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Group Title: GCREC research report
Title: Seedless watermelon cultigen evaluation, Spring 1996
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00090238/00001
 Material Information
Title: Seedless watermelon cultigen evaluation, Spring 1996
Series Title: GCREC research report
Physical Description: 12 p. : ; 28 cm
Language: English
Creator: Maynard, Donald N., 1932-
Gulf Coast Research and Education Center (Bradenton, Fla.)
Publisher: Gulf Coast Research and Education Center
Place of Publication: Bradenton FL
Publication Date: 1996
 Subjects
Subject: Watermelons -- Varieties -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
bibliography   ( marcgt )
non-fiction   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references (p. 4-5).
Statement of Responsibility: D.N. Maynard.
General Note: Cover title.
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Bibliographic ID: UF00090238
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 309295678

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6'sC
UNIVERSITY OF
FLORIDA


Gulf Coast Research and Education Center
5007 60th Street East, Bradenton, FL 34203
GCREC-Bradenton Research Report BRA 1996-17


Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences




SEEDLESS WATERMELON CULTIGEN EVALUATION
SPRING 1996


D. N. Maynard








GCREC Research Report BRA 1996-17


SEEDLESS WATERMELON CULTIGEN EVALUATION
SPRING 1996

D. N. Maynard'
Gulf Coast Research and Education Center
University of Florida, IFAS
5007 60th Street East
Bradenton, FL 34203

The concept of seedless watermelons was described first in the U.S. literature by Kihara (1951)
based on experimentation that began in Japan in 1939. Seed for planting seedless watermelons
results from a cross between a selected tetraploid female parent, developed by treating diploid lines
with colchicine, and a selected diploid (normal) male parent. The resulting triploid plants are sterile
and do not produce viable seed. However, small, white rudimentary seeds develop which are eaten
along with the flesh just as immature seeds are eaten in cucumber.

Fruit enlargement in normal fruit, including watermelon, is enhanced by growth-promoting
hormones produced by the developing seed. Growth hormones are lacking in seedless watermelons
so those agents must be provided by pollen. Since flowers on triploid plants lack sufficient viable
pollen to induce normal fruit set, normal diploid seeded watermelons are interplanted with triploids
to serve as pollenizers. An adequate bee population is necessary to insure that sufficient transfer of
pollen occurs. Seedless fruit (from triploid plants) tend to be triangular shaped without sufficient
pollination.

Although the procedure for production of seedless watermelons has been known for almost 50 years
and commercial varieties have been available for nearly 20 years, the interest in and acreage of
seedless watermelons has remained small in Florida. Erratic performance, poor seed germination,
high seed costs, and inadequate varieties resulted in the lack of interest in seedless watermelon
production.

Specialty vegetables are in high demand and seedless watermelons offer an attractive alternative for
discriminating consumers and the food service industry. Seedless watermelons are being actively
promoted by marketing organizations and seed companies to stimulate demand. At the same time,
new varieties are being developed that are superior to those previously available. Seedless
watermelons have been evaluated at this location annually since 1988 (Maynard and Gilreath, 1988;
Maynard 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995).

The objective of this trial was to evaluate the performance of seedless watermelon cultigens under
west-central Florida conditions.


'Professor and Vegetable Extension Specialist.


December










MATERIALS AND METHODS

Seeds of 38 seedless watermelon varieties or experimental lines for replicated trials (Table 1) were
planted in a peat-lite growing mix in No. 128 Todd planter flats (1.5 x 1.5 x 2.5 in. cells) on 17
February. The watermelon transplants were grown by a commercial plant grower.

Soil samples from the experimental area obtained before fertilization were analyzed by the
University of Florida Extension Soil Testing Laboratory (Hanlon and DeVore, 1989): pH = 7.2 and
Mehlich I extractable P = 42 (high), K = 15 (very low), Mg = 115 (high), Ca = 803 (adequate), Zn
=3.3 (adequate), Cu = 1.8 (adequate), and Mn = 2.5 (deficient) ppm.

The EauGallie fine sand was prepared in early February by incorporation of 0-1.2-0 lb. N-P205-K20
per 100 linear bed feet (lbf). Beds were formed and fumigated with methylbromide:chloropicrin,
67:33 at 2.3 lb/100 lbf. Banded fertilizer was applied in shallow grooves on the bed shoulders at 3.1-
0-4.3 lb N-P205-K20/100 lbf after the beds were pressed and before the black polyethylene mulch was
applied. The total fertilizer applied was equivalent to 148-60-206 lb N-P205-K20/A. The final beds
were 32 in. wide and 8 in. high, and were spaced on 9 ft centers with four beds between seepage
irrigation/ drainage ditches which were on 41 ft centers.

Transplant return, the percentage of seeds that developed into acceptable transplants, for each entry
was determined prior to transplanting in holes punched in the polyethylene at 2.5 ft in-row spacing
on 26 March. The replicated plots were 17.5-ft long and had seven plants each and were repeated
three times in a randomized, complete block design. Standard watermelons that were being
evaluated were direct seeded in beds on each side of two seedless watermelon beds on 12 March to
serve as diploid pollenizers. Weed control in row middles was by cultivation and applications of
paraquat. Pesticides were applied as needed for control of silverleaf whitefly endosulfann and
esfenvalerate), aphids endosulfann), and gummy stem blight (chlorothalonil and metalaxyl-
chlorothalonil).

Watermelons were harvested on 4-10 June and 19-21 June. Marketable (U.S. No. 1 or better) fruit
according to U.S. Standards for Grades (1978) were separated from culls and counted and weighed
individually. Tetraploid fruit, where they occurred, were not included in the marketable category
because they are not seedless. Soluble solids were determined with a hand-held refractometer on
at least six fruit from each entry at each harvest and the incidence and severity of hollowheart were
noted on these fruit. Where possible, the resulting data were subjected to analysis of variance and
mean separation was by Duncan's multiple range test.

RESULTS AND DISCUSSION

Temperature (Table 2) during the experimental period from 26 March to 21 June was near normal.
Rainfall during the fruit development period was greater than normal which did not provide good
watermelon growing conditions. Also, there was considerable plant damage from wind early in the
season which caused plant loss and necessitated some resetting.










Transplant return varied from 50% for 'Millionaire' to 97% for 'Summer Sweet 5244' (Table 3). The
average return of named varieties was 85%, whereas the transplant return of experimental lines was
76%. This agrees with results obtained in previous studies (Maynard, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993,
1994, 1995) when return of named varieties also was higher than that of experimental lines.
Differences in performance of seed of named varieties and experimental lines may be related to seed
quality as influenced by production techniques or seed storage conditions. Characteristics of the
individual hybrid also may contribute to variations in seed performance.

Early yields, represented by the first of two harvests, ranged from 133 cwt/acre for 95-14 to 352
cwt/acre for 'Favorite Ball' (Table 3). Thirty-one other entries had yields similar to those of 95-14
and 33 other entries had yields similar to those of 'Favorite Ball'. Average fruit weight at the first
harvest varied from 11.6 lbs for 95-14 to 22.7 lbs for W 0037. Soluble solids concentrations ranged
from 11.4 % for 'Jack of Hearts' to 14.4 % for W 0016. The percentage of fruit having hollowheart
at the first harvest ranged from 0 for 'Millionaire', 92-08, 'Favorite Ball', RWM 8008, 'Tri-X-
Shadow', SSC 460066, W 0037 and 3F 1174 to 83% for WM 8009, 'Scarlet Trio' and 3F 855. The
severity of hollowheart varied from 0 for the aforementioned entries to 2.9 in. diameter separations
for 'Scarlet Trio'.

Total yields (Table 3) varied from 243 cwt/acre for W 5001 to 507 cwt/acre for 'Millionaire', but
only W 5001 and 95-14 had yields that were significantly lower than 'Millionaire'. Total yields far
exceeded the state average yield of 220 cwt/acre for the 1990-91 to 1994-95 seasons (Gender and
Pugh, 1996). Average fruit weight for the entire season ranged from 12.4 lbs for 3F 1273 to 20.0
lbs. for 'Ace of Hearts' and W 0037. Soluble solids concentrations varied from 11.5% for 'Jack of
Hearts' and 'Crimson Trio' to 13.9% for W 0016. Accordingly, soluble solids in all entries far
exceeded the 10% specified for optimal use in the U.S. watermelon grade standards to describe very
good interval quality (U.S.D.A., 1978). The incidence of hollowheart ranged from 0 for
'Millionaire', 92-08, 'Favorite Ball', W 0037, 3F 1174, and W 4033 to 67% for WM 8009. The
severity of hollowheart varied from 0 for these varieties to 2.3 in. for 'Crimson Trio'.

SUMMARY

Since most seedless watermelons are packed in cartons, it is desirable to have relatively uniformly
sized fruit. Many entries (Table 4) had the majority of their fruit weighing between 10 and 20 Ib,
therefore they could be packed four per carton with a carton weight of about 60 lb.

Seedless watermelon variety trials have been conducted at this location each spring season since
1988. The highest yields ranged from 507 cwt/acre in this year to 1161 cwt/acre in 1993 (Maynard,
1993). In spring 1996, the highest yield in the replicated trial was 507 cwt/acre which was
considerably less than the 811 cwt/acre average yield of the previous eight years.

Variety shape and rind patterns, based on observations in this trial, are shown in Table 1. Varieties
producing oval to oblong fruit may be more suitable for boxing than varieties producing round
melons. Generally, the striped melons are more attractive for the U.S. market than those with dark
stripes on a very dark green background, or those with a solid dark green rind.











Based on results of this and previous trials, varieties, in alphabetical order, that appear to have
considerable potential for commercial production in Florida include 'Crimson Trio', 'Genesis', 'King
of Hearts', 'Millionaire', 'Scarlet Trio', 'Summer Flavor 5032', 'Summer Sweet 5244', and 'Tri-X-
313'. 'Tiffany' was not included in this trial, but has performed well in several past trials.

NOTE

The information contained in this report is a summary of experimental results and should not be used
as recommendations for crop production. Where trade names are used, no discrimination is intended
and no endorsement is implied.

ACKNOWLEDGMENT

The author appreciates the financial support for watermelon variety evaluation provided by Abbott
& Cobb, Inc., American Sunmelon, Asgrow Seed Co., Harris Moran, Petoseed, Rogers Seed Co.,
Sakata Seed Co., Shamrock Seed Co., Sunseeds Co., and John C. Van Diepen.

LITERATURE CITED

Gender, J. K. and N. L. Pugh. 1991. Florida Agricultural Statistics. Vegetable Summary 1994-95.
Florida Agricultural Statistics Service, Orlando.

Hanlon, E. A. and J. M. DeVore. 1989. IFAS extension soil testing laboratory chemical procedures
and training manual. Fla. Coop. Ext. Circ. 812.

Kihara, H. 1951. Triploid watermelons. Proc. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci. 58:217-230.

Maynard, D. N. 1989. Seedless watermelon variety evaluation, spring 1989. Gulf Coast Research
and Education Center Res. Rept. BRA1989-16.

Maynard, D. N. 1990. Seedless watermelon variety evaluation, spring 1990. Gulf Coast Research
and Education Center Res. Rept. BRA1990-14.

Maynard, D. N. 1991. Seedless watermelon variety evaluation, spring 1991. Gulf Coast Research
and Education Center Res. Rept. BRA1991-21.

Maynard, D. N. 1992. Seedless watermelon variety evaluation, spring 1992. Gulf Coast Research
and Education Center Res. Rept. BRA1992-18.

Maynard, D. N. 1993. Seedless watermelon cultigen evaluation, spring 1993. Gulf Coast Research
and Education Center Res. Rept. BRA 1993-18.










Maynard, D. N. 1994. Seedless watermelon cultigen evaluation, spring 1994. Gulf Coast Research
and Education Center Res. Rept. BRA 1994-21.

Maynard, D. N. 1995. Seedless watermelon cultigen evaluation, spring 1995. Gulf Coast Research
and Education Center Res. Rept. BRA 1995-24.

Maynard, D. N. and P. R. Gilreath. 1988. Seedless watermelon variety evaluation, spring 1988.
Gulf Coast Research and Education Center Res. Rept. BRA1988-18.

Stanley, C. D. 1996. Weather report for 1995. Gulf Coast Research and Education Center Res.
Rept. BRA 1996-06.

USDA U.S. Standards for Grades of Watermelons. 1978. AMS, Washington, D.C.


Table. 1.


Seedless watermelon entries, descriptions, and seed sources. Gulf Coast Research
& Education Center, Bradenton. Spring 1996.


Entry Description Source


Ace of Hearts


ASM F464


ASM 5092


Crimson Trio


Deuce of
Hearts

Favorite Ball


Elongated, blocky. Wide, indistinct dark-green
stripes on light-green background.

Oval. Indistinct, wide, medium-green stripes on
light-green background. Similar to 'Tri-X-313'.

Oval/round. Distinct, narrow dark-green stripes
on medium-green background. Smoky rind
color.

Oval. Indistinct, wide, medium-green stripes on
light-green background. Similar to 'Tri-X-313'.

Round/oval. Narrow medium-green stripes on
light-green background.

Oval. Narrow, distinct, dark-green stripes on
medium-green background. Thin rind. Good
internal color.


Petoseed


American Sunmelon


American Sunmelon


Rogers


Petoseed


Known You










Genesis


HMX 7928


Jack of Hearts


King of Hearts


Millionaire


Queen of
Hearts


Revelation

RWM 8008



Scarlet Trio



SSC 856


SSC 460066


Summer Sweet
5244

Summer Sweet
5544

Tri-X-313


Oval. Indistinct, wide, dark-green stripes on
light-green background. Similar to 'Tri-X-313'.

Oval. Very dark-green indistinct lines on dark-
green background.

Round/oval. Indistinct, wide, medium-green
stripes on light-green background.

Oval. Indistinct, dark-green stripes on medium-
green background. Similar to 'Tri-X-313'.

Oval. Indistinct, wide, dark-green stripes on
light-green background. Similar to 'Tri-X-313'.

Oval. Distinct, dark-green stripes on medium-
green background.

Oval. Indistinct, wide, dark-green stripes on
light-green background. Similar to 'Tri-X-313'.

Oval. Distinct, narrow, dark-green stripes on
medium-green background. Similar to 'Queen
of Hearts'.

Oval. Thin, distinct, dark-green stripes on light-
green background. Similar to 'Queen of
Hearts'.

Oval. Narrow, distinct, dark-green stripes on
medium-green background. Yellow flesh.

Oval. Wide, indistinct, dark-green stripes on
light-green background. Similar to 'Tri-X-313'.

Oval. Indistinct, wide, dark-green stripes on
light-green background. Similar to 'Tri-X-313'.

Oval. Indistinct, wide, dark-green stripes on
light-green background. Similar to 'Tri-X-313'.

Oval. Indistinct, wide, medium-green stripes on
light-green background.


Shamrock


Harris Moran


Petoseed


Petoseed


Harris Moran


Petoseed


Shamrock


Rogers



Rogers



Shamrock


Shamrock


Abbott & Cobb


Abbott & Cobb


American Sunmelon










Tri-X-Shadow Oval. Smoky medium-green background with American Sunmelon
darker green distinct lines.

W 0016 Round/oval. Narrow dark-green stripes on Pioneer
medium-green background.

W 0037 Elongated. Wide, dark-green stripes alternating Pioneer
with narrow light-green stripes. 'All Sweet'
type.

W 0038 Elongated. Distinct dark-green stripe on a Pioneer
smoky medium-green background.

W 1003 Oval/round. Narrow, distinct, dark-green stripe Pioneer
on medium-green background. Similar to
'Queen of Hearts'.

W 1025 Oval. Wide, indistinct dark-green stripes on Pioneer
light-green background. Similar to 'Tri-X-313'.

W 3022 Elongated/blocky. Distinct, dark-green stripe on Pioneer
light-green background. 'Jubilee' type.

W 3053 Oval. Indistinct, very dark-green stripes on Pioneer
medium-green background. Similar to
'Tiffany'.

W 4033 Elongated/blocky. Indistinct light-green stripes Pioneer
on dark-green background. 'Allsweet' type.

W 5001 Elongated/blocky. Indistinct light-green stripes Pioneer
on dark-green background. 'Allsweet' type.

WM 8009 Round/oval. Indistinct, wide, dark-green stripes Rogers
on a light-green background.

3F 855 Round/oval. Distinct, narrow, dark-green stripe Known You
on light-green background.

3F 1004 Oval. Wide, indistinct, dark-green stripes on Known You
light-green background. Similar to 'Tri-X-313'.










3F 1174


3F 1273


92-08



95-11



95-14


Oval. Dark-green rind. Similar to 'Sugar
Baby'. Thin rind. Good internal color.

Oval. Narrow very dark-green on dark-green
background.

Oval. Wide, indistinct, dark-green stripes on
medium-green background. Similar to 'Tri-X-
313'.

Oval. Narrow, distinct dark-green stripe on
light-green background. Similar to 'Queen of
Hearts'.

Oval. Wide, indistinct, dark-green stripes on
light-green background. Similar to 'Tri-X-313'.


Table 2. Temperature and rainfall at the GCREC during the spring of 1996 and the 42-year
averages (Stanley, 1996).


Average Daily Temperature (F)
Maximum Minimum Rainfall (in.)
Month 1996' 42-vr avg 1996' 42-vr avg 1996' 42-yr avg

March 75 78 52 55 5.50 3.45
April 81 82 58 60 1.58 1.83
May 88 87 67 64 9.52 2.86
June 90 89 70 70 11.75 7.96


'Field transplanted 26 March 1996. Last harvest 21 June 1996.


Known You


Known You


Sakata



Sakata



Sakata











Table 3. Transplant return, early and total yields, average fruit weight, soluble solids, and the incidence and severity of hollowheart of seedless
watermelons. Gulf Coast Research and Education Center, Bradenton. Spring 1996.


Transplant Early Harvest2 Total Harvest
Return' Weight Avg. fruit Soluble Hollowheart Weight Avg. fruit Soluble Hollowheart
Entry (%) (cwt/A3) wt (lb) solids (%) (%) (in.) (cwt/A3) wt (lb) solids (%) (%) (in.)

Millionaire 50 319 a-c4 19.7 a-c 11.7 fe 0 c 0 d 507 a 18.7 a-d 12.2 b-e 0 d Oe
Queen of Hearts 96 332 a-c 15.8 c-f 12.4 b-f 25 b-c 0.1 cd 503 ab 14.8 g-l 12.5 be 33 a-d 0.3 d-e
92-08 70 315 a-d 14.4 c-f 12.3 b-f 0 c 0 d 495 ab 13.7 j-1 12.4 b-e 0 d 0 e
Favorite Ball 82 352 a 13.2 ef 12.7 b-f 0 c 0 d 470 ab 13.0 kl 12.6 a-e 0 d 0 e
Summer Sweet 5244 97 335 a-c 19.5 a-c 12.9 a-f 33 a-c 0.7 cd 464 ab 18.9 a-c 13.2 ab 42 a-c 0.9 b-e

Ace of Hearts 86 217 a-e 21.6 ab 13.3 a-d 33 a-c 0.2 cd 461 ab 20.0 a 12.8 a-d 42 a-d 0.6 c-e
ASM 5092 67 255 a-e 16.7 b-f 13.7 a-b 18 bc 0.2 cd 451 ab 15.8 c-k 12.8 a-e 8 d 0.1 e
Jack of Hearts 77 242 a-e 16.4 b-f 11.4 f 61 ab 0.7 cd 450 ab 15.2 e-l 11.5 e 40 a-d 0.5 c-e
ASM F464 85 251 a-e 18.2 a-e 12.6 b-f 18 bc 0.0 d 434 a-c 16.7 c-j 13.0 a-c 13 cd 0.1 e
Crimson Trio 88 257 a-e 15.6 c-f 12.0 d-f 68 ab 2.8 a 432 a-c 16.8 b-j 11.5 de 58 a-c 2.3 a

RWM 8008 75 337 ab 16.6 b-f 13.0 a-f 0 c 0 d 427 a-c 15.9 c-k 12.7 a-e 6 d 0 e
Tri-X-Shadow 63 263 a-e 16.7 b-f 12.5 b-f 0 c 0 d 426 a-c 16.5 c-j 12.3 b-e 17 b-d 0.3 d-e
WM 8009 62 264 a-e 16.7 b-f 13.3 a-d 83 a 1.7 a-c 426 a-c 17.9 a-g 13.1 ab 67 a 1.4 a-d
HMX 7928 86 233 a-e 13.9 ef 13.1 a-e 18 bc 0.5 cd 423 a-c 15.5 d-l 12.6 b-e 17 b-d 0.3 d-e
Deuce of Hearts 91 213 a-e 15.1 c-f 12.8 a-f 33 a-c 1.1 b-d 409 a-c 15.0 f-I 12.2 b-e 37 a-d 0.7 b-e

Scarlet Trio 91 272 a-e 19.7 a-c 12.6 b-f 83 a 2.9 a 405 a-c 18.3 a-f 12.6 b-e 62 ab 1.6 a-c
King of Hearts 95 268 a-e 15.1 c-f 12.5 b-f 18 bc 0.2 c-d 399 a-c 15.0 f-1 12.7 a-e 31 a-d 0.5 c-e
W 1025 76 289 a-e 16.4 b-f 12.1 c-f 18 bc 0.1 cd 396 a-c 15.9 c-k 12.2 b-e 8 d 0.1 e
Revelation 90 244 a-e 15.6 c-f 13.1 a-e 18 bc 0.1 d 394 a-c 14.8 g-l 13.0 a-c 8 d 0 e
W 1003 68 279 a-e 13.9 ef 13.6 a-c 18 bc 0.1 d 393 a-c 15.0 e-l 13.5 ab 42 ad 0.2 e









Table 3. Continued.


Transplant Early Harvest2 Total Harvest
Return' Weight Avg. fruit Soluble Hollowheart Weight Avg. fruit Soluble Hollowheart
Entry (%) (cwt/A3) wt (lb) solids (%) (%) (in.) (cwt/A') wt (lb) solids (%) (%) (in.)

3F 1273 56 234 a-e 12.1 f 13.0 a-e 18 bc 0.1 d 391 a-c 12.41 12.8 a-d 8 d 0 e
3F 855 86 305 a-e 18.3 a-e 12.2 b-f 83 a 2.4 ab 390 a-c 18.4 a-e 13.1 a-c 58 a-c 1.8 ab
SSC 460066 82 251 a-e 18.3 a-e 13.5 a-d 0 c 0 d 389 a-c 17.2 a-i 13.1 a-c 17 b-d 0.1 e
Tri-X-313 66 272 a-e 16.9 b-f 12.4 b-f 18 bc 0.1 cd 388 a-c 17.2 a-i 12.5 b-e 8 d 0.1 e
Genesis 90 211 a-e 15.4 c-f 12.9 a-f 44 a-c 0.3 cd 387 a-c 15.5 d-1 12.8 a-e 30 a-d 0.2 e
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
W 3053 86 244 a-e 14.3 d-f 13.1 a-e 33 a-c 0.2 cd 374 a-c 15.6 c-I 13.0 a-c 36 a-d 0.6 c-e
W 0037 82 177 a-e 22.7 a 13.5 a-d Oc 0 d 368 a-c 20.0 ab 12.6 b-e Od Oe
W 3022 92 163 b-e 17.7 a-e 13.1 a-e 33 a-c 0.2 cd 365 a-c 18.8 a-d 13.0 a-c 25 a-d 0.1 e
Summer Sweet 5544 91 219 a-e 17.9 a-e 12.5 b-f 33 a-c 0.8 cd 358 a-c 16.6 c-i 12.5 b-e 33 a-d 0.7 b-e
95-11 65 261 a-e 16.6 b-f 13.1 a-e 33 a-c 0.7 cd 357 a-c 15.5 d-1 12.6 a-e 25 a-d 0.6 c-e
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
3F 1174 55 197 a-e 15.5 c-f 12.5 b-f 0 c 0 d 353 a-c 14.4 h-I 12.3 b-e 0 d 0 e
W 4033 90 295 a-e 17.6 a-e 12.9 a-f 18 bc 0.1 d 339 a-c 17.5 a-g 12.9 a-c 0 d 0.1 e
SSC 856 87 240 a-e 16.9 b-f 13.6 a-c 18 bc 0.1 cd 337 a-c 16.3 c-k 13.5 a-b 8 d 0.1 e
W 0016 95 205 a-e 14.5 c-f 14.4 a 18 bc 0.2 cd 328 a-c 14.4 h-1 13.9 a 25 a-d 0.2 e
3F 1004 87 247 a-e 14.4 c-f 13.2 a-e 33 a-c 0.7 cd 323 a-c 14.0 i-1 12.7 a-e 33 a-d 0.9 b-e
...............................--------------------------------------.........................................-----------------------------------------------------------------.
W 0038 70 137 de 15.9 c-f 12.0 d-f 18 be 0 d 321 a-c 15.9 c-k 12.3 b-e 28 a-d 0.4 de
95-14 59 133e 11.6f 12.5 b-f 25 bc 1.3 b-d 302 bc 14.9 g-1 12.5 b-e 8d 0.4 c-e
W 5001 87 155 c-e 18.5 a-e 12.3 b-f 57 a-c 0.5 cd 243 c 16.4 c-j 11.8 c-e 38 a-d 0.3 de


'Proportion of acceptable transplants of seeds planted.
2Early harvest based on first of two harvests.
3Acre = 4840 lbf.
4Mean separation in columns by Duncan's multiple range test, 5% level.








Table 4. Fruit size distribution of the total yield of seedless watermelon. Replicated trial. Gulf Coast
Research and Education Center, Bradenton. Spring 1996.


Fruit Wt (lb)

Entry 8-14 14.1-18.0 18.1-22.0 >22
------------------------- Percentage of fruit---------------------

Ace of Hearts 4 20 44 32
ASM F464 29 36 29 6
ASM 5092 39 29 29 3
Crimson Trio 29 32 29 10
Deuce of Hearts 57 20 20 3

Favorite Ball 77 21 2 0
Genesis 37 44 15 4
HMX 7928 50 33 10 7
Jack of Hearts 41 41 13 5
King of Hearts 34 52 14 0

Millionaire 7 47 33 13
Queen of Hearts 46 46 8 0
Revelation 52 31 17 0
RWM 8008 34 41 17 8
Scarlet Trio 17 33 21 29

SSC 856 48 30 9 13
SSC 460066 20 36 32 12
Summer Sweet 5244 15 37 22 26
Summer Sweet 5544 26 43 22 9
Tri-X-313 8 42 50 0

Tri-X-Shadow 18 50 29 3
W 0016 42 42 16 0
W 0037 5 30 35 30
W 0038 18 64 18 0
W 1003 48 31 17 4

W 1025 44 26 22 8
W3022 19 19 38 24
W 3053 46 23 23 8
W 4033 27 41 14 18
W 5001 19 50 25 6









Table 4. Continued.


Fruit Wt (lb)

Entry 8-14 14.1 18.0 18.1-22.0 >22
------------------------- Percentage of fruit-------------------------

WM 8009 12 46 31 11
3F 855 29 25 29 17
3F 1004 52 44 4 0
3F 1174 56 30 14 0
3F 1273 81 17 3 0
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
92-08 59 25 16 0
95-11 40 36 16 8
95-14 38 48 14 0







The Gulf Coast Research and Education Center


The Gulf Coast Research and Education Center is
a unit of the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sci-
ences, University of Florida. The Research Center
originated in the fall of 1925 as the Tomato
Disease Laboratory with the primary objective of
developing control procedures for an epidemic out-
break of nailhead spot of tomato. Research was ex-
panded in subsequent years to include study of sev-
eral other tomato diseases.

In 1937, new research facilities were established
in the town of Manatee, and the Center scope was
enlarged to include horticultural, entomological, and
soil science studies of several vegetable crops. The
ornamental program was a natural addition to the
Center's responsibilities because of the emerging in-
dustry in the area in the early 1940's.

The Center's current location was established in
1965 where a comprehensive research and extension
program on vegetable crops and ornamental plants is
conducted. Three state extension specialists posi-
tions, 16 state research scientists, and two grant
supported scientists from various disciplines of
training participate in all phases of vegetable and
ornamental horticultural programs. This interdisci-
plinary team approach, combining several research
disciplines and a wide range of industry and faculty
contacts, often is more productive than could be ac-
complished with limited investments in independent
programs.


The Center's primary mission is to develop new
and expand existing knowledge and technology, and
to disseminate new scientific knowledge in Florida, so
that agriculture remains efficient and economically
sound.

The secondary mission of the Center is to assist
the Cooperative Extension Service, IFAS campus
departments, in which Center faculty hold appropri-
ate liaison appointments, and other research centers
in extension, educational training, and cooperative
research programs for the benefit of Florida's pro-
ducers, students, and citizens.

Program areas of emphasis include: (1) genetics,
breeding, and variety development and evaluation;
(2) biological, chemical, and mechanical pest manage-
ment in entomology, plant pathology, nematology,
bacteriology, virology, and weed science; (3) produc-
tion efficiency, culture, management, and counteract-
ing environmental stress; (4) water management and
natural resource protection; (5) post-harvest physiol-
ogy, harvesting, handling and food quality of horti-
cultural crops; (6) technical support and assistance to
the Florida Cooperative Extension Service; and (7)
advancement of fundamental knowledge of disciplines
represented by faculty and (8) directing graduate
student training and teaching special undergraduate
classes.


Location of
GCREC Bradenton


IFAS IS:
" The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences,
University of Florida.
Q A statewide organization dedicated to teaching,
research and extension.
Q Faculty located in Gainesville and at 13 research
and education centers, 67 county extension
offices and four demonstration units throughout
the state.
" A partnership in food and agriculture, and natural
and renewable resource research and education,
funded by state, federal and local government,
and by gifts and grants from individuals, founda-
tions, government and industry.
Q An organization whose mission is:
Educating students in the food, agricultural,
and related sciences and natural resources.
Strengthening Florida's diverse food and
agricultural industry and its environment
through research.
Enhancing for all Floridians, the application
of research and knowledge to improve the
quality of life statewide through IFAS exten-
sion programs.




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