Group Title: Historic St. Augustine: Block 7 - Lot 1, Gallegos
Title: Gallegos House provisions
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00090505/00044
 Material Information
Title: Gallegos House provisions
Series Title: Historic St. Augustine: Block 7 - Lot 1, Gallegos
Physical Description: Interpretive outline
Language: English
Creator: Bushnell, Amy
Publication Date: 1982
 Subjects
Subject: Saint Augustine (Fla.)
21 Saint George Street (Saint Augustine, Fla.)
Gallegos House (Saint Augustine, Fla.)
Spatial Coverage: North America -- United States of America -- Florida -- Saint Johns -- Saint Augustine -- 21 Saint George Street
Coordinates: 29.897052 x -81.313361
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00090505
Volume ID: VID00044
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution.
Resource Identifier: B7-L1

Full Text
Amy Bushnell
April 14, 1982


GALLEGOS HOUSE PROVISIONS


Salad Garden
onions
carrots
radishes
cabbage
leaf lettuce
asparagus
small artichokes
green peas
collard greens
garlic

Herbs
cayenne pepper
chili pepper
chives
dill
borage
parsley
winter savory
fennel
marjoram
spearni nt
basil
rosemary
lavender
coriander


Cultivated Fruits
sweet oranges
sour oranges
Key limes
lemons
grapefruit
plantains
figs
pomegranates
grapes
guavas

Field Produce
turnips
sweet corn
field corn
pumpkins
winter squash
canteloupe
watermelon
sweet potatoes
lima beans
black-eyed peas
white acre peas
field peas
gourds


Environment, Flora
cassina
koonti
heart of palm
palm fruit
pers i nnons
'cactus fruit
blackberries
wild grapes
wild onions
acorns

Environment, Fauna
oysters
clams
turtles
mullet
redfish
drum
shark
sea salt
honey

Expedients
hominy grits
yellow cornmeal
city water
dried hominy


Trade, Import
cassava
chocolate
wheat flour
rice
wine vinegar
wine
olive oil
hard soap
rock salt
rum
hard cheese
salt beef
salt pork
hard brown suga
black beans
kidney beans
garbanzos
fava beans
navy beans
pinto beans

Trade, Local
fresh beef
dried beef
lard
salt bacon
dried turkey
bear fat (imit
tobacco twists
venison


Availability: Not all of these would have been available
year round. There should be attention to the seasons, with fresh
garden produce and fruits appearing only when they naturally would.
Otherwise, they must be used dried. Imported items should appear sporadically
and in limited quantities. Vinegar, olive oil, wheat and wine were the only
ones a Spaniard considered indispensable. The wheat flour would probably be
baked into pound loaves or hardtack elsewhere. Wine would be consumed by the
soldier-husband, probably in a tavern.

Storage: Dried herbs and vegetables may hang inside the house. No large amount
of import-trade food should be in evidence. The Indian-type wild roots were
used mainly during a famine, so they should not coincide with other foods.
Containers must be authentic. The alacena should not be used to store modern
containers. There should be no unauthentic supplies on the property.
'
Cooking: Use a small fire and a clay pot sitting on the coals. The dishes that
may be prepared are these:
(1) a cocido based on dried corn, peas and squashes, with other vegetables
added for flavoring. The cocido may contain fish or shellfish, or
a small amount of salted or dried meat.
(2) a salad of fresh or cooked vegetables, eaten with vinegar and oil.
(3) sweet corn in the inner husk, or sweet potatoes, baked in the ashes.
4corncakes, wrapped in cornhusks and baked in the ashes.




Amy Bushnell
April 14, 198?


GALLEGOS HOUSE PROVISIONS


Salad Garden
onions
carrots
radishes
cabbage
leaf lettuce
asparagus
small artichokes
green peas
collard greens
garlic

Herbs
cayenne pepper
chili pepper
chives
dill
borage
parsley
winter savory
fennel
marjoram
spearmint
basil
rosemary
lavendar
coriander


Cultivated Fruits
sweet oranges
sour oranges
Key limes
lemons
grapefruit
plantains
figs
pomegranates
grapes
guavas

Field Produce
turnips
sweet corn
field corn
pumpkins
winter squash
canteloupe
watermelon
sweet potatoes
lima beans
black-eyed peas
white acre peas
field peas
gourds


Environment, Flora
cassina
koonti
heart of palm
palm fruit
persim nons
'cactus fruit
blackberries
wild grapes
wild onions
acorns

Environment, Fauna
oysters
clams
turtles
mu llet
redfish
drum
shark
sea salt
honey

Expedients
hominy grits
yellow cornmeal
city water
dried hominy


Trade, Import
cassava
chocolate
wheat flour
rice
wine vinegar
wine
olive oil
hard soap
rock salt
rum
hard cheese
salt beef
salt pork
hard brown suga
black beans
kidney beans
garbanzo
fava beans
navy beans
pinto beans

Trade, Local
fresh beef
dried beef
lard
salt bacon
dried turkey
bear fat (imit
tobacco twists
venison


Availability: Not all of these would have been available
year round. There should be attention to the seasons, with fresh
garden produce and fruits appearing only when they naturally would.
Otherwise, they must be used dried. Imported items should appear sporadically
and in limited quantities. Vinegar, olive oil, wheat and wine were the only
ones a Spaniard considered indispensable. The wheat flour would probably be
baked into pound loaves or hardtack elsewhere. Wine would be consumed by the
soldier-husband, probably in a tavern.

Storage: Dried herbs and vegetables may hang inside the house. No large amount
of import-trade food should be in evidence. The Indian-type wild roots were
used mainly during a famine, so they should not coincide with other foods.
Containers must be authentic. The alacena should not be used to store modern
containers. There should be no unauthentic supplies on the property.

Cooking: Use a small fire and a clay pot sitting on the coals. The dishes that
may be prepared are these:
(1) a cocido based on dried corn, peas and squashes, with other vegetables
added for flavoring. The cocido may contain fish or shellfish, or
a small amount of salted or dried meat.
(2) a salad of fresh or cooked vegetables, eaten with vinegar and oil.
1(3 sweet corn in the inner husk, or sweet potatoes, baked in the ashes.
4corncakes, wrapped in cornhusks and baked in the ashes.




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