Group Title: Press bulletin
Title: Cowpeas
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00090293/00001
 Material Information
Title: Cowpeas
Series Title: Press bulletin
Physical Description: 2 leaves : ; 23 cm.
Language: English
Creator: Scott, John M ( John Marcus )
University of Florida -- Agricultural Experiment Station
Publisher: Florida Agricultural Experiment Station
Place of Publication: Gainesville
Publication Date: 1911
 Subjects
Subject: Cowpea -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: by John M. Scott.
General Note: Caption title.
General Note: "June 10, 1911."
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00090293
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 82927329

Full Text






PRESS BULLETIN 170


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION


COWPEAS

BY JOHN M. SCOTT


There are probably more than a hundred distinct varieties of cowpeas.
Out of this large number we have only found two that we can recommend to
the farmers of Florida. During the past three years the Experiment Station
has tested 110 kinds of cowpea. From among these we have found two sorts,
the Iron and the Brabham, that are well suited to Florida conditions. They
are the best for us because they are the only kinds yet known that are resist-
ant to root-knot, and because they produce more hay than any other variety.
YIELDS OF HAY.
On July 27, 1909, a field was planted to Brabham cowpeas, which when
harvested on October 4, sixty-eight days after planting, gave a yield of 4096
pounds of cured hay per acre. A variety test was conducted last year with
eight sorts, the seed being both drilled and sown broadcast. The results were
as follows:
YIELDS OF HAY PER ACRE. Broadcast. Drilled.
Brabham.................... ............... .. .... ........ 2320 lbs...............2520 lbs.
N ew Era ........................ ....... ..............1530 ...............1050
Red Ripper.......................... .---...--- ......... 1600 .............1312 "
Unknown .................. ......... ....... .......... ..1050 ..............2056 "
Iron ..................................... ...................1700 ................2012 "
W hippoorwill.............. ......-............................1250 .............1837 "
SGroit......................... ......... ... .............. ........... ........ 1050 .... .......... 962 "
Peerless............... ............. ... ....-- .................. ...... 1650 2........... 2231 "
TIME TO PLANT.
During June and July will be found a good time to plant cowpeas. They
can be planted much earlier than June; but if sown much before June 15, they
will mature and be ready to harvest during the season of the year when we


June 10, 1911









are likely to have considerable rainfall. At this season of the year, it will be
found almost impossible to save the hay.
The cowpea requires a warm growing season for its best development.
As it only needs a short growing period, from sixty to eighty days, it can be
used to good advantage as a catch-crop or an after-crop. It can be planted
after any crop that can be harvested by the first of July. Therefore, it fits in
well after spring and summer vegetable crops. Cowpeas can also be planted
after oats, and can be sown in the corn field at the last cultivation of the corn.
In this latter case the crop requires but little attention after planting until
ready to harvest.
FEEDING VALUE.
Comparing well-cured cowpea hay with wheat bran, we find that, pound
for pound, they are nearly equal for milk and meat production. Comparing it
to cottonseed meal, we find that about three and a half pounds of hay are equal
to one pound of cottonseed meal in feeding value.
Good cowpea hay is relished by cattle, hogs, horses, mules, and chickens.
However, it will be found most satisfactory as a feed for cattle, hogs and
chickens. If horses and mules be fed cowpea hay as the only source of rough-
age, it will be found to give unsatisfactory results. If not more than one-half
or one-third of the roughage be replaced with cowpea hay, no difficulty is likely
to be experienced.
Hogs are fond of well-cured eowpea hay. When fed a liberal quantity,
it will be found to produce a good quality of pork which will be produced more
cheaply than when only corn is fed.
How TO PLANT.
During the past year a comparison was made between planting in rows
with a drill and giving good cultivation, and sowing the seed broadcast and
covering with the harrow. In nearly every case a larger yield of hay was se-
cured by planting in rows and cultivating.
Plant in rows 30 to 36 inches apart. Use from half a bushel to three
pecks of seed per acre. The planting may be done with an ordinary one-horse
corn-planter. It will only be necessary to change the drill plate. Use a drill
plate with eight or ten holes. The holes in the drill plate should be about half
as large as those used for planting corn.
If sown broadcast one bushel to one and a half bushels of seed will be
required per acre.
The preparation of the land will not differ whether the seed be planted
in rows or sown broadcast, and should be about the same as for corn or velvet
beans.


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