• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Board of control
 Letter of transmittal














Group Title: Report of the Board of Control of the state educational institutions of Florida for the period ...
Title: Report of the Board of Control of the state educational institutions of Florida for the biennium ending June 30, 1920
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00090515/00002
 Material Information
Title: Report of the Board of Control of the state educational institutions of Florida for the biennium ending June 30, 1920
Series Title: Report of the Board of Control of the state educational institutions of Florida for the period ...
Alternate Title: Report of the Board of Control of the state educational institutions of Florida for the biennium ending ..
Report of the Board of Control of the state institutions of higher learning of Florida for the biennium ending ..
Report of Board of Control, state of Florida
Physical Description: 29 v. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Florida -- Board of Control
University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: Florida -- Board of Control
Place of Publication: Tallahassee
Manufacturer: T.J. Appleyard
Publication Date: 1921
Frequency: biennial
regular
 Subjects
Subject: Education, Higher -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
statistics   ( marcgt )
Periodicals   ( lcsh )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: 1905/1907-1962/64.
Numbering Peculiarities: Reporting period for reports 1905/1907-1907/1909 ends Jan. 1; for 1909/1910-1911/1912 ends Dec. 31; for 1912/1914-1962/64 ends June 30.
Numbering Peculiarities: Report for 1907/1909 mistakenly dated 1908/1909.
General Note: Includes the report of the president of the University of the State of Florida, later the University of Florida, and of the presidents of the other state institutions of higher education.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00090515
Volume ID: VID00002
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 50135007
lccn - 2002229051
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Report of Florida Board of Regents

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Title Page
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Board of control
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Letter of transmittal
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 135
        Page 136
        Page 137
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
        Page 145
        Page 146
        Page 147
        Page 148
        Page 149
        Page 150
        Page 151
        Page 152
        Page 153
        Page 154
        Page 155
        Page 156
        Page 157
        Page 158
        Page 159
        Page 160
        Page 161
        Page 162
        Page 163
        Page 164
        Page 165
        Page 166
        Page 167
        Page 168
        Page 169
        Page 170
        Page 171
        Page 172
        Page 173
        Page 174
        Page 175
        Page 176
        Page 177
        Page 178
        Page 179
        Page 180
        Page 181
        Page 182
        Page 183
        Page 184
        Page 185
        Page 186
        Page 187
        Page 188
        Page 189
        Page 190
        Page 191
        Page 192
        Page 193
        Page 194
        Page 195
        Page 196
        Page 197
        Page 198
        Page 199
        Page 200
        Page 201
        Page 202
        Page 203
        Page 204
        Page 205
        Page 206
        Page 207
        Page 208
        Page 209
        Page 210
        Page 211
        Page 213
        Page 214
        Page 215
        Page 216
        Page 217
        Page 218
        Page 219
        Page 220
        Page 221
        Page 222
        Page 223
        Page 224
        Page 225
        Page 226
        Page 227
        Page 228
        Page 229
        Page 230
        Page 231
        Page 232
        Page 233
        Page 234
        Page 235
        Page 236
        Page 237
        Page 238
        Page 239
        Page 240
        Page 241
        Page 242
        Page 243
        Page 244
        Page 245
        Page 246
        Page 247
        Page 248
        Page 249
        Page 250
        Page 251
        Page 252
        Page 253
        Page 254
        Page 255
        Page 256
        Page 257
        Page 258
        Page 259
        Page 260
        Page 261
        Page 262
        Page 263
        Page 264
        Page 265
        Page 266
        Page 267
        Page 268
        Page 269
        Page 270
        Page 271
        Page 272
        Page 273
        Page 274
        Page 275
        Page 276
        Page 277
        Page 278
        Page 279
        Page 280
        Page 281
        Page 282
        Page 283
        Page 284
        Page 285
        Page 286
        Page 287
        Page 288
        Page 289
        Page 290
        Page 291
        Page 292
        Page 293
        Page 294
        Page 295
        Page 296
        Page 297
        Page 298
        Page 299
        Page 300
        Page 301
        Page 302
        Page 303
        Page 304
        Page 305
        Page 306
        Page 307
        Page 308
        Page 309
        Page 310
Full Text
* q
..r -


REPORT


BOARD OF CONTROL]


taile In-tihurions oL


Hiher Leizmin ol Florida


. ,.a - -- -
a.


I
4*:~r :




p


REPORT


BOARD OF CONTROL


State Institutions of

Higher Learning of Florida


FOR THE
BIENNIUM ENDING
JUNE 30, 1920

1921
i~ -^I "- u-a- '-


Z'jj~'YX .."I








":~
CL~rL






















BOARD OF CONTROL


J B. HODGES, Ok.Mr o.H .................... Lake City
W. W. FLOUv o ........... .. ..... ..D unak Springs
H, B. MINU t ... .... ........... ...... .J acaonvlle
J. B. SB TroN, ..-. ......- ... -- .. ........ .Tampa


E,. L. WArMAN.. ..

J,. T. DIA D, SeCreary. .


...........Citra

..... .Tallassee


:i
':~1
:


"`i


,a:
h
P









































>4






A
I.


























*~~

i; ..



4.a~



















-:i

LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL


January 15, 1921
To Bis EBcefleavy.
Cary A. H ee,
Governor of Fork .
Sia:
TI compliance with the provisions of Chapter 5384, Laws of
lrida, herewith is submitted biennial report of the Board of
Control for the period from July 1, 1918, to Jne 80, 1920, to be
by you transmitted to the Legislatre.


Respectfully,
BOARD OF CONTROL,
Br J3. B. Homn, Chairman. R

A -,











n* J < *:


r*









Is::





s
























6
P
I;
&;I






I









EIGCrifh BILNrAMl RE-PORT OF Th BO RD
OF CON ROL





this Board has fully realized th great reipo iltles re ting
upon it and lhe imporitaace of tie tn imposed ie n tdirsctingt
alitri of tie late lua titutioh s of Higher Tar ling of Floridt
N0( pul l ihas this responsibility been ina o ipe as by a.
rdlonltioi va in thee institutions amr bring twiiahil the ylung
men and women of our state, who will in he lear futr Ibegin
to fnl many of the arpopitant ktationg in The life of thle commno,-
Wealth, socially, econonai ay a lnd bupoliticy hit alse o aC-
counat of tlh in iereai burdean laid "upon tOle i nlw provided z
for ite operation and maintaining of these iUstitutions, eaned
by ihe honorinoius advance IL pro o H clae oa am terialA .nd
coinineit"ie, [?constaiting a Coast tconr eratile diftstributiona of,
exipenditlures 11 1
it is, ho&w-ve, rdeply gratifyint to this Roaod to beable toW
report ll t a continued |iprgr e hlas lbcqn iiatiaineil i t e he s-
eral inaitit ila dung the beannum, as is e olee by detailed
reports lo h l tn st Out,
To flip patriotic devotion to duty on the part OE oie proiudentu
and nimellill of the faculties of tliose etitntitnlo i 'dIue in Ill rge *'
measure theauecsh ai itrtion surf. t"itr "ilal ftd fly *
on ilaries flxd during laral timfl a u un, Tormln1 prices- t lo 13
faind, In other weyprioes and bIlnnsee slaries were- 3W
creased to meCi t le gaetl y luienstad clok O living, yet thos
engaged in R aryidin on Fleoum a iTti"tuftiPni It Igi erHT :
ing could not b geanted afi fal a e In whlalry, Covifr 4'.m't
With prevailing costof bivig b~iea. t a p i we

not ,iifbiBi .~.

g I i. I r Il I 11 III

IF I I I












S~ JMO Earmaa resigned to accept an appointment as a
a belr of the State Brard of Health, and Mr. H. B. MiniUm of
JMonli ail i, wns appointed in his plae, and Mr. J. B. Hoges,
'a hF e City, etcted chbaiman. Mr. J. T. Diamond, having
aomred into a county where two of the Intitlions are located,
te1igned, an Mr. W. W. Flourny, of DeFuliak Springs, Wa
Sls place.

REPORTBB

hereto are the reports froa the Four inDituftions under th
. o thiis Board, via;


import ofoA A. M aphReo, A, M. ILL Dl, proajo-t . 47
RMeort of W. B. ands.,non linear.. .. .

COIJTAD OF ARTS AND sCIENS.

RoOM of Joazeo N. Anderson A4 A, Ph R. Dean of the College at
Arm Had Sclinoc sSand Fflofeoe Of ACieB Lnt uage J*. 1

COLLO0 OP AGRICULTURE.,

WH~ort Of p. X. ols I. S., Dean of th Callege of Atmucuii...

LTUkiL EXPERIMENT STATION.

M 8, Vincuar of Me Agrivilharal lgmad
XI Su. Vica te Aiet rleInI ...... e.ri o
DOWiag% 1. 3. n. ..... .-
'thaoletiet. $ X iftewm .......... . 1
pgia~n Patbolog i CR a, Shorbsskollko ... 1
Reportoat whe hei R. s W. Rupro oh ........... ....... 1
Slort ot the "antapbmolowsi R. Is aOO .....

Pret of aoa la un p P phnioW1, B. W man .........
Report of sm Asaesatt Aaouoiniiti I

bIRESDr0R'S RflR Or Ths ng a*,CrUTIALAX, ECIENSION

mflFg, A. D. Spo.,oer W"e ...... 114






















Reprt at Harry R. Truaer, A. MX, LL, D, Dean of the College of
Law and Profesors of LAW.. .. --


Report of HaTV, S W Cos, A M, Ph D. Dean of Tacher'
and Normal SbooQ said Profeamor [f PhlHoophvby a"d
ton .. .. ... --


Report of Cor ltimore Librarian .. .. ..
Report of KI H, Graham, Auditor ..... ... .
Report of T. Van Hynietlf Curator Director of MuseumI


Report of Edward Conrtdi, A M. PhD, Premident and Profaosor
of Philosophy . .1 -
Revoit of wm G Dold. A M, PhD, Dean or the ColsgeArts and
Sdjlnces andProreasor of Eilsh --
Reprot of Nathaniel M, alIley. A B-, Dean of the Normal School
and Professor of Educaio .
ReoFl t of Miss Cor Z Gryv, M S, Dean oF Sehool of Homne PO-
nomlam tDepiirtmient ...-... ..
Report of MIsm Ella Sable Opperman, A, B., B M.., DiNa of the
School of Music ....... -- - .. *.
Report of J. 0 ellum, gamintess iMnater .. .< ......-















































































* .j r ,

a i i *


r- I" i i ,i


*E.' *:,. I,: ili -_._'i i -

,_ T'y'r 1" Lr*, ._ *i i". *1 *,


*" 1 :
r *, 1

i I ,L iu



iTi.


*- ,i 1 I












Thtrstst portI* at &b hlbl frrbtu~Llt'e .4nl *m~ o heensttbeo
1AS me AlA.totwoAe.1





rhoe nl~w mdtottsP on madl ll eE tt thesj crolo t rmayflf
An~ -, At:..li.. Sao f)r the tet -v tI oitnd, as gi n
"m A











tenho to arrto a~ls~ifaIn Wi atterlonl flot~ saete ,otoi nl o teC
otlahorbn adl ,tlawml yuon eor t ovr suttetstW to heSed oMmti bha
1hg t~rijtpreto&n I srpsWP4thln~ theao Nrltro~rXOk ni Aete oCrr h ok
tar tOta~dsWi~8 aomAeion111 aCllpl~l th fithidel WoIpeot sotht nl as
it,,, wuld be Dedsstr to cOlxfiet it Vrbef fonda are Ivailabro Al
thauae woutaido workl zfdb lnsl DU potlet of thse iad a hsbodn nsb

The fonda ao~~rar e e opriatdib taso r the Se lhes tth colfrh ent
and the~iaP flu ~d, tan buecs ir ,140d tol ui richest no rin m t enoe
A Athe hAatti AyAoAM
Aipmorop.tiroans m nr ana sa~de by The lastalu sealo oftot eaue o
tenloa- at an auditorS m Ad. YA d t f. Ai .. tAd
legs tl)r $B~ea~Lroal onthe wnllorlin oil thiieec hihdig has aenoris a(
the tuad~U Woidpmtod"m arprium rait mad asudhtntlu,, 5 en ,e euoohb
*ove it So tot b naht1 COdl a await ainohixit t~~e Osde togl/ coIjOt
Anl th orutlaidE o ciotdo Eof thei homt~ o in a been Sml~hd,
The approprYoq l e tttoi~ll of l~ $taOO br reval onfib i tteA and M
Cohlx tAr A A lsIr hoe boo ua. Arh ol asomtl room p tAie :%:A.d
ins boa boot. ramodeled and loade Mo a dining ro ,ii, and (tie IBaCO (O
UjOrIb red for a3/OO IIMA 70014 baago beta ebnutod ta dritr
Thlh eBas~ GIYQO~ aesdnnioiehmc rplneeded Iaor~mitoysasad~mt e~a


eoprn rnf ole1NmTnuvO, DEOOTXVO, BlR

the arranodTEment~n i u pmeti~ 1clrOnd% Inohir fre IOhbI not, hr
wvprD el ~obClqlOemrd lthe pt Yonrartive 4emnfita o xlr a h rte a
Agralni Elldiuan lrg ttohtalon voois t enb aot tieVttrt f lrd, n
anio bsmonsir irp a~uot.a Woaa neola 1(dcl~ted byterltd SaCll o

Womn i a Snahs arnInedsoos

I. lthis conoro wtap JlAsh t4* eahin yourlr snoln .ttontto toth
Am A X A A A A..:...... .....~~~~~e~

























;iI"
Ams Star t in Aae At
A AC










12
As you are advised, this extension work Is carried on from Fderal
and State Funds, a laare part being from the Federal Smith.Lever BFaud,
vi. $10,000 per annum unconditionaly and $83500 for the next blend.
nium upon conditions that the State apprprpiates a like amount for Dis
work We recommend that this amount be appropriated. We would sug.
gest that this be made a continuing appropriation.

THE GENERAL EXTENSION DIVISION,

During the blenium covered by this report the General Extenlaon Di-
vision of the i university has bon established, This Department is low
givng Instruction in almost every subject taught tn Grammar Schools,
High Schools and Colleges It haM enrolled during the nrat year of its
work 2,149 students These are unable to attend school or college, and
doubtless would not have had the arIvilege of continu lf their course o
Instruction had this department not been established.
The General Etension Division is giving lostructions to many teach
era and prospective teachers of the state. 'Through it many teachers
are able to continue their High Scltool or Colleg Work while teachlns
This Department of the University is already reaching more student
than Its strongest advocates expected it to reach during the first fow
years of Its work It has proved a blessing to those who are unable, be1
cause o various reasons, to attend a Righ School or Collee. The Board
is well pleased wih Its work and heartily commend it to the people of
the State.


A complete record of receipts and
shown in the Financial Report of B
1918, to June 30, 991, and from July
Prvacttally all of the balances ehoi
the scholastic year ending June 30, 1
The itemized details of our expen
drawn by us on the lSate Treasurer
him and set forth in detail in lhis pul
duplicating these details here


To the Bnard of Control of Instituti
Gentlemen-


I
ii





A










Ii


I


CES,

expenditures for the bennium Is
san Mack. Secretary, from July 1,
1, 1819, to June 30, 1920
wa will be expended by the end ot
931E
lltures are shown by the warrants
, HoA, J. C. Luning, and paid by
isoed report, and hence we are not


Tallahassee, Au ., August 1. 1919.

ns of Higher Learning


The following report of the finances of the Board of Control
the prloed beaamlnfg July 1. 1918. and ending June 0, 1919, Is herewith
reoap.eeully sabmltted.
BRYAN MACrd of
Secretaryr Board Of C *
















ITTE. C
r".@ T


I L -_ i I F. -If
I fr u iI




* I ..I '. I T


.11


I. --


r a r L. -



I*I- ~ h s al"" "'r**
,.. ,- N rW
* -i rtB-" I, _Erh .Iar


-j r jiOt 0


I ..i. a

I 'll l


-_...id


Il


j C ; a L I V' P -7 TS l,,
* ag*. .'._ 1 P ." L_ .* L i. LlI ;I, a
.L L111










14


A. & I, COLLEGE FOR NEGROES.



EDUCATIONAL FUND.

Resources-
Balance or 1917 Legislative Appropriation Brought Forward
July 1 1918 .. ...... .... ............... ......
Expenditures-
For Salaries ............ ... ........... $ 7,088.&3
For Equipmoet, FurnuLure. Apparatus .......... 986.5
For Heat, Lght and Water .. ............ 1,290.47
For Postage, Stationery and Offiee xpenaes ..... 486.7
For Advertisig 'and Printing -. ........ 3,96
For Buildings and Repairs ............. 58 S1
For Traveling Expeneso ........ .. ..... 69.76
For Misenllaneous Expenses ......... ....... 90.00


Unexpended Balance July 1 ,1919 ..-..



MORRILL FUND


Resources-
Receied from Federal Goverment .. ..... ..
Exp ndtireas-
For Deficit Brought Forward from Previous Year.$
For Salaries ............. .... .. ..........
For Equipment. Furniture Apparatusa .
For Hea. Light and Water .............
For Postage, Stationery, Office Expenses .. ..
For Advortnlng and Printing .. .. -....
For Buildings and Repairs .. ....... ..
For Freight and ExPreas ....... ..........
For Feed Stufa .. . .... .. ... .....
For Books and Publcations ....... ..... .
For Miscellaneous Expenses ... ...............


Unaxpended Balnc July 1, 1919 .


,09
19,248.00
2,604 41
840 5
17742
4,00
17277
11,01
1,165,16
242.80
4smfA


i 10,097.43

S 200580 |






2 5,000,00 |



















ere, AIWrts ,.
Sr. I- -- -
7, DAFu0 EpBsra
AIvisrtiEhuA and Preadug
Buiidingu aa RePtTra
Traviing Epouea
FiAigt aad Etpress
Broke Aid Ouhik ions .
MOCiOMsllaa ti ene .. .


* tB


TOnepanri atoance July 1, ll ,,,



FIRE LOSS FUND

ReRoureoa-
Eidaute )roUht Forward Jily 1, 1918 .... .. .....
Expenditarts-
For SaIr.o . . ......... 125 -


~~pr*


SLATER FUND.

Resources-


ilannce Brounght Forward Joly 1 1S8- $ 50
ReceiptP for Tar ... ...... 40.00

Total RTaOflrMS ...... ........... .. -......... 455
EfpendltureB-
Mor Se.attres .... .....-........ ... $ aO $ 00

lunaleeaded lBarala July 11, .. ," .$- 1655"3


5: :~,


II


k.










; .*:* '1

SCHOOL FOR THEi DM



SEDUCATIONAL
R.eourcGB-
B ne B n ronot forward Judy 1, 1918, -
Approprirtion ...............r... *
Amount Tranrusrred from Building FuPn(*

Total ReJ sources ...... .... ..
EpeditureB--
For Salsrleo .....
For q uipment, Furlture. ApDDratus .. ..... .
For fHeat, igbf and Waxer ..................... 9 3,90m
A For Postage, Statfontry, Office Efpenes ..... .. 682,3
Fpr Adlvetising ed PrtInIng .-............... 52,6
Fro S 4gs ad ROpir .... .. .B....d 1,00063
W For Traveling Expeensn .... ....... 1. I661
F fCo Feed Sit~oi .. . ,,.... . 12,06120
FOr Books and Publicat'ons ........ .... 697
For Mleellaneou Expeues .... ...... ..... 98.7
-- $ t1ai8


INCIDENTAL FUND.
Resourcre-
keceipts for year ......... ... ............
S Expend Lres--None
Uhaoadeaded Bal2ce July 1, 1019 .... -- *



BIULDfNG FUND.

SBalnce Brought Forvward July 1, 1 8, from Ir n *
Appropri adoo .,L ,I ...-.... . .. ,, '
LMas Awmont Trwaerred to EducafloOal Fund .. *A

I ..* n,



----- ,1 .
NVl
.j
a Ma




















A pip prriatia ... ,,.-..... ,,.,, .... ,
xpenditreg- l

lBitnimet, Pat tiltr0 ApDarats 4,' -^S 7,,$Sf6
neat, lglhta Amwter ........,,,, .. A,0t^SC
ptag. s, tatiodnerw Ofy e 001at *igoo Mevi
AdvenIialry and Priolntting ,' .. .. G*YU5

TRAVI BSWApi-es ,, I 1,120,16

FMdi elauia N, o -s ..,. U4a
nhl)0 aeiod Plblaerjis 1, 5
-lF c litEusapOi ExpnuLs. ,,-,. -


'IS girtU.












$ All


Raesarcor-
Balantc Brirout Forward July 1, WS ,


Total NR aon r'n .. ........-. .

Por Salr risg n at ........-.. - .
For qutilPnntI. TirtdEud Appata"* L
S ar a. uahrt aad AFtgr .. ........
r IPosag gByStatilrwi ofe. ixilsea
vor AdvrtihuIn and p14ntta ..
r pnvaddin lifal RotS ....

Pa' TW e tar i 'a pr s ............
door aObe an two ,a .t.oaa. . .

'tot* led"Ix xs. i"Pa l "


11 * 44






l ,6 r U".-


4---.E 9 ~ ::y :
: ^ ^ H3 '-'.*l
.-- :.M.*.*** s











1S

SEMINARY INTEREST FUN


Ina avreah-
Balance Broiught Forward July
Relpts from Interest on Bonds.


Total RetOU es ................... ..

Expendlture--
For Salaries --. .... .... r ...
Por Equipment. uriture, Apparatus .... ..


UIexpennid Blalance July 1 19 ..



BUILDING PUND

Resources-
Balmnce Biought Forward July 1. 191 .- .
Expenditures-
For Dormitory and aldiiuatlional Builldin gs .,
For Purchse of LAnt ......
For Pavlng .. ... .


Uneipended Balar ie jIny 1, 19109 .... -



SPECIAL BUILDING FUND

Resources-
Appropriation by Spenlad .^p" nf tot iaf,,tA
Expendltures-
aFr Building Aradsl fro
lug Room ... ..
For Paving .........


1Unepenlde Blance *


Sr Innnnn









19

EXTENSION FUND.
ResearaeB--
Aproprildton by SDecial rSeaon of Leglslaotre 15 001.0
Expendoures-
For Building Aeande from Rcnoulda HalE to DJi
In6 RBtoom ,- . . ........S S.O2,60
For Paving .. .... ...... ,..... 1,01000


s 7ti0


Resources-
Balance Brought Forvard July 1, m191, front 1917
Legislative Apliopriation ....................
Expo ditttrca-
For Wonoo' liialitutes ,
For Extenitou Laboratory Etlpmont .
For Uniy Specialist ... .
For Bulletin Writer .
For Printing Bullets
For Slimer School .


Unexpetded Balance July 1 1910.

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA.

EDUCATIONAL FUND
Resources-
Balance Brought Forward July 1.91 from 1917
Leislakte Appropriation .... .. ... .
pFor Salares .... .... .
For Eipment, FIrnItireA. Apparatus
For Hent Litghft ad Water .
For PosIage. Stationary, Office Epene n
For Advertising and Printing
For Building and eare ...


Traveling tpeioowe .e
Freight and Expret -
Feed Stuf.
Baoles Rna Puiblictioiis
Mliscllaneo EpeEqat ..a


4,S.70



158000

1,90o 3


44323.09
026,04

1,S12-70

l.iP 26
M94.00
3, 90O,0
911,501
455,10
450nS3


aflrft July 1, 919 .o.............. .....


Iljj-


8 1 .31











20

MORlRILL FUND.


ReGisolres-
Face ved from Federal
xpend itures-
For Sualari, .....


ofverllUt t...........

................... .".,,... 25,00.0


AcGRCULTURAL COLLEGE FUND.
Resourcea-
Balance UBiroght Forward July 1, i91S ........
Received from Intcret on DoInda ........... ..
ASpripriati n by Legislaturm to Make Up Defl-
clenty tn InteLest for Change of Bondi [terest.

eTotal Rt e sources ... ... ...............
Expenduiturs-
For Salarie .. ... ..........s......, lS 7,


Unexpedred Balande July 1, 1919... ...


Resouircc-
Brought Forward July 1, 1 ...............
ReceiptT ror the Year ..... ................

Total Re urces ... .. ... ... ....


5,074.00,

Z7l,6s.O*



$ 7,790


$ 4.t102.45

$ 1taIO,4r^A


Expenditures-
For Salarie
For Equlipmnt Furntite, Apparatus ........
For Heat, t>it anl Water ... .. ....
For Poetafl, Staflonctpy, Offto ExIen .
For Advertising and Pilting .
SFor nliitings and Repairs .. ......
For Trveli x ....... ......
For Freighlt and Elreay ..,......
For Fred Stufts ... -.
For nooks and Pulithlins .... ..
For Mitcellanumous Einses ...o .......


tUnexpended Balance July 1, 1979.. .......
















Th1 "ri,,I 1. 1 --
-~ s hI -, *
N.l -
r ff IP I


SBsti apoTward Jly 71. ftom 017 Legta:


4W li :E^? rl*en $. $t O ,4A. N
Odagntal Libt r ..-. v ,,.., 2N4>13' S* / ***

CMbap, TLi Stac and iupmIOt....nt .. ;.648


UnVepelnde W lafet July 1. 191A ,,. .. I ..m



EXPERIMENT STATION


ADAMS FJUD.
RIsotee *--
flceirdd tro Fedoral Govnrvlmsn t A. ..< -> G. ..-. ..i *
aipIdfturAs-- A U

m Sljitol rn.. Sk,.... Ap -tu- ..... 3. AA A. AN
k f Eggflp enl ulk, purniatua, Ap ttIB. A,..,, 1....1.39 gf S
*: * ac t, T.- ad Water ............-.- j . m. IN|


S F II. .. ..Pn I
.'.. ...n il I = r --. nL




















i.r<'~FIRFEnLOS CFnVdNJ
*ri'L Appa ralls ..A.
Fo 1idL I i .i.I t.-*


i" r L .'J L,1 .- i"" .
n. p e wanes jJy 1 .. *

r t r Fin I D
r I'd L I I I II





Rq rce- rFlRE LOSS FUND.
SRResources-

Expendittres-
4Equiment, Furniture, Apparatus .
lr Freight and Express .... .


Unexpended Balance July 1, 1919

Resonurces- INCIDENTAL FUND,
Brouht Forward July 1, 1918 .... ...... ..
Rece pta for the Year ........... .......

Total Reoourbes ...... ,.....
Expenditures-
Far Salaries .... .- ..- .. ......... ...
Eiluipment, Furniture, Apparatus ......
For Heat. Light and Water ........
For Postage, Stationery, Office Expenses -. ...
For Advertislng and printing ,.,.... ......
For Buildings and Repairs .,.... .......
For Traveling Expenses ................ ...
For Freight and Express ....................
For F eed Stuffs ............. ........ ....
For Books an Publications ..... ...........
For M alieHlaneouns Eipenses .......


eatIeDa d *Balance July J, 1919 ......


; 1E0oo0o f11








$ 241.35

$ 36.17


$ 8s8.25
782$-5 .


$ 1.043,07
339.97
86,ii
54.21
1310
1001
165.70
71.46
3752.89
800
101,93
--- $ 95,5S5S **
duesk-a...
S .dH -















-.' l i7 *E." i I L Ii



|ij~; . ..- - .S.



S' *plendi i la an July 1, 1f19 ....


Resources-
Appropriation by 191T Legislature ... ,70,
Expenditures-
Far Salaries .............. ........... ....... 17. 90337
For Equipmeat, Farniturae Apparatus .. . 76.
For Postage, Stationery, Office Expenaes ...... 872 13
For Advertlsing and Printing ..... .. .. 106
For Traveling Expenses ............. 018
For Freisht and Express ..,,. ................ 1651
For Booka and Publications ................... 2S 01
- 22.10431


Resources-
Received from Federal Government
Expenditures-
For Salaries ..... ............. .
For Equipment. Furniture. Apparat u
For Polsage, Sta, Stationry O xpenses .....x s
For Advertising and rinting .....
Fur l Biin dIn d Repairs .
For Traveki Expenses .......................
For Froleht ad Epress .. ..........
Fdr Books "aid Publiftlonns .......... -.
For M llaeouel M Expen............
N I


$ ZaIOLU


S PMh! QI I*nf-P E--*aTilf AI- rl-L












[ i.E "T ~ 11 I n ,, I


ll^^lflwfla r at the
p olimg Juds July1, 11
141*7 SuStuyIEed


nances of the Board of Control for the Ie-
and ending June 30, 1920, Is herewith mr


Secret

2' dUMMARY OF AMOUNTS AVAILABLE AND
THE YEAR BEGINNING JULY 1, 1919,
JUNE 30, 1920


Board of Control .
A & M College for Negroeq
School for the Dear and Blind ,
Floriia Stato College for Women
Unrversaty of Florida
Experimnen, StaLton .
Agricultural Extension Divion


Board of Control .
A & M College for Negros
School for the Deaf aind Bhind
Florida Stoat Colpleg for Women0
lTnlTrity of Florida .
TElaeriment Station
Agricultural xlptrnDon Division


BRYAN MACKI
ary Board of Control.

EXPENDITURES FOR
AND ENDING


1. 8,r71

. t98,O00

.. 60,014
..2,-37


t $ 42
. . . 60,049I
. ... 94007
IOr, 176
174,411
S 1022
2. 437

















u ,-griari.- .. -F i


. *I *I


i i ." si ...... ...

s:^^^ luEt !ar44D mo,.to.ol a,,-^ .-..


nts
cq.


A. & M. COLLEGE FOR WEGROES,


EDUCATIONAL FUND.
Resdurcae-
Balance Brofught Forward July 1919 .......
xpendittnrs-
For Postage., Statonery, Office Expenses .. $


Reaources-
Appropriation by 119 Legslaiture
Expendutures-
For Salaries, .. ,,, ... .. ,, ... 7J.E7-
Per EquiipmPlot, Furniture, Apparatus .
For Heat, Light and Water . ,51.
For Postage, stagIontry, Ofice iExpeses 4853 )
For Advertising and Printg 54
For Bufldintg and epai rg ... ............... 849.07
For Traveling ixinsles .. . 1.. .. - 23,77
For Fritght and 8%presg .... ..... -T5
or P ed tuffs g -h .. 159JIn
Fop MiuaollaaIneo.. ExpoE ... ... .. 90,5


nPleendl Ba1M" July 1, 11 ... ..


":"

,, ,\
ra ::?""














S BEaM*. Er.ailA ad L Lu
lam J *l P ig-r 'i r5C -nar.k.-



pi r af n q im -Al



l A I I l l
-- I A I Ii A l,
rL*I .I -
-7 1 ,
*'' *u


$ 2G t31ltl f
$ Isfos l
~^


iiaC^aiie BWDHSS^ R.,,.,......... .


lf:: ':et la y 1, 1920 ..... ..,



INCtIDONTA FMJ,


Brought Forward Jul 1, 1,1919 .. ...
Reepts for the Y ar . ..............


Total Resources ... ..... .....
Expenditures-
Salaries .... ................... ... .
E ulpment, Furnittre. Apparatus ...........
Heat Light and Water ... -.-.. .. ..
Pdanage, Stationery, Office Eaenses ..,,, .-
AdvOrtltsig arni Printing ... .. .........
Buildings and lRepairs ... .... .... ..
Traveling Expenses ....... .... ..
Freight and Sxireas . .. ..
Peed Stuns .... ... ... ......
Books and Publiatio n ..............
MIscellansous Expensea -., ...


tnexpendea Balaen July 1, 1920 .


$ 4,20 .r6


$ 1,0768
852,35

28&K
185I83
127,42


4,25 W

13wtZ
'. '**^




r rX,
,:,:


For
For
For
For
For
For
For
For
For
'or
FOr





% Fa
"< *<














qi lu Pr m ., II
Baft P w
9040 Pa. vq


Tr iF- -.r


AlpftDa$a.ti by 19t9 Jail.atures......

r Dorl ry ..... ...... ..
For Audltorih ............. .. ........ 8,92.5


$ MY
A:



$ 1,821 00

$ 9,.77.O00


SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF AND BLIND.



CURRENT EXPENSE FUlND
Besourcea-
AMrprpaeon by 1919 Leislature.. . ...... $1,OO00
Ienantures--
For Salaries .... ....... 24,36SI29
FOr Equipment, Furaiture, Apparatus.. .... 45.14
For e~nt, light and Water ......... ......... ,3
For Postage, Si, tion Offce fpnse ........ 700.84
For Advertising and FPrinting 27 ,
For Badtd lae and itmpaitr ......... ... ....,. X A.l
For Traveling banaens ..,,...... .,,...... R4M7.
For FreOght an Express ........ ............. 1,.7,3
For Feed BStat ... ... IG. 5

I W deBlI ....


^ithspent ly j, 20 t.... ST.g


I

















lQuliA I Iu.r-u
lihri -*r.urirun-"- * j

Pllhu^'L Jjl L iJ.


I I V i I I
I 'I


%ii r


s~bPiknblps


FLORIDA STATE COL3GEB FOR WOMEN.



CURRENT EXPENSE FUND.
*Resources- ,
Apptppriation by 190 LegialAture .. .. ..
Exprnditurea-
for Halarl ea . . ......... .. ... ..$ 83,04.(
For equipment, Ftrniture, Aprparatus .... .. 11,253.
For Heat, Light and Water ., ................. 1,714.
For Postage, S oipry,r Ofie ae paues ........ 2,1012
For Advertising aad Printng ....... ........ 1,512
For Buiii liug and Repawira ........... ......... 1.513,
For TravelIng Express ..... ....,,...... .. CMO-
For Pres ht and ExprUs ..... -. .......... 1,187,
Por Feed Stuffs ..... .- .... ............ 12.
For Books and Publicatlon ..... ....... IM9.
For Igceellagoii Bpenses .... .. f.


; d
l:j
~ls6,8ola

taarssls


nexpendead Balance Jul$ 1, I9on .......








.


: rE -, T 0 F. p.


*--
iT *>*- r *


6 IKn**. Eir -.......

V: ,r pat. Stationery, O~cte expense
Slr MwIaBerttlsin andt Prinug. ..... ...
> /Br ttitEn6BadRepairs .
For tan Pab lia IcatloNEf ..
lFor .i...ella.eoes EZpenss .....
Uetfcit from Prviou Yar r


$ If14,704
In~ocN




s lomo XG


Heaolurces-
Brought Forward July 1, 1919 ..
Received fr)m Intereat o Boands

Total leoiiurcs .
Expen udi tures--one

Unexppenldl BSalance July 1, M1


Resonrces-
ApproprJtion by 151$9 L[etlallue 15500 00
Esxpnditunre-
For luipmern't for Bro; Ard Hall ,. . $ 15A 6 SO
For Central Heatiln Plant 1.297
For Comipleting rioward Hall 0.-...... .. ,2Stl
For Inirary UHludg - -. S,7T7 4I
For Estln ion to Reynolds Hull DormitorTy.. M 1-00W 4
For FIrst Unit Trrainlng Schoot ...... .., 4,27,50
Fdr Comni letng Klftche ... L .......,. B,03.00

----- 1I 18"2

Oinae ndedal Balanice I 13D) I. tin... S (hies










iln

err. ;..r, 7.*...


* *aI -Is.--
dii *r l Ba i
Ili~oyree


I.


- StnlJ
f 3T,9*m ^


S...... ........ .. .... ......

^ :'*'*'''ai spe.datkt ,-
va' a... .-.++... .+++
Equipment fr RBeearch Work ... .. ...
For JnlAr Service ......... ...
For Assistant Research Work ... ....
For Aessitant Home Demonstration Agent
For Women's institute .... .. .
For Practice House Rent and Offle Supplies..
For Miscellaneous Expenses ......... ...
For Amount Not Allowed by Comptroller .


Unespended Balance July 1, 1920 .-



UNIVrRSITY OF FLORIDA



CURRENT EXPENSES FUND.
Resources-
Apprproriation by 1919 Legislature .
Expendltures-
For Overdraft as Shown by Previous Report..
For Salaries - -
For Furniture, Equipment. Apparatus .
For Heat Light and Water .
For Postage Stationery, Office Supplies ...
For Advertising aud Printing .. .......-
For Buildings and Repairs .. .....
For Traveling Expensea ......- .. .
For Freight uad Enpress .- .
For Feed tu ............ -........
For Books and Publications -. ... .
Por Miscellaneous Expenses ...................


I $166,000,0i

1,31
65,725.59
2,273.01
1,579,27
1,064.93
2,660,68
1,10 28
1,176,72
1,139.18
$49.6S
22.74
889.7.


Unespended Balana July 1, 19 ............














Nomirade L4p lI wass"-n-.-m 15 Be orr.
Bxiicffiljtft
il~gitizI dreawar-
F^ Ellu.lt''rr1"
-- I -, ihf" r





: "' ~Ld .r .
1o fl- ~*--


** .** x e t l u e ." . ** I .y* : | J |
duetp toR~hS~B thL~ly:.iril le ll:"r: 13sa~, . ** t*, ~"iggG5"i
x v" x" x x x x
..oTftue M adrde" ^ '.>1 ,www.. -- ES .:;

*^ Mar ahdares v, ,-.l,,,,,. .-. .^ a **.ggag **'. /,
.. or IInlpinpent, liunatrs, Apparai. U .- 1S194 .I
no. Homt, UoIgt and rWater .. .... ..... V4%.t '
Fof postagel, StauEcry. n .siAense ..-.( ... .
F* ^W Ah~tisira ngf and. Printinf ... ... ... 84T-64 .* .'||
P-or Bumdino add Raplgra .. U-'79. g
For Travelf"g Vxpnases ...---. 746.l51
narF relght aa Express ...si.. 932 .
ner Fnd Stn=9 ...----.- --. QU" -
For Booan and Pbltlctions ... ......." R."
For Miscellaneous aispense" .... .- OftUD


Use rInendad Salance JMy 1, 1920 ....... .. $ 728 .

+. A h P.
mEmiNAY MTRKBT MME,'::^.

pBrgat tOF Inato Judsy 3.o1,D" ...-.v.... I1 .f *%
RBcplpffa train labtmnt, an Bonds ..r--^,--.:--. ,0,5 *' ~

Ktia Kflm u e a. .,..-.... .----------.4 2....78 :


I a Ir
















-a--


&I t k .1 .t u l. J i


Fa rg*- BL .-

i .n. i ,;.
rapt-. .1 --


.pto 11 Leg slature ... .

Sotoil Rtesources ... ... .. ...... ..
.Kpenditnres-
io Current Expenses, Library, Laboratoriea ,
F Iyar Xew Equipment, Libraries, Lboratories -..
Sor Law Library ...... ... ....
Por Campus, LSve Stock, Et, ............, ,
For Amount Not Allowed by CompUtoler ...


.... .... 35,60



S8,40115
14,48a 69
1,495.45
214,81
1,9088 4
-S 20.503.4


UneOpended Balance July 1, O9 .. ....4


GENERAL EXTENSON FUNDS
R esourcea-
AroprLt9lo by 1919 Legislature
'sxpndituren -
Sor FlHUg Cas, e, WritUng Machines, Etc ...... 544A
ao Parcdtae Slides and Films ... ........ 941. 4
for Biiricae Correspnde Cources ......... 1,i
Swt tamrps ..... .. . ... 1.16M
For, P rindtb g -.., ,, ,... .... ,3 115
T el .. tsy ns an Per4t99calaf, - .. 98.15
T w -Tt'aveli EfpottEo and CinitpGenooas .u cmb. "

^.* *. Salt E dut.- y1. .I .. .. 1,03 9
In pa st et I'n Jl 1 ,


L ILe

L Ir d* .,
, rn.w L.


I I, Ia L .I
l


















f- 1i J -r.-:.--

.9W lsr O *I L, lull 3. ar.t


I *n -ft -
r ~ I vi l I Ifull t _|* i'
* F ed n .a n.,I T i

I 1 i 1 I
I -,


6It". Sbal m I
Reo lr e fro *Federil Ge rnient > ..., .^ ..-.. W 1......
ot Salares. . .. .. ........ .. ......
for sE iiDThFnt r fm trs. Aparatua,. . 1,87 ./O






r a .o .ht Piom.W.ate.. ........ ....
ahr l Aaertlais and PrintingS .0.... lA
J *f r S iha n Rtepatrar .uf u .......a... l' |'
or Boo a. M* *i* / '* n .' 1*8-4
x x xx. ^ y* */ / K .K/KK KKKK.W


























I... -O I 1E1414 Fyhar.a.w1 y r fyr.n l "."i .



FL, ITIL plyltr1- IN'n. I N N .
LT, l L __1 ,iO ,i? '

S -1I*Al.E- il. i ..a. ". *













L Ti
-i t-f-thYear




,









,,,
1 1 1 1
I---I 1 i "


















all 1. I* lt



~ ~ l 7I *I i i


lsudlad


Thr ttavoI


.AGIOLrTonnAr, lNfliO DIs : i.



SMITLtjVRR STAr D.


,u ot L9Sl Leslaatur Ai--O [

S .,,. ,, .... .. S .* e $....*.|. 4 I I .
Oat, FTrnitraiMI Apparatus ....
e Btfttanery Ofic Expt,' es.u.v. an G

ang E. .a..aa, F..n F ,.~
aneonH,+uus -- S *. .


4






















,If, E4 IJimNIaNaL lF, r -1 1 A *. *

i- r F h-t . = I I 111 M-" NN
F Ir I ar iil a I 4.




S-- 1 r -" r r









i I i -I





Z : 1 iT


















1-1 ..If HL I I,. r I I I .I u I 9n 1 u
r e u'rerj 1100 I Ngll O n w1 i 1 S F Ii 1 1 'L 1I M











I I i I 1


Bumlhn and lfmarprfment4.


Upkeep and Equipment... ..,.....
Current Expnses, Balaries, Repairs,
Unit of Administration Building, A8s
sembly Room, library aind State
Museum .... ... ..,,.. .... $1 0, ,00'
Dormitor, and Equipmilut ...... 100,000.00
Entlrgenient o Dining Hall and
Kitchen . .... ..... .- .. 10,000.0
Extension of C'ntrial eating Plant... 10,0l00.0n
Students Hospital Building. ........ 10,000,0


fienral Eaitison.

Operating Exp nsesi ..- ......

(Co-oip i a-c l' bat ni Hn Ron e Dm Ionsittio iolk/T


S62a, 10 '
:':/.^


60,00.00


Amotint to mat h Fedeiral Aid for yvea
ending June 301, Il22 .. ..... 39,000 00
Amount to match Fediera Aid for year
ending June 0, 23 ........ 44,500.00 8,5 00 00

Total for University .-.... ... $,142.10001


.. &mI


t, il ,


P:






FIN,



EXPERT ATION
EXPERIMENT STATION.


Current Expenses, Administrative De-
partment . .. ...... 37,( Animal Tiditistry ad Fieldi Crop... 1(0.)29tIH
Sugair C'Le Experienifiltal and lField
Work ............ 2.0.000.10
ExIperinm'enit in Soil ind F(rtilizers. 3.000.100
Pelcn lnvesli- 'wiioI :aind Field Wolk 15,,OO)0D0
Plant Piathologicl WVork, .. .. 73,- T000
Ex emiens ii E ntornology ....... 211,9000.
Exlerntient Test Gr miids .. ,.7 l1)
Exldprimuent 4Stiion Libraryi ... 7,4 00(00
Branch Ext'rtirilt Station (at Lake
A lfled) .. ............. 31 11)(1,110I
Total ...., .
Lessi Amount Re ei ved from
I' Govrmiielnt. -


Toial Experinent Station


S347,310,00



$ l i,
d Su n













I 1 E J* -i ~-_- F


j, I 1,1 I rray .Pw

I. L I [ I ll i0oh
-. II A1\ ] I *, *


EipaBaethi l inlue &hO O
'Equimpm 't tfo *bwin...,.,--.... -Wo ...
Sdlithinto T*inioPg School... *. N A .

Ai AdMUttonal Beflr; Heating Plant,. 0
onmuads dCrediug, Wvalik, etc... .... 4001 U:;
Changes in Admini atratiot lildhiig-. 100o.00
Practice House .......... .*. 15,0L.00 '
Loaindy .ry............ .....,-- -- 20,000,00
Poultry Farm. n ...... ...... 5,000.00


Dairy Room and Dairy Herd-... .


Amoun t Vewedl d to (wplete alt Iqpdp
Buirin VOee Und on4tt iion
Reynolds Hall Addition .........
Infirmary -.. ....................
Equipment for Same ..............
Brontrd Hall......... .,....
Virainig School .... .....
Kittien ......... 1.. ......- ....
Equipment t..........- .. ...... .. .

Wsornki. Work.
*Hiibiwt-eontrathe Wo s... .......


$ 512,WFDl00


37,06,000
8,000.00
15,000.00
L7,000,1O
10,000.00
----4 ao,00o0


Srr~nacrp

Ft~r












..iMDA AM'ONli. Joilf THEi- D1.? A;U r Tiar Li'%L.

...*l i C..r-*F 1 $ II.i l lrrin


*r.i.Irrl Fht
. C I -'
11 I


. i l I| I


II I


M 1 ,,, I,,,
i ind^J ^- Itnd .1iv.ding:. 2500.00 -



DlDfsif ~ al d Adldtion to Barn ... 5,00.00
Tiling Diiiig Roam Flouors and taee4i-
Wins EnAad Dooras if rDuoito
in ^ '....,. ,. ,,.,, ,,^ .. . 3,000.00
S' tric Timn e and Program Clock aid


* r ...... L" 1,000.00
................. 1,500.00
S Iand ry. .......... 1,500.00
liopms in Hospital4
for Colored Pupils
I I* ..... ........, 1,200,
1A ** .t..- .., ..... 500.00
l. foer Tadatlfal Department. 000,00 230,700.00
/ '* ~


F., A


lsil. i11 anM) I.r,











IlIr~ '11i ljl


1,jI(


ria: t s Bohl' Aliqex^ (E- f M1I0i
* ' i Ei ':.: \ . '.", .

crttage for o itagious DiIsIeem....
1ilo tIm4lemeit and 'toek Seads, nod
r Polt'rry n e se .......... ...
Pimnting and Renovating Buildings,

VOtWl .. ...... .-'---- .
aord of Control: Operating Exipase.
Summer Rehoalvs Operating x pense.


% 1d04-

P0it. 0 0


In making thee recominme dations for appropriations from the
Legislature e te Board realizes that it hlas asked for a large
amount for blimlditgs and equipmenCt However, the Board has
thoroughly considered every need and has not asked for a single
item that ih aineeessary, if tile Instittioni of Mhigher Learpinm
Aae to meet the needs of the people of our rapidly growing Stite,
The need of more dormitories, cla v room and additiona
Aid$tg room space at the Enive'sity and Plorida Stat Conli
for Women is fully demonstrated ly) the fat tthat'we hire had to
turn away hundreds of Florida yon ig women who iae njplOie
far admlesion the past two years, for want of onams to uteamm
dat themi At the University the groter pOttion of the 'youni
ilul I I I 1 1 I
,i a i i 1 1. 0 i i I |1 I
1l .* I II I* I ri C I r. P I j. *,1
a rl l .I ur r I I | | h I l h l II r i I -g 1 li I



















iriaijrJrpim I o.ina,-=J ,L ruminn o.i irn-_- r., .,, j rr i.,
rr Kr uligi LL -'-a i l L .'.nT l 1r., -, .L,* TJn.ni A
ii T Il 1. i-.n 1 l ih .L , 111 fIT r


I al I IIt i i ij I Il I r I r il




aIn I In i : nn i l n n
na l I I ,I 11 II i I I i u I ,


n I n r r n I n i i. ,


L nmet.otitaetly "n deinto tar
lih| fediba tlia'tl t sihoulla


, I
induatstr ena

r g


mt king higher s varies n noe
our WSote-Ittitutimos aT
tfib are leing blid- in A'" othr ke in
L |


S I I II
i ' i

^:'^ *' "" -'*^.'1 '-1


i.n I I I I
S 41 I 1 i i, ,

r, Ii I
I F I !. r I I. .r I .

rIIt j "p i I ri r' i... r Ii n ,


li .- -


















, I of fl Fni. qp, r -nt
mi li-, t I I 1.




4 I IF I
i I T I- I I I

*. I I .


I,


I ii -, 1 iF
.m 1l l L ,i *

IFli"~1


II


1 113. % I q -. l..r
i IIr I f r. II I
S -- .I Ir, r
S I i .


II I II II


- *


I lu r I, r 1 Ii j rl I I I
r I I I a II



t. ibefoe Obat thiy hare taitntioof of fknfiq oiFai whikteyK
: lt ay be juftly poU.
].The MOMral poliIy of the LegiatUJtt toward te yintitato .
Slahgely beeM rxTponsiblVd Mfo-theerAig reMltarwetmd Z
flaettfinate aThe lae tlat noney so d se4 'not mreo0 Spt
l '. wi Jfy. ibw b^ead.


<"e:oxto O *'aitt .
!s.'. ** *** E 'RD. I *'ONTROL.


Fij M& y (i. 0 r L* I r 'I







_ _-F m y


I I I I I ) I ) 4







I ;






PH:* r ..



lb

Ham i uJL r I
B t.I-*T .h'I .1 ,P *


!; LOWl J .L'

I I la I I I
: e lseeteneral Statues, I Aoreby make request of the Board
VI to fcludde in On budget for higher edncatlof a aunmer school
a.rf holaion o $15,000 per year for the years l21 and 1922-a total of

f Yoirw very truly,
W. N. SEATS,
State Superlutendaen,











PRESIDENrTS BIENNIAL REPORT UNIVERSITY
OF fLORIDA



1ie oowe Board of Contrll,-
A P WIflns o HIPher LearngH: -

.nUenteu-

1 herewith submit he g biennal Teport of the s tas oa the University,
rvtie ,vng the work of the at* two years and forecsting the needs of
t Ihe InstituUo fr the coming biennial period, The detailed satement of
the University's condition is contained In the accompanyin reports of the
Deans and other ofileers in Immediate change of the various activities;
and it remains for me only to call attention to the general situation with
which we are confrronted
This situation ma4 be summed up in a single wo-rd The university
s facing, not a Ocriis, but the cridls i its existence. The fate of the
institution iill be definitely determined, by the action of the Legislature
of 1921 with reference to its budget, if It eceives adequate fliamecal sem
ipot, the University will aidouibtedly become one of the greot State Uni-
versitles oe the country:; f support fails, it muas inevitably hink to a po
sition far below its present statues
This cria s, which had been gradually grow ig under normal eon(l-
tions, was poeiiitatued with unexpected and alarming utddenunes by two
fundamental ecifnges which grew out or our rirtieipation in the World
War. The first of these is too wall known to n.d more than bameat, mtn
tiol-the great decrease in the purchasing power of the dollar The sec-
ond is made equally obv:ous by a glan e at ithe flAnes-the great in.
orcege in the number of students at the Unversity 'Their joilt eofect
ias been to rehvelilonize the fluan al needs of lbe institution of ite prom.
Ise of growl h is not to be blighted
The measure of an institution a growth is a two-fold oine-qtatitative
and qualitative, the number of tildents raluiei, and the esxellenae or the
training given Tile iuantit live growth of your UnIleTraBy 1i assured,
more stldernt ate applyiLg for d miulirn tha n anD posb:y be matriln-
laied. and Outr ofineers mid faulty had tl'emrelves emo arranost by the
present overcrowded condition. The quality of instruction which att e.
dent can rtweive under the pireoil reonditiout it rapidly deterioratng
and suph detrIorrtlou unless intuniIliely chorlier must ipiarni runqt on
the attlenuaue, and that also will begin to fall off, Tht ivitae result
will tb that the imarvelis, almost ion n cedented, growth of the Uat
rasity of Fiorifa, whi hlis sxpcit.e not only t#h pride ao t. w Sate bi
the admnratloa of tfe edcattional world, will he glos,.
Thins etlerloratio i direl due to the two binate fat ts nentlonedaw
-the decreased dollar and the ancreaeht attedtanectl a ni j aSt1st t L A.i











rF Io a li{ [ ,.-i r- c i L& ,a J .w r i ,. , i rD . =1 i i i .
r : 9 1. 1 T *r.e L I I * 1 I1 1 In 1 -1
i: I L I a Lest L ama l 1 gh I P I I In I I I
II 1a I L I- I I II I I I

A I UE U a I I r
t d: t t .anil md lsted uner a enhrept opens aeounat; (b) by the amount
A. or lesAs permanent addition and imjrovemVent to the planir (a)
I llu g n eedea to house the plant. ihese various phases of the
0 2' wibject will be discussed in order.

I, a-THE FACULTY.

The fundamental factor in determining the efficiene3 of an educational -
institution is its l att of -nstructors Inefficiency In the teaching force
cannot l e compensated for by any amdunt of expenditure In other direc-
tions, hbile an efficient teaching force may compensate for very grave
defciencies in other things. The value of the institution is absolutely
qieasared by y he que iatonality of the nsructionnd the quality of the ntru-
tion is mainly determined by the ability of the instructor This propo
sition, is I take It, obvious and axiomatic in education.
A second proposition is equally true. Due allowance being made for ex-
ceptlonal conditions, it is broadly the fact that the salary scale paid by
an institution measures the ability of its teachers; the Institution able to
offer the largest salary will in the long run and on the whole command
the best men
With these two propositions In mind, attention should next be called
to the excepllonal conditions under which the Faculty of the University
of Flo]ida was assembled and recruited during its earlier years. Any one
conversant with the facts knows that there hls always existed a startling
discrepancy between the size of the school and the salaries paid on the
one hand and on the other the ability of the men who compose its Facult.
For years the institution succeeded in obtaining men of marked ability.
though its student body was lss than 200 and its salary scale fell far be-
low that or schools of like standing in neighboring states The expilna-
tion is fairly obvious. TIe teachers enlisted were young and without
large families, and so did not feel the need of large salary- their were
ambitious and weie attracted by the new and injlrlng educational ven-
Lure, they desired the Florida climate, and frankly accepted the e hnatic
conditions as part of their salary
This conjunction of fortunate coniititos could not continue definitely.
Even before the World War the low salary seale was heinning to produce
its Inevitable result As time went on, larger families to support had
grown up around the Instructors. Ihey themselves had become nmn of
riper scholarship. of larger experience s teachers, and of wider repis-
(to, and inluenco in the educational world. As a consbeuence lFstitl
lions with larger salrie to offer were reqmentiog their services, and se-
-al had already resigned on this account before the war.












.I I I I 1.
Aila prnaitr The great increase tn attend laoe at all colleges ad uwi
i f& o th country has treamendaously increased the demand tor men
Spn fo teh, while e e supply has been appeciably les i scene by
Sber of e4qlt teacher going into r ommecial life. The flael of the
tnlva~lty of Florida has felt the uill force of this condition. A conasd
rable number of our best men have accepted positions hI other iatUitM
tions and In the commercial world at salaries from 76% to 10% higher
than we could pay. It is becoming Increasingly diffilt, If not impossible,
to replace these men.
Those who remain, largely through attachment to the University and in
hopes of speed relief are ending their efficiency crippled by constant
worry over their finances and several have faced serious loss in spite aof t-
most economy. And it is only Just to sa tha t tiney cannot be expected
to remain lndeftnitely under such conditions
These conditions have been met throughout the country In evesy de-
partment of eouction from the atrmary school in the small rural dis*
trit to the greatest Universit; in the land by the only possible remedy-
an adequate increase in the salary scale. Privately endowed foundations
have, through their aluni and friends, Increased their endowments two,
three and fourfold, denominational schools have benefited by unprece-
dented ussesImeuts upon their churches; tax-supported institutions have
had their appropriations enormously raised It is no exaggeration to say
that I knoe of no Institution of higher learning anywhere in the United
States which has not made earnest and Sucessful effort to meet this sit-
untion by Increasing its income end raising very substantially its sat-
ary scale
If the University of Florida fans to keep pace with this movement, Its
usefuilnes to the State will be disastrously Impaired because, In that
event, It must Inevitably replace Its rfresent faculty of exceptional ability
ltli one of second or third rate powers

I, b-THE NUMBER OF INSTRUCTORS.

A second measure of the efilclency of an Institution is the number of In-
stridors on its teaching staff as compared with the number o students.
In general the situation is this if one school has one Instructor to every
ten students and a second school has one Instructor to every twenty Atu-
dents, then It s probable that under normal conditions the Instruction
at the former school will be twice as efficient as that at the latter. A
teacher has a given amount of time and energy at his disposal. It is
usually expended in the following ways So Bmany hours per week are
devoted to meeting and Instructing his cdlases in lecture-room, laboratory
or shop; so many hours are nieded for preparation for this work: so
many hours are consumed In coretcing and grading papers and handing
In reports; uo Tany hoars are required in attendance on Facilty Bad
Committee meetir s; and there should be some time to alve to advanced












urai a *ogL.u.- itf l- l. -5- *.s I'- I s -**I- n- l ; "-*
chrdai- ainLIna --." '. r In.. r I -A.. L. ..'I 1. -
I.-* daMIS .afai* *Er "i "I ". I -- H -
W .ir. l E r- n I. F n -
i ,*. Ha I *., P
I.H r lff I I r .i l H- 'I rl l"l7 mr l. In ... ' i H
li^tatio f aed with a lair increase in attendance must do
Edlflatth re thiil 1) Accept the additional atuents, increase its
Stlg forpt f in propoton, and maintain its standard of efficiency; or
I m~ it number of students to its present capacity, keep its present
thingig force and thus retain its standard; or (3) accept the added stu-
d l ma~f no oEvislin for additional teachers. and lower Its standard
ot ildruction The nrst of these alternatives is what all school authori-
tie desire. The second is honest, but distressing to those who desire to
See an Institution grow in usefulness. The third is dishonest and in tIM
end will prove disatrous.
A glance at comparative statistics will show that the Faculty of our
University has from the beginning been overburdened with hours of work,
unjust both to the teacher and the student. A glance at the statistics for
our own school will show that this condition has grown progressively
worse, that additions to the teaching staff have not kept pace with the
growth in attendance. We haOe tried to compromise with the three al-
ternatives; adding a fearfully inadequate number to the teaching force,
limiting our attendance somewhat, and perforce submitting to a deteriora-
tion of our standards of efficiency-all in hopes that conditions would
change for the better The situation Is now desperate. The State must
either provide an adequate teaching force for the number of students de-
manding admission, or the officers of the University must drastically limit
the attendance. This latter step will deprive numbers of young men who
should receive their training here of this opportunity

II, a-CURRENT EXPENSES.

The statement of the financial needs on the side of physical equipment
requires less expansion, as they are very analogous to the situation faced
by every family. If the head of a family of five persons finds his family
increased to ten, the wants of the individuals remaining constant, and If
his dollar can now purchase only half what it formerly did, then It is clear
that his expenses will increase fourfold when these two changes occur sim-
ultaneonely. If, in addition, he had allowed his stocks rn abnormally low
in prior years, then this would mean still further expense This is prac-
tically the condition that obtains at the University. The number of stu-
dents has largely increased and the various commodities consumed daily in
the running of the University vary directly as the number of students.
At te same tie e cost of such commodities has increased een more
largely than those used by a family. In addition, the stocks of smrplie
for laboratories, Chemistry, Physics, Biology, etc, for Shope and for












SI bad already become very low. It Is needle to say that no mat-
Show able the instructor or industrious the student, the qlty o -
t t a must be lowered if these things are not adequately provided
in conclusion, lot me 'rge that the detailed aeedw of the Untversity for
the next biennium as contained In the following reports and summarized
In the appended budget have been worked out most laboriously by the
President, the Administrative Council, and the Faculty and represent the
minimum requirements of the institution I it is to face the next two
years with any hope of giving adequate training to the large body of
young men who are demanding admleslon. The vUlveristy believes that
It has Justified fts existence and that the vast majority of the citize
of the State desire to see It supported. The fture of Florida, its continued
growth in population, in wealth, and In Ideals of citizenshIp, is naex
tricably intertwined with the welfare of her University. and no more dies
astrous blow could be dealt the State tlba to cripple the usefulneas of her
great Institution,
The following reports from the Deas and other officers will come in
the order enumerated:

I. Report on Attendance, by the Registrar.
2. College of Arts and Sciences, James N Anderson, Ph.D. Dean,
College of Agriculture, including the Expeilment Station, and the Di-
vision of AgrEcultural Extension and Home Demonstration Work, P.
H. Rolls, M. A,, Dean.
SCollege of Engineering, J. R. Benton, Ph D, Dean
5 College of Law, Harry Trusler, A M,, LL.,, Dean
G. Teachers' College and Normal School, H, W. Cos, Ph.D., Dean.
7. General Extension Division, B C Rilev, B A. A S A, Director.
S. General University Library, James M. eake, Ph D, Chairman of the
Faculty Committee on University Library.
9. State Museum, T Van Hyning, Curator.
10. Report of the University Auditor.

I conclude this report by submitting the following Biennial Budget for
the University for the years beginning July 1, 1921, and ending June 30,
1923,
Respetfully submitted,
A A. MURPHREM,
President












REUCAPITTATION.

ANIMAL BUDGET OF UNIVERSITY QO PLORIDA.


i
V






Gonera] Unlversity.. $ l3,850 27,331 $ 16,260$ 77.4351$ ..... $ 77,435

College of Arts and
Sciences ......... 48,700 6,75O 9,02 64,475 9,600 64,976
College of Agiiculture I
(1) Instructional 44,40 17,825 29,550 91,25 16,000 75,826
(2) Experiment Sta-
tion ...... 84,300 79,745 34,G25 19870 30000 1688,70

(2) *Daemonstration
Work
College of B ngineerl'g 29,600 1,1701 25,000 557701 i,500 45,270
College of Law ,.. 19,300 400 3,800[ 23,501 4,000[ 19,500
Teachers' College, .. 43,300 2.600 3,400j 49,300 8,000 41.300
Total ... ..305.500 1$35.85 51121,650S$5e0,9'75$ 78,000 1482,975
Total appropriation for two years .. ............ 96n,950

Buildings:
(1) Unit of Administration Building, Assembly Room, Library
and State Museum ...... ...... ......... ....,,. 150,000
(2) Dormitory and Equipment ........ .. ... 100,000
(3) Enlargemeut of Drinng Hall and Kitchen .. ........ .. 40,000
(4) Extension of Central Hating Plant.... .......... 40,00

Grand Total ....................... ............ 1295,950



































Current Permt
Salary Expenr's Intenror. Total
Executive ... ... IS 97.000 7 .. $ 7,000
Departments of Instruction........ 9.Soo aGO 2.600 12,900
Library , . .- 4,3 2,7350 3,750 10,800
Museum ... . . 1 ,800 1,000 10,000 12.800
Regitlrar's Ofce . 2.700 : : .-... 2,70f
Auditor' Office ...... ..... .. 4..00 22,985 -,-,-- 27,285
Grounds and Baldings. . 3,960 | ,950
Total ., -.. .. . |-. S 3.S5 ]5 1,350 | 77,436

*Item' carried under Auditor's Budgedt 01 Current Expese-

DETAIL BUDGET OF GENERAL UNIVERSITY EXPENDITURES.


^i ^ith Womanms Colaege an l various cous t

*Menailw and Nelson Feundera..und...... ............,, -
mi naF Intterest FD04 .......... ...........,,........
amlitht.he s Federal Vocational Fund...--....-. .
Hatka and Adams Plaral Experiment Sta-ion Funds... ......
Law Tuttlon ant Incdental Fand, ...... .
General BEdlucation Board for Secondary Education. .....


Addenda'
To Match Federal Ad for Farm and Home Demonstration Work.$
For General University Extantionl Department ................
For Student Hosfital Buildin .......... ... ............ ..


I Executive.
Salary-
(1) President ....... ........ ...... 5000
(2) Vice-Presdent .. ........... ... ... 500
(3) Secretary to President ....... 1 ,500
Current Expense ................ . ......


11. Departments of Instructon
(1) Physical Educatson
Malary-
Professor of Pfulcfell Education ...... $3,000


$7,000















rma~et Improvempt -
fpparbas u f r p ymnsnlum ..... 2I500
(2) Miltary Sfeln e,

Commandant and prot of Mil. Silence (Detailed
(3) Cadet Band.
Salary-
Instructor In Music ............. $2,500
(4) Public Speaking,
Salary-
Asaistaut Prof. of Publc Speaking ..... 2500
(6) Y. M. C. A.
Salary-
Instructor in Bible and Secretary. ....$1,500


$1


bI


8,10C


. *p*I~


- - Se


Ill Library.
Salary-
(1) Librarian . ................ ........ 2,500
(2) Assistant Librarian ..... ......... 100 $4,300
Current Expense-
Subcrlptions to pagazinesa rebinding and bind-
ing, additional assistance, Oice supplies,... $2,750

Permanent Improvement-
Purchase of new books ................ $3,750 $3,750
$10,800
IV. State Museum.
Salary-
Curator of Museum ..... .. ...... $1,800
Current Expense . ........... 1,00
Permanent Improvement-
New cases and other needed equipment.. $10,000
-- --- 12,800
V. Regiatrar's Office
Salary-
(1) Registrar ...... ... ... ......... ...$1,800
(2) Stenographer and assistant to Registrar., 900 $2,700
Current Expense-
Office supplies .. ....... ............ ... ..













3.--I -
|.^. .* 'C nBp e


Se auditor's budget for deta il ............ eB

Va. rounds and Buildings-
Salary-
(1) Buperintendent of grounds and buildings, 2,000
(2) Night watchman ..... .. ......... 1,200
(3) Three student assistants at $250 ....... 50 $3.90
Current Expense-(See Auditor's budget)..* ..... ..... S.950

Total ,,, .................. ...... 477,435

*Stationery. office supplies etc.. carried In Auditor's Budet

AUDITOR'S BUDGET OF
GINERAl CURRENT EXPENSES FOR THE ENTIRE
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA.

Sundry suppl'!o, Intcluding feed for campus mule teams, dis-
inectrans, and toilet paper for buildings, etc ....,,... $ 7000
Heat, lilht and power, including gas and electricity for class
rooms, laboratories and shops, coal and wood for central
beating plant antd other boilers ........ .......... S,, 00
Postage and stationery for offices and departments . .. 1,10.00
Printing and advertising, including catalog and three quarter-
ly bulletins, special printing for registrar's office anld riscel
laneous advertising .................. ............... 200 00
Commencement expensBe, including speakers, diplomas and
medals for, graduates, Invitations and programs for exer-
clses ..... .. ................ .... '.. .. .. 1.0000
Traveling expenses for all pmposBa .......... ............. 1,000.00
Miscellaneous expenses for association membership dues,
premiums on bonds, freight and express .......... ..... su000
Janioor labor for InstructIonal buildings. 5 japitors at $00
per annum .... ........-....................... 3,000.00
Campus labor for upkeep of grounds, walks and roads and
planting of gras and hrubbery ................ ....... 4,000.00
Repairs and upkeep on all butidlngs. Including pDanting, renewal
of pslmbing, labor on roor and valley, replace broken
tile etc ........ ........................... ........ 3,00,000

Total for one year ............................... $22,98,o0

















I.- ~.



..e~t ....... ........ 000
l. Sonotonle and Sociology ........ 3,000 ,.
Zn*lash ..... ... . .. ,
lHistory and Political cence . 3,300 .
tMathematcs .. ........, ..... 5,300
Modern Languages ...... .. ... 4.750
Physics .............. 3,000
Total .. ........... I$ 48.700


I. General.
Salary-
Dean ,


II. Ancient Languages
Salary-
(1) Prof of Ancient Languages ..... .. .$3.500
(2) Ass't Prof. or Forelin Lnguages (one-
half time) .. .... ,250


III. Biology.
Salary-
(1) Professor of Biology
(2) Associate Professor of
(3) Instructor in Biology
(4) Student Ahsistant .


$4150 $47505


Biology


Current Expense--
Chemicals dissecting materials, glassware, etc
Permanent improve ,ents-
Microa opens, charts, models, sterling appa-
ratus, etc, ..... ... ........ .


$1,000


2,000 $11,5s,

$16,8M0


SI* I


. .. . ...... .. 5 $ 0














(1 Ptoeor ot Chemistry ,... ..,,,....,,.500
(2) as eor in hemitry ............
1) Curator of Chea Labolrator ...... 1,200
(4 Two Stdent assistant . .. 00

Current Expenses (See Chemistry Budget) ..
Permanent Impr6aement (See Chernstry
Budget) .. .. ... ... ,... -. .


V, Economics and Socioloy.
Salary-
Professor of Economics and SOCioloAy

VI English.
Salary-
(1) Profesor of Englh ..
(2) Assaclate Plofessor of Elila .
(3) InstrlctOr in English .. .
(4) Studeat Asisanut .


VIIHsltory and PolItical Science
Salary-
Plofesi or f History and Poitical Science


6,400 $13400


- AS5a1l
:iloo
ig$a


VII ilathematcas
Salary-
(1) Profeh or of Mathmietics
(2) Instructor in Matbenmatics


. $3,500
. 1,00


Permanent Imrovemet ...,


IX, Model m Languages.
Salary-
(1) Profes;or of Modern LiAnuages .... $3500
(2) Ass't Professor of Forein Languages
(oue-half time) 1,250


$5,i00

$125 5,425


14,750 $4,750




II -~""~~~~~~"~~-~-"~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~-


iI.


*1.. L

Aiat le Praelwar e Phyas ......... -.,,AN
trirt lapenes (Seef fDept ReD*art)*t.-,.-
S lEnmt Imroement (See Dept. Rport) *.

w Ttalm. .....+........ -....... .... ...
Fid et ...... ................ ........... ... ..


Genera] Indivtdual
Class Chemicals Apparatus Apparatia
Freshman ......... ,200 $ 400 900
Organic ............. 1,200 500 S00
Gravimetrle, Volumetric, Industrial 00 1,100 300
PhlCyal .. ..... 00 1,200I 200
grNcultui al, Physiological 00 500 600
Totals ..... .. [ $ 5,000 I ,700 0
Of the general apparatus needed the hollowing may be mentioned:
Balances, analytical Cnemical microscope
Charts Autoclavo
Electric oven Dryig- ovens
Electric furnace Combined baloptican
Electric vacuum and pressure pump Galvanometer
Platinum dishes Cooper-Hewitt light
Chemical balances (freshman) Spectroscope and accessories
Babcock milk tester Solution balance
The individual apparatus includes test tubes, crucibles, evaporating
dishes, Bunsen burners, retoits, etc, for separate experiments

*Items carried under Audtor's Budget for Current Expenses.












SGITAIRY OF BUDGET FOR AGRICULTURAL COLLEGR. L.
I TRUCTIONAL (Co e Proper).

SurrKnt "pearmt
Salary Expesn's Bnerov, Total
General ....... .................. iet 1,650 $ 4,150 f 8,40
HortliCtllure ,,, ..... 8.750 4.500 7f0 H14100
Anmual Husbandry .. ... 7,750 3,50 104,00 28,000
oeld CroD6 Soils & Farm EnMg 150.5 4,375 3,000 22,725
Veterinary Scence .. ... ........ 3750 1,100 1,250 ,100
Poultry Husbandry ......... 2,750 231i0 4,000 10,100
Agricultural Chemtry .......... 2,500 .. .. ... ,600
Total ......... ..... 1 |^ 44,450 T 17.826 1 29,550 F 937825
Less Government Funds .. -.. ...- ..... ....... 10,000
Total Anuial Apprpration .................... 7 S,825



EXPERIMENTAL, AND FIELD WORIK
(Agricultural Exipenrment Statio).


Salary =Ex 4Twc's improve. Total
Genial .000 $14"0 I...... a5 t17,2 0
Mailing and Blletin Room .... 1,000 750 1,760
Anili industryl 26300 E0,145 22,700 70,145
Sugar OCine .. . ...... 4,50 5,500 .. .. 10,000
Soils and Fertilizers .. ...... 10,00 7,000 .. ... 17,500
Pea Investigations ... ,700 2,800 1,000 7,&00
Plant Pathology , 21,700 15,000 . 36,700
Entomology ... ... ,40 8,5s60 1490
Experiment Test Grounds .. 1,200 3,76 "500 3.Ef7Ro
Experiment Station LUbrrr ,,,.- 2,000 575 1,125 3,700
Branch Experiment Station. Lake
Alfred ....1. . 3,00 5,3 8,300 15,650
"Totl .... ~ ............ .-$$ 84,300' $ 79,745 $ 34,ti25 1l9a70
Less Govermm tment Funds .... 17,200 1300 ,000
iTonal Annual Appropriation 1 }$ 17u0 $ 67"ti7 $ 341 $16fS0O

Full e planatlons and details of the above A ured will be found in Direc-
tor Rolf's Report on pses as follows.


















. .. ir.. ..

-.l ,- y"- L *,-- .

Si i. .ry ,.. .......I..........
A e ultur- C.e stry......

EXPERIMENT STATION.

general .......................... ......
MAlln and Bulleti Rom rn .......
Animal Husbandry .. ................. .. ... ..
Sugar Cane ............. ....... ........... ....
Soils and Fertlizers ............ ........
Pecan Investigation ....................... ..
Plant Pathology .........
Entomology ... .. .. .. .......... ...
Experiment Test Grounds
experiment Station Library ... ...... ..
Branch Experiment Station (Lake Alfred) .... ..


Current Pernm.
Salary Expens's Imirrov, Total
General ......... 1,25 70 2,500 ,8
Civil Enginering .. ...... 6,250 225 5,000 11,4~7
Electrical Engineering ... ,250 225 .... 47
Mechanical Engineering .......... 12,850 150 17,500 $ 31,004
Chemical Engineer.ng 3,000 ..., ..... 3,000
Total ..0











r ET -._..z L*LW[ : * -r *r*-.0.i0.*

I. *_-* -

l . ,

m* m Suptle. e ........... ............. 4 ,v
S Permatrnlt maprotemelWt-
/ At.Mrata (to be distributed to dopts ...... .


IU Civil saginert
Saary--
(1) Professor of Civil Engineern .......
(2) Assistant Prof. of Civil Eagineerig ...
(3) Student asaltent ....... ... ... s..
Current Expense-
Maintenasoe oa laboratory and instrumentst ...
Permanent Improvement-
mEulpment of Pydraulic laboratory .........

Il. Electrical Engineering.
Salary-
(1) profesor of Physics and Electrical Eag,
(2) ASalitaat Professor of Electrical Eng.....
(3) Student assistant ... .. .......


5,000 $11,475


2,500
260 10,250


Current Expense-
Maintenance of laboratory... ........ 3 235
IV. Mechanical Egnineering.
Salary-
(1) Professor of Mechanical Engineering -.. 8,00
(2) Associate Professor o Mechanic Arts .... 3,000
(3) Asalstant Professor of Mebanical Eng.... 2500
(4) Instructor in Mechani A .............. 1,800
(5) Instructor in Drawing ......... .... 1,800
(6) Student asalftnt ....... .. ........ 250 $12850


Current Expense-
Maintenances of hops ......-r-......... 1....
Permanent improvement-
(1) Equipment of wood-shop* ...... .......,OO0
(2) Equipment of foret..... ........ 26f00
(3) Equlpnpmet of tfoamryr....... ......... 2,500
(4) Eauimtent at s tean Iaboratory*...-.. 6,0 00


$ 6s5




117.500 M31,000


*Ta replace wornoent apparatus; for additional machinery aBd equipment
for aew shops eret tdhre rean ago but not nd tfor lack of tflnds
for plprar t nta u TplUt.










1.


II .i- -

Ancotdate Profiesor ot Cnmoicalt Bus inlB ... 314m $11"a
For Curent olRpense and Iermanent Impro
iente s ee us dget for Chemiatry mder Collee
of Aria and Selences.

Total ..... .......... ................ .. ... .. $5iT
Dfeduct -...... ...... ............... 10,50

Total annual appropriation............. .. 45,27



SUMMARY BUDGET OF COLLEGE OF MLW.


""U""""urrent Permt7
Salary Expena's Improv, Totl
General .................... 500 $200 $ 300 $ 100
Faculty ................ 17,000 ..... . ... 17,000
Library ............ 0.. .. 1,800 200 3,500 5,50
Total ..... ............ 19,300 I00 $3,800 $23,500


I. GeneraL
Salary-
Dean . .........
Current Expense-
Office supplies .. ...... ..
Permanent Improvement-
Office fixtures .............


S ........ $ 500

........... 200

... . ~300


II Faculty.
Salary-
(1) Professor o Law ,,.... .... $3,500
(2) Proressor of Law .. ............... 3.00
(3) Professor of Law .... ... .... ... 3,500
(4) Professor of Law . ... .. ... '3,500
(5) Professor of Law ..... ............ .... a. 7.00













!*i Lbm rno -
FE E -

r I T- I -

Peremnient Improvement-
ParlEbBe new law books ......... ........

Total ............. ... -.
Deaduct ,, .. .......... .. .. ,-

Total annual approprlatlon ..


,l500 l0

4,000

$1% ,00


Current Pernmt.
Salad ry xpeu's Improv. Total
Ge aral ........ ..... ... $ 2,300 2,10h $1I,500 5900
Psychology ................ 4.000 ..400 4.400
College Education ....... ..... 7,000 .. ... -. 1,000
Elementary Eduatio .... 3,500 ...... ... 3,500
condary Education .... 3,000 ... ....... 3,000
Agricultural Eduaton ......, 10.000 ....... 10,000
Nomal School and Practice
High School ....... 3,500 600 1,500 5.00
Summer School ........ 10,000 10,000
Total .. .... I 43,300 $2 000 $3,400 $49,30


. Genera].
Salary-
(1) Detan ...... .
(2) Secretary to Dean .....

Current Expenses-
(1) Orfie supplies .........
(2) Tavelig expense .... ..


. $ 500
.. .... .... 1.00 $2,30


.. .. . 900
,.......... 1,300 $2,100


$15600 alo00







Li I. .1


1 Prof-or 1 Psychalo -- -- .
( )tudeo Aastatnat in psycghto ....S... 50
t ) Student Asttaut hiBucaoa P .. 2o50

Permanent Improvement-
Apprtus in psychology Laboratory ..........


Ill Hfstorr, Theory and Arts of Edeation.
Salary-
() Professr of Education . .. ..... 3,500
(2) Professor of Education ........ ... .. 3,600

IV, Elementary Education.
Salary-
Professor of Elementary Education ....

V. Secondary Education.
Salary-
Professor of Secondary Education .....


$4,000


400 $4W40
, /


VI Agricultural Education
Salary-
(1) Professor of Agricultural Education .. $3,500
(2) Professor of Industrial Education ... 3,500
(3) Professor of Agricultural Education In
Industrial Arts .. ........... .... 3,000 $10,000

VII, Normal SCeool
Salary-
(1) Instructor in Languages ............... $2,500
(2) Four teaching fellows ........ ....... 1,000 $3.600


Current Expense-
Maintenance of Practice High School Lab,.,
Permanent Impro, ment-
Apparatus for Practice H, S Laboratory ....

VIII. Teachers Summer School.
Salary-(See Summer School Bulletin) ...

Total. .. .. ... ....., ,.
Deduct .... ....... ... ........... ..

Total manual appropriation ..................


$ .00

1.C00 $5,500


$10,000












- t I---------------------
o Honorable j d of Control, '
I Key Wet, Florida.

Gentlemen:

For a number of years the State Assoclation of Drugglsts has recom-
mended and urged that the University of Florida establish, in connection
with its organized Department of Cemistry, a school in which the young
men of the State may te taught practical pharmacy. We believe that such
a department can be added with but little additional coat t the State.
We also believe that there i a widespread demand for instructiOn of
this character at the State University. The pharmacists Insist that the
State ought to provide for a large contingent of young men who re at
present forced to leave the State to attend other ioltitutions at & cost of
from three to four times the exsense of attending such an institution at
the University
I beg, therefore, to submit herewith I careful estimate of the cost of such
a department, and commend to )our favorable attetihk the enclosed re
Sport of Dr T. R. Leigh, the present head of the Department of Cmisoltry
of the Univerait of Mlorida. I further retqust at this statement, together
Dith Dr Leigh's report, be printed in Ihe li ennal report or the Board
of Control, with such comment as the Board may see Mt to make
Respectfully submitted,
A. A. MURPHREE,
President


February 7, 1921
President A A. Murphree,
University of Florida

Sir.

Pursuant to our conference relative to the establIhment of the College
of Pharmacy at the University of Florida, wherein you instructed me to
study the problem anid tender a report. I beg leave to submit the follow-
Ing.
There Is no school of pharmacy within the State of Florida at the pres-
ent time The law requires that every pharmacy, or retail store carrying
drugs, shill be under the direct supervision of a registered pharmacist
'who shall take care of the dispensing, of the expounding, and the sale
of drugs. medlcles or poisons anywhere In the State' and no liceEtiate
shall haves suprvIion or more than one pharmacy or drug store at one
Uime. The immediate and continued employment of a large number ot
registered pharmaists is therefore, required

^-4 Co'*










SI.

7r.- L. i- Fan i ..**. O -. J ** F ". * .
ui r-- ar 1 'A _,v r - A. r AN F A b.
I L.r .. r - r L A *
A APN rA r A A
I A III A A AAI IN' NI A A A A A A A r 11 1
r I 1, I ,' II
l aa s gfat h present time te youth of Florida who desire to p Pfl
I S Algi CSou tn p harmacy find it necessary to seek their iostride
Srtl nutideot the State
i tlhee and other reasohs I recommend the establishment of the Co
S ie ,ofPharmtacy as the sixth college of the University of Florida, ma-
. t* It of equal rank and standing with the Ave existing colleges. The
college of pharoacy that would best serve the citizens of Florida should
ofer the following courses of Instruction:

A two yeal's course, leading to a certificate in pharmacy, which
when combined with two year's experience [n the practice of phar-
may. would render ( per eson eligible as an applicant for the exami-
nation before the Board of Pharmacy of the State of Florida.

IT A three yar e ear's r leading to the title or Pharmaceutical Chem
ist (Ph, C ), which prepares persons for positions in wholesale drug
and compounding companies.

Ill A four years course leading to a regular B. S Degree In Pharmacy,
which la some Institutions is called Doctor of Pharmacy

It is possible to establish the College of Pharmacy At the University of
Flrnla by the expenditure of a small amount of money In the first few
years of Its existence owing to the fact that an, of the branches of study
required foa the tuainlng of pharmacists arc at the present thie offered
by the various departments of the University
Six thousand dolls'i per rear for the first two years will estiablisli and
maintain the College of Pharmacy, making twelve thousand dollar rs for the
biennium The following estimate has been madle

Dean of - S
Secretary to the Dfean ..... 3
Professor of IPhaImacy .. .. 3 .
Special Lecturers .. ... .. 0il
Laboratory Deshks S400
Apparatuts ,, 4
Chemicals niud DIlitug .... 604
Library3 .- ,. .. ]-0
Offric Supplies, ae- 0,,. An

Amount of Annual Appropriation--- .-- 6,00

pRepectf lly yours.














I I I W L


S I aptfEulym hand yao herewith report showing the attendace at the
I etalrsity a d Flrle for the two s.essons of the cast blentum:

SUMMARY, U19841m9.

Crsduate Schol .,,............... .. .. ....
College of Arts alTd Scleuoes ................ 16
College of Agriculture-
College .... ..... .. .. . .. . 75
Two-Year Course .. ....... ..,. .... 1
On -Year ... ............ ..... I1
S
College of engineering . ... .. 146
College of Law .. ... .... .. 62
Teachers' College and Normal Sehooe-
College .... 11
Normal Schlool 3
Practice Higb School ....... 30
Summer Scliool .. ... . .. 434
498
Advanced a A T C. Course .... . 25
Naval Reserves ... -

Total Enrollment for 191 -1919 .. 1
Connted Tawe .

NeT Total ... S3
NumlbWr Attending Boyy' Sbort Course i Agriculture ... S
Number Attending 1armoro: Ten-Day Short Cmnoure 7
Number Attending Army Traininu Sebool ... 10

Grand Total ........ .. 182

In 918-1O19 fift-one Flaridni ountilee ere ,eprieiicd as foflawi*-
Alachan, 14fi; Bay. 8; Bradford, 1I; Brelard. 14. Bmrward. 3, CalhoUt. 1.
Citrus, 11 Clay. 1 Colim kila 15, Da e, 32, DeSoto. 42, DmIval 47; Ea-
crnbLa,. 17, Fr gler, $ Franklia, I: Gadulsen. ; Hamiltonm 7i Rlernando,
Il, Hiiolmstr aiftt., 9I, Holmes, 4: Jaksn. s. Jfferto., 4 Lamayette. 1:
laale, 3t Lre. 15r TLon, I8; Levy, i LAiberty, 1; Madieon, 0; Maflte,
17: Mara o. I1; Bntourg Ie, Nassal 2: Orange, 23M: OWeoI
i3; Palm Betcr. 39; P2a1 o, N 1; P; Poills. 3B Pol.: 38. ; Pantam, 9; SL








SN PB, **' tt ."'^ S *1 f!' 'lpat. ha "wtt L. r^LBa. Ili. .k-
- x" : ..'w' ; P PP S f P, .4 w .t..

<;:.: .'E1 "u. | L/ rahLiB^n, l'f iite j, iii i, u^ j.b :
!ig!" t tap" .pj..t t P ,d aa
:"*.- .,L*.* -*] n,,,.lb Wm ,. ,.i Iaat. .-:
iit:!-'"Pp 9;.j OP''^ "^'11 tL P**Pow aM .t ypPpi ^ P P
.""ji W Ptia tata aI.B i muw M NP . ab

:'~. 4 aa ". -. 4 P '.... mP .
T .,, .am .t .:-..la. a .a., ,t lrn.



S.' r l .' m ..: . .. i







pt;.. *El hil0S u Jl.tt t.t P faI iU, tIa dan
t H.t.. :N P. a "P .
;. U b utU lA- n It a a.Dr P .h ta p ni


iptP~t,. .P~t mt PP td y...Pa.Pt. P.A q.





I : ::, ;: ri. :; i: ;,: ;
*it.nint Itt'wj Pmuertnatf Pp SUPpa44 h'taP In taitd Btn. ntai

PU* a -. baa *- --f~~njpr(URDLid -^ NitN a tadup a
PPPStIPPN pa .arhrt~tt- .Klltaf^ atMalm. t11m BL.np R-n.
rit ,apttp -a*ui.:t P ;.iE :: Pu.as a 4 taU.




eh** a HM taw~~lma it eha. inaapittk a r'iM~adrrhhiaH.;LID
inty Ppt' aet'ap-: t. .pae pi:yp Ptd Pa t tp*t '* .*
IrrprlfP~aPppaNiaattm; p~p a aa~ap


eN.; Itt.l~9lr etpta4tIIa fifi taL. tae..








& I I I Ir. IL J A r -'-.L- f I I- 1 7 a it MI j I a I =cl JIa L,- J'L
uilA .1J I 1 I I I 1 1 ) -- 1 ,II Ij -IL

S --E 1 i l' l I r I l
a. ,. I , -l. I h ,. C I; a .- .-


s l E B', 3 B. Ia AgrlEura d I S, X 3 8E 1; 0, > zS : ;
SS tB. M ;B, Ak in Etattmn, ; LL.B., il fsad Certiane %.
bnale in parking 1, On Aruvst 8; 191. at the "a of te Nommer A
|:l' to hef llowlDB degrCee and certlf cates were flwarded; Mt A. In E
a *atO I! A B. In Ad., 3; B. S. In Ainr, 1; B, S. E- A,1; normal sbool
elar"hates, 5.



SUMMARY, 1919+1920.

Graduate School .... ....... ... .... ... ...
College of Arts and Sodencea .,. .....* ,, -..,7 9
College of Agriculture-
College ... .... ..... ....... ............... 129
TwoYear Course .. .. ..... ............ 26
One-Year Course .. ....,, ........... ....... 32
our dnts Course ......... ... ..... ... .. ..... .. 8
19S
College of Enlsgeeing .-. - - ... .. 150
Colleeof Law.... . - ... ,, 04
Teachers' College and Normal School-
College ,..... ,. .......... 28
Normal S ool ......... . ..... . . ...... ... 31
Praciice Aih School , , .,-,,,,,,,,-,. 1 18
Summer School .1. -., -, 2 1l
484

Tol nrEnrollmeat for 111920 4 ..,......... ....... ... .. 105
Cotedl Twice .... 29

Net Total ... .. ..... .. ...... .... 127
Number Attendlg Boy' Short Couse In Agricunture ... 101
Number Attending Ftrmers' Ten-Day Short Courme .........

Grand Totall ,--. -... ... ... -..... ,.... 113 13

in 1i1-dlal, ffty-four Forilda ountla were repradented, s folnea"a:1
AIaeli, ISN; Baker, 1: Bsa, 10; Bradford, 3; Bregard, 13; Broward, A R
CIONAQ- 4; Cl(rus, 14; CNIN 7; Colulelcar. 25; Uea 40; DeNol, 55 ..
Duanl, ig Asesmtl, aV; Faleor, 4; Frankillb,'k Gaddsen, 1U; SlamS




A .







I h n fr R u d IN,." r ,L *i I i,, I I I I

isi. ; eEMC -M1elare, 35; MiAtre, 10; NCflt, 1; Oialoosan,
it aiN tifais; 0o la, IL Poim B each, 24: Panae, 2(;
1t G 45 lpa, 14n it; Sta Johns. 14; St.,Luile, 12; San a
; N oiMtahle 12; imlmtr, 28: ou r ; w ns 22; Taylor, 2: Volusa, 18;
bi,2 Wfat ;n; W ltonI, shlngton, 10T
a'tmleldt Cofanifia, twentyomfle States and four foreign countries
.- ra. iwteented by 14 stuadeils. as follows: Alabama, 7; BraNzl. 5;
tna, 2; Connestiemt, 1 Delaware, 1: District of Columbia, 2; F or-
Aids, t19S; Georglia, 14; Indiana, 1; Kentucky, 3; Maine, 2; Massacha-
1/ ete 1: M1iiogan, 4; Minnesota, 1; Misssidippi, 2: Miassuri, 2; New
york,4; North Carolina, 2; Ohio, 4; Pennsylvania, 5; Philippines, 1;
SarMla, 2; SOmth Carolina, 3, Tenbes ae. 7, Texas, 1, West Virginia, 1,
By a comparison of the total registration and attendance the first
months of each semester and the last mouth of the regular session of lots-
1920, It will be Been that the registration steadily increased during the
year, while the number in attendance varied. The first monthly report
of the first semester, November 1, 1919, showed a total registration of
595, and the number in attendance, 583 The first monthly report of the
second semester, March 1, 1920, showed a total registration of 650, and
the number in attendance, 562. Tee final monthly report for the session
showed a total registration of 672, and the number in attendance. 538.
The summary for 1919-1920 includes the registration for the summer ses-
sion and also the number attending the Boys' and Farmers' Short Courses.
On June 1, 1920, at the close of the regular session, the following deo
agrees were awarded. A B., 5, B 5; B. RS. in AgrL, 15; B. $. C. E, 5;
B, S. E.E 6B, S M. E, C. E,. 1, J. D. 3;LL.B, 10, B S. in Ed.
4, A. B in Ed, 1, B S. in Agr. Ed., 2, and normal school certificate, 1: cer-
tifcate of Graduate in Farming, 3, certificate for two-year course in Agil
culture. 1; certificate for one-year course in Agriculture, 6. On August 6.
1920, at the end of the summer seBsion, the following degrees and certifl-
cates were awarded, M A, in Ed., 1, S, S. In Ar Ed., 1; B A In
Ed, 1; .B S in Agr, 1; normal school certificates, 2

Retspct ully submitted,
W 1B ELLIS,
Regist at.








Beat Is &. *e rF t -T ..r .- *r % .-*I IN 11,.q,


7 N .,

*I i n* ,

w tWte tly la the way at attMnte. That yeat I-L8AS) WM4 A
SWled n h Cllee oa Arts anMd Sete cea SS men, bMtI of thlaq-m er
, moe than Ote-tird, had dropped out before the clos of fa yfA
The prspdt for the a term was not atll ei outragit

THE S A. T C,

At this critical juncture the National Government came to the asoaB
tnce of the colleges, and the coUleges came to the assistance of the
Government, The S. A T. C. was established and our coilegea became
mainly war institutions for the training of officers rather than educam
tional centers for the training of citizens. This was a war measure and
anoul be so jtudgeLd If te war lad continued the S. A T. CG would
doubUless have uastlfled itself. Even as it was, It may have had its t.
Bnence in bringing about the sudden and unexpected esasetio Of hoes
utilities. But judged from the point no view of the college, the xperi-
leunt of the a A. T C was not ai entire success, tioughI probably a
successful here as at other Institutions Though not entirely seceneful
the S A T. 0 brought et one great advant It gold in college many men
Who would otherwise have dropped out Our enrollment Jumped from
32 1n the College o Art and Sciences to I0 in 1918-191D and Increased
to 170 in 1919-1920 It would seem that the war has been a great E'e n-
tive to our young menI to seek a higher degiee of educadon.

SALARIES.

I don't like to argue on a self-evidentoproposition but I wish to record
my firm conviction that unless the salaries of the professors are'great
inareased at once the usefulneed of the University of Florida w:ll
greatly impaired

PERSONNEL OF TFHE FACULTY

We oave lost b death our beloved Profesor of Mathematles, Dr.
H Q. Keppl el. Tis place was fillM by the appantment of Dr. T. M.
Slmpeon, oE tha UNlveritt of W eisconin.
FDrW -1 $im, Proetor of 4Boolo t and political Salene left i t te
middle ot this year. Te Iace remained vacant the rest of the
but OE, U i Bx l t.l has been appoInd Professor Eeonemies an '
ocom thy no f~I






. I
1:


I rL Aj PAofeNS r A rl- r, I Ft -aE.c. Ikh I r
aart tasW Ilte i a pr h Im 0w ufr LI- j u I 1 I. LJr -u
aI mi ialed ra pir*itml-renmjb
Dr j. M.s _nw. fr-lJ lui r -L-- -* L-...,. -1, P.n
sp WngJ WOm. P* j L.A*

I I A n..-n i f I In n n A n % nn -
A. Z n r n-- n n r 1 l I A I

I r FA Z b
gi*m ri i. _i rL] i t IL II 1 1 I "
..r N -Ui i i A I Ai 'i 1 A L, L L r 1 .

I INl N I l I I I 1 11 IA I
r- I I A I I I n 1
1" g 21 N l IIIAI 1 l A A l
S. I



1 ty (tficUlt at present to find quarters for our new professor.
I be of grert advantage if we had houses we could turn over
tD t em It was a part of the original scheme in planning the uiverllty
to bidd houses on the cmpas for the professors. Would it not be we l
t0 consder now whether or not t is advisable to carry out this plan?

LIBRARY.

Evury department la vitally terested in the library, Without further
famention it Is understood that each professor expects a fair appropriation
for hooks, periodicals, etc. We should make our library as good as posb
ble and provide every facility possible for Its efficient use.

TRAVELING EXPENSES.

There ought to be a fd to permit some of ot professrs to attend :
the annual meetings othe learned societies in which they might be
most Ineterested. Ta I recommend to the Interests oa the University--
to keep our pro feswn p to date n their several fields.

THE DEPARTMENTS OF THE COLLEGE

ANCIENT LANGUAGES.

TDrinfg te SA- T. C prlono Caoerse n S EW. was gsien aMd OS y
S1 r nn A .a student
*" .-'I r *- *r at" t Io I tmeto te1,ls.t
.r . r r M th term on of ther
i .. A n*k w-iNtr O rANdNA







FL. IL* i 1 ** n 1 . .1. I k r..i iE
only.' j F.II !r:i I. -I I N, I I
I. I .. I -
N ay wriaes inA, w hci they fatlete two iMtae w a hey; :
L a lhi iSchool It Useems to wme Mtat we have martiva at O ia 1
Me0i wB tint M have to gMive tne eausues ruoltt every yearW, bat bt N
44I v*osiallt need Some help, Prhapbi gualf the time of Sa aSiStwt
poeass of languages would meeI our needs for the next 1bifnlttm.



The department of biology has recently been reorganied, the old der
apartment of botany being divided between the department of hiortltltiur
and the department of biology. This has given some temporary roelle
but the dedarttment is still badly crowded. Last year there were e-
rolled In the department 132 students Lbe first semester and 110 the
second semester. Tne twvo laboratories used by the dpartmuent were
scarcely uffoieiet to meet the needs of these students Protesor Daria
suggests that we need a new building especIally designed for the work in
biology He suggests that the museum might well be located In thus
proposed new building.
He asks for an additional instructor in biology and for a student assist-
ant
The following is an itemised estimate by Dr. Davis of biI needs for
each of the next two years
Instructor ....4 51800,00
Student Assistant 25000
Bacteriology and Phlnt Pathology ,-- 500,00
Botany ..... ... ..... 25000
Zoology and Entomology , 3G0,00
IMicroscopes for Botany, Bactriology and Zoology 1250 i00
A uari ...... ..... . 16000
Charta, Models. Etc ..... 2500
lmoathoaie, Collecting Apparatus, Et., for Field work. 250.00
Library .....- ., ,,,----..- - -- ---.- . 25000

Total ...... ... , .. ...... 5, ,00

CHEMISTRY.

Thil department Is almost overwhelmed by Lte large number of stt-
dents Bomething like 200 men are taking chemistry. The department
needs more pace, more laboratories, more heomnials, more Inutrmenta,
more booe, more m teaoers-belttr equipment in every respect. The
professor thinks we need a new building devoted entirely to chemistry.
He sugaeals that we add to our staft an asselale professor, an in.
mtructo ert, r. a e fellowshia and a part-time stetOgratper.










h' a hI n It, fRtI- S '- | A -I 1 -it Ir r tIL I" i.
I I Ci iu'L I lt UL.. IF


r-6. .1m l, r. r,,
W...i.i I LE. Is. r, J i 1
W-i L r- iL. IT

.. .. r , ,. 2,600(jL

L E.i .. .. 1,250.00
L.- 125.00
N 'BH ^Aea s ...... ,- -,-...... ... .......,, .. 5000

|.ital .. -... -,, ,..... ., ., . ... ..... ....... ..... 12,9$500

ECONOMIC AND SOCIOLOGY,

Dr. L. M Bristol lias recently] ar lved to take charge of this depart
mnent. See Deartment of History and Eco comics

ENGLISH,

We now require two yea.R of English of every canmtl ate foi i degree
in the College of Arts and Selences. This means large numbel l in Eng-
Ha-li-nd additional teachers music be provided Professor Farr has Iben
ably assisted by Assistant Professor BeDk, but these two are no longer
able to give all ith deirred courses In English, An additional in- ruweor
Is asked for, as well as a student assistant

HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE.

The work in the social scienesF has been reorganized recently, and now
conassts of the Department of History and Political .Slence on the one
hand and on the e other the Department or Economis and oiology That
is, Profesor Leake has exchanged Economies for Political Seience Uti-
matebl we shall have to divide these two departments 'gain and malre
tour department out of them. Even at present it is difficult for two men
to gve the deshied, courses in t]hse two departments. Sta i History I is
required of all A. B. Freshmen, the class Is large and unwieldy and should
e divided. Professor Leak, wno, pending the election of a Protlfeor or
EconomIs and SocIloogy made a report for the two departm ts, thinks
that the services of an assistat professor sho, ud be divided between the
two departments.
There is still wine demand for the establishment of a S ooi of Bmsinms
A linisration. In the tae of greater neea hle question may wil
Psotwe4 but sbtOld not be lost sgh o. It was 4ad t in my h is R
Pt.














..A.il biae atlematit Isa regatred of all regular studebtl tI in .1
te ana ma$n btudenlta other college, we once more face Ih atatn
10ata more students iS the department than we can eonvOlmntly a
< ~*Erake E arm of. The Past year tlihr were about 800 student 1
athemote. The professor of matheiaties could not handle all the
aioaes Aftr resorting to tea.orary expedtents an asslstant professor
f mathOematica and pbhyaJe was finally appointed, and this gave a partial
aSd temporary relief The professor now asls for -an additional Instrue
tor In mtmal matics. There is also great need of good blackboards And
other equipment,

MODERN LAk'GUAGES.

Tlhe modern laguate department i tall to overflowing. The elementary
classes ih to e divd to divd into two r three section. The lard amount
of written work makes the giving of these courses (particularly laborious
Some courses for which there was demand could not be glven. The ro-
feaor of a ceent languages gave some assistouce, but his somrvies are
needed in his own department. At least a half-time assistnt professor is
needed in this department

PHYSICS,

This desp rtment also has been overwhelmed with large numlbrs The
past selion there were about 240 students registeredi in physimc Our
laboratory facilities were taxed and or teaching force adequate FPoal-
ly an assistant professor of physics and mathematics was appolated, and
this gave some relief, but more help is needed In order to give remgral
advancel colrsps ror which there is a demand
The professor asks for an appropriation of $750 a year for upkeep and
$500 A year for the irchae of new equipment,
I am subjolaing a resume of the modest and moderate estimate o the
needs of the College of Arts and Sciences or eanh of the next two years.
Baliarie are I Inlded. but estimates for the library are omniltt



-


,:,:




:A '.





F
Te I

91EC47fl





** II- I k I

-mi 4z.1a
mir 1 L------------*F i .. a .
U Ir *' B I *


&r' I I .* "
-".11,
tbti asl Poflfen a ctee,...,... 3,300 I...... 10 | U00
,jJT h tle i. 5$,a{,)I I2 5.42.
SM t A Xan e es .. .... ...' .. .... 4,7flO
PlICalte ..,.... -.....,..... 3,000 75 500 4,50


1, General.
Salary-
Dean .......... ...... ....... . .,-.$ 500


I, Ancient Languages.
Salary-
(1) Pfofessor of Ancient lAnsuage....... $,50
(2) Assistant Prof, of Foreign Languages
(one-half time) .. ............ .. ,$1,250
II, Blooy,
Salary-
(1) Professor of Biology ... ........ :..$3,500
(2) Associate Proteasor of Biology ........ 3,O
(EB Instructor in Biology .... ........ 180
(4) Student Asistant ................. 250

Current Exxpens-
ChemiOca, Dissecting Materials, Glasware
etC .....,, ..... ..... .. ..
Pe1rmaeant Iprovemens--
Mieroeo es, Charts, Models. Sterilakg Ap,
Dffratu$ ete. -- -., ..........

tftd et.ard ....................


$4,M50 $4,10







$I,50




aoo ^I1154 1
H6,W.|2












II I
L r Ip
is,,& r mi. F, I


MIUCenn t paet(So (Set Cal udt) I

V. ISwdale and Sodkiotr-

Protestoa of i Sooiology) ... .$3,OOO


VI, English.
Salary-
(1) Profesworof o agl sh .............
(2) Aseociate Profeseo O of English ... ..
(3) Instramtor In ~Englsh ......... .
(4) Student At A..stat..........


VIl. History and Political SClenle.
Salary-
PVuIesor of Haistor atd PoItiat Ssence.




(1) Professor of Mathematics .......
(2) instructor ln Mathemastes+ ...-..


$8s5o #0igo


$3,800


$5,3O

$12 *5.425~


la nRotr of Mode LIntuatng.
ftlAwrt o o yesbO. ~S
Moolunp ofCFur~ol~


ItsE


r:



IIC
'"(,:

~r
#OMI


1



























SGeuerait Iadividual
CIASS Chemicals Apparattus Apparateus
reshmau ...................... f2,200 $ 400 $ 00G
Or)ant ....... .. ........ .... 1,00 u00 00
Gravimetrile
Volumetrtc ......... ... .. 500 1,100 o30
ndtis trial 1
Phystcal ..... .. 300 1,200 200
Agricultural
Phnlogioal S ...... ......... .. 800 500 00
Totai .........^... .. .. $5,000 3,700 $70o


I 4 i r .
-._I i .. i f r *1" I I


*T' tel. AA I n a Approprlation....... ....,



CHeMISTRY BUDGET.
I


Of the enermil apparatn


needed the following may be mentioned:


Balnces, analytical
Charts
Electric oven
Electric furnace
EulCtri vacuum and resusre -pum *
Platinum dishe
Chemical balances (reshnmm)
BaboCk milk tester


Cleicmf ] microscope
Aumeeave
Drying oven
Cnimblnui balortican
Gal o eter
Cooper-Hewitt light
SpcftroWmsor and aew oearis
Soluelrn balance


The Individual alilratus Wenlude tket tuam ,rethblen evaporaxin
ihes Bunsen burners, retorts, ei., for separate expert

RPs~ lftily sbmittled,|
JAME N, ANDEa N,
DaM of te 0>lreis of Ars gd S ne .te.









Sit *L.I.C? .. Li T ., .


awath plrape TAid the budget setti or e t*mi,
te A utr ollee for the iinnm bennl July 1 Si
espithectrtilly yout"
w ZOLrS Dean,
The samnary of this budget is followed by a detailefd state t ol
all the items in the summary and of the uses for which twey are to te
employed.
Ao appreclable enlargement of the equipment for the Florlda Aaril
tural College bha been made since 1914 At that time the dar larnt was
onlipletedl Since thn student body in the Agrleultura] Co e has
increase over 10er 0 pr cet. This makes many of the classes so large hat
taey have to be divided Into sections. The classroom snace, lihk thi
equipment, is also Inadequate. The lack of sufficient classrooms and
equipment has made it exceedinly difficult for the professors to Oe
mas mulum result trom their teaching. The stores brought on as an
ticident to the war has now passed and we should therefore make nii
ufor the loe t time. The need for men and material for war made it im-
perative to0 us to get along without the needed equipment and nstruc.
tlonal force In many of the departnmnts the equipment ta interior to
and tie uIntructional force much smaller than that which maiutaoe in
other Southern States. This budget calls only for thops things that
are most imperatively needed It sttt he somewhat larger than would
have been the case, it during the last six years, a reasonable addition
bad been made each year.
SUVMMARY OF BUDGET FOR AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE.
Instructional (College Proper)
aa I Co current Permr,
| Salary Expens s Improv Total
Rienerad .: .. .....-.. .. 1 3.b00 | .460 i t 4,1 -50
Hodrtcualare ......., .,.. ,750 4,500 1 50 -1A,000
Animal tHulandry .- -..- .. 7,750 3.... 16.40 B000
Flel4 Crors, Soils &Tarm EvI, 15,31i5 4,175 3,000 32.725
YVeterinary S lence-s... ...50 1,10, L| | I ,250 ,9l"fO
PoualtNy HRusandry -,,.I. I.... 3760 2350 4dW0 18,10
Agrh ultural Cuenfirt, ....... -| 2.500 .,, ,.3 |6
"fTotal ... s| < |,, .... .. .. .| f7 5 s

1 tar vesranme afundabL ....f. --. --.- r,,
| Total aSan1a anlrqpritlon. IL ----, ,,-,-.---- .s.-T 25


e c I 1.,




m mm T a

a.

flfXlEiYE'iaL t"L* 1LLu rh Ii


. fsz" r. .1 k I


A i- *' .3 AJ .u il-L l ..
&n al..j ii Hr

L, tI Ir



.Eperiment Teit Grounds ...
v i*rB elm t Station Library .....
Sranoh Experiment Station,
Lae Alfred .....- .. -..


II
ii -


Totao ... ......--.... $4,300 1 797465 $34,625 $198,670
e4 s Government Funds .... 17,200 12,300 500 30,000
Total Annual Appropriation,, $67,100 *37,445 5 34,125 $16S,7


INSTRUCTIONAL DIVISION.

I. GENERAL.

Under tais heading are included such items as are not correctly charge
able to any particular instructional department. The State has a num-
ber of small farm buildings here costing approximately $10,000. These
beingframe buildings, will require larger amounts for repairs and painting
than more permanent structures. The people of the State are not wilhng
to see their property neglected. The buildings must be kept in good
repair, and the fences and roads must be kept up in good shape.
The people of the State have also a right to know what progress is
being made. The most efficient way of informing a large number is
through exhibits at county and State Fairs, and we ask for $750,00 for
this purpose
Salary-
(t) Dean* ....... ............... .. .... $ 300
(2) Stenographer to Assistafit Dean ............. 1,30 $2,0G

Cuemant Expiagea-
() Printing and Publishing ...............,,.
(2) h ats tate a Sae an oty wFais ...... To
(3) Offce Suspplie ... .........4..0 $1 ,650








Il

F., Me r W. i
IL Ti Rli I L J 11 1 r ..'Lhuilar* L % I .%'
tr i a,- "n i di I . L 1 .. E
IJ w Virall if I i Ma F. 1 I I S. .'mi

-in r IN I1^ r ..1. El "".
a...- H i I r I I -I I a*
I.r lo i -i F .*_ * * *LI"n
1wN I 1 IL I N



Y.l^'.-L OmaaTICULTUlRE .: ':*

Cfitru3 e ag evn is RnBthe moot Im'potat u e owf car a lr ,AU tha
is^ being eartled .on :ab Statei.e $L riflngs in, an ania) rheve Ie ofatI!
fort molwl id ollars. T tie prewent time it al ot' Dearn, popblefe to |
e ^ h mori.E tanart time of oe rn. to nem e w iosv e cti tio t students I^
de. mltrus clture Ehopgh donw o our people in the State denote an enteJ
^ e// titme'to (Qtsol:*ineas There Is to other Iristituon in the Uni
*" tatea t w i our young men can bao ent IN recT"" the p.oper tra'ans ^
en th% Iin e.
Tncic gring.peach growing. pecao groLfbled as weon other VI Pt. L
ropw, toalt la gr en reoter attention tenan hereleftor. Thle lm ate No
beLg serioufly indered J IN development for the laN oayoung Fre Z .
v wIt good uadametal training in tese Ines of horttetur. The
mintration E arw e FiviBng a good as can be found anryhere, but tt he
Colassed ma grown antirely too large and weo mruerot*, Thoe Hn 4l
*trths whie shoul be ptaugt t horticulture ame too volumio fopr ono
man to hadleo Florida muipt Nroduce her own hortiulturiffla or ePo loan A
milon of-dollare and be greatly retarded in br de elopment.
Salar--
Il) Professor f HortlLrre h aIId Adsitant Dea ..03,5G0 :f0
()Prof r of Citr-Culure and Botaory...... 3-a.001)
(31 toran for Horticultural Gro=und .-L.4.... 2.OO
(4) haStudenr mAsiant ..... ...... -.-......... Rod Ki5nd *

Corer E edsomms-
(I) wro Labourer at woo- ..... ----,2-00--->-.5 1 .r
(I C lame Snpples aNd Rear ..,..,, 3, an ..
.) 'TavelFng Expenss -.,..........--....--. age dil


I. ", T -U.-."L - 1--, RI MI








.- .LH I i rLPANuI


1N1 IN r L. ul Ro m A r^ lI Ki .l* L ".JIA "i A Ii A
.LI rT i F 1 ir p .

S. I. 1 1I n
r-h1l n *I . ** *,* i *r , ,
S , F d . 1 , u l r I h ', r *

.r i I

g t lAtodr 4 mpa.eat and type ber whlEh id dblo I I
I 6 oaic: 'eaati (a ( &Aalr m butabaidry fIne*, A no material) addition has
abe pfashl*e in the last lour year, it cany no te daily understood that tio
S. department, today Us tlrely insuficiently equiplea Wo satilfy the needs
Sothe State. I is lipvasible at the pyeweot tie for the instructors to
ive the students that are maktg application for this work the instruction
l at they desire. Dalryyig is rapidly becoming as important ag rcuitural
work, bot differs from thi work as carried 0oe n other Statet. Florlda
Ias had to el al t rely lot entirely upon other States for er trained dairy
men. At the present thne we have at the college pEctically only those
type of pure-lreld animal that have been donated to thE institution by
interPstn hl ends The State Agricultural Collrege should have at least
a Iair of all the IlIfkrent types of beef and dairy cattl, as well as of bogs
and sheep. Our equiplment, toth In tae line of laboratory Aupplle. and
tpei animate, bi far below that at any othEr of the Southern agriculturaE
college The amount asked for in the animal husbandry department In
the nmauiimm that can be efliheently used

Salary---
(1) Plrotesor of Animl Husbandry .... -3,500
(2) Assistant Protessor of Animal Husbandry 2.00
(3) Herdsman and Foreman ........ .. lO,
(1) Student Assistant .... 250 775

CuITent lspensies
(1) Two Laboi-ore for Feed Crops it $600 ... $1,200
(2) Office and Clas ..... ... .. ... 15
(3) Purchase of SupAplcs for Cloas-rinm .... 2ei0
(4) Glassware and Chemicals ....... . 20
(5) Travelin< Expent5e .. .......... AD, *
(6) Coneentrsats for Fheding Hogse Cattle and
Ni -es ....- -- ,- - ,, L,(O $ ,S 1

Permanent improvementi-
ll) Bait for Beef Cattle, Shee and For ed . Sc
12) Thrre Ehelter Shead for Dary NCattl and
C(lb fo -....... .... -. .. ... .. .w.








,Fi i-Ic ll.d F-NJUUI* u.J fiffhdna. ULm^ Fn Ii LTan
ared, Pq.a ,ip uli .i -w e ., s i.





*r 1
i ,i h ,i- IB' I , i,


I

** L SO1LS AND 1WAPHM MANA SWMA*t

[i 7 Tfl sOlat oe noul, e ad extrenmely variable. They arg at the mariOd
* Ula amone the tnost ditleUlt to make and keep psoduit4atin, .s JaPita
ftradiy b aown abDout the solls, mid this bshold bae ifenartd to the ymnrt
netu of the State. It is, therefore necessary to eniarig.our iartlnoti 4
fore in thils department. Closely allied Wtothe soils studies e t tat;
asicultural anratering. Proper layiNg Ou at drainage systems, Olper
construction of Irrigation systems. proper handling ogf farm. tractors.
as well as knowledge of handling farm achitnery, to say bothi about
the proper aolied of farm ipilemants for particular farim, ia osfiggiwt
importance.
The correct management of a farmI is a necessary as the orrea t
management of a bank or of a mebChadlse establsament. Good fim-
ng is bIecoming so comnplited that It is necessary to give special in-
struction bo that the students mnay know which particular part o fa rm n
btainess in proa able and which is unprofutable Formarly the "vlner
had no means ot knowing the facts in regard to various crop. Al that
was kuoa n bas that at the end of the year he had more or letos moey
tran the year brefrm. Many crops are being grown the tfams that
cannot hb produced economically Farm management discovers whether
It is euonomoi al for the partielar arm to produce ertarn crop or not,
manstruction in general farming or how to drow croa has always boeen
Crylna need in agriellturte Ere as elsewhere There is now a large tfoao
of acgcurte and deflinte data on this subject. To make thei available
Uo the students in ariultiure it la nccesary to Whame Oa addltoeal tugter
and more eluImeN

A


aad ...i .i r ..
N, 4 N



.. : .
cL Ui 'A










I*J cfLrpliUlj
1III Nfbip'n 11 Ill
I II Fecl mo I. am I E

1 Bi.. ll

S I --- '. i
l~* 9 ?IJ I .m In *


-' -


(1Y Tractors ......... ......-...... 1,500
2) GaO s E ne ...... ...................-... 2350
(a) Other Machinery r .... .... ......... W


V, VETnI ,INARY SCJENCt l

When Ceilorklda farmer, mtoman or the Livestoc Sanitary Board
ruats to employ an experienced veterflarian they have to depend on
le traitel Io aIotiher State There has been very lttle oppo
Sr * *, 1 *igatlonof ontaious utvestack dieeaes
S* to Flor1ld It ls expected to make a
begInnD i now and, lay the fomudaion for the eacbing of rteriary
ubrlene on a atter scane f I- qim VTpo*sed to make some Investiationt
S* r conditions that are peculimr to
thaO been moe appreated tnase
u .- lt, HOh has asny 11eoit 1WVQ genera ly


SI I I
I -I


C. r-.. ....
I1 I jibaf. i F i
'.1 m u.i. I | *


L' ~ ~ a~ IIA~AM~~,0
~~-~~ -LL


~~~~(SbU
,,..,,,,.,," /60 1B1W




Ii'..


III juep AN LLA ..1 -TAnI4


A a, I .



:1' I DflutUmii of in, bog iIn td'Adlge

al 8 ote o of Nutley,? f f Ir ..........
S (a) qtUdmdenMt .. .... r....n...


I I

A .
*


250iG


Current ExpfenAes
(1C) nvestlgaon of Soresead Vaccine .... .... 40
(2) Feeds ........ -...-. ..... ,,..- 500 1
3S) Labor ...... .. ... .......... ... .. 1,00
(4) Traveling Expenaes .......... ... 400 32,350

PeroaNnent Improvelments-
(1) Houses, yards and Runs ...... 1500
(S) Breeding Stock and Laying contests .,.... 2,500 4,00 %10,100

VIL AGRICULTURAL. CHEMISTRY,

The whole realm of chemistry is so large that no one can leam all Mter
Is to be known of the subject. The agricultural Atudenits muS have i-
stroOttok in chemistry This usteruictlo in chAemistry ShIoi be of an
agricultural nature. The fundamentals of all chemistry at.e the aMy
hat the aricoltural applcatmon of cliemistry soorld be taught to darjI
cultural stdeutsa The classes In chemistry are o large that they have
to be divided into sections. Tho agricultural students should b tabht
by a lan e~a ecialIy ltted to teach asrioulitral chemistry.

Salary-
(1) Alstant Professor of Chemistry IN ..... .,....,i SS
e(For Lna ralory Sppts and Equipment See Under
COae of Arts and science.)

TtYal to InHtruCtionl P.urp.eas .-... .,,.-tWS *
hIos ..er.... nmentmnuods .r. -" .-- .----.-. jiun


I






86

DETAILED BUDGET FOR THE EXPERJMENT STATION AND
FIELD WORK


lA gnrflr am a


Erperntrwl Str,.:a'


l tiha work e4onomialy at the Exp mnt 'tAtth9 there i
x tha amst be done in a. general way that anot rIa U be c argued
.to #a departIent, such as salary of the DIrector, salary of the Secretary,
salary of the Auditor, also a considerable amount of current expenses, in.
eluding the publication of the bulletins and.annual reports. The demand
for Experiment Station bulletins has become so great that it requires a
'very large edition of each number. It will no longer suffice to place these


odt in small editions.


Of the 157 bulletins that have been published by


the Experiment Station less than 25 per cent are in print,


Many


of the


bulletins that are out of print are among the most valuable that have been
issued from the institution. Owing to the fact that no fund wag available
during the present bienniuni for issuing out of print bulletins the cost of
printing in the next two years will be somewhat greater than wouli other-
wise be the case. The constant importunities for information on materials
contained in bulletins out of print, show that the people of the State are
needing this information and are wanting it. The printing of the bulletins
is one of the most important pieces of work of the Experiment Station.

Salary-
(1) Director .................................. $1,200
(2) Secretary .................................. 1,000
(3 Assistant to Audito r.......................... 800 $3,000

Current Expenses-
(1) Traveling expenses. director ................ $ 125
(2) Printing current bulletins ................... 2,500
(3) Emergency miscellaneous ................... 1,400
(4) Office supplies ..................... ......... 200
(5) Stanps, stationery and supplies ............. 800
(6) Files and furniture ................ ....... 400
(7) Freight and express ..................... ..... 150
S(8) Fuel for Experiment Station ................ 400


(9) Janitor's
(10) Janitor,


supplies ............. .... ..........
Experiment Station ................


Painting Experiment Station ................


of fencing ..........................


Printing and reprinting bulletins ............
Exhibits farm crops and livestock at State
and county fairs .........................


6,00S


750 $14,20 $17,20


Repair











W1.L r. nr A I* r ,,.. .I1 .L .-*.sI
iia m t Mterial of this kind that has to be eared tl situ aif
I t is necersa ar to have this part of the wor dois by a*wit
Jgal ini^Tt person,



rat orretat rpents-
p( IMIacellanekous .... ..... ..... W

III. ANIMAL INDUSTRY AND FI~LD CROPS

G(ineral.-Eiareriments along the lie of animal husbandry and field
Crops a ae among the most iportand bit, of work that can be done This
should not be confused with the instructional "qrk on this Eamr subject.
Tho field has grown so large and the livestock interests of the State no
varied, that Inreas'ngly large demands are beIla placed on the Exportl
ment Station for xtending this w-ork There Is only one Florida, con
sequently the Florida Experiment station as practically, the only one to
which people cian look for acenrate as. detailed information on problem
peclilar to Florida
Dairs -T'he daily leerimnents carried out in the last fifteen years
have given lesuch indid lts that the date men of the State are de
nianding more work of this kinll In addition to the work behng c ried
on at headquarters, a nan should be employed who is capable of going
to all dairies in the State and calry out CO operative esipei tieta with the
dairym en. He should also be alile to ive them advice regarding the f o
atructlon of dair burns and the prorier bslancing of feed The services
of such a man now would be invaluable to the State Standard brais of
livestock Mntut be nad det with which to perform these experlnienat at head
quarters in dairy work It can not be exileced that enIh farmer per-
form such experiments for hIimnelf. It cof inmmeasurably less to have
these investigation made at the Experiment Stalton and give all the
dairymen the benefit~ of the results than to duplicate salh, experiments
on each of the farms
Swine- Mich i une mork has already [en done in swtine husbandor
The amount that has been done ptults out the immensity or the field As
an illustration, according to the Soiuthern Ruralist, Flonda s ihen pen
alihd five million dollars sia y ,ar oa account of prtdutinga soft lpark-
AppPFdltly, from our studies of the sofr pork qnues I It will be possible,
In time. to eliminate It enaterei i "ti materially stores iig the cost
This i one of the very mirortant lines of work that nDeeis to lie cMried
otr The tptriment Stattion $a t own type animals of diftereat breeder
for 0ouandtin strck. Without the Sxssibility of breedif with known
stocr, much of the cserimntal work wiJll he far less valuable.








EXW

47 Nt ,ltm m y a Slwte.-The fitrerimenlt SttUIoi Is a inks
l protIonL It is neceSmary, therefore, to produce as much of the
Seled a.ora fr Ihestoak onm ts own farm as poesmie. The State
Sshou4d aot het feed for its animals when this feed an be economically
Tiasedl r i out wa felds.
Range Cattle mprovement.-By far the largest area in Florida Is at
present employed for production 9f range cattle. These animals are num
bared by the hundreds or thousands Experiments on the range fre irm-
perative. The cattle on the range must be greatly Improved, A specialist
should be employed who can devote all of his time to co-operating with
the owners of range cattle and help them, either through the seiuringr
of purebred bulls, or by improvement of the feeding quality of the range.
Experiments should be started immediately to test out the different
breeds of beef cattle best adapted to varying conditions of the ranges as
well as the grasses best adapted to the widely varying ranges.
Feeding Experiments.-The most advanced farmers in Florida are
beginning to take up the question of steer feeding for high-prlced mar-
lets and production ot the finest types of beef. Older states have apent
millions of dollars and lost many thousands of dollars for the lack of ac-
curate and definite data in regard to the best methods of feeding and
handling animals at the time of feeding. Much of the best fattening for-
age at the present time is utilized in Florida only for the imrrovement
of the soil Steer feeding should be systematized and brought Into a profit-
able line of agriculture With this in view, Florida has many crops pe-
euliar to itself that need to be tested under our climatic condition
Field Crops-The general field crops n Florida are of such vital Its-
portance to the State that it Is necessary to carry out detailed and exten
sive work, not only at the Central Experiment Station hut In valuous
parts of the State, to determine the best methods of crop production One
boy in Florida has raised ovli one hundred bushels of corn annually for
three consecutive year without using fertilizer. The average yield per
acre for corn in Florida i from 14 to 16 bushels. Thwre are many other
standard field crops unon "hubh experiments need to be performed, both
at the station and with leading fameras
Grasses ard Forae.-Such splendid success has been attainud by
the small amount of work that we have done with the introduction and
distribution of better pastule grasses and the development of ipstures
that these need only to he mentkhned Grasses are the foundation for Ith
prosperity of the livestck farmer Already a large number of our prom-
Islng grasses have been introduced from foreln rounstri, and these await
distribution to various parts of lhe State it is nuess ary to ~ taish
these in permanent pastures, e at cilly in north Forida










I* I
-. C *.,. ..



eurment Exilensi -
) Abor on E eriments ...........
(2) Ofte Suplies and Statonery .....


(b) Dairy-Experimental and Field Work.
Salary-
(1) Field Asistant Daryman .........
(2) Dairy Foreman ...............

Current Expenges-
(1) Labor .. ........................
(2) Concentrates, Feeds .........
(3) Traveling Expenses ..... .......


..... 1,000
...... 900




....... 2,500
....... 1,200


.$ 900
* 1,750
S1,"00 $4,160


Permanent Improvement-
(1) Purchase of Holstein, Jersey and Guernsey


(0) Swine-Experimental and Field Work,
Salary-
(1) Swine Husbandman ........... .... .,000
(2) Assistant in Swine Management......... 1,200
(3) Chemical Assistant on Soft Pork and spe-
dairy work ....... ....... 1,00 $6,000


Current Expenses-
(1) Labor ..... ... .. .
(2) Feeds for Foundation Stock...

Permanent Improvement-
(1) Foundation Breeding Stuck .
(2) Stock for Feeding Experimelnts
(3) Selte Shed for Swn .


. ... 720
.,, .... $2,750


..... $9,000

Ip7H


(d) Crops for Dairy and Swine
Salary-
(1) FaFrm Foema -,. .. ....... .
Current Extenses-
(1) Four Laborers at $00 ....... ......... S00
(2 Ocasonal labor ....................... 50
(ii; Fertiizer for 10 Acres Field Cps-..... 1,00







PermDanse ImprovemenlEl-
III Muljes at W(i,
121 Farm Machinery


Rang Cattle Improvement,

(1) Range Ce Cattle Specialist .


Current


(1) Traveling


Expenses-


Expenses ....


Permanent Improvement-


(1) Purchase


of Bulls ......


Feeding Experiments.
Current Expenses-
(1) Feed .......................
(2) Labor for Feeding ........

Permanent Improvement-
(1) Purchase of Steers at $40.
(Revolving Fund)
(2) Ensilage Cutter ............
(3) New Silos .................


Shelter


Shed for Beef Cattle...


*2,500

$1,500

$1,000


.$ 800
, 175 $ 975


............. $ 800


......... 500 $2,350


(f) Field Crors.
Salary-
(1) Assistant .....I .....................


(2) Assistant


Second Year ................


.$2,500
. 900 $3,400


Current Expenses-


Expenses ........


(2) Two Laborers at $600..........
(3) Fertilizer for Field Crops.......

Permanent, Improvement-
(1) Clearing Land for Pasture and
(2) Farm Machinery and Tools ....
(g) Pasture Grasses and Forage Crops.
Salary-


(1) Grass and Forage


.$ 300
. 1,200
. 500 $2,000


Feeds.


..$2,000
... 1,000


Specialist..


(2) Assistant for Second Year
Current Expenses-
(1) Traveling Expenses ....... .


(2) Freight


and Express


900 $3a4


6$ Soo


(3) Labor ....... ......
(4) Seeds arnd Miscellaneoars .....


, *#,, rrJ 300


$2Q6 $70J,46


(6i Btf


6 .1 i1r i
ll 3 I .10'I)


(1) Traveling









S ,- .. I' u *.. il.,- T rL -a i.


fi I lIJun 11 i *L i i Lji I 11 u r. I I j U ,i j ub i i 2'I "
L .. , I N1 A .l I i .I I -- I
S l = I L *'. LLr U 4 L L .. ir l Ift
h = rI" i II ,_I nr I I 1 i., qI .1 1 ." 1.
grde man is needed (or this work to be able to give the small farmers
a wenl as the e large n growers, irtt-hand and esnat InJor4atM in
reard to b adlng this prop .

Salary-
(1) Sugar Cane Speelalist ...................... 300
(2) Field Assistant .,....... ............ 1,00 $4,

Current Expenses-
(1) Traveling E penes . ..... .. .......... $1,500
(3) Fertilizer and Chemitcal .. ..... ...... 2,600
(3) Office and Laboratory Supplies ..... ...... 00
(4) Field Supplies and Labor ....... ... 1000 $5,500 $10,000

V. SOILS AND FERTILIZERS

The investigation in soils and fertilizer made In Florida has been very
meager vwen compared with the necessities and demands for this work.
The sels are so variable, and oven sots that a paper quite uniform are
found to be extremely variable in crop production. The soil problems
are sf complicated and so difficult to work out that it requires the highest
degree of skill The soil conditions maintaining in North Florida vary
mateorlly al d elsentilyd from those occurring in South Florida. It Is,
therefore, necessary to secure the services of traned men to Work on
the problems of each of these sections. The foreoing work relates
especially to the different changes taking place within the soil Itself.
The study of bacteria of the soil. the study of the different chemicals
developed in the soil while the plant Is growing, and the logs or (ood
material from the soil. are problems that the soll chemist must solve,
He must also determine the classification of the soils so bhat his fluding
may be most valuable to the fanrnrs of tae State, as well as the prospect
tire farmer.
The problem of the effect of rettlllzers on the plant growh is one that
has been studied for the Dast DfteeP years by the Expboiment Station,
The results of thoes studies have been found so valuable, especally a
to the effects af bhe dflerent feititzer] on Irish potatoes, sweet posatoe
aod citrus that it Is deemed of highest importance toat this work should
be conttiued,










, i.._. rff.i

i * -- *>* i *


(1f) natt orth sad Wsat Florida ..,, ,.;2.500
(2) Astitant South and Centra Florida ...... 2,500

Current EBpeloese-
(1) TravelUng Expenses ,,.... .... ....... $400
(2) Special Chemfcals and Ferilizer ...... 1.500


(c) EHect of Fertilizers on Plant Growth.
Salary-
(1) Alssistant Chemst ....... ..... ..
Current Expenses-
(1) Experiments in Progress ........
(2) Apparatus and Supplies ......
(3) Traveling Expenses ..........


S.-.1 750
....... 1,750
...... gOo


VI PECAN INVESTIGATIONS

The pecan industry has grown to immense proportions in North Florida.
The sales last year were reported to be worth more than four million
dollars. The money invested in pecan groves must at least be worta
ten times as as much as the annual crop It of highest importance that
the pecan crop be given thorough and special attention A specialist
whose sole duty It is to make general studies of the pecan crop should
be employed He should have two assistants, one who would gine all
of his time to the study of pecan diseases and another to the study or the
pecan insects The specialist himself should devote atl of his time to the
study ot the pecan tree, its fertilization, cultivation, best varieties and
varieties best adapted to certain kinds of soils.

Salaryr-
(1) Specialist . ......... .... .. ..$2,500
(2) Assistant ...... .. ...... .... 1.200 ,3.7


Current Expenses-
(1) Traveling Expenses .................. $q,
(2) FIeld Experiments .......... ..... ....... 1,00

Permanent ImPavetyent
(1) Microscopes, Laboratory Apparatus and Supplies


B
r







r
Lil IL i l. ,l4.L ... A ja.



l i i i -i I f I i -

1 *i ri _. i I I .I i

Iit haS Ta ome o the most profitable resul t that have ben a*ttied .
T i I erlment Station. This work should be continued and e- '
Ir aed s IeD the need for tiS work has more tha doubled in tha last
r: fwyearc.

FIELD CROP AND %tRUCK PATHOLOGY-The study of disease of
track crops has been carried on for more than twenty-five ears, The
results or these studies have been most satisfactory and have Saved many
thousands o dollars to the State. This work should not only be con-
tinued but should be enlarged to Include the pathology of field crop
In some portions ol the State. entire areas of corn are destroyed by an
unknown and unstudied disease known as frenching Hundreds of acres
o corn are lost annually by a sudden witting and dying of te plants
generally thought to be due to a bacterium, Sweet potatoes are subject
to attack of a large number of diseases Careful survey shows that farm
crops worth several millions of dollars are annually destroyed by what are
apparently preventable diseases. The studies on these diseases, there
fore, should be enlarged so as to Include the study of disasa of field
crops as well as truck crops,

DECAY IN TRANSIT.-Th amount of truck and citrus fruit., sweet
potatoes and other farm crops that decay In transit is enormous In a
single year the loss lsusained by the producers of citrus truit alone
amounts to n n mo than a million dollars. By co-operating wi the Fed-
eral Department of Agriculture and the Bureau o Markets, it would be
possible for Florida to reduce this decay in transit quite as much as
California reduced the decay In transit from that State to markets. Thi
will require the services of a specialist throughout the entire yer and
at least three assistants during the most active shipping season running
from November I to June 1 Last year th Aricultural College was
able to save many thousands of dollars to te watermelon groers of
lorida through the employment of a single specialist tcr a period of
three months This work Is new and difficult and at the same time on
of the most profitabe





'4


i n fI l i and- If IIllI
I !, Lp r ;"aL F ar .a L ha I


Ui jll'F *E. .r


Mvrebse
.t.')E. r i n d e Bxphrerletls <
.) b, Oa, nAvocado, Mango and Field
S(4) Laboirtory and Office Supplie ..

(b) Field Crops and Truck.
S Salary-
(1) Professor of Truck Pthology ....
(2) Assistant Plant Pathologist ..
(3) Laboratory Asslstant .... ....


.-...-,, 1,00o
........ 1,BOO
Work,. Me00O
750 s6,t


.,,..- 2,500
,... 1,000


Current Expenes-o
(1) Traveling Expenses .
(2) Field Experiments ......
(8' Laboratory and Office Supp ie, .

(c) Decay in Transit.
Salary-
(1) Chlef Pathologist .. ....... ... .
(2) Three Assistants art time) .

CrNrent Expenses-
(1) Traveling Expenses . ... ..
(2) Supplies, Apparatus, Etc. .... ..


VII ENTOMOLOGY

The value of farm crops and other property destroyed ; in'w cts annal
ly in Florida amonnts to many million dollars, varying from seaso to
season. Fully 50 per cent, of the amount that is destroyed could he tved
without material cost if the proper remedies were known and applied
The work done by our eItomologlsts here in the Experlment Staion is
netting the citrus growers at least three million dollars annually It It
netting the grain producers of the Stato many hundreds of thousands
of dollar With all the work that has been done. it has ey nn means bnn
completed, The Elperlment Station ha carried out enitomologial studied
soc~eN ully for more than 25 years and the annual saving to the State
a result of these studies has been grcfter than the cost o the enire in-
tltution for its etlre tiame. With the enlargement and development of or







U: aLM .m :IjrrtJ n l p.ss LFee H **Las n Lnn r 2 -,21 : B.d sl id .


Elf 1 I. *-m.I Mid L rB: Iis IN I .1I 1 I.I I i
rU L Libu 1 IN L I in.. I u %1 1 1 To I I NEI nl T Nnn.
fe l i .l *1 .I M N In -. i l J .. a I I
,w "i .1

ag Lant r o.l .a... .. .... ,.1 a **g ..
11Z.I.g PWr mornO ot B .rtomology .-. -*,,,*>. ,. t




(. () tntoioIo ls. t for Field Work ad LCeontres 2,500
() sletaornt E ntamologit t por tab rat or... ...I"
(4) Laboratory Assistant (part time) ....... 600 $S,400


Current Expenses-
(a) General
(1) Correspondece and Office Work
(2) Office Suppile .

(b) Citrus and Tropical Fruit Pest Wolk
(3) Field Work, Spraying and Controe
(4) introduction Benetfial iasects .
(6) Traveling Exenses ...

(c) Farm Crop Pest Work.
(6) Chemicals and Other Supiesi i
7) Labor n Field .......
(8) Chemicals and FieIld Supplies

(d) Truck Pest Work
(9) Root Knot Experiments
(10) Insects .- ,,- -
(11) Chettllcals and Supphe ...
(12) Triveling Espeiis .s .

(e) Camihor Thrips
(13) Clleiciel aI, Supplies and Labor .. .
(14) Traveling Epeise .. ......

(t) Decidnuous Fruit Pet Work
(151 Labor aad FlId Spple ... ...
(1i) Traveling Expese .. ...












than Real b*r.ed EL, JiMI.IL. wu. .1 me 0 WS o.I,
,rn 90 1 of a rL'.g F m .1q j.' I z I. P~ly IdLEM C.' 1 ii'
*l *a'IPLWrt lr 4 r *w:. l~ .~n~' b pIts. *1 *L' .11 *U zrIIdi.W't In
OId **. LI -d !I ..;. ...r *L. Ad 'I EAS d-00 SI
n" 1. iLr IhI frh P*Pr I L.j'J 11LML.LO 3 .... :a
*I r.. LL I. I; ka 04 U L.a
-I 1. *iI I I L. 'o. I A
a. a..,I. r -. *.a I L:. .r -JrL
L IL" 1 1 I 1 1 1r 111&r I r


(1) Po amI dOreb at Bog .3A 5




Permanent Im roVlment-
(10) Repaia and BsildIng...... -........ ..0 ...


X, EXPERIMENETr STATION IBRAL .

The library Is a.n essential department t the hxpieriment Station. 1 |
la hter hat the bulletins from all other experiment Statiowu, bBuiletI
rnm tde '. Department of Agriculture. ja Well as butletu tfrom E-1
:eriment Stations located all over the world, are collected, clssfed an|
cetalogued, so tha tIey are limmeddteEy a latmbe t0. the Wrbker o the
ExPerlment Stat~it, In addition to the workers aI the A tricatral Col-
le a tha te dents Ih the colle flead tb adi extr~ e lay idle lterernce
II rary. Our library has not ony been used Wy peoig ntothd utate bt
has bea u beoudel by people trom other utiets a far r Japan and
-. -" ..1
Salary -


: ... .. ie C.. . .......fr . ..*.. .: '*" |









**il Binllma4L bWi ia l4 action bill
g, ravulUna "IIFsr nd- Iab
IlI fll-l iarugl rIa A'L.1-,a 60 |all2R 13 iL




-U K Ellar je 1 I I ir n I ..I I i I i T i f _ai,
r-1l, Ir- r '-, L psal j *ju- I U I i 'I FLL Mrj Us *I
SI I I III I. I I f F IL L I 1 I

s& tha. tKee i tNer titon Is W b nl.th.,e


inCptfSla n t afr t er oal w hi heraora. sepaugg |
'^Etm 40trit to tart long time eaperioentte ls, ail#i
arely a eacterimet is diffluelt to anrmy ,tW heti elr
:* dve to the aw ner ft the igroe. eTudiitl aoIr Ea n m N NE I
tetb be ar te aptheof expr1mlinth beat will onedt a f 4,l l"
fare1lg as the St ere Ma a whole tie taae shoih hear thiae aWne
*au the efliens the ienefit of the emalts of thi work for aiattig mrt
Spehtimente it cannott be foredto Wahich Of the ermt .a b
thl tree gretly and whtei ill be curious. It is lhae ble to tef ell
or hman whether a newt sprayig mixatMe for etete willn t be seriously
deotrimei l tho the atrue tree Ther ae emay rtenula o aiprap .-
Wmaterlals that were at one time popular which had N be abandoned e.
tMues ato the unfiovrable effect on tUS tree wvni uisK to A "nitadai&l
time. Ta flirtiltr experiments it annot be foretold wEIt N atitil
o l seriously harmful to the tree. New and cheer ftert lfa es wu manco-
tbntliy coming on the muhet, it bis iloasl to iar beqrorlizd *hth~
tOi m ll he benefcial or harmful whIP Unid on Florilda soU. widita. BT
are many oIther questions that the State mast settle on Its own Apr
and not depend upon the gratuity of movinate ad tirbter gfrcdsi oiiut s
work The State should generously support thls Branch Sat.'nhi
Ia Sfo il primary bdecf the eerientation, pon ta ttre, ji i*

Whe e SWate bec0me1 mtrea wealthy it will be ealeaing tosiott N I
branl epeditenu t stati in variouss part h o e Sbtt b Tis be th
eonomklet and mstiatory way o carrying out brald
Sat The Bxperhiment Statint hEdditN
totite maM the branch sBtation heir b1andAn "r asa T
, lma M tifl needed to brnhg Nal a ep I i t
.::, . ^ ^ *' r
:I,~":E%
.% A.. .







L.*








(Y) onuway and Breeding ExpeimeAt. ....
(a) Spraepg Experimenr .... ..... 4 100
(fl Ferwlaer ixulermenbta ..............., 4 $5.350

Permanent I improve
(1) Superlntant t's outage .... ..... .. $8000
(2) Well and Water Supply ......... .... 750
(9) Combination Barn and Tool Shed ....... 50
(4) One Mule ..... ......... .............. 150
(6) Plows, Harness and Tools ............... 150
(6) Fenolng Cleared Lands and Groves..... 400
(7) Laborattory Building ....- .. ........$3,500 $8.300 $15,650

Total Experimental and Field Work $ 198,70
Less Govern ment Funds . .3.. 0,000

Total Annual State Appropriatioo for Ex-
perlment Station .. ........... e,70
TO MATCH FEDERAL AID FOR COUNTY AND HOME DEMONSTRA.
TION AGENTS COOPERATIVE DEMONSTRATION IN AGRI-
CULTURE AND HOME ECONOMICS,
For carrying on work co-operativfly between the Agricultural College,
Woman's College and Negro College through County Agents, Home Des-
onstration Agents, Boys' and rl' Club Wor and Specialist
The Smith-Lover Congressionat Act appropriates approxlrmatey $49,000
for the fiscal ear beginnIng July 1, 1921. provided Flrltda approrriates
$39,000 as an offset, and for the fiscal year beginning July 192, ap-
proximately $54.000, provided Florida appropriates $44.500, (The exs
amount is determined by the proporhon of nrral poipuatlon of Plorida
bears to the total rural population of the United State as Shown by
each United Staes census),
The funds arc expended under the rules and reBlations of the United
States Department of Agriculture and In accordan6 with the act of the
i'lorida Legislature approved May 25, 1914.

Amount Needed July 1. 1921 ... ....... $ *
Amount Needed July 1, 1923. ... .... .. 44.5

Total for Blennium ... ...... $1I











: ;i'- rr I *, -* r


- EXPEBrn T STATION


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

John M. Scott Vice Director.


L~R T to dent!


I bave the honor to submit herewith the report or the Expernment Sta-
tion for te biennium closing June 30. 1920.
It is evident from the requests that come to the Experiment Sttion
that the people of the State are taking a more active Interest In the
Experiment Station ad tae work it is doing
This also indicates that they have confidence In the work of the Ex.
Deriment Station We are lad to see this. A large part of the world's
business is done on confidence As soon as people lose confidence,
business sihaps and the result is hard times
The same principle holds true in experimental work. It is mch
easier to do the work, and much more work can be accomplished when
the workers realize that thle people of the State have Intorest In their
work.
The following $Ia list of the bulletins published during the period
covered by this report

Total
No Tithe edition, Pages. Pages
140 Some Diseases of the Fi ........ ,000 12 450.000
150 Florida Citis Diseases .... .. ..... 20,000 98 1,960,00
151 Florida Truck and Garden Insects .. 00 102 816,000
152 Velvet Beau Varieties ....... 20000 32 440.000
153 Napier and Merker Grass 20,000 16 320,000
164 Cfriu Fertilizer Experiments . 15,240 4 731.620
165 Prussic Adid in dSratam ..e 13,400 8 107,200
15 Sweet Potato Fertilzer Experitmnts. 10,23 8 21,784
I57 Soft Pork Studies .. ... ...-.. 10,000 8 30,000

131,863 322 4,986,504

In addition to to e above, twenty-seven pires bulletin have also been
published.


I




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs