Weather


Bureau,


The Florida


Geological


Survey,


The Florida


Water


Resources


Development
During


Commission,
the biennium


other


state


just ended,


agencies, an(
the curricula


i several


industrial companies.


in the various Physical


Science


departments have been strengthened, and an effective program of general education


in the Division has been established.


One effect of this program has been to distribute


the teaching load at the freshman level more evenly throughout the five departments.
A fellowship program has also been established which will be effective in improving the
quality of graduate students attracted to this University.

The Oceanographic Institute
The staff of the Oceanographic Institute has continued to enhance its research
facilities and activities. Marine Geology and Physical Oceanography have been added


to the Biology and


Chemistry


courses already


established.


Members of the Institute


staff have received adequate grants from outside agencies in support of their research
and have represented the University and the Institute in international congresses, both
in this country and abroad.


In view of


increased activities on


the part of both local and visiting personnel,


additional facilities on the campus and at the marine installation at Alligator Harbor
are greatly needed.


Reserve Officers


Training Corps


During the past biennium, the ROTC programs of both the Air Force and the
Army have continued normal growth in the basic programs and have shown marked


increase in enrollment at the advanced level.


Of particular significance has been the


increase


in reserve officer output.


The ROTC band and drill teams, as well as the


cadet corps, have participated in commemorating Veterans Day and Armed Forces Day


in Tallahassee.


In other


extra-curricular


activities


steady improvement


has been


noted, and in national competition both Army and Air Force rifle teams have enjoyed an


enviable record.


The College of Arts and Sciences has continued to receive the usual


highly satisfactory cooperation from both the Army and the Air Force.

College Program for The Armed Forces
During the past biennium, there have been over 10,000 class enrollments in college-
level courses at the following military installations: Eglin Air Force Base, Florida;
Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida; Homestead Air Force Base, Florida; Moody Air Force


Valdosta, Georgia;


Turner Air Force Base and the Marine Corps Supply Center


at Albany,


Georgia;


Charleston Air Force Base,


Charleston, South Carolina; Ramey


Air Force Base and the


U. S. Army Antilles Command in Puerto Rico; and Army,


Navy and Air Force Commands in the Panama Canal Zone.


Since


July 1956, forty-nine bachelors' degrees have been awarded military personnel


who have been assigned to the campus under the six months temporary duty plan.
Respectfully submitted,
J. Paul Reynolds, Dean







FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY

THE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION


To the President of


The Florida


State


University


The 1956-58 biennium has been characterized by concentrated effort on the part
of the School of Education to strengthen its instructional program in a number of areas.
Much progress has been made, especially since the appointment of an Associate Dean
and a Coordinator of Instruction in the School of Education whose first responsibilities
are the improvement of the instructional program.
At the end of the biennium parts of the School of Education, formerly scattered


about


Education


campus,


were moved into


is now entirely


housed in


purpose for which they are used:
Physical Education Building, the

Undergraduate Program


a new and modern building.


The School of


the four buildings that were planned for the


the Women's Physical Education Building, the Men's
New Education Building, and the University School.


The required


undergraduate sequence of


courses for students who are planning


to teach


greater


is undergoing


emphasis for the


complete


and revision.


The revised


program


elementary teacher on reading and arithmetic with


places
closer


coordination


between subject


content and laboratory experiences with children.


required


course


for secondary teachers now places


greater emphasis on


the subject


specialty of the teacher. There has been a general improvement in the School of Educa-
tion courses. Practically all undergraduate instruction is now given in the junior and
senior years. This makes it necessary for the prospective teacher to establish a satisfactory


record


in the general college


program in Arts


and Sciences before being committed to


teaching as a profession.
An average of "C" is now required before the student can begin


the first


education


course, and the same average is required of all transfer students.


An average of "C+"


is required in the subject area in which the student is planning to teach.


Through


cooperation


with the College


of Arts and Sciences,


the School


Education has worked out courses of study for the prospective Mathematics teacher,
the English teacher, and the Social Studies teacher that require as much or more subject


content as students majoring in these


areas in


the College of Arts and Sciences must


A similar


an outstanding


program is now


science


worked out for science teachers.


educator to our staff in the fall of 1958 to


We are adding


strengthen


program.

Graduate Program


The strengthening of the


more rigorous require


program


ents for entrance


on the graduate level has taken the form of
into the Graduate School and greater subject


area concentration


in closer


coordination


with the College


of Arts and Sciences.


Encouraging results have been obtained from a
between The Florida State University and the c


program


which stresses cooperation


county school systems in the selection


of outstanding teachers for training in advanced educational leadership.


Cooperative


efforts have been set up between the University and the county school system to make


it financially feas
advanced study.


ible


for the selected


persons to


take a


year from


Plans are underway for greatly extending this


their work for


program


state


assistance


to the student.


Organization and Growth
Changes in the internal


organization


of the School of Education and the nature







PRESIDENT'S REPORT


of the new personnel reflect progress toward the achievement of the expressed aims and
purposes of the School of Education. The School of Education is coming rapidly to the
time when there will be programs in the training of personnel for all positions in public


education in the State, from kindergarten through the University.


research and testing


A new department of


has been set up to which has been added the Test Service Bureau


formerly
guidance
guidance


independent of


any college


or school


in the University.


Counseling and


has been improved through the addition of personnel and setting up of
clinic facilities. A permanent faculty member to train personnel for higher


education and work in community colleges has been employed.


The areas of mathematics


education
personnel,


and social


studies


education


have been strengthened


the addition of


and science education will be strengthened in this manner in the fall of 1958.


A doctoral program in physical education has been developed and approved by the


Board


of Control.


Future Needs


The most outstanding needs
ment of the higher education and


in the School of Education


community college


are: the further develop-


program to meet the unprecedented


needs of teachers and administrative personnel; the development of programs for train-
ing of teachers and other personnel in the area of television education; the expansion


of the program for the


above;


the development


training of perso
of imaginative


nnel for the leadership positions mentioned


programs


meeting


the needs


for teaching


personnel


in the foreign


languages area.


Respectfully
Mode


submitted,
L. Stone, Dean


THE SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS


To the President


The Florida State University


(Note:
retired,


The following report is the


after thirty-six


years


final report


continual


Dean


service.


Margaret


R. Sandels,


reason,


now


report


sometimes touches in


retrospect


on more than


the last biennium.)


In the


winter


of 1922-23


the School of


Home


economics


moved


from a few


scattered rooms over the campus to occupy one floor of the newly completed Science


Building.


The facilities so provided had been built with little recognition of the needs


a well-balanced


program


of Home


Economics and


with no thought of


aesthetic


values.


Yet the drab rooms, inadequately provided with the utilities needed in any


functional laboratory, did make possible


the movement of classes out of basement rooms


and did gather the various activities of the School under one roof.


Long before the beginning of the


1956-58 biennium the School had overflowed


these quarters and was scattered in ten different buildings on two


campuses.


With the


fall of


1956, however, we were privileged to move into a new and


functional building,


bright with color, in whose planning home economists had for the first time been able


to participate.


Not only has this recent move brought faculty and students back under


one roof, it has enabled us to operate for the first time in carefully planned laboratories
and uncrowded offices.
Having left behind them the over-crowded, dingy and inadequate facilities of the


previous


years,


the faculty and student body show vastly improved morale and the


number of majors in the School is showing a healthy increase.


The figures for the first


semester of 1957-58 are 20 per cent higher than those for the first semester of 1955-56,


the year prior to our moving into the new building.


We believe that the quality of our








FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY


teaching, our research and our counseling of students has


risen likewise in line with


improvement in the physical surroundings in which the School now operates.


Resident Instruction


In 1922 the School provided only one curriculum for Home Economics


majors.


It contained the minimum number of Home Economics courses required for certification


to teach Home Economics in the high schools of the
station Agents followed the same curriculum. Mud


State.


Prospective Home Demon-


1 emphasis was placed upon skills,


upon physical care of the house and physical care of the family.


In the main, the work


was elementary in
of students made


character,


though


possible a more advanced,


the strong related science background required


though


very limited,


type of work in


nutrition.


In the 1956-58


biennium


the School of Home Economics offered stro


rounded curricula for both professional and non-professional majors, in a broad


of the Home Economics field.


coverage


The majors in Home Economics Education and Home


Demonstration Education, which were present in the


1922-23


offerings, have now been


differentiated, and greatly strengthened and broadened in character so that they bear


little resemblance to the limited program of 1922.


During the two-year period of the


biennium undergraduate students have been enrolled also in the general non-professional
curriculum, as well as in major professional curricula in Textiles, Housing and Interior
Design, Nutrition and Dietetics, Institutional Food Administration, Child Development
in Home Economics, and Fashion Design and Merchandising.
In any modern School of Home Economics emphasis must necessarily be placed
upon those elements which provide the knowledge and contribute to the development
in students of the understandings and skills conducive to satisfying personal and family


life. At the same


time it is necessary to recognize that the large majority of young


women feel


the need for preparation for some professional activity.


For this reason,


it is necessary that we offer both professional and non-professional majors.
At the graduate level, Master's degrees have been awarded in the Department of
Food and Nutrition, Home and Family Life, Home Economics Education, and Institu-


tion Administration.


Doctor of Philosophy degrees have been earned in Child D


evelop-


ment, Food


Technology,


and the inter-department;
Economics.

Research


the interdivisional program in Marriage and Family Living,
al program of Clothing and Textiles combined with Family


In the 1922-24 biennium the


germs of a


research


program


were present im


a small


very modestly supported nutrition laboratory which later was


swept away during


depression of the thirties.


For the next fifteen years any research undertaken


had to


limited


character,


financed


largely


individual


faculty


members


or by


graduate students.


The belief in the importance of research, as indicated by the small


studies completed over the years, has, however, influenced and given impetus to the
development of a more comprehensive research program during the past decade.


During
Studies of


1956-58
the radia


significant research in several areas was completed and published.


tion


preservation


of meat and fishery products are of potential


importance not only to the families who are the consumers of such products, but to the


commercial


enterprises of


distribution of these foods


Florida which are concerned with the production, processing or
s. Studies of the prevention of fat oxidation of meat open up


important possibilities for improvement in the flavor of preserved meat,


whether the


meat be stored for twenty-four hours in the family refrigerator or for longer periods


6







PRESIDENT'S REPORT


of time by the frozen food industry, the canner or other processor of foods.
Findings concerning the weathering of drapery fabrics in the Florida climate are
being prepared for publication and have already been presented before interested groups
of homemakers, motel operators and others. A selected group of resin finishes for cotton
fabrics in current use were studied to determine consumer satisfaction as indicated by


ease of laundering, crease resistance and other factors.


Such studies contribute to wiser


spending


of the family


income


and supply


information


of practical value


to the


textile industry.
Various aspects


of present day family life have been under investigation.


Studies


of attitudes toward child guidance, of the work of married women outside the home
and of family role concepts-the "good" parent, the "good" child-have been published
in professional journals and favorably reviewed in both professional and non-technical


publications having national circulation.


Objective studies of this kind are needed to


provide students of


the family with factual bases for programs pointed


toward the


improvement of family living in the home.
The researches discussed above have been supported in part by the State, but to


considerable


degree


by governmental,


commercial


or non-profit,


non-governmental


organza
School


tons.


In all, the relatively small graduate faculties of two departments in the


(the Department of Food and Nutrition and the Department of Home and


Family Life) have published twenty-one research papers in national professional journals,


or more


scientific


papers


and four semi-popular


papers.


A third


department


(Clothing and Textiles)


has a backlog of completed but as yet unpublished research.


In addition,


national


press


groups


releases,


have brougi


group c
it these


Discussions
research


and talks before interested


findings and


the implications of these


studies to the attention of the public.


Some dozen


or more less ambitious but substantial


studies from five of


awaiting


the departments of the School have been accumulated and are


preparation for publication.


Off-Campus Activities
Correspondence and extension classes have again been offered in Textiles, Nutrition,


School


Lunch


Administration,


Child


Development,


Parent


Education


and Family


Relations.


Registrations in such organized


courses can be


tabulated and credited to


departmental


loads.


Activities


more often


failing of


recognition


are the non-credit


one to three day conferences, institutes and workshops, the individual conferences in
the field and the extensive program of family counseling done by our specialist in this
area.


Members


workshop


of the Department of Home


directors or coordinators,


and Family


discussion leaders,


Life alone have served as


panel members and featured


speakers at conferences within the State attended by some twenty-seven hundred people.
If we include attendance at conferences in cities in the neighboring states, we can esti-


mate the number of persons reached as well over three thousand.


All the departments


of the School have contributed speakers at professional meetings and have served as


consultants


to various


professional groups around


the State.


The off-campus State


contacts of the School as a whole, therefore, can be conservatively estimated at forty-five
hundred to five thousand persons.

The Faculty of the School


In the final analysis


the quality of


the faculty


determines the quality of an


educational program.


Scholarly achievements, professional activity, enthusiasm for the


work to be done and the people to be served are the earmarks of the superior teacher.








FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY


We have been fortunate in securing and holding such faculty members in
positions.


our senior


The productivity


paragraph.


A second


of the faculty in research
measure of their standing


has been


discussed


an earlier


in the professional field lies in the


extent


to which


have been


given


recognition


through election


to national or


regional offices, and committee assignments assumed in connection with the professional


activities


of their group.


ship in a wide variety of


Our Home Economics faculty members are assuming leader-
positions. One professor of Home and Family Life is now


serving


her second


as President of the National Council on Family


Relations,


a position rarely given to a woman.


The head of the Department of Clothing and


Textiles is a member to two national committees of the American Association of Textile


Chemists and Colorists.


a second


The head of the Department of Food and


Nutrition is serving


as national chairman of the Conference on Improvement of


Teaching in Food and Nutrition.


Another professor of Food and


College


Nutrition is Associate


Editor of the


Journal of Food Technology and is a member of the inter-institutional


nuclear


research


committee


which


is concerned


with development


of policies


nuclear research in the universities of the State.


The professor of Institution Adminis-


tration has been elected chairman of the College Personnel Section of the


American


School


Food


Service


Association, an organization with several thousand members.


has also been a speaker at the annual meeting of the


American Dietetic Association,


and at the annual meeting of the American School Food


Service


Association.


professor of


Home Economics


Education is now serving as Secretary to the Department


of Colleges and


Universities


of the American


Home Economics Association


associate professor of Clothing and Textiles is a member of the Coordinating Committee
of the Conference of College Teachers of Clothing and Textiles in the Eastern Region.
In addition to these various national offices, we find that members of the faculty have


been active in


the professional groups of the State, several being committee chairmen


in the Florida Home Economics Association and the


Florida Dietetic


Association.


was a speaker


Motel


at the Florida


Association, and


State Conference of Social


the Southeastern Seminar on


Work, another at the Florida
tater Conditioning; another is


serving as State Sponsor for the College Home Economics Clubs of the Florida Home


Economics


Association


and still another has been elected delegate from the Florida


Dietetic


Association


to the National


Association.


This recognition


our faculty


through their research and through their professional activities reflects credit upon the


University and adds


prestige


to the School and to the degrees earned by our students.


The Student Body
A preliminary study was made during the past year of graduates of the School of


Home Economics during the last fiv


e years


who, as


freshmen, had taken the


American


Council on Education test required of entering freshmen.


The scores they received on


this test were found to be distributed normally over the entire range, showing, as had
been shown as early as 1'929, that the student graduating in Home Economics is typical
of students over the campus as a whole.
A study of the correlation between the percentile ranks and the final grade point
averages of the students showed again that their performance was typical of that of the


total- student body.


quality o
reviewing


instructor


The quality of students entering
n given in that area. We feel,


the above study.


are acutely


a program is apt to reflect the


therefore,


aware, however,


some


satisfaction in


that many factors in


addition to those tested contribute to a student's success or failure in college, and that
a study of these factors is needed for better counseling of our students.








PRESIDENT'S REPORT


Future Prospects
The nuclear research program underway in the University opens a wide field of


study in food and nutrition.


A series


of studies in connection with the


Quartermaster


Food


and Container Institute and the U.


S. Fish and Wild Life


Service


has been in


progress
possible
research


during the biennium


to take immediate


fellow


has been


just ending.


advantage


appointed


The experience thus gained has made it


of the expanding


under


the State


facilities, and already one


program,


and plans are well


advanced for institution of nutrition studies using radioactive isotopes.
For many years the Department of Institution Administration worked under the
handicap of having no laboratory facilities of its own and so being dependent upon the
cooperation and subject to the policies of large quantity school food service units locally


available.


With the 1956-58 biennium, however, basic equipment and facilities have been


provided in the new building.
undergraduate levels is already


An expanded resident program at both graduate and
taking shape and requests for off-campus services have


been stimulated.
Research must be interpreted if it is to function in our everyday lives, and it is


primarily at the University level that this interpretation must begin.


It is not enough


for classroom instruction to present facts in organized form; it must go further and assist


students to see relationships and applications of these facts.


We must go beyond the


classroom


to the homes and


communities


of the State


answer


in non-technical


language the myriads of questions coming to us daily-how to provide better nutrition
for the family, plan for satisfying family relationships, use the family income to better


advantage or to bring more beauty into the home. T
Economics recognizes its responsibility in these areas a.
to carry out more effectively the programs now in oj
Throughout its existence as an organized field o
various areas, has faced criticism because this need fo
suggestions has sometimes obscured the fact that soun


must be based upon knowledge.


'he faculty of the school of Home
nd plans are now being developed
operation.
f study, Home Economics, in the
>r simple vocabulary and practical
d interpretation and wise practice


Constructive criticism is wholesome and it is our hope


that such criticism as exists may serve to increase our efforts to interpret our field


in the


proper light to the public and through scholarly achievements to increase recognition
of those areas dedicated to service to the home and the family.
The retiring dean can not close this report without expressing to the Governing


Boards of the University and the Administrators under whom she has worked her


sincere


appreciation of their support, their


years.


She feels


confident that the


sympathetic interest and
School of Home Econom


their assistance over the
ics. with its tradition of


scholarly activity anCd useful service


to the State, will continue to merit the


recognition


so generously given


to it in the past.


Respectfully submitted,
Margaret R. Sandels, Dean


THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC


To the President


The Florida


State


University


The School of Music continues to serve the


center in the field of music through


State


of Florid


its dedication to music


as a


a as an educational
positive social force,


and by active cooperation with the other divisions of The Florida


State


University.


cursory


view of the


status


of the school


during


the 1956-58


biennium reveals


the following:








FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY


Faculty


During the biennium the faculty attained


of Music was privileged to report a wide variety and


honors at the annual Faculty


Honors Convocation.


The Dean
of special


These included four foundation


grants for study and research in other countries; the performance of original


chamber


music,


symphonies


operas,


in New York,


Detroit,


solo works,


Minneapolis,


Francisco, the Edinburgh International Festival of Arts, the World's Fair in Brussels and
elsewhere; the recording and publication of four books of music for the public schools,
along with a number of other musical compositions and studies; lectures at national


plenary
positions.


meetings;


citations,


honors,


awards


and commissions


for original


During the biennium the number of faculty members was


which allowed the School of Music the opportunity to
demands for instruction, both on campus and extension.


serve


increased to


a larger


forty-one


portion of the


Graduate Study


Graduate study toward master's


students enrolled.


degrees in music was established


At the beginning of the present biennium fifty-six


in 1946 with


graduate students


were enrolled during the fall registration alone. During the biennium fifty-eight
degrees and ten doctorates were awarded.


masters


Two doctoral curricula were activated during the biennium as part of the Doctor


of Music


degree


program.


These present fields of study frequently requested by ad-


vanced graduate students:


the Doctor of Music with a Concentration


Composition,


of Music with a Concentration in


Undergraduate Study
The undergraduate


program remains


Vocal


the center of


Literature.


the School of Music.


steady increase in the size of the student body places the school near the lead in numbers
of music majors in the colleges and universities of the county.

Financial Grants


A number of scholarships were granted the


School of Music by private


sources


during the biennium. Included


in the new grants are:


The Anna


Forbes Liddell Loan


Fund,


The Gladys Olive Koch Memorial Loan Scholarship, The Amy Gertrude Jones


Memorial Scholarship, and two to three
donor to outstanding students.


grants of


$1,000 each


These funds supplement the budget available through the
work assistantships.

Outlook


year


by an


university


anonymous


for student


Plans have been made for the publication of


a series


of scholarly works by the


music faculty.


These are historical, theoretical, and special studies pertinent to current


musical


problems.


Material for thirty-two monographs has already been identified,


most of which is immediately available.
The apparent need for the development of the cultural


encouraging for the future.


resources


of Florida


to make an increasing contribution to this vital phase of our social structure.
Respectfully submitted,
K. O. Kuersteiner, Dean


its highest level in distinction.


a significant extent


cornm-


and the Doctor


It is the hope of the school of Music to have the


means


I






PRESIDENT'S REPORT


THE SCHOOL OF SOCIAL


WELFARE


To the President


The Florida


State University


During the biennium, the School of Social Welfare has continued to expand its


course


offerings and programs of study.


personnel in social work for Florida and


The School is the primary source of trained
adjoining states.


There are now eleven programs of study in the School of


Social


Welfare leading


to the bachelor's degree.


During the biennium, the curriculum in police science was


initiated.
laboratory


This is


a logical


at The Florida


development


State


University


following


the establishment


and the Florida Sheriffs


of the


crnme


Bureau


Tallahassee.
Many functional courses in marriage and the family whose primary purpose


I. I i


-1 11*-. ---s _


prepare young men ana women for successful marriage and intelligent parent
During the biennium, members of our staff conducted some fifty-odd workshops,


ood,


statutes,


and conferences


for P.T.A.,


church


and other community groups in


marriage and family living throughout Florida.
Fifty-one bachelor's degrees were granted in 1957-58, a
over the last year of the previous biennium (1955-56). The
ments have remained about the same for this biennium as


However, it may be noted that a larger


proportion of the e


in increase of 40 per cent
undergraduate class enroll-
during the preceding one.
enrollment is in junior and


senior courses.

Graduate Curricula and Enrollments


The graduate


leading
Thirteen


to the


professional


two-year


degrees were


degree


granted


program
, Master
in 1956,


of education
of Social ,
eighteen in


and training


Nork,
1957,


for social


has continued


to


and twenty-five in


grow.
1958.


On the basis of


present


enrollment,


t


The School has a contract with the


hirty-five
Southern


are scheduled


Regional


for degrees


Education Board


in 1959.
as a social


work training center.


Graduate Programs in Family


Life Education


The School of


Social


Welfare is


one of the co-operating units in the inter-divisional


graduate program in marriage and family life education. I
and family life, education, sociology, and psychology. This is
the number of students enrolled in it is comparatively small.


who have received


'he other units are home
not a quantity program-
However, those students


the doctorate in the program occupy important positions in leading


universities.
During the biennium, the School of Social Welfare and the Department of Sociology
worked out a joint doctoral program providing for concentration either in marriage and


the family


or criminology


corrections.


There


a modest enrollment


in this


new program.

Criminology and Corrections


The School of


Social


Welfare in recent years has gained national prominence


center of training of personnel for the field


of corrections.


The doctoral program in


criminology and corrections has been a logical development of the undergraduate pro-


grams as well as those on the master's level.
The Annual Southern Conference on Corrections which


held on campus provides


an excellent forum for bringing university educators and prison administrators together
for discussion of mutual problems.


is to







FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY


Community and


State


Activities


Our staff is called on for


These


services


a wide


variety


of se


take a number of forms-working


commissions, providing consultation
a number of other related activities.


services to State


services to the people of the State.
on policy-making committees and
departments and institutions, and


Staff Growth and Development


The problem


recrul


The staff, in order to be effective
the best academic training.

Research and Publication


and retainir
as teachers,


Ig


a competent


staff is


always


a


must have had successful experience


cute.
plus


Several members of
in their respective fields.


our staff


are making


Three books, several


significant


contributions to the literature


monographs, and many articles have come


from the members of our department. Practically all members of our staff are engaged in


some form of research or

Physical Facilities


creative writing.


The School of
Classroom Building


Social


Welfare has been located in three widely separated


"A", top floor


of South


parts-


of Graduate Building and the little


wooden
Music.
facilities.


building


between


It is difficult to function


the old School of Education Building and the School of


as effectively as we


would


like in such physical


realize that the


building for the
it badly.


School I


1957 Legislature
of Social Welfare.


authorized and made an appropriation
As of today, it has low priority. We


Respectfully submitted,


Coyle


E. Moore, Dean


THE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS


To the President of


The Florida


State


University


With the


completion of the new School of


former inadequacy in housing has been removed.


Business building in May, 1958, the
The new building includes facilities


for classrooms, offices, research, and conferences.
The major concerns of the School of Business during the biennium were those


of redefining objectives;


appraising and revising the undergraduate and graduate cur-


ricula; evaluating methods of teaching; improving library and research materials;
and examining relationships between the School and the University on the one hand,


and the alumni and the business community on the other.


Substantial


improvements


were also effected


in the organization of the School.


Departmental Activities
The Accounting Department completed a study and


revision of the


Accounting


curriculum at both the undergraduate and graduate levels with a view to improving


them wherever possible.


Southeastern


Section


Members of the Department are serving as chairman of the


of the American


Accounting


Accounting Concepts and Standards Committee of the


Association
American


as members of


Accounting


and as nominators of candidates for the Earhart Foundation Fellowships.


Association,
They have








PRESIDENT'S REPORT


participated in professional conferences and business meetings both within and without


the state.


One member of the staff is writing a manual of practices for use in the


Florida State Auditor's Office.


The Department assists the State Board of Accountancy


in giving CPA examinations and takes steps in recognizing outstanding students in the
principles of accounting.


The Department


of Advertising


increased


approximately


fifty per cent


in en-


rollment during the past two years.


During the same period, an extensive revision of


courses


and curricula was accomplished.


Course


offerings were reduced somewhat to


consolidate


the curriculum.


Our student


groups,


Alpha


Delta


Sigma


(men)


Gamma Alpha
Sigma received
national compete


Chi


(women)


both accomplished outstanding programs. Alpha Delta


first place in the A. P. Phillips state competition and first place in
tion. Gamma Alpha Chi achieved first and second places in consecutive


years in the Phillips state competition and second place in national competition.


bers of
Sigma,


Mem-


the Department are serving variously as National President of Alpha Delta


as National Vice-President of the Advertising


Federation of America.


The Business


Education


Department


offers


two curriculums


leading


to the


bachelor's


degree,


namely:


office


management


and business


teacher


preparation.


Noteworthy activities of the Department include a graduate program at the master's
degree level for teachers of business subjects and the sponsorship of the Future Busi-
ness Leaders of America throughout the secondary schools in Florida.


The Business Law area services other areas of the


School.


Currently six semester


hours


faculty


of business


law are required


has resulted in


classes


of students


and the use of


in the School.


part-time


Limited


lecturers.


full-time


Additional


faculty are needed to reduce class sizes to reasonable proportions and to provide ad-
vanced work in public regulation of business-an area which is becoming exceedingly
complex.
The 1956-58 biennium was a period of growth and accomplishment for the Depart-


ment of Insurance.


The changes which occurred during this period placed the depart-


ment on a par with outstanding insurance departments in other major universities.


entire


insurance


curriculum


was reworked to


eliminate


undesirable


courses


combine related


courses.


New courses were added to fill in the gaps and to attune


the schedule of offerings to the dynamics of the industry.


The natural growth of the


School of Business together with an increasing interest in insurance careers sent the
enrollment in insurance courses skyrocketing from 300 per annum to more than 1,000.
The Department secured the services of three outstanding faculty members during this


period.


In addition to normal teaching and research loads, special projects have been


undertaken especially coordination of the various municipal pension plans in Florida


and an actuarial


project in


casualty insurance.


Largely through


the efforts of


student organization


known


as the Insurance


& Real Estate


Society,


the insurance


world became aware of the F.S.U. insurance program.


The national C.P.C.U. organiza-


tion chose F.S.U. for the initiation of its National Insurance Day program.
The number of course offerings of the Department of Management and Finance


remained


approximately


same


during the


biennium.


The enrollment has


consistently between
of four instructors.


700 and 800 students each semester for the original department
The major change in the Department was the addition of two


new men in the area of Finance, bringing the total number of faculty in the department
to six. It is now intended to divide the present Management and Finance Department


into three departments--Finance, Management and Transportation.


The present head


of the Department of Management and Finance, because of his theoretical and practi-


the advertising fraternity, and




:* ./C 'l .
..* :. .-:


cal experience


in Transportation,


will be Head of the


effective September 1, 1958.


The enrollment in


Transportation Department,


the Department of Marketing continues to increase ra
.yldip


Class enrollments each semester have now passed the 500 mark.


have increased much faster than faculty so that in the spring, 1957, the
*~~~~ j .k ?9


was 47.3 students for the whole department.


Class enrollments


average


Additional faculty has now lowered


the size of the class and helped to improve the quality of instruction.


During the


past two years, much attention has been given to the undergraduate curriculum and
greater emphasis on strengthening the graduate program. Two new programs embrac-
ing the latest developments in marketing management have been added: Distribution


Control and


Electronic Data


representatives, the


Job-Getting


Processing
Seminar,


for


Business.


Clinics conducted by business


and interviewing schedules by the Placement


Bureau have helped many of the Marketing majors find desirable employment. Demand
for Marketing graduates has constantly been much greater than the supply.
During the 1956-58 period, the Department of Restaurant and Hotel Management
consolidated its curriculum, added faculty, and extended its services to the state by
adding a field-service program. In cooperation with the Florida Restaurant Association,
an Education and Research Foundation was established for the purpose of raising funds


to improve the Department and the industry.


The Foundation published a monthly


bulletin containing latest developments and recent educational advances.


The bulletin is


sent to all members of the Florida Restaurant Association and other interested persons.
A field representative has been employed by the Department and charged with the


development of


materials and


with the conducting of short courses in food


service


throughout the state.


Needs of


the School


The School of Business is in need


of funds to provide a better student-faculty ratio,


better professional services and revised
of the state.


research in basic


areas affecting


economy


Members of


the faculty


have achieved


enviable progress during the


biennium.


Numerous members of our faculty have engaged in further study for advanced degrees,
some have published materials which contributed to education for business leadership,


have addressed


business


and professional


groups


throughout


Florida


problems of future growth.


By invitation, members of the faculty have appeared


guest speakers,


consultants, and discussion leaders before


executive


groups in many


states throughout the nation.


Respectfully submitted,


Charles


A. Rovetta, Dean


THE LIBRARY SCHOOL


To the President of The


Florida


State


University


The Library


years,


School's sixth biennium has been notably successful.


enrollment increased in quality as well as in quantity.


During these


The faculty improved


programs of instruction and were influential in professional practice and philosophy in
the field. Housing handicaps were reduced by removal to new quarters in the new
library.


During the biennium
areas of instruction and


a refinement in
the embryo of


course offerings was undertaken.


Two major


a third emerged as forerunners "to possible


departmentalization.


some


FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY








PRESIDENT'S REPORT


Librarianship
To educate for special library needs, the faculty developed graduate specialization


to supplement the basic professional programs in lib:


and Research Librarianship;
Audio-Visual Librarianship;


rarian


(2) Public Librarianship; (3) School
(5) Cataloging, Reference, Bibliography


ihip in (1) College
I Librarianship; (4)
and Documentation.


This program leading
Association.

Audio-Visual


to the Master's degree is accredited by th


c American


Library


Audio-Visual


four sections each


course


offerings


were expanded.


The beginning


was added to


course


the new


e averaged
course in


Graphics.


Courses


to support the


new interdivisional program in Educational Tele-


vision


were introduced, and television seminars (with mobile equipment) were offered


during the summer session.


A full Master's program in AVI


is now offered,


approved


by the Department of Audio-Visual Education of the


School Materials


Service


urng


the biennium


faculty


members worked


with the State


Department of


Education, school librarians and audio-visualists to develop a new certification in "In-


structional


Materials"


(school


library


and audio-visual


service).


approval of


certification in September


the faculty developed a certification


program


which


has been


the basis for a state-wide


conference on


course content.


program is the embryo for a third possible area to be known
Service," which will undertake to prepare personnel in the whole
materials-library and audio-visual-to administer the emerging
schools of Florida and the nation.


This certification


"School


range of instructional


Materials


Library Use


Courses


years


the FSU


Library School


pioneered


a course


on "Librar


in Graduate


Research."


It has received


national


attention,


was described


in an


article in College and Research Libraries,


September, 1956,


and has been imitated in


part or as a whole by many graduate schools.


A recent study by a committee of our


Graduate Council reaffirmed the need for the content of this course.


Graduate schools


and research scholars are universally agreed that one prerequisite to the granting of a


graduate


degree is evidence of bibliographic and documentation knowledge.


Internship Instruction


At the request of the School of Education audio-visual instruction
all of the teacher interns before their departure for internship. Thi


beginning, but it


is provided for
s is a desirable


is hoped that this brief session will develop into a broader unit that will


encompass teacher orientation in the use of a school materials
range of instructional materials.

Extension


Each academic semester


since


through the General Extension Division.


center


and the whole


courses


1957 when


seven


classes


City, Pensacola, Fort Lau


were offered in the following
derdale, West Palm Beach, T


cities:


Jacksonville,


Panama


ampa and DeFuniak Springs.


areas


semester, and a second section


N. E.


Materials


Centers


its beginning the Library School has offered


An all-time high was reached in the fall of









FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY


Clinics, Conferences,


Workshops


The last of a series of three pre-school clinics on instructional materials


sponsored with the State Department of Education was held in late


annual school materials conferences, sponsored jointly with two N. E.


the State


were held in December of


August


1957.


A. Section


1956 and 195;


jointly
Two
is and
7: the


Southern
held in


Public
June o


Library


f 1957; and


sponsored


with the State


Research


Library


Library,


Workshop


attracted library leaders and research workers in


Faculty


Activities


Faculty


members


have held offices and


served


on committees


in the


American


Library Association, Department of Audio-Visual Instruction of the National Education


Association, Southeastern Library Association,


and Florida Library Association. Consul-


station services have been given to several of the junior college libraries, notably those


in Madison, Ocala, Bradenton, and Orlando, and a


held in June of 1958.


junior college library conference was


Two faculty members were awarded fellowships to work toward


their doctorates


at Indiana


University


and Teachers


College,


Columbia


University.


Publications of the faculty have appeared in the


Saturday Review, the N.


E. A. Journal,


Library


Journal,


College


and Research


Libraries, Library


Trends, and other


journals.


Materials


Center


The Library


School's


demonstration library and


materials


center,


which


serves


as a teaching laboratory for Library School students and renders services to the School
of Education and other units on the campus, has a total of 21,862 volumes, some 4,160


ephemeral


items,


326 disk


recordings,


1,306 films, 1,300 filmstrips, and


miscellaneous


samples of slides and other materials.


Audio-Visual


Center


Motion


picture


production


and dissemination


absorbed


considerable


attention


during the biennium.
and rentals to $5,800


Film library acquisitions of about 1',000 brought the total to 2,000


Campus use increased and previewing


showings,


now in their sixth


year, made


faculty and students


more


aware


of this


medium as a teaching aid. Filming of athletics for Men's Physical Education


was almost


continuous, and a film for


Women's


Physical Education is nearly complete. A transfer


process developed by a graduate student and a faculty member has been filmed and
will be described in an article in Educational Screen.

Enrollment


The Library


School


served


during


1956-57


a total of 180 full-time equivalent


students, and during 1957-58 a total of 21'2.8 full-time equivalent students, or


of 18 per cent for one


an increase


However, the Library School is primarily a graduate


school and therefore all of its students are either graduate or upper level; no lower-


level courses are offered.
the Library School during


follows:


uppDDer


classmen,


From the analysis made by the Office of the Dean of Faculties,
r 1957-58 divided its 212.8 full-time equivalent students, as


126.8;


graduates,


Although


proportions


unique when compared with other academic units, this composition of the student body
is standard for accredited library schools, since only graduate accreditation is given by


the American Library Association.


Department of Education,


Workshop, jointly


the Southern College and


June of 1958.


was


at the Tuesday night


.*


V








PRESIDENT'S REPORT


Housing


The ground floor of the


University


Library provides improved quarters after


decade in


West Campus barracks and wooden struct


ures on


the Main Campus.


ever, part of the School's operation remains in Lang House and in the Music Building.
The University Library will soon need to expand into the space occupied by the Library
School.

Summary


In the next biennium some major decisions must be made. Foremost


the need for


more faculty and staff. During the summer of 1958 regular faculty carried full teaching


loads on top of directing from five to ten Master's papers.


fact that the School is underfinanced.


problem.


Student costs bear out the


Second is the need for quarters, a perennial


A high priority for an addition to the Library Building adequate to house


the Library School, or a separate classroom building, should be considered.
the necessity for a decision on the placement of the Audio-Visual Center. I


Third is
ts admini-


station by the Library School developed from a need for an instructional demonstration
unit. The need for such a unit will always exist in a Library School since audio-visual
librarians are now in constant demand, and FSU is one of the 10 accredited library


schools with a recognized specialty in this area.


Fourth, since FSU has regional as


well as state responsibilities for graduate professional education in librarianship, steps
should be taken to grant tuition consideration, at least, to Alabama, Mississippi, and
South Carolina, states without accredited library schools, and to South Georgia. Fifth,


with added faculty,


steps should be taken to inaugurate a doctoral program in librarian-


Respectfully submitted,


Louis


Shores,


Dean


THE SCHOOL OF PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION


To the President


The Florida State University


The School


of Public


Administration


provides


a number


services


designed to improve the processes of government.


Its program of instruction develops


insights into the theory as well as the practices of government.


Its internship program


provides opportunity for students who are interested in factual materials related to


government.


Its consultant services are used by public officials and organizations in


a large variety of situations where problems arise that require independent advice.
The School's undergraduate program was revised and strengthened in the areas


of municipal
students with


administration and municipal planning. Employment opportunities for
the undergraduate degree increased greatly during the biennium. The


graduate program was revised and strengthened in the areas of international administra-


tion and


comparative administration.


Enrollment continued to


increase


steadily and


substantially.

Instructional Program


Former ambassadors, officials of the U.


S. Department of State, the United Nations,


the International Cooperation Administration, the International Bank for Reconstruction
and Development and officials of various other departments of the Federal government


came to the campus as lecturers.


Members of our State Cabinet and other state officials


also lectured.


During


the biennium,


the School's annual


Federal lecture program


-* *;ft
*'"..^-
*.."*3
**^
< ^'




*K.^-^ .^$.:
*..* |~i.:'//^ .
**. .-..*^'<* *' ** "
***^S^' *
'^^ *-
* '/ .


centered around two themes: "Administration of Foreign Affairs" and "Governmental
Personnel Problems and Practices."


With the active support of the Governor and the Budget Director,


a program of


graduate trainee positions was inaugurated, enabling superior graduate students to work
toward the master's or doctor's degree while working on a part-time basis in one of
the departments of the state government.


Considerable


training


expansion


was undertaken


state and local officials.


in the School's


In addition


to teaching


program


evening


in-service


courses


state officials, members of the staff of the School helped in the planning or teaching of
numerous short courses and workshops throughout the state for the Governor's Conference
on Urban Renewal, the Florida Development Commission, the City Managers' Associa-


tion, the Municipal


Finance


Officers


Association, the Municipal Electrical Employees


and Utilities Association and the Pinellas County Planning Conference.
Members of the teaching faculty continued to render research and consultative


assistance in their areas of special interest to the Bureau of Governmental


and Service-a division of the


School of Public Administration devoted to the


Research
assistance


and consultation of public officials of our state.

Research and Consultation


During the biennium the Bureau of Governmental Research and Service


its service on a large scale.


Reports requested by public officials and completed


continued
or carried


forward during the biennium by the Bureau, or by members of the instructional staff


working through the Bureau, are listed below.
are not included.


Confidential memorandum on reports


Organization
Report on Levels
ments, Defeat of


Florida
Florida


Citizens


and Management Survey o0
of Assessed Property Tax Va
the Tallahassee Civic Center
Tax Council, County Property


lue


the State Beverage Department, A
es, State Supervision of Local Assess-


Proposal, Summary of Studies


Tax Assessment


Florida,


P


of the
proposed


Constitution of 1958 and the Constitution of 1885.


The Bureau of Governmental Research also assisted the State Merit


System


Council


in connection with the state classification and compensation plan, Governor Collins in
connection with a proposed bill on revenue collection, the City of Pensacola and the


City of Jacksonville Beach in the development of


personnel programs, the city managers


of Auburndale and Quincy on the development of urban renewal plans, and the


Warring-


ton Chamber of Commerce in its study of the need for annexation or incorporation.


The Bureau


also prepared


an organization


chart for the


Agriculture, comprehensive personnel and salary study for the


State Divi


Department of
sion of Correc-


tions, comprehensive inventory of possible prison industries in Florida, a report on the
salary structure of our state courts and of selected state and local agencies, a manual


for tax assessors of Florida, and


a fiscal study for the


City of Jacksonville Beach.


Other Activities


Members of the staff


State and Girls


State


continued to participate in the annual


and to direct the Know


Your


programs


Government Program.


of Boys


In 1957 the


Know Your Government Program, which


held each year the legislature is in session,


brought to the campus more than 3400 high school students to be instructed in the


organization and procedures of their state government and to
in action.


see their state


government


A member of the staff continued to serve as correspondent of Florida for the


Municipal Yearbook and Public Management. Another continued to serve as a member


FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY


f







PRESIDENT'S REPORT


of the National Advisory Committee of the


American


Society


for Public Administration


and as consultant to


a number of management institutes.


Members of


the School


participated in programs of the learned societies.


One member of the staff received


the Doctor's degree, so that all teaching members now hold this degree.

Individual Research and Writing


Despite thqir


official research responsibilities in relation to the Bureau, members


of the staff


continued research of their own for articles and books.


During the biennium


many


books and articles were


published


or advanced


to publication.


Respectfully submitted,
Wilson K. Doyle, Dean


THE SCHOOL OF


JOURNALISM*


To the President


The Florida


State University


The School of Journalism serves the users and makers


cation
training
zines, 1


by enabling laymen to study the vital role of the


young
television


people for
and radio,


professional careers, and by ai


advertising


and public relations


r


of media
free press


mass


communi-


in democracy, by


ding newspapers and maga-


through


timely


service.


The three-fold program of the School of Journalism-advertising, editorial practice,


and television-radio--is recognized nationally.


The School


is affiliated with the American


Society of Journalism School Administrators and the American Association of Schools


and Departments of Journalism.


It is accredited.


Its assets are these:


it has a curri-


culum which requires of its majors


outstanding


students and


teachers,


a liberal education and thorough training;


the latter all men with


it has


journalistic experience,-


five of whom have doctoral degrees;
affairs.


Its liabilities are these:


it has


and it is in the state capital, news center of public

an inadequate physical plant, although assured of


space in a new building approved by the state legislature
only limited funds for its Institute of Media Research, ar


unified program of television, radio,


at its 1957 session; it has
id it does not encompass a


and film.


Graduates of the School of Journ


Texas,
Florida.


Mississippi,
In 1957-58


Georgia,


Illinois,


alism


hold successful positions


New York,


and Pennsylvania


in New
as wel


Mexico,
l as in


the entering freshmen in the school ranked higher in scholastic


ability than the students in any other school.


The school


serves


as the


Distribution


Center


of the


Advertising


Federation of


America


Fourth District.


It is the headquarters of the Florida


Association of Magazine


Publishers.


It works with people interested in both the amateur and


professional


press.


It sponsors the FSU School Press Institute.


With an enrollment


exceeding


one hundred


in 1957-58, it


has grown


steadily


was founded in 1949.


Respectfully submitted,
Laurence R. Campbell, Dean


THE SCHOOL OF NURSING


To the President


of the


University


Since the organization of the school in 1950 the program has


grown


steadily and


the quality of the students now entering the program has improved. As college prepara-

* By direction of the Board of Control, the School of Journalism is to be discontinued on June 30, 1959.










FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY


tion for nurses has become better known and accepted in the


ber of


students


has applied


our program.


State, an increasing num-
the Beta list of college


preferences has listed The Florida State University School of Nursing as first choice of


the five collegiate programs in nursing now available in this


icant than the increased enrollments


during this biennium


as compared


State.


Even more signif-


is the picture of total numbers of degrees conferred
to the total of all degrees previously conferred.


Combined


B.S. in Nursing


B.S. in


Nursing


Education


Total


1950-56
1956-58


Totals


The new biennium will


see the


senior years the largest classes in the


School of Ni
history of the


irsing carrying
School, and it


into their junior and
can be predicted now


that the numbers of


degrees to be


conferred in the next biennium will show a sub-


stantial


increase


over those reported above. Even greater numbers


of nurses must be


prepared in the college setting if we are to meet Florida's needs for nurses in teaching,


supervision,


and administration as well as the other fields now being expanded in this


mental


health


and psychiatric


nursing,


public health


nursing,


industrial


nursing and others.
In previous reports, mention of need for scholarships was made. Seventy students


enrolled in


the basic


four-year


program


during this biennium held the $500


state nursing scholarships.


One student holding the


Varina


Bower Culpepper


nursing


scholarship (income from a $10,000 grant) is about to enter her senior year. No accurate
figure is available on the total number of students receiving small scholarships from the


private groups, but many such funds are being used by our students.


Registered nurses


from three-year programs returning to campus for degrees have had available to them


for the first time funds under Public Law 911, Title II.


As The Florida


State University


is the only school in the State and one of only 52 in the United
funds, it might be well to outline grants to date:


1956-57
1957-58
1958-59


States receiving


these


grants for 6 traineeships........................................................................ -------$13,970


grants
grants


for 16 traineeships ..... ........ ...................... ........................
for 25 traineeships ...................................................................-..-


40,792
Final


allocation still to be made but money appropriated by Congress.
These grants, incidentally, provide $200 a month cash to the nurse, and in addition


cover


tuition and fees as well as some travel expenses.


One registered nurse is also


studying on campus under a grant of $2,000 from the Florida Council


on Mental Health


Training and Research.
In addition to scholarship assistance for students, the School received a grant of


$15,000 from the National Institute of Mental Health last year.


This grant permitted


appointment


two additional


faculty people


qualified in


psychiatric


nursing.


However, since qualified faculty people could not be found to fill the positions, the
money was not spent, and the outlined project in further integrating mental health


principles


was not expanded other than as could be done by the regular staff.


grant of $7,560 has been made to begin the project this next year.


The faculty of
their Bachelor's de


the School now numbers thirteen.


agrees


The Florida


group since completing their Master's


positions here.
work.


degrees


of the four was granted


State


Uni


Of this group, six
diversity, with four


received
of the


in other institutions and returning to
I a scholarship to continue advanced




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