Group Title: Press bulletin
Title: Hay
CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00090347/00001
 Material Information
Title: Hay
Series Title: Press bulletin
Physical Description: 2 leaves : ; 21 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Rolfs, P. H ( Peter Henry ), 1865-1944
University of Florida -- Agricultural Experiment Station
Publisher: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station
Place of Publication: Gainesville
Publication Date: 1910
 Subjects
Subject: Hay -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by P.H. Rolfs.
General Note: Caption title.
General Note: "September 10, 1910."
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00090347
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 79948458

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HISTORIC NOTE


The publications in this collection do
not reflect current scientific knowledge
or recommendations. These texts
represent the historic publishing
record of the Institute for Food and
Agricultural Sciences and should be
used only to trace the historic work of
the Institute and its staff. Current IFAS
research may be found on the
Electronic Data Information Source
(EDIS)

site maintained by the Florida
Cooperative Extension Service.






Copyright 2005, Board of Trustees, University
of Florida







PRESS BULLETIN 153 September 10, 1910

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION





HAY
BY P. H. ROLFS
This crop has been among those of the first importance in the United
States. In Florida, however, ft has never been given the attention it de-
serves. This is not because we do not have the proper plants for producing a
large amount of hay, but rather that our livestock have been able to exist
without hay being fed to them.
The hay crop of Florida, however, is becoming more important with each
succeeding year. During this summer we should give special attention to
producing as much hay as is possible. A large portion of the North and West
has either borne a small hay crop, or the hay crop has been practically a fail-
ure. Consequently, under normal conditions, the hay from the West will be
much higher priced than heretofore. Every farmer in the State of Florida
should see to it that he save as much hay as he can. If he has to buy hay, he
will find that it is high priced, therefore he should rather have some to sell.
The average hay production of Florida, according to the census for
the year 1909, was about one-half ton per farm. This production is al-
together too small, since there is scarcely a farmer in the State of Flor-
ida but could save at least several tons.- There are in the State at the pres-
ent time a number of orange growers who, in place of mowing off their grass
and allowing it to rot in the field, make it into hay, and thereby derive a nice
revenue from a by-product. In fact, in some cases the hay has yielded a bet-
ter profit than the citrus*fruit from the same area.
FOOD ELEMENTS IN DIFFERENT HAYS
Protein Carbohydrates
Beggarweed ............................16 per cent................................69 per cent.
Cowpea . ............ .................16 per cent........... ..............67 per cent.
Velvet bean..............................14 per cent..............................72 per cent.
Peanut ......... .............................. 13 per cent....................... ......73 per cent,
Crowfoot grass.................... .... 8 per cent ...........................75 per cent.
Crab grass ................... ... 7 per cent. ...... ...... ....... ........ 79 per cent.
Timothy........................................ 6 per cent........................82 per cent.
Millet ............. ... ...... ..... ..... 6 per cent......... ..................76 per cent.
Mexican clover...................... ...... 5 per cent.................................79 per cent.






EXPERIMENT STATION VALUATION OF HAYS
Timothy........ ......... ......... ........... ..................20.00 per ton.
Velvet bean........................... ......... ~....... ............................. 20.05 per ton.
Peanut ......................... ...................................... ........ 20.00 per ton.
Beggarweed............ .... ...... ................................ 19.95 per ton.
Crab grass.................--- ......................................... 19.60 per ton.
Cowpea .............. ................. ......... ............. 19.50 per ton.
Mexican clover............. ............. .................... ...... 19.05 per ton.
Crowfoot grass......................... ......... ... ........................ 19.00 per ton.
M illet.. ............... ......... ..... ................ ... ... ................. 18.65 per ton.
In making these calculations we have valued the protein (muscle and
bone-producing element) at 28J cents a unit, and the carbohydrate (fat-pro-
ducing element) at 22J cents a unit. This gives Timothy a value, in round
numbers, of $20 per ton.
HAYMAKING
There is quite as much of a knack in making hay as there is in producing
any other farm crop. It' should be mown before the stalks become tough and
before the seed has matured. This will vary considerably with different
plants. The leguminous plants,, such as the beggarweed, cowpea, velvet bean
and peanut, should be dried very quickly. It is best to mow in the afternoon,
thus allowing the leaves to wilt slightly before night. Then during dry
weather the hay will be in fair condition, ordinarily, to be placed under shel-
ter before the next night. If cowpeas and beggarweed are mown in the
morning and nearly dried, the leaves are likely to shatter badly before the
crop is entirely dry, thus losing the most nutritious portion of the hay. Vel-
vet beans, as a rule, cannot be easily mown without a special attachment to
the mower, and for the most part are used as a field forage. Peanut hay is
usually made with the "nuts" attached, though in some instances it is made
without the nuts. Mexican clover, crowfoot grass, millet, and crab grass
may be mown almost any time of the day, but preferably during the after-
noon, and allowed to wilt and partially dry before night. If completely dried
before night and heavy dews occur, the hay is likely to bleach out considerably
and not be as bright and palatable as it otherwise would.
Mexican clover is not a legume. This will be apparent at once from the
above table, which shows that it is rather low in protein. Though it is low in
nutritive elements, it is one of the most palatable hays. For the western and
northern part of Florida it makes one of the best hay crops that we have.
The yield is large, and the entire material is consumed by the animals.


State papers please copy.




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