Group Title: Historic St. Augustine: Block 7 - Lot 4
Title: Plan of excavation
ALL VOLUMES CITATION MAP IT! THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00090508/00027
 Material Information
Title: Plan of excavation De Hita site spring 1975
Series Title: Historic St. Augustine: Block 7 - Lot 4
Physical Description: Research notes
Language: English
 Subjects
Subject: Saint Augustine (Fla.)
37 Saint George Street (Saint Augustine, Fla.)
De Hita House (Saint Augustine, Fla.)
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States of America -- Florida -- Saint Johns -- Saint Augustine -- 37 Saint George Street
Coordinates: 29.8966 x -81.313257
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00090508
Volume ID: VID00027
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution.
Resource Identifier: B7-L4

Full Text










S NOT
, ,.. FEA. 22_ |







E A TEDI TED ,XCAVAT
mx,^ t s! .


si \". t i i 1--'= ....
1 6L % ^ I F N OT E X CA V AT E D .




NOI -

S- --- ~T

Iw-aAMA


I

I4K I C.ro~~8l
I I


SNOT
EXCAVATED

I -----
!p ~4 d ~ -










ST. 2.


C
V


PLAN OF
EXCAVATION
bE HITA SITE
SPRING 1W15


0 3
LrtMS
oNrru=3
Mugu


tobN
103e


TANSIT 0
STATION


loo N
tmd







As for the difference in building materials, Geronimo

would certainly have preferred coquina over tabby because

of its strength. Gradual home expansion was very common

in colonial St. Augustine (Manucy 1962:44, 52, 54). Thus

a coquina addition would be a valuable improvement for a

tabby house, He might not have wanted to use the northern

wall of the original house for part of the addition,

fearing it might weaken the new construction.

To summarize, though the contempranity of the two

houses cannot be proved; it seems most probable that both

dwellings were owned by the de Hita family, both having

been constructed prior to 1763. Expansion of the original

tabby house by construction of a coquina addition seems

likely whereas any construction by the realtor Fish seems

highly doubtful.

B. Wells

Other significant features were also found on the

lot. Two wells were excavated, one located six meters

distance from the southeast corner of structure A. Wells

in eighteenth century St. Augustine were often built by

digging a pit and then sinking barrels, one or two

according to the desired depth. Water was drawn by rope

and bucket, usually without the aid of a pulley structure,

Some wells were curbed at the surface with stone for

added stability ('anucy 1962:125-6). This well perhaps

had two barrels, but only one remai;~d intacL, though two

metal straps of the other were recovered. Built up layers







Sof wash became evident at the top of Zone II approximately

.59 meters below ground surface (Figure 7). These layers
extended down to the top of the barrel with a square of

Stabby around it at 1.84 meters. After sinking well points
,to remove the ground water, the bottom of the barrel was

1 reached at 2.63 meters below ground surface (Figure 6).

S.The barrel itself had twenty-seven wooden staves averaging

10 centimeters wide, wrapped on the outside with vine

j strips, each 3 centimeters wide. Fugitive areas of poured
tabby around the barrel served as reinforcement

SThe well construction date indicated by the contents

of the well pit (Feature 8), is a T.P.Q. of Puebla Blue

on White, 1700 (Goggin 1968:294). The contents of the

d barrel, which included a thin leather strap, were all

eighteenth century and suggests it was used and filled

during the first half of that century, having the T.P.Q.

for Puebla Blue on White of 1700 (Goggin 1968:294). Filling

of the well was indicated by the position of fallen blocks

of coquina, possibly from a curb above the well, at

approximately ,85 meters below surface. One had been cut
L-shaped, but the rest had been cut into square blocks the

largest one being about 50 cenitimot:ers square (Figure GA).

Two rusty barrel straps were e(ncionti.r--d 3a 1.05 fmeters
below ground surface above the well with few traces of

wood, the barrel having rotte;i away. This well might be

earlier than the de r':t;a resi.dence, but i.s most likely tnc

Family ,:ell, used aind filled cefo'-e 163.,




28
I 2


I The other well was uncovered in the exploratory
.^ trench and is of a later period. A curbing line of wooden

staves was encountered at 1.30 meters. below ground level.
Well points were sunk, the rest of the barrel uncovered,
and its contents recovered. The barrel had twenty-six
wooden staves, each about 10 centimeters wide, bound with
metal straps, having a maximum interior diameter of 89
centimeters. The base was reached at 2.20 meters below
ground surface. The contents-of the well were artifacts
of the second half of the eighteenth century with a T.P.Q.
of feather-edge pearlware at 1780 (Noel Hume 1974:131).
C. Kitchen Area
Approximately 4.10 meters east of the rear wall of
structure A, and north of the contemporary well, a raised
"FT" shaped feature of coquina blocks on an oyster shell
footing was uncovered (Figure 8B). It was 1.30 meters
by..70 meters, averaging .30 meters thick and standing

.39 meters high. It initiated in Zone I and had its base
at the top of Zone II Level II. Beneath this feature's
southern half, field specimen #236, contained an early
eighteenth century assemblage, with a T.P.Q. determined by
Puebla Blue on White at 1700 (Goggin 1968s294). This
structure was surrounded by a clay floor and appears to
have been a First Spanish Period cooking hearth. Burnt
corn cobs were found irn a nearby pit (See Figure 19). Hard
red brick fragments were also found irn the footing material.
ST. This type of brick is uncommon in. construction of this


~LYLI~YILYL-I _.




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs