Title: Report of the Board of Control of the state educational institutions of Florida for the period ..
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 Material Information
Title: Report of the Board of Control of the state educational institutions of Florida for the period ..
Series Title: Report of the Board of Control of the state educational institutions of Florida for the period ...
Alternate Title: Report of the Board of Control of the state educational institutions of Florida for the biennium ending ..
Report of the Board of Control of the state institutions of higher learning of Florida for the biennium ending ..
Report of Board of Control, state of Florida
Physical Description: 29 v. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Board of Control
University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: T.J. Appleyard, State Printer
Place of Publication: Tallahassee
Publication Date: 1924
Frequency: biennial
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Education, Higher -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: 1905/1907-1962/64.
Numbering Peculiarities: Reporting period for reports 1905/1907-1907/1909 ends Jan. 1; for 1909/1910-1911/1912 ends Dec. 31; for 1912/1914-1962/64 ends June 30.
Numbering Peculiarities: Report for 1907/1909 mistakenly dated 1908/1909.
General Note: Includes the report of the president of the University of the State of Florida, later the University of Florida, and of the presidents of the other state institutions of higher education.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00090515
Volume ID: VID00003
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 50135007
lccn - 2002229051
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Report of Florida Board of Regents

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REPORT
OF THE

BOARD OF CONTROL

OF THE

State Institutions of
Higher Learning of Florida


FOR THE
Biennium Ending
June 30, 1924

T J. APPLYAA RD, PRI NR, TALLAHASS~, FLORI DA
Scio


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
LAW LIBRARY


VOL.NO.


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BOARD OF CONTROL


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P. K. YONGE, Chairman..... .... ....................... . .Pensa.ola

E. L. W ART ANN .... ... ....... ............................. ... iitra

JOHN 0. COOPER, JR. ..... ............ .. ........... .. .. Jacksonville

A. H. BLANDI)NG ..... ............................ ............Leesburg
W B. DAVIS.. ... .......... ........ ... .. ....... ...... ......Perry


J. T. DIAMOND, Secretary..................................Tallahassee


2-B. Con.


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INTRODUCTION



We beg to submit herewith our biennial report on the State Educational
Institutions under our management, viz:

University of Florida, Gainesville.
Florida State College for Women, Tallahassee.


School for the Deaf and the Blind,


Agricultural and Mechanical


St. Augustine.


College for Negroes,


Tallahassee.


The report


is made under different heads as follows:


I. Membership.
II. Reports.
III. Lands and Buildings.
IV. Growth.


Budgets.


VI. Conclusion.


I-MEMBERSHIP


The terms of two members of the Board expired in July, 1923,


Mr. E. L.


Wartmann, of Citra, and Mr. John B. Sutton, of Tampa.


Wartmann was appointed to succeed himself and Mr.


A. H. Blanding, of


Bartow,


was appointed to succeed Mr. Sutton.


Weaver resigned and Mr.


W. B. Davis, of Perry,


In June, 1924, Mr.


W. L.


was appointed in his


place.


II-REPORTS


We hand you herewith the following reports, viz


Report of J. T. Diamond, Secretary of the Board of Control.


Report of W.


S. Cawthon, State Superintendent.


Report of A. A. Murphree, A. M., L.L. D., President of the University.
Report of Edward Conradi, A. M., Ph. D., President of the Florida State
College for Women.
Report of A. H. Walker, A. B., Litt. D., President of the School for the
Deaf and the Blind.
Report of J. R. E. Lee. A. M., L.L. D., President of the Agricultural and
Mechanical College for Negroes.




A ** *- : * *


. *.. . . . . . . . .. .. .--.---- --


The reports of the Presidents are published separately from


but are to be considered a part of it.


They are full and complete.


ing also the reports of the Director of the Experiment Station, the


and heads of departments.


report,
mbody-
Deans


give a full and clear account or the


work of the Institutions,


next biennium.


that


courses


of study, etc., and


the needs


We believe you will lie interested in them and


you will give them your careful consideration.


ror the


feel assured


111-LANDS AND BUILDINGS


The appropriation for the buildings made by dhe last


Legi-


nature


been expended for the several buildings as authorized. The aui..uun


enlarging and remodeling


the Auditorium at the Florida Stanr. College


for Women
in usable sh


was not sufficient to complete the work.


ape.


It is, L0


% ever,


The amount for the Library at the University was only


sufficient to build one I'nit of the building but


ments for the next biennium. T
Florida State College for Women.


this will meet the require-


he same is true of the Library at the


The amount of land at the several Institutions


the same


as shown


in our last biennial


report


except that 5.6 acres


has been added to the


acreage


of the Florida State College for Women and 10


acres


has been


added to the acreage of the University.


Also the


Trustees of the Internal


Improvement Fund have


set apart 480


acres


additional to the Everglades


Experiment Station, adjoining the


acreage


already set apart,


so :.bat the


amount of land owned


as follows:


University


acres


Florida State College for Women...
School for the Deaf and the Blind..


274.C acres


acres


4-)L
&)


Agricultural


Mechanical


College


.......... 229


ac res


Negroes ............. ....
Branch Experiment Stations:


Tobacco


Citrus


Station...
Station.....


acres


84 acres


Everglades


Station


..... 640 acres


acres


TOTAL


1889.6 acres


IV-GROWTH

The following table showing the attendance for each year for each In-
stitution sinoe the passage of the Buckman Act in 1905 and the estimated
attendance for the coming biennium gives an idea of the growth of the
InSitutions:


K"


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ATTENDANCE OF THE) SEVERAL INSTITUTIONS


Summer


Session


1905-06
1906-07
1907-08
1908-09
1909-10
1910-11
1911-12
1912-13
1913-14
1914-15
1915-16
1916-17
1917-18
1918-19
1919-20
1020-21
1921-22"
1922-23
1923-24
1924-25
1925-26
1926-27


..D...
.....



. ....
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o.....
.....
...a..
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* . .

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* . .










.....
* .

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* . *
* *
* *
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101S


1550 1484
1800 1856


1913-14.
1914-15.
1915-16.
1916-17.
1917-18.
1918-19.
1919-20.
1920-21.
1921-22.
1922-23.
11923-24.
1924-25.
1925-26.
1926-27.


* After the year 1921-22 no students are included in the attendance at the
University and Florida State College for Women except those taking
regular College work.


V-BUDGETS


The Presidents of the several Institutions, the Director of the Experi-
ment Station, the deans and heads of Departments have made up their
budgets in great detail, giving the amounts they consider necessary for the


biennium, July 1, 1925,
Budgets is as follows:


to June 80, 1927.


The recapitulation


of the


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10

RECAPITULATION OF THE BUDGETS OF THE INSTITUTIONS AS
RECOMMENDED BY THE PRESIDENTS


Other


Sources


Appro-
priation


Operating


Buildings


University of Flor-
ida, including Ex-
periment Stations
and Extension Di-


visions.......... $2,829,258


$206,731


$2,622,527


$1,718,327


904,200


Florida


State


lege for Women.
School for the Deaf
and the Blind...
A. & M. College for
Negroes.........


1,284,568


375,250


562,942


136,875


52,400


1,147,693


375,250


510,542


503,193


232,250


155,529


584,500


143,000


355,013


TOTALS..


$5,052,018


$396,006


$4,656,012


$2,669,299


$1,S86.713


For details of the Budgets,


see Reports of the Presidents.


We recommend that certain changes be


made


in the budgets


as follows:


UNIVERSITY

(1) That $15,000 be added to the Building Budget for furnishing the
Library, making this budget $919,200, instead of $904,200.

(2) That the Building Budget as amended be reduced from $919,200
to $668,800, the amended budget being as follows:

ADMINISTRATIVE-
Under Campus and Road Construction should be con-
sidered new walks and hard surfacing of all drives.
This has been carefully worked out by Prof. Alex.


Bresth


of the Engineering College and


blue prints


with specifications filed showing cost of............$20,000
Iron fence for enclosing campus grounds.............. 5,000
New Unit in the Central Heating Plant account of new
Library and Auditorium, Buildings added..... ... 15,000


Connecting


Buckman


and Thomas


Hall dormitories


with the Central Heating Plant and new return sys-
tem for steam heating installed (estimated)........
Enlargement of the present sewerage system tank and
removal of the septic tank to the target range......
Dormitories done over and new furniture installed....
Wooden Barracks arranged as Dormitory Annex......


Furnishing


Library


10,000


20,000
10,000
1,000
15,000


$ 96,000.00


Budget


'^- .












ARTS AND SCIENCES-
Biological Station on Lake Newman.


............. . 4,100


New Building Chemistry and Pharmacy
Equipment for same....................


...........200,000
........ ... 50,000


254,100.00


CIVIL ENGINEERING-


Building


100,000.00


AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE-


First


Unit Horticultural


Building.....


150.000


Completing and furnishing third floor of


Building ...... .. ...... . .
Barns for bulls and beef cattle...
EXPERIMENT STATION-
Purchase of new land...........
Greenhouses for Plant Disease...


Agricultural


.. ............. 4,000


.. .5,000


159,000.00


22,400


............... 5,000


Isolation


Citrus Station Laboratory Buildings.


12,000


Tobacco Station new land.
Packing House ...........
Outside Insectary ........
Citrus Station, new land..
Mule Barn and Tool Shed.


........................ . 1,700


.. .. 4,500


......................... 1,000
....................... ... 12,000


59.700.00


TOTAL


$668.800.00


That $15,000 be added to the amount for the Experiment Station


Budget for the eradication of the tomato disease,

(4) That the General Extension Budget be r
$80,000.


"nail head rust."


reduced from $154,220 to


(5) That the term of the Summer School be reduced for the second
year of the bienmium from 12 weeks to 8 weeks, thus reducing the budget


of Teachers' College


and Summer School from $110,250 to $100,000.


The Operating Budget with the foregoing changes will be $1,663,657.

FLORIDA STATE COLLEGE FOR WOMEN

That the Building Budget be reduced from $584,500 to $515,500, the
amended budget being as follows:


Auditorium, completing Building
Auditorium Equipment.........


Library


* 9 " . a . . . . 9
9 .. . 9 * .*,9. .9 .9
...........................


Building Equipment....


Training School and Equipment.


38,000.00
7,000.00
6,000.00
80,000.00


Dormitory
Dormitory


Equipment...........


Heating Plant Enlarged.........
Gymnasium and Equipment.....


..... 140.000.00
..... 10,000.00
..... 12,000.00
..... 300,000.00


8--B. Con.


S.


pens . . . . . .
















Academic Building......;.......................
Home Economics Practice House.................
Tile Roof on Jennie Murphree Hall..............


Completing Dining Room.
Fire Stairways..........


Land


* * ..*.

. . . 4
......."


. . 4 * . *
. *..*...... **


....... ... D t


... ..* ..l*9 a
. ... .... ..
. .... . .. ..
9*S1t*1* 911
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80,000.00
12,000.00
2,000.00
10,000.00
8,000.00
10,500.00


$515,500.00


SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF AND THE BLIND


That the Building Budget be reduced from $143,000 to $120,000, the
amended budget being as follows:


Kitchen--Addition to
Bulk Head ..........
Athletic Field .......


. * . .
* I I. 9


* . . C . .
*. .9 . . I


* 9 I 9 4 C C I 9 I C 9 .
* 9 C . I * 9 9 .
* 4 9 9 * 9 C *.


Campus


New Boilers.........
Boys' Dormitory.....


*99C*CI.
. .I . .*.I


*. . .* . I 9 .
* C I I I C .


* I 9 4 I I I 9 I 9 I I 9
* .....IC C 9..9... C


Completing Bloxham Cottage.


25,000.00
14,000.00
8,000.00
3,000.00
7,500.00
00,000.00
2,500.00


$120,000.00


AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE FOR NEGROES


(1) That $5,000 be added to the Building Budget for repairs, making
this budget $365,013, instead of $360,013.

(2) That this budget as amended be reduced from $365,013 to $295,013,
the amended budget being as follows:


Girls' Dormitory (Brick) ..... .... . . . . ............. ... .
Dining Hall, complete, including Refrigerating Plant.......
New Science Hall, complete ................................
Mechanic Arts Building...................................
Administration Building, Class Rooms and Assembly (brick)


Repairs on Buildings.........................
Nurses' Home . . . ..... ..... . . . .....
Central Sewerage System and Septic Tank,.....
Water System...............................


* *9 * *
..........
..........


80,000.00
12,400.00
7,500.00
4,500.00
125,000.00
10,61300
5,000.00
25,000.00
25,000.00


$295,013.00


W t .W the foregoing changes we approve the budgets.
s e tec;apltalation as amended is as follows:

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13

RECAPITULATION OF THE BUDGETS OF THE INSTITUTIONS


AS AMENDED


Other


Budget


Sources


Appro-
priation


Operating


Buildings


University of Flor-
ida, including Ex-
periment Stations
and Extension Di-


visions.......... $2,539,188


$206,731


$2,332,457


$1,663,657


$ 668,800


Florida


State


lefe for


Women.


1,215,068


136,875


1,078,193


563,193


515,000


' School for the Deaf
and the Blind...
A. &. M. College for
Negroes.........


352,250


502,942


52,400


352,250


450,542


232,250


155,529


120,000


295,013


TOTALS.


$4,609,448


$306,006


$4,213,442


$2,614,629


$1,598,813


The amount asked for is large, but it is a question whether these In-


stitutions should be asked to get along on less.


It is unnecessary to call


attention to the fact that Florida appears to be on the eve of a great
development and the indications are that her progress in the near future


will be unprecedented.


There are many serious problems to be solved in


agricultural, horticultural and other lines that will have an


bearing on. this development.


important


We know also that many more of


young men and young women should be in our Institutions than there
are at present, but on account of their over-crowded condition we cannot


properly take care of more


than we have.


The reports in .the State


Superintendent's office show that there are more than 3,000 students in
the Senior Classes of the High Schools of the State and we should be in
position to take care of all who may make application for admittance to


our Institutions.


These conditions must be carefully weighed in fixing


the amount of the appropriation.


VI-CONCLU SION


The reports


from


the several


Institutions,


Experiment


Station


I)epartments are so full and complete that


we do not deem it


necessary


go into them in detail as it would be


largely repetition, but we earnestly


hope you will give them your most careful consideration.


ever,


to say a few


We wish, how-


words in regard to the Agricultural and Mechanical


College for Negroes as there have been some important changes at that


Institution since our last report of which you should be advised.


At the


close of the first year of the biennium we deemed it to be for the best


interest of the Institution to make a change in the Presidency.


Not being


able to find a suitable man for the position at once we appointed a mom


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ber of the faculty as Acting President.


This proved to be


an unfortunate


selection and the Institution had a very unsatisfactory year. In June
last, after careful investigation we appointed J. R. E. Lee President and
we think we were fortunate in getting him. He is a man of good edu-
cation, fine executive ability and a good disciplinarian and we believe
well fitted for the position. Under his management the Institution has
greatly improved and we think with sufficient financial support it will
develop into an excellent school and will be of great benefit to the negro
race, and of course to the State.
We trust that all of the Institutions and work referred to in this report
will receive the most liberal treatment from you that conditions justify.
In conclusion we wish to thank all those in the work under our manage-
ment for their earnest and efficient efforts and our hearty appreciation
of their fine spirit and cooperation.


BOARD OF CONTROL,


By P. K.


BOARD OF


Yonge, Chairman.


CONTROL BUDGET


For the Year 1925-26


For travelling


expenses


of Board members and Board's


Secretary ........................ ..................
For Office Expense, including record books, postage, sta-


$2,000


tionery, office supplies,


For Salary of Board's


etc.. .............


Secretary..... .......


For Salary of Stenographer and Clerk.


200
... 1,800


.......i. 1,000


$5,000


For the Year 1926-27

For travelling expenses of Board members and Board's
Secretary ........................ ..................
For Office Expense, including record books, postage. sta-


tionery, office supplies,


For Salary of Board's Secretary..........
For Salary of Stenographer and Clerk....


$2,000


..........


For printing Biennial Report of the Board of Control.


... 1,000


$6,000


Total Budget for the Biennium ..............


$11,00o


.''


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etc.............




;. * ** **. ^ : ....-' .- : :* ,,-" %* "* *^ / | **;^ (
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15


Tallahassee, Fla.,


Aug. 1, 1923.


To the State Board of Control:

Gentlemen:

The following report of the receipts and disbursements of the funds for


the several


institutions under


the management of the


Board for


scholastic year beginning on the first day of July, 1922, and ending June
30, 1923, is herewith respectfully submitted:


J. T. DIAMOND,
Secretary Board of Control.


SUMMARY OF RECEIPTS AND
BEGINNING JULY 1, 1922,


DISBURSEMENTS FOR THE YEAR


AND ENDING JUNE 30


Total Receipts


University


of Florida.


Florida State College for Women.


Florida


A. and M. College for Negroes.


.... ..........$335,778.35
............... 303,110.66


.. ......... 50,292.79


(Total for higher learning)...........
Agricultural Experiment Station...........
Agricultural Extension Division...........
Florida School for the Deaf and the Blind.


$ 689,181.80


.......$115,095.03
....... 124,107.22


114,047


$ 353,250.17


Total


Receipts ........ .


$1,042,431.97


Total Disbursements


University of Florida.......................
Florida State College for Women............
Florida A. and M. College for Negroes.......


..$329,491.00
.. 285,618.85


..... 50.292.79


(Total amount spent for higher learning)


.... $


665,402.64


Agricultural Experiment Station


Agricultural Extension


Division


...... $ 94,577.24
...... 124,088.33


Florida School for the Deaf and the Blind.


112,307.77


$ 380,973.34


Total


Disbursements...


$ 996,375.98


Unexpended Balance on July 1, 1928..........


46,.0590


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UNIVERSITY


OF FLORIDA


CURRENT EXPENSE FUND--STATE APPROPRIATION

Resources:


Balance brought forward 1921
priation .. . . . .........


Legislative appro-


Warrant No. 37771 cancelled May 24, 1923.


Legislative appropriation 1921..


170,000.00


170.100.00


Expenditures:


For Salaries............


For Equipment, Furniture and Apparatus


.........$127,637.11
........ 17,894.72


For Heat, Light and Water....
For Postage and Office Expense
For Advertising and Printing..
For Buildings and Repairs.....


For Traveling


* 9 9 " 9 .9
*.9. . . .9 .
*. 9 *. * 9 9 9 .
* 9. .* 9 9 9 9*


.......
* 9 9 4 9 "


Expenses..


For Freight and Express...
For Feed Stuffs............
For Books and Publications.
For all other purposes.......


........ iiiii........
S. 9 9 99 9 9 9
. 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9
*. 9 9 .9 9 . . .9 . * .. *
* . 9 9 9 . .9 . .. . . 9


2,210.89
2,179.57
3,840.22
6,790.35
2,234.3S
2,252,82
1.,037.89
3,871.55
150.50


170,100.00


MORRILL FUND--FEDERAL APPROPRIATION

Resources:
Received from the Federal Government...........

Expenditures:
For Salaries. .. .. .. .......... . ............



INCIDENTAL FUND-SUNDRY COLLECTIONS


25,000.00


25,000.00


Resources:


Balance Brought Forward July 1, 1922.
Receipts Collected During the Year....


S.......... $


........... 33,779.06


33,779.28


75.00


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<< .. < * ^ ^ .^ ^ v


Expenditures


For Salaries.........


For Equipment, 1Furniture and Apparatus.
For Heat, Light and Water...............


For Postage, Stationery and Office Supplies.
For Advertising and Printing..............


For Building and Repairs...


For Traveling


Expenses.


.......$ 17,910.40
....... 4,813,88
... .. .97.76


.... 640.62
.... 671.48


2,447.53
1,254.00


For Freight and Express...
For Feed Stuffs...........
For Books and Publications
For All Other Purposes....


... 564.51


. ...... ....... ..
. . .. . . ..
.............'.........


184.20
516.18
206.83


29,307.43


Unexpended Balance on July 1, 1923..


4,471.80


SEMINARY INTEREST FUND


Resources:


Received Interest on


Expenditures


For Salaries....


2,151.50


2,151.50


AGRICULTURE COLLEGE FUND


Resources:


Received Interest on Bonds......................


Expenditures:
For Salaries.....


BUILDING FUND


Resources:
Balance Brought Forward July 1, 1922, of the 1921


Legislative Appropriation for the First
Administration Building...............


7,427.50


7,427.50


Unit of


61,372.50


Expenditures:
Fort First Unit of Administration Building......


01,8'T12ZO


: it
** .*.


. *.
.'. "* ^


9*t



r- l""d^ fi
*. I ;'* .?
: .* *
"s^T


'^'.I '*^/-"


B onds......................




WV~ S ~ J..w ~ "~rp
lxtvt
~ Ptt'&"


18


GENERAL EXTENSION DIVISION


Resources:
Balance of 1921 Legislative Appropriation Brought


Forward July


1, 1922.


Legislative Appropriation 1921 for this year.


...... $


1,499.01


...... 30,000.00


31,499.01


Expenditures:


For Salaries.....


.... ....$


For Equipment, Furniture and Apparatus....
For Heat, Light and Water..................
For Postage, Stationery and Office Expense.
For Advertising and Printing .................


For Buildings and Repairs.......
For Traveling Expenses.........
For Freight and Express ........
For Slides and Films............
For Books and Publications......


For All


* ... . . . .. . C
*. C .9 9 . .* .* .C .*
*. C 9 .9 C C C 9 9


20,692.22
1,292.34


21.30


2,640.24
2,044.24
107.50
2,505.98
73.77
1,069.48


871.94
180.00


Other Purposes......


31,499.01


GENERAL EXTENSION DIVISION, INCIDENTAL

Resources:


Balance Brought Forward July 1, 1922.


Received During the Year...


FUND


32.43


. ........ $


. ...... .. 4,410.18


4,448.61


Expenditures:


For Salaries..............


.......$


For Equipment, Furniture and Apparatus...
For Postage, Stationery and Office Expense.
For Advertising and Printing ...............
For Building and Repairs...................


1,228.83


206.01
56 33
139.90


For Traveling
For Freight am


Expenses.....
i Express....


S* C * I C C C C 9** 9 C 9 *
*.. .me......'...C..


For Enrollment Fees in Other Institutions.


For Books and Publications...
For All Other Purposes.......


* * *...
* 9 . .* C 9 C


9* ** C


142.70
57.19
206.00
76.55
515.35


2,683.06


Unexpended Balance July 1, 1922............


1,815.55




J .. *


19

SUMMARY OF THE RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS TOGETHER
'WITH THE BALANCES IN THE DIFFERENT FUNDS
OF THE UNIVERSITY


Name of the Fund


Receipts


Disbursements


Balances


Current
Morrill


Incidental


Expense
Fund.....


Fund.


Fund..


Seminary Interest Fund...
Agricultural College Fund.


Building
General


Fund...


Extension Division..


General Extension Incidental


......... $170,100.00


25,000.00
33,779,23
2,151.50
7,427.50
01,372.50
31,499.01
4,448.61


$170,100.00
25,000.00
29,307.43
2,151.50
7,427.50
61,372.50
31,499.01
2,633.06


$4,471.80


1,815.55


Totals


$335,778.35


$329,491.00


$6,287.35


AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION

CURRENT EXPENSE FUND-STATE APPROPRIATION

Resources:


Balance


1921 Legislative


Appropriation


Brought


Forward, July 1, 1922...


7,478.27
30,000.00


Appropriation 1921 for this year.


37,478.27


Expenditures:


For Salaries ......


. ......... .$ 19,307.00


For Equipment, Furniture and Apparatus.


For Heat, Light and Water........
For Postage, Stationery and Office


For Advertising and Printing..
For Buildings and Repairs.....
For Traveling Expenses........
For Freight and Express......
For Feed Stuffs...............
For Books and Publications....
For All Other Purposes........


Expense.
. . . . ..


* . .


. . . . 4 . * .
. 4 * 4 4 * .
.*. 4 4 .* . . . .
*.....4..*....*.*..


5,938.69
315.47
567.63
4,412.34
2,472.32
2,118.88
333.02
1,289.08


659.91


37,478.27


:i'*''*
: ^
" /


- **^
' / ; ': ^ *




w A*.


ADAMS FUND-FEDERAL APPROPRIATION


Resources:


Received Check from Federal Government........

Expenditures:


For Equipment, Furniture and Apparatus.
For Heat, Light and Water..............


15,000.00


.......$ 13,894.11
....... 619.20


For Advertising and Printing.
For Buildings and Repairs....
For Traveling Expenses.......
For Freight and Express......
For Feed Stuffs..............


........9....9.....*
. . . . .. *


14.81
14.68
302.99
97.07
37.80


For Books and Publications.............
For All Other Purposes.................


15,000.00


HATCH FUND-FEDERAL


APPROPRIATION


Resources:


$ 15.000.00


Received Check from Federal Government.

Expenditures:


For Salaries .. ..... ... ... ...


. . . .$


For Equipment, Furniture and Apparatus....
For Heat, Light and Water.................
For Postage, Stationery and Office Expense.


For Advertising and Printing.


For Buildings and
For Traveling Exj


Repairs.
3enses....


For Freight and Express...
For Feed Stuffs......... ...
For Books and Publications.
For All Other Purposes.....


.......


O........
* 9. 9 9.. 4 *.


* .. . .* *
.. .. .


12,489.31
1,111.80
21.05
130.17
45.19
123.65
363.00


16.94


* * 4 * S . 9
. *99* .4 *9 9 .9 9*.


499.95
185.70
13.15


14.9.9999


Unexpended Balance July


1. 1923....


INCIDENTAL FUND--FARM SALES


Resources:


Balance Brought Forward July 1,


Receipts During the


Year..... . . . . . ........ .


593.72
6,028.79


6,617.51


1922............


For Salaries......... .......




* ..* '* .. *'' : *
il' .' ' .
>(t


"*: C"I:3:^ rl,",iBn iiiiiil
* /''^


Expenditures:


For Salaries........ ..... .....


. C C C $


For Equipment, Furniture and Apparatus.
For Postage and Office Expense...........


For Buildings and Repairs..
For Traveling Expenses.....
For Freight and Express...
For Feed Stuffs............
For Books and Publications.
For All Other Purposes.....


.........9 ..9C ..... C
. .... ... .. ... ...


817.94
657.56


142.51


35.73
4,389.26
16.68
203.56


6,265.84


Unexpended Balance on July 1, 1923..........


351.67


TOBACCO EXPERIMENT STATION


Resources:


Balance Brought Forward July 1, 1921..........
Legislative Appropriation................... .....


5,833.74
15,000.00


20,833.74


Expenditures:


For Salaries............. ................
For Equipment, Furniture and Apparatus.
For Heat, Light and Water..............


For Postage and Office Expense
For Advertising and Printing..
For Buildings and Repairs.....


* -f . C C C
.......CC C .C.


........ $ 6,170.02


..,.....
..I.....
* . .9 .. .


3,358.67
360.26
396.44
21.29


...... 10,181.35


For Traveling Expenses .....
For Freight and Express.....
For Feed Stuffs.............
For Books gnd Publications..


. . .C . . .* 9 . C .C . C
. . .* . .* C . . C . C
. . . C C . .C C . C


155.22
78.85
109.44


$ 20,833.14


Unexpended Balance July 1, 1923............ $
(Reverts to Treasury)

INCIDENTAL FUND-TOBACCO EXPERIMENT STATION

Resources:


Received Refund on Hardware for Laboratory....

Expenditures:


Nothing


200.00


.... ... ... .... *** ***I**** **
_ C **** ***. C C| C C S C** C *9 tC" C Cat C9* >*C* 9


Unexpended Balance July 1, 1928............


200.00


A*

S
**
. .' I/J




A 1"
I:~~v1J


EVERGLADES


EXPERIMENT STATION


Resources:


Amount of 1921 Legislative
Forward ...............


Appropriation Brought


Legislative Appropriation for this


9,965.51
10,000.00


year.


19,965.51


Expenditures:


None


Unexpended Balance July 1, 1923


19,965.51


SUMMARY OF RECEIPTS AN DISBURSEMENTS TOGETHER WITH
THE BALANCES IN THE DIFFERENT FUNDS OF THE


AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION


Name of the Fund


Current
Adams
Hatch


Incidental


Tobacco
Tobacco


Expense Fund


Fund ....
Fund.....


Fund.


Station.
Station,


. *. $


Incidental.


Receipts
37,478.27
15,000.00
15,000.00


... 6,617.51


20,833.74


Disbursements


37,478.27
15,000.00
14,990.09
6,205.84
20,833.14


200.00


Balances


351.67
.60
200.00


Everglades Experiment Station.


19,965.51


19,965.51


Totals


$115,095.03


$ 94,577.24


$20,517.79


AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION DIVISION

SMITH-LEVER-STATE APPROPRIATION


Resources:


Legislative


Appropriation


48,872.25


Expenditures:


For Salaries .............


For Equipment, Furniture and Apparatus....
For Postage, Stationery and Office Expense.
For Advertising and Printing ...............
For Traveling Expenses.....................
For Freight and Express...................


........$ 34,651.57


843.05
672.48
328.49


..... 12,374.60
..... 2.06


48,872.25


........... $


. . . . . . . . . . . ... $










23

SMITHR-LEVER-FEDERAL APPROPRIATION

Resources:


Balance Brought Forward from Previous Year....
Received from the Federal Government............
Received Interest on Deposits from State Treasurer


666.12


58,287.09


632.80


59,586.01


Expenditures:
For Salaries.....


......... .$


For Equipment, Furniture and Apparatus........
For Postage, Stationery and Office Expense......
For Advertising and Printing....................
For Buildings and Repairs.......................


For Traveling


35,182.22
2,720.28
1,353.02
4,558.47
535.68


Expenses....


For Freight and Express....
For Books and Publications.
For All Other Purposes.....


208.10
65.58


59,567.99


Unexpended Balance on July 1, 1923..........


18.02


SMITH-LEVER, SUPPLEMENTAL--FEDERAL APPROPRIATION

Resources:


15,496.08


Received Check from Federal Government........
Received Interest on Deposits from State Treasurer


152.88


15,648.96


Expenditures:


.......$ 15,383.16


For Salaries............................ ..
For Equipment, Furniture and Apparatus.
For Traveling Expenses...................


.......
* I ...


1.21
263.72


15,648.09


Unexpended Balance on July 1, 1923..........


.-.. '.^
'' '. .: *'^
** ^
^
.. *' '..\-
/.. ^.. ^.
'. ** '..*^ 4s"


..................... 14,941.24










24

SUMMARY OF RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS TOGETHER WITH
THE BALANCES IN THE DIFFERENT FUNDS OF THE
AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION DIVISION


Name of the Fund


Smith-Lever,
Smith-Lever,


Lever,


State...
Federal


Supplemental.


............ $

... .. .. ..


Receipts
48,872.25
59,586.01
15,648.96


Disbursements


Balances


48,872.25
59,567.99
15,648.09


Totals


FLORIDA


$124,107.22


STATE COLLEGE FOR


$124,088.33


WOMEN


CURRENT EXPENSE FUNDI-STATE APPROPRIATION


Resources:


Balance Brought Forward Previous


Legislative


Tear....


...... $


Appropriation


1,803.65


146,000.00


147,803.65


Expenditures:


For Salaries.......... . . .
For Equipment, Furniture and
For Heat, Light and Water....


......... $122,384.67


Apparatus.


For Postage, Stationery and Office Expense
For Advertising and Printing..............
For Buildings and Repairs.................


For Traveling Expenses.
For Freight and Express


...Q."
....."


For Books and Publications.
For All Other Purposes.....


. . ............ .


. 4 * 4 4 .
. 4 .. 4 9. 4. *. 9
.....................


.. ..... 11,891.32


3,136.58
2,450.75
181.50
3,336.95
351.56
294.74
3,189.33
586.25


147,803.65


INCIDENTAL FUND-SUNDRY COLLECTIONS


Resources:


Balance Brought Forward July 1, 1922............


Receipts Collections During the


Year. ........ .


11,559.96
44,261.33


55,821.29












Expenditures:
For Salaries........


For Equipment, Furniture and Apparatus...
For Heat, Light and Water .................
For Postage, Stationery and Office Expense.
For Printing and Advertising ...............


For Buildings and


Repairs.


5,531.86
629.90


637.03


1,109.69
2,294.07


For Traveling Expenses.....
For Books and Publications.


120.00
993.08


38,599.58


Unexpended Balance on July 1, 1923..


....... $


17,221.71


SEMINARY INTEREST FUND


Resources:


Balance Brought Forward July 1, 1922..........


Received Interest During the


5,820.26


Year...


7,971.76


Expenditures:


For Salaries......


................ ... ......... $


7,961.66


Unexpended Balance on July 1, 1923.


. . .. . .


BUILDING FUND


Resources:


Balance


Brought


Forward


Legislative


Appropria-


tion July


1, 1922.......


.......... $


74,445.43


Expenditures:


For Equipment, Furniture and Apparatus.


For Heating


Plant... ....


For Construction of Jennie Murphree Hall.
For Grading Campus and Building Walks.
For Freight and Express.................


9,538.91


. 11,443.85
. 52,039.63
. 1,329.75
. 93.29


74,445.43


A


10.10


*


*E lI: i: ,y


* *^..^ ..:**I^Tqi.^


I............... OI09.


.......$ 27,283.95


........... 2,151.50




4r~: .. ; **~ ."""l


26

HOME DEMONSTRATION-STATE APPROPRIATION

Resources:


Balance Brought Forward July 1,


Legislative


1922.


Appropriation.


. . .
*..*1


1,805.53
15,000.00


16,80S.53


Expenditures:
For Salaries.....


..... ... ..............$


For Equipment, Furniture and Apparatus


For Heat, Light and Water....


.....".
* p. I P


For Postage, Stationery and Office Expense.


For Advertising and Printing.
For Buildings and Repairs....


For Traveling


Expenses....


For Freight and Express....
For Books and Publications.
For All Other Purposes.....


:*
* p


* p


* p p p p p p. p .p p p .p p p
*....p ......p p p. ....p *
*.. *. p. .. p. p p p .. p


7,003.91
3,185.53
45.86
1,192.37
2,833.22
15.70
1,330.78
294.58
78.86
227.72


16,808.53


JAMES D.


WESCOTT ESTATE


Resources:


Balance


Brought Forward July


260.00


Expenditures


None


Unexpended Balance on July 1, 1923..........


260.00


SUMMARY OF RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS TOGETHER WITH


THE BALANCES IN THE DIFFERENT FUNDS


OF THE


FLORIDA STATE COLLEGE FOR WOMEN


Name of the Fund


Receipts


Disbursements


Balances


Current


Incidental
Seminary
Building


Expense


Interest


Fund.


Fund....


Fund .............


$147,803.65
55.821.29
7,971.76
74,445.43


$147.803.65
38,599.58
7,961.66
74,445.43


$17,221.71


Home


Demonstration


Fund.


16.808.53


16,808.53


James D.


Wescott Estate....


..... 260.00


260.00


Totals


$303,110.66


$285,618.85


$17,401.81


.~ **
"'*


1, 1922............


Fund ........




p''^ ** ' '; .: '; *:;;;""~ r *1, ^; "';" ~i~
% ,,,

" 7


27


THE FLORIDA


SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF


AND THE BLIND


CURRENT EXPENSE FUND-STATE APPROPRIATION

Resources:


Balance Brought Forward July 1,
Legislative Appropriation........


1922. . .. . .


3,567.27
80,000.00


83,567.27


Expenditures:


..........$ 42,059.58


For Salaries.. ................
For Equipment, Furniture and
For Heat, Light and Water...


Apparatus.


For Postage, Stationery and Office Expense.


For Buildings and Repairs.
For Traveling Expenses.....
For Freight and Express....
For Feed and Groceries.....
For Books and Publications.
For All Other Purposes.....


O . . . .. . . .. .
S*9 *. . .. .** .
.....................


....... 14,003.87


3,303.20
477.18
3,966.07
1,147.51
1,081.51


1,631.28
2,381.10


83,567.27


INCIDENTAL FUND-SUNDRY


COLLECTIONS


Resources:


Balance Brought Forward July 1, 1922
Receipts During the Year............


.......... $


1,181.54


............ 883.50


2,065.04


Expenditures:
For Buildings and Repairs.


Unexpended Balance on July 1, 1923.


S.............. $


. . . .V. .$


324.89


1,740.15


BUILDING FUND--STATE APPROPRIATION

Resources:


Balance Brought Forward July 1,


2922...... ......


28,415.61


Expenditures


For Construction of Annex to Building for Negroes


28,415".81


KS


................ .. .. 13,515.97









28

SUMMARY OF RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS TOGETHER WITH
THE BALANCES IN THE DIFFERENT FUNDS OF THE FLORIDA
SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF AND THE BLIND


Name of the Fund


Current
Incident


Expense
I Fund .


Building Fund...

Totals ......


Fund.......... $
1. 2. 1 .. . . . . .
" C C C S .. *


Receipts
83,567.27
2,065.04
28,415.61


............ $114,047.92


Disbursements


83,567.27
324.89
28,415.61


$112,307.77


Balances


$1,740.15


$1,740.15


THE FLORIDA AGRICULTURAL AND


MECHANICAL


COLLEGE FOR NEGROES

CURRENT EXPENSE FUND-STATE APPROPRIATION


Resources:


Balance Brought Forward July 1, 1922..


Expenditures:
For Salaries. ....


14,063.17


............$ 10,996.60


For Equipment, Furniture and Apparatus....
For Heat, Light and Water.................
For Postage, Stationery and Office Expense.


For Advertising and Printing ............
For Buildings and Repairs.............
For Traveling Expenses.................


1mU1(1111
"@...... *
@. . C ..C *
*. . . ..*.C *


301.63
1,035.17
213.74
360.15
957.49
55.14


For Freight and Express.....
For Books and Publications..
For All Other Purposes......


135.05


14,063.17


MORRILL


FUND-FEDERAL APPROPRIATION


Resources:


Balance Brought Forward July 1, 1922.....
Received Check from Federal Government.


72.67
.00.00


25,072.67


Expenditures:


.......$ 20,231.93


For Salaries................ ........... ...
For Equipment, Furniture and Apparatus.
For Heat, Light and Water...............
For Buildings and Repairs.................


2,264.30
929.50


317.65













For Freight and Express...
For Feed Stuffs.............
For Books and Publications.


For Postage, Stationery and Office Supplies.
For All Other Purposes.....................


40.52
852.20
231.25
179.02


20.30


25,072.67


INCIDENTAL FUND-SUNDRY COLLECTIONS

Resources:


Balance Brought Forward, July 1, 1922..


........ $


3,371.32


Receipts Collected During the Year..


......... ... 4,941.98


8,313.30


Expenditures:


.......... .$


For Equipment, Furniture and Apparatus.


For Heat, Light and Water........
For Postage, Stationery and Office


For Advertising and Printing.
For Buildings and Repairs....
For Traveling Expenses.......
For Freight and Express.....


Expense......


"' .... ''D .9 ..' S
" *. . ..S* *
* S *.. 9** & .* *.S.* .9


5,420.42
444.13
929.50
276.11
78.59
317.92
58.59
439.88


For Feed


Stuffs... .........


For Books and Publications.
For All Other Purposes.....


63.88
315.95


8,313.30


BUILDING FUND


Resources:


Balance Brought Forward July 1, 1922 .. ..........
Received Balance Due on Appropriation made by
Trustees of the Julius Rosenwald Fund........
Received Balance Due on Appropriation made by


314.41


400.00


the General Education Board.........


... 696.59


1,411.00


Expenditures:
For Equipment, Furniture and Apparatus....... .
For Repairs on Buildings........................


1,160.26
250.74


1,411.00


I


: ; " 1 "" r* $j~E"r~l""l j
Pi
B *


'";; 8: E~~"; r; IP~E4""1: B i i ""a~;'"F ?~~I*E"$~,: ~ );~ ::' ii"


*4\ "
x *
'


For Salaries..............











30

HOSPITAL FUND-RECEIPTS FROM HOSPITAL

Resources:


Receipts Collected During the


1,432.65


Expenditures:


For Salaries......


For Equipment, Furniture and Apparatus.


.. . . .
* S S


For Heat, Light and Water...


For Postage, Stationery and Office Expense.


For Advertising and Printing.


For Drugs.......


For Freight and Express.


For Groceries....


311.05
304.43
100.43
23.81
21.50
253.24
5.76
412.43


1,432.65


SUMMARY OF RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS OF THE FLORIDA
AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE FOR NEGROES

Disburse-


Name of the Fund


Current Expense Fund-State Appropriation.
Morrill Fund-Federal Appropriation.........


Incidental


Fund-Sundry


Collections..


Building


Hospital Fund-Receipts from Hospital


Receipts


... $14,063.17


25,072.67
8,313.30
1,411.00


........ 1,4


32.65


ments
$14,063.17
25,072.67
8,313.30


1,411.00
1,432.65


Total Receipts and Disbursements.


..... $50,292.79


$50,292.79


BOARD OF CONTROL

Resources:
Balance, Legislative Appropriation of 1921, brought
Forward July 1, 1922..........................


Expenditures:


For Salary of Board's


Secretary..........


For Office Furniture and Fixtures......


* S S S S .
........$
....'...


For Postage, Stationery and Office Expenses...
For Printing the Biennial Report of the Board.
For Traveling Expenses.................. .....


1,300.00
353.35
395.81
902.60
1,888.36


4,790.12



1

I




4,790.12 .


4

*1


'1


13


Year .............


Fund........................




*^, '.. ^ ^ ^^ ^,7,^^ ^ ^ ^ ^^ ^^ ^ ^^ O^ j
1 U *





31


Tallahassee, Fla., Aug. 1, 1924.


To the State Board of Control:

Gentlemen:

The following report of the receipts and disbursements of the funds for


the several


institutions under the management of the


Board for the


Scholastic year beginning on the First day of July, 1923,
June 30, 1924, is herewith respectfully submitted:


and ending


J. T. DIAMOND,
Secretary Board of Control.

SUMMARY OF' RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS FOR THE YEAR
BEGINNING JULY 1, 1923, AND' ENDING JUNE 30, 1924

Total Receipts:


University of Florida....
Florida State College for
Florida A. and M. College


..$582,427.90


Women


for Negroes.


498,802.99
144,092.64


(Total for higher learning) ..................


Agricultural Experiment Station...........
Agricultural Extension Division............
Florida School for the Deaf and the Blind.


$1,225,323.53


.......$159,585.06


127,446.97
150,775.71


$ 437,807.74


Total


Receipts......


....... $1,663,131.27


Total Disbursements


University of Florida


.........$480,686.53


Florida State College for Women......


407,961.39


Florida


A. and M. College for


Negroes.


.... . . . 77,754.13


(Total for Higher Learning)

Agricultural Experiment Station.


Agricultural


Extension


$ 966,402.05


S. . . . . . * *


Division


Florida School for the Deaf and the Blind.


$133,223.75
127,446.64
124.970.46


$ 385,640.85


Total


Disbursements...


$1,352,042.90


Unexpended Balance on July 1, 1924..........


$ 311,088.87











32


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

SALARIES, EQUIPMENT AND OPERATING EXPENSES


Resources:


258,708.65


Legislative Appropriation, 1923...................

Expenditures:


Salaries of Teachers and Office Employees.
For Labor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
For Equipment, Furniture and Apparatus....
For Heat, Light and Water .................
For Postage, Stationery and Office Expense.


For Advertising and Printing.


.....$164,001.79
.... 20,607.00
..... 41,185.71
..... 2,220.75


2,490.24
5,699.77


For Buildings and Repairs..
For Traveling Expenses.....
For Freight and Express....
For Feed Stuffs............
For Books and Publications.
For All Other Purposes.....


* . . . . . 9 * 9 *
* . 9 * 9 * . 9 9
9 9* 9 . . . 9 9

* 9 9 4 9 . 9 9 9 . 4 9


2,231.98
3,840.24
1,589.38
4,176.2S
202.00


$ 258,708.65


INCIDENTAL FUND


Resources:


Balance Brought Forward July 1,
Received During the Year.........


1923..........
.. 23 . .. . *


4,471.80
39,352.46


$ 43,824.26


Expenditures:
For Salaries of Teachers and Office Employees.
For Labor...................................
For Equipment, Furniture and Apparatus.....
For Heat, Light and Water..................
For Postage, Stationery and Office Expense...


For Advertising and Printing......
For Buildings and Repairs.........
For Traveling Expenses..........
For Freight and Express..........
For Feed Stuffs .......... ........
For Books and Publications........
For All Other Purposes............


i........e
.........
........

.........
..9 .....*



. .9 .9 .9
*...4..


...$ 20,439.98


6,011.90
4,816.02
615.36
676.48
789.58
3,416.20
323.37
360.84
269.75
930.94
100.00


$ 38,750.42


Balance Unexpended July 1, 1924............


5,073.84


xr: *, :;- ", .
.:'


.' ^ . "
: i. '


.......... 10,4U3.51












MORRILL FUND


Resources:


Check from


Federal


25,000.00


Expenditures:


For Salaries of Teachers.........................


25,000.00


AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE FUND


Resources:


Received Interest on Bonds..................

Expenditures:
For Salaries of Teachers .............. ..............


8,376.98


8,376.98


SEMINARY INTEREST FUND


Resources:


Received Interest on Bonds......................

Expenditures:


For Salaries of Teachers..


2,172.96


2,171.50


Balance Unexpended on July 1, 1924


FIRE PROTECTION


Resources:


Legislative Appropriation, 1923...................

Expenditures:
For the extension of Water Mains on the Campus..


6,250.00


6,112.13


Balance Unexpended on July 1, 1924..........


137.87


BUILDING FUND


Resources:


Legislative


Appropriation,


$ 200,000.00


/

tE
..~ " "* *.^v3


1
^ :< "
- ^ : '


Government................


1923........ ..........




I; ,,4*
<4, i

V~~lE^
EiC


34


Expenditures:
For the completion of Auditorium Unit of Admin-


istration


Building.


For the erection of a Library Building


..$ 64,349.00
.. 37,032.01


For Equipment for


Auditorium.


3.000.00


104,381.01


Balance Unexpended on July 1, 1924.


95,618.99


GENERAL EXTENSION DIVISION


Resources:


30,000.00


Legislative Appropriation, 1923....................

Expenditures:


For Salaries of Director and Instructors.
For Labor .... .. ... .................


For Equipment,


Furniture and Apparatus.


For Heat, Light and Water........


. . . ...$


.......
*. . .


For Postage, Stationery and Office Expenses.
For Advertising and Printing...............


20,926.15
317.40
2,374.54
13.68
2,931.02
1,868.69


For Traveling


Expenses......


For Freight and Express......
Correspondence Study Courses.
For Books and Publications...


*. . t. *. . . .
* *. *. .. ft ft *. f f. *.. f


610.03
16.95
213.00
728.54


30,000.00


GENERAL EXTENSION DIVISION-INCIDENTAL FUND

Resourced:


Balance Brought Forward July 1, 1923.....


S*..... $


1,815.55


Received Collections During the


Year .......


..... 6,279.50


8,095.05


Expenditures:
For Salaries of Instructors.
For Labor..................


a..... f
S. ...


........
*. f. t t. f f f


..... *


For Equipment, Furniture and Office Expenses.
For Heat, Light and Water...................
For Postage, Stationery and Office Supplies...
For Advertising and Printing.................
tor Building and Repairs.....................
For Traveling Expenses....................... .


1,138.17
879.88
2,125,60


... 67.55


789.81
485.44
222.25
327.61


S ", *
::












For Freight and Express....
For Films........... ......
For Books and Publications.
For All Other Purposes.....


* .. ...
*. i.e....


313.66
67.76
259.93
508.18


7,185.84


Balance Unexpended on July 1, 1924.


. . . ... $


909.21


SUMMARY OF RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS TOGETHER WITH


THE BALANCES IN THE DIFFERENT FUNDS


OF THE UNIVERSITY


Name of the Fund


Receipts


Disbursements


Balances


Salaries,


Equipment


and Operat-


ing Expenses.....


Incidental


Morrill


Fund....


Fund .......


Agricultural College Fund.


Seminary


Interest Fund....


Fire Protection....


Building


Fund....


General Extension Division.


....... $258,708.65
....... 43,824.26


25,000.00
8,376.98
2,172.96
6,250.00
200,000.00
30,000.00


$258,708.65
38,750.42
25,000.00
8,376.98
2,171.50
6,112.13
104,381.01


$ 5,073.84


137.87


95,618.99


30,000.00


General
dental


Extension
Fund....


Division, Inci-


8,095.05


7,185.84


909.21


Totals


$582,427.90


$480,686.53


$101,741.37


AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT


STATION


MAIN STATION, GAINESVILLE


Resources:


Legislative Appropriation,


55,000.00


1923.................. .


Expenditures:
For Salaries of Scientific Agricultural Workers and


Office


Employees............ .


For Labor............. .... ....


For Equipment, Furniture and Apparatus.
For Heat, Light and Water. ...............


For Advertising and


Printing.


For Buildings and Repairs....
For Traveling Expenses.......
For Freight and Express.....


For Feed


Stuffs..... ... ....


For Books and Publications...


* a C ** C C C .
* . C C C C * *4.
a.a....., ..V
).............


...$ 17,720.50
8,518.43


9,699.77
617.92
4,415.10
1,406.79
4,828.92
802.66


965.63


2.069.10











36


For Postage, Stationery and Office
For All Other Purposes...........


Expense..


1,493.27
405.45


52.9413.60


Balance Unexpended on July 1, 1924...........


ADAMS FUND


2,056.40


Resources:


Received Check from Federal Government ........

Expenditures:


15,000.00


For Salaries of Scientific Agricultural


Workers....


15,000.00


HATCH


FUND


Rseources:


Balance Brought Forward July 1, 1923......


. ..... $


Received Check from the Federal Government


15,000.00


1l-,000.01


Expenditures:
For Salaries of Scientific Agricultural Workers and


Office


Employees.....


*... $


15,000.00


Balance


Unexpended on July 1, 1924..........


CITRUS EXPERIMENT STATION


Resources:


Legislative Appropriation,


10,000.00


Expenditures:


For Salary of Superintendent..
For Labor.................... .


For Equipment, Furniture and Apparatus...
For Postage, Stationery and Office Expenses.
Por Advertising and Printing...............
For BUildings and Repairs...................


Ie Traveling txpenaes..
eir relgxt and Express.


*^j /.*.*' . ** : .: < *


.............*.....$


* 0 I * I 0 * t S 0 S t S
*Se ...*.. .. .4...*5 *5


2,400.00
3,085.65
2,571.41


17.40
52.93


1,352.51
111.92
20*8


1923...................




"=L === = y I == =
, .
I


For Feed Stuffs............
For Books and Publications.
For All Other Purposes.....


299.82


75.00


10,000.00


TOBACCO EXPERIMENT STATION


Resources:


Legislative Appropriation, 1923...................

Expenditures:
For Salaries of Superintendent and his Assistant..


For Labor. ..............


For Equipment, Furniture and Apparatus...
For Heat, Light and Water .................
For Postage, Stationery and Office Expense.
For Advertising and Printing................


For Buildings and Repairs..
For Traveling Expenses.....
For Freight and Express....


For Feed


Stuffs...


13,500.00


4,307.17
2,855.37
1,367.97
1,867.45


126.41
107.85


2,169.42
324.95
244.36


111.33


For Books and Publications.


13,500.00


EVERGLADES EXPERIMENT STATION


Resources:
Balance Brought Forward July 1, 1923, Legislative


Appropriation,
Appropriation :


General Revenue Fund.


from


July 1, 1923......


General


Revenue


19,965.51


Available


.......... 5,000.00


24,965.51


Expenditures


For Salaries
cialist......


of Superintendent


and Grass


For Labor. . . . .. . .. . . . . * *.
For Equipment, Furniture and Apparatus...
For Postage, Stationery and Office Supplies.
For Advertising and Printing...............
For Buildings and Repairs. .................


.....$ 1,291.66
....,. 3,465.25
..... 4,055.56
..... 169.07


....~. 2,919.50


* t* '


v,^- .-./
f.I ^ *.^
".:'-'. '^ /


*. .



*1 '* *.3
'. .^ .:- v-t


=y = == *"' .= : =: ,=
-*.. .. .. .
* _'- ^ **


< A > <. '
A ^ t i " .
' \
*' *' ** ^ l .*
41 ~. ^/.~f ?" *
^ i- 'SRi

'*''*


. .. ., . ... ...
..... . ....
. . . i. .. I . .













For Traveling Expenses.....
For Freight and Express....
For Books and Publications.


578.23
120.08
18.30


12,626.71


Balance Unexpended July 1,


1924.


12,338.80


NUT BEARING INDUSTRY


Resources:


Legislative Appropriation,


7,500.00


1923 ............ . .. .


Expenditures:
For Salaries of Field Workers in the Investitgation


of the


Diseases


of Pecan and Other Nut Bearing


Trees ............


.$ 3,061.33


For Labor.. ...............................
For Equipment, Furniture and Apparatus...
For Heat, Light and Water. .................


For Postage, Stationery and Office
For Advertising and Printing.....
For Buildings and Repairs........
For Traveling Expenses...........


For Freight and


78.95
972.78
20.25


Expense.


*. . .. . .. I
* I .* .* I I .I *
*. . .. . ..* .* . *


Express...


For Books and Publications.


35.74
248.75
582.67
82.33
137.09


5,225.68


Balance


Unexpended July


1924.


2,274.32


,MAIN EXPERIMENT STATION-INCIDENTAL FUND

Resources:


Balance Brought Forward July 1, 1923.


351.67


Received Collections Farm Sales During the Year.


9,377.61


9,729.28


Expenditures:


For Labor..... .... .....


........$


For Equipment, Furniture and Apparatus.....
For Heat, Light and Water.................
For Postage, Stationery and Office Expense.
For Advertising and Printing................
For Buildings and Repairs.... .............
F'or Traveling Expenses.....................


542.50
794.11


.16.42


31.40


y4
,,; Z


t












For Freight and Express.
For Feed Stuffs..........
For All Other Purposes...


201.38


7,029.71
213.88


8,927.76


Balance Unexpended July 1, 1924.


TOBACCO


801.52


EXPERIMENT STATION-INCIDENTAL FUND


Resources:


Balance Brought Forward July 1,


Expenditures During the


200.00


none.


Balance Brought Forward July 1, 1924.


........... $


200.00


EVERGLADES EXPERIMENT STATION-INCIDENTAL FUND

Resources:


Received


Warrant


No. 33,001


Transferring


Unex-


pended Balance of the $25,000.00 Appropriated by


the Legislature from


the Everglades


Drainage


Bond Funds for the amount of.........


....... $


8,690.26


Expenditures :


None.


Unexpended Balance


on July


1, 1924.


....... $


8,690.26


(Note.--$16,909.74 of the $25,000.00 available


was


spent by the Board of Commissioners of The
Everglades Drainage District for Buildings at


the Station


and the balance


of $8,690.26


turned


over to


the Board


of Control


to be


used at the Station in carrying on experimental
work.)

SUMMARY OF RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS TOGETHER WITH
THE BALANCES IN THE DIFFERENT FUNDS OF THE
AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION


Name of the Fund


Main


Adams
Hatch


Station,


Gainesville..


Fund......... ....
Fund................


Citrus, Experiment Station.


Tobacco


Station............


Receipts


. $ 55,000.00


15,000.00
15,00001
10,000.00
13,500.00


Disbursements


$ 52.943.60
15,000.00
15,000.00
10,000.00
18,500.00


Balances
$ 2,056.40


Er^


*. "**'


1923............




:., .. ,_ /.
;* .:. '/ **'v*!^ '* ' .' I\-q ^^,


Everglades
Nut Bearing


Station....
Industry.


S. ... .. S
.... .....


24,965.51
7,500.00


12,626.71
5,225.68


12,338.80
2,274.32


Main


Station


Incidental


Fund,


Farm


Sales......... .


Tobacco Station, Incidental Fund.
Everglades Station, Incidental Fund


9,720.28
200.00
8,690.26


8,927.76


S01.52
200.00
s,690.26


Totals


$159,585,06


$133,223.75


.t26,361.31


AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION DIVISION

SMITH-LEVER-STATE FUND


Resources:


Legislative Appropriation,


4S,72.25


1923 ..................


Expenditures:


For Salaries


of Extension


Workers


and Office


Em ployees .... ...................
For Labor...........................


........... $ 35,474.83


For Equipment, Furniture and Apparatus...
For Postage, Stationery and Office Supplies.


For Advertising and Printing.


118.00
949.1!)
850.98
520.34


For Traveling


Expenses..


..................... 10,911.00


For Freight and Express.


47.91


415,S72.25


SMITHI-LEVER--FEDERAL FUND


Resources:


Balance Brought Forward July 1. 1923 ........
Received Check from the Federal Government.
Interest Paid by the State Treasurer...........


58,85438
563.10


59,435.35


Expenditures:
For Salaries of Extension
Employees................


Workers
*.*.* * 9*


and Office
............$ 36,832.05


For Labor..... ... .......................
For Equipment, Furniture and Apparatus.
For Heat, Light and Water...............


For Postage, Stationery and Office Supplies...
For Advertising and Printing................
For Traveling Expenses.....................


118.28
1,926.00

1,484.44
4,408.M9
14,190.64


~:~" "~":
i *













For Freight and Express..


For Feed


Stuffs...........


For Books and Publications.....


161.79
200.15
51.20


59,435.02


Balance Unexpended on July 1, 1924.


LEVER--SUPPLEMENTAL-FEDERAL FUND

Resources:
Balance Brought Forward, July 1, 1923..........
Received Check from Federal Government........
Received Interest Paid by the State Treasurer....


15,496.08


142.42


15,639.37


Expenditures :


For Salary of Extension
For Labor...............


Workers.


For Equipment, Furniture and Apparatus.


For Office Expense...........
For Advertising and Printing.
For Traveling Expenses.......


133.95


"..................
"...............BUD.


124.13


15,639.37


CITRUS SEMINAR


Resources:


Legislative Appropriation, 1923............. ......

Expenditures:


For Salaries..............


......$


For Equipment, Furniture and Apparatus...
For Heat, Light and Water.................
For Postage, Stationery and Office Expense.
For Traveling Expenses.....................
For Freight and Express........ ...........
For All Other Purposes.....................


250.00


25.00


.... 13.43


16.00


..... 2.60


250.00


; ;:rs:.' |*


'*5r "
^r ;^^-.
y' -4 ^ .'-1 ^
* *


*. r'4 .4
. :.t ^A !


*** *"* ^ / : >.;. .i
' ^*'*


i: . .^~i 1 I".


............... $ 15,371.95













LIVE STOCK ROUND UP


Resources:


Legislative Appropriation,


250.00


Expenditures:


For Salaries.. ......... ........... . .
For Labor........... ... . ............ ...
For Equipment, Furniture and Apparatus.
For Buildings ..........................
For Traveling Expenses...................


For Freight and


142.50


... 7.00


11.78


79.24


250.00


FARMERS' WEEK


Resources:


Legislative Appropriation,


1,000.00


Expenditures:
For Salaries................................
For Labor..................................
For Equipment, Furniture and Apparatus...
For Postage, Stationery and Office Expense.


For Advertising and Printing.
For Traveling Expenses.......
For Freight and Express.....


* . . . . .9
. . . . ..
.99. . ..


.....$
* . . i
* . .
* . .

* . .
* .
I.$..
".....
"0...


141.00
54.10
180.05
120.84
431.15
43.37
29.49


1,000.00


EXHIBITS AT FAIRS


Resources:


Legislative Appropriation,


2,000.00


Expenditures:
For Labor................... ................... .. .
For Equipment, Furniture and Apparatus........
For Advertising and Printing....................
For Buildings and Repairs.....................
For Traveling Expenses..........................
For Freight and Express........................


48.00
792.38
79.25
957.53
120.01
2.83


2,000.00


1923..................


Express .................


1923 ..................


1923...................




Th


ll'':
* ;.


Name of the Fund
Smith-Lever, State Fund........
Smith-Lever, Federal Fund.......
Lever, Supplemental Fund........
Citrus Seminar..... ........... ..
Live Stock Round Up............
Farmers' W eek ...................
Exhibits at Fairs................


Receipts
48,872.25
59,435,35
15,639.37
250.00
250.00
1,000.00
2,000.00


Disbursements
$ 48,872.25
59,435.02
15,639.37
250.00
250.00
1,000.00
2,000.00


$127,446.97


T otals.......................


FLORIDA STATE (

SALARIES, EQUIPMENT


Resources:
Legislative Appropriation,


COLLEGE FO:


$127,446.64


R WOMEN


AND OPERATING EXPENSES


$ 183,826.50


Expenditures:
For Salaries of Teachers and Office Empl
For Labor ................... .........
For Equipment, Furniture and Apparatu
For Heat, Light and Water.............
For Postage, Stationery and Office Expel


For Advertising and Printing.
For Buildings and Repairs....
For Traveling Expenses.......
For Freight and Express......
For Books and Publications...
For All Other Purposes.......


... . .
. ". .. . $


9....9 9 .


oyees.... $129,701.05
......... 11,639.36
s........ 13,675.48
.. ....... 4,290.10
nse...... 2,444.57
........ 1,019.77
........ 8,771.63
........ 810.81
........ 312.95
........ 4,588.81


. . . 9 . . *9 9


203.00


177,457.53


Balance Unexpended on July 1, 1924.


S....... $


6,108.97


INCIDENTAL FUND


Resources:
Balance Brought Forward July 1, 1923.. ..........
Receipts-Collections During the Year............


17,221.71
49.386.73


66,608.44


Balances


iN
Ej. -9
'*'^


43

SUMMARY OF RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS TOGETHER WITH
THE BALANCES IN THE DIFFERENT FUNDS OF THE
AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION DIVISION


1923 ...................




* -. ,Sr-'F Sr."
= a. =de ; ** *' t
m * .
I)'i.!.--' '*
fl L '"
L7,;


/Expenditures:
For Salaries of Teachers and Office Employees.
For Labor....................................
For Equipment, Furniture and Apparatus.....
For Postage, Stationery and Office Expense...
For Buildings and Repairs....................
For Freight and Express................ .....


...$ 38,948.72


1,423.24
3,967.98


217.07


... 571.82


14.88


45,143.71


Balance Unexpended on July 1, 1924


21,464.73


. . .


SEMINARY INTEREST FUN])


Resources:


Balance Brought Forward July 1, 1923........


Received


Interest During the


2,172.95


Year ..........


2,183,05


Expenditures:
For Salaries Teachers and Office Employes.
For Equipment, Furniture and Apparatus..


......$


For Heat, Light and Water.................
For Postage, Stationery and Office Expense.


37.83
207.39
496.49


56.26


For Advertising and Printing...
For Books and Publications .....


*... 9 .. *.
* 9 .* . *


........
........


1,134.78
247.16


2,179.91
A


Unexpended Balance on July 1, 1924..........

BUILDING FUND


Resources:


Legislative Appropriation,


1923. ........... ..... .


$ 235,875.00


Expenditures:
For the erection of addition to Jennie Murphree


....$ 53,610.00


For the erection


of addition


to Auditorium and


Changes in Offices.........................
For the erection of Library Building..........
For the installation of Lights on Campus......
For the erection of Gates on Drive Ways....


Wor putting


Roof


on Science


35,650.00
54,100.00
2,566.22
4,163.68


addition


Dormitory, addition to Dining Room and repairs
to Root on Bryan Hall.........................


8,354.95


10.10


**


H a ..........................




S* .1 .


:" /


?: ,




*'


* *...m
* . .
*.e .*
*.a.m.a#


For the erection of Arcade between Dormitories.


4,054.35
524.82
6,775.00


186.98


3,244.24


$ 173,230.24


Unexpended Balance on July 1, 1924


. m.e..... $


62,644.76


HOME ECONOMICS EXTENSION


1Resources;


Legislative Appropriation, 1923 ...................

Expenditures:


8,750.00


For Salaries


of Extension


Workers


and Office


............$ 2,432.30


292.37


Employees...............
For Labor................


For Equipment, Furniture and Apparatus........
For Postage, Stationery and Office Expense......


For Advertising and Printing...........
For Traveling Expenses.................
For Freight and Express................
For Books and Publications.............


S.am.. .mm

* a a. . .


930.31
1,022.75
2,870.08
1,039.44
103.25
57.93


For All


Other Purposes......


8,750.00


THE JAMES D.


WESCOTT ESTATE


Resources:


Balance Brought Forward July 1, 1923........


260.00


....$.


Received from the Estate.....


.... 1,500.00


1,760.00


Expenditures:
For Salaries of Teachers in Demonstration School


Balance Unexpended on July 1, 1924..... ....


1,200.00


560.00


** ; : *<. -
*. '_ :" .
% ':/

1^ >
S*< j .. :
z / - *.


For repairs to Buildings and Fixtures..
For Water Mains on Campus..........
For the purchase of Land...........,..
For Walks and Campus Improvement..


"" : ^y^^^


** ,::*" *




a' :tld


46

SUMMARY OF RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS TOGETHER WITH
THE BALANCES IN THE DIFFERENT FUNDS OF THE
FLORIDA STATE COLLEGE FOR WOMEN


Name of the Fund


Receipts


Disbursements


Balances


Salaries, Equipment and Operating


Expenses ............


Incidental


Fund........


Seminary Interest Fund.


Building


Fund . . . . ......


. $183,626.50


11.0
* . .
. .. .


* . .
ft* . .
* . .


Home Economics Extension.


James D.


Wescott Estate..


66,60S.44
2,183.05
235,875.00
8,750.00
1,760.00


$177,457.53
45,143.71


$ 6,168.97
21,.41 .73


2,179.91


173,230.24


62,644.76


8,750.00
1,200.00


560.00


Totals.


$498,802.99


$407,961.39


$90,841.60


THE FLORIDA SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF


SALARIES, EQUIPMENT


AND THE BLIND


AND OPERATING EXPENSES


Resources:


Legislative Appropriation,


1923 ..... . .. ..


87,450.00


Expenditures:


For Salaries of Teachers.
For Labor...............


.........$


For Equipment, Furniture and Apparatus.


36,063.61
8,401.34


.. ..... 11,428.66


For Heat, Light and Water.......
For Postage, Stationery and Office


For Advertising and Printing.....
For Buildings and Repairs........
For Traveling Expenses ..........
For Freight and Express.........
For Feed and Groceries...........
For Books and Publications.......


Expense.


* * *
Q.'....
......


........5.
" . 9 9 . . .
........... *
* 0 9 4 .* *


3,973.26
299.16
244.29
6,466.50
1,600.9S
1,439.43


.... 16,565.60
.... 150.07


For All Other Purposes..


817.10


87,450.00


BUILDING FUND


Resources:


Legislative Appropriation,


60,000.00


Expenditures:


For Heating Plant.... ............ .....
For Cottage and Equipment...............
For Athletics..............................


......$ 13,205.64
...... 18,623.60


258.45


*


1923...................













For Fire Protection.....


For Repairs and Campus Improvement.


For Books and Publicatio


ns . . . .


2,828.49
1,107.00
450.00


36,473.18


Unexpended Balance on July 1, 1924


23,526.82


INCIDENTAL FUND


Resources:


Balance Brought Forward July 1, 1923


S.... $


1,740.15


Receipts Collected During the


Year....


.... ...... 1,585.56


3,325.71


Expenditures:


For Buildings and Repairs.


..................... $


1,047.28


Unexpended Balance on July 1, 1924..........

SUMMARY OF RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS


2,278.43


TOGETHER WITH


THE BALANCES IN THE DIFFERENT FUND'S OF THE FLORIDA
SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF AND THE BLIND


Name of the Fund


Receipts


Disbursements


Balances


Salaries,


Equipment


and Operat-


ing Expenses.....


Building
Incidental


Fund.......
Fund.....


$ 87,450.00


60,000.00


... 3,325.71


$ 87,450.00
36,473.18


1.,047.28


$23,526.82
2,278.43


Totals...


........ ... $150,775.71


$124,970.46


$25,805.25


THE


FLORIDA


AGRICULTURAL AND


MECHANICAL


COLLEGE FOR NEGROES


FUND FOR SALARIES, EQUIPMENT


AND OPERATING EXPENSES


Resources:


State


Appropriation,


1923....... . ............


29,975.23


Expenditures:
For Salaries of Teachers and Office Employees.
For Labor ... .. ..... .. ... ...... ...........
For Equipment, Furniture and Apparatus......
For Heat, Light and Water...................
For Postage, Stationery and Office Expense...


...$ 11,217.90
... 6,835.26
... 4,571.83
8,355.38
... 614.28


~~s': "" "**'"""* "'"' *:I "* ? :" ~:7ir~~:.~r*n11










48


For Advertising and Printing................... ...
For Buildings and Repairs .....................
For Traveling Expenses..........................
For Freight and Express........................
For Feed Stuffs.... .......... .... ......... ..
For Books and Publications......................
For All Other Purposes .................. ........


199.81
1,111.62
255.82
385.12
1,062.70
56.25
309.25


29,975.23


MORRILL FUND


Resources:


Received Check from Federal Government........

Expenditures:


For Salaries of Teachers and Office Employees.


25,000.00


...$ 19,680.00


For Labor. ... ..... ...... ...........
For Equipment, Furniture and Apparatus
For Heat, Light and Water..............


......


244.55


3,877.07
330.20


For Postage, Stationery and Office Expense.


For Buildings and Repairs..
For Freight and Express...
For Feed Stuffs............
For Books and Publications.
For All Other Purposes.....


.. "" .S .. ".4.5.. .... "
. .4 .5 5 . .. .* 4 .9 .


66.21
104.13
26.35
332.70
308.61
30.18


25,000.00


FOR BUILDINGS


Resources:


Legislative


Appropriation,


Expendtures:
For Kitchen and Dining Room..


*


For Equipment, Furniture and Apparatus.


For Advertising for Bids on Buildings.


For General Repairs............
For Repairs to Special Buildings


* 4.44
* 5*4*


S
*


38,000.00


.......$
*. . .


* 44 *** 44 4 4
* 4 *.* 4 4..
* 4.4...,...


4,500.00
4,765.00
32.34
1,546.13
5,299.27


16,142.74


Unexpended Balance on July 1, 1924..........


21,857.26


__ _


1923........ .........







^FtS'.S */*



K-. *
^< .


Resources:


Receipts Collected During the Year..............


2,952.77


Expenditures:


For Labor........


For Equipment, Furniture and Apparatus........
For Postage, Stationery and Office Expense......


For Advertising and Printing .............
For Buildings and Repairs.................
For Traveling Expenses ....................
For Freight and Express..................
For Books and Publications................


..I..
. .....
*.....

*....S*
. .. .


For All Other Purposes.


648.84
547.48
353.37
213.85
51.00
214.29
90.00
41.92
347.72


Balance Unexpended July 1, 1924.


............ $


2,503.47

444.30


HOSPITAL FUND


Resources:


Receipts Collected During the


1,286.90


Year..............


Expenditures:


For Salaries......
For Labor........


* 9 .9 9 9
* 4 *4 *.


.......................$
*. S *. . . ..9.* 4 .9 .. . S


For Equipment, Furniture and Apparatus...
For Heat, Light and Water.................
For Postage, Stationery and Office Expense.


18.00
155.96
130.47
457.56
15.50


1.24


For Freight and Express....
For Groceries ...............
For Books and Publications.


504.24


1,285.97


Balance Unexpended July


1, 1924


FIRE INSURANCE FUND-BUILDINGS


Resources:


Received Insurance on Duval Hall...
Received Insurance on Gibbs Hall...


9........ ....


Received Insurance on Mechanic Arts Building....
Received Insurance, Fire Damage to Auditorium..


6,000.00
15,000.00
16,500.00
800.00


Received


Insurance,


Fire Damage


Building


to Laundry
............ 125.00


38,425.00


; ;
L:


49

INCIDENTAL FUND


' \ *;













Expenditures:
For Repairs to Auditorium............
Repairs to Laundry Building...........
For erection of Science Hall............
For erection of Mechanic Arts Building


..........$
......g....
* . . C *
." .C .*. C


800.00
125.00
450.00
550.00


1,925.00


Balance


Unexpended July 1, 1924............


36.500.00


FIRE INSURANCE FUND-EQUIPMENT


Resources:
Received Insurance on Equipment in Duval Hall..
Received Insurance on Equipment in Gibbs Hall..
Received Insurance on Equipment in Mechanic
Arts Building ..................................


4,502.74


S,452 74


916.72


Expenditures:
For Equipment for Kitchen and Dining Room....


Balance Unexpended on July 1, 1924..........


10.283.28


SUMMARY OF RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS OF THE FLORIDA
AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE FOR NEGROES


Name of the Fund
Salaries, Equipment
ing Expenses......
Morrill Fund........
For Buildings.......
Incidental Fund.....
Hospital Fund......


Receipts


Disbursements


Balances


and Operat-


."'...

......
*....*.*
* C C .* .
* C *.


Insurance-Buildings.....
Insurance-Equipment ....


....... $ 29,075.23
.. ..... 25,000.00
..... . 38,000.00
..... .. 2,052.77
...... 1,286.90


38,425.00
8,452.74


$ 29,975.23
25,000.00
16,142.74
2,508.47
1,285.97
1,925.00
016.72


$21,857.26
444.30
.93
36,500.00
7,536,02


$144,092.64


$ 77,754.13


$66,338.51


BOARD OF CONTROL


Resources:


Legislative Appropriation, 1923...................


3,400.00


Totals . . ... . . .. . . .. ..




-'


Expenditures:


For Salary of Board's Secretary...
For Office Furniture and Fixtures.


.............. .$


For Postage, Stationery and Office Expense.
For Traveling Expenses......................


1,300.00


156.27
845.19


1,098.54


3,400.00


STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
TALLAHASSEE

W. S. CAWTHON. SUPERINTENDENT


January 9, 1925.


Hon. J. T. Diamond,
Secretary Board of Control,
Capitol.

* My Dear Sir:


In compliance


with Section


641 of


the Revised


General


Statutes,


hereby make request of the Board of Control to include in its budget for
higher education, a summer school appropriation of $20,000.00 per year


for the


year, 1925


and 1926, a total of $40,000.00.


Budgets for the amounts


requested for the summer schools


at the


University


of Florida,


the Florida State College for


Women, and


Florida Agricultural


and Mechanical College for


Negroes


are attached


hereto.


Yours very truly,


W. S. CAWTHON,
State Superintendent.



















































































































.







REPORT
OF THE


President
University of


of


the


Florida


TO THE


BOARD


OF


CONTROL


FOR THE
Biennium Ending
June 30, 1924

















'.1x


*' '



xx






























































































































xx




I /* .

** */ '


BOARD OF CONTROL


P. K.
E. L.


YONGE, Chainnan ....................... ...................................... .. Pensacola
WARTMANN-................................................................................... Citra


J. C. COOPER, JR ................................................................................. Jacksonville
W B. DAVIs.. Perry................... . . .....................p 4 m em Wh ammeWhR mmmmWM gm aggaerr


GENERAL
J. T. Du


A. H. BLANDING.................................................................. ..............Bartow


MOND. ......................................................... Secretary


to the Board


STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION


Chairman, ................................................................Gov


A. HARDEE,


H. CLAY


ernor
State


Treasurer


RIVERS H1. BUFORD....................................................................A. ttorney- General


W. S. CAWTHON,


Secretary........State Superintendent


of Public Instruction


UNIVERSITY


COUNCIL


ALBERT A. MURPHREE, LL.D ..............................President of the University


JAS. M.


FARR, PH.D......................................ice-President


of the University


JAS. N. ANDERSON, PH.D.............Dean of the College of Arts and


Sciences


WILMON NEWELL,


D Sc......... ................ D ean


of the College of Agriculture


J. R. BENTON, PH.D ...............................Dean of the College of Engineering
HAIRRY R. TRUS~ER, LL.B................................... of the College of Law
JAS. W. NORMAN, PH.D..................................Dean of the Teachers College


CARY


CRAW FORD ............................................................... Secretary of


J. C. LUNING ............................. ...................................State


..,
'. **
:*E /














































































II




P-r "* *
i'


TABLE OF CONTENTS


PRESIDENT'S REPORT, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA.............


Legal Status .............
Organization ..........
Comment on Present
Conclusion .........


N eeds .................... ............ ...............


REPORT OF THE DEAN OF THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES................ 21
COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, REPORT OF THE DEAN ....... .............................. 28
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING, REPORT OF THE DEAN ........................................ 35
COLLEGE OF IAW, REPORT OF THE DEAN...................................................... 47
TEACHERS COLLEGE AND NORMAL SCHOOL, REPORT OF THE DEAN.......... 50
AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION, REPORT OF DIRECTOR ................... 62
Citrus Experiment Station ................----.................. ......... 80
Tobacco Experiment Station --------................................ 82
Everglades Experiment Station---..---...............----... 85
AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION DIVISION, REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR............ 90
GENERAL EXTENSION DIVISION, REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR .-..-....--........... 110


Department of Extension Teaching ......................
Department of General Information and Public
Department of Military Extension ...................
Organization .................................


REPORT OF THE LIBRARIAN...... .........................


Service--- ................126
..............................139
-.. ..-.. ........ 141


........................144


REPORT OF THE FLORIDA STATE MUSEUM..................................................-- 148
REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS..........158


AUDITOR'S


REPORT ...--............---....--....------ ...-...-.--..........161


ITEMIZED BUDGETS OF THE UNIVERSITY FOR THE NEXT TWO YEARS........161
1. Museum, Library, Military and other General Expenses not
included in other budgets ........................ .............. ..... .......... .....165
2. Budget of the College of Arts and Sciences................................166
3. Budget of the College of Agriculture ................. .........- ............169
4. Budget of the College of Engineering ..........................................174
5. Budget of the College of Law ..................................................... 177
6. Budget of Teachers College ........................................ .. .................. 178
7. Budget of Experiment Station...... ................................................ 181
8. Budget of Agricultural Extension Division ................................ 192
9. Budget of General Extension Division.. ........ ............................. 194
AUDITOR'S REPORT OF RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS FISCAL YEAR OF
1928-24 AND 1924-25..............................................................................201
REPORT OP BOARDING DEPARTMENT ....................... .... .................................208
6


S S











PRESIDENT'S REPORT OF THE

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


1, 1922-June 30, 1924


To the Chairman and Members of the Board of Control:
I have the honor to present this report of the University of Florida
for the biennial period from July 1st, 1922, to June 30th, 1924; and the
reports for this bienrinm of the various administrative officers of the
University. These reports deal almost exclusively with the financial de-


mands of the University.
need of more teachers, mc


The problems presented are based upon the
,re buildings and more equipment. The fi-


nuncial problem is so outstanding and urgent that no attempt is made
to ,deal with other administrative problems, or with definite educational
policies of the Institution.
It may be said in the outset, without exaggeration or undue expres-
sion of pride, that the past two years have been the best years in the


history of the State University.


The increase in student enrollment, the


state-wide interest, the state-wide service, and the achievements in all


lines of University


activity,


in the face of most discouraging obstacles,


combine to make this the most impressive and the most important bien-


nial period of the


University of Florida.


A. LEGAL STATUS

To understand and appreciate the state's relation and the state's


obligation to this educational enterprise, it


is necessary


to refer to the


Constitutional and statutory provisions for the establishment and con-


duct and support of public education.


Constitution of Florida


is this: "Thd


Article XII, Section 6, of the
Legislature shall provide for a


uniform system of public, free schools, and shall provide for the liberal
maintenance of the same." In the interpretation of this section of Article
XII, the Supreme Court has held that the term "public school is a com-
prehensive one, and it should not be narrowed or restricted in meaning."
The institutions of higher learning are legally embraced in the public


free school system of Florida.


This has been so declared by the Su-


preme Court in the case of State vs. Bryan,


Volume 50 of the Florida


Supreme Court Reports, page 293. In that case it was held that "the
institutions, incorporated by Chapter 5384, Acts of 1905, constitute a
part of the public free schools in the constitutional provision of a system
of free schools of the state."


With


this constitutional back-ground the statutes place these in-


stitutioas under a Board of Control, consisting of five citizens--one from
West Florida, one from Middle Florida, one from Middle South Florida,
one from South* Florida, and one from East Florida-who shall be resi-
dents and citizens thereof, no one to be appointed from a county in which
one of the institutions of higher learning is located.







The statutes further pvide "that said board except as herein
provided, shall act in connection with, but at all times under and
subject to, the control and supervision of the State Board of Education."
Now, the duties of the State Board of Education are broad and in-


elusive.


This Board has the supervision over the safe-keeping and


penditures of all educational funds of the state, and is required to "keep
in view the establishment of schools on a broad and liberal basis, the
object of which shall be to impart instruction to youth in the profession
of teaching, in the knowledge of science, the theory and practice of ag-
riculture, horticulture, mining, engineering and mechanic arts, in the
ancient and modern languages, in the higher range of mathematics, lit-
erature, and in the useful and ornamental branches not taught in the
common schools, and shall cooperate with the State Superintendent of
Public Instruction in the management of the Department, and in the
general diffusion of knowledge in the state."
Such are the powers and duties of the State Board of Education,
under which the Board of Control of the higher institutions of learning


performs its functions.


It is a wise provision of the statutes which im-


poses the delegation of certain powers of the


State


Board of Education


to the State Board of Control.


it is a


physical impossibility for the


State


Board of Education, composed of state officials engaged with the


multitude of details, problems and responsibilities of their respective


offices, to


give time required for effective management and careful super-


vision of these institutions with their hundreds of employees, their thous-


ands of students, involving the


necessary


expenditure of large sums of


state and federal funds.
The Board of Control, appointed by the Governor, has always been
composed of high-minded citizens who have given freely of their time,
without any remuneration whatsoever for their services, save the re-


ward that comes from the


sense of


useful and unselfish service to the


youth of the state. Under the careful management and wise leadership
of the Board of Control 'the instit nations of higher learning have become


firmly established in the confidence of the people.


Under this Board


the citizens of Florida know that the function of these institutions is
purely and solely educational; that they are neither political nor partisan,


neither


sectional


nor sectarian:


that their business,


under the State


Boards, is to furnish appropriate and ample educational ,facilities for


the entire citizenship of the state.


They are the higher high schools


of the state and, as such, stand at the head of the educational system of


the state.


They are legally and logically related to all other elements


of the system, whether they be the high schools, graded city or ungraded


country schools.


are organic parts of one and the same educational


body.
B. ORGANIZATION

How is the University undertaking to meet its implied contract to


the State?


The accompanying reports of the deans and directors will


answer that question.





From these reports it will be seen that the University carries on
its work in three distinct domains of service: (1) teaching; (2) research
or investigation; (3) and direct service to the people thru extension, or
carrying the work of the University to the people. While there is a
small overlapping of these three divisions of University activities, each
domain has its own organization and operates on its own separate in-


come and budget.


It would be manifestly untruthful, therefore, to charge


the entire income of ,the University to the expense of teaching fourteen
hundred young men, or to the expense of any other activity in the other


two fields of University endeavor.


This important distinction


is often


overlooked in appraising the work of the University.
The size and complexity of the University call for an organization of


its administrative machinery.


big business, calls for a
tion effectively and wise
instruction is first menti


A large educational enterprise, like any


carefully planned organization if it is to func-
Fly. Under organization, the work of resident
ioned. Under this division fall:


I. Work of Instruction


College of Arts and Sciences.


Students here obtain four


years


of liberal training in the sciences, economics, history, languages and


literature,


mathematics,


philosophy, political


psychology, sociology, business administration.


science


and government,


The general education


here obtained serves as a foundation for the professions of
journalism, theology, teaching and commerce.


Agricultural College.


law, medicine,


In this College students learn the science


and 'art involved in vocational and professional agriculture.
taught to utilize scientific knowledge in agricultural practice.


They are


trained as teachers of agriculture, as research workers, as farm demon-


station


agents or extension workers.


College of Engineering.


Here young men are trained for the


profession of engineering, and are offered choice of courses in civil,


chemical, electrical and mechanical engineering.


The engineer has a


large, constructive service to render in the development of Florida's nat-


resources.


This College


is training Florida young men for construe-


tive thinking along lines of engineering practice, and is seeking to.in-
spire them ito realize the opportunities that lie before the well-trained
engineer in such service.


College of Law.


state.


This College promotes legal education in the


It has a standard, three-year course, based on accepted standards


for admission.


Many of its graduates have taken places among the lead-


ers of the younger members of the bar and not a few are now occupying
places on the bench of the state.


Teachers College.


This College prepares teachers for graded


schools and high schools, and trains principals, educational supervisors


and school administrators.


Such training is more liberal and valuable


where it is given, as it is here, under University atmosphere, where aca-
b


4*


'. *.*^
* '"* "^ .







demic breadth and scholarship are emphasized and encouraged. This
College is doing much towards the advancement of better schools and


better trained teachers in Florida.


During the regular session and the


summer school more than a thousand teachers receive instruction here
annually.


6. School of Pharmacy.


1923.


This school was established in the fall of


It is now under the supervision of the College of Arts and Sciences


and is mentioned in the report of the 1Dean of that College.


It is desir-


able that this School be organized as a separate college and authorized
to give suitable degrees in three and four-year courses for pharmacists


or pharmaceutical chemists. The attend
the grade of work to be done will justify


lance, the faculty required, and


a separate


college organization y


for this work in the University.
It was a forward-looking move of the State Pharmaceutical Associ-


ation which undertook, nearly ten


years


ago, an effort to have a depart-


ment of pharmacy established at the University.


This effort persisted


until it was crowned with success thru an act of the Legislature of 1923.
Forty-five students matriculated in the first-year class in the fall of '23,
which shows that the state was ready and waiting for this work at the
University.
Cities and towns and villages of the state are demanding more ade-


quate


pharmaceutical


service.


Towns and


villages


are springing up


everywhere in this rapidly growing state, and among their first needs


is a properly equipped pharmacy.


Well-trained pharmacists are nec-


essary to the health, comfort and convenience of the citizens of the state.
The School will meet a clearly defined demand and now offers training
in a useful and worthy profession for young men.


Graduate School.


This School


consists


of the organization


n of


the advanced courses of all the colleges of the University to furnish op-
portunity for qualified graduate students to pursue advanced study and


research in their chosen fields.


tion of a


University.


to add to the sum of knr


This is a necessary


and important f


t:
hi


One of the important duties of a universe
owledge. Other states are recognizing the v


of productive scholarship to the state and to society in general and
propriate funds for the support of investigators in a distinct school


research.


The University of Florida can undertake but little in this


because its library and laboratories are too limited in scope and its


ulties carry too heavy a burden of undergraduate teaching.


Equipn


I


nc-
y is.
value
ap-
for
field
fac-
nent
.1


should be enlarged and the teaching load should be lightened and pro-
fessors given the opportunity, which so many of them greatly desire,


to engage in research. Such a policy would .vitalize teaching,


as stud


ents


I
1


are brought into close contact with productive scholarship in the sub-
jects which they are pursuing.


II. Research or Investigation


The next field of service is that of research or investigation. Ref-
erence has just been made to a limited field of general research in the
10


j








Graduate School.


The only separate and distinct research organization


of the University is the Experiment Station and its three branches or
sub-stations.


Experiment Station.


The work of the Station and its branches


is discussed in the appended report of the Director.


The sub-stations--


(a) the tobacco station at Quincy, (b) the citrus station at Lake Alfred,
and (c) the Everglades station-like the main Station, devote themselves
exclusively to the study and investigation of problems of farmers and


growers


of the state.


Results already achieved in these stations


have added immeasurably to the achievements of agricultural practice
in Florida, and may be depended upon, in the future, to solve problems
that will add tremendously to the agricultural resources of this common-
wealth.


III. Extension

The results of the investigations i


Station laboratory
the application


ries


Service

n the Agricultural Experiment


are carried, in printed literature, to farmers, and


of the results obtained by investigators


is promoted


and supervised by the demonstration agents engaged in the Agricultural


Extension Division of the


University.


1. Agricultural Extension and Home Economics.


service


carried on in cooperation with the United States Department of Agricul-
ture and the Department of Home Economics of the State College for
Women. Included in Extension Service are the boys and girls clubs


which are under the supervision of special


agents


of this Division.


Thru


this Extension


Service, a


full knowledge of farm practices and better


cooperation in marketing problems are encouraged. No state offers
more interesting opportunities in agriculture than Florida. It is the aim


of the Agricultural Extension Division to render every possible
in developing the agricultural potentialities of the state. Fol


service
r a full


account of the work of this Division, reference is made to the appended
report of the Director.
It may be added in this connection that the Dean of the Agricultural
College is also Director of the Station and its three branches, and Direc-


tor of the Agricultural Extension Division.


These three departments


are included in the organization of the Agricultural College.


Under


this arrangement better coordination and cooperation is secured in the


operations of these three activities of the University.


It has been found


that this is the best means of eliminating friction and duplication of
effort, confusion and expense, end of shaping the general policies in
teaching agriculture, in agricultural research and agricultural extension
service.


General


University


Extension


Service.


This Division


of the


University concerns itself with the extension of the work of the other
colleges to citizens interested in what these colleges have to offer. In
addition to that, it offers aid to boys and girls, men and women, who have
not had the advantages of high schools, libraries and other facilities for
11








education and culture. M
studies by correspondence.


ore than 7,000 personas have been


pursuing


Some of these have prepared themselves


for admission to college, others for teachers' examinations, still others


for civil


service.


Circulating libraries of several hundred volumes have been sent to
rural schools and to localities where libraries and books are not generally
accessible.
Educational moving picture films, with moving picture machines, are
in circulation in schools and communities that are limited in their re-
sources for general entertainment.
The Director has prepared an extended report of this Department,
and it will be found to be a most illuminating statement of the work of


which he has charge.


The report shows a vision of the possibilities of


this Department to render educational service, particularly to the under-


privileged communities of the state.


It is believed that no department


of the University is rendering a larger immediate service for the sum


expended.


The accompanying report of the Director outlines a large


program for social betterment and civic improvement; and it is the hope


of the Department to undertake, with the means at hand,


as many of the


suggested projects


possible.


funds devoted


to this General Ex-


tension Division will, in the future, as it has in the


past, continue to


bear golden dividends in wholesome contentment and better citizenship


and greater


educational efficiency in the communities


are served.


IV. Other Departments


Under this caption are included


other


University


activities


which


cannot be classified under any one of the above departments of univer-
sity organization. In the main, they minister as aids to the work of
instruction, but the library and state museum are important adjuncts to


the work of research and university


The Library.


extension service.


The Library is the heart of the University.


dents and faculty of every college rely upon the Library for the neces-


sary background of all courses of instruction.


Departments or reaenrth


and general extension are more or less dependent upon a resourceful


library.


Practically every student of the


Library to do part of his work.


University must go to the


In view of these great demands, it may


be understood how the restricted quarters and congestion, during the
past years, have hindered the uses of this library. The conditions hete
during the last two years, on account of the large enrollment, have be-


come almost intolerable. It is
relief of the librarian, faculty


not difficult to imagine, therefore, the


and students


which


comes


from


realization that the new library, now under construction twill be ready
for use within the following year.
Unfortunately, however, the appropriation is not sufficient to com-
plete this building according to plans required to meet the present de-
ands of the University. !Rence, there remain the two wings to be
12


7 ~ ~ ~~~~ x **.*** ,i ****:* .x * *xx.x


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added-the magazine and reading rooms and I


There is lacking, also, the necessary funds to provide the shelving, tablet


and chairs needed to furnish thi


further congestion, though not


is building. We may expect, therefore,
so serious, until such time as the two


wings and the furniture for this building are provided for.


The State Museum.


This institution is devoted to the accumu-


lation and preservation of valuable collections relating to the natural
history, political history and natural resources of Florida. The collec-
tions already on exhibit -are a revelation to persons 'who visit the Museum


for the first time. T
sources of informati
obtained at no one


'hey find that it is not only most interesting, but the
ion are invaluable and that this information can be


anywhere else in


Florida.


Unfortunately,


many of the most interesting and valuable things available for exhibi-
tion are stored away in basements of buildings because there is a lack
of room for their display. One is made to wonder how the Curator has
accomplished what he has in the development of this Museum with the
obstacles he has had to face, and with the limited funds he has had to


spend.


His report calls for a modest sum for the next biennium.


importance of the Museum, the state-wide interest it has served and the
educational value of its collections amply justify the appropriation of
the amounts called for. It is urgently recommended, therefore, that
the Curator's request for this appropriation be approved.
3. The Military Department. Being a Land-Grant College, the
University is required to give military training to all students in the


freshman and sophomore classes.


ors and seniors.


This training is elective for all juni-


The completion of the advanced courses of the junior


and senior classes leads to a commission as Second Lieutenant in the


Reserve


Corps of the Army.


During the last two years the Government


pays to each student enrolled in the advanced course commutation of
rations which amounts approximately to $12.00 a .month or $144.00


a year.


The United States Government also supplies, free of charge,


all equipment, including uniforms, for the cadets.
More than $75,000.00 worth of military supplies, not including uni-
forms, is lent to the University by the War Department.
The officer personnel, consisting at the present time of one major,
four captains and two sergeants, are detailed by the Adjutant General
of the Army to serve as instructors of military science and tactics.
In his report the head of this Department emphasizes the value of


military training.


"Sound bodies, trained minds, good morals, courtesy,


respect for law and order and love of country"
trained by students in this Department.


Department of Physical Education.


are results to be ob-


Every University student,


during his first two years at college, is required to take physical exer-


cise for body training.


of athletics.


Others are encouraged to engage in some form


The Department is divided into two sections.


First:


Intercollegiate athletics,


which is again divided into (a)


major and (b) minor sports.


Major sports include football, asket ball


the stack room for :bu


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baseball and track athletics.


The minor sports are wrestling, swimming,


tennis, golf, cross country runs, etc.


Second:


Under the second section are included intramural sports,


that is, athletic contests between classes, colleges and


other student


groups.


Then the


systematic training in the gymnasium, corrective


gymnastics, and other forms of exercise are prescribed to meet the vary-
ing needs of the students.
The department of physical education is organized with a director


at its head.


Serving under supervision


of this director are all the


coaches in the various sports and the instructors in gymnastics and
other forms of physical education.

This completes the brief outline of the organization of the Univer-


No attempt has been made to do more than merely


to mention


the different divisions of the University organization, and to indicate


ithe purposes of each.


This was undertaken in order to present theZ


general character and scope of all University activities, and to show
that this institution is following in spirit and practice the plan of mod-


ern state universities.


It must be understood that the


University of


Florida is not any longer


a small college.


in response to distinct demands of the people.


It has


grow


It is no


n and developed
w a big institu-


tion, engaged in big, constructive educational service to the entire com-
monwealth of Florida.

C. COMMENT ON PRESENT NEEDS

In the light of the enormous undertakings and the unparalleled
increase in student -attendance, biennial increases in appropriations have
lagged behind, until now the University faces the greatest crisis in its
history. The deans and directors, in their reports attached hereto, have
felt it their duty, regardless of consequences, to state frankly what they


consider their actual needs for the next biennium.


It remains for the


state to decide whether the sums needed shall be granted or whether
the work of the colleges and divisions shall be impeded or curtailed in
their development and service to the people of the state.
On the side of instruction these needs may be classed under two


headings: (1) More teachers.


(2) More classrooms and laboratories.


I. Teachers


(1) The University is not asking at this time for general increases
in salaries, though the salary scale here is lower than the average of
other state universities of this section; but request is made for the ad-
vancement of some assistant professors to full professorships, and the


normal increase in certain professors'


salaries.


Under the rule of the


Board, a full professor is employed at $3,000 the first year, with the
understanding that he is to receive $100 increase each year for four years







until his salary reaches the maximum of $3,400.


Some additional in-


structors, assistant professors and a few full professors are required.


The insistent demand is for more teachers.


As attendance increases


instructors must be added, along with more books and more laboratory
supplies; otherwise, the efficiency of the teaching falls down, and the


standards of the University become discredited.


This must not be al-


lowed to happen here.


Yet this will happen, unless provision


is made


for additional teachers, as provided for in the detailed budgets.
(2) The Summer School has become one of the most important


phases of the work of the University.


The law requires that the grade


of work done by teachers in the Summer School shall be such as to en-


_ title students to credit toward degrees.


The limited appropriations for


the Summer School have rendered it impossible to engage enough teach-
ers of college grade to offer the advanced courses demanded by the stu-


dent teachers and required for college degrees.


Furthermore, the teach-


ing staff has worked on half pay during these summer months. The
Dean has not been able to secure teachers from abroad on the salaries


available.


When many


of the


University professors,


worn out from


overwork during the regular session, must go away for rest and relaxa-
tion, or when they go away for advanced study, it has been almost im-
possible to secure professors from elsewhere to fill these places on the


University


Summer


School


faculty


at salaries


offered.


It must


emphasized that the work of this Summer School is just


as important


that of the regular session, and a salary of not less than $300 per month,


or $600 instead of $350 for the two months, must be offered.


A larger


appropriation for the Summer School is requested to provide a morel
reasonable salary scale and in order to enlarge the scope of the college
curricula of the Summer School.


(3) In connection with teaching, your attention


is called to the


needs of


the military department.


To obtain choice of the best officers


the University must do what other institutions are doing, namely, allow


some additional remuneration on salaries.


The general salaries of these


officers are paid by the Federal Government, but in order to obtain a
superior personnel, it is necessary to the best interest of the University
and students to add small inducements to make this station desired by
the best military officers on college detail. It is recommended that
$1,000 be paid by the University to the head of the military department,


and $300 additional to each of his


assistants.


feel that they are a part of the University.


This will make the men
It is only just for another


reason, namely, that they are at greater expense than they would be
at a military post, where they have furnished quarters, cheap commissary
prices, and free medical end dental service for themselves and their
families. These officers lose these advantages when they are on a
school detail. In this connection, it might be mentioned that there is
need of a property man to care for $75,000 worth of military supplies,
for which the University is responsible. The target range is in need of
reconstruction.


-~'" "';*;I1" '" "




I. *I .* y
** ..
i J Vi


L DBmildings


Since 1914 no new recitation buildings have been added.


The plant


of the University, therefore, for teaching has not been increased since


that date.


The student body has increased four-fold, and the physical


plant cannot be stretched any more. The time has arrived when more
buildings for laboratories and classrooms must be supplied. We, there-
fore, urge the construction of three new buildings at the earliest pos-
sible moment-(1) agricultural college building, (2) a building for the
chemistry department and the school of pharmacy, and (3) a building,
or an addition, to the college of engineering. We would place the need


of no one of these buildings before either the other two.
equal importance, and they are all needed now.


They are of


1. Agricultural College Building

The Agricultural College and the Experiment Station and the Ag-
ricultural Extension Division are crowded from cellar to garret in the


buildings which they are now occupying.


There arc not sufficient class-


rooms nor laboratories. This means a poor quality of work in teaching,
and a great hindrance to the research work of the Station. Increased


attendance and the necessary increase in


the teaching staff and the


Station staff will render the need of this building more impelling and
acute.
The law requires that the University shall provide offices and lab-


oratory quarters for the Plant Board.


This Plant Board is now occupy-


ing the equivalent of one entire floor in Language Hall, which is the
home of the College of Arts ,and Sciences. The Dean of that College has


asked for a building; but if this agricultural college building is


provided


the present congestion of the College of Arts and Sciences will be some-


what relieved.


It is urged, therefore, that an appropriation of $250,000 for


the first unit of an agricultural building, befitting the


agricultural


industry of Florida, be provided.

2. Chemistry and Pharmacy Building and Equipment


Then the chemistry building


is very urgent.


The Department of


Chemistry


serves


every


college on the campus.


It is no wonder, there-


fore, that with an enrollment of between 500 and 600 students in Chem-
istry, the Department is scattered in basements and elsewhere thruout
five buildings on the University campus. The laboratories have become
totally inadequate, and the School of Pharmacy has had to occupy. two


small basement rooms in Science F
be endured. A separate and distin
sary. The building that is intended
answer as a temporary expedient.


[all. This condition can no longer
ct building for Chemistry is neces-
d for some other purpose will ndo
A building for Chemistry requires


special design, and it costs nearly twice as much to erect and equip a
modern fire-proof chemical laboratory as it costs to construct a college
16


**I
I*m


x '







-buildtng of equal size.


some chemical laboratory


For instance, all ceilings must be very high. In
ries, the ceiling is 20 feet in height. Ventilators


and hoods must be installed to carry off obnoxious fumes and poisonous
gases.
It is estimated that the cost of equipment for a chemical laboratory,
to supply desks, plumbing and other apparatus is at least one-fourth
of the cost of the house. Therefore, it is estimated that a new building
for the Department of Chemistry and the School of Pharmacy should
have at least $275,000 for construction and $75,000 for equipment.
If this building is constructed, the State Museum will be given the
second floor of Science Hall, now occupied by the Department of Biology.
This would afford room for display eases and exhibition of many fine
and valuable and interesting collections that are now deteriorating in
basements for lack of attention and care.


The Biology Department, which is also hopelessly congested, would


go to the first floor of Science Hall.


This would necessitate some re-


modeling, but the amount suggested in the detailed budget


is small.


3. Engineering Building and Equipment


The Engineering Building has been seriously crowded for some


years.


The problem of more room has been accentuated by the increasing en-
rollment, and, unless more room is provided, one of two alternatives
must be resorted to: Either a limit put upon attendance, or admit numbers


beyond the capacity of the College.


The latter alternative would cause


a break-down in the work, and be hurtful to students in engineering and


impair the reputation of the College and the University.
the College of Engineering makes out a clear case for ti


building.


The Dean of
he need of this


Attention is directed to his discussion of that need.


hundred twenty-five thousand dollars is required for this purpose.
In addition to the building, the Dean repeats a request, made for the
last six or seven years and only partially granted in the last appropria-
tion, namely, more equipment for foundry and machinery, for wood shop,
forge shop, for hydraulic laboratory, for testing machines, surveying
instruments, laboratory for steam engineering, internal combustion en-
gines, gas producers, etc., amounting, in all, to $30,000.


4. Library


Building and Equipment


The library should have at least $60,000 to complete at least one
of the wings omitted from the original plans, and to supply the necessary
furniture to properly equip this structure.
The larger uses of the Library require an additional assistant libra-


rian and more student assistants and a larger sum for books.


At least


$6,000 per year should be set aside for books for various departments.

There are other structures that should be erected at the earliest


possible moment.


While the temporary infirmary in one of the old army




t= I.
, = 1-


d" "*a:" . /A. '- ''i


barracks is serving a ietul purpose, it is inadequate, and being con-
structed of wood, is a fire hazard and constant risk. Then two dormi-
tories are needed for all first-year students to live in so that they may be
subject to more careful supervision of their conduct and study hours;


but we are compelled to think of these buildings


as of secondary impor-


tance to those that are needed now for classrooms and laboratories to
avoid the inevitable breakdown of the work of the University.
When the library is moved from its present quarters in Peabody
Hall, it will be necessary to make certain alterations and to provide


seats for additional classrooms.


An appropriation of $2,500 will be re-


quired for these ,alterations and for desks.

5. Enlargement of Central Heating Plant


The central heating plant, with one boiler, is now supplying steam
heat to five academic buildings. We must now call upon this central


plant for additional heat for the large auditorium unit


of the Admninis-


tration Building, which
is under construction.


soon to be occupied, and the new Library,


Another boiler


and an extension


which


of the boiler


room will be required to meet these new deman
dollars is the estimated cost for these additions.


S $i 1 ....


6. Sewage


ds. Fifteen thousand


Disposal Plant


Another very important and pressing matter is the enlargement of
the sewage disposal plant. This plant was built when the enrollment
of the University was around 300. With an enrollment of nearly 1500
students during the regular session and a little over a thousand teachers


in the Summer School, this plant has proved inadequate.


Besides, it is


too near the dormitories and gymnasium, and should be moved farther


away to


a more secluded place.


For this purpose, $20,000 will be needed.


III. Station and Extension Budgets

No attempt will be made here to refer in detail to the items of the
Station budget and the budget of the Agricultural Extension Division.


Suffice it to say that it


is the belief that the future of Florida


is wrapped


up in the work of these Departments, especially in the Station and its


branches.


Vision and wisdom would dictate a liberal policy in the sup-


port of these University activities.
The General Extension Division asks for an increase of its acppro-


priation from $30,000 to $50,000 per year.


From the service rendered


it is obvious that this Division would make wise use of this increase, and
the results obtained would more than justify the enlargement of the
service which this increased appropriation would permit.



18








E, CONCLUSION


We cannot conclude this report without 3


of the many gifts in scholarships and in loan funds and for other purposes.
The state scholarships for teachers and scholarships established by the
*Daughters of the Confederacy, the Scottish Rite Masons of Florida, the
Knights of Pythias of the state, civic clubs and many individuals, have
added tremendously to the opportunities of the poor boy to secure the
advanced training he desires, but which would be difficult if not im-
possible to obtain without such assistance.
Perhaps, the largest undertaking is the effort of the Rotary Clubs
of Florida to raise a loan fund of $100,000 to be placed in loans at the
disposal of students who need funds to meet their expenses in college.
A maximum of $300 a year, or $1200 per student, for four years, is
available at the rate of 6%, with easy payments for the return of this
loan after the student leaves school to engage in some gainful occupa-
tion.


The General Education Board


another benefactor and has be-


stowed $3500 a year for a period of five years for the support and main-


tenance of
University.


a chair of secondary education in Teachers College of the
This gift was made with the understanding that the state


would take the ciair over .and continue its service.


In view of the mul-


tiplied high schools in Florida requiring an ever-increasing number 'of
high school teachers, more improved methods of teaching high school
subjects, and better methods of school administration, etc., this profes-


sorslhip of secondary education must be continued.


This chair must be


supported to meet a distinct need as well as to fulfill the University's
obligation to the beneficent Board which has extended this aid during
this five-year period. Thirty-five hundred dollars per annum is named
in the budget for this purpose.


The most significant


gift during the past year is that of Dr. Andrew


Anderson, of St.


Augustine.


Dr. Anderson was so much impressed with


the first unit of the Administration Building, and with the cathedral
effects of this vast auditorium that he saw the need of a great pipe organ


as a necessary


part of the equipment of this assembly hall.


Very gener-


ously he has made *a gift of $50,000 for this organ, and thereby placed the
University and the state under a lasting debt of gratitude.
In representing the various needs of the University, in describing, in
mere outline, the activities and the service which the University is ren-
dering, not only to the student body but to multiplied, interests of the
state, more space has been required than had been thought necessary.
If the facts here assembled shall aid the Board of Control in representing
the scope and magnitude of this undertaking, and assist the Board in
making up the final draft of the budget for all University activities
this report will have fulfilled, in part at least, the purpose for which
it was written.
Finally, I desire to commend the entire faculty, the various stai


;* .


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makin acknowledgment

making aelniowledgmtt : ^:.:


K/:


liy
.


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,7'~*g" ~r *~~yv


in reseah and Uni eat divisions for their energy, interest
Sdevotion to their several tass, and for their splendid service which
they have perf~rml nder the most trying and discouraging conditions.
To the nt body, composed of as fine young Americans as can be
found m say college in the land, much credit is due for their loyalty
to their State Iaersity, for their good behavior, and their devotion to
high student ideals. To the Board of Control, the entire state is under
a lasting debt of gratitude for its devoted, unselfish service in the in-
terest of the youth of Florida. I wish to express my personal apprecia-
tion for the confidence and encouragement and support of this Board in
the adainistttion of the affairs of this University.
Respectfully submitted,
A. A. MURPHREE,
President.


' ** . '. ,- '. ',
ii '' '. '. '


h'S' '








BIENNIAL REPORT OF THE


COLLEGE OF


ARTS AND SCIENCES


To the President:
In the year 1921-22 there were enrolled in the college of arts and
sciences 300 students. That was the time of my last biennial report.
The following year, 1922-23, the number was 412 and for 1923-24 we had


564 students in this college.
lem which confronts us. V


This shows at once and clearly the prob-
Te must have additional teachers in practi-


every


department represented in this college.


Nor is it simply


question of more teachers. We
and above all more classrooms.


must have more equipment, more books,
By fitting up three classrooms in the


basement of Language Hall, by utilizing the basement of Science Hall
and the old shop building, by shifting classes wherever possible all over
the campus/,we have managed somehow to get through the year 1923-24,


but what shall we do now ?


It is true that the completion of the Library


building will give a little room in Peabody Hall, and if quarters can be
found somewhere for the Extension Division and for the Plant Board,
perhaps we can find room enough for the immediate present, but it is
a question in my mind if we should not right now ask for an additional
building for some departments, such as Business Administration, Econ-


omics


and Sociology,


History


and Political


Science,


Philosophy,


The University of Florida should prepare to meet its destiny.


We


destined to be a big University. There is no way to prevent it, unless
we refuse 'admittance to many students who would come here. It is al-


most incredible that the attendance on this college has in


six years


creased from


92 to 564.


The state is growing rapidly in population and


property valuation.


The high schools are turning out ever-increasing


numbers and most of the boys are coming on to the University.
prepare to .take care of them.

NEW DEPARTMENTS


Since


We must


our last report the School of Pharmacy has been successfully


launched here, at present, as a department of the College of Arts and
Sciences, but under the immediate directorship of Dr. Townes B. Leigh.
We have also under the department of Economics and Sociology


added a number of courses in Business Administration.


This work may


easily be developed into a separate department or even into a separate
school or college.

PERSONNEL OF THE FACULTY

Several changes have taken place and some additions have been
made to our Faculty since our last report.
Mr. E. C. Beck, for some time Assistant Professor of English, re-


signed in 1923 to return to Nebraska.
(Harvard) was appointed as his success


Mr. A. R. Halley, M.A., Ph.D.


Klz


~ ~~~*"1Y i; " ; j




*..., *



and I believe will be required of students in Pharmacy. It is an elective
science for A.B. and A.B.S.S. students. There are also required courses
for the colleges of Agriculture, Engineering, and Teachers.
The Head of the Department has sent a long and detailed report,
showing the great needs of the Department. The work is handled at
present by two professors, an instructor and three student assistants.
The department asks that the instructional staff be increased to five-
two professors, two assistant professors, and one instructor and that
the number of student assistants be increased to six.
The department clearly needs more space-more class rooms and
more laboratories. If Chemistry is removed from Science Hall it is
believed that satisfactory quarters can be provided for Biology and the
Museum.
The changes that are thought necessary are to be found in the Pro-
fessor's report. He asks for an appropriation needed

To remodel and equip Science Hall ................................... $11,500
To erect building and fence for Biloogical Station on
Lake Newnan ........... .... ................ ..................................... 4,100
Apparatus and supplies. ............ ...-.............................................. 5,000

Total for equipment ............. .... .................. ................. .....-........$20,600

Professor Gray's work has been separated from the Department of,
Biology. See the report of the Dean of the College of Agriculture.

Chemistry

The Department has grown rapidly. Now there are about five hun-
dred students, many taking advanced work, several working for the
Master's degree. The establishment of the School of Pharmacy has
added to the work in Chemistry and now classes in these two subjects
are held in five buildings. They ought to be brought together. The
Head of the Department emphasizes the need of a new building for
Chemistry and Pharmacy. Unquestionably this is one of the things
needed on the campus. The Professor asks for a large sum for the
erection of one unit of the Chemistry Building but he makes it plain
that it is much more expensive to erect and equip a building of this sort
than a building designed primarily for classrooms.
The Professor has included Agricultural and Engineering Chemistry
in his report to me but I shall try to sift these items and refer you to
the proper deans for these estimates. His budget then is something like
this:
New building for Chemistry and Pharmacy ................. $275,000
Equipment for the same.......................................................... 75,000
Chemicals, General apparatus, special apparatus for the
biennium ................................. ...-................................... 13,000

H e also asks that Dr.,Heath be promoted-to a full professorship at.
$8,Q9 and that Professor Jackson, who substitutes Wfor YProfessor Bl]ack:
24




-


for 1924-25, be retained as Assistant Professbor of Ancaytical Chemitry
at $2800 and that a new Assistant. Professor of Chemistry be employed
at $2500. He also asks for a Curator at $1500 and four fellows at $500
and five student assistants at $200 and five student assistants at $150.
He estimates that he needs $200 for office supplies for the biennium.


Economics and Sociology


Owing to the great demand for some sort of business course we
added in 1923 a professor of accounting and finance to this department.
As a good many students are taking up this work and many more are
expected, the two professors feel that they must have an addition to the
teaching force. The minimum estimate calls for a new Assistant Pro-
fessor of Advertising, Salesmanship and Marketing at $2700 and for
the year 1926-27 a new Assistant Professor of Economies and Transpor-
tation at $2500. The Head of the Department also asks for a part4time
Instructor in Sociology at $600 and a part-time Instructor in Office
Management at $600, also two student assistants at $100 each. In the
way cf equipment lie asks for one Burroughs Adding Machine at $200
and one Mimeograph at $172.50.

English

Practically every man in the University is either taking College
English or has taken it. This means great numbers and numerous sec-
tions, especially in the required Freshman English. The work has been
carried on during the past year (1923-24) by one professor, two assis-
tant professors, one half-time assistant professor, one part-time assis-
tant professor, one part-time assistant professor borrowed from the
Teachers College, and one part-time student assistant. It has been a
perplexing problem to take care of this work. Two new instructors are
needed or the equivalent provided for by taking part-time men who
would divide their time between English on the one hand and Ancient or
Modern Languages on the other. The difficulty is to take care of Fresh-
man English and at the same time not ask any teacher to devote his
whole time to this one class.
Another method of meeting this difficulty of Freshman English
would be to appoint a number of teaching fellows at about $500 each.

History and Political Science

History I is required of all Freshman A.B. students and either
History I or Political Science I of all Freshman A.B.S.S. students. Be-
sides, these subjects are often chosen as electives by other students.
Consequently the classes are large and several sections are required.
For this reason although a new instructor has been employed in 192824,
it.has not been possible to offer any new courses. To takeca.& afirhe
advanced courses, including graduate work (for which there i4 always
25


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a demand in this department) there will be needed for the next biennium


a new assistant professor.


The department also asks for a student


assistant.
Mathematics
*
During the past year, three men (one professor and two instructors)
have taught 564 men in 18 classes. As Mathematics is a .required sub-
ject in nearly all of our courses as also in some other colleges (notably
the College of Engineering) the numbers enrolled in Mathematics will


increase in proportion to our total enrollment.


More teachers are needed


and will be needed in this department.
The department has also been handicapped by lack of suitable class-


rooms.


There is only one class-room on the campus adequately equipped


with blackboard for teaching Mathematics.


Some of the courses have


been given here and there wherever a vacant class-room could be found.
The Professor asks for two more properly, equipped class-rooms. He
also asks for the addition of one assistant professor for 1925-26 and one


more assistant professor for the


year


1926-27.


This will make five men


in the department by that time, but in my judgment they

Modern Languages


The classes are large and the sections numerous.


will be needed.


Son.,e temporary


relief was obtained in 1923 by the appointment of an assistant professor
of French. He has had charge of all classes in French in 1923-24 but


already the French is too much for one man.


'He asks for an instructor


in French.


But Spanish is the favorite foreign


language


sity of Florida, and help is needed in this language


and one students were enrolled in Spanish A in 1923-24, W
a Professor of Modern Languages, an Assistant Professor


and an Assistant Professor of Spanish (half-time).


at the Univer-
Two hundred


e now have
of French


It is suggested that


two new instructors be added, an instructor in French and


an instructor


in Spanish, but it would be well to have each mlan capable of teaching two
foreign languages or one foreign language and English, in case his ser-


vices may be needed in that department.


The Professor


of English would


really prefer two half-time instructors to one full-time man.
Philosophy and Psychology
Some of the classes 'are large and need to be divided.


Additional


courses should be given. The Psychological laboratory should be re-
opened and improved. The Professor asks for an instructor, two labor-
atory assistants and a slightly increased allowance for instruments and
supplies-all these are needed.
Physics
The work in Physics is an essential part of the College of Arts and
Sciences but since the head of the department is also Dean of the College
of Engineering, it seems most convenient to let him make the report on
Physics with his report on the College of Engineering.








The School of Pharmacy

Due largely to the active interest and financial help of the pharma-
cists of the state in their organizations, the School of Pharmacy was
establshe4 in 1923. This is at present organized as a part of the College
of Arts and Sciences, but under the immediate supervision of Dr. Townes


R. Leigh as Director.


The work has been successfully launched and forty-


one students were enrolled the first year.


The plan


is, aft


to offer only standard three-year and four-year courses, the


er this year,
one leading


to the degree of Pharmaceutical Chemist, the other to the degree of
B.S. in Pharmacy.
It has been difficult to provide class-rooms and laboratories for
these men even for the first year. From the point of view of the School
of Pharmacy, it is highly desirable to have a new Chemistry Building,
specially planned to accommodate also the School of Pharmacy.
It is highly desirable that the work of every department of the
University of Florida be recognized as of standard quality. We wish
the School of Pharmacy to be so recognized. Recently we had a repre-
sentative at the Conference of the American Pharmaceutical Faculties.
Our claims were presented and the Conference was favorable and I have
no doubt that in the due process we shall be ultimately accorded the


recognition we seek, but the Conference suggests that
Faculty more men trained in Pharmacy. We must bea]


we need in our
r this in mind in,


making additions to this Faculty.
The Director ,asks for traveling expenses that we may be represented
at the various meetings of societies in which we are interested.
He also asks for 'a full-time secretary.
He suggests that we should start a drug garden for the cultivation
of medicinal plants.


His report enumerates the gifts


the School has received.


Not only this report but the reports from the other departments are


on file


my office and may be seen whenever needed.
Respectfully submitted,
JAMES N. ANDERSON,
Dean.


For Detailed Budget of the College of Arts and
of Contents.


Sciences,


see Table


F








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DEAN'S BIENNIAL REPORT,
COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE S

To the President:
I have the honor to submit the following report of the work -and
status of the College of Agriculture of the University of Florida for the 7.
biennium ending June 30, 1924, together with budgets, or estimates,
setting forth the needs and requirements of the College, for the bien-
nium beginning July 1, 1925.
Respectfully,
WILMON NEWELL, Dean.

The College of Agriculture is divided into three main divisions.
(1) The Instructional Division, in which instruction is given to resident
students; (2) the Experiment Station, which is devoted entirely to re-
search work in agriculture; and (3) the Agricultural Extension Division,
which is devoted to the extension of agricultural knowledge to those
citizens of the State who cannot attend the University, thru the activ-
ities of county and home demonstration agents, extension schools, pub-
lications, etc. Owing to the distinct character of the work performed by
these divisions, they are, in this report, treated under separate headingsi
altho all of these divisions work in close cooperation with each other as
well as with all other federal and state agricultural agencies.
At this point, attention is directed to the urgent and pressing neec
for an adequate building in which to house the various agricultural ac-
tivities of the campus. Every department in the Experiment Station and
agricultural college has outgrown its present quarters and work in all
lines is cramped and handicapped for lack of room. Class rooms in the
Agricultural Building are not large enough for the classes being held
in them and lack of laboratory space is seriously interfering with the
quality of instruction.
In the Experiment Station building over 30 people work. There is
not room for another laboratory desk, the workers are crowded, the li-
brary is too small to care for the books *actually on hand and it has al-
ready been necessary to erect one temporary outhouse for storage of
equipment and supplies. Student attendance is bound to increase, which
will require a corresponding increase in teaching staff and greater space
for class rooms and laboratories. Then the Experiment Station must
necessarily expand its work and increase its personnel to meet the needs
of the State's agriculture along research lines. Within two years the
congested condition of the present buildings will become most serious
and will seriously handicap the work of all divisions of the College. In
addition, 'the University is required by law to provide office and labora- '
tory quarters for the extensive work of the State Plant Board which
occupies more than one floor of Language Hall, space badly needed by .
the University for class room work. 1




1'?''


It is recommended, therefore, that immediate provision be made
for an agricultural building which will not only meet present needs but
which will be adequate to meet the additional needs of the agricultural


work for several years to come.


Plans should be made for the construc-


tion of an agricultural building to cost, when completed, not less than one
million dollars, and the next session of the Legislature should be asked
for, say, $250,000 with which to begin the first unit of this building.
The present experience of housing all agricultural work in three dif-
ferent buildings on the campus has amply demonstrated the fact that all
of these related activities should be brought together under one roof.
The work of all three divisions of the College of Agriculture and of the
State Plant Board is closely related, employees of all must hold frequent
conferences and work together and the concentration of this work in a
single building will not only result, for all time to come, in marked econ-
omy in its administration but will also effect material economies in
equipment, library facilities, laboratories, etc., and will make for greatly
increased efficiency.


AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE


(Instructional Division)
I. General


The attendance


last year


of 152 regular students


was an increase


of 19 over that of the previous year, while that of 126 rehabilitation stu-
dents was a decrease of 23.
Many of the rehabilitation students have completed their vocational


instruction and comparatively few new ones are being enrolled.


As the


attendance at the majority of agricultural colleges has been decreasing
during the last two or three years, owing to the depressed condition of
agricultural products, the continued increase of regular students is a
source if gratification and encouragement.
The increase of teaching force this biennium has not only made it
possible to add new courses, but also to reduce the size of unwieldy sec-


tions in laboratory and field work.


In the few


cases


where subdivision


was not practical it was possible, with the student assistants provided,


to use one who had already taken the course to aid the professor,


so that


the individual effort of each pupil could be more closely supervised and
incorrect methods promptly corrected.
The Department of Economic Entomology and Plant Pathology,
organized during this biennium, fills a gap in the preparation of trained


workers readily apparent.


With additional equipment and facilities its


activities can be extended and improved.
It seems advisabe to continue the courses in shop work and forge
work under the Department of Mechanical Engineering in the College of
Engineering.
Below will be found brief reports from the various departments
teaching applied agricultural subjects.
29


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Because of the importance of agricultural chemistry in a state where
main industries are largely agricultural, request was included in the
budget for the present biennium for an assistant professor of agricul-
tural chemistry; this having been granted, the following changes and
additions were made:
(1) General chemistry, required of all agricultural students, is given
by the same professor who has charge of the advanced courses of these .
same 'students. Stress is laid on agricultural applications. .
(2) Two new courses were added: "Chemistry II, Organic Agricul-
tural Chemistry," one semester; and "Chemistry IV, Organic Agricul- .
tural Chemistry," a more advanced two-semester course. The latter is .
required of students majoring in agronomy and agricultural chemistry i.
and the former of all others.
The assistant professor teaching these courses has, in addition, all ''
the work in quantitative analytical chemistry. He, therefore, needs the '
aid of student assistants in supervising laboratory work.
It is planned to offer new courses such as "Dairy Chemistry," "Sugar
Chemistry," "Plant Chemistry" and others as soon as facilities will
permit.

III. Agricultural Engineering

The work of the Department has been improved greatly during the -.
biennium by having a full-time man instead of a half-time man, devoting
his attention to agricultural engineering subjects.
New courses have been added in wood and forge work, concrete
construction and farm buildings. The wood and forge work is given in ..
cooperation with the College of Engineering. The laboratory sections
have been reduced in size and the work is much more satisfactory. m
More storage space for machinery consigned by manufacturers for ."
instructional use is needed. The laboratory is too crowded with the ma- ,
chinery now on hand, yet many machines that are needed could be bor-
rowed if sufficient storage space was available. The farm-motors lab-
oratory should not be in the Agricultural Building on account of the ...
noise that necessarily accompanies laboratory work of this nature.

IV. Agricultural Journalism

During the last two years two courses have been offered; namely,
"flow to Write the News Story" and "The Principles and Technique of
the Short Feature Story." While these courses are listed in the Uni-
versity catalog as "Agricultural Journalism," straight journalism is
taught. The best way to learn to write for the agricultural press is to
learn to write for the newspapers; the fundamentals and principles of
writing are-the same for all branches of the art. However, when a st-
dent expresses a preference for agricultural work, effort is made to as- 5
80





*C








sign him articles along that line. How to recognize news, how to gather
it, and how to write it for the newspaper are the cardinal aims in both
courses. Selections for library readings are made with this end in view.
Interesting features of the work in this department are the issuing
of special editions of different newspapers. For three years the class
has done the editorial and reportorial work on the Jacksonville Journal
for one day, and for two years the same has been done on the Gainesville
Sun. In every instance the students have won much sincere commenda-
tion. The Associated Press has cooperated with the classes, offering to
make use of such articles as the students could write concerning Univer-
sity activities, taking the articles just as the students prepare them.
A third course, "The Country Newspaper," is being added the coming
semester. Here stress will be iput upon the place and function of the
weekly newspaper in the country community. Farm and home phases
will be emphasized. Students preparing for country leadership will be
encouraged to take this course, particularly those contemplating county
agent work.
The department has grown until a student assistant is required.
With such help the cooperation begun with the newspapers and the As-
sociated Press can be continued and enlarged, with much beneficial help
to the University from a publicity standpoint.


V. Agronomy and Agricultural Economics


During the present biennium the work of the department has been
improved greatly 5 the addition of one assistant professor and one
instructor. This made it possible to relieve the professor of agricultural
engineering from teaching agronomy subjects and to enable him to de-
vote his entire time to agricultural engineering.
New and much needed courses were added in "Advanced Soils,"
"Special Field Crops," amtd "Farm Bookkeeping and Marketing." The
collection of farm management data has proved of great value. By
a cooperative arrangement .ith the United States Department of Agri-
culture, detailed records covering six years of the organization, manage-
ment and business transactions of 100 Florida citrus farms are now
possessed by the Department.
The laboratory work also was improved greatly by increasing the
number of sections. But much improvement can be made along this line
and it is believed that the most economical, as well as satisfactory, method
of doing this is by providing graduate student assistants for half-time
work at relatively low salaries.
Courses now being offered in the Department include the following
subjects: Soils, field crops, forage crops, fertilizers, farm law, arm
management, farm bookkeeping and marketing. Additional courses for
which there is demand and which should be added are as follows: Soil
surveying, pastures and pasture grasses and statistical methods for reg-
ular students, farm bookkeeping, marketing and farm law for one and
two-year men.
31


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VI. Animal Husbandry and Dairying

The enrollment has been satisfactory in spite of deflation and re-
duction in the livestock industry.
The creamery and cold storage plant erected by business men of
Gainesville and vicinity last year is within four blocks of the campus and
furnishes opportunity for observations and study of practical value to
the students.
Judging teams from the College are competing with team from


other colleges of Florida and


Georgia at state and district fairs in


livestock judging contests with gratifying success.


It is desirable that


funds be provided for sending a team to the International Live Stock


Exposition at Chicago or the National Dairy


Show


at Milwaukee every


year or two for the instruction and inspiration it


g-ves.


The work of supervising


continued.


dairy cows in advanced registry


Annual records for 80 Jerseys and 40


COVws


are now held; about 40 additional cows are now on test.


has been


of other breeds


The results


shown by these records are of special interest and value in showing the
high average cows may make under Florida conditions.
The Experiment Station dairy herds which are used for instructional


purposes are constantly being improved.


But too few good beef cattle


are available; the number kept by neighboring


difficulty


breeders is so


small that


is experienced in showing good examples to students.


desirable that a reasonable sum be provided


for replacing


and purchasing


high-class


livestock for


instruction


and testing


purposes.


A special barn with stalls, yards, fences, grazing and soiling crop


areas,
needed,


and breeding facilities for the management of mature bulls


A convenient location for this can be found, provided the funds


are available.


The services of


a trained herdsman is still a pressing


need, more so now than ever before.


The amount assigned for feed for


farm animals during the last biennium was insufficient, as ;the amount
of farm land available for growing feed crops is small and the number


of animals


is increasing.


Class and laboratory equipment needs replace-


ments and additions, and buildings and fences need repairs and painting.

VII. Economic Entomology and Plant Pathology

During the year ending June 30, 1924, instructional work has pro-
gressed in economic entomology and plant pathology with the organiza-
tion of short courses, undergraduate and advanced courses in these


subjects.


Work has consisted largely of class and field identification


of insects and diseases with control methods for them.


Instructional


collections of insects and diseases of Florida have been started, as has
also a departmental collection of bulletins needed in the work.
It is hoped to soon extend the program to practice work in life
histories of insects, isolation and laboratory study of disease organisms
and more intensive practice in the study and application of insecticides
and fungicides.


.








VIII. Horticulture -


This department has progressed steadily as improvements have
been made and facilities for more thoro and comprehensive instruction


have been added.


The present orchard is too small, with no room for


expansion to adjacent acres. Therefore, another orchard has been started
somewhat farther away and this may be extended over a large area as


time and


funds 'permit.


The nursery is gradually being enlarged to


give opportunity for a larger amount of practical work in propagation,
and the growing of desirable plants for the orchard.


The greenhouse


provided


for in the budget for this biennium is


being erected.


It will aid in teaching floriculture and certain phases of


botany, propagation and pathology more effectively.


A competent fore-


man should be in charge of it and the flower and vegetable gardens
near-by,. that proper cultivatinn, watering, heating and ventilation may


be given.


It is desirable that the greenhouse be enlarged and improved


as its usu incrcaie..


An interesting tart has been made in collecting


and preserving in as natural condition as possible :
of fruits that ripen at special seasons, often when it


cure them for class use in a fresh state.


Additional cot


important varieties
is difficult to pro-
itainers and display


cases to make the collection more complete are needed.
A graduate student, giving half of his time to assisting in the work


of the department and the other half to
culture is desirable.


some


research problem in horti-


IX. Poultry Husbandry


The Poultry Department now has a modest equipment for teaching
purposes. A new brooder house, several laying houses and a feed and


work house meet the serious need of


two years


The incubators


have been in use ;thru much of each year, thousands of chicks being
hatched in practice work by the regular students as well as by the re-


habilitaticn men whom the College


enabled the employment of


is trying to train.


a full-time professor.


Added funds have


The classes have been


large, one at least larger than the class room was intended to seat.
Seven courses in poultry are offered and there is no need for a Florida
boy to go out of the State for poultry instruction.
The Poultry Department has its own office, class room and labora-
tory, a decided improvement over conditions of two years ago. Effort
toward better breeding and feeding has brought some valuable results
in earlier maturity, larger egg production and better market stock.
A student assistant was asked for in the previous report and the
need is even greater now than at that time.

X. Veterinary Science

During the last two bienniums the Department of Veterinary Science
has received appropriations sufficient to build a small veterinary oper-
83


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eating room and dissecting room.


These structures enable the Depar


ment to conduct laboratory work much more efficiently. .
The demands for veterinary diagnostic tests became so great lassj
year that it was determined to render this service to the vetetrinarianj
A .* -_.*" .


or tne State;
Department.


therefore, a diagnostic laboratory was improvised by thL.
During a period of five months there were sent to the labiW


oratory over 300 specimens of cows' blood to be examined for evidence ot:
I- -_ .- - -


oc ntagious abortion, 50 specimens of intestinal disc
charges to be ex-
amined for evidence of worms, and many specimens from diseased ho#
and poultry. There was no laboratory available within the State foF


making such tests until this one was established.


It is necessary to have


the use of such a laboratory in order to diagnose such diseases as con-
tagious abortion, hemorrhagic septicemia in cattle and hogs, anthrax
carbonon, fowl cholera and many other diseases. An appropriation should
be made to carry on this important work.
There has been little research work done on animal diseases in the
State, and since the dairy and poultry industries are being so rapidly


developed, some research should be carried out on the


animals under Florida conditions.


diseases


of these.


The diagnostic laboratory mentioned


herein could be used in carrying on such work, and at little additional


expense,


as many specimens received would be useful in research (see


paragraph on "Livestock Diseases," in the Experiment Station's part of
this report.)
For Detailed Budget of the College of Agriculture see Table of
Contents.


<*r-ly.'
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DEAN'S REPORT, COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING


For the Biennium Ending June 30, 1924


To the President:


I respectfully submit the following report from the College of
Engineering of the University of Florida. It has been prepared in col-
laboration with the Faculty of the College of Engineering, and has the
approval of that Faculty.
This report covers all of the technical engineering departments of
instruction, and also the department of Physics, which is housed in the
Engineering Building, but serves other colleges of the University quite


as much as it does the College of Engineering.


Chemistr
Military


Sci


The departments of


Economies, English, Geology, Hygienne, Mathematics, and
ence, all of which serve the College of Engineering as well


as other colleges


are included under the reports of the other colleges.


PURPOSE OF THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

We conceive that the College of Engineering exists not only for
the purpose of supplying a certain kind of education to its resident
students, but also as an agency to assist in the development of the in-
dustries of Florida, partly by supplying technically trained young men
to these industries and partly by suppling the same sorts of service to
the industries of manufacturing, transportation and public utilities that
the College of Agriculture does for the industry of agriculture. That


is, the C]lege


of Engineering ought not only to carry on resident in-


struction, but ought also to maintain an engineering experiment station
for researches on Florida materials and engineering problems, and an


engineering extensik
universitU d are ear
in the middle west.


on division.


The engineering colleges of other state


trying on such activities with great success, notably


As yet,


no provision for these activities has been


made in Florida and the work of the College of Engineering has been


largely
work in


col2fined


givim


QUALITY


to resident instruction, except for a little extension


g short courses


OF INSTRUCT(


or conferences.

)N IN THE ENGINEERING COLLEGE


The quality


of instruction


in the engineering


college


has been


maintained at its previous high standard.


Every influence for further


improvement of the quality of instruction is of immediate advantage
to the students, and ultimately to the advantage of the state as a whole,
since the life work of the students after their graduation will be done


better in proportion as their preparation is better.
The following influences have been favorable to


improving the


quality of instruction:
1. The strict entrance requirements that have been in force for the
last few years have resulted in freshman classes prepared to do better
835








work lthan tfnerly. Swever, lax in giving enhance' its to students who have not really done the
work specified for the upit.. This sort of "misbranding" of course soon
comes to light in the college work, and the students concerned are de-
moted in those subjects in which they have shown that they do not in
fact possess the preparation certified by their high school principal.
2. The higher salary scale in force the last few years has made it
possible to retain the services of thoroly competent and able instructors.
There are, however, a few points at which salary.increases are required.
3. The provision of additional instructors has been of great benefit
to the quality of instruction, both by remedying overloaded conditions
in some departments, and 'by permitting more specialization on the part
of individual instructors.
The following influences have been unfavorable towards maintaining


high quality of instruction:
1. The lack of a mechanical engineering


laboratory.


There being


no available space in whcih to develop this laboratory, this condition


can not be remedied until an additional building


sR put up.


2. The lack of proper equipment in the department of mechanic


arts. The last legislature appropriated $11,000 (out


for equipment of this department.


of $25,000 needed)


This has been spent and has enabled


the department to do far better work than formerly, but the equipment


does not yet meet the needs of the department.
3. The unexpectedly large increase in enrollment ka3
good deal of crowding of laboratories and other facilities;,


resulted in
with obvioi


detriment to the quality of instruction. Unless the Stlte is willing to
place a fixed limit on the number of students to be admitted to the
College of Engineering, there appears to be no way to remedy this con-
dition except by providing an additional building. It will tot be possible
to remedy this difficulty by dividing the classes into more sections, since


the laboratories and class-rooms are already in


use almost continuous]


-as nearly continuously


as it is practicable to


arrange


a schedule fo


yr
r.


ENROLLMENT

The enrollment in the College of Engineering (which may be taken
as a measure of the quantity of instruction given) has been as follows:


1922-1923
Seniors ................ ................... ........ ........... ........28
Juniors .......................................... ................ 28
Sophom ores .................................................... 45
Freshmen ........................................................ 59
Special ........................................................... 28

Total College Students ............................ 188
Number attending Road Builders Conference
held in C. E. E Departmen t..........................100
Number attending Short Course for
Metermen held by El E. Department...
36


1923-1924


a
is


4 xi


.4^

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(Slight disTrepancies between these fikiiais fai HE 4 hi-n
the university catalog arise from the fact that the catalog Omits the
names of students who have registered in. the College of Engineeing
dnj- Inl j-h 4- n t^A t.n Mf Td Ahj l iTT


colle

collE


aer ranserre to anot er college of the .Universty)
The nurnber of freshmen in 1923-1924 exceeded the capacity of the
ge, which is for about 75 freshmen and about 50 sophomores, The


capacity is determined by several methods, based on space available, on
equipment available, and on instructing force (a full report on this sub-


ject was made for the Board of Control in January 1924).


The situation


was met by the following undesirable expedients:
1. All students from outside the engineering college were excluded
from classes in whcih hitherto students from other colleges have been
admitted, these classes being used as electives by them.
2. In a number of cases classes were taught in larger sections than
is permitted by the standards of the Southern Association of Colleges
and Secondary Schools, thus lowering 4the quality of instruction.
3. In other cases additional sections of the classes were organized
which called for more teaching hours' on the part of the instructors
than is permitted by the above mentioned standards, and this also low-
ered the quality of instruction given.

DEGREES GRANTED

During the biennium 42 bachelor degrees have been granted from


the College


tribi ,ed


of Engineering, and 5 advanced degrees.


as follows:


B.S.C.E.,


13; B.S.E.E.,


These were dis-


; B.S.M.E., 7; B.S.Ch.E.,


C.E. (advanced degree), I
The total number of deg


ing sine
B.S.M. ,
9; E.E.,


e its orgamlzat
, I8; B.S.Ch.E.,


M.E., 1,


ion


treess granted from the College of Engineer-
is as follows: B.S.C.E., 53; B.S.E.E., 52;


6, making a total of 129 bachelor degrees; C.E.,


making


a total of 13 advanced


degrees.


PROBABLE.FUTURE GROWTH OF THE


COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

Altho the demand for instruction in ,the College of Engineering has
exceeded the capacity of the college, it seems probable that the demand
will continue to increase very considerably in the future. This forecast
is based on the following reasons:
1. The statistical studies made by the National Industrial Conference
Board in 1923 showed that the industries of the'United States require
an annual supply of technical graduates very considerably greater than
the Engineering Schools have been graduating.


2. With increasing population, Florida is becoming more of an in-
dustrial state than hitherto, and more public works are being built and
maintained, all of which will require an increasing number of technically
trained men in Florida.


*:
** -
* ^ *: *. *.*. .



't(, *
*- .:
-, -






COOPERATION FROM PRACTICING ENGINEERS AND


INDUSTRIAL CONCERNS


It is a pleasure to record that


a large amount of very valuable


cooperation has been generously given to the College of Engineering


by practicing engineers and by industrial concerns,


state and elsewhere.


both within this


I regret that space does not permit mentioning


all of the. individuals who have kindly assisted, and to whom the ins't-


tution


owes


a large debt of gratitude.


The following are the principal forms in which cooperation has been
given:
Employers have applied in large numbers to obtain the graduates
for technical positions, or the undergraduates for temporary work. In
some lines it has been impossible to fill the demand.
Many manufacturers have been most liberal in making gifts or
loans of apparatus, or in giving very liberal special discounts on pur-
chases. There seems little doubt that our laboratory equipment in ma-


chinery and instruments would be greatly


increased


by gifts if


we had


the space in which to install them.
been suggested by manufacturers of


Some very


generous offers have


refrigerating machinery,


who are


interested in having courses in that branch develop in


our mechanical


engineering department; but there is no space in which to develop a
laboratory of refrigerating machinery.
The use of a considerable number of power plants and other in-


dustrial establishments has been offered


for the use of our upper classes


for practice in making commercial tests on the operation of machinery.
The last few years the senior classes in. mechanical and electrical en-
gineering have made one trip each year for the purpose of making such


tests-the plants offered not being located in


Gainesville.


Some industrial


concerns


have been most liberal in giving inspection


trips to groups of interested students, at the
visited.
In the Roadbuilders' Conferences and the
trical Metermen, very valuable assistance from


expense


of the concern


Short Courses


for Elec-


outside was given,


with-


out which it would not have been possible to carry out these projects.
A number of prominent Florida engineers have accepted invitations


to lecture to the students, giving their services without pay.


industrial concerns have also supplied lecturers on


tures of their products, or have loaned


Several


the technical fea-


sets of lecture slides or moving


picture films.
A group of engineers who asked that their action be considered


anonymous, made an unsolicited offer to


give financial assistance to


indigent students at the recommendation of the dean as need might
arise; and supplied all funds called for.
SHORT COURSES OR CONFERENCES
During the week beginning April 21, 1924, the Department of Elec-


trical Engineering,


with the cooperation of practicing engineers and







manufacturers of electrical instruments, repeated and greatly amplified
the one-week course for electrical metermen, first given in 1922. This
course or conference was participated in by 67 persons, of whom 84 were
electrical metermen (23 from Florida, 6 from Georgia, 7 from Alabama),
4 were central station managers, 2 were other persons engaged in elec-
trical industries, 9 'were electrical students of the University, 5 were
electrical instructors in the University, and 3 were lecturers engaged from
among practicing engineers.
On February 8th, 9th and 10th, 1923, the Departmnent of Civil En-
gineering, with the cooperation of practicing engineers and highway
officials, gave a Roadbuilders' Conference, which was attended by 100
engineers from all parts of Florida and from neighboring states.
On 'February 13th, 14th and 15th, 1924, the second Roadbuilders'
Conference was given, which was attended by 150 engineers.
During the fall of 1924, the Department of Mechanical Engineering
expects to give a conference for refrigerating engineers and ice man-
ufacturers.


The results of these short com
gratifying, and they have been o
value to the industries concerned.
to the institution, as the contact
has been very stimulating, and has
upon the instruction being given to
projects have been borne in large


Irses or conferences have been most
)f unquestioned direct and practical
They have also been well worth while
with practical men in the industries


undo
our
part


)ubtedly re
students.
by the Gi


acted very beneficially
The expenses of these
sneral Extension Divi-


sion; but the labor of organizing them has fallen entirely upon the fa-
culty members in all details. If it were not for this difficulty, many
other short courses or conferences would be developed, for other indus-
tries, which is not possible under present condition. It is earnestly
hoped that eventually an engineering extension division (or an engin-


eering section of the General Extension Division) may be provided,
furnishing a personnel which could look after the organizing of such
short courses, merely calling upon the faculty members to do their share
in delivering lectures and leading discussions.

STATUS OF THE ENGINEERING DEPARTMENTS
Civil Engineering Department. The work of this department has
been greatly strengthened by the provision of an additional instructor.
The need for additional drafting-room space has become so urgent in
this department that it has been necessary to partition off half of the
hydraulic laboratory as a drafting-room. This of course is very bad for
the hydraulic laboratory, but it has seemed a lesser evil to cramp it
than to do without the needed drafting-room space. The equipment of
surveying instruments is no longer sufficient for the increased size of
surveying classes. It has been necessary in some cases to do the survey-
ing field work with parties of five or six men to one instrument. Enough
instruments should be provided to make it possible to do this work with
only two or three men to an instrument, thus giving each man a fair
39







chance to obtain practice in the use of the instruments.


The civil en-


gineering department is often called upon to make commercial tests
of. the strength of materials; it is very desirable that the department


should make'such tests, not only


as a service to the industries of the


state, but also on account of their instructional value to the students;
but some of the tests called for demand larger testing machines than the
department possesses (in particular, those of concrete building blocks).
In fact no important additions to the material testing equipment have
been made since the university has been in Gainesville, the same old


equipment still being in use that was brought
1906.


over from Lake City in


During the past biennium 13 men were graduated from this depart-
ment, all of whom found immediate engineering employment in Florida.


Department of Physics and Electrical Engineering.


This depart-


ment gives technical instruction, in its work in electrical engineering;
but its work in physics is not peculiarly of an enginceerng character, but


on the contrary


serves


the other colleges of the university quite as much as


I1 t-n 1


tme College of Engineering. Physics is a required course not only in
the Engineering College, but also in the pre-medical and B. S. courses of
the Arts and Science College, and is either optional or elective in aill
other courses of the Arts and Science College and the Teachers' College.


The great bulk of the work in Physics


has been in giving the re-


quired or optional elementary college courses, in which 255 students


received instruction in 1923-1924.


The laboratory


has become much


crowded; but by forming additional sections of


ing till


the classes (some


work-


six P.M.), it has been possible to accommodate the students in


these courses.


But in the more advanced elective courses the department


has been seriously handicapped on account of the complete absence of
any laboratory room that could be set aside for the use of these classes,
It is of course impossible to do worth-while work in these courses with-


out laboratory facilities.


It is necessary that such courses be given,


not only as electives for the Arts and Science College, but also for the


graduate students in chemistry,


who are beginning to be numerous.


Advanced work in chemistry requires corresponding work in physics.
Additional laboratory space for the physics department is urgently
needed, and the work of elective courses can not be much develop with-
out it.
The work in electrical engineering has been principally in general
courses required for upperclass engineering students, altho a beginning
was made some years ago towards offering more specialized work in


this department.


The department needs more space for the work of the


general courses; and more specialized courses should also be develop,
but there is not much chance to develop them until more space is avail-
able. The additional instructor provided for this department has made
it ,possible to definitely offer one of these special courses-in radio--
but there is no laboratory room for this course, which has been using
a temporary wooden shed back of the engineering building, insecure
40


_


j







; against weather and tbtth The lest bud
Vfon. delon in elecrical dt tn e u


Ight provided pArt of the funds
enkh and 4thn ii t bO%1Ald 4he


- -V g- r & - J U J5 ng I.& Mq pmt1, CUnL tfll O s C t ^ aA e
department to make great :progresB 'with this work. It now regularly
tests the standards used by electrical companies for checking the cor-


rectness of their meters~
made for:


During thq, past year, such tests have been


Daytona Public Service- Company, Daytona, Florida
Florida Public Service Company, Orlando, Florida
Florida Public Service Company, DeLand, Florida
Georgia-Alabama Power Company, Albany, Georgia
Valdosta Power & Light Company, Valdosta, Georgia
Pinellas County Power Company,. Clearwater, Florida
St. Petersburg Light Company, St. Petersburg, Florida
Orlando iPublic ;tTtilities Co., Orlando, Florida
Municipal Light & Water Plant, Starke, Florida

This work is a real contribution towards public welfare, since the main-
tenance of correct weights

justice in all transactions.


our students.


This work has also had instructional value to


is urgently desirable that the remainder of the sum


asked for this work be appropriated, so that the work may be further


perfected and extended.


During the past biennium there were gradu-


ated from this


department


17 men, most of whom took employment


with large electrical companies outside of


Florida.


Several have al-


ready returned to Florida and are engaged in electrical industries within
the state, and others will undoubtedly do likewise.


Department of Mechanical Engineering.


The provision of an


assis-


tant- professor giving fall time to this


department,


instead of an instructor


giving part time to it, has resulted in much improvement in its work.
But the department is almost hopelessly handicapped by lack of space.
It has no laboratory room; what little laboratory equipment it has is
crowded into a corner of the testing laboratory; a room intended for this
department has had to be converted into an extra drafting-room for
freshmen, thus making the office of the professor into a public passage-
way for much of the time; while the only working space that is available
for the assistant professor is a desk in a general drafting-room which
is in use by students most of the time. In my opinion there is no point
in the whole university in which additional space is so urgently needed


as in this department.


Additional building should certainly be begun


at once, to provide a laboratory for mechanical engineering.
During the past biennium, 7 men were graduated from this depart-
ment, of whom four are known to be employed in the industries of Flor-


ida, and three outside of Florida.
Department of Chemical Engineering.


The engineering branch of


the chemistry department is constantly progressing, and we believe our
course compares favorably with chemical engineering courses offered
by other institutions in this country. The technical library and museum
is being added to from time to time, largely thru donations from chem-
ical and metallurgical industries. During the past year the ~chemical in-


"7







dtstries of Florida were listed and tabulated.


It is planned to keep in


touch 'with these industries for the purpose of rendering them any pos-
sible assistance and also to place our graduates in their employ.


The needs for the next two


years


are closely allied to those of the


chemistry department.


There is great need of more space for laboratory


work, lecture and class rooms, offices and library.


The teaching force


is too small .to handle the courses in the most efficient manner, there


being


so much routine work, that practically no time is available for


research, extensive reading, or advanced courses.


condition that ought to be remedied.
erence books and technical periodicals


This is an unfortunate


A larger supply of technical ref-
is needed. We hope to be able


to open an industrial chemistry laboratory in the near future. Such a
laboratory should be equipt with small scale plant apparatus, such as


filter presses, autoclaves, driers, reaction kettles, etc.
this type will familiarize the student with the operation


A laboratory of
of plant machin-


ery in a much more satisfactory manner than
text books alone.


is possible


means of


During the past biennium, 5 men
ment.


Department of Drawing and


were


Mechanic


graduated from


A rts.


this depart-


The work of this


department has been much strengthened by the


instructor, instead of an instructor giving
apartment.


The work in drawing urgently


provision


only part


requires more space.


of a full-time


time to this de-


The number


enrolled in the freshman course in drawing


was 126 in the past year.


were


expected to use a room containing 24


desks.


As this room


was also needed for other classes, it


was not possible to schedule it for


the freshmen for more than three sections, which would have assigned
42 to 24 desks. This situation was met by installing additional desks


in a room intended for another purpose,


thus interfering


with the work


of the mechanical engineering department.
The work in mechanic arts, which had completely broken down on
account of the wearing out of 20-year old equipment, has been largely
restored, on account of the appropriation of part of the funds needed


for equipment of this department.


These funds were used for installing


forge shop equipment, and for partially installing woodshop equipment;
and instruction in these two shops has been given. The funds did not
permit installing foundry equipment, and the department is therefore


still unable to give


instruction in


Space for the foundry was provided


this subject, except


years


by text-book.


ago in the shop wing of the


engineering building; but funds for its equipment have never yet been


made available. TI
for the wood shop.
and lavatories. Th


his is an urgent need, as well as additional equipment
There is also urgent need of suitable locker rooms
te number of students taking work in the shops last


year was 276.
Departments outside the Engineering College. Besides the depart-
ments just mentioned, engineering students use the Department of Mili-







bary Science and the following departments which are assigned to the
College of Arts and Sciences: Chemistry, Economics, English, Geology,
Hygiene, and Mathematics. The needs of the College of Engineering
require adequate facilities in these departments as well as in the tech-
nical departments. Their needs are set forth elsewhere; but it may be
appropriate to state here that the College of Engineering would be espe-
cially helped by the provision of more space for the chemistry depart-
ment; of a larger instructing force in the English department, so that
more attention can be given to criticizing English composition and to
giving instruction in public speaking; and of a larger instructing force
in the mathematics department.

NEEDS

New Building. The greatest and most obvious need of the College
of Engineering at this time is more space, the present quarters having
become so crowded as to interfere seriously with the efficiency of in-
struction. It is also urgently necessary, as pointed out in all previous
reports, to provide space in which to develop a mechanical engineering
laboratory.
The need for additional space can be best met, as recommended in
the last biennial report, by providing an additional engineering building.
This building should be located as near as possible to the present en-
gineering building, since both students and faculty would have occasion
to use both buildings, and since it would be desirable to have various
electrical circuits, piping, and similar services between the two buildings.
To secure the necessary proximity, it might be best to construct the
new building as a wing to the present building, joining it at the boiler
rooiti and extending parallel to the present shop wing. In any case, we
believe that a much better and more substantial type of construction
should be used than in the old building, as offering the greatest economy
in the long run.
The most logical arrangement for the new building would seem to
be one which would place in it all those laboratories that use machinery
(aside from the shops, which already have a wing of their own). This
would include the mechanical engineering laboratory for which no space
is now available anywhere, together with the dynamo laboratory which
is now housed in the old building, and perhaps also the hydraulic labora-
tory and the testing laboratory. The new building should also provide
drafting rooms, which could be advantageously placed in a second stojy.
The space left in the old building by moving out the dynamo laboratory
and the drafting rooms could be utilized to very good advantage by the
departments of civil engineering and of physics, both of which are seri-
ously crowded in their present quarters.
To carry out this plan would require an expenditure of about
$125,000. This figure is reached as follows: The present dynamo labor-
atory has total floor area of 2700 square feet (including store roons,
battery room, work shop, office, etc.), and it provides space for enough


*" ;z"X







machines to work about 18 astudentsin a laboratory section.


It is now


filled with about as many machines as can be crowded in, and does not


offer space for installing other types,


which should be provided.


new laboratory ought to have twice the capacity of the old one, to pro-
vide room for new machines, and make it possible to accommodate 36
students in a section-(a number which has been attained in our junior
clase, land seems likely to be attained in the senior class soon), and also to
make room for apparatus for special courses which have not ye been


develop, tho the demand for them


exists.


square feet for the new dynamo laboratory.


ing laboratory should be of equal


This would call for 5400
The mechanical engineer-


Both of these laboratories should


occupy the ground floor, and together would require 10,800 square feet.


A second story
would call for


to provide drafting rooms and other
a building at least 30 feet high, and


volume of 324,000 cubic feet.


In the


necessary
thorokorc


type of cons-truction


abit, this would cost about 35c per cubic foot,
$113,000; 'allowing $12,000 for equipment, a g
reached.
It will be noted that the foregoing plan pr,


making a
Randd tot,


ovides


facilities
having a


thought advis-
'.ocal of about
o.f $125,000 is


for the satisfaction


of two entirely distinct needs, both of which have become pressing:


the provision of the mechanical e<
needed for years, and (2) some rel
present engineering building. A


neering laboratory which has been


from the crowded


condition of the


building which satisfies only one of


these needs would not


relieve


believe that the former is the


other to any


more


pressing


extend whatever.


of the two needs, since


would correct an actual defect in our equipment-a detail in which we are
nbt giving to the young men of Florida as good instruction as they can
obtain by going to engineering schools outside of the Siate. But the
latter need is also pressing since further growth of the engineering


college enrolhnent is impossible until it is satisfied,
of the present quarters has been reached already.


as the full capacity
We could, of course,


shut our eyes to this situation, and allow the state to send increasingly
large numbers of young men to the engineering college without provid-
ing room for them; but such a policy could result only in confusion, since
the space would not be available for putting these men to work-the
drafting room has space for only so many desks and is already in use
continuously for one section after another with every place filled; and
similarly with other facilities.
Clearly more space must be provided now, or else a limit must be
puC on the number of students to be admitted to the engineering college,
or else we must face as a result of admitting numbers beyond the capac-
ity of the college such a breakdown in its work as will be most injurious
to its students and to its reputation.
Equipment. In addition to the small current alowances made to
the different departments for adding to their equipment, there is need
for special appropriations of large amount for equipment for certain
departments. These needs have been set forth in previous reports, but
44


" ; **;" i~r'i : :; J, .i; \ -**^ ^ *-




JW ~ rT-- ---..-----. -- - *-'-------*---*---- r-------------------
->~~~~~" R T~$~K >~7K


have been only partially met, the following suma behI still needMd out
of the original totals mentioned in the last report:
Department of Mechanic Arts, for foundry and for addi-
tional machinery for wood shop and forge shop..............$14,000
Department of Civil Engineering, for hydraulic laboratory,
and for testing machines, also for additional surveying
instruments, to keep pace with the increased size of
classes .... .............. ..... ...... ................................... $ 9,200
Department of Electrical Engineering, for testing equip-
ment, used both for instruction and for calibrating stand-
ards for central stations thruout Florida............................. $ 1,000
Department of Mechanical Enginecring, for equipment of
mechanical engineering laboratory which has not yet been
developed-steam engines, boilers, internal combustion


engine E, gas producers, testing inlstrnments, etc...............$ 8,500
In some cases larger sum? are n-eeded.
Slight incrc-a.es in the allowancies for current maintenance of
the lab1ratoric are required, on account of the increased num-
her :1' stud iints in the lahoratr-rie'.


Teaching Force.


With the increa'-irig enrollment of students comes


the n.:r J fnr ir..rea-.e in


tor (An 1.ii'.
to 5 t i l' .-'


size of teaching force.


Ie :,:-I to good advaritnlce, bt at


9


t*' v. r-k,


Some additional instruc-
present there is no room


as the -rapr,.ity, of the present quarters has been


reached !


- t- niic--i I'uildringr l.'.i not be ready for use till the


college


\-.; r


.* n92,-9-, o nowe-' in riLctors are asked for


for the first


yctr of t!.
art r( I ,,
de!p..L nUl

neqln.; '.

req'j.i .- i:


r
I


;, :.fni,.I' but twn addi'ti ,il instructors at $1800 per year each,
-...- I Li'r the- o. lhL-.-- :.ehr 1*'26-1927, to be .assigned to the
. ,.f n-.'chan...cl '.rgine .r iEg and physics, respectively.


k~ t ','ine the salaries of the more recently appointed faculty
;.r-. ;ira.- ~~th the- r.L.'u'ar slnaries for their rank, in accordance


u Lial uo'icv orf th-"


the following


increases


Profes .-,:r
.1", ',:tan,' n


" n.t-,. h nicuaI *ngireerin~ ln .i... ............... $3250& to $3400


ii *---a-


erginee . .i
iisstl-tan, pr in c i' :r
In ruL' ..r in civil


Assista It
in truc'tor I


Insti uctoi


of ph.9sics

of nmechanical
nlgin n-ering
r in physics


and electrical
....................., 2500 to
en.gineering.... 2500 to
................ ..... 1800 to
advanced to
....................... 1500 to


I wish also to recommend that the present position of instructor in
physics and electrical engineering at $1800 a year be changed to an
assistant professorship at $2500 a year. The reason for recommending
this change is because it has been found extremely difficult to attract
to the $1800 position any men of the qualifications needed for the work
of this position. I believe it requires a man having the Ph.D. in physics
or equivalent training. It has been only by extremely good luck that
we have succeeded in filling this position with a properly qualified man,
who has taken it temporarily.
Non-Teaching Positions. I wish to repeat the recommendation of the
45


S-


. *:i
:i :.


II


kC f F


Uinla.:-rity,








tnt o'rt for the appointment of a mechanician at $1800 a year whoe
Anties should be the care and upkeep of machinery and apparatus. The
college of engineering already has much valuable machinery, the proper 2'
upkeep of which requires a large amount of time. In some cases, it is .
not being well kept up, and that is poor economy in the long run. If
there should not be enough of such work to fully occupy a mechanician's
time at present, he could utilize the rest of his time to very good advan- -,
tage in connection with other machinery on the campus, or on upkeep
of the buildings. .1
The secretary of the College of Engineering has been receiving :
$1000 a year, while the secretaries for the other colleges receive from
$1200 to $1500. I recommend the correction of this inequality by raising .
the salary of the secretary of the College of Engineering to $1400.
Respectftully submitted,
J. R. BENTON,
Dean.
For Detailed Budget of the College eo EngineerinR see Table of
Contents.
,di






*
*' -
:1






,.
4








i







*,
t1












46,
~
I






I .

I>




/ J *^ A, S v ^ . =, *, ^ ^ : *= '
'= f :' *


BIENNIAL REPORT OF THE COLLEGE OF LAW

To the President:
Following is my report upon 'the condition and needs of the College
of Law.


GENERAL STATEMENT


Since the biennium ending June 30, 1922, the College


taken several steps forward. NI
ments its popularity ij unabated.


state have increased.


of Law has


notwithstanding higher entrance require-
Inquiries from students outside of the


There is a keen demand for our graduates which


we have been able barely to meet.


Practically all of them have located in


Florida, assisting in its development through the active practice.


Each


year that the College has been a member of the Association of Ameri-
can Law Schools it has been represented at its meetings, different pro-


lessors


attending in order that the benefits of this national convention


of legal educators may be more widely distributed.


The College


is "reg-


istered" by the Board of Regents of the State of New York and ranked


as an


"A" school by the American Bar


Association,


each classification


being the highest


given.


STUDENT BODY

The following has be4h our enrollment for the last biennium:


Session
Session


1922-23 3....... ............................................---........ ....27
1923 -24. .................... ...........................--...............19 6


The enrollment


of 1922-23,


the largest the College has


ever enjoyed,


explained by the fact that at this time there was a rush of students to


avoid the entrance requirement of one
which became effective in the fall of 192


year of academic college work,
3. The enrollment of 196 of the


next year, however, without the artificial ,stimulus of scholarships and
in the face of higher requirements is more significant, being additional
evidence that the law is wanted for its own sake, and not because a de-


gree therein can be acquired by less than four
hitherto has been true.


years


of college study,


A tabulation of law school registrations reported in October, 1923,
was published in the December issue of the American Law School Review.
A comparison of our registration with that of a number of other southern


law schools at this time indicates that


we are leading most of them in


attendance.


University of Alabama ...................................-.......... -.-. ... -. ......-.--.-.
University of Arkansas ..... ..........-.....-............-.---- ------. . -. .
University of Georgia. ................. ... ........................... ..................
Emory eUniversity..............--... -----...... -'---...........-------.....-----.-..

Tulane Universiity-...--..-..---. ------------'.-.--"- '..--.---"-"---.-----
University of Mikissippi.-.......*-**..-----.-...-...----.....
University of Missouri.. **...--...-......... .-..--..---.-.




0I .1"/


mniver styof it Q. o1na a. ................. ....... ..... .......1... .24
University of South Carlina................ ...... ................-........... 142
University of Tennaesseed.,._ ......................... ..............---. 60
Washington and Lee University ......................,..... ....... ..... 107
University of West Virginia.-. ................................ ........ .... 1141
University of Florida ...... .................................. ......................... .. 182

GRADUATES

During the last biennium the following degrees were granted:


1922-23,


LL.B ....... 21,


1923-24, J.D ........ 8, LL.B......... 20,


total ........ 2 1
total,........ 28


More J. D.
close of the


degrees
1923-24


were granted and more men were graduated at the
session than at any other session of the College.


LIBRARY


There are at,


present 6,730


volumes


of law books' in our library.


Buying: 'reorts to


the Reporter System, so in time we may


have all the


Armericn cases, is expel
standpoint of volumes.


and prevents a better showing from the


It is essential, however, for


such a library as


a good law school should have.
It is obvious also that books call for book stacks.


The ones


using are made by the Art Metal Construction Company.


we are


The library


new is in


need of more stacks.


Everythingethat we have been able to


spare


from


necessity so


mend
least


"office


me o


fixture: has


f the a2


ing $4,000 for the
$1,000 will be used


propriation for the


into book stacks and also of


"law library."


I am recom-


biennium for the library and estimate that at
for book stacks.


FACULTY


The faculty consists


now of five professors


who give their entire


to teaching,


thereby


enabling the entire curriculum, amounting to


ninety-four semester hours, to


be given each year.


Their names, degrees,


and Iclngh of service at this College follow:
Harry R. Trusler, A.M., LL.B., fifteen years' service.
Clifford W. Crandall, B.S., LL.B., eleven years' service.


Robert S. Cockrell, M.A.,


five years' service.


Harry L. Thompson, B.S.C.E., J.D., one
Dean Slagle, A.M., LL.B., one-half yes


year's


lr's


service.


service.


All of these men have had experience in the law practice.


Professor


Thompson came to us from the faculty of the Mercer Law School and
Professor Slagle, who has had considerable teaching experience, came
to us from the practice, taking the place of Professor R. A. Rasco, in-
capacitated on account of illness.
From letters received from the deans of other southern law schools
I know that a movement to increase the compensation of law professors


is going on.


Florida's compensation of law pr6febrs relatively is not


J.D......... 0,








high. Rather than dsltis sala a*ewkree howem, It ote m11re
to the point to consider salaries in Flordda. It seems not unreasonable
that professors of. long service in the State Law School should receive
as much as circuit judges. The legislature has given them $5,000 per
year. I am not going to ask for this sum, but I recommend that the three
professors of longest service be raised from $8,600 to $4,000 per year and


that the salaries of the others be increased to $3,600.


Realizing the ad-


vantages of keeping satisfactory professors, I have asked for these
younger men a salary that should enable us to meet the competition of


other


chllools.


DEANSHIP


I recommend that the salary of this position be maintained at
level no lower than that of the other deanships of the University.

SECRETARY-LIBRARIAN


In my last report I stated the amount of work handled by this office
and its indispensability to the College, recommending that the salary


be made $1800 for eleven months'


service.


In a supplemental report,


under date
mendation.


of April 20, 1923, I


These


reasons c


gave


in detail my reasons for this recom-


continue, and I renew my recommendation.


JANITOR


The college


building


has been kept clean by two half-time student


janitors at $15 per month each. This aid has been very helpful to our
needy students, but experience has shown that the building is not so
promptly or so thoroughly cleaned as it would be with a full-time negro
janitor. If higher excellency in janitorial service is desired, I recom-


mend the appointment of


a full-time negro janitor.
Respectfully submitted,
HARRY R. TRUSLER,
Dean.


For Detailed Budget of the College of Law see Table of Contents.


*



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