Group Title: Historic St. Augustine: Block 7 - Lot 1, Gallegos
Title: Memo to Joan Scott re terminology at the Gallegos House
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00090505/00045
 Material Information
Title: Memo to Joan Scott re terminology at the Gallegos House
Series Title: Historic St. Augustine: Block 7 - Lot 1, Gallegos
Physical Description: Correspondence
Language: English
Creator: Bushnell, Amy
Publication Date: 1985
 Subjects
Subject: Saint Augustine (Fla.)
21 Saint George Street (Saint Augustine, Fla.)
Gallegos House (Saint Augustine, Fla.)
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States of America -- Florida -- Saint Johns -- Saint Augustine -- 21 Saint George Street
Coordinates: 29.897052 x -81.313361
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00090505
Volume ID: VID00045
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution.
Resource Identifier: B7-L1

Full Text






HISTORIC ST. AUGUSTINE PRESERVATION BOARD


MEMORANDUM

October 3, 1985


TO: Joan Scott, Daniel Hayes, Gayle Prevatt

FROM: Amy Bushnell Ab

SUBJECT: Terminology at the Gallegos House



For years we have referred to the interpreter stationed at the Gallegos
House as "Sef'ora Gallegos." Nothing would appear more natural than to give the
wife of Martin Gallegos his name, along with the title that throughout the
Spanish world now stands for "Mrs." However, in the mid-eighteenth century
not everyone was entitled to be called "Sefor" or "Se'ora," just as not every
Englishwoman was a lady or had the servants to call her "mistress," which is
the origin of "Mrs."

Martin Martinez Gallegos, the off-the-scenes husband, is an artilleryman,
one cut above a common soldier but nowhere near the social class of his officers.
He is not called "Sen'or Gallegos" or "don Martfn," just "Marftn el artillero."
Because he was born in Spain he is a peninsular (note that the word is not
"peninsulare"), whereas someone of Spanish blood born in the New World would be
a criollo. A creole from Florida was frequently called a floridano.

Martin's first wife was a criolla, or floridana, named Victoria Escalona.
His second wife, the one we usually represent at the Gallegos House, was Isabela
Serrano, a German girl whose family moved to Florida in 1756 from their earlier
home in the English colonies. They probably came to live among the Spanish in
order to be with other Roman Catholics. Isabela, in addition to her German and
Spanish, is probably fluent in English.

We cannot properly call Isabela "Senora Gallegos" because in her time
"mi senora" meant "my lady." Only the governor's wife, of all the women in St.
Augustine, might possibly have the noble blood to merit such a title. A woman
of the hidalgula, or Spanish gentry, known to be "of quality," would have donaa"
prefixed to her Christian name, but no wife of an artilleryman would be calling
herself "donYa Isabela."

Isabela Serrano, as was the custom, kept her own name after her marriage
to Martin. From that day on he called her his "mujer," just as a Frenchman
calls his wife "ma femme." Someone else needing to identify Isabela could call
her "Isabela Serrano, mujer de Martin Gallegos.l' If it was necessary to note
that the marriage was a legal one, as on the parish registry of baptisms, Isabela
would be called Martin's "mujer legitima," just as the newborn was recorded as
their "hijo legftimo."

The children of Martin and Isabela could call themselves either Serrano
or Gallegos or both. Martin himself apparently used both father's and mother's
names. If he followed the present practice of listing father's name first, when
we call him Gallegos we use the name of his mother.









GALLEGOS HOUSE GARDEN


Until there is a chance to do more thorough research, which is planned
for the month of May, we may put in a garden that includes examples of
the following:


Vegetables


basil
coriander
cumin
flat leaf parsley
winter savory
spearmint'
-Italian oregano
chives
Spanish lavender
thyme
-rosemary
marjoram (already there)



Fruits

figs
pomegranates
grapes
guavas
Seville orange
sweet orange (already there)
limes
plantain
lemons


leeks
scallions
radishes
carrots
cabbage
leaf lettuce
,Egarlic
green peas
turnips
artichokes
asparagus
cucumbers
Chili peppers


The field crops, which would have been
planted outside the town, would have been


corn
crowder peas
kidney beans
pumpkins or a
many varieties
canteloupe
watermelon
sweet potatoes,


winter squash
Snf heans


Amy Bushnell
3-19-82


Herbs




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