PAGE 1

and restrooms, and made repairs to the Smith Mound boardwalk. Perhaps it was the homemade cookies provided by sta member Linda He ner, or perhaps it was the good company, that kept these folks smiling, singing, and having a good time all while making a signi cant contribution and improving the Trail experience for our visitors. Volunteers are needed on a daily basis to keep the butter y garden lush, vegetation on the mounds tamed, our signage looking spi y, our bookstore open, and our visitors informed. Interested? Call Cindy at 239-283-2157, she will put you to work and be sure you have good time too!Getting Ready for the SeasonSta and volunteers have been active in recent weeks with vegetation clearing, mulching, and repairs to buildings and walkways in anticipation of the many hundreds of visitors who visit Pineland each year, especially from January to April. School tours have already begun, and visitors are increasingly seen at the Calusa Heritage Trail, or dropping in to tour the newly rehabilitated Ruby Gill House. A number of exciting special events are planned, including a Winter Solstice Celebration Cruise on the evening of December 21st, a lecture on sharks by Dr. Charles OConnor on January 19th, and of course our annual Calusa Heritage Day, this year scheduled for Saturday, March 12th. In addition to the special events, Debbie Zwetsch o ers her popular yoga class at 6:30 p.m. every Wednesday at the Ruby Gill House, and we will soon resume guided tours of the Calusa Heritage Trail every Wednesday and Saturday from January through April, beginning at 10:00 a.m. New books and clothing have been added to the book and gift shop at the Calusa Heritage Trail, so consider doing some of your holiday shopping early when you next decide you are ready for a walk along the Trail on a crisp fall day. There are always birds and other animals to see, and the views of Pine Island Sound from the top of a 30-foothigh mound are spectacular.September 4: Spruce Up Day at the TrailSweltering morning heat was no match for hardworking volunteers who came out on Saturday, September 4 to Spruce Up at the Calusa Heritage Trail. Many thanks go to Forestry Resources, Inc. for the donation of mulch, and to over twenty volunteers who beauti ed the parking lot, tackled exotic vegetation, cleaned the classroom Randell Center Looks Forward to Active YearSite and Buildings Spruced Up, Ready to Welcome Visitorsby Cindy Bear and Bill Marquardt Friends of the Randell Research Center Time is taking a continued on page 4

PAGE 2

kitchen waste. They moved out of the small house into an adjacent stilt house in 1980. Pine Island resident Phyllis Davis, a neighbor and friend, fondly recalls Pat as a gracious and kind woman with a sense of history, of ecology, of taking care of a special place, and of learning from that place. With a ection, she notes that Pats Pineland wardrobe consisted of Levi slacks, canvas shoes and a straw hat, and can still picture Pat tending the vegetable garden and picking fruit from trees and then sharing the bounty with friends and neighbors. Phyllis also recalls Pats love and a ection for her pets, especially her beloved Labrador retrievers. An artist, writer, and poet at heart, Pat was inspired by the natural landscape and created many written works, needle points, paintings, and ink drawings in tribute to the area. Her Original Cracker Postcards, designed in the late 1980s, were created to share the special nature of Floridas environment, and to evoke in others the captivation she felt for its inhabitants. Sets of the cards were donated to the Pine Island library for sale in a successful fundraising project. Family and friends still cherish hand-drawn cards created by Pat for holidays and birthdays, including A recent inquiry to our web site asked for information on the Pineland community. In newsletters Volume 8, No. 3 through Volume 9, No. 3, Bill Marquardt chronicled our site history from the 1900s to present. We follow now with a series of biographies of people who have made a particularly signi cant impact on our recent history, beginning with Patricia (Pat) Crandon Randell. Pat and her husband, Colonel Donald (Don) Randell, donated approximately 56 acres of their Pineland property to the University of Florida Foundation in 1994, setting the stage for the development of the Calusa Heritage Trail and the continuation of archaeological studies at the Pineland site complex.Patricia (Pat) Crandon was born in Miami, Florida, at the start of the Roaring Twenties on February 12, 1920. Her father, Charles Henry Crandon, a Dade County, Florida, Commissioner from 1929 to 1949, was admired for negotiating, prior to WWII, the gift of over 800 acres of land on Biscayne Key, Miami, to the county for preservation. A key piece of the negotiation was Commissioner Crandons agreement that the county would build a causeway to the island. To nance the causeway Crandon persuaded the DuPont family advisor and nancier Ed Ball to purchase $6 million of bonds. The Rickenbacker Causeway to this day connects Miami to Crandon Park and Key Biscayne. Pats mother, Agnes Conoly Crandon, was born in Valdosta, Georgia and was both college-educated and a concert pianist. Pat grew up in Coral Gables, Florida, with one brother, Philip Howland Crandon, thirteen years her junior. She attended Converse College in South Carolina. In 1940, at the age of 20, Pat moved to New York City and became a successful fashion model working with the prestigious Conover Agency. The Conover Cover Girls, as they were known, included the likes of Jane Adams and Eileen Ford. While working in New York, Pat lived in a womens hotel where men were not permitted above the rst oor and so gathered in the greeting room awaiting their dates. It was in this greeting room that Pat met thirty-twoyear-old Donald Randell, a 1932 graduate of Princeton University in Economic Geology and an army artillery o cer. The couple married in 1941 and moved to New Jersey in 1946 following Dons combat tour of duty with Pattons army in Europe. Don then worked on Wall Street as an investment analyst. The Randells son, Crandon, was born just prior to Pearl Harbor, followed two years later by daughter Deborah and Frederick (Ricky) in 1948. The family spent twenty-two years in New Jersey and often visited Patricias family in Coral Gables, Florida. In September, 1967, Pat and Don drove from New Jersey with their youngest son, Frederick, to Pineland, Florida, and later chose the area as their retirement spot. Ricky, now 62, remembers the land being grown over, with tall weeds covering the mounds and the old house being without running water. The Randells worked the land, transforming it into the Rocking R Ranch, with an orange grove, cattle, garden, and a compost pile for Ode to Pat: A Biography of Patricia Crandon Randellby Cindy Bear 2

PAGE 3

those Pat sent from the animals to her grandchildren. By the 1970s, Pat and Don had pieced together properties that included some of the best preserved and most signi cant archaeological resources in southwest Florida, including major portions of the Pineland complex and Josslyn Island. Their rst donation of land honoring the importance of the area came when they donated land, now known as the Pineland Historic Marker, to Lee County in the 1970s. Although she cherished the tranquility of Pineland, Pat joined with her husband in welcoming archaeologists to their property, and funding excavations both at Josslyn Island and Pineland. It was during the Year of the Indian events in 1990 and 1992 that they hosted thousands of visitors, including 5,400 schoolchildren, at excavations taking place literally in their backyard. Patricia Randell passed away in 2002. She will be remembered for her role in preserving Pineland and the spirit of giving that she embodied. In her honor, the next time you nd yourself walking at Pineland, pause for a moment, remember her love for the place, and craft your own verses to her poem Ode to Pineland which began, There once was a place known to me, a fairy-tale spot by the sea A tting tribute it would be, one that would likely bring her a smile. And, if you choose, send your verses to us and well publish them here in future newsletters in her honor.Thanks to Ricky Randell, Crandon Randell, Debbie Randell, Phyllis Davis, and Michaela Valenti, who helped put this article together. Winter Solstice Full Moon Cruise with Performance by Flutist Kat EppleDecember 21, 2010, departing at 7:30 p.m. from Captiva Island (Proceeds bene t the Randell Research Center!)Flute music will ll the air while the moon and stars paint the night sky during a Captiva Cruises voyage, to bene t the RRC, on Tuesday, December 21, 2010, the winter solstice. Interpretive narratives about the solstice, planets, and stars will be interspersed with a performance by Kat Epple, Emmy Award winning and Grammy nominated utist and composer. Kat has amassed a unique collection of utes from cultures around the world, which she features in her performances. Her music has been Dont Miss These Special Events!described as celestial, yet earthly, primeval, and innovative. Kat created the music for the Calusa documentary The Domain of the Calusa, and for the dance performance Calusa with the David Parsons Dance Company. Comple menting Kats performance will be information about the solstice, celestial facts, and identi cation of night sky features, provided by Richard Finkle, Environmental Educator for Captiva Cruises. Guests will depart aboard the Lady Chadwick from McCarthys Marina on Captiva at 7:30 p.m., cruise the waters of Pine Island Sound, and return to the dock at 9:30 p.m. The cost of $65/ person includes light hors doeuvres, complimentary wine, and a full-service cash bar. Reservations are required and may be obtained by calling Captiva Cruises at 239-472-5300. Please join us for what will surely be a magical evening.Shark! : A Presentation by Charles OConnorJanuary 19, 2011, 6:30 to 8:00 PM at the Classroom, Calusa Heritage Trail, Pineland Admission $5 per person.Shark! will explore the natural history of sharks, human and shark interactions, and fossilized teeth, with a special focus on (Carcharocles) Megalodon sharks. Diet, dimensions, tooth structure, evolution, and demise will be explored in this lively and colorful presentation. Megalodon was arguably the formidable carnivore ever to have existed. It was a super-predator and probably reached lengths of 70 feet, with teeth that surpassed 7 inches in length. It indisputably had the greatest bite force continued on page 83

PAGE 4

the guide, a mobile application of the guide, and other digital solutions in order to expand the reach of the VCB around the world. According to VCB Executive Director Tamara Pigott, Lonely Planet is the perfect global marketing partner for Lee County because of its commitment to sustainability and responsible, respective travel, and shared philosophies in protecting and preserving beaches and natural resources. The Calusa Heritage Trail, Randell Research Center, will be among the visitor sites featured in part because of our commitment to teach as we learn. We were visited by a Lonely Planet lm crew on October 15. Francisco Aliwalas, Lonely Planet TV Producer, and his crew, hiked the trails lming the vistas and signage while remarking about how much they learned during their brief visit. We appreciate the support of the VCB and look forward to more visitors to the trail as a result of this partnership. 4October 15: Calusa Heritage Trail lmed for Lonely Planet Guide ProjectThe Lee County Visitor and Convention Bureau (VCB) has announced a new partner ship with Lonely Planet, the worlds largest travel publisher, to create a customized destination guidebook, a digital online version of New Cards and Books in the Calusa Heritage Trail Store (All proceeds bene t programs of the Randell Research Center.) Pat Randells Original Cracker CardsWith images provided by her daughter, Deborah Randell, weve recreated four of Pat Randells Original Cracker Postcards. The images are touching in their depiction of the beauty and spirit of Pine Island. Guy LaBree: Barefoot Artist of the Florida Seminoles, by Carol Mahler, University Press of FloridaCarol Mahlers eye-catching new book showcases 42 paintings by Guy LaBree which are all from the Seminole point-of-view. She describes her accompanying essays as biographies of the images because they explain the in-depth research necessary for authentic details. Currently a resident of Arcadia, LaBree grew up near the Dania (Hollywood) Seminole reservation where his friendship with Seminole tribe members nurtured his interest in Seminole tradition, especially the legends and mythology. Two of LaBrees works hang in the Smithsonian Institutions National Museum of the American Indian, and former Chief James Billie is among his most proli c and shared philosophies in protecting and preserving beaches and natural resources. Trail, Randell Research Center, will be among the visitor sites featured in part because of our commitment to teach as we learn. We were visited by a Lonely Planet lm crew on October 15. Francisco Aliwalas, Lonely Planet TV Producer, and his crew, hiked the trails lming the vistas and signage while remarking about how much they learned during their brief visit. We appreciate the support of the VCB and look forward Active Year continued from page 1

PAGE 5

Featured Sites allow one to learn about the ora and fauna of the area, about the Indian people emphasized at the site, and to hear interviews with archaeologists, historians, and educators. Stunning illustrations depicting Floridas earliest inhabitants provide background on each page and the crisp, exciting photographs are the next best thing to being there. Teachers in parti cular will nd the site useful for lesson plans, student computer time, and virtual eld trips. how this collection of essays will have wide appeal to a variety of readers. Over 100 essays are presented by the editors and include some of the best nature writers and observers of the natural world ever assembled in one book. The essays trace the origins of tarpon shing from 1885 and have been collected by the editors for decades. While the big sh is the focus, book reviewer John Fitch, a contributor to the highly regarded Southwest Floridas Wetland Wilderness, writes, A book that anyone with an interest in Floridas history, natural history, literary history, love of nature, love of shing, sense of adventure, or interest in the real Florida should purchase and read.Trail of Floridas Indian Heritage Website UpdatedIf youve wondered how to nd the Miami Circle, thought about visiting the Ah-Tah-Thi-Ki Museum but werent sure of the hours, or would simply like to add to your understanding of Floridas past, then the updated website of the Trail of Floridas Indian Heritage should be among your book marks. Found at www.trailo oridasindianheritage.org, the site highlights 36 visitor sites, including the Calusa Heritage Trail at Randell Research Center. From the trail map, the virtual tourist links directly to the website of the organization, making it the most comprehensive directory to Florida cultural heritage visitor sites. Seven collectors. This book provides a remarkable opportunity to see his work and explore the Seminole with the intimacy of an artist. Author Carol Mahler will be on hand at Calusa Heritage Day on March 12 to sign copies of her book and to share essays from her work.Randy Wayne Whites Ultimate Tarpon Book: The Birth of Big Game Fishing, edited by Randy Wayne White and Carlene Fredericka Brennen, University Press of FloridaAnyone who has seen a tarpon roll can catch tarpon fever and understand 5 New and Renewing Friends of the RRC(Please let us know of any errors or omissions. Thank you for your support.)Supporting Members ($1,000-$4,999) Gretchen & John Coyle Deborah & Elmer WheelerContributing Members ($100-499) John Cauthen Don Cyzewski Mary Ann Hight Thomas McIntosh Joan McMahan Anne Reynolds Sabal Trust Company John & Glenda Sirmans Randal L. Walker Patty Jo Watson Rob & Phyllis WellsFamily MembersFred Browne Bill & Rosemarie Hammond Barbara & Carl Harcourt Phyllis & Peter Kolianos Herb SeidelIndividual MembersDavid Amico Beverly Brazill Boca Grande Historical Society Lois E. Clarke Judith DAgostino Marc & Jill Fontaine Brenda Johnson Michael Moseley Gina Poppell William G. Vernetson

PAGE 6

DearFriend,You are cordially invited to join, or renew your membership in, the RRCs support society, Friends of the Randell Research Center. All Friends of the RRC receive a quarterly newsletter and free admission to the Calusa Heritage Trail at Pineland. Supporters at higher levels are entitled to discounts on our books and merchandise, advance notice of programs, and special recognition. Your continuing support is vital to our mission. It means more research, more education, and continued site improvements at the Randell Research Center. Thank you.Sincerely, William H. Marquardt Director Randell Research CenterPlease check the membership level you prefer, and send this form with your check payable to U. F. Foundation, to: December 2010 Friends of the Randell Research Center Permanent Address ___________________________________________________________ Name ___________________________________________________________ Address ___________________________________________________________ City / State / Zipcode Seasonal Address (so we can send you your newsletter while you are away) ___________________________________________________________ Name ___________________________________________________________ Address ___________________________________________________________ City / State / Zipcode Use my seasonal address from ___________ to___________. (date) (date) quarterly Newsletter and free admission to Calusa Heritage Trail The above + advance notice and 10% discount on childrens programs Contributor ($100-$499): The above + annual honor roll listing in newsletter + 20% discount on RRC publications and merchandise The above + invitation to annual Directors tour and reception Supporter ($1,000-$4,999): The above + listing on annual donor plaque at Pineland site ($20,000-$99,999), and Patrons ($100,000 and above) receive all of the above + complimentary RRC publications and special brie ngs from the Director.The Randell Research Center is a program of the Florida Museum of Natural History, University of Florida. Photo by A. Bell.

PAGE 7

Books, Videos, Cards, and RRC Gear BOOKS ON SOUTHWEST FLORIDAS ARCHAEOLOGY & HISTORYNUMBER ORDERED COSTThe Calusa and Their Legacy: South Florida People and Their Environments by Darcie A. MacMahon and William H. Marquardt, U. Press of Florida, hardcover, $39.95 $ Sharks and Shark Products in Prehistoric South Florida by Laura Kozuch, Monograph 2, softcover, $5.00 $ The Archaeology of Useppa Island edited by William H. Marquardt, Monograph 3, hardcover $35.00, softcover $20.00 $ New Words, Old Songs: Understanding the Lives of Ancient Peoples in Southwest Florida Through Archaeology by Charles Blanchard, illustrated by Merald Clark, hardcover $19.95, softcover $9.95 $ Fisherfolk of Charlotte Harbor, Florida by Robert F. Edic, hardcover, $35.00 $ Floridas First People by Robin Brown, Pineapple Press, hardcover, $29.95 $ Missions to the Calusa by John H. Hann, U. Press of Florida, hardcover, $35.00 $ Floridas Indians by Jerald T. Milanich, U. Press of Florida, softcover, $19.95 $ Archaeology of Precolumbian Florida by Jerald T. Milanich, U. Press of Florida, softcover, $27.95 $ by Carol Mahler, U. Press of Florida, hardcover, $34.95 $ edited by Randy Wayne White and Carlene Fredericka Brennen. U. Press of Florida, hardcover, $34.95 $ I-Land: At the Edge of Civilization by Roothee Gabay, a part-fantasy, part-historical novel based in the Calusa domain, PublishAmerica Books, $14.95 $ Song of the Tides by Tom Joseph, a historical novel about the Calusa, U. of Alabama Press, $19.95 $ Eyes of the Calusa by Holly Moulder, a historical novel for young readers, winner of the silver medal in young adult ction from the Florida Publishers Association, White Pelican Press, $8.95 $ The Crafts of Floridas First People by Robin Brown, a step-by-step guide to making Florida Indian tools and containers (for ages 10 and up), Pineapple Press, softcover, $9.95 $CALUSA POSTCARDS$ Images from the Calusa Heritage Trail Art by Merald Clark, 4-x-6 postcards, full-color, set of 11 cards, $4.50 $AWARD-WINNING DOCUMENTARIES$ The Domain of the Calusa: Archaeology and Adventure in the Discovery of South Floridas Past DVD video, $12.95 $ The Wild Heart of Florida, Wild Alachua) DVD video, $24.95 $RANDELL RESEARCH CENTER GEAR$ RRC logo hat $20.00 $ RRC logo short-sleeve cotton sta shirt Specify size (S, M, L, XL) and color (cream or blue-denim) $35.00 $ RRC logo short-sleeve cotton T-shirt Specify Adult size (S, M, L, XL) $15.00 / Specify Child size (XS, S, M) $12.00 $ RRC logo tote bag $10.00 $ RRC logo co ee mug $10.00 + + $To place order, make check payable to U.F. Foundation and mail to: Randell Research Center PO Box 608 Pineland, FL 33945. Questions? 239-283-2157 E-mail: randellcenter2@rancenter.comcastbiz.net Total for items ordered:Friends of the RRC who give at the $100 level or above may deduct 20% Discount: Florida residents add sales tax: Shipping: Add $3.50 for rst item, $0.50 for each additional item: TOTAL: Name (please print): ___________________________________________________ Mailing address (please print): ____________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________ Zip code (please print): __________________________________________________

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Randell Research Center PO Box 608 Pineland, FL 33945-0608 Forwarding Service Requested Where Has Your Hat Traveled? RRC staff member Cindy Bear visited Ecuador this summer and found her RRC hat, and its logo, to be a bridge between herself and the many people she encountered. Wearing the hat in this picture is Natalie Gualinga. Natalies father, Don Orlando Gualinga, is credited with the vision and negotiations that made the Sani Lodge the rst in the Ecuadorian Amazon Basin to be owned and operated by the Santa Isla communa whose members are part of the indigenous ethnic group, the Kichwa. Don Orlando is also shaman of the Sani Isla communa. His wisdom is evident in Natalie, who Cindy describes as gleefully pointing out wildlife, climbing cocoa trees to share fruit, and proudly reciting the English alphabet after showing o her Spanish and Quechuan language knowledge. If youve got a photo of your hat traveling the world, please send it, and your travel story to us. We would like to feature them in upcoming newsletters. You can email your information to Cindy at cbear@u .edu. Special Events of any known animal, up to 18 tons. Megalodon was most likely homoeothermic (erroneously termed warm blooded), preyed on other large sh and marine mammals, and populated ancient oceans across the globe. The shallow seas covering prehistoric Florida most likely provided a birthing/ nursery area, because mostly smallto medium-sized teeth are discovered here. Larger teeth are found on the coastlines of the Carolinas and Georgia and elsewhere in the world. A nutrientrich upwelling ocean current may have nourished the dense prey food web needed to support Megalodons dietary needs. Dr. Charles OConnor is a native Floridian, an amateur paleontologist, and was an assistant in the Vertebrate Paleontology Laboratory at the Florida Museum of Natural History in Gainesville, one of the nations premier Pleistocene fossil collections. He received the Southwest Florida Audubon Educator of the Year award, was a Golden Apple Teaching Award nalist, 2009 Environmental Teacher of the Year, and has presented hundreds of fossil talks to schools, fossil clubs, and community groups for over 13 years. He is currently vice president of the Southwest Florida Fossil Club and Education Chair for the Friends of Six Mile Slough Preserve. Send questions or comments to: Telephone: Email: Website: RRC NewsEditor: Writers: Production: Gift Shop & Tour Information:


Friends of the Randell Research Center
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00090510/00036
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Title: Friends of the Randell Research Center
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: Randell Research Center, Florida Museum of Natural History, University of Florida
Publisher: Randell Research Center, Florida Museum of Natural History, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Pineland, Fla.
Publication Date: December 2010
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Friends of the
Randell Research Center


December 2010 Vol. 9, No. 4


Randell Center Looks
Forward to Active Year


Site and Buildings Spruced Up, Ready to
Welcome Visitors

by Cindy Bear and Bill Marquardt


Getting Ready for the Season
StaFFand volunteers have been active in recent weeks with
vegetation clearing, mulching, and repairs to buildings and
walkways in anticipation oFthe many hundreds oFvisitors
who visit Pineland each year, especially From January to April.
School tours have already begun, and visitors are increasingly
seen at the Calusa Heritage Trail, or dropping in to tour the
newly rehabilitated Ruby Gill House.
A number oFexciting special events are planned, including a
WinterSolstice Celebration Cruise on the evening oF
December 21st, a lecture on sharks by Dr. Charles O'Connor
on January 19th, and oFcourse our annual Calusa
Heritage Day, this year scheduled For Saturday, March 12th.
In addition to the special events, Debbie Zwetsch offers her
popularyoga class at 6:30 p.m. every Wednesday at the Ruby
Gill House, and we will soon resume guided tours oFthe
Calusa Heritage Trail every Wednesday and Saturday From
January through April, beginning at 10:00 a.m.
New books and clothing have been added to the book and
giFt shop at the Calusa Heritage Trail, so consider doing some
oFyour holiday shopping early when you next decide you are
ready For a walk along the Trail on a crisp Fall day. There are
always birds and other animals to
see, and the views oFPine Island
Sound From the top oFa 30-Foot-
high mound are spectacular.

September 4: Spruce Up Day -
at the Trail
Sweltering morning heat was no
match For hardworking volunteers
who came out on Saturday,
September to Spruce Up at the
Calusa Heritage Trail. Many thanks
go to Forestry Resources, Inc. For
the donation oFmulch, and to over
twenty volunteers who beautiRed
the parking lot, tackled exotic
vegetation, cleaned the classroom


A spreading strangler ig receives a trim courtesy oF
Dan England. (Photo by C. O'Connor.)

and restrooms, and made repairs to the Smith Mound
boardwalk. Perhaps it was the homemade cookies provided
by staffmember Linda Heffner, or perhaps it was the good
company, that kept these Folks smiling, singing, and having a
good time all while making a signiRcant contribution and
improving the Trail experience For ourvisitors.
Volunteers are needed on a daily basis to keep the butterfly
garden lush, vegetation on the mounds tamed, oursignage
looking spifFy, our bookstore open, and ourvisitors inFormed.
Interested? Call Cindy at 239-283-2157, she will put you to
work and be sure you have good time too!
continued on page 4


Time is taking a
toll on the Smith
Mound Boardwalk.
Lee Tapager, Patrick
Rennert, Charles
O'Connor (not pic-
tured), and Mark
Chargois completed
a temporary repair;
however, a complete
replacement will be
required in the near
Future. Sponsorship
ofthe boardwalk
repair is available by
contacting Cindy Bear
or Bill Marquardt.
(Photo by C. O'Connor.)








Ode to Pat: A Biography of
Patricia Crandon Randell

by Cindy Bear


A recent inquiry to our web site asked
For information on the Pineland commu-
nity. In newsletters Volume 8, No. 3
through Volume 9, No. 3, Bill Marquardt
chronicled our site history From the
1900s to present. We Follow now with a
series oFbiographies oFpeople who have
made a particularly significant impact on
our recent history, beginning with Patricia
(Pat) Crandon Randell. Pat and her
husband, Colonel Donald (Don) Randell,
donated approximately 56 acres oFtheir
Pineland property to the University oF
Florida Foundation in 1994, setting the
stage For the development ofthe Calusa
Heritage Trail and the continuation oF
archaeological studies at the Pineland
site complex.
Patricia (Pat) Crandon was born in
Miami, Florida, at the start oFthe
"Roaring Twenties" on February 12,
1920. Her Father, Charles Henry
Crandon, a Dade County, Florida,
Commissioner From 1929 to 1949, was
admired Fornegotiating, prior to WWII,
the gift oFover 800 acres oFland on
Biscayne Key, Miami, to the county For
preservation. A key piece oFthe negotia-
tion was Commissioner Crandon's


Pat Randell in 1958, modeling For a
Dr. Pepper soft drink advertisement.


agreement that the county would build a
causeway to the island.To Anance the
causeway Crandon persuaded the
DuPont Family advisor and Fnancier Ed
Ball to purchase $6 million oFbonds. The
RickenbackerCauseway to this day
connects Miami to Crandon Park and
Key Biscayne. Pat's mother, Agnes
Conoly Crandon, was born in Valdosta,
Georgia and was both college-educated
and a concert pianist.
Pat grew up in Coral Gables, Florida,
with one brother, Philip Howland
Crandon, thirteen years herjunior. She
attended Converse College in South
Carolina. In 1940, at the age oF20, Pat
moved to New York City and became a
successFul Fashion model working with
the prestigious ConoverAgency. The
"Conover Cover Girls," as they were
known, included the likes oFJane Adams
and Eileen Ford. While working in New
York, Pat lived in a women's hotel where
men were not permitted above the Rrst
Floor and so gathered in the greeting
room awaiting their dates. Itwas in this
greeting room that Pat met thirty-two-
year-old Donald Randell, a 1932 gradu-
ate oFPrinceton University in Economic
Geology and an army artillery oFRcer. The
couple married in 1941 and moved to
New Jersey in 1946 Following Don's
combat tour oFduty with Patton's army
in Europe. Don then worked on Wall
Street as an investment analyst.
The Randells' son, Crandon, was born
just prior to Pearl Harbor, Followed two
years later by daughter Deborah and
Frederick (Ricky) in 1948. The Family
spent twenty-two years in New Jersey
and often visited Patricia's Family in
Coral Gables, Florida. In September,
1967, Pat and Don drove From New
Jersey with their youngest son,
Frederick, to Pineland, Florida, and
later chose the area as their retirement
spot. Ricky, now 62, remembers the
land being grown over, with tall weeds
covering the mounds and the old house
being without running water. The Randells
worked the land, transForming it into the
"Rocking R Ranch,' with an orange grove,
cattle, garden, and a compost pile For


.....


Patricia Crandon in the early 1940s.
Reprinted with permission From Pine
Island, Mary Kay Stevens. Available
From the publisher online at www.
arcadiapublishing.com, by calling
888-313-2665, or at the Calusa
Heritage Trail.

kitchen waste. They moved out oFthe
small house into an adjacent stilt house
in 1980.
Pine Island resident Phyllis Davis, a
neighbor and Friend, Fondly recalls Pat
as a "gracious and kind" woman with a
"sense oFhistory, oFecology, oFtaking
care oFa special place, and oFlearning
From that place." With aFFection, she
notes that Pat's Pineland wardrobe
consisted oF"Levi slacks, canvas shoes
and a straw hat," and can still picture
Pat tending the vegetable garden and
picking Fruit From trees and then sharing
the bounty with Friends and neighbors.
Phyllis also recalls Pat's love and aFFec-
tion For her pets, especially her beloved
Labrador retrievers.
An artist, writer, and poet at heart,
Pat was inspired by the natural land-
scape and created many written works,
needle points, paintings, and ink drawings
in tribute to the area. Her "Original
Cracker Postcards," designed in the
late 1980s, were created to share the
special nature oFFlorida's environment,
and to evoke in others the captivation
she Felt For its inhabitants. Sets oFthe
cards were donated to the Pine Island
library Forsale in a successFul Fund-
raising project. Family and Friends still
cherish hand-drawn cards created by
Pat For holidays and birthdays, including


I~


























those Pat sent "From the animals" to her donated land, now known as the


grandchildren.
By the 1970s, Pat and Don had pieced
together properties that included some
oFthe best preserved and most signiR-
cant archaeological resources in south-
west Florida, including major portions oF
the Pineland complex and Josslyn Island.
Their Rrst donation oFland honoring the
importance oFthe area came when they


Pineland Historic Marker, to Lee County
in the 1970s. Although she cherished
the tranquility oFPineland, Patjoined
with her husband in welcoming archae-
ologists to their property, and Funding
excavations both at Josslyn Island and
Pineland. It was during the "YearoFthe
Indian" events in 1990 and 1992 that
they hosted thousands oFvisitors,


Pat and Don Randell were guests of
honor at the opening of the Historical
Museum on Useppa Island, April,
1994. In this photo, island owner
Garfield Beckstead (center) welcomes
the Randells. (Photo by W. Marquardt.)

including 5,400 schoolchildren, at
excavations taking place literally in
their backyard.
Patricia Randell passed away in 2002.
She will be remembered For her role in
preserving Pineland and the spirit oF
giving that she embodied. In her honor,
the next time you And yourselFwalking
at Pineland, pause Fora moment,
remember her love For the place, and
craft your own verses to her poem "Ode
to Pineland" which began, "There once
was a place known to me, a Fairy-tale
spot by the sea ..." A Ftting tribute it
would be, one that would likely bring her
a smile. And, iFyou choose, send your
verses to us and we'll publish them here
in Future newsletters in her honor.
Thanks to Ricky Randell, Crandon
Randell, Debbie Randell, Phyllis Davis,
and Michaela Valenti, who helped put
this article together.


E


Don't Miss These Special Events!


Winter Solstice Full Moon
Cruise with Performance by
Flutist Kat Epple
December 21, 201o, departing at
7:30 p.m. from Captiva Island
(Proceeds benefit the Randell
Research Center!)
Flute music will Rll the airwhile the
moon and stars paint the night sky
during a Captiva Cruises voyage, to
beneRt the RRC, on Tuesday, December
21, 2010, the winter solstice.
Interpretive narratives about the
solstice, planets, and stars will be
interspersed with a perFormance by Kat
Epple, Emmy Award winning and
Grammy nominated Rlutist and
composer. Kat has amassed a unique
collection oFRlutes From cultures around
the world, which she Features in her
perFormances. Her music has been


described as celestial, yet earthly,
primeval, and innovative. Kat created the
music For the Calusa documentary "The
Domain oFthe Calusa," and For the dance
perFormance "Calusa" with the David
Parsons Dance Company. Complementing
Kat's perFormance will be inFormation
about the solstice, celestial Facts, and
identiRcation oFnight sky Features,
provided by Richard Finkle, Environ-
mental Educator For Captiva Cruises.
Guests will depart aboard the Lady
Chadwick From McCarthy's Marina on
Captiva at7:30 p.m., cruise the waters
oFPine Island Sound, and return to the
dock at 9:30 p.m.The cost oF$65/
person includes light hors d'oeuvres,
complimentary wine, and a Full-service
cash bar. Reservations are required and
may be obtained by calling Captiva
Cruises at 239-472-5300. Please join us
Forwhat will surely be a magical evening.


Shark!: A Presentation by
Charles O'Connor
January 19, 2011, 6:30 to 8:00 PM at
the Classroom, Calusa Heritage
Trail, Pineland
Admission $5 per person.
"Shark!"will explore the natural
history oFsharks, human and shark
interactions, and Fossilized teeth, with a
special Focus on (Carcharocles)
Megalodon sharks. Diet, dimensions,
tooth structure, evolution, and demise
will be explored in this lively and colorFul
presentation.
Megalodon was arguably the Formi-
dable carnivore ever to have existed. It
was a super-predator and probably
reached lengths oF70 Feet, with teeth
that surpassed 7 inches in length. It
indisputably had the greatest bite Force
continued on page 8






4
Active Year continued From page 1


New Cards and Books in the
Calusa Heritage Trail Store
(All proceeds benefit programs of the
Randell Research Center.)
Pat Randell's Original Cracker Cards
With images provided by her daugh-
ter, Deborah Randell, we've recreated
Four oFPat Randell's "Original Cracker
Postcards." The images are touching in
their depiction oFthe beauty and spirit
oFPine Island.


Volunteers load wheelbarrows with mulch destined for native plants at the
RRC parking lot. RRC provided beverages and refreshments. Many thanks go to
Forestry Resources, Inc. For the donation ofa truckload oFbeautiful mulch that
transformed our parking lot islands into a showcase for our native plantings.
(Photo by C. O'Connor.)


October 15: Calusa Heritage Trail
filmed for Lonely Planet Guide
Project
The Lee County Visitor and Convention
Bureau (VCB) has announced a new
partnership with Lonely Planet, the
world's largest travel publisher, to
create a "customized destination
guidebook, a digital online version oF


Francisco Aliwalas, Lonely Planet TV proc
views Cindy Bear at the Calusa Heritage
Camera Assistant Ritsuko Yamaguchi kee
(Photo by A. Paquet.)


the guide, a mobile application oFthe
guide, and other digital solutions" in
order to expand the reach oFtheVCB
around the world. According to VCB
Executive DirectorTamara Pigott,
"Lonely Planet is the perFect global
marketing partner For Lee County
because oFits commitment to sustain-
ability and responsible, respective travel,
and shared philosophies in protecting
and preserving beaches
and natural resources.
The Calusa Heritage
4 Trail, Randell Research
,. Center, will be among the
visitor sites Featured in
v part because oFour
S commitment to teach as
we learn. We were visited
by a Lonely Planet rFlm
crew on October 15.
Francisco Aliwalas,
Lonely PlanetTV
Producer, and his crew,
hiked the trails Fiming
the vistas and signage
while remarking about
how much they learned
during their brieFvisit. We
appreciate the support oF
the VCB and look Forward
ucer inter- to more visitors to the
Trail while
ps notes.a trail as a result oFthis
pps notes.
partnership.


Guy LaBree: Barefoot Artist of the
Florida Seminoles, by Carol Mahler,
University Press of Florida
Carol Mahler's eye-catching new
book showcases 42 paintings by Guy
LaBree which are all From the Seminole
point-oF-view. She describes her
accompanying essays as "biographies oF
the images because they explain the
in-depth research necessary For
authentic details." Currently a resident
oFArcadia, LaBree grew up near the
Dania (Hollywood) Seminole reservation
where his Friendship with Seminole tribe
members nurtured his interest in
Seminole tradition, especially the
legends and mythology. Two oFLaBree's
works hang in the Smithsonian
Institution's National Museum oFthe
American Indian, and Former ChieF
James Billie is among his most prolific


P7 ....


I ~c~c~e~






























Image reprinted with permission of
the University Press ofFlorida.

collectors. This book provides a remark-
able opportunity to see his work and
explore the Seminole with the intimacy
oFan artist. Author Carol Mahler will be
on hand at Calusa Heritage Day on
March 12 to sign copies oFher book and
to share essays From herwork.
Randy Wayne White's Ultimate Tarpon
Book: The Birth of Big Game Fishing,
edited by Randy Wayne White and
Carlene Fredericka Brennen, University
Press of Florida
Anyone who has seen a tarpon roll
can catch tarpon Feverand understand


how this collection oFessays will have
wide appeal to a variety oFreaders.
Over 100 essays are presented by the
editors and include some oFthe best
nature writers and observers oFthe
natural world ever assembled in one
book. The essays trace the origins oF
tarpon Ashing From 1885 and have
been collected by the editors For
decades. While the big Ash is the
Focus, book reviewer John Fitch, a
contributor to the highly regarded
Southwest Florida's Wetland
Wilderness, writes, "A book that
anyone with an interest in Florida's
history, natural history, literary history,
love oFnature, love oFFshing, sense oF
adventure, or interest in the 'real
Florida' should purchase and read."
Trail of Florida's Indian Heritage
Website Updated
IFyou've wondered how to And the
Miami Circle, thought about visiting
the Ah-Tah-Thi-Ki Museum but weren't
sure oFthe hours, orwould simply
like to add to your understanding oF
Florida's past, then the updated
website oFthe Trail oFFlorida's Indian
Heritage should be among your book-
marks. Found at www.trailoffloridasin-
dianheritage.org, the site highlights 36
visitorsites, including the Calusa
Heritage Trail at Randell Research
Center. From the trail map, the virtual
tourist links directly to the website oF
the organization, making it the most
comprehensive directory to Florida
cultural heritage visitor sites. Seven


"Featured Sites" allow one to learn
about the Flora and Fauna oFthe area,
about the Indian people emphasized at
the site, and to hear interviews with
archaeologists, historians, and educa-
tors. Stunning illustrations depicting
Florida's earliest inhabitants provide
background on each page and the crisp,
exciting photographs are the next best
thing to being there. Teachers in parti-
cularwill Fnd the site useFul For lesson
plans, student computer time, and
virtual Reld trips. (


Image reprinted with permission of
the University Press ofFlorida.


New and Renewing Friends of the RRC
August 1 through October 31, 2010
(Please let us know oFany errors or omissions. Thank you For your support.)


Supporting Members
($1,000-$4,999)
Gretchen John Coyle
Deborah E Elmer Wheeler
Contributing Members
($100-499)
John Cauthen
Don Cyzewski
Mary Ann Hight


Thomas Mclntosh
Joan McMahan
Anne Reynolds
SabalTrust Company
John E Glenda Sirmans
Randal L. Walker
Patty Jo Watson
Rob E Phyllis Wells


Family Members
Fred Browne
Bill E Rosemarie Hammond
Barbara E Carl Harcourt
Phyllis E Peter Kolianos
Herb Seidel
Individual Members
David Amico
Beverly Brazill


Boca Grande Historical
Society
Lois E. Clarke
Judith D'Agostino
Marc E Jill Fontaine
Brenda Johnson
Michael Moseley
Gina Poppell
William G. Vernetson


211










-- Friends of the

J Randell Research Center
Pineland, Florida December 2010
Phone 239/283-2062
Email: randellcenter2(prancenter.comcastbiz.net


Dear Friend,

You are cordially invited to join, or renew your membership in, the RRC's support society, Friends ofthe Randell
Research Center All Friends oFthe RRC receive a quarterly newsletter and Free admission to the Calusa Heritage
Trail at Pineland. Supporters at higher levels are entitled to discounts on our books and merchandise, advance
notice ofprograms, and special recognition. Your continuing support is vital to our mission. It means more
research, more education, and continued site improvements at the Randell Research Center. Thank you.

Sincerely,



William H. Marquardt
Director
Randell Research Center




Please check the membership level you prefer, and send this Form with your check payable to U. F Foundation, to:

Membership Coordinator Randell Research Center PO Box 608 a Pineland, Florida 33945


" Individual ($30) and Student ($15): quarterly Newsletter and
Free admission to Calusa Heritage Trail
" Family ($50): The above + advance notice and 10% discount on
children's programs
" Contributor ($100-$499): The above + annual honor roll listing in
newsletter + 20% discount on RRC publications and merchandise
" Sponsor ($500-$999): The above + invitation to annual
Director's tour and reception
Permanent Address

Name

Address

City / State / Zipcode
Seasonal Address (so we can send you your newsletter while you are away)

Name

Address

City / State / Zipcode
Use my seasonal address From to


(date)


" Supporter ($1,000-$4,999): The above + listing on annual
donor plaque at Pineland site
" Sustaining Members ($5,000-$19,999), Benefactors
($20,000-$99,999), and Patrons ($100,000 and above)
receive all oFthe above + complimentary RRC publications and
special brieFings From the Director.




~ 1B~e~SL '" :,,


(date)


The Randell Research Centeris a program oFthe Florida Museum oFNatural History, University of Florida.






Books, Videos, Cards, and RRC Gear


W BOOKS ON SOUTHWEST FLORIDA'S ARCHAEOLOGY E HISTORY
The Calusa and Their Legacy: South Florida People and Their Environments
by Darcie A. MacMahon and William H. Marquardt, U. Press oFFlorida, hardcover, $39.95
Sharks and Shark Products in Prehistoric South Florida
by Laura Kozuch, Monograph 2, softcover, $5.00
The Archaeology oFUseppa Island
edited by William H. Marquardt, Monograph 3, hardcover $35.00, softcover $20.00
New Words, Old Songs: Understanding the Lives oFAncient Peoples in
Southwest Florida Through Archaeology
by Charles Blanchard, illustrated by Merald Clark, hardcover $19.95, soFLcover $9.95
FisherFolk oFCharlotte Harbor, Florida
by Robert F Edic, hardcover, $35.00
Florida's First People
by Robin Brown, Pineapple Press, hardcover, $29.95
Missions to the Calusa
by John H. Hann, U. Press oFFlorida, hardcover, $35.00
Florida's Indians
by Jerald T Milanich, U. Press oFFlorida, softcover, $19.95
Archaeology oFPrecolumbian Florida
by Jerald T Milanich, U. Press oFFlorida, softcover, $27.95
Guy LaBree Barefoot Artist ofthe Florida Seminoles
by Carol Mahler, U. Press oFFlorida, hardcover, $34.95
Randy Wayne White's Ultimate Tarpon Book: The Birth oFBig Game Fishing
edited by Randy Wayne White and Carlene Fredericka Brennen. U. Press oFFlorida, hardcover, $34.95
I-Land: At the Edge oFCivilization
by Roothee Gabay, a part-Fantasy, part-historical novel based in the Calusa domain, PublishAmerica Books,
$14.95
Song oFtheTides
byTom Joseph, a historical novel about the Calusa, U. oFAlabama Press, $19.95
Eyes oFthe Calusa
by Holly Moulder, a historical novel For young readers, winner oFthe silver medal in young adult Fiction From the
Florida Publisher's Association, White Pelican Press, $8.95
The Crafts oFFlorida's First People
by Robin Brown, a step-by-step guide to making Florida Indian tools and containers (Forages 10 and up),
Pineapple Press, softcover, $9.95
CALUSA POSTCARDS
Images From the Calusa Heritage Trail
Art by Merald Clark, 4"-x-6" postcards, Full-color, set oFll cards, $4.50

AWARD-WINNING DOCUMENTARIES
The Domain ofthe Calusa: Archaeology and Adventure in the Discovery oFSouth Florida's Past
DVD video, $12.95
Expedition Florida: Three-Program Set (From Exploration to Exhibition,
The Wild Heart oFFlorida, Wild Alachua)
DVD video, $24.95

RANDELL RESEARCH CENTER GEAR
RRC logo hat $20.00
RRC logo short-sleeve cotton staffshirt
Specify size (S, M, L, XL) and color (cream or blue-denim) $35.00


RRC logo short-sleeve cotton T-shirt
Specify Adult size (S, M, L, XL) $15.00 / Specify Child size (XS, S, M) $12.00
RRC logo tote bag $10.00
RRC logo coffee mug $10.00 Fri
levelol
To place order, make check payable to
U.F Foundation and mail to:
Randell Research Center
PO Box 608 Name (please print)
Pineland, FL 33945.
Pineland, FL 33945. Mailing address (ple
Questions? 239-283-2157 Mailing address (p
E-mail: randellcenter2(arancenter.comcastbiz.net


[-NU -E


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Total For items ordered:
ends ofthe RRC who give at the $100
rabovemaydeduct20% Discount:-
Florida residents add sales tax:
Shipping: Add $3.50 For First item,
$0.50 For each additional item:
TOTAL:


ase print):


$
$


+
+
$


Zip code (please print):


r-co-ST










Randell Research Center
PO Box 608
Pineland, FL 33945-0608
Forwarding Service Requested


Non-proRt
Organization
U.S. Postage
PAID
Pineland, FL
33945
Permit No. 26


RRC staff member Cindy Bear
visited Ecuador this summerand Found
her RRC hat, and its logo, to be a bridge
between herselFand the many people
she encountered. Wearing the hat in
this picture is Natalie Gualinga. Natalie's
Father, Don Orlando Gualinga, is credited
with the vision and negotiations that
made the Sani Lodge the Frst in the
Ecuadorian Amazon Basin to be owned
and operated by the Santa Isla communa
whose members are part oFthe indig-
enous ethnic group, the Kichwa. Don
Orlando is also shaman oFthe Sani Isla

RRC News


Editor: William Marquardt
Writers: Cindy Bear
William Marquardt
Production: GBS Productions
Gift Shop E Tour Information:
(239) 283-2157


FLORIE
MUSEUM
OF NATURAL HIST


UNIVERSITY of


Where Has
Your Hat
Traveled?







communa. His wisdom is evident in
Natalie, who Cindy describes as "gleeFully
pointing out wildliFe, climbing cocoa
trees to share Fruit, and proudly reciting
the English alphabet after showing off
her Spanish and Quechuan language
knowledge."
IFyou've got a photo oFyour hat
traveling the world, please send it, and
your travel story to us. We would like to
Feature them in upcoming newsletters.
You can email yourinFormation to Cindy
at cbeariaul.edu. U


Send questions or comments to:
Randell Research Center
E PO Box 608
Pineland. FL 33945-0608
STelephone: (239) 283-2062
A Fax: (239) 283-2080
TORYi. Email: randellcenter2(trancenter
comcastbiz net
Website: www flmnh ufl edu/RRC/


Special Events continued from page 3
oFany known animal, up to 18 tons.
Megalodon was most likely homoeo-
thermic (erroneously termed "warm
blooded"), preyed on other large Ash
and marine mammals, and populated
ancient oceans across the globe.
The shallow seas covering prehistoric
Florida most likely provided a birthing/
nursery area, because mostly small-
to medium-sized teeth are discovered
here. Larger teeth are Found on the
coastlines oFthe Carolinas and Georgia
and elsewhere in the world. A nutrient-
rich upwelling ocean current may
have nourished the dense prey Food
web needed to support Megalodon's
dietary needs.
Dr. Charles O'Connor is a native
Floridian, an amateur paleontologist,
and was an assistant in the Vertebrate
Paleontology Laboratory at the
Florida Museum oFNatural History in
Gainesville, one oFthe nation's premier
Pleistocene Fossil collections. He
received the Southwest Florida
Audubon Educator oFthe Year award,
was a Golden Apple Teaching Award
Fnalist, 2009 EnvironmentalTeacher
oFtheYear, and has presented hundreds
oFFossil talks to schools, Fossil clubs,
and community groups For over 13
years. He is currently vice president oF
the Southwest Florida Fossil Club and
Education Chair For the Friends oFSix
Mile Slough Preserve. 1


11111~




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