Title: Production times
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00090492/00004
 Material Information
Title: Production times
Series Title: Production times
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Publisher: Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: Fall 2007
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00090492
Volume ID: VID00004
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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0on
'ion


Fall 2007
Volume 14, Number 3


This material is provided as one of the many
services relating to the educational programs
offered to you by this agency. Our statewide
network of specialists is prepared to provide
current information on agriculture, marketing,
family and consumer sciences, 4-H, marine
science, and related fields. We will be happy to
help you with additional information upon
request.
Use of trade names in this newsletter does not
reflect endorsement of the product by the
University of Florida, Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences, or the Florida Coopera-
tive Extension Service.


UNIVERSITY of
UF FLORIDA
IFAS Extension


Can the Right Potting Mix Replace

Fungicide?
By Don Comis
Reprinted from the USDA ARSNews and Events at www.ars.usda.gov


Potting mixes custom-tailored to
fight plant diseases can work
much better than systemic fungi-
cides.
Agricultural Research Service
(ARS) plant pathologists Leona
Horst, James Locke and Charles
Krause found this was true for a
mix of peat, compost and the
beneficial fungus Trichoderma
hamatum strain 382. Horst and
Krause are at the ARS Applica-
tion Technology Research Unit
in Wooster, Ohio. Locke is part
of the unit's relatively new
Greenhouse Production Re-
search Group in Toledo, Ohio.
In a test with begonias, the scien-
tists found that the mix reduced
Botrytis gray mold, caused by the
Botrytis cinerea fungus, better
than the standard fungicide
chlorothalonil did. Botrytis gray
mold is the most common dis-
ease of greenhouse floral crops


such as begonia, carnation, chry-
santhemum, cyclamen, gera-
nium, impatiens, petunia and
marigold.
The beneficial Trichoderma fun-
gus seems to enter the plants
through the roots and spread
through the entire plant inter-
nally. One advantage of systemic
biocontrol- as opposed to spray-
ing the plant leaves with a solu-
tion containing beneficial
fungi-is that it doesn't leave a
residue on the plant that harms
plant market value.
Begonias grown in this mix had
much fewer gray mold symp-
toms and much higher market
value that those grown in
straight peat and sprayed with
chlorothalonil. The improvement
in plant quality and market
value makes the Trichoderma-
compost mix very promising for
(Continued on page 4)


Business Disaster Plan-create your own plan at www.FloridaDisaster.org with critical suppliers and
vital records in a form that can be printed out and saved for future emergencies. The Florida Division
of Emergency Management recently launched this web tool to help businesses plan for disaster.

The Institute of Food and Agricultural Science (IFAS) is an Equal Employment Opportunity Institution authorized to provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals and
institutions that function without regard to race, color, sex, age, handicap or national origin U S DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, FLORIDA COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE, UNIVERSITY
OF FLORIDA, IFAS, FLORIDA A & M UNIVERSITY COOPERATIVE EXTENSION PROGRAM, AND BOARDS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS COOPERATING


* Production Times is brought to
you by
Juanita Popenoe, Ph.D.
Lake County
Woody Omamentals/Multi-County
(352)343-4101








Research Roundup
By Juanita Popenoe


The following is a summary of research re-
ported at the American Society for Horticultural
Science Southern Region 2007 Annual Meeting
and recently in HortTechnology.
* Response of Texas and Florida Live Oak
Seedlings to Water Deficit Treatments Com-
pared seedlings from Groveland, FL (a humid
site) and Justiceburg, TX ( a dry site) and found
that seedlings from central Texas are better
adapted to dry, xeric sites than live oaks from a
mesic (humid) site. This provides further proof
that provenance is important in plant success.
* Influence of a Modified Pot-in-Pot Strategy
on Root Temperature and Growth of Rhodo-
dendron x 'Mrs. G.G. Gerbing' in Full Sun -
Utilized a raised bed, double-row pot-in-pot
production system with sockets in a triangular
design with plants 24 inches apart in rows 8
inches apart to study the differences between
black or white weed barrier and middle of the
double row irrigation line to cool soil beneath
the weed barrier. They found no differences in
the pot-in-pot production with these alterations,
but the pot-in-pot plants were superior to
plants grown in full sun above-ground and the
50% shade house.
* Growth Modification of Bedding Plants
using ChromatiNeting Compared the growth
responses of six bedding plants, Dianthus
'Dynasty Red', 'Sun Leaper' tomato, 'Sweet X3R
Camelot Hybrid' pepper, 'Crimson Rambler'
morning glory, 'Patron' broccoli and 'Blue Van-
tage' cabbage, under five colors of Chromati-
Neting in a double polycarbonate greenhouse
in Auburn, AL. Black ChromatiNeting reduced
shoot height in dianthus, pepper, morning
glory, broccoli and cabbage but shoot height
was the same as blue and gray in several cases.
Pearl ChromatiNeting yielded the tallest plants


in tomato, pepper, morning glory, broccoli and
cabbage, but these plants were the same height
as outside light or red in several cases.
* Clean Chip Residual Substrate for Con-
tainer-grown Perennials: Effect of Supplemen-
tal Nitrogen Rates Clean chip residual (CCR)
is composed of 42% pinebark, 9% needles and
49% wood from residue remaining after in-field
harvesting of pine wood chips for the paper in-
dustry and is thought to require more nitrogen
when used as potting media. This study com-
pared the growth of buddleia, gaura and core-
opsis in CCR and 6 month aged pinebark with
four rates of supplemental nitrogen. Their re-
sults indicate that the plants tested had similar
growth when grown in CCR or pinebark and
did not require any extra nitrogen.
* Infectivity of Mycorrhizal Products Mar-
keted for Trees in Urban and Landscape Soils
- Compared the effect of commercial mycorrhi-
zal products on growth of corn, sorghum, tri-
dent maple and sweetbay magnolia in the
greenhouse. They found that the commercial
products only resulted in 5% or less mycorrhi-
zal colonization, while lab-cultured inoculant
yielded much higher colonization. However,
the commercial products generally improved
corn and sorghum shoot growth and increased
soil concentrations of phosphorus, potassium,
calcium and magnesium in a dose-dependent
manner. The commercial products did not in-
crease mycorrhizal colonization or shoot
growth in magnolia or maple saplings. Success
of commercial mycorrhizal products will de-
pend on improvement of the current retail dis-
tribution methods to improve survivability of
the mycorrhizal fungus.
* Final Summary of All-America Daylily
(Continued on page 3)







(Continued from page 2)
Evaluations: Rust Observations, Flowering,
and Landscape Performance All-America
daylily cultivars evaluated at LSU indicate cul-
tivars resistant to daylily rust are: 'Miss Mary
Mary', 'Chorus Line', 'Lullaby Baby', and
'Bitsy'. Slightly susceptible cultivars were
'Black Eyed Stella' and 'Frankly Scarlet'. 'Plum
Perfect' was moderately susceptible. Highly
susceptible cultivars were 'Red Volunteer',
'Lady Lucille', 'Starstruck', 'Leebea Orange
Crush', and 'Judith'. Cultivars in bloom the
most days were 'Miss Mary Mary', 'Lady
Lucille', 'Bitsy', and 'Black Eyed Stella'. The
earliest to bloom cultivars were 'Bitsy', 'Black
Eyed Stella', 'Judith' and 'Miss Mary Mary'.
Repeat bloomers were 'Lady Lucille', 'Bitsy',
and 'Black Eyed Stella'.
* Initial Landscape Shrub Rose Observa-
tions: 'Knock Out', 'Home Run', 'Wild Thing',
and 'Nearly Wild' Roses were evaluated in
the landscape in Baton Rouge, LA for perform-
ance and blackspot susceptibility. Blackspot
was not seen on 'Knock Out' or 'Home Run',


while minor blackspot was seen on 'Nearly
Wild' and 'Wild Thing'. 'Knock Out' had the
highest visual quality, although in monthly
evaluations it was often similar for 'Home
Run'.
* The Effect of a Garlic Extract and Root
Substrate on Soilborne Fungal Pathogens -
Pythium aphanidermatum, Pythium irregulare, Py-
thium ultimum, Phytophthora cinnomomi, Phy-
tophthora nicotianae, Rhizoctonia solani, Fusarium
oxysporum and Thielaviopsis basicoli failed to
grow in nutrient solutions containing 10% or
higher levels of garlic extract or a fungicide
control. When tested in peat-based potting me-
dia, a single application of at least 35% garlic
extract or two applications of 25% extract killed
all the Pythium aphanidermatum in the medium.
A single application of 25% garlic extract or
two applications of 10% extract were enough to
kill off the Pythium aphanidermatum in sand.
Garlic extract was found to be fungicidal
against a broad range of soilborne fungal
pathogens, but the concentration required to
kill the pathogens varied with the potting mix.


M Tip for Greenhouse Growers: Add Silicon
2N By Don Comis
Reprinted from the USDA ARSNews and Events at www.ars.usda.gov


Modern greenhouse production methods have
often eliminated conventional earth as a growth
medium and, with that, eliminated silicon, a
mineral naturally found in soil.
Greenhouse growers might do well to add sili-
con back in their nutrient applications, irrigation
or potting mixes, according to Agricultural Re-
search Service (ARS) scientists. That's because a
growing body of research suggests that silicon
boosts yields and protects plants from toxicity
and fungal diseases. This means silicon may re-
duce the need for plant growth regulators and
disease-control pesticides.
Over the past three years, scientists have studied


silicon uptake in a variety of ornamentals, in-
cluding begonia, carnation, geranium, impa-
tiens, marigold, orchid, pansy, petunia, snap-
dragon, verbena and zinnia.
X-ray analysis has shown that some of these
plants-such as New Guinea impatiens, mari-
gold and zinnia-accumulate silicon in signifi-
cant concentrations in unique cells in their
leaves. The researchers want to see which crops
put nutrients where they are most useful to the
plant.
The scientists also tested some of these plants to
see if silicon imparts resistance to two wide-
spread pathogenic fungi, gray mold and pow-







(Continued from page 1) Right Potting Mix
greenhouse operations. Also, Botrytis has devel-
oped resistance to several fungicides.
The Trichoderma fungus thwarts Botrytis on
more than one front. It prevents Botrytis from
infecting fresh wounds, and produces com-
pounds that keep Botrytis spores from germinat-
ing.
(Continued from page 3) Greenhouse Tips
dery mildew. They found that it helps reduce
symptoms of powdery mildew in zinnia but
has no effect on species such as begonia and
geranium, which do not accumulate silicon.
The scientists will continue to use similar tests
to see if silicon accumulates in the leaves of


Surprisingly, the compost mix had a similar ef-
fect even without Trichoderma. This means there
could be naturally occurring beneficial fungi or
other biocontrol agents in the compost.
But, growers need to add beneficial fungi like
Trichoderma to their mix, because they can't
count on commercial composts to have them
naturally.
other ornamental crops and test those crops for
silicon-induced resistance to insect pests.
Such knowledge about plants' silicon use will
help breeders choose promising lines for creat-
ing new varieties of flowers and ornamental
plants that will need fewer pesticide applica-
tions.


2007 Planning Calendar
Links to most programs and agendas may be found at: http//cfextension.ifas.ufl.edu or the UF Extension Calendar at
httpi/calendar.ifas.ufl.edu/calendar/index.htm

luly

11, 18, 25.......Nursery BMP and Water Use Workshops. Contact Maggie Jarrell (352) 343-4101.

28 .......Review and Exam. Limited Certification Licenses. Tavares. Contact Maggie Jarrell (352) 343-4101

August

9-11.......Southern Nursery Association Forum 2007, Atlanta, GA http://www.sna.org/

30.......Review & Exam Ornamental/Turf & Private App. Orlando. Contact Celeste White (407) 254-9200

September

15.......Review and Exam. Limited Certification Licenses. Tavares. Contact Richard Tyson (407) 665-5551

19.......Floriculture Update Series: Apply Water and Nutrients Efficiently. Contact Maggie Jarrell (352) 343-

4101.

October

4-6.......FNATS The Landscape Show Orlando, FL http://www.fngla.org./

18.......Review & Exam Right of Way & Aquatic. Orlando. Contact Celeste White (407) 254-9200

28-31.. International Plant Propagators' Society Southern Region Annual Meeting Chattanooga, TN. http://

www.ipps.org/southernna/index.htm





Program Locations


Speakers:


Steve Cox
East Central Florida Resource
Conservation & Development
(ECFRCD)
(321) 231-4851 or Rance Ellis at
(321) 231-4853
Contact them to set up a BMP
assessment at your nursery

SBobby Brown
Lake County Mobile Irrigation
Lab team leader
(352) 343-2481 x 6
james.brown@fl.nacdnet.net
Contact him to set up a free
irrigation evaluation


Presented byYour Local
County Extension:
Juanita Popenoe
Lake Co. Extension
1951 Woodlea Rd., Tavares
(352) 343-4101



July 11 Seminole Springs Herb
Farm and Antique Roses,
34935 W. Huff Rd. Eustis
(across the street and just
north of Seminole Springs Ele-
mentary School)

July 18 Matlack Tree Farm
11631 CR 561 Clermont (2
miles south of Hwy 50)

July 25 Zephyr Lake Nursery
2605 Cooke Rd. Fruitland Park
(west off 441 at Flea Market)
UF UNIVERSITY o
W FLORIDA
IFAS Extension

LAKE COUNTY
FLORIDA
The Institute of Food and Agncultural Science (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity
Institution authonzed to provide research, educational infonnation and other
services only to individuals and institutions that function without regard to race,
creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, national
origin, political opinions or affihations U S DEPARTMENT OF
AGRICULTURE, COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE, UNIVERSITY
OF FLORIDA, IFAS, FLORIDA A & M UNIVERSITY COOPERATIVE
EXTENSION PROGRAM, AND BOARDS OF COUNTY
COMMISSIONERS COOPERATING


Who's

Afraid of

BMPs?
(Best Management
Practices)



W after! j...

And Fertilizer?




July 11, 18 and 25, 2007
10:00 AM 12:00 PM

An Extension Program at a
nursery near you

FREE Program
Registration requested







Who's Afraid of BMPs?


W! Lake County Nursery
Water! C Best Management Practices
And Fertilizer? and Water Efficiency Workshops

Program from 10 am-noon:

Learn what BMPs are and how they may affect you in the future.
Learn how an assessment is done at a local nursery.
Learn what Nursery BMPs can do for you.
Learn about the free Lake County Mobile Irrigation Lab.
Learn how they can help you save on your irrigation bills.
Find out the facts at a location near you.

July 11 Seminole Springs Herb Farm and Antique Roses
34935 W. Huff Rd., Eustis (across the street from
Seminole Springs Elementary School)

July 18 Matlack Tree Farm
11631 CR 561, Clermont (2 miles south of Hwy 50)

July 25 Zephyr Lake Nursery
2605 Cooke Rd., Fruitland Park


ah


County (required)

BRING YOUR OWN LAWN CHAIR!
Email, Fax, Call or Send to:
Maggie Jarrell
mjarrell@ufl.edu
Lake County Extension Office
1951 Woodlea Rd.
Tavares, FL 32778-4204
(352) 343-4101
FAX 352-343-2767
Participants requiring special accommodations contact
Maggie Jarrell a day before the program.


LAKE COUNTY
FLORIDA


UNIVERSITY of
iF FLORIDA
IFAS Extension


Who's Afraid of BMPs?
July 11, 18 and 25
FREE!
Registration Requested. Mail or Fax this form, or
Email or Call with the information.
Please print clearly!
Name of Organization


Phone:( )
Mailing Address:






Your Speakers:


Paul Fisher, PhD.
Environmental Horticulture
University of Florida
Gainesville

Bill Argo, PhD.
The Blackmore Company
Belleville, MI



Your Extension Agent:

Juanita Popenoe, PhD.
Commercial Horticulture
Lake Co. Extension
1951 Woodlea Rd.
Tavares, FL 32778-4204
352-343-4101


^y-SB.


Afternoon Program Location


Morning Program Location


Knox Nursery, Inc.
940 Avalon Rd.
Winter Garden, FL


UF UNIVERSITY of
FLORIDA
I FAS Extension


LAKE COUNTY
FLORIDA
The Institute of Food and Agricultural Science (IFAS) is an Equal Opportunity
Institution authonzed to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function without regard to race, creed, color,
religion, age, disability, sex, sexual orientation, mental status, national ongn, political
opinions or affiliations U S DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, COOPERATIVE
EXTENSION SERVICE, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, IFAS, FLORIDA A & M
UNIVERSITY COOPERATIVE EXTENSION PROGRAM, AND BOARDS OF
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS COOPERATING


Floriculture Update Series:

Apply Water and

Nutrients

Efficiently


Workshop for
Nursery Growers
and Workers Knox
Nursery and Mid-
Florida Research
and Education
Center Apopka

September 19, 2007
8:45 am-3:30 pm






Floriculture Update Series:

Apply Water and Nutrients Efficiently
September 19, 2007 8:45 am-3:30 pm
Cost: $40 Reserve your space early, seating is limited.
A workshop for greenhouse or nursery growers. Dual tracks in English and Spanish in the
morning; English only in the afternoon; handouts provided in both languages.


Program:
8:45-9:15: Check in at Knox Nursery, Inc., 940 Avalon Rd., Winter Garden
9:15-12:00: Hands-on programming at nursery location in Spanish and English
> Choosing fertilizer types and concentrations
> Water quality how does that affect irrigation and fertilizers
> Fertilizers how to read a fertilizer label
> Selecting water-soluble fertilizers
> Selecting slow-release fertilizers
> Media
> How the growing medium affects nutrients and irrigation
> Alternative media components
> Watering method and leaching
> How to measure leaching
SRelationship between leaching, growing medium, and fertilizer
> Timing and method of irrigation
> Dealing with water restrictions
12:00: Morning workshop finishes. Boxed lunch provided to those attending
morning session only.
12:00 to 12:30: Travel to Mid Florida Research and Education Center, 2725 S. Bin-
ion Rd., Apopka
12:30-1:15: Boxed lunch and sponsor displays.
1:15-2:15: Nutrition management (English only)
1:15 to 1:30: Break
2:30 to 3:30: pH management (English only)


Apply Water and

Nutrients Efficiently
Nursery Workshop and Seminars at MREC
Non-refundable Registration $40
September 19, 2007 8:45 am-3:30 pm
Registration Deadline: Sept. 12 Seating is limited

Name

Company


Address

City, State


County (required)

Zip Phone


] Morning Session:


O English


] Spanish


] Afternoon Session

Please detach and mail completed form with checks
payable to Horticulture Advisory Account to:
Lake County Extension Office
1951Woodlea Rd.
Tavares, FL 32778-4204
(352) 343-4101
Participants requiring special accommodations contact
Maggie Jarrell by September 12, 2007.





F I UNIVERSITY of
U F LORIDA
IFAS Extension


LAKE COUNTY EXTENSION
1951 WOODLEA ROAD
TAVARES, FL 32778
PHONE: (352) 343-4101
FAX: (352) 343-2767


LIMITED PESTICIDE LICENSE CERTIFICATION REVIEW AND EXAM

$20 PER PERSON NON-REFUNDABLE FEE FOR CLASS

LAKE COUNTY EXTENSION, TAVARES, FL SATURDAY, JULY 28, 2007

If you plan to take an exam, you should study the training manuals. They can be ordered at 800-226-1764 or http://ifasbooks.ufl.edu SM1-
Applying Pesticides Correctly, and either SM7- Ornamental and Turf Pest Control or SM47-General Household Pest Control Applicator Training
Manual. Exams are administered only with a completed application, photo and license fee or if you choose to expedite the process on Review
and Exam Day you can bring in an approval letter from the Bureau of Entomology & Pest Control. Applications are available from the Bureau of
Entomology and Pest Control. See web locations below for applications and submittal information.

* Limited Certification for Governmental & Private Applicators Lawn & Ornamental A license is necessary for each government
employee, business owner or their employees who applies pesticides outdoors of a government or business owned buildings.
http://www.flaes.orq/pdfllmtdpckt.pdf
Limited Certification for Governmental & Private Applicators Structural A license is necessary for each government employee,
business owner or their employees who applies pesticides indoors of a government or business owned buildings.
http://www.flaes.org/pdfllmtdpckt.pdf.
Limited Certification for Commercial Landscape Maintenance A license is necessary for each commercial landscape
maintenance person who applies pesticides to ornamental plant beds. http://www.flaes.orq/pdfllndspckt.pdf

8:00 8: 30 am Registration
Review for all exam categories
8:30 10:15 am
Pesticide Safety, Labels, Laws and Regulations and Pest Identification
10:15- 10:30 am Break
10:30 11:20 am IPM and Biological Control
11:20 am 12:10 pm Key Plants/Key Pests
12:10 -1:10pm Lunch on your own
1:10 2:00 pm Why Landscapes Fail
2:00 2:50 pm Mistaken Identities
2:50 3:15 pm Break/ Study
3:15 Exams administered for Limited Certification Licenses


LIMITED CERTIFICATION REVIEW REGISTRATION SATURDAY, JULY 28, 2007
$20 PER PERSON NON-REFUNDABLE FEE FOR CLASS


Name

Business

Mailing Address

City/State/Zip

Phone ( )


Please check which license you're applying for:

Limited Lawn & Ornamental ]

Limited Structural ]

Limited Landscape Maintenance ]


Do you need a confirmation? How should we send it?
E Fax D Email


Email


Deadline to register: July 25, 2007. Make check payable to "Horticulture Advisory Account" and send to Maggie Jarrell at Lake County Ext, 1951 Woodlea Road, Tavares, FL 32778.
Special accommodations: Persons with disabilities needing assistance to attend should contact the County Extension Office at least 5 working days in advance of the meeting.


The Institute of Food and Agricultural Science (IFAS) is an Equal Employment Opportuty-Affirmative Action Employer authonzed to provide research, educational information and other services only to individuals and
institutions that function without regard to race, color, sex, age, handicap or national orgin U S DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, FLORIDA COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA,
IFAS. FLORIDA A & M UNIVERSITY COOPERATIVE EXTENSION PROGRAM. AND BOARDS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS COOPERATING











LAKE COUNTY EXTENSION
1951 WOODLEA ROAD
TAVARES, FL


The Lake County Extension Office is located just north of the Florida Turnpike, between 1-75 and 1-4.
Directions
From the Turnpike, take Exit #289, Leesburg North (US 27) to US 441.
From 1-75, take Exit #329, SR 44 East.
Where US 27 and US 441 merge, take US 441 South to Tavares. As you enter Tavares, veer off to the right on Old 441.
Turn right at the first traffic light onto SR 19, heading South. Turn right again at the third traffic light at Woodlea Road.
The Extension Office is on the left. It is a cream-colored one-story building.






UF UNIVERSITY of

U FAS ExtnI

IFAS Extension


Orange County/University of Florida
IFAS Extension Education Center
6021 S Conway Rd
Orlando, FL 32812
(407) 254-9200
FAX (407) 850-5125
http: //landscape.ifas.ufl.edu


REVIEW AND EXAMS FOR RESTRICTED USE ORNAMENTAL & TURF OR
PRIVA TEAGRICUL TUREAPPLICA TOR PESTICIDE LICENSES

ORANGE COUNTY EXTENSION SERVICE, ORLANDO, FL. AUGUST 30, 2007

$20 NON-REFUNDABLE FEE FOR THE CLASS


Private Applicator Agricultural This license will be issued to persons who apply or supervise the application of restricted use
pesticides for agricultural production such as vegetable, fruit, or cattle farm, sod farm or nursery and greenhouse. You will need
to take both the General Standards exam and the Private Agricultural Applicator exam.

Ornamental and Turf This license is for persons employed on a golf course, park, athletic field, or cemetery. You will need to
take both the General Standards exam and the Ornamental and Turf exam.

Training manuals cover exam questions SM1-Core/Gereral Standards, SM7 & SM38-Ornamental and Turf, SM53-Private Ag. They
can be ordered at 800-226-1764 or http://ifasbooks.ufl.edu If you plan to take an exam, you should study the training
manuals.


8:00 8:30 AM Registration
8:30 11:00 AM Review for the General Standards Exam
11:00 NOON IPM and Pests
NOON 1:00 PM Lunch on your own
1:00 2:00 PM Calibration/Equipment Review
2:00 PM All Exams Administered


REGISTRATION REQUIRED $20 NON-REFUNDABLE
PESTICIDE APPLICATOR TRAINING & TESTING
AUGUST 30, 2007

Name CHECK WHICH CLASS YOU WILL BE ATTENDING

Business General Standards (CORE) Review D

Address Exam D

Private Applicator Agricultural Review D


City/State/Zip Exam


Phone (


Ornamental/Turf


Email

Confirmation of registrations by: 0 Fax 0 Email


Review


Exam


Deadline to register: August24, 2007. Make check payable to "Orange County Extension Fund"and send to Celeste White,
at 6021 S. Conway Rd. Orlando, FL 32812. Special accommodations: Persons with disabilities needing assistance to attend
should contact the County Extension Office at least 5 working days in advance of the meeting.

The Institute of Food and Agricultural Science (IFAS) is an Equal Employment Opportunity-Affirmative Action Employer authorized to provide research, educational information and other services
only to individuals and institutions that function without regard to race, color, sex, age, handicap or national origin U S DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, FLORIDA COOPERATIVE
EXTENSION SERVICE, UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, IFAS, FLORIDA A & M UNIVERSITY COOPERATIVE EXTENSION PROGRAM, AND BOARDS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
COOPERATING









Orange County/UF/IFAS Extension Education Center
6021 South Conway Road
Orlando, FL 32812-3604
Office: (407) 254-9200
Fax: (407) 850-5125
http://landscape.ifas.ufl.edu


,w --- --nn I-


1


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0
a.
0

I-


East-West Expy



o
Hoffner Ave
_____________________________----- ----------------- a,________----

Orange County Extension <
Education Center
6021 S. Conway Rd.
Orlando, Florida 436
J Vista Blvd


Judge Rd


Beach Line (Bee LineS EXDV .


Orla- o
II
InternstionaI. t
Beac UnjB- "-' --


A JS h


From north Orange County: Take I-4 west to E. Michigan Street and turn left. Continue to Bumby Avenue and turn right. Turn left on
Lake Margaret Drive, then turn right on Conway Road. Continue south approximately 3 miles to the Extension Education Center at 6021
S. Conway Road.

From west Orange County: Take Colonial Drive to I-4 West. Exit at E. Michigan Street and turn left. Continue to Bumby Avenue and
turn right. Turn left on Lake Margaret Drive, then turn right on Conway Road. Continue south approximately 3 miles to the Extension
Education Center at 6021 S. Conway Rd.

From east Orange County: Take Colonial Drive west to Semoran Blvd / 436 and turn left. Continue south for approximately 5 miles,
then turn right on Hoffner Road. Turn left onto S. Conway Road. Continue south approximately 0.8 miles to the Extension Education
Center at 6021 S. Conway Rd.

From south Orange County: Take Sand Lake Road to Jetport Drive (near Boggy Creek Road). Go straight on Jetport Drive, then turn
left onto Tradeport Drive. Tradeport Drive becomes S. Conway Road. Continue north approximately 0.9 miles to the Extension Education
Center at 6021 S. Conway Road.


T




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