Group Title: Press bulletin
Title: Japanese cane--fertilizer experiments
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00090305/00001
 Material Information
Title: Japanese cane--fertilizer experiments
Series Title: Press bulletin
Physical Description: 2 leaves : ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Rolfs, P. H ( Peter Henry ), 1865-1944
University of Florida -- Agricultural Experiment Station
Publisher: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station
Place of Publication: Gainesville
Publication Date: 1911
 Subjects
Subject: Sugarcane -- Fertilizers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Sugarcane -- Varieties -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by P.H. Rolfs.
General Note: Caption title.
General Note: "April 1, 1911."
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00090305
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 84243264

Full Text





PRESS BULLETIN 167


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION





JAPANESE CANE-FERTILIZER EXPERIMENTS
By P. H. Rolfs
Fertilizer experiments with Japanese cane have been carried on for two
years by the Experiment Station; and while the work is to be continued, the
results so far obtained may be given here.
1. Japanese cane is a gross feeder, and produced the largest yield with
a complete fertilizer and lime.
2. Ground limestone increased the yield 25 per cent.
3. Sulphate of ammonia gave on the whole a larger yield than dried
blood.
4. Muriate of potash gave a somewhat larger yield than high-grade sul-
phate of potash.
Incomplete Fertilizers
Where fertilizers were used containing no ammonia, the plot yielded an
average of 15 tons of green matter per acre; while six plots treated with fer-
tilizer containing ammonia, yielded on the average sixteen and three tenths
tons per acre. (See Table.)
On the plots that were treated with fertilizer containing no potash, we
find that the yield averaged 13.1 tons per acre per year; while those plots
which were treated with a fertilizer containing potash Yielded 16.6 tons per
acre per year.
The plot which received a fertilizer containing no phosphoric acid, yielded
an average crop for the two years of 19.4 tons per acre; while the average
of six plots which received a fertilizer containing phosphoric acid was only
35.6 tons per acre per year. By referring to the table it will be noticed -that
the plot which received no phosphoric acid yielded the largest tonnage dur-
ing the first year, excepting Plot No. 8. This indicates strongly that a suffi-
cient amount of phosphoric acid was held over in the soil from the previous
year.
Complete Fertilizers and Limestone
Taking the three plots which received incomplete fertilizer, we have an
average of 15.8 tons per acre per year, while in four plots which received a


April 1, 1911









complete fertilizer, we have an average of 16.3 tons per acre per year. That
plot which received limestone at the rate of one ton per acre produced a crop
of 21.5 tons per acre. In other words, the addition of the ton of ground lime-
stone increased the productiveness of the crop rather more than twenty-five
per cent. This may have been due to the limestone correcting the acidity of
the soil, or it may have been due to a lack of calcium which the ground lime-
stone supplied.
Separate Ingredients
Taking the different chemical elements into consideration, we find that
the dried blood gave an average for the four plots of 15.8 tons per acre per
year; while 'the two plots that received sulphate of ammonia gave an average
of 17.2 tons per acre per year. On a two years' basis, it would seem that
sulphate of ammonia was a better source of ammonia for Japanese cane than
dried, blood.
In the case of the potash, we find that the four plots treated with muriate
of potash yielded 15.7 tons per acre per year; while the two plots treated
with high-grade sulphate of potash gave 14.6 tons per acre per year. This
would indicate that muriate of potash was perhaps a better form of potash
for Japanese cane than the high-grade sulphate.
We find likewise that the combination of sulphate of ammonia and mu-
riate of potash with a sufficient amount of acid phosphate gave us a higher
yield per acre than other combinations which included acid phosphate. The
highest tonnage was produced, however, where ground limestone was used
in connection with the complete fertilizer.
Japanese Cane-Fertilizer Test, 1909-10

Plot lot Pot Plot Plot lPot Plot P lot
I II III IV V VI VII VIII

Dried Blood.... .. ............- ........-- 112 ....... 112 ......... 112 ....... 112 112
Sulphate of am m onia................................ .......... 72 ......... 72 ......--
M uriate of potash..........: .............. 84 84 .......... 84 84 .........
Sulphate of potash .... ........- .... ....... .... .... ---.. --.--.. ---- .......... 84 84 84
Acid phosphate..... .............. .. .......224224 224 224 224 224
a Ground lim estone..................... ...... .. ..... ... .......... .......... 2000
Total fertilizer per acre ............ 1196 308 336 380 420 380 420 420
b Yield, tons, 1909............--...--24.2 .17.7 16.1 19.1 19.5 18.9 16.6 27.0
b Yield, tons, 1910................... 14.6 12.4 10.0 14.4 11.8 16.7 14.1 16.0
a Ground limestone is not considered as a fertilizer, but as a soil corrective.
bGreen material.


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