• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Project background
 Findings and recommendations
 Investing in the future
 Comprehensive strategies to achieve...
 Implementation strategies
 List of references
 Florida statutes and appropria...
 Vision plan
 Estimates of cost - example






Title: St. Augustine historic area strategic plan
ALL VOLUMES CITATION PDF VIEWER THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00090048/00001
 Material Information
Title: St. Augustine historic area strategic plan
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: RS&H
Publisher: University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00090048
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:

StAugustine_Historic_Area_Strategic_Plan_FINAL ( PDF )


Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Title Page
        Title Page
    Table of Contents
        Page i
        Page ii
        Page iii
    Project background
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
    Findings and recommendations
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
    Investing in the future
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
    Comprehensive strategies to achieve the vision
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
    Implementation strategies
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
    List of references
        Page A-1
        Page A-2
        Page A-3
    Florida statutes and appropriations
        Page B-1
        Page B-2
        Page B-3
        Page B-4
        Page B-5
        Page B-6
    Vision plan
        Page C-1
        Page C-2
        Page C-3
        Page C-4
        Page C-5
        Page C-6
        Page C-7
    Estimates of cost - example
        Page D-1
        Page D-2
Full Text












ST. AUGUSTINE


HISTORIC AREA STRATEGIC PLAN


JANUARY2009









ST. AUGUSTINE












PREPARED FOR:

UF UNIVERSITY of
UF FLORIDA

IN PARTNERSHIP WITH:


oBff st. 1$i m


HISTORIC AREA STRATEGIC PLAN
JANUARY2009


AND
THE


PREPARED BY:
RS&H
Pressley Associa tes
Economics Research Associates
Gallagher & Associates
Halback Design Group, Inc.
Kenneth Smith Architects, Inc.
Archaeological Consultants, Inc.

FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT:
Ed Poppell, UF, 352/392-1336, poppelluufl.edu
Linda Dixon, UF, 352/273-4000, Idixon@ufl.edu
Strategic Plan Website: http://www.facilities.ufl.edu/staugustine/index.htm


1. RS&H
2. Maureen Ortagus, Public Image Consulting Group
3. St. Johns County Tourist Development Council
4. Halback Design Group
5. St. Johns County Tourist Development


NATIONAL PARK SERVICE


2 .31 4












TABLE OF CONTENTS



1. PROJECT BACKGROUND: THE DAWNING OF A NEW VISION FOR THE ST. AUGUSTINE HISTORIC AREA......... 1

HISTORIC ST. AUGUSTINE: A NATIONALTREASURE ........................................ .................. ................................... 1
LEGISLATIVE HISTORY ............... .. ............................................................ .................. 2
STRATEGIC PLAN DEVELOPM ENT ............................................ ......................................................................................2

2. FINDINGS AND RECOMMENDATIONS: A STRATEGIC VISION ....................................................................11

FINDINGS ........... ............................................................... ......................... 11
RECOM M ENDATIONS ........... ......................................................................12
A. Interpretive Center ....... ........ ..... ...................... ........ .. .............. . .....12
B. Existing State-O w ned B uildings..................................................................................... ........................ 13
C. Public Infrastructure ....................... ................................... ....... ................ ...... .............. ......13
D. "Layers of History": A Visitor Experience Strategy ........................................................ ....................... 14
E. D direct Support O rganization.................................................................................................. ...... .......... 14

3. INVESTING IN THE FUTURE: REALIZING THE VISION ...........................................................................16

INITIAL CAPITAL INVESTMENT ....... .. .............................................. ... .........................16
RECURRING PLANT OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE (PO&M) FUNDING .........................................................17
ESTIM ATED COSTS ......................... ................ ............................................................ .......................... 17
M ANAG EM ENT AN D O PERATIO NS .......................................................................................... .. ............... ......... 18
R ETU RN O N INVESTM ENT ........................... ............................. .... ...... ........................... ........................19

4. COMPREHENSIVE STRATEGIES TO ACHIEVE THE VISION......................................................................20

M ISSIO N : ..................... ............................... ................................................................................ 20
V ISIO N : ................................................................................... .........................2 0
G U ID IN G P RIN C IPLES:............................... ........................... ......... .. ....................... ..................................................2 1
PHYSICA L PLA N STRATEG IES .......................................................... ........................... ................. ..... ... ... ......2 2
In terp retive C enter............ ...................... .......................... ........................... ...............................................22
Existing State-ow ned Buildings ............................................................ .......................................................... 33
Vehicle and Pedestrian Access, Circulation and W ayfinding.................................................. ........................33
Infrastructure, Transit, Hardscape and Landscape Improvements..............................................................47
R EV IEW O F D ESIG N R EQ U IREM ENTS..................................................................................................................... ....... 4 9
EDUCATIO N AND EXHIBIT STRATEG IES ............................................................................................ ............................. 5 1
V visitor Exp erien ce .......................... .................................... ............ ................................. .. .................5 1
Layers of H history ..................................... .. .. ....... .. ........................... ... .... ....... ... ................ 52
Layer of History: Spanish Settlement Origins and the Early Colony ..........................................................54
Layer of H history: The D developing City ...................................................................................... ........................ 55
Layer of History: Flagler Era Boom......................................................................................... 56
Layer of History: African American Experience and Civil Rights.............................. ...........................57
Preservation .................. .... .... ............... .... ......... ......................................... ........................ 58
Proposed New Interpretive Center and Other Interpretive Opportunities................... ...................59
M ARKETING STRATEGIES .............. .............................. .................... ..61
N national Benchm arks Lessons Learned............................................................................... ....................... 61
M market A analysis ........................ ..... .. ........................................................ .......... ............. .... ................ 62
Interpretive, Commercial and Educational Uses....................................................................................... 63
Economy ic M odel and the Prioritization Process..................................................................... ................... 64
Lease Revenue and Funding Opportunity .............................................................................. ................... 64
Capital In vestm ent......... ............. .............................................................. .......................66
Eco n o m ic M o del R results .............................................................................................................................. ...... 6 7
Ticketing Strategy ... ............................. .......... ...................67



St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan Table of Contents Page i of iii











5. IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGIES ........................................................................................................... 68

D IRECT S U PPO RT O RG A N IZATIO N .......................................................................................... ..... .............. ............... 6 8
A CADEM IC / R ESEARCH C O M PO N ENTS ........................................................................................... ............................. 69
PERFORM ANCE M EASURES .......................................................................... ... ....................... ........................70
FRAMEWORK FOR PRIORITIZATION OF EXISTING ASSETS AND RECOMMENDED NEW PROJECTS ........................ ........................72
SUM M ARY OF STRATEGY RECOM M ENDATIONS................................................................. ............................................73

FIGURES

FIG U RE 1-1 : ST. A UG USTIN E, FLO RIDA ................................................................................................. ............... .............
FIGURE 1-2: EXPANDED STUDY AREA .. ........................................................................................................................8
FIGURE 1-3: STUDY AREA NORTH ............................................. ......................................................................................9
FIG URE 1-4 : STUDY A REA SO UTH ..................................................................... ............................... ........................ 10
FIGURE 4-1: PRIM ARY PEDESTRIAN INTERPRETIVE CENTER ACCESS............................................................................ ........... 24
FIGURE 4-2: INTERPRETIVE CENTER ACCESS POINT 1: FROM ST. GEORGE STREET AT THE CURRENT SITE OF THE PESO DE BURGO
B U ILD IN G S V IE W SH ED ........................................................ ............................. ....... ......... ...............................2 6
FIGURE 4-3: INTERPRETIVE CENTER ACCESS POINT 1: FROM ST. GEORGE STREET AT THE CURRENT SITE OF THE PESO DE BURGO
BUILDINGS EXISTIN G CON DITIONS ............................................................. ....................... ........ ......................... 26
FIGURE 4-4: INTERPRETIVE CENTER ACCESS POINT 1-A: FROM ST. GEORGE STREET AT THE CURRENT SITE OF THE PESO DE BURGO
B U ILD ING S R EN D ERIN GS ............................................ ................ .. ................................................................... 2 7
FIGURE 4-5: INTERPRETIVE CENTER ACCESS POINT 1-B: FROM ST. GEORGE STREET AT THE CURRENT SITE OF THE PESO DE BURGO
BUILDINGS RENDERINGS WITH NEW PROPOSED INTERPRETIVE CENTER................................ .................................... 28
FIGURE 4-6: INTERPRETIVE CENTER ACCESS POINT 2: FROM ROUTE AIA- VIEWSHED..................................... ...................... 29
FIGURE 4-7: INTERPRETIVE CENTER ACCESS POINT 2: FROM ROUTE AIA- EXISTING CONDITIONS........................................................ 30
FIGURE 4-8: INTERPRETIVE CENTER ACCESS POINT 2: FROM ROUTE AIA -RENDERINGS ......................................................30
FIGURE 4-9: INTERPRETIVE CENTER ACCESS POINT 2: FROM ROUTE AIA -RENDERINGS ......................................................30
FIGURE 4-10: INTERPRETIVE CENTER ACCESS POINT 3: FROM NORTH ST. GEORGE STREET- VIEWSHED.................................................31
FIGURE 4-11: FROM NORTH ST. GEORGE STREET- EXISTING CONDITIONS ....................................... ........................ 31
FIGURE 4-12: INTERPRETIVE CENTER ACCESS POINT 3: FROM NORTH ST. GEORGE STREET -RENDERINGS....................... ..........32
FIG URE 4-13 : PRIM ARY V EHICULA R PATHS ......................................................................................... ............................. 36
FIG URE 4-14 : M AIN V ISITO R KIOSK EXAM PLE...................................................................................... ............................. 39
FIGURE 4-15: KEY DECISION-M AKING POINT EXAM PLE ......................................................................... ........................ 39
FIG URE 4-16 : INTERPRETIVE SIG N EXAM PLE ........................................................................................ ............................. 40
FIG URE 4-17 : T RO LLEY / T RAIN RO UTES ............................................................................................. ............................. 45
FIG U RE 4 -18 : PHYSICA L PLA N O PTIO NS.............................................................................................. ............................. 4 6
FIGURE 4-19: SETTLEMENT ORIGINS AND THE EARLY COLONY .................................... ................................................54
FIG U RE 4 -20 : T H E D EV ELO PING C ITY ................................................................................................. ............... ......... 5 5
FIGURE 4-21: FLAGLER ERA BOOM ............................................................... ...................................................... .........56
FIGURE 4-22: AFRICAN AMERICAN EXPERIENCE AND CIVIL RIGHTS .................................... ...........................................57
FIGURE 4-23: PRESERVATION .................. ............ ............................. ......... ...............................58
FIG U RE 4 -24 : C A PITA L INV ESTM ENT .......................................................................................... ..... .............. ............... 6 6

TABLES

TABLE 1-1: STATE-OW NED ASSETS ............................................. ......................................................................................6
TABLE 4 -1 : R ELEVANT PLANS AND STUDIES ........................................................................................ .............................4 1
TABLE 4-2: ECONOMIC MODEL EXAMPLE COST IMPLICATIONS....................................................................... 65
TABLE 4-3 : ECONOM IC M ODEL A SSUM PTIONS .................................................................................... .............................66
TABLE 5-1 : PERFO RM ANCE M EASURES............................................................................................... ............. ............. 7 1







St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan Table of Contents Page ii of iii











APPENDICES

APPENDIXA: LIST OF REFERENCES...................................................................................................... A-1
APPENDIX B: FLORIDA STATUTES AND APPROPRIATIONS .................................................................. ....................... B-
A PPEN D IX C: V ISION P LA N ........................................................................................ .............................................. C -
APPENDIX D: ESTIMATES OF COST- EXAMPLE..................................................................................... ....................... D-


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan Table of Contents Page iii of iii


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Table of Contents Page iii of iii

































Image Provided by: St. Johns County Tourist Development Council


1. PROJECT BACKGROUND: THE DAWNING OF A NEW VISION FOR THE ST.
A UGUSTINE HISTORIC AREA



HISTORIC ST. AUGUSTINE: A NATIONAL TREASURE
In 2013, Florida will celebrate the 500th anniversary of the state's discovery in 1513. The first
successful colonial settlement, St. Augustine, Florida was established in 1565, forty-two years
before the first permanent English colony of Jamestown. The United States will celebrate the
450th birthday of St. Augustine in 2015. These first European settlers in America were Spanish.
With one 21-year interruption, they and their Hispanic successors would live and work in St.
Augustine for 235 years helping to shape the course of American history. Theirs was a vibrant,
multicultural society that is little known to most Americans today.

Many buildings, artifacts, and sites existing today in St. Augustine are a testament to the long
and storied history of this oldest continuously occupied American city. In celebration of the
400th anniversary of St. Augustine in 1965, reconstructed buildings were added to the St.
Augustine landscape to depict life in the early settlement, many of which were constructed on
original building foundations. The State-owned historic properties in St. Augustine embody the
story of this first colony in a collection of original and reconstructed buildings located on several
key properties within the National Register Landmark District. These buildings could, with well-
crafted, state-of-the-art exhibit and education programs, showcase this first permanent


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Page 1 of 74









European settlement in America and its contributions to our nation in an exciting and highly
visible way. This St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan is the first step toward creating,
here in Florida, an enriching and unforgettable 450th American birthday celebration and a
lasting historic treasure for the State of Florida. When implemented, this Strategic Plan also has
far-reaching implications for education and economic stimulus in the State of Florida and
Northeast Florida region.

LEGISLATIVE HISTORY
In 2007, the State of Florida Legislature enacted Chapter 267.1735 Florida Statute (F.S.) which
authorizes the transfer of management responsibilities to the University of Florida (UF) for
certain state-owned parcels and buildings located within the Historic District of St. Augustine,
Florida (see Appendix B for Chapter 267.1735 F.S. text). These 33 state-owned parcels with 34
separate buildings are currently sub-leased to the City of St. Augustine. This statute also
authorizes transfer of all artifacts, documents, equipment, and other tangible property to UF.
Upon transfer to UF, all existing management contracts will be rescinded. This Florida Statute
also states that UF is permitted to enter into agreements facilitating acceptance of payment for
goods, collection of admissions from visitors, and negotiation of rent or lease agreements for
the state-owned parcels and buildings. A listing of the state-owned parcels and buildings is
contained in Table 1-1, and maps of the area are provided in Figures 1-2 through 1-4.

In response to this act, the University of Florida conducted a physical assessment of the
facilities potentially to be transferred to UF. This assessment resulted in a report in July 2007
and a legislative budget request for restoration and rehabilitation to address deferred
maintenance and Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) accessibility issues on the properties.
The request also included the recurring Plant Operations and Maintenance funding needs,
along with a request for funding to develop an historic preservation management strategy.

In 2008, the Legislature responded by providing funds for UF to produce this St. Augustine
Historic Area Strategic Plan (see Appendix B for appropriations bill text). This plan serves as
future guidance for the most effective and efficient use of the state-owned parcels and
buildings. The recommendations contained herein were developed, along with a Mission,
Vision and Guiding Principles, through dialog with community and university stakeholders (see
Appendix C for details on the Vision Plan component).

STRATEGIC PLAN DEVELOPMENT
The University of Florida commissioned this Historic Area Strategic Plan with the purpose of
developing recommendations for the use, management and maintenance of 33 state-owned
historic parcels, with 34 separate buildings, located in the City of St. Augustine, Florida.
Although the primary purpose of the Historic Area Strategic Plan is to serve as guidance for
the development, management and operation of these state-owned historic parcels and
buildings, the Strategic Plan also addresses the community context in which these properties
are situated including social, cultural, economic and physical aspects. With input from
university faculty and community stakeholders including the City of St. Augustine, St. Johns
County, the National Park Service, and Flagler College, the Plan speaks to partnerships and


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Page 2 of 74









strategies that benefit the State of Florida, and particularly the North Florida region, through
education, economic stimulus, and preservation of historic and cultural public assets.

To guide the strategic planning effort, UF formed advisory groups that include leading UF
administrators and faculty; local leaders from St. Augustine and St. Johns County; and
representatives of key stakeholders such as the National Park Service and Flagler College. UF
students have also been involved in the overall effort, led by Architecture, Landscape
Architecture and historic preservation faculty. Through an ongoing series of public stakeholder
meetings in St. Augustine, UF has achieved a high level of community and stakeholder support
for the strategic planning effort and its recommendations.

Public meetings were held from May through August 2008 to formulate the vision plan that is
the prelude to the strategic plan. Additional public meetings were held in October and
December 2008 to review and discuss strategic plan recommendations as they were being
developed. Throughout this process, the public remained very engaged and many stakeholders
actively participated. A website and email list was used to facilitate communication between
the stakeholders and project management. A Steering Committee remained empanelled to
host public meetings and provided targeted feedback. Committee members represented the
University of Florida, City of St. Augustine, National Park Service, Flagler College, and Visitor &
Convention Bureau. The members of the Strategic Plan Steering Committee include:

H Chairman: Ed Poppell, Vice President for Business Affairs, University of Florida
[ Project Manager: Linda Dixon, Assistant Director, Facilities, Planning and
Construction, University of Florida
[ Kathy Deagan, Distinguished Research Curator of Archaeology, Florida Museum of
Natural History
SMichael Gannon, Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus, Department of History,
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, University of Florida
H Roy Graham, Distinguished Professor and Director, Historic Preservation Programs,
College of Design, Construction and Planning, University of Florida
5 Glenn Hastings, Executive Director, St. Johns County Tourist Development Council
SRoy Hunt, Professor Emeritus, Levin College of Law, University of Florida
H John Regan, Chief Operations Officer, City of St. Augustine
[ Chris Silver, Dean, College of Design, Construction and Planning, University of Florida
B Tracy Upchurch, Assistant Professor of Law and Government, Flagler College
H Gordon Wilson, Superintendent, Castillo de san Marcos National Monument


To assist in the development of the Historic Area Strategic Plan, UF retained a team of
consultants led by RS&H, Inc., an architectural, engineering and planning firm with its
headquarters in Jacksonville Florida. The consultant team also consists of subject matter
experts in specific areas related to the planning and development of historic areas and heritage


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Page 3 of 74









tourism destinations. These additional consultant team members, with their specific expertise
noted, include:

SEconomics Research Associates (Washington, D.C.)
Market Analysis and Management Planning

M Gallagher & Associates (Bethesda, MD)
Exhibit and Educational Plan, Visitor Experience Strategy

[ Pressley Associates (Boston, MA)
Urban Design

[ Halback Design Group (St. Augustine, FL)
Landscape Architecture

H Kenneth Smith Architects (Jacksonville, FL)
Historic Architecture

This Historic Area Strategic Plan and the implementation of its major recommendations will
greatly enhance the observance of several upcoming anniversaries. These anniversaries
include:

B 500th anniversary, in 2013, of the initial discovery of Florida by Europeans in 1513
[ 450th anniversary in 2015 of the European settlement of St. Augustine in 1565, the
oldest continuously settled city in the United States
I 100th anniversary, in 2016, of the founding of the National Park Service in 1916

The Historic Area Strategic Plan is a compilation of the Mission Statement, the Vision
Statement, the Guiding Principles and four specific component strategies. The Historic Area
Strategic Plan has five key components.

[ Mission, Vision, and Guiding Principles
[ Exhibit and Educational Strategies
H Physical Plan Strategies
[ Marketing Strategies
H Implementation Strategies

In developing the Strategic Plan, the RS&H team consulted numerous existing studies including
several transportation, signage/wayfinding and heritage tourism plans of the City of St.
Augustine. They also coordinated their efforts with ongoing plan development of the St.
Augustine, Ponte Vedra & The Beaches Visitors and Convention Bureau. Most notably, the
recommendations contained in this Plan are consistent with and advance the recommendations
of the National Park Service's General Management Plan and Environmental Impact Statement
for the Castillo de San Marcos National Monument located in St. Augustine, Florida.


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan Page 4 of 74


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Page 4 of 74










As stated, the following two pages include a table listing the state-owned assets (Table 1 -1).
Figure 1-1 shows the location of St. Augustine, Florida. Figure 1-2 shows St. Augustine's Historic
Area, generally highlighting the focus areas for this study. Figures 1-3 and 1-4 illustrate the
study area for the state-owned assets. These maps identify the state-owned assets along with
other signature landmarks. The first map includes the Castillo de San Marcos National
Monument and St. George Street, north of Treasury Street (Figure 1-3). The second map shows
areas south of Treasury Street (Figure 1-4).


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan Page 5 of 74


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Page 5 of 74










Table 1-1:
State-Owned Assets

* In)
^EjjM^^Bf^i^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^B^n^^^^^II.^


GOVERNMENT HOUSE


48 King Street


3901 DE MESA SANCHEZ HOUSE 49 St. George Street
3902 ARRIVAS HOUSE 46 St. George Street
3903 PARADES DODGE HOUSE 54 St. George Street
3904 PARADES DODGE OUT 54.5 St. George Street
3905 GALLEGOS HOUSE 21 St. George Street
3906 RIBERA HOUSE 22 St. George Street
3907 RIBERA KITCHEN 22 St. George Street
3908 TRIAY HOUSE 29 St. George Street
3909 GOMEZ HOUSE 27 St. George Street
3910 CERVEAU HOUSE 26 Cuna Street
3911 HAAS HOUSE 28 Cuna Street
3912 PESO DE BURGO / PELLICER HOUSE 53 St. George Street
3913 PESO DE BURGO NORTH OUT 53 St. George Street
3914 PESO DE BURGO SOUTH OUT 53 St. George Street
3915 JOANEDA HOUSE 57 Treasury Street
3916 RODRIGUEZ HOUSE 46.5 Cuna Street
3917 BENET HOUSE 65 St. George Street
3918 COQUINA HOUSE 46 Cuna Street
3919 SANCHEZ DE ORTIGOSA HSE 60 St. George Street
3920 DE HITA HOUSE 37 St. George Street
3921 GONZALEZ HOUSE 39 St. George Street
3922 NEW BLACKSMITH SHOP 37.5 St. George Street
3923 FLORENCIA HOUSE 33 St. George Street
3924 SPANISH MILITARY HOSPITAL 2 Aviles Street
3925 WATSON HOUSE 206 Charlotte Street
3926 SALCEDO KITCHEN 42.5 St. George Street
3927 SALCEDO HOUSE 42 St. George Street
3928 GONZALEZ RESTROOMS 35.5 St. George Street
3929 SIMS HOUSE 12 Cuna Street
3930 SIMS OUTBUILDING 12 Cuna Street
3931 OLD BLACKSMITH SHOP 26 Charlotte Street
3932 HARNESS SHOP 17 Cuna Street
3933 PUBLIC RESTROOMS 40 St. George Street
N/A Vacant Lot Charlotte Street
N/A Vacant Lot Spanish Street
N/A Vacant Lot Cuna Street


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan Page 6 of 74


3900


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Page 6 of 74










Figure 1-1:
St. Augustine, Florida


2N
A 0 25 50
Miles
^ k.


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan Page 7 of 74


-- Major Roads

I St. Augustine City Limit


I


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Page 7 of 74











Figure 1-2:
Expanded Study Area


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan Page 8 of 74


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Page 8 of 74










Figure 1-3:
Study Area North


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan Page 9 of 74


~mn~n~


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Page 9 of 74










Figure 1-4:
Study Area South


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan Page 10 of 74


pyonida Men.


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Page 10 of 74




































Images Provided by: Maureen Ortagus, Public Image Consulting Group

2. FINDINGS AND RECOMMENDATIONS: A STRATEGIC VISION



FINDINGS
Through the development of this visionary Strategic Plan, the potential for educational
partnerships and economic stimulus were clear.

Educational programming links the past to the present, and demonstrates the relevancy of
historic events. The extensiveness of historical and cultural resources in St. Augustine
(including structures, sites and artifacts) requires careful stewardship and interpretation. The
University of Florida enjoys many existing educational partnerships in St. Augustine covering
many disciplines, including the Historic St. Augustine Research Institute, a collaboration with
Flagler College. The breadth of UF educational initiatives in St. Augustine draw on traditional
fields of historic preservation expertise such as history, archaeology, anthropology,
architecture, urban planning, landscape architecture, interior design, museum studies,
librarianship, and similar disciplines. However, other disciplines also expand the audience for
higher education programming and collaboration in St. Augustine, including fine arts, law,
business, journalism, marketing, graphic/visual arts, tourism, and others. These established ties
between the University and St. Augustine community can be enhanced by the opportunities
presented through the state-owned properties.


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Page 11 of 74









With high caliber educational and interpretive programming, the St. Augustine community can
expect increased economic yields from tourism. The quality of the heritage tourism experience
will dictate the frequency of visits, length of visits and spending habits of visitors. As St.
Augustine approaches its 450th Anniversary celebration, the time is right for investments in
historic assets to produce high economic returns such as those seen in Jamestown, Virginia and
other successful heritage tourism sites.

RECOMMENDATIONS
The primary recommendations detailed in the Historic Area Strategic Plan relate to the
following:

A. Construction of a new Interpretive Center as the focal point for visitor access to state-
owned parcels and buildings
B. Restoration and rehabilitation of the existing state-owned buildings to protect these
important public assets
C Implementation of public infrastructure improvements to support the visitor
experience including a wayfinding /signage strategy and transportation system
modifications
D. Application of the "Layers of History", embodying various periods and themes, as the
framework for organizing the visitor experience for both the state-owned parcels and
buildings and other community assets
E. Operation of a direct support organization with established priority criteria and an
economic model adaptive tool to aid future decision making as it relates to the state-
owned parcels and buildings


A. Interpretive Center
Visitors to St. Augustine are presented with an array of attractions, both historic and non-
historic. These venues are located throughout the community and there are multiple points of
entry providing voluminous choices for visitors to decide what they want to do and see. In the
downtown historic area, the City's existing Visitor Information Center (VIC) provides a
comprehensive overview of attractions, and is conveniently located adjacent to the Historic
Downtown Parking Facility. This location is also convenient to the Castillo de San Marcos
National Monument, St. George Street promenade, the state-owned historic properties and
numerous other historic interpretive venues.

The Historic Area Strategic Plan envisions a new Interpretive Center that will serve as the focal
point for visitors to access the key historic assets in St. Augustine. It can display collections of
the NPS and State of Florida/UF with facilities that support the educational mission of the
university. The proposed location, partially on land owned by the City of St. Augustine and the
State of Florida, is ideally located near the VIC, adjacent to the state-owned historic assets and
across the street from the Castillo. The concept of a new interpretive center was first
conceived by the Historic St. Augustine Board in 1988. In 2007, this concept became a key
element of the National Park Service (NPS) General Management Plan and Environmental


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Page 12 of 74









Impact Statement for the Castillo de San Marcos National Monument. Through the
collaborative stakeholder process that accompanied the development of this Strategic Plan, the
City of St. Augustine, the National Park Service, and the University of Florida have mutually
stated their desire to collaborate on the design and construction of a new Interpretive Center.

The proposed Interpretive Center location is also a mid-point between the VIC and the
Government House, a significant state-owned historic property whose location serves as a
terminus of the St. George Street promenade and a gateway to the historic assets south of King
Street. Early in the development of this Strategic Plan, advisory groups and stakeholders
concluded that a strategic plan focused solely on the management and maintenance of the
existing state-owned resources would likely miss the stated vision of linking all state-owned and
community assets into a cohesive visitor experience that is also economically viable. The
project team realized that the key to creating a cohesive educational experience and an
economically viable enterprise hinged on creating a new and exciting focal point for the visitor
experience in St. Augustine. This focal point was identified as a new interpretive center
developed in partnership with the National Park Service that serves to:

[ Anchor the visitor experience;
H Support the educational mission of the University;
SImplement the General Management Plan/Environmental Impact Statement of the
NPS;
H Physically link the City's Visitor Information Center with the Castillo de San Marcos
and the state-owned historic properties;
SIncrease tourism revenues by extending visitors' length of stay, attracting new visitor
markets, and celebrating several significant upcoming anniversary observances of
the community, state, and nation.

B. Existing State-Owned Buildings
Included in Legislative History discussion was mention of the physical assessment conducted by
UF, in which a report documenting needed restoration and rehabilitation was completed in July
2007. The state-owned assets include 34 individual buildings, each with varying degrees of
restoration and rehabilitation need. These properties have deteriorated over the years and
must be rehabilitated and preserved as a national treasure.

The structure with most expensive repairs is the Government House, primarily due to its age
and size. Other buildings, although varying in condition and estimated repair costs, suffer from
a variety of corrective needs. More detail regarding needed repairs can be found in the
Physical Strategies.

C. Public Infrastructure
A number of critical public infrastructure improvements have been identified to facilitate visitor
access to the historic assets in downtown St. Augustine. The infrastructure recommendations
made in this Strategic Plan are focused primarily on access from the Historic Downtown Parking
Facility and VIC to the proposed new Interpretive Center, the Castillo, and the state-owned


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Page 13 of 74









assets. They include recommendations for way-finding/signage strategies as well as
modifications to public roads and open spaces, and are supported by existing studies prepared
for the City of St. Augustine and NPS. Federal, state and local funding should be identified to
implement these recommendations, particularly in advance of the 450th Anniversary of the
founding of St. Augustine. These recommended infrastructure projects are detailed in Section 4
of this Plan and include:

H Area-wide: Wayfinding Signage Strategies including main visitor kiosks, signage
elements for key decision-making points, interpretive signs, banners, and UF
branding signage
[ Area 1: Orange Street between the existing VIC and the Old City Gate
H Area 2: Grounds and Parking Area of the Castillo de San Marcos
[ Area 3: Plaza de la Constituci6n and Adjacent Streets
[ Area 4: Historic Area Streetscaping
H Area 5: AIA Pedestrian Crosswalks
[ Area 6: Trolley Routes and Services

D. "Layers of History": A Visitor Experience Strategy
A key educational and interpretive strategy is the creation of a visitor experience framework
that can communicate and interpret the many chronological periods and thematic areas that
are threads in the historic fabric of the St. Augustine community. Through collaborative effort
with university and local scholars, a framework named "Layers of History" is presented as a
unifying approach to interpreting not only the state-owned historic resources but all other
historic resources and community assets. This strategy defines a flexible format for conveying
the history that is the story of St. Augustine. The "Layers of History" can serve as an
organizational framework for interpretation, marketing, and cohesiveness for the visitor. It can
be applied to the evolution of individual historic sites and the community at large as well as the
social and cultural shifts that have occurred over 450 years of continuous settlement.


E. Direct Support Organization
Chapter 267.1736, F.S. authorized creation of a university direct-support organization (DSO) to
assist in asset management and historic preservation education purposes and responsibilities
(see Appendix B for statute text). The DSO is organized and operated exclusively to receive,
hold, invest and administer property as well as make expenditures to or for the benefit of a
state university. This DSO mechanism allows the State of Florida educational funding for the
facilities dedicated to an educational purpose while at the same time allowing for collection of
revenue from commercial tenants. Both of these funding sources are retained for use in the
effective management and maintenance of the state-owned properties.

The Historic Area Strategic Plan provides useful information for the development of a required
DSO Business Plan. These recommendations and resources include marketing analysis, criteria
to establish priorities for project and strategy implementation, and an economic model that is


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Page 14 of 74










an adaptive tool for decision-making regarding the use and operation of the state-owned
assets.

The DSO mechanism has successfully been implemented by the University of West Florida in
regard to the management of twenty historic properties. This precedent provides confidence in
the future success of utilizing the DSO mechanism for the St. Augustine state-owned resources.


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan Page 15 of 74


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Page 15 of 74
































Image Provided by: Pressley Associates


3. INVESTING IN THE FUTURE: REALIZING THE VISION


To realize the aspirations of this Historic Area Strategic Plan, the timing of funding is critical.
Several upcoming anniversaries will greatly enhance the positioning of St. Augustine
internationally as a world class heritage tourism destination. The 500th anniversary of the first
recorded discovery of Florida by Europeans occurs in 2013. The 450th anniversary of the
European settlement of St. Augustine, the oldest continuously settled city in the United States,
occurs in 2015. The 100th anniversary of the founding of the National Park Service occurs in
2016. The eyes of the world will be on St. Augustine within the next five years and funding the
elements of this Historic Area Strategic Plan is essential to realizing the historic area's true
potential.

INITIAL CAPITAL INVESTMENT
The cornerstone to the successful implementation of this Historic Area Strategic Plan is the
construction of a new Interpretive Center that links the military assets associated primarily with
the Castillo de San Marcos and the colonial civilian assets associated with the state-owned
historic resources.

To that end, estimated costs for a 17,000 square foot Interpretive Center will be approximately
$10 Million, including interpretive and educational content. As mentioned earlier, the City of
St. Augustine, the National Park Service, and the University of Florida have mutually stated their
desire to collaborate on the design and construction of a new Interpretive Center. The $10


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Page 16 of 74









Million construction is anticipated to be met by equal contribution of the State of Florida and
the NPS. The City of St. Augustine will make available the property informally known as the
"Mary Peck Property" that when combined with adjacent state-owned parcels will provide an
excellent site for this new facility.

In July 2007, the University's Facilities Planning and Construction Division completed the "St.
Augustine Facility Assessment Report. This report provided cost estimates for the restoration
and rehabilitation of each of the existing state-owned buildings. These rehabilitation costs total
$26.7 million assuming full remediation of the report's identified building deficiencies within
the five-year time frame from 2009 to 2013. This timeline is based on completing necessary
building remediation in advance of the first significant anniversary celebration in 2013.

RECURRING PLANT OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE (PO&M) FUNDING
The State University System of Florida requests and is provided PO&M funding for existing and
new educational facilities as part of each fiscal year's legislative budget request (LBR). With the
planned transfer of these state-owned historic resources to the stewardship of the University of
Florida, PO&M funding will be one available funding mechanism for long term management
and maintenance of any of the state-owned buildings that are used for an educational purpose.
Current PO&M funding averages $8.44 per square foot of facilities with air conditioning and
$6.25 per square foot of facilities without air conditioning. Gross square footage of the
proposed Interpretive Center is approximately 17,000 square feet. Gross square footage of the
existing state-owned buildings is approximately 71,400 square feet.

ESTIMATED COSTS
For purposes of arriving at a cost estimate with which to approach funding sources for
implementation of the recommendations related specifically to the construction of a new
Interpretive Center, the needed restoration and rehabilitation of state-owned buildings, and
the development and installation of interpretive content, the following assumptions were used.

B Rehabilitation Costs for existing state-owned assets are as summarized in the July
2007 St. Augustine Assessment Report prepared jointly by UF Facilities Planning &
Construction, Physical Plant Division and Environmental Health & Safety.

[ New Construction Costs for the proposed Interpretive Center are based on square
foot costs for a recommended off-site Visitor Center presented in the NPS's General
Management Plan / Environmental Impact Statement for the Castillo de San Marcos
Alternative C.

[ Interpretive Content Costs are assumed to be $3.75 per square foot

H Annual Inflation Rate = 4%

[ Assume Costs are incurred from 2009 through 2013 in order to construct new
Interpretive Center and complete building rehabilitation in advance of scheduled St.
Augustine and NPS anniversary celebrations.


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Page 17 of 74









Funding requests based on these assumptions are summarized as follows:


SInterpretive Center (state portion including interpretive content)... $4,981,500

SInterpretive Content for Existing State-Owned Assets........................ $215,000

S Building Rehabilitation / Restoration..................................................... $26,671,000

SUBTOTAL $31,867,500

SInterpretive Center (NPS portion including interpretive content)..... $4,981,500


TOTAL $36,849,000

Rehabilitation and Restoration costs may be partially offset by Plant Operations and
Maintenance (PO&M) funds for state-owned assets having eligibility based on their educational
use. These funds are dispersed at the rate of $8.4376 per gross square footage for air
conditioned space and $6.2447 per gross square footage for non-air conditioned space, which
are applicable for FY 2009-2010 (See Appendix D).


Recurring Plant Operations and Maintenance (PO&M):

M Existing state-owned assets............................................................ $479,000

I Interpretive Center.......................................................................... $143,000

TOTAL $622,000

MANAGEMENT AND OPERATIONS
The project team and advisory groups have focused their efforts on developing strategies that
increase the economic impact of visitors. This was an easy goal for all community stakeholders
to rally around as it is clear that improving the revenue stream for the state-owned historic
resources benefits all other community venues and assets as well. "A rising tide floats all
boats" became the theme for the further enthusiastic collaboration of all stakeholders.

Currently, the state-owned resources include a range of historical/interpretive venues, revenue
producing retail space, residential rental space and undeveloped open spaces. One product of
this strategic plan is the development of an economic modeling software tool, specific to this
historic area that will be used to aid future decision making as it relates to use of state-owned
parcels and buildings. The state-owned resources are intended to serve primarily as civic and
educational assets, supported in part by select commercial activities. This economic modeling
tool will facilitate the future balancing of building and parcel uses to meet the stated
educational and interpretive goals. As a use for a property is selected, whether interpretive,
educational, or commercial, the model provides immediate feedback on projected operating
income or loss.


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Page 18 of 74









A key recommendation of this strategic plan is the implementation of a centralized ticketing
program that capitalizes on a robust, computer based approach not only to strategically
improve potential ticket revenue opportunities but also to capture visitor population data in a
manner that can inform future marketing decisions. Documenting site-specific visitation allows
for a targeted marketing program that can increase the economic impact of visitors.

These management and operations strategies can be implemented by the direct support
organization (DSO) that will be charged with managing the state-owned properties

RETURN ON INVESTMENT
Heritage tourism is best supported by collaborative and coordinated efforts between
community stakeholders, governmental agencies, and historical subject matter experts.
Creating world class heritage tourism experiences has reaped significant economic return for
communities willing to make this focused, coordinated effort. Examples of recent national
success in this arena include recent improvements to the overall visitor experience at
Jamestown and Gettysburg.

An economic impact study of Jamestown's 400th anniversary shows the commemoration not
only made history, it made dollars and cents. The study showed that the anniversary of
America's first permanent English settlement created nearly 21,000 jobs in Virginia, generated
$1.2 billion in sales for state businesses, produced more than $28 million in state and local tax
revenues, and increased awareness of Jamestown through more than 12 billion U.S. media
impressions.

Pennsylvania Governor Edward G. Rendell, during an opening ceremony at the Gettysburg
visitor center, described the state's $20 million contribution as an "investment". The average
daily visitor to Gettysburg spends $293.45 per day, according to a 2007 study conducted by the
California University of Pennsylvania. "Do the math", said Governor Rendell, who elaborated
by saying "It's a pretty good return on the Commonwealth's investment."

The appropriate marketing of St. Augustine's significant historic resources can reap a similar
benefit for the local community and the State of Florida. The same heritage tourism visitor
population that generated the Jamestown and Gettysburg anniversary's significant economic
impacts can also be brought to St. Augustine provided that the visitor experience is of a caliber
equal to or greater than other national examples.

The main elements of this strategic plan provide the catalyst for expanding the market reach of
these St. Augustine historic resources. The new landmark Interpretive Center coupled with the
"Layers of History" unifying approach to interpretation combine to reinforce the world class
heritage tourism destination to which St. Augustine rightfully lays claim. It is through this
cohesive, overarching interpretive strategy that the visitor will be afforded a world class
heritage tourism destination. These elements along with the existing national and state-owned
historic resources provide the catalyst for tapping into the significant heritage tourism market.


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan Page 19 of 74


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Page 19 of 74



























4. COMPREHENSIVE STRATEGIES TO ACHIEVE THE VISION


In the summer of 2008, the University and its advisory groups completed an initial study of the
transfer of the state-owned historic resources. This highly productive initial effort culminated
in the publication of a Vision Plan that provided guidance in the form of a Vision Statement, a
Mission Statement and Guiding Principles.

MISSION:
To ensure long-term preservation and interpretation of state-owned historic assets in St.
Augustine while facilitating an educational program at the University of Florida that will be
responsive to the state's needs for professionals in history, historic preservation, archaeology,
cultural resource management, cultural tourism, and museum administration and will help
meet needs of St. Augustine and the state through educational internships and practicums.
(Adapted from Chapter 267.1735 Florida Statutes)

VISION:
The historic resources in St. Augustine shall provide a visitor and educational experience that
enhances the St. Augustine community, meets the needs of the State of Florida, and garners
worldwide acclaim by preserving St. Augustine's history as a valuable National Treasure. To
this end, the state-owned historic assets in St. Augustine shall:

1. house appropriate educational, research and service programs;

2. accommodate effective administration;

3. and generate revenue necessary to become an economically viable operation;

4. with management under the auspices of the University of Florida working in
partnership with other community stakeholders.


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan Page 20 of 74


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Page 20 of 74










GUIDING PRINCIPLES:
1. Educational Collaboration: The University of Florida should continue and expand
collaboration with Flagler College, the City of St. Augustine, St. Johns County, the
National Park Service, and other partners to deliver multidisciplinary education for
varied audiences and to conduct research that supports authentic interpretation of
historic resources.

2. Physical Cohesiveness: The St. Augustine historic area, including the state-owned
historic assets, should be cohesive and easily navigated providing heritage tourists with
a holistic experience that flows from an orientation point (such as a Visitor Center), with
adequate parking and is anchored by signature facilities along St. George Street with
comfortable pedestrian access.

3. Economic Development: The St. Augustine historic area, including the state-owned
historic assets, should increasingly support local economic development by becoming a
premier national and international heritage tourism destination.

4. Partnership Finance: The University of Florida can become a key financial partner
through facilitating a combined lobbying effort; leveraging state, local and federal
resources; and assisting in grant writing and donor support.

5. Effective Administration: The University of Florida, through a Direct Support
Organization (DSO), has the ability to manage the state-owned historic assets to be
physically sound, historically authentic and economically viable while furthering the
goals articulated in the Mission Statement and Vision.

Using the Vision Plan as its compass, the University, with the support of the consultant team
and advisory groups, engaged in development of comprehensive strategies that provide an
implementation framework for this Historic Area Strategic Plan. These comprehensive
strategies provide recommendations in the areas of education, urban design, physical facilities,
marketing and operations. Using the Vision Plan as its compass, the project team and
stakeholders identified the following comprehensive strategies. The Vision Plan is included in
its entirety in Appendix C.


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan Page 21 of 74


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Page 21 of 74









PHYSICAL PLAN STRATEGIES


The Vision Plan identified the following four objectives for the development of the physical
plan strategies of the Historic Area Strategic Plan.

1. Integrate the state-owned assets into their surroundings in a way that orients the visitor
with a clear path to experience the historic resources of downtown St. Augustine.

2. Employ existing and potential new signature facilities to house critical programs and
serve as navigational landmarks for the visitor experience.

3. Develop the necessary improvements to public infrastructure that provide comfort and
access for visitors and residents in the historic downtown area of St. Augustine.

4. Employ the state-owned assets to the use that best supports the Strategic Plan Vision,
Mission, and Guiding Principles.

The physical plan strategy includes emphasis on a new landmark Interpretive Center along with
renovation of existing state-owned buildings, the promotion of desired vehicle and pedestrian
circulation, branding of the state-owned resources with appropriate recognition of UF's role,
and urban design recommendations for unifying and enhancing the historic area.

Interpretive Center

Comprehensive Overview I Interpretive Center
The objective for the new Interpretive Center is to introduce visitors to the rich layered history
of St. Augustine utilizing the scholarship of UF to tell the civilian story and the military story of
the National Park Service/Castillo de San Marcos. The Center is intended to be a collaboration
between the University of Florida, the National Park Service (NPS), and the City of St. Augustine.

Through the use of media, interactive (computer and low tech), authentic objects, immersive
environments, and rich interpretation, the history of St. Augustine through time will be brought
to life. This center will aid in piquing visitor interests so that when they journey to multiple
venues beyond the Interpretive Center, they will be ready to explore and learn more. Exceeding
expectations with a "world class" interpretive experience will create a "buzz" and extend
visitors' stay in the area.

The priority location identified for this new facility is on the parcel informally known as the
Mary Peck Property in combination with adjacent state-owned parcels. The Mary Peck
Property is currently owned by the City of St. Augustine, and will be made available by the time
of construction of the new facility.

The site proposed for the Interpretive Center includes city and state-owned parcels of land that
front both St. George Street and A1A, affording desirable views of Castillo de San Marcos. This
location provides the potential for ideal relationships between the historic interpretation of
both military and civilian life. The site benefits from the presence of mature shade trees and its


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Page 22 of 74









proximity to existing historic interpretive exhibits in adjoining back yards. The Intracoastal
Waterway will also be visible from the Interpretive Center.

It is anticipated that the new facility will encompass 15,000 to 20,000 gross square feet (GSF) on
two floors. Approximately 10,000 GSF have been identified to meet the needs of the NPS with
the remainder to be used for UF interpretive and teaching facilities. The Interpretive Center is
envisioned as a carefully scaled assemblage of enclosed volumes that are visually compatible
with the adjacent buildings in the Historic Area. Several renderings and 3-D images were
created to provide a vision of the potential impacts associated with the introduction of a new
signature facility at this location. These images are included at the end of this section of the
strategic plan, but in no way represent a final design or building appearance.

The proposed location on the "Mary Peck Property" will allow pedestrians to access the
Interpretive Center from three points each offering unique experiences as depicted in the
following images. Figure 4-1 illustrates primary pedestrian paths and access points to the
Interpretive Center, as recommended in this Strategic Plan. These paths will be supported by
vehicle and pedestrian access, circulation and wayfinding recommendations.


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan Page 23 of 74


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Page 23 of 74










Figure 4-1:
Primary Pedestrian Interpretive Center Access


On subsequent pages, each Interpretive Center Access Point, as listed below, is described in
detail followed by graphics to illustrate the area and the proposed new Interpretive Center.

1. Interpretive Center Access Point 1: From St. George Street at the Current Site of the
Peso de Burgo Buildings

2. Interpretive CenterAccess Point 2: From Route AIA

3. Interpretive CenterAccess Point 3: From North St. George Street


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Page 24 of 74









Interpretive Center Access Point 1: From St. George Street at the Current Site of the Peso de
Burgo Buildings
Pedestrians could conveniently access the Interpretive Center from the Historic Downtown
Parking Facility (north of the historic area) or from the Plaza de la Constituci6n (south of the
historic area) via St. George Street. This access allows the visitor to experience the civilian life
of Old St. Augustine prior to entering the Interpretive Center. Options for accessing the
Interpretive Center at this location include:

SPeso de Burgo (reconstructed in 1977), on the east side of St. George Street
between Fort Alley and Cuna Street, which could serve as the gateway to the
Interpretive Center with visitors passing completely through Peso de Burgo and into
the shaded landscape beyond (1A).
[ Alternatively, the Peso de Burgo buildings could be relocated and the entrance to
the Interpretive Center could be via a gate in a new garden wall (1B).


Buildings from the First Spanish Period, the British Period, and the Second Spanish Period were
typically built directly on the street edge, and the Spanish typically used an enclosed entry
courtyard rather than having the front door directly on the street. Since the proposed
Interpretive Center is set back from St. George Street, instead opting for a more direct
relationship with the Castillo by fronting Castillo Drive, a potential courtyard option at the
current site of the Peso de Burgo buildings maintains the important connection to the street.
The five and one-half foot (5'-6") high wall that surrounds the courtyard also helps to articulate
the "urban wall" created along St. George Street by the period buildings that are directly on the
street.

The gateway through the wall would become the main western entrance to the Interpretive
Center. It is important to create the maximum visibility of the Interpretive Center through this
portal while maintaining an appropriate size for the gateway. According to the City of St.
Augustine Historic Architecture Review Board (HARB) guidelines, the most appropriate width is
about four feet (4'), but the guidelines allow an opening to be as large as twenty (20'). An entry
between eight and twelve feet (8'-12') should be appropriate as it balances both needs. It is
also large enough to serve as a visual cue to visitors that the courtyard is the main western
entrance to the Center.

Figures 4-2 through 4-5 are a series of images illustrating the two concepts described for this
access point to the Interpretive Center. For orientation, Figure 4-2 highlights the view of the
images shown in Figures 4-3 through 4-5, which begins at the point shown in red and spans the
yellow triangular area. These images were derived from the Existing Conditions image shown in
Figure 4-3. Figure 4-4 illustrates this view with colored sketches, according to the two
alternatives previously described. Figure 4-5 illustrates the proposed Interpretive Center in
both a three dimensional and a colored sketch rendering.


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan Page 25 of 74


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Page 25 of 74










Figure 4-2:
Interpretive Center Access Point 1:
From St. George Street at the Current Site of the Peso de Burgo Buildings Viewshed


Figure 4-3:
Interpretive Center Access Point 1:
From St. George Street at the Current Site of the
Peso de Burgo Buildings Existing Conditions


Peso de Burgo (reconstructed in 1977) located on the easl
Alley and Cuna Street, is shown to the right of this image.


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan Page 26 of 74


1nftrnr~fh),P rpntpr


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Page 26 of 74










Figure 4-4:
Interpretive Center Access Point 1-A:
From St. George Street at the Current Site of the Peso de Burgo Buildings Renderings











5,






a.I



Peso de Burgo House could serve as the gateway to the Interpretive Center
with visitors passing completely through the house and into the shaded
landscape beyond.


Peso de Burgo buildings could be relocated and the entrance to the
Interpretive Center could be via a gate in a new garden wall (shown in
Figure 4-5)


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan Page 27 of 74


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Page 27 of 74










Figure 4-5:
Interpretive Center Access Point 1-B:
From St. George Street at the Current Site of the Peso de Burgo Buildings
Renderings with new Proposed Interpretive Center

Interpretive Center


This image assumes relocation of the Peso de Burgo buildings. The entrance to the
Interpretive Center is shown as a gate opening in a new garden wall at the current site
of the Peso de Burgo buildings. In the background is a three dimensional sketch of the
proposed new Interpretive Center


This image is a shaded rendering of area shown in the above image.


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan Page 28 of 74


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Page 28 of 74









Interpretive Center Access Point 2: From Route AIA
Improved pedestrian accommodation along A1A (San Marcos Avenue) will be important to
reduce the impact of this four lane major thoroughfare and assure that the experience for
pedestrians accessing the Castillo de San Marcos and the Interpretive Center are as historically
authentic as possible. Sidewalk improvements, the addition of street trees and crosswalk
upgrades are infrastructure improvements that would improve the visitor experience. The
NPS's General Management Plan and Environmental Impact Statement anticipate that the
existing parking area on the Castillo de San Marcos grounds will be significantly reduced in the
future to improve view sheds.

Figures 4-6 through 4-9 are a series of images illustrating this access point to the Interpretive
Center, as described. For orientation, Figure 4-6 highlights the view of the images shown in
Figures 4-7 through 4-9, which begins at the point shown in red and spans the yellow triangular
area. These images were derived from the Existing Conditions shown in Figure 4-7 below.
Figures 4-8 and 4-9 illustrate the proposed Interpretive Center in both a three dimensional and
a colored sketch rendering.


Figure 4-6:
Interpretive Center Access Point 2: From Route AIA Viewshed


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan Page 29 of 74


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Page 29 of 74










Figure 4-7:
Interpretive Center Access Point 2: From Route AIA Existing Conditions

Castillo de San Marcos


This view is Route A1A looking north, with The Castillo de San Marcos National Monument to the right.


Figure 4-8:
Interpretive Center Access Point 2: From Route AIA Renderings


Interpretive Center


This three dimensional image of the proposed new Interpretive Center is situated on Route A1A
looking north. The Castillo de San Marcos National Monument is to the right in this view.


Figure 4-9:
Interpretive Center Access Point 2: From Route AIA Renderings


~-Th-~I


This rendering the new proposed Interpretive Center is the same view point as the image above


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Page 30 of 74









Interpretive Center Access Point 3: From North St. George Street
Pedestrians might choose to access the Interpretive Center by strolling through connected
spaces that exist to the rear of the buildings that front St. George Street. Currently the spaces
between Fort Alley and the proposed Interpretive Center site are host to numerous tasteful
interpretive living displays and demonstrations of early life in St. Augustine including a
blacksmith, domestic animals, craft demonstrations, gardens, and other educational exhibits
presented by period costumed interpreters.

For orientation, Figure 4-10 highlights the view of the images shown in Figures 4-11 through 4-
12, which begins at the point shown in red and spans the yellow triangular area. These images
were derived from the Existing Conditions shown in Figure 4-11 below. Figure 4-12 illustrates
the proposed Interpretive Center in both a three dimensional and a colored sketch rendering.

Figure 4-10:
Interpretive Center Access Point 3:
From North St. George Street Viewshed


InterDretive Center


Figure 4-11:
From North St. George Street Existing Conditions
0- ta- ~


This view starts in the backyards of the Triay and Gomez Houses and I
George Street and in the direction of the proposed new Interpretive Center


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan Page 31 of 74


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Page 31 of 74










Figure 4-12:
Interpretive Center Access Point 3:
From North St. George Street Renderings


This view is a closer look at the elevation of the building on approach from the backyards
of the Triay and Gomez House.


This view starts in the backyards of the Triay and Gomez Houses and looks both across St. George
Street and in the direction of the proposed new Interpretive Center


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan Page 32 of 74


.. ... ..


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Page 32 of 74









Existing State-owned Buildings
Previously mentioned the outcome of the physical assessment conducted by UF for the 34
state-owned buildings (Table 1-1) revealed varying degrees of restoration and rehabilitation
need. These properties have deteriorated over the years and must be preserved and
rehabilitated as a national treasure.

The most repair cost-intensive structure is the Government House, primarily due to its age and
size. The original exterior construction is of coquina block, a rather porous material that has,
over time, allowed salt-laden moisture to penetrate into the reinforcing steel in the structural
beams. Some areas show major spelling of concrete over windows, doors, and porches that will
require complete demolition and reconstruction. Building conservation will require complete
scaffolding of the building in phases as well as acquisition of new coquina blocks that are only
manufactured in two quarries in the United States. There are multiple precast concrete
decorative window dressings that have cracked with age and need to be replaced, requiring
custom casting of these 280-year-old pieces. To be ADA-compliant, an original elevator must
be modified to allow access to the upper floors.

The Government House is partially sprinkled, but areas of assembly and crucial storage are not
currently sprinkled. Fire Codes require adding automatic fire sprinklers to the remainder of the
building, necessitating design and installation of a system that will remain mostly hidden to not
spoil the original appearances of the structure. This will also require design and upgrading of
the water infrastructure serving the building to properly pressurize the sprinkler system. All of
these corrections and more will need to be designed and constructed by architects and
construction managers who are well-versed in historic building preservation.

Other buildings, although varying in condition and estimated repair costs, suffer from a variety
of corrective needs. All need minor ADA upgrades to become accessible. Many of the buildings
that house extensive inventory need automatic fire sprinklers, requiring water infrastructure
upgrades to lines serving the buildings and designs that will keep the historic appearance of the
buildings. Many buildings are termite-infested and need structural replacement of wood
columns, beams and siding. These components are almost entirely hand-hewn cypress planks,
hand-split red-cedar shakes, and hand-shaped beams and columns, all requiring a significant
amount of work to accomplish accurate construction techniques. Additionally, all metal
connectors should be hand-cast in the local blacksmith shop, also requiring extensive work to
remain historically correct. Buildings requiring concrete repair must utilize a period technique
of casting in place called tabby-concrete requiring a rare craftsmanship virtually unavailable in
today's market.

Vehicle and Pedestrian Access, Circulation and Wayfinding
Since the arrival of Spanish explorers in 1513 and the establishment of St. Augustine and the
Castillo de San Marcos, modern interventions have both enhanced and detracted from the
experience of visitors. The invention of the automobile has provided Americans with the means
to access the unique City of St. Augustine and the Castillo de San Marcos and their history.
Over the most recent century, the increasing demands of the automobile have caused the
visitor's experience of St. Augustine's unique history to be increasingly compromised. In recent


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Page 33 of 74









years the City of St. Augustine has made significant strides to improve the visitor experience
through incorporation of vehicle circulation, signage and parking strategies that reinforce
pedestrian movements in the historic area.

Primary to this remedial action has been the development of St. Augustine's Visitor Information
Center (VIC) and the adjacent Historic Downtown Parking Facility. These facilities are located
immediately north of the historic area that is the subject of this strategic plan. The intent of
these facilities is to provide a destination for all travelers reaching St. Augustine from north or
south via Rt. AIA or US1. Thanks to the Historic Downtown Parking Facility, visitors are afforded
a place to alight and immediately experience the adjacent VIC where they receive orientation to
the many attractions of St. Augustine.

The existing VIC serves an important role as the visitor's first orientation to all that St.
Augustine has to offer. The proposed Interpretive Center should be the visitor's next stop for
more in-depth examination of St. Augustine history before entering the Castillo de San Marcos
and other historic venues. For this reason, convenient and comfortable visitor access is crucial
to success.

Vehicular circulation should be managed within and around the historic area to encourage of
pedestrian movement. For vehicular travel, the signage strategy should be further
implemented so that it guides visitors to the Historic Downtown Parking Facility and the
adjacent VIC. West Castillo Drive should be reinforced as the primary entry into the City and
Historic Area with all vehicular signage pointing the driver to the VIC and parking facilities
regardless of City entry point. Additionally, with the NPS's Castillo de San Marcos as a signature
landmark within the City's historic area, it would be beneficial for UF to explore the option of
linking UF to the National Park Service branding along A1A, so as to leverage the NPS brand for
the purposes of both the NPS and the state-owned assets.

The existing VIC serves as a focal point for visitors and residents creating an organized arrival
area, near to the Castillo de San Marcos, the Spanish Quarter, the future Interpretive Center
and the remainder of the historic area. The Historic Downtown Parking Facility is a multi-modal
facility providing access to a number of transportation options: loading/unloading slips for tour
buses and school buses; pickup/drop-off stations for private tour train vendors; horse carriage
staging area; future city transit bus area; extensive pedestrian plazas and loggias; and 1,164
parking garage spaces.

A recommended corollary action to these vehicular circulation and signage strategies involves
discouraging parking in residential areas, on street parking and/or all-day parking in the
business districts. Increasing meter fees, parking fines and enforcement of parking violations
will act as strong encouragement to use the Historic Downtown Parking Facility, in which
primary vehicular paths to access this facility are shown in Figure 4-13 on the following page.

Once the visitor either parks in the Historic Downtown Parking Facility or enters the historic
area from other entry points, it is imperative that wayfinding and signage elements blend with
the existing signage program such that a cohesive, clear and user-friendly system is in place.
This "network" of elements will create a unified and distinct image to reinforce the overall


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Page 34 of 74









character of the St. Augustine area and to lead the first-time visitor to its various amenities,
historic sites and venues.

As previously described, one cornerstone of the overall wayfinding / signage system is to lead
the visitor to the Historic Downtown Parking Facility adjacent to the VIC. Once at the VIC, the
visitor is introduced to materials and information that convey the choices for venues and
activities within the entire St. Augustine area. This approach is based upon the premise that the
more the visitor knows about what is available, the more likely it is that their stay will be
extended and that the revenues realized by the entire St. Augustine area will increase.

In addition to the vehicular signage that accomplishes the directing of visitors to the VIC, the
signage elements will further include the following elements related to pedestrian circulation.

B Pedestrian signage leading to specific areas or signature landmarks throughout St.
Augustine, such as the Castillo de San Marcos, the Spanish Quarter, Government
House, Flagler College, etc.
H Identity signage at the specific amenities (both UF and other)


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan Page 35 of 74


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Page 35 of 74













Figure 4-13:

Primary Vehicular Paths


i


4.4


4 ,' : a'-. .L








S* *



, ,i




.'' ",' " ,,.. E. ,
";. ..S S ii:.


1~~ '*1J
-" ~q *4*
-~~ .: -3




PS 4. I


*( r% '
* qj ~
" r Lb 2.
t3.l '


,, .


, 4L
1~


L I

S1'


.1
*^




."

i


.-

v

^o


5


Vr
Ln
Cl
U

S: '


I


Cha

'i


.. .. "
*1 1


Ar


C 4.

5 '. 1t U



~si.

I -




,,4 L
* I. *?
'Tr'
u- .114~
"tF 4- 4..

I.


. '


4..
en
it

SI






jt


-p
S







'4-'




*1'
~~I



1L


If |'An]i


rlote Sleel S
4




2 St George Street
















'.
., V '..;
I.. .


It i



*&.. '








; ,,








"" ..:i


CC

A A 5
a c


[,.

14


H*


:.*
G


V *i


I 4 ,


Se^"'5"86
.. -


.r








*v.







.t.



**L


I --


.4j
*h ,: !~.


i


...








I..


IO


N I1




iik


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan Page 36 of 74


L =.=iF.T.ilr.= -


' 41, .


,4' c


Legend
SMain Visitor Information Kiosks
SInlerprelite Center
Key Decision Zones
Vehicular Entry Corridors
Banners

f Stale-Owned Assels
Stale-Owned Parcels'

-F ,


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Page 36 of 74


k


..
li
;


i


i "
,.
;;T
;'


-&


!


bh









The signage elements identified below will include messages and information for venues that
are owned by UF, as well as amenities throughout the City of St. Augustine. The venues and
messages should be confined to key visitor-oriented destinations within the city. It is advisable
to incorporate print materials for the visitor to take away, to provide additional information. A
committee, including UF, the NPS, the Tourism Bureau, and the City of St. Augustine and other
appropriate community stakeholders should be utilized to determine the messages that are
appropriate for both signage and print.

Main Visitor Kiosks
These elements will give the visitor a comprehensive understanding of all of the options
available within the area, so that they can plan their day. These larger elements typically
incorporate a map of the area and print materials. Further development of these elements will
also explore the integration of interactive screens and media. It is assumed that one Main Kiosk
would be located as the visitor exits the VIC parking garage and one Main Kiosk would be
located at the south entrance to the Spanish Quarter. Additionally, an area near the Main
Visitor Kiosks could be designated as a location to meet a guide for a guided tour and/or
directions. Figure 4-14 is an example of a Main Visitor Kiosk from the Gettysburg National
Military Park, which is an NPS site, in Pennsylvania.

Key Decision-Making Points
These signage elements would be placed throughout the city and would be located at key
decision-making junctures. Some may be two or four-sided; others, depending on the available
area, would be smaller in scale, with directional text and arrows only. These signs will also
provide an opportunity for changeable information that can be updated and kept current for
festivals, events, 450th Anniversary announcements, etc. Figure 4-15 is another example from
the Gettysburg National Military Park of the type of signage that might be used at a Key
Decision-Making Point.

Interpretive Signs
Interpretive panels can be placed adjacent to such properties as the living history museums,
archaeological sites and historic homes so that the visitor on a self-guided tour, can gain more
insight as to the historic significance of the property, whether or not they choose to enter the
building at that time. Interpretive Signs from the Prairie Avenue Historic District in Chicago
are shown in Figure 4-16 as an example.

Banners
The main path of travel for the first time visitor has been identified along A1A. It would be
advisable to develop a series of graphics and banners that could activate the corridor. They will
act as an arrival statement and help to detract from any unsightly elements leading to the VIC
parking garage.

UF Branding
The state-owned parcels and buildings have a variety of existing signage elements. As part of
determining appropriate UF Branding of state-owned assets it is necessary to evaluate the
existing signage that is related to a state seal or a historic designation. The intent is not to add


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Page 37 of 74










to the signage clutter, but to create a "marker" or brand to link the UF interpretive sites
together and to clearly identify them as interpretive sites managed by UF. As mentioned
previously, the existing signage will be fully considered prior to designing the branding signage
for UF properties.

It is critical to point out the UF assets are only a part of the overall St. Augustine experience.
The City of St. Augustine is comprised of a wealth of activities, restaurants, beaches, and retail
opportunities that all combine to make it the unique destination that it has become. The UF
assets are intended to enhance this overall experience and to add the historical and educational
components to the visitor's options. The depth of experience that is a part of the UF academic
contribution and the wonderful assets that the University and the National Park Service bring to
the mix, are what will make collaborative actions a success for all.


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan Page 38 of 74


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Page 38 of 74










Figure 4-14:
Main Visitor Kiosk Example
TI1,9 "


I~~ 1*-4-- ...


Image Provided by: Gallagher & Associates


Figure 4-15:
Key Decision-Making Point Example


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan Page 39 of 74


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Page 39 of 74












Figure 4-16:
Interpretive Sign Example


LOST HOUSES OF P

16 O'o 1700 B0I:C.4L


Note: This is an example. Text on this image is not meant to be legible
Images Provided by: Gallagher & Associates


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan Page 40 of 74


U,
10
0 ,.,,,.,._
z

_ IC~r.Lrafc"- mjir wi
*-< J- uuj'i.pr~
L t
zpr-- ~l-
za~r
0 qr


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Page 40 of 74










To a large extent, the development of access and circulation facilities will be the responsibility
of local governments and the Florida Department of Transportation. UF plans to partner with
these entities to identify needs and secure funding through State or Federal agencies, grants
and other mechanisms. The 450th Anniversary celebration presents an opportunity to secure
such needed funds, and an Anniversary commission is being mobilized to work on
recommendations including infrastructure improvements, which must be coordinated and
consistent with this strategic plan. Existing infrastructure plans and facility recommendations
are also keys to identifying public infrastructure needs.

Table 4-1 below lists the primary resources that have been utilized in the development of
access and circulation plans for this Historic Area Strategic Plan.


Table 4-1:
Relevant Plans and Studies

Conceptual Traffic and
1995 Prosser, Hallock & Kristoff, Inc. City of St. Augustine
Parking Plan
Conceptual Master Plan for
2000 Reynolds, Smith and Hills, Inc. City of St. Augustine
a Transit Greenway System
Master Plan Update 2004 Halback and Associates, Inc. Flagler College
PD&E/Feasibility Study-
Pedestrian Underpass and 2008 England-Thims & Miller, Inc. City of St. Augustine
or Safety Improvements


Through review of these previous plans and development of this strategic plan, it is
recommended that the overall visitor experience can be further enhanced through
infrastructure and landscape improvements focused on six critical areas.



Area 1: Between Existing VIC and Old City Gate
Recommended pedestrian improvements are experienced first as one departs the existing VIC
and Historic Downtown Parking Facility. Today visitors navigate narrow sidewalks along Orange
Street between the Historic Downtown Parking Facility and the Old City Gate which was
originally the only entrance to St. Augustine. The pedestrian experience here can be
significantly enhanced by adjusting vehicular traffic patterns on Orange Street between South
Castillo Drive and Cordova Street. In addition, the ramp from South Castillo Drive (A1A)
southbound to Orange Street can also be removed in order to expand the pedestrian precinct
adjacent to the historic and picturesque City Gate at the head of St. George Street.

The removal of the ramp from A1A southbound will also enhance the historic Huguenot
Cemetery at the corner of A1A and Orange Street. This closure would allow visitors, walking
from the VIC through the City Gates to St. George Street, to avoid crossing traffic and move
more freely around the gates to better appreciate the landmark and space.


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Page 41 of 74









Along Orange Street near the City Gate and the VIC, there is a good opportunity to both visually
and physically reconnect the Cubo Line with the redoubt south of the VIC, the City Gate, and
the Cubo line extending to the Castillo. The Cubo line, made of palm log and earth, was
constructed in 1702 following a British siege and provided protection for St. Augustine citizens
on approach to the reconstructed redoubt, part of the Castillo defense system. Visitors would
be aided as the Cubo Line would act as an arrow, pointing directly to St. George Street and
Avenida Menendez, both of which then lead to the UF/NPS Interpretation Center. The resulting
area south of the VIC would thereby become an entry park for the historic district.

Area 2: Grounds and Parking Area of Castillo de San Marcos
The National Park Service can play an important role in the enhancement of the glacis, which is
the sloped lawn that surrounds the Castillo. Current plans for the fort include reducing the
parking area to handicapped and bus parking only. In addition to simplifying the parking
options for the visitor by reinforcing the Historic Downtown Parking Facility's role at the main
public parking facility, this will help to visually reconnect the fort to the new Visitor Interpretive
Center, the Spanish Quarter, and the rest of the historic area. Possible reductions to the width
of Castillo Drive or removal of on-street parking would further enhance this connection.

Area 3: Plaza de la Constituci6n and Adjacent Streets
The City should consider improving the Plaza de la Constituci6n in an effort to improve the
pedestrian connections between St. George Street and Aviles Street, which leads to historic
destinations south of King Street. An improvement that should be considered is the closing of
St. George Street between Cathedral Place and King Street. Traffic will still be able to circle the
Plaza and Government House by using the Ponce de Leon Circle to the east of the Plaza, and
this closed roadway will help improve pedestrian connections to both Government House and
facilities south of King Street.

Area 4: Historic Area Street Scaping
Street scaping can also improve pedestrian circulation, access and safety in and around the
historic area. The goal is to seamlessly blend public space design, lighting, planting greenery,
paving, signs, amenities and other elements to achieve a sense of identity and unity along the
entire stretch of the Castillo Streetscape (South Castillo Drive), City Gate Streetscape (Orange
Street), Bay Front Streetscape (Avenida Menendez Avenue) and Historic City streets (Cordova,
Spanish, Cuna, Charlotte, Hypolita, Tolomato, and Treasury Streets). For instance, the new
pedestrian space created by closing Orange Street can benefit from a brick or coquina cement
surface to better mesh with St. George Street and provide a visual cue to vehicular traffic.
Paving wider sidewalks, along A1A, can facilitate an improved experience for visitors walking
towards the Interpretive Center. These streetscape enhancements can also improve the vista
from the Castillo de San Marcos.

Area 5: AIA Pedestrian Crosswalks
It is recommended that pedestrian access from the Interpretive Center across A1A to the
grounds of the Castillo de San Marcos and the waterfront be handled by an existing crosswalk
plus a relocated crosswalk (from Fort Alley) at the northern most point of the Interpretive


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Page 42 of 74









Center's property. The following improved safety features will help ensure collision frequencies
do not increase.

H Improved roadway lighting on both sides of AlA/South Castillo Drive (from Avenida
Menendez to West Castillo Drive)
H Widen each crosswalk on AlA/South Castillo Drive
S"Countdown" pedestrian signals at each cross walk on South Castillo Drive
H Landscaping elements bordering AIA sidewalks so as to eliminate mid-roadway
pedestrian crossings

Opportunities for further pedestrian enhancements to A1A are constrained by the relatively
narrow width of the existing A1A right of way within this area. Within the existing right of way
it may be feasible to provide additional space for pedestrian enhancements through a
reduction in the number of the existing through travel lanes on this segment of A1A. In
addition to wider sidewalks and crosswalks, these enhancements may also include the
provision of a grass median in the center of A1A that would function as a refuge area for
pedestrians crossing between the proposed Interpretive Center and the Castillo de San Marcos
National Monument. Federal funds may be available for the provision of improvements that
would enhance pedestrian movements across A1A in this area. Further study of the feasibility
of this option in conjunction with the FDOT and adjacent landowners, specifically the NPS, is
required.

Area 6: Trolley Routes
Currently there are two existing trolley routes that tour St. Augustine's downtown historic
district, the Old Town Trolley Tours "Green Trolleys" and the Ripley's Sightseeing Trains "Red
Trains". Both are privately owned and operated. The Old Town Trolley Tours operates daily
from 9:00am to 4:30pm, with full tour duration of hour and 15 minutes. The Tour has a total
of 22 stops with trolleys arriving at each stop every 20 minutes. The Ripley's Sightseeing Trains
operates daily from 8:30am to 3:30pm, with full tour duration of 1 hour and 20 minutes. The
Tour has a total of 22 stops with trolleys arriving at each stop every 15-20 minutes.

In the past a free city shuttle operated in the historic area. Following the opening of the VIC, a
shuttle ran along Cordova Street to Hypolita Street and the Plaza de la Constituci6n. Eventually
the shuttle was discontinued, due in part to a lack of proper signage and the preference of
tourists to walk. Currently the shuttle only operates during the holiday weekends.

The free city shuttle service should be reinstated with a new shelter at the Plaza de la
Constituci6n. Those who choose to walk from the VIC and adjacent parking facility could be
transported back to the garage quickly and comfortably after a day of sightseeing and shopping.
It may also encourage tourists to take the shuttle directly to the plaza in order to visit the
attractions south of King Street. Figure 4-17 shows existing trolley routes in the historic area of
St. Augustine.


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan Page 43 of 74


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Page 43 of 74










Options described under the Pedestrian Circulation and Associated Wayfinding / Signage
Strategies and the Infrastructure, Landscape and Transit Improvements to Enhance Pedestrian
Circulation (Areas 1-5) sections are illustrated in Figure 4-18.


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan Page 44 of 74


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Page 44 of 74








Figure 4-17:
Trolley / Train Routes


tk 'P; ;i .Y
1*. *'IV.* ti

,, "...."
113"
S" h it I" ,i r": I
;I:v; - .


, -' ... ; ": ': ;""
r ' ii
41t





: L ]duirk.'14 "fl" ":

b'4 "s
%4 .
.7 N.. : jV.





:e ---t'
..;.....









.-:",.... -,
A'
-A




G Tl o.








Stt-we Parce' -s*
.. = V fa:" .. ,-" "









& -
461














a --tJW*I
ul 7-.. r1I C 4

i .-A
A-



)ndb~ : ;:" j, ii ". -.ii J ..,
rr~


~ I.. ,- ,,.....
-40-


f.40








St Augustine Shuttle Ic ",i-e." ..... -'[ .-
Red Trolley Route ,.!.l.

Green Trolley Route I;. --
State-Owned Assets ._. ,. .
State-Owned Parcels* D ,
iic~ .

'~~ '. If rl je l










Fre, e,;CjI~ An... .
a" r~e reT.')e.: iiiiiiiiL ..'' "".,,,z" ..' -I il:r
mi~~~iiiiiiiL.,,r~l~~i r" a ,k,


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan Page 45 of 74


-





Irr r p-
tcor bL _TTV'


Lege


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Page 45 of 74












Figure 4-18:
Physical Plan Options


i i. il..*i

S .0 *
S e a

4 n0






rim ... Iion
I < : '1 | .


U

3
*


I



ggs @SSe See s esUSU 6*.***^ sem ee*Ss a ^s ** abS
SAa6ida Menender we *nu

l p J 'e *O 3 i n n . * **. ***

*

r r 'loe Street .
r : .-" fl ~' : ,



S. i 1
*i . '" 4 . ...


,' U. _.







T' e -
U .tee I gs





s pan ee
,,- . S ., . .. ", '. ,.
.... ,_. ..&.


A'l


C.'i
-.4*i


lit


S ;~ : '
i 5 Y1
S c
1 r t



i4


'V1 -A;,~
A~,' .
) I 1{ '* *~
-$1 4 L
- -'a t
*g"cat ; "
S:i A i ri~ ;


C"T


,' p Cot


C. 1 .
I~
cowdOVB


Yi n


*


' : ;' ...
, .. *,. '' .it. . |
, "" *" L .


i M "'. ' .: .h,


.- "e .. .. ... r i .t
-2-, + +:


- A



'::"i" '


eern6


C

-r


AVI 6


Legend


- 1.. *





I-.

--;9i
I k:


* Main Visitor Informallon Kiosks
Interpretive Center
Key Decision Zones
Vehicular Entry Corridors
Banners
* A1A Slreetscape
iiIIII Crosswalks
f Orange Street Adjuslment
SNPS Parking Lol Adluslmenl
SState-Owned Assets
State-Owned Parcels'
< i c i ''
1..,-, 1 1 r, I ,- l..r.. l..
.:,. L c,;TI., G.. ..1 l. r.l Ii Il.rir,.l


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan Page 46 of 74


tr




-441








14x


*


I" Q


-I


*


1, . ...,


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Page 46 of 74










Infrastructure, Transit, Hardscape and Landscape Improvements
A variety of native and indigenous period plants should be used to accurately reflect the plant
material available to St. Augustine residents before 1821, which marks the end of the Second
Spanish Period. A full list of appropriate trees, shrubs, and edible plants is provided in the City
of St. Augustine Historic Architecture Review Board (HARB) guidelines, and the most
appropriate selections from these guidelines are listed below. These are selected due to their
hardy nature and ability to thrive in a coastal environment (i.e. salt tolerant):

Trees
Live Oak (Quercus virginiana) not listed with HARB, but a Florida native; high salt tolerance

Sycamore (Platanus occidentalis) Florida native; moderate salt tolerance

Slash Pine (Pinus elliottii) Florida native; moderate salt tolerance

Dahoon Holly (Ilex cassine) Florida native; limited salt tolerance

Yaupon Holly (Ilex vomitoria) Florida native; high salt tolerance

Dogwood (Cornus florida) Florida native; limited salt tolerance

Palms
Cabbage Palm (Sabal palmetto) Florida native; high salt tolerance

Fruit Trees (some are not native, but are appropriate to the time period)
Damson Plum (Chrysophyllum oliviforme) Florida native; limited salt tolerance

Sour Orange (Citrus aurantium) not native, but there were once citrus groves on Anastasia
Island; limited salt tolerance

Pear (Pyrus communis) not native, but there are pear trees in Watson House yard; limited salt
tolerance

Pomegranate (Punica granatum) limited salt tolerance

Shrubs
Yaupon Holly (Ilex vomitoria spp.) Florida native; high salt tolerance

Glossy Privet (Ligustrum lucidum) naturalized to Florida; moderate salt tolerance

Spanish Bayonet (Yucca aloifolia) Florida native; moderate salt tolerance

Saw Palmetto (Serenoa repens) Florida native; high salt tolerance

Waxmyrtle (Myrica cerifera) Florida native; high salt tolerance


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan Page 47 of 74


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Page 47 of 74









Flowering Shrubs (some are not native, but are appropriate to the time period)
Oleander (Nerium oleander) high salt tolerance

Swamp Rose (Rosa palustris) Florida native; high salt tolerance

Rose of Sharon (Hibiscus syriacus) moderate salt tolerance

Vines
Trumpet Honeysuckle (Lonicera sempervirens) Florida native; moderate salt tolerance

Japanese Honeysuckle (Lonicera japonica) naturalized to Florida; moderate salt tolerance

English Ivy (Hedera hedix) naturalized to Florida; limited salt tolerance

Flowers (some are not native, but are appropriate to the time period)

Daffodil (Narcissus spp.) high salt tolerance
Phlox, Annual (Phlox drummondii) Florida native; limited salt tolerance

Coreopsis (Coreopsis lanceolata) Florida native; moderate salt tolerance

Black-eyed Susan (Rudbeckia hirta) Florida native; moderate salt tolerance

Beach Sunflower (Helianthus debilis) not listed with HARB, but a Florida native; high salt
tolerance

Herbs (some are not native, but are appropriate to the time period)
Basil (Ociumum basilicum)

Chives (Allium schoenoprasium)

Dill (Anethum graveolens)

Sage (Salvia officinalis)

Vegetables (some are not native, but are appropriate to the time period)
Carrot (Daucus carota)

Cauliflower (Brassica oleracea var. botrytis)

Potato (Solanum tuberosum) still a major agricultural product in St. Johns County

Squash (Cucurbita spp.)

Tomato (Pycopersicon asculentum)

Most landscaping in this period consisted of vegetable gardens, flower gardens, and fruit trees.
Edible plants requiring constant maintenance, such as the herbs and vegetables, should be
considered for use in teaching gardens within the grounds of the Spanish Quarter. The entry


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Page 48 of 74









courtyard, on the other hand, should include a variety of trees (including fruit trees), shrubs,
and flowering plants. This will help to ensure that this area remains an aesthetically pleasing
entrance year-round. Garden layouts for should also reflect a design appropriate to the late
1700s / early 1800s.

Street furniture, ranging from benches and trash receptacles to wayfinding signage, should fit
into the Second Spanish Period in both the materials and the overall look of the item. The scale
of the item is also an important attribute to ensure that it complements the surrounding
historic area. Generally, these items are made of metal, such as wrought iron, or masonry, such
as coquina concrete. Wood is also appropriate for trellises and bench slats. Overhead
canopies, including umbrellas, should be white, natural canvas, or sailcloth.

A variety of site furniture components were designed as part of the City of St. Augustine's new
transportation facility at the Visitor Information Center (VIC). Wrought iron benches and trash
receptacles used for this project are also appropriate for streetscape and courtyard purposes.
Consistent furniture styling can also help to integrate the Spanish Quarter, Interpretive Center
and the VIC, thereby extending, unifying and ultimately enhancing the visitor experience.

Appropriate paving materials should also be considered. Asphalt and plain concrete are
prohibited by Historic Architecture Review Board (HARB) as they are not in keeping with the
historic district, but a variety of hard pavements are permitted, including coquina concrete,
tabby, brick, and stone on sand. Loose coquina, crushed shell and river rock are also
appropriate, but should only be considered as decorative pathways that are not designed for
ADA accessibility.

Masonry walls, such as the one surrounding the proposed entry courtyard that fronts St.
George Street, should be covered with smooth stucco or plaster with a rounded, steeply
angled, or flat cap. These walls should also be between five and five and one-half feet (5' to 5'-
6") in height. The gateway should be topped with a two to three foot (2'-3') lentil, and the
gates should be made of an appropriate material, such as wood, with black metal hardware.

REVIEW OF DESIGN REQUIREMENTS
The Florida Bureau of Historic Preservation, State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO) has
review and approval control over any proposed changes to the existing or proposed state-
owned facilities located within Historic St. Augustine. The SHPO review and approval process is
likely to address the following issues. Additionally, the City's Historic Architectural Review
Board (HARB) will have a review role in physical plan changes within the historic district.

1960's Reconstructed Buildings: Any proposed physical changes at these buildings would most
likely have to be individually reviewed. Their context within the historic district will be a
consideration. If the reconstruction was conducted on the basis of archeological
documentation, that documentation will also be a consideration. Secretary of Interior
Standards will be applied to changes.

Vacant Property: Proposed new construction will need to be reviewed for compatibility with
the character of adjacent properties. Archeological issues and investigation of the site will need


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Page 49 of 74










to be reviewed and resolved prior to any new construction. Secretary of Interior Standards will
apply.

Mothballing out-of-use buildings: There are National Park Service Technical Briefs for
mothballing historic buildings to use as a guide for this work. The impact of taking the buildings
out of service in the historic district will need to be reviewed.

Government House: Renovations, restorations, and rehabilitations will need to comply with
Secretary of Interior Standards. Character defining building features will need to be preserved.

Historic Structures: Secretary of Interior Standards will be applicable for any proposed
modifications.

Signs and Markers: The Florida Bureau of Historic Preservation will expect to review locations,
designs, text, and similar features.

ADA Issues: ADA accessibility issues at qualified historic buildings will need to be evaluated. If
requirements threaten or will destroy the historic building integrity, then full compliance will
not be required but minimum requirements will be required. If minimum requirements will
threaten or destroy the historic integrity then alternative requirements can be implemented.
ADA modifications will need to be reviewed on a case-by-case basis. Section 11-4.1.17 of the
Florida Building Code ADA Accessibility Requirements details a consultation process for
qualified historic properties when deviations from accessibility requirements are proposed.

New Construction: Relevant guidelines for new construction are documented in National Park
Service Preservation Briefs 14 New Exterior Additions to Historic Buildings; and 17 -
Architectural Character, Identifying the Visual Aspects of Historic Buildings as an Aid to
Preserving Their Character. SHPO concerns are to verify that the design of new structures in
the St. Augustine National Register Historic District is compatible with the National Park
Service's standards and surrounding structures. New buildings will be required to be
compatible with surrounding St. Augustine historic structures in size, scale, shape, roof type,
openings, projections, setting, and exterior materials. National Park Service requirements do
not permit new construction to exactly match historic construction. These standards require
that there be a visual distinction between new construction and historic construction; however,
new construction is required to be compatible with the historic construction. This may conflict
with city goals to make new construction more closely match historic construction.

General: Requirements and obligations under Chapter 267 Florida Statutes will apply for the
state-owned/managed assets.


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan Page 50 of 74


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Page 50 of 74










EDUCATION AND EXHIBIT STRATEGIES


The Vision Plan identified the following five objectives for the development of an education
and exhibit strategies of the Historic Area Strategic Plan.

1. Organize educational and visitor experience around a unifying theme.

2. Develop educational and exhibit programs targeted at various audiences including the
general public, students of higher education, K-12 students and professionals.

3. Deliver educational programs that are interactive, immersive and engaging.

4. Develop educational and exhibit programs that are authentic, multidisciplinary, and
demonstrate high standards in stewardship of historic and cultural resources.

5. Recognize that St. Augustine is a living city, and work in partnership to maintain the
community character while enhancing the educational and visitor experience.

The education and exhibit strategy identifies a framework upon which further development of
specific exhibit and educational details can be organized and developed. It is important that
the educational and visitor experience is organized around a unifying theme that targets
various audiences including the general public, students of higher education, K-12 students and
professionals.

Visitor Experience
A successful visitor experience relies heavily on a format for conveying the history that is the
story of St. Augustine. The method, content and context are major elements of the delivery of
the visitor experience. The overarching goal of this project is to create an authentic heritage
tourism experience utilizing the University's expertise. This experience will not only create a
unique destination within St. Augustine, it will also increase overall visitation, extend the
average stay and capture more of the visitor revenue.

Outlining key ideas is an essential initial step in the development of an effective visitor
experience strategy. A review of the history of St. Augustine as well as the context for this
project, resulted in the following list of key ideas to incorporate into the developed strategy.

Key Ideas:

H First European Settlement in 1565
[ Multi-Cultural/Multi-Layered
SDiscovering History Always something new to discover
H Authentic it happened here!
[ Lens to View American History
SRelevant Today Archaeology, Architecture, Preservation


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan Page 51 of 74


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Page 51 of 74









Layers of History
The visitor experience for the UF state-owned assets in historic St. Augustine, Florida should
begin with the early colonial periods and European settlements of the area and continue
through the 21st century and modern era. The most compelling way to bring these stories to
life will be through the individuals who lived in those periods, the touchstone collections and
the physical environments. The comprehensive strategy should highlight how we have come to
know this history and what we take from that knowledge to help interpret the past and
preserve for future generations.

As with many heritage tourism destinations, St. Augustine's history consists of several
chronological periods as well as several thematic areas that bridge these chronological periods.
For this reason, it is recommended that the framework for developing the visitor experience
strategy be adaptive to the many layers, both chronological and thematic, associated with the
St. Augustine area and its compelling historical narrative. Through collaborative effort, this
framework was christened the "Layers of History". It is through this multi-layered framework,
incorporating various periods and themes, that the visitor interpretive experience can be
coordinated and guided.

"The story of St. Augustine is more complex, more variegated, more interesting, and more
rich than a few headlines might indicate. Here is no short-lived Plimoth Plantation, no brief
candle like Williamsburg, and no several days-long smoking meadow at Gettysburg. Here is a
dynamic, international, constantly changing, endlessly fascinating, compact city existing
nearly 450 years in time."

Michael Gannon, Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus, University of Florida, Department
of History

Scholars typically describe the story of St. Augustine through the following chronologic periods:

H Settlement Origins and the Early Colony (1565-1600)
I The Developing City (1600-1763)
H The British Interregnum and the Arrival of the Minorcans (1763-1784)
B Spanish Restoration (1784-1821)
[ U.S. Territory and Statehood (1822-1861)
H Civil War, Reconstruction and Gilded Age (1861-1917)
B World War I to the Present (1918-2009)

Cutting across and bridging these periods were numerous thematic subjects:

B Prehistory
H Religion
[ Maritime History
H Military Life
[ Indian Relations


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Page 52 of 74









H Warfare and Sieges
[ Trade and Commerce
E Lifestyles
N First Schools and Hospitals
W Architectual Styles
[ Agriculture, Fishing and Ornamental Horticulture
H Tourism
[ Minority Residents


The "Layers of History" framework is a more generalized approach that attempts to organize
this complex history into "layers" that can be presented to the uninitiated visitor. In this way,
the "layers" serve to whet the appetite of the visitor to seek a more in-depth understanding by
visiting the various interpretive sites in St. Augustine.

Through the course of consensus-building workshops, support was expressed for this concept
as well as for recognition that additional layers could be added to reflect other community
assets and venues that may not be fully interpreted through the initially defined layers. One
distinct benefit of the "Layers of History" interpretive framework is that it is adaptable for use
by the community and does not impose rigid boundaries to interpretation of other St.
Augustine venues and attractions. The following summary gives a general description of five
example layers as well as a description of interpretive opportunities and a target visitor
audience for each.

Examples of groups or individuals that might visit St. Augustine include: general tourists,
heritage tourists, Hispanic tourists, families with children, School groups studying Florida
history, College students, military history buffs, Minorcan descendants, religious tourists, and
cultural tourists with particular interests in art and architecture/historic homes. Each
component of the multi-layered experience identifies a target audience from this list (these are
intended as examples of the target audience and are not exhaustive lists).


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan Page 53 of 74


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Page 53 of 74










Layer of History: Spanish Settlement Origins and the Early Colony
This experience can provoke visitors to experience a bit of early Europe in America by vividly
imagining the first colonial settlement as interpreted through living history. People of Spanish,
Caribbean, Native American and African heritage co-existed in Spanish St. Augustine. Visitors
can experience how families and individuals interact when multiple cultures are living with
competing visions. Opportunities to see, touch, smell the food of America's earliest European
settlers brings this experience to life.

Target Audience: casual tourists, heritage tourists, Hispanic tourists, families with children,
school groups studying Florida history, college students




Figure 4-19:
Settlement Origins and the Early Colony


Images provided by: Florida Museum of Natural History


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan Page 54 of 74


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Page 54 of 74










Layer of History: The Developing City
These later colonial and American periods highlight the second Spanish, British and Territorial
eras communicating the drama associated with St. Augustine's military history. This can also
highlight the long-standing heritage of Minorcans in Florida and St. Augustine.

Target Audience: casual tourists, military history buffs, heritage tourists, Minorcan
descendants, religious tourists, college students, families with children, school groups studying
state/military history/statehood



Figure 4-20:
The Developing City
















Photos by Maureen Ortagus, Public Image Consulting Group
i a i.; *. . .... ;;i,,. ......:" 'ii : : . .













Photos by Maureen Ortagus, Public Image Consulting Group


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan Page 55 of 74


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Page 55 of 74










Layer of History: Flagler Era Boom
Experience the Gilded Age of Railroads and Flagler's vision to bring tourism to Florida as a
winter retreat for the wealthy, with luxury hotels and some quirky ones as well. Celebrate the
art and architecture that distinguish St. Augustine from any other city in the country.

Target Audience: casual tourists, adult couples, heritage tourists, cultural tourists particular
interests in art and architecture/historic homes, families with children, college students



Figure 4-21:
Flagler Era Boom


.1


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan Page 56 of 74


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Page 56 of 74











Layer of History: African American Experience and Civil Rights

Visitors can learn about the history of the African American struggle for freedom during the
Civil Rights era and earlier by seeing key sites such as the St. Mary's Missionary Baptist Church
where Dr. Martin Luther King spoke. Heritage programming can link sites and current
educational curricula to connect local history. Early African American history can be
interpreted at nearby Ft. Mose, and the broader struggle for human rights can be presented
through St. Augustine history involving Spanish women's rights, slave life, free blacks and
Native Americans.

Target Audience: casual tourists, adult couples, African American heritage tourists, Freedom
Trail tourists, families with children, middle school, high school and college students



Figure 4-22:
African American Experience and Civil Rights
















Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. delivered some of his most powerful
sermons here in 1964 after which demonstrators took to the
streets in nonviolent protests against segregation. Image
provided by: Shirley Williams-Galvin, ACCORD Photographer



ACCORD
FREEDOM TRAIL
79 Bridge Street
R~rnI -e' III l I rr l l Ir I .l I. I.Il ibaW M t11 0
sw. sm._ s "- L cm hi i mm alpt.I IrMIs b nds H--" r ld tl o Blk m n r u re llm t me
S . .. nrr Ir l Tm e t elu l m ll ils se'rquirid lllr lwn rum
-Df r d ID 1t1 L -brr B H ll1l9 1. 2 drHIM Ibn ibfflu pr i al l
leadU 3 'U yeIn In lek p Ire-I onc* in%,r I.Um tIu. sI l idl, I t i- (Inl (s t Ina
Image provided by: 40th Annr ivr er Kinsary to Commemorate
rte Ci I.il Rht s Demonstratrions Ia n. I (ACCO
St.-Agustirr neH Al meS I trrtg wiP rma Po gupen i5r o
.i d.r t Im t b .ildlo -hni hn-pqun. II I.
..X > Il r- oa raem- th. J. B1an and R."lph Trmple
-rrr hLunind b, -rt IIRD .whri h mrnrd to im r
4adr (et Iry aM 2009
1 c d -- %r L Mr s Remif (Gnell-rd1-ILb (1907 -241 made Naloon il 1S %Len Ishe bemr ah f nt
S -meal W YMearn 1 MfL piNhBr oflrin 1 S t. 4mpnitag. M ra ndldi for 9W CMn) Com1i101 .M
hsa HoMana I r lm m an D aI l( I- oo, V



Image provided by: 40th Anniversary to Commemorate
the Civil Rights Demonstrations, Inc. (ACCORD)


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Page 57 of 74










Preservation
This can make the experience of visiting St. Augustine relevant to today by interacting in real
time with archeologists, historians, architects, interpreters and preservationists. See how we
discover, learn and record history. Development of new visualization technologies, such as
virtual walkthroughs and mappings of different periods of St. Augustine's history, can also
highlight research from UF and other resources and bring them to life.

Target Audiences: casual tourists, adult couples, heritage tourists, cultural tourists, middle
school, high school and college students



Figure 4-23:
Preservation


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan Page 58 of 74


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Page 58 of 74









Proposed New Interpretive Center and Other Interpretive Opportunities
Historic destinations have a wide array of interpretive opportunities for orienting and
communicating with tourists, educators, and students. A key component of the recommended
visitor experience strategy for the St. Augustine Historic Area is to provide an initial focal point
for the visitor that coordinates and communicates all of the available interpretive
opportunities. The "Layers of History" framework, as previously described, provides the broad
framework in which each of the historic assets can be positioned and related to each other.

Providing visitors with a focal location to begin their interpretive experience is essential as it
will allow them to understand the overall context of the area and its history. Based on that
introduction, visitors will be better able to select individual aspects and venues for further
investigation based on their individual interests and needs. Providing visitors with an initial
"portal" to the historic area will ensure that their individual interpretive experience realizes its
maximum potential and is tailored to their personal goals.

Further reinforcement for the concept of a focal point at which to begin each visitor's personal
experience was identified in the National Park Service's March 2007 Final General
Management Plan and Environmental Impact Statement (GMP/EIS) for the Castillo de San
Marcos National Monument. In this document, the National Park Service identified Alternative
C Emphasis on Rehabilitation of Casemates and Landscape New Visitor Center Off-Site as
the preferred alternative for the management of resource conditions and visitor experiences
for the next 15 to 20 years.

Through the collaborative stakeholder process that accompanied the development of this
strategic plan, the City of St. Augustine, the National Park Service and the University of Florida
have mutually stated their desire to collaborate on the design and construction of a new
Interpretive Center. This Interpretive Center will serve as the focal point for initiating the
visitor experience for both the federal and state-owned historic assets.

While the new Interpretive Center will provide the entry portal for the visitor experience, it is
just one of the many interpretive opportunities available to the University of Florida to
interpret the state-owned parcels and buildings. The following summarizes the potential
exhibit, educational and interpretive strategies that could be used singularly or in combination
for each state-owned historic asset as well as the proposed Interpretive Center.

Heritage Experience and Interpretive Venues I Living History Exhibits and Spanish Quarter
The goal within the Spanish Quarter Exhibits is to introduce interpretive threads that can guide
visitors to their areas of interest throughout the city and facilities of UF, NPS and other
institutions. These different interpretive threads can be made available electronically for access
both pre and post-visit for teachers and tourists alike. This added level of engagement allows
visitors to meet real individuals connect to UF be it researchers, students, educators,
interpreters or performers.


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan Page 59 of 74


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Page 59 of 74









Walking Tours
Walking tours are an essential part to the overall visitor interpretive experience. They will
illuminate, along with the signage program, the depth of history and individuals who connect
St. Augustine through key events that had impact on the state, the nation and how we know
history today. Walking tours can be organized around a variety of interpretive themes including
historic homes, architecture, gardens, the Freedom Trail, archaeological sites and the 1572
Town Plan. Such tours can focus on the state-owned assets, or include properties of multiple
owners.

Related Venues*
Beyond the assets directly connected to UF, the opportunity for visitors to gain a broader
understanding of the importance of the area and the different levels of exploration and
discovery are key to engaging audiences of different backgrounds, cultures and interests.
Venues such as Castillo de San Marcos, Flagler College, Lightner Museum, Excelsior African
American Cultural Museum, The Oldest House (Gonzalez-Alvarez), Nombre de Dios Mission,
Fort Mose, Historic Homes and Churches and the Historic Lighthouse all provide different lens
to both interpret and engage.

* Note: These are examples of connected venues. The full listing of related venues would be
further investigated and defined in the next phase of interpretive development.

Educational Programming and Lecture Series I Government House
Government House, due to its prominent location, as well as it's architectural significance, will
provide a great location for educational programming and outreach interpretation. With
adjacency to both Flagler College and the Lightner Museum, it can become a connection point
for UF to highlight its diversity of programs related to archeology, education, historic
preservation, architecture, etc. The exhibition spaces can illuminate the progress and show on-
going projects in conjunction with its partners in St. Augustine and beyond.

Web I Podcast I Audio Tours I Multiple Languages and Themes
Beyond the physical exhibitions and interpretive signage, there are opportunities to reach a
broader audience. Technology via webcasts, audio guides or internet downloads allow visitors
to customize their experience, gain access to more information or seek particular guides that
are in different languages or target specific age groups. This medium would also allow for UF to
have a strong web presence and key all of its assets and programs in a primary distribution
point. Direct ties to programs at UF, scholarship and continued research are best suited to this
means of communication.

Special Events I Festivals I Cultural Events
Special events, cultural fairs and festivals bring life to the existing venues and draw new and
different audiences. UF programs in music, culture and history can connect seasonally and
programmatically to the history and rich culture of St. Augustine. This would be a great draw
connecting local audiences, UF and the regional tourists. Topics might include; Cultural -
Spanish Days, Archeological Tours, Golden Era Music or after hour events targeted for visiting
families.


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Page 60 of 74









MARKETING STRATEGIES


The Vision Plan identified the following three objectives for the development of the marketing
strategies of the Historic Area Strategic Plan.

1. Integrate the programs of the state-owned historic properties into regional tourism and
economic development plans.

2. Manage commerce in a way that is welcoming, convenient and authentic for the
heritage tourist.

3. Manage the state-owned assets to be economically viable where operational expenses
and new initiatives are fully funded by program revenues, grants, and partnerships with
state, local, federal and private entities.

The marketing strategies focus on tactics that will improve the economic impact of visitors
through effective use analysis and management of the state-owned resources. Strategy
elements include the creation of an economic modeling software tool, specific to this historic
area, which will assist in future decision making regarding the use of the state-owned historic
resources. Additional recommendations are presented regarding ticketing strategies and
performance measures.

National Benchmarks Lessons Learned
On behalf of the RS&H Consulting Team, Economics Research Associates (ERA) reviewed a
number of leading national examples of living history museums and suggests that the following
'lessons learned' should be considered by UF for this Historic Area Strategic Plan:

H While early examples like Colonial Williamsburg (VA), Old Sturbridge Village (MA)
and Historic New Harmony (IN) were established through significant gifts from
wealthy founding families, the current models combine endowment and commercial
revenue programs (commercial rentals, joint ticket admissions programs, product
lines, residential rental revenues, fund raising) with educational funding for
interpretive programs, research and operating costs for staff. A membership
program might also be explored, should an entity be considered that could manage
and support this type of activity. This model can be adapted for St. Augustine as the
interpretive program and management approaches are better defined over time.

B Partnership with the National Park Service for a new Interpretive Center will more
closely link the Castillo de San Marcos and other historic sites in central St.
Augustine, and will provide new opportunities to tell and interpret the St. Augustine
story in its many dimensions as well as to cross market multiple visitor experiences
through a carefully structured marketing program with the St. Johns Tourist
Development Council, the City of St. Augustine and others. The Castillo de San
Marcos will remain a major destination operated by the NPS, which has also
expressed willingness to explore a joint ticketing program that would allow visitors
to purchase admissions to the Castillo and other historic sites in St. Augustine. Joint


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Page 61 of 74









ticketing that allows admission to multiple historic sites (whether purchasers
actually visit all the sites is neither relevant nor required) is a proven approach to
managing multiple interpretive properties while generating operation and
restoration revenues.

H There are precedents for multi-venue interpretive programs and joint ticketing,
multi-site operations, different approaches to revenue generation and joint
marketing strategies in the national benchmark examples analyzed. In all cases, a
combination of public and private funding sources has been utilized, but with
particular sources and uses of funds varying according to the programmatic and
interpretive objectives of the sponsoring organizations. Other sites successfully
include both interpretive historic sites as well as central interpretive centers,
commercial uses such as hotels, retail stores, restaurants and offices (sometimes
operated by the sponsoring organizations to generate operating revenues) and new
construction/infill locations. The precedents suggest that a balance between
educational and selective commercial activities to support the educational and
interpretive purpose of the program provide both flexibility and opportunities to
seek a range of ways to fund and operate multiple properties, though all of those
reviewed have endowment funds to produce an annual revenue source for
operations, management and program support.

Market Analysis
To estimate the depth of market support for specific sectors in the historic area of St.
Augustine, ERA examined demographic and economic conditions across a range of indices,
focusing on those factors that fuel demand for real estate.

ERA utilized a number of public and private data sources in its research, including the U.S.
Census Bureau; ESRI Business Analyst; St. Augustine, Ponte Vedra & The Beaches Visitors &
Convention Bureau; CoStar; and Claritas.

The Demographic and Economic Profile features four study areas:

[ 0.25-mile radius from Cuna St. and St. George St.;
[ The "Historic Area" as defined by the area west of Avenida Menendez/San Marco
Ave., south of Castillo Dr., east of N. Ponce de Leon Blvd/San Sebastian River, and
north of Bridge St.;
H 0.50-mile radius from Cuna St. and St. George St. (inclusive of the area within a 0.25-
mile radius);
[ St. Johns County

As a means of understanding growth and development trends, ERA studied population growth
for selected study areas between 2000 and 2013. Based on trends and forecasts prepared by
ESRI Business Analyst and the US Census, the population of St. Augustine is approximately
12,300, with 2,500 households within 2 mile of the historic area and 630 households within the
historic area.


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Page 62 of 74









The number of households within the historic area is projected to increase 9.5 percent by 2013.
The number of households county-wide is projected to increase by 27.5 percent by 2013. As is
true of most jurisdictions across the United States, median household incomes in the study
areas have increased since 2000. In 2008 however, over half of the Historic Area median
household annual incomes are less than the U.S. average household income of $54,000.
Incomes county-wide are higher, with only 37 percent of households less than the U.S. average
household income.

St. Augustine, Ponte Vedra & The Beaches Visitors & Convention Bureau estimates that the
2006-2007 St. Johns County visitation was 4.1 million visitors. Based on historical rates of
visitation changes, ERA estimates an annual compounded visitation increase of 3.6 percent.
This suggests that visitation may reach 4.9 million per year by 2013.

To estimate projected Historic Area visitor spending, ERA utilized the St. Augustine, Ponte
Vedra & The Beaches Visitors & Convention Bureau Survey, which indicated that 42 percent of
total visitors are interested in history and culture. Therefore 1.7 million visitors in 2007 and an
estimated two million visitors in 2013 are interested in history and culture. ERA assumes that
the Historic Area can capture 75 percent of these visitors, with a ten percent increase in
capture by 2013 as facilities are improved and tourism is strengthened. In addition, ERA
assumes that the Historic Area may capture up to one-third of visitors who are primarily in the
area for the beaches.

The St. Augustine, Ponte Vedra & The Beaches Visitors & Convention Bureau Survey estimates
that for Historic Area visitors, the average party size is 2.52 and the average length of stay is
3.71 days. Based on expenditure data, party size, and length of stay data, ERA estimates that
current Historic Area visitor spending is estimated at $132 million (not including lodging), with
$50.2 million on Food and Beverage (38 percent),. $48.9 million on Leisure and Entertainment
(37 percent), and $33.2 million on Retail Goods and Services (25 percent). Assuming visitor
spending will increase at the same level as inflation, ERA estimates that visitor spending in the
Historic Area in 2013 will be approximately $201 million.

Based on upgraded sales productivity levels, ERA estimates that total supportable space within
the Historic Area is currently approximately 471,800 sq. ft. and projected to be 634,600 sq. ft.
by 2013.

Interpretive, Commercial and Educational Uses
The St. Augustine properties under consideration by UF include a range of
historical/interpretive venues, commercial uses and present/future educational uses. The
review of existing conditions indicated that some historical sites are in use as revenue-
producing retail spaces, others include rental residential uses, or mixtures of the two, and other
properties include undeveloped open spaces that could be used in the future as infill
construction locations, assuming careful design of any possible infill buildings to assure
compatibility with St. Augustine's pedestrian-oriented scale and historic/architectural
character.


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan Page 63 of 74


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Page 63 of 74









The use of these buildings and sites today can be considered a baseline that may evolve over
time, but future uses are undetermined and subject to further study before a final use program
can be identified. It is important to recognize that the state-owned historic St. Augustine
properties are not a commercial investment, but are intended to serve as a civic and
educational asset, supported in part by selected commercial activities. This suggests that
current tenants and operators will not change in the near term, and may evolve over many
years, but only in selected locations that may transition to interpretive or educational facilities.
No current uses should be changed immediately, as UF is interested in determining the most
appropriate mix of uses in the historic property portfolio that will best meet community needs
and expectations in St. Augustine. There is much additional work to be done in analyzing the
individual properties before a future program of uses across all the sites can be determined.
Consideration will also need to be given to commercial enterprises that sell "authentic goods"
and may qualify for certain tax advantages.

Economic Model and the Prioritization Process
The University of Florida will need to develop a strategy that supports the interpretive vision
and its educational mission, while bringing in adequate income to provide long-term viability. A
land use plan for all 33 properties will have seemingly limitless options. Therefore, ERA
developed an economic model to assist UF with its decision process.

The economic model can inform financial decisions as UF's strategic plan is refined or
assumptions change. As a use for a property is selected, whether interpretive, educational, or
commercial, the model provides immediate feedback on projected operating income or loss.
The model is a decision making tool that measures incremental budget impacts as the portfolio
of property use or cost assumptions change.

The tool displays three dimensions of financial performance: operating revenue, operating
expense, and capital investment. Operating revenue and expenses, and subsequently
operating income, provide a picture of land use performance in perpetuity. Capital investment
is the estimated facility upgrades that are required to restore each property for planned
interpretive or commercial use. The pieces together provide a picture of required initial
investment and ongoing financial performance, and ultimately return.

Lease Revenue and Funding Opportunity
The model projects expected revenue when an individual property is identified for commercial
use (i.e., retail store, commercial office space, residential rental). For the sake of providing an
accurate baseline financial picture, current lease rates are reflected within the model
assumptions. As opportunities exist to adjust lease rates to better match market values, new
assumptions can be changed in the model for each property.

When a property is designated for interpretive, educational, or public use, then the economic
model illustrates the lost opportunity to generate commercial lease income. However, the
model assumes that interpretive or educational facility uses qualify for state Recurring Plant
Operations and Maintenance (PO&M) funding. Therefore, PO&M figures have been provided


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan Page 64 of 74


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Page 64 of 74










by the University of Florida and included in the model. Should the probability of receiving the
funding change, then the model's assumptions would be adjusted to reflect the probability.


Table 4-2:
Economic Model Example Cost Implications*



6 Name Address Size Current Use Proposed Use

32 New Blacksmith Shop 37.5 St. George Street 242 Museum Retail market rental
33 Old Blacksmith Shop 26 Charlotte Street 469 Crucial Coffee Muumeducation
34 Paredes Dodge House 54 St. George Street 1,074 St. Augustine Art Glass Residential (market)
35 Peso De Burgo N Outbuilding 53 St. George Street 337 Museum esential(university)
36 Peso De Burgo S Outbuilding 53 St. George Street 206 Museum Administration
37 Peso De Burg oPellicer House 53 St. George Street 682 Museum OtherPubli euu u
1R PlhiirL Dctrnnmc AA nt (snrn4 Ctrsst r R; Pllhlir Psc rnnmc- Cthpr Piihlir 11ic
*For illustrative purposes only

Each property requires ongoing operating expenses to cover general maintenance,
management, utilities, insurance, and payments-in-lieu-of-taxes (PILOT). Although these
expenses vary by size and condition of the individual properties, UF can assume that these
expenses do not vary according to land use. Therefore, ongoing operating and management
expenses are included in the model on a fixed "per square foot" basis.

Should a property be designated for interpretive use, then UF must plan for a substantive
increase in operating expenses to cover costs associated with more detailed maintenance,
collections care, fundraising, marketing, and other program-related expenses. Although these
program-related expenses can vary widely, depending on the scale of interpretive programs,
ERA has included a model input for a target budget "per square foot". The targets serve as
guidance as UF measures the financial implications of its future decisions.

The categories of expense are management and maintenance for general property and
interpretive program-related activities. These categories reflect interviews with Bill Adams, the
Director of Heritage Tourism for the City of St. Augustine, and Richard Brosnaham, the
Executive Director of West Florida Historic Preservation, Inc., as well as research available
through the American Association of Museums, the Urban Land Institute, and ERA's
comparable project experience. The estimates, to reiterate, provide a starting point for
measuring financial feasibility of land use strategies. As interpretive programs and commercial
leasing strategies become more evident, the University will need to refine the cost assumptions
to reflect more detailed operating plans.


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan Page 65 of 74


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Page 65 of 74










Table 4-3:
Economic Model Assumptions

Property Management and Maintenance Museum Operations, Management and Marketing
S$4 00/SF Building Operations and Maintenance $4 50/SF Additional general expenses
$0 15/SF I Advertising and Promotion (commercial leasing) $0 35/SF Fundraising
$1 50/SF Placeholder for PILOT $4 50 /SF Educational programming, exhibits, research
S$0 75/SF Insurance $2 25/SF Collections Care
$2 25/SF General and Administrative $2 00 /SF Marketing



Capital Investment
The last economic factor within the model is the required capital investments to address
deferred maintenance and costs to upgrade properties for intended uses. From an economic
standpoint, UF would like to see adequate return on this investment for properties
commercially leased. Likewise, properties with interpretive significance should provide return
measured in terms of interpretive, historic, or educational value, but still provide feasible
methods to fund the investment in the properties.

The University of Florida estimates that six properties (Government House, Cerveau House,
Parades Dodge House, Arrivas House, Haas House, Harness Shop) account for over 80 percent
of required capital investment. These properties will likely require the most intense scrutiny to
ensure capital is rationally appropriated. The economic model will help identify any marginal
impacts of these properties and can provide a clearer picture of the relationship between
capital investment and return (payback period) as illustrated in Figure 4-24.

Figure 4-24:
Capital Investment*


1800000 30
S Marginally Interpretive Properties
1500000 I Interpretive Properties i25
-Payback Period

1200000 20 2


900000 15 *
C-

600000 10


300000 5


0 0
A B C D E F H J L M N P R S T U V W X Y Z AA B CC
Individual Properties

*For illustrative purposes only


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Page 66 of 74










Economic Model Results
The economic model provides guidance for rationalizing land use strategies of the property
portfolio. When the three main financial factors within the model are rolled up for the entire
property portfolio, the funding gap, if any, will be evident. Ticketing revenue and fundraising
will be important means to resolve funding gaps; otherwise, alternative strategies must be
explored.

Ticketing Strategy
A centralized ticketing program should be considered as part of the operating program.
Implementing this program would require development of a computer-based approach with
some type of linked, mechanized 'readers' in all of the participating sites. All of the site-based
terminals could be linked into a centralized database.

As one example, a bar-coded ticket reader could be used to determine how many of the historic
interpretive sites and properties are visited, the daily attendance volumes per site and over
different seasonal patterns, and (assuming that credit card purchases are also integrated into
the system, a capital investment but also a needed improvement over the ticketing program
today), could also provide "point of origin" information from the addresses of the credit card
purchasers. A database could also be structured to measure repeat visitation from year to year.

A centralized, site-based ticketing system would also be needed to allocate admissions
revenues between UF and other partners including the NPS, as some guests might only see the
Castillo while others would see the NPS site as well as one or more of the state-owned historic
or interpretive sites. Documenting site-specific visitation through a central ticketing program
would also allow documented allocation of admissions revenues.


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan Page 67 of 74


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Page 67 of 74





































5. IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGIES


As UF looks toward assuming authority and responsibility for the management and
maintenance of the state-owned assets there remains a mindful focus on the excitement and
visitation that will be generated in St. Augustine by the upcoming anniversaries in 2013, 2015
and 2016. Priorities and strategies presented in this plan, such as the implementation of a new
proposed Interpretive Center, should be built around a timeline that will advance the success of
these upcoming anniversaries.

Strategies to support the management and maintenance of the state-owned assets are the
formation of a direct support organization, prioritization of existing assets and development of
performance measures. Academic and research opportunities in St. Augustine are identified
in this section, including discussion of the Preservation Institute: Nantucket as an example that
can be used as a model.

DIRECT SUPPORT ORGANIZATION
Florida Statutes Section 1004.28 provides for the creation of a direct support organization
(DSO) where an entity is to be organized and operated exclusively to receive, hold, invest and
administer property and to make expenditures to or for the benefit of a state university. The
DSO mechanism allows the State of Florida educational funding for academic facilities, and
more specifically, will allow for revenues from commercial tenants to be retained for use in


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Page 68 of 74









historic sites (programs, operations and maintenance). Ideally, State formula funding would be
distributed directly to the DSO and provide eligibility for matching funds from other sources.

Precedent has been set by the University of West Florida (UWF), in which a DSO has been
established to manage twenty historic properties, ten of which function as interpretive
properties that are open to the public. The West Florida Historic Preservation, Inc. is run by
full-time staff, students, and volunteers. UWF's Board of Trustees has direct oversight for the
DSO, which operates independently, sells memberships, writes grants, fundraises, and buys and
sells properties.

In essence, there are two sides of the UWF DSO. One side is the private not-for-profit that sells
memberships, charges admission, leases the buildings, and matches grants. The other side of
the operation is the public, which is dependent on the University. This side receives salary
dollars for staff, Public Education Capital Outlay (PECO) for capital renewal, and Plant
Operations and Maintenance money for general operations from the University. Two separate
budgets are kept for auditing.

ACADEMIC / RESEARCH COMPONENTS
Rich opportunities exist for academic and research activities in St. Augustine involving a variety
of disciplines across multiple colleges. For example, the College of Design, Construction and
Planning has a 40-year history running the Preservation Institute: Nantucket (PI: N) as an off-
campus field school where graduate students learn documentation, research and hands-on
conservation and restoration techniques on the historic island of Massachusetts. Projects for
the students are identified by various historic organizations and the town government of
Nantucket, and there are joint lectures, exhibitions and other citizens activities co-sponsored in
the facilities that the UF owns on the island.

This program, which includes students from around the nation and international scholars, could
be used as a model for creating a similar program in St. Augustine. The PI: N is a stand-alone
self-funded program that is not dependent on the university's budget. Such a field school in St.
Augustine would utilize UF faculty along with visiting lectures. There are additional
opportunities for the Preservation Institute: St. Augustine (PI: SA) to operate offering year-
round programs to more students and adding additional coursework in traditional crafts,
preservation techniques, museum conservation, public archaeology, as well as historic
preservation.

Space needs for expanded academic programs, including laboratories, housing
accommodations, libraries, studios and classrooms with state-of-the art wireless and
instructional technology could be accommodated in some of the state-owned historic buildings
or the new proposed interpretive center. Separate storage space for research, materials and
artifacts would also be required, but such space may provide an opportunity for a public library
or exhibit hall. Currently, the UF main campus provides storage and curatorial care space for
more than two million St. Augustine artifacts. The facilities and expenses associated with this
artifact curation are borne by UF's Florida Museum of Natural History.


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan Page 69 of 74


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Page 69 of 74












The strategies outlined in this Plan will enable expansion of these and other UF research,
teaching and service activities. Such partnerships would greatly enhance the historic
preservation of the state-owned buildings in St. Augustine and benefit the citizens as well.

PERFORMANCE MEASURES
Performance measures provide a tangible and accountable method to score progress towards a
vision. Key to an effective scoring system are metrics that are measurable over time and
accurately track progress towards objectives that, in turn, support a five or ten year vision. The
vision currently states:

"The Historic resources of St. Augustine shall provide a visitor and educational experience that
enhances the St. Augustine community, meets the needs of the State of Florida, and garners
worldwide acclaim by preserving St. Augustine's history as a valuable National treasure."

The challenge posed by this vision statement is that the "needs of the State of Florida" require
more clarification. The mission statement provides more insight, as it states that UF shall
develop educational programs that are "responsive to the State's needs for professionals in
history, historic preservation, archaeology, cultural resources management, cultural tourism,
and museum administration."

The Vision Plan has outlined objectives and performance measures that could create the path
and accountability towards the vision. The key to refining these metrics is to first ensure that
they are measurable and object-oriented. But second, the measures should provide a balanced
perspective of organizational performance. A balanced system will represent stakeholders,
processes, and financial requirements. They include: (1) the mission, (2) economic, (3) the
visitor, (4) the community and tenants, and (5) internal operational needs.

ERA evaluated and categorized the proposed performance measures to provide insight into
their balance, which are listed in Table 4-4.


St. ugutin Hisori Ara Stateic lan age70 f 7


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Page 70 of 74










Table 5-1:
Performance Measures

Proposed Mti -rpi C


Increased opportunities for students to
participate in coursework or research
conducted in St. Augustine.


Mission


Opportunities need to be defined. For
example, no. of classes offered, no. of
degree programs, etc.


Increased enrollment in programs related to St Mission Concise and measurable good
Augustine, such as UF's Historic Preservation
Studies Program and Departments of History,
Anthropology, Museum Studies and Tourism
Creation of joint programs or joint degrees Mission and Oriented to one-time
between the University of Florida and Flagler Internal achievement/objective. May wish to
College re-orient as no. of students enrolled in
joint programs and measure over
time.
Number of UF-sponsored conferences held in Mission and Concise and measurable good
St. Augustine Visitor
Number of K-12 students participating in tour Mission Concise and measurable good
programs in St. Augustine.
Number of visitors touring the state-owned Visitor Concise and measurable good; need
assets. to discuss best way to measure
Increases in authenticity ratings of tourist Visitor and Concise and measurable good
experiences. Community
Increased participation in historical site and Visitor and May be redundant with other
museum visitation, and historical architecture Mission measure, "No. of visitors touring the
and character sightseeing. state-owned assets"
Increased revenue from donations and grants. Economic Concise and measurable good




Increased revenue from retail activities and Economic Further discussion required on how to
commercial leases. measure retail activity. Tenants may
not report retail sales to City today (as
part of their lease).
Increased revenue from donations and grants. Economic Concise and measurable good




Annual financial reports showing a balanced Economic Concise and measurable good
budget for the DSO.


St. ugutin Hisori Ara Stateic lan age71 f 7


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Page 71 of 74










Table 5-1:
Performance Measures


(continued)


Proposed e Pre i Con-


Condition assessment of
buildings.


the state-owned Internal


Good; discuss ways to refine th
condition assessment. For example,
identify four points of measure that
qualifies the condition of a
structure/building.


Funding level for property maintenance and Economic Concise and measurable good; the
rehabilitation/reuse. risk is that funding level may actually
go down as property condition
improves or other income grows. An
alternative may be to define
maintenance requirements each year
and measure percent of required
maintenance deferred.


The measures represent a good cross-section of perspectives; however, internal measures
should be bolstered to provide operational effectiveness and efficiency. Some examples of
daily processes that UF may wish to measure include: exhibits and programs, marketing
activities, maintenance procedures, customer service and response, and tenant management.
However, more intimate knowledge of these processes will not be evident until a final business
plan for the properties is defined.

Lastly, UF must also ensure that the needs of the St. Augustine community are aligned with the
objectives and measures targeting UF's educational mission and visitor needs. If not, an
additional set of measures may be required.

FRAMEWORK FOR PRIORITIZATION OF EXISTING ASSETS AND RECOMMENDED NEW PROJECTS
In partnership with stakeholders, UF has determined that the following criteria will be used to
set priorities for the preservation, rehabilitation and renovation of state-owned historic parcels
and buildings in St. Augustine. These criteria are incorporated into the model described in the
previous section.

H Historical and / or Program Significance
[ Square Foot Cost of Repair / Preservation
H Building Stabilization
[ Economic Factors Identified in Marketing Plan


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan Page 72 of 74


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Page 72 of 74










SUMMARY OF STRATEGY RECOMMENDATIONS


Recommendations set forth in this Historic Area Strategic Plan are the culmination of social,
cultural, economic and physical evaluation, including assessment of the community context in
which these state-owned assets are situated. The outcome is this strategic plan that serves as
guidance for the development, management and operation of these state-owned historic
parcels and buildings.

The consultant team made up of subject matter experts in specific areas related to the planning
and development of historic areas and heritage tourism destinations has developed this plan
which garners a high level of community and stakeholder support for the strategic planning
effort and its recommendations.

UF formed advisory groups and community stakeholders including the City of St. Augustine, St.
Johns County, the National Park Service, and Flagler College have all weighed in on the direction
of the Historic Area Strategic Plan, which, in summary, recommends the following:

1. Construct a new Interpretive Center; as a partnership between UF, the NPS and the City
of St. Augustine; on the property informally known as the Mary Peck Property in
combination with adjacent state-owned parcels.

2. Preserve, renovate and rehabilitate existing state-owned building to protect the
structures, correct code and life-safety deficiencies and implement priorities consistent
with the Strategic Plan.

3. Provide multiple access points to the new Interpretive Center to reinforce this new
structure as a key focal point to experience the interpretive opportunities offered by the
NPS and UF through their individual properties and venues.

4. Reinforce wayfinding and signage strategies that initially direct the visitor to the City's
VIC and adjacent Historic Downtown Parking Facility. Introduce wayfinding and signage
elements that blend with the existing signage plan such that a cohesive, clear and user-
friendly system is in place as detailed in the Physical Plan.

5. Educate local, state and federal agencies about the six areas of infrastructure, landscape
and transit improvements noted in the Physical Plan that will enhance the visitor
experience through improved vehicle and pedestrian circulation. Encourage local, state
and federal agencies to fund these improvements as a cooperative action that balances
UF's investment in the St. Augustine community.

6. Incorporate period and area-appropriate hardscape and landscape features to provide a
unifying theme for the historic area.


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan Page 73 of 74


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Page 73 of 74










7. Adopt "Layers of History" as a flexible visitor experience strategy framework. The
implementation of the visitor experience strategy will require a high level of
coordination among governmental and nongovernmental stakeholders, including
commercial facility operators and tour services providers and nongovernmental
organizations with custodial responsibility for existing historic assets in St. Augustine.

8. Incorporate varied use of media, interactive (computer and low tech), authentic
objects, immersive environments, rich interpretation and educational programming to
maximize interpretive value of state-owned parcels and buildings.

9. Employ the Economic Model developed as part of this Historic Area Strategic Plan to
be used in the future decision making as it relates to state-owned parcels and buildings.

10. Employ a modern, centralized ticketing strategy that has the ability to collect point of
origin information and daily attendance volumes, to allocate admission revenues, and to
provide ticketing alternatives that combine visitation to several venues under one
admission price.

11. Create a Direct Support Organization to manage and maintain the state-owned parcels
and buildings.

12. Further refine and develop performance measures in order to provide a tangible and
accountable method to score progress towards a vision.

13. Implement educational programming utilizing the expertise of the University of Florida
in teaching, research and service.


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan Page 74 of 74


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Page 74 of 74










APPENDIXA: LIST OF REFERENCES


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan Appendix Page A-i


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Appendix Page A-1










Appearance Guidelines for Entrance Corridors, City of St. Augustine, Executive Summary Report
Herbert-Halback, Inc. September 1999

Architectural Guidelinesfor Historic Preservation City of St. Augustine, Florida, 1997-present

Bridge of Lions Landscape and Urban Design Plans Florida Dept. of Transportation, June 2003

City of St. Augustine, Conceptual Master Plan for a Transit Greenway System: Technical Report
#2 Draft Reynolds, Smith, and Hills, Inc; Herbert-Halback, Inc; McGuire Communications; and
Howard Davis & Associates, July 2000

Description and Photographs of the State-Owned Buildings in St. Augustine Managed by the City
of St. Augustine William R. Adams, Department of Heritage Tourism, City of St. Augustine,
February 2007

Economic Impacts of Historic Preservation in Florida, Executive Summary Center for
Governmental Responsibility, Levin College of Law, University of Florida and Rutgers University,
September 2002

Feasibility Study Pedestrian Underpass and/or Safety Improvements England-Thims & Miller,
Inc, June 2008

Final General Management Plan and Environmental Impact Statement, Castillo de San Marcos
National Monument, St. Augustine, Florida National Park Service, U. S. Department of the
Interior, March 2007

Flagler College Master Plan Update Frederick Halback and Associates, Inc, February 2004

Flagler College Master Plan Update Halback Design Group, October 2008

Government House Feasibility Study Kenneth Smith Architects, Inc., June 1997

Heritage Tourism Assessment and Recommendations for St. Augustine, Florida The National
Trust for Historic Preservation, June 2003

Heritage Tourism Study, St. Johns County, Florida Center for Tourism Research and
Development, Department of Recreation, Parks and Tourism, University of Florida, October
2002

Historic Buildings Survey Up-Date, St. Augustine, Florida Historic Property Associates, Inc,
September 1999

Historic St. Augustine The Colonial City Architectural Aspects of an Interpretive Plan University
of Florida Department of Architecture, April 2000

Master Site File Forms, Site SJ00010, St. Augustine Town Plan Historic District Florida
Department of State, Division of Historical Resources, 1968-present


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan Appendix Page A-2


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Appendix Page A-2










Recommendations: State-Owned Historic Properties and Programs in St. Augustine, Florida
Special Task Force on St. Augustine State-Owned Historic Properties, City of St. Augustine,
December 2006

St. Augustine Conceptual Traffic and Parking Plan (Part I) and Parking Utilization Study (Part II)
Prosser, Hallock & Kristoff, Inc, 1995

St. Augustine Facility Assessment Report University of Florida, July 2007

St. Augustine Heritage Tourism Signage Program, Final Master Plan Herbert-Halback, Inc,
December 1999


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan Appendix Page A-3


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Appendix Page A-3










APPENDIX B: FLORIDA STATUTES AND APPROPRIATIONS


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan Appendix Page B-i


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Appendix Page B-1










The 2008 Florida Statutes

Title XVIII

PUBLIC LANDS AND PROPERTY

Chapter 267

267.1735 Historic preservation in St. Augustine; goals; contracts for historic preservation; powers
and duties.-

(1) The goal for contracting with the University of Florida is to ensure long-term preservation and
interpretation of state-owned historic properties in St. Augustine while facilitating an educational
program at the University of Florida that will be responsive to the state's needs for professionals in
historic preservation, archaeology, cultural resource management, cultural tourism, and museum
administration and will help meet needs of St. Augustine and the state through educational internships
and practicums.

(2)(a) Upon agreement by all parties to the contracts for the management of the various state-owned
properties presently subleased to and managed by the City of St. Augustine and by the University of
Florida to assume the management of those properties, all existing management contracts shall be
rescinded upon execution of a contract between the Board of Trustees of the Internal Improvement
Trust Fund and the University of Florida for the management of those properties.

(b) The contract shall provide that the University of Florida shall use all proceeds derived from the
management of these state-owned properties for the purpose of advancing historic preservation.

(3) The Board of Trustees of the Internal Improvement Trust Fund may transfer ownership and
responsibility of any artifacts, documents, equipment, and other forms of tangible personal property to
the University of Florida to assist the university in the transition of the management of the state-owned
properties. All records, property, and unexpended balances of appropriations, allocations, or other
funds associated with the state-owned properties shall be transferred to the University of Florida to be
used for its historic preservation activities and responsibilities as provided in the contract with the
Board of Trustees of the Internal Improvement Trust Fund. The transfer of segregated funds must be
made in such a manner that the relation between program and revenue source as provided by law is
retained.

(4)(a) The University of Florida is the governing body for the management and maintenance of
stateowned properties contracted by this section and shall exercise those powers delegated to it by
contract as well as perform all lawful acts necessary, convenient, and incident to the effectuating of its
function and purpose under this section and s. 267.1736. The University of Florida may contract with its
directsupport organization described in s. 267.1736 to perform all acts that are lawful and permitted for
notfor-profit corporations under chapter 617 in assisting the university in carrying out its historic
preservation and historic preservation education responsibilities.

(b) The university or its direct-support organization, if permitted in its contract with the university,
shall have the power to engage in any lawful business or activity to establish, maintain, and operate the
state-owned facilities and properties under contract with the Board of Trustees of the Internal
Improvement Trust Fund, including, but not limited to:

1. The renting or leasing for revenue of any land, improved or restored real estate, or personal property
directly related to carrying out the purposes for historic preservation under terms and conditions of the
contract with the Board of Trustees of the Internal Improvement Trust Fund and deemed by the
university to be in the best interest of the state.


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan Appendix Page B-2


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Appendix Page B-2










2. The selling of craft products created through the operation and demonstration of historical museums,
craft shops, and other facilities.

3. The limited selling of merchandise relating to the historical and antiquarian period of St. Augustine
and its surrounding territory and the historical period of East Florida from the Apalachicola River to the
eastern boundaries of the state.

(c) The university or its direct-support organization, if permitted in its contract with the university,
shall have the authority to:

1. Enter into agreements to accept credit card payments as compensation and establish accounts in
credit card banks for the deposit of credit card sales invoices.

2. Fix and collect charges for admission to any of the state-owned facilities under contract with the
Board of Trustees of the Internal Improvement Trust Fund.

3. Permit the acceptance of tour vouchers issued by tour organizations or travel agents for payment of
admissions.

4. Adopt and enforce reasonable rules to govern the conduct of the visiting public.

(5) Notwithstanding the provisions of s. 287.057, the University of Florida or its direct-support
organization may enter into contracts or agreements with or without competitive bidding, in its
discretion, for the protection or preservation of historic properties.

(6) Notwithstanding s. 273.055, the University of Florida may exchange, sell, or otherwise transfer any
artifact, document, equipment, and other form of tangible personal property if its direct-support
organization recommends such exchange, sale, or transfer to the president of the university and if it is
determined that the object is no longer appropriate for the purpose of advancing historic preservation.
However, any artifacts, documents, or other forms of tangible personal property that have intrinsic
historical or archaeological value relating to the history, government, or culture of the state may not be
exchanged, sold, or otherwise transferred without prior authorization from the Department of State.

(7) Notwithstanding any other provision of law, the University of Florida and its direct-support
organization are eligible to match state funds in the University Major Gifts Program established in s.
1011.94.


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan Appendix Page B-3


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Appendix Page B-3










The 2008 Florida Statutes

Title XVIII

PUBLIC LANDS AND PROPERTY

Chapter 267

267.1736 Direct-support organization.-

(1) The University of Florida shall authorize a direct-support organization to assist the university in
carrying out its dual historic preservation and historic preservation education purposes and
responsibilities for the City of St. Augustine, St. Johns County, and the state under s. 267.1735 by raising
money; submitting requests for and receiving grants from the Federal Government, the state or its
political subdivisions, private foundations, and individuals; receiving, holding, investing, and
administering property; and making expenditures to or for the benefit of the university. The sole
purpose for the direct-support organization is to support the historic preservation efforts and historic
preservation education programs and initiatives of the university. Such a direct-support organization is
an organization that is:

(a) Incorporated under the provisions of chapter 617 and approved by the Department of State as a
Florida corporation not for profit;

(b) Organized and operated to receive, hold, invest, and administer property and to make expenditures
to or for the benefit of the university; and

(c) Approved by the university to be operating for the benefit of and in a manner consistent with the
goals of the university and in the best interest of the state.

(2) The number of the board of directors of the direct-support organization shall be determined by the
president of the university. Membership on the board of directors of the direct-support organization
shall include the professional expertise needed to ensure that the university is meeting its dual purposes
of historic preservation and historic preservation education. Such membership shall include, but not be
limited to, a licensed architect who has expertise in historic preservation and architectural history, a
professional historian in the field of American history, and a professional archaeologist. All board
members must have demonstrated interest in the preservation of Florida's historical and archaeological
heritage. Membership on the board of directors must be representative of the areas of the state served
by the direct-support organization and the university in its preservation efforts. The president of the
university, or the president's designee, shall serve as a member of the board of directors.

(3) The direct-support organization shall operate under written contract with the university. The
contract must provide for:

(a) Approval of the articles of incorporation and bylaws of the direct-support organization by the
university.

(b) Submission of an annual budget for the approval of the university. The budget must comply with
rules adopted by the university.

(c) Certification by the university that the direct-support organization is complying with the terms of
the contract and in a manner consistent with the historic preservation goals and purposes of the
university and in the best interest of the state. Such certification must be made annually by the
university and reported in the official minutes of a meeting of the university.

(d) The reversion to the university, or the state if the university ceases to exist, of moneys and property


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Appendix Page B-4










held in trust by the direct-support organization for the benefit of the university if the direct-support
organization is no longer approved to operate for the university or if the university ceases to exist.

(e) The fiscal year of the direct-support organization, which must begin July 1 of each year and end
June 30 of the following year.

(f) The disclosure of material provisions of the contract and the distinction between the University of
Florida and the direct-support organization to donors of gifts, contributions, or bequests, as well as on
all promotional and fundraising publications.

(4) The university may authorize a direct-support organization to use its property (except money),
facilities, and personal services, subject to the provisions of this section and s. 1004.28. A directsupport
organization that does not provide equal employment opportunities to all persons regardless of
race, color, religion, sex, age, or national origin may not use the property, facilities, or personal
services of the university. For the purposes of this subsection, the term "personal services" includes
fulltime personnel and part-time personnel as well as payroll processing.

(5) The university shall establish policies and may adopt rules pursuant to s. 1004.28 prescribing the
procedures by which the direct-support organization is governed and any conditions with which a
directsupport organization must comply to use property, facilities, or personal services of the university.

(6) Any moneys may be held in a separate depository account in the name of the direct-support
organization and subject to the provisions of the contract with the university. Such moneys may include
lease income, admissions income, membership fees, private donations, income derived from fundraising
activities, and grants applied for and received by the direct-support organization.

(7) The direct-support organization shall provide for an annual financial audit in accordance with s.
1004.28.

(8) Provisions governing direct-support organizations in s. 1004.28 and not provided in this section shall
apply to the direct-support organization.

(9)(a) The identity of a donor or prospective donor to the direct-support organization who desires to
remain anonymous, and all information identifying such donor or prospective donor, is confidential and
exempt from the provisions of s. 119.07(1) and s. 24(a), Art. I of the State Constitution; and that
anonymity must be maintained in the auditor's report. The university and the Auditor General shall have
access to all records of the direct-support organization upon request.

(b) This subsection is subject to the Open Government Sunset Review Act in accordance with s. 119.15
and shall stand repealed on October 2, 2012, unless reviewed and saved from repeal through
reenactment by the Legislature.


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan Appendix Page B-5


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Appendix Page B-5










Extract from the 2008 Conference Report on House Bill 5001 General Appropriations Act for Fiscal
Year 2008-2009:

From the general revenue funds provided in Specific Appropriation 151 to the University of
Florida, $300,000 is provided for the purpose of developing a long-range master plan to
ensure long-term preservation and interpretation of state-owned historic properties in St.
Augustine while facilitating an educational program at the University of Florida as specified
in section 267.1735, Florida Statutes. This plan shall be submitted to the Governor, the
Speaker of the House Representatives, the President of the Senate, and the Board of Governors
prior to February 1, 2009.


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan Appendix Page B-S


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Appendix Page B-6










APPENDIX C: VISION PLAN


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan Appendix Page C-i


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Appendix Page C-1






STAEI LN O H TT OWE HISTOI PRPRTE AND ENIOS
S.AUGSIE FLOIDA


VISION


APPROVED
BY THE
ST. AUGUSTINE HISTORIC DISTRICT STRATEGIC PLAN STEERING COMMITTEE
OCTOBER 6, 2008


FACILITIES PLANNING &
CONSTRUCTION DIVISION




UF UNIVERSITY of

UFFLORIDA










Introduction


In 2007 the State of Florida Legislature enacted Chapter 267.1735 F.S. to provide for contracting
with the University of Florida to assume management responsibilities for certain historic
properties located in St. Augustine, Florida. In 2008, the Legislature provided funds to the
University to produce a Strategic Plan that will serve as the roadmap for preservation
management of these state owned historic properties. Subsequently, the University developed
a Work Program and formed stakeholder committees to guide the Strategic Plan development.
A Strategic Plan Steering Committee was formed with the following members:
1. Glenn Hastings, Executive Director, St. Johns County Tourist Development Council
2. John Regan, Chief Operations Officer, City of St. Augustine
3. Tracy Upchurch, Business Administration Department, Flagler College
4. Gordon Wilson, Superintendent, Castillo de san Marcos National Monument
5. Kathy Deagan, Distinguished Research Curator of Archaeology, Florida Museum of Natural
History
6. Michael Gannon, Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus, Department of History, College
of Liberal Arts and Sciences
7. Roy Graham, Professor and Director, Historic Preservation Programs, College of Design,
Construction & Planning
8. Roy Hunt, Professor Emeritus, Levin College of Law
9. Ed Poppell, Vice President for Business Affairs
10. Chris Silver, Dean, College of Design, Construction & Planning


A University Technical Work Group was formed, originally consisting of eighteen members, to
represent the University's diverse academic and administrative involvement in St. Augustine and
these state owned properties. Three months into the Strategic Planning process, that list had
grown to twenty-seven members and continues to grow. Similarly, a local stakeholders group
was identified initially with twenty-nine interested individuals, but increased to over eighty
individuals by three months into the planning process and continues to grow. The Appendix to
this Vision plan documents meeting dates and participation of these stakeholders. Although the
surveys and meeting attendance represent a small, self-selected sample of stakeholders, the
opinions expressed therein provide some reasonable insight into the attitudes of the community
members most involved in historic preservation issues.

One conclusion of this planning process is that the Strategic Plan for the State-Owned Historic
Properties and Environs in St. Augustine, Florida should be first and foremost focused on the
state-owned historic properties and artifacts as valuable heritage resources of the State and
Nation. Notwithstanding, the Strategic Plan should also address the community context in
which the properties are situated, including the social, cultural, economic and physical aspects
of St. Augustine, St. Johns County, and the Northeast Florida Region. This Vision Plan articulates
a mission, vision, and guiding principles that shape the Strategic Plan. Furthermore, it suggests


Vision


Page 1 of 15










implementation strategies and performance measures that will be reconfirmed and elucidated
in the Strategic Plan.

Implementation strategies involving partnerships with various public and private entities are
vitally important to the successful stewardship of the state-owned historic properties. These
properties can only flourish and serve their rightful purpose when complemented by the
surrounding historic and cultural resources such as the Castillo de San Marcos National
Monument.

Strategies also reflect the proper role for the University of Florida as unveiled through the
community conversations of this visioning process. The University's greatest assets are its
reputation, credibility and relevant expertise. Existing educational partnerships in St. Augustine
cover many disciplines and include the Historic St. Augustine Research Institute, a collaboration
between Flagler College and the University of Florida. These established ties between the
University and St. Augustine community can be enhanced by the opportunities presented
through the state owned properties. In order to be successful in these collaborations, the
University must remain objective and lead by example. Its greatest contributions can be made
through its physical presence in St. Augustine and its ability to bring educational content to the
visitor experience, serving as a catalyst for change and a key financial partner.




Mission Statement

To ensure long-term preservation and interpretation of state-owned historic properties in St.
Augustine while facilitating an educational program at the University of Florida that will be
responsive to the state's needs for professionals in history, historic preservation, archaeology,
cultural resource management, cultural tourism, and museum administration and will help meet
needs of St. Augustine and the state through educational internships and practicums. (Adapted
from Chapter 267.1735 Florida Statutes)




Vision

The historic resources in St. Augustine shall provide a visitor and educational experience that
enhances the St. Augustine community, meets the needs of the State of Florida, and garners
worldwide acclaim by preserving St. Augustine's history as a valuable National Treasure. To this
end, the state-owned historic properties in St. Augustine shall:
1. house appropriate educational, research and service programs;
2. accommodate effective administration;
3. and generate revenue necessary to become an economically viable operation;
with management under the auspices of the University of Florida working in partnership with
other community stakeholders.


Vision


Page 2 of 15










Guiding Principles

1. Educational Collaboration: The University of Florida should continue and expand collaboration
with Flagler College, the City of St. Augustine, National Park Service, and other partners to
deliver multidisciplinary education for varied audiences and to conduct research that supports
authentic interpretation of historic resources.

2. Physical Cohesiveness: The St. Augustine historic area, including the state-owned historic
properties, should be cohesive and easily navigated providing heritage tourists with a holistic
experience that flows from an orientation point (such as a Visitor Center), and is anchored by
signature facilities along St. George Street with adequate parking and comfortable pedestrian
access.

3. Economic Development: The St. Augustine historic area, including the state-owned historic
properties, should increasingly support local economic development by becoming a premier
National and International heritage tourism destination.

4. Partnership Finance: The University of Florida can be a key financial partner by facilitating a
combined lobbying effort; leveraging state, local and federal resources; and assisting in grant
writing and donor support.


5. Effective Administration: The University of Florida, through a Direct Support Organization
(DSO), should manage the state-owned historic properties to be physically sound, historically
authentic and economically viable while furthering the goals articulated in the Mission
Statement and Vision.



Strategic Plan Components


1. The Exhibit and Educational Plan: Educational Collaboration


Objective 1.a. Visitor Theme:
Organize educational and visitor experience around a unifying theme.


The Visitor Theme will be developed in the Educational and Exhibit component of the Strategic
Plan. This is perhaps the most difficult and most important task of the Strategic Plan. The
breadth and depth of history in St. Augustine is both a strength and a complicating factor to
concisely identifying the "Story of St. Augustine". When asked about the historical education
experience, attendees at the St. Augustine public meetings and UF Technical Work Group
meetings could not identify a strong focus area preference. Important periods were cited as the
First Spanish Period, the British Colonial Period, the Flagler Era and the Civil Rights Era. In fact,
the "layers of history" was a common response when asked about St. Augustine's story. Surveys


Vision


Page 3 of 15










conducted at the June Public Workshop and UF Technical Work Group meeting revealed that
89% of the general public and 69% of the UF stakeholders agreed or strongly agreed that the
"historic educational experience should balance the various periods of history." This statement
elicited more support than statements suggesting an emphasis on specific periods. Still, some
participants observed that the 16th and 17th century periods are the components of St.
Augustine that are most unique and cannot be reproduced elsewhere. These are also the
periods to which the state-owned properties and collections most relate.


Other specific theme concepts that were mentioned during the Visioning discussions included
St. Augustine's Town Plan, the Military and Civilian Experience, Multiculturalism, and the First
Permanent European Settlement in North America. Ultimately, the Visitor Theme will be the
cornerstone of branding and marketing to make St. Augustine a National and International
history destination with a consistent message and story.


Objective 1.b. Audience:
Develop educational and exhibit programs targeted at various audiences including the
general public, students of higher education, K-12 students and professionals.


In addition to out-of-town visitors, participants in the Visioning discussions also noted the
importance of targeting programs to residents of St. Augustine and St. Johns County, including
both adults and children. Programs targeted for the general public were discussed largely in
terms of partnerships with formats such as self-guided tours, audio-tours, living history
museum, interpretive centers, museums and re-enactments. Examples of higher education
programming included archaeological field schools and historic preservation studios, which may
also be open to the public. Such programs draw on traditional fields of historic preservation
expertise such as history, archeology, anthropology, architecture, urban planning, landscape
architecture, interior design, museum studies, librarianship and similar disciplines. However,
other disciplines were cited as opportunities to expand the audience for higher education
programming and collaboration including fine arts, law, business, journalism, marketing,
graphic/visual arts, tourism, etc. Higher education programs were also discussed in terms of
partnership opportunities, particularly through the Historic St. Augustine Research Institute.
Educational programs for K-12 students focused on expansion of existing programs and
opportunities to increase the support of public school teachers through grants and curriculum
development. These programs were seen as vital to gaining support from area residents, and
nurturing youth that will appreciate historical and cultural resources as adults. Professional
development opportunities included ideas for conferences, trades and apprenticeships in
historic restoration, and tour guide training.


Vision Page 4 of 15


Vision


Page 4 of 15










Objective 1.c. Delivery Methods:
Deliver educational programs that are interactive, immersive and engaging.


A strong consensus was expressed around the idea that the educational program for historic St.
Augustine must be hands-on and immersive, not static pictures or even standard technology
such as audio tapes and movies. Rather, the experience should be state-of-the art, adaptable to
different visitor interests and to new research foci. Living history and re-enactments were often
cited as important components of the educational program. An immersive experience may be
created by restoring a contiguous area, such as a street, block or cluster of buildings, into an
authentic recreation of living history. Engaging the public in archaeological explorations was
also seen as an important way that people can be immersed in St. Augustine's history. The
Colonial Spanish Quarter already provides the foundation of a living history experience based on
findings of archaeological excavations. This area could be enhanced, and possibly expanded,
with new interpretive components.


Integrity is extremely important to the educational program; however, the educational message
must also be fun and engaging for families to reach beyond the audience of "history buffs". One
suggestion to engage people in historic St. Augustine is to identify a daily signature event, such
as a changing-of-the-guards or ceremonial cannon firing, that becomes a "must see" in the eyes
of locals and tourists alike. Furthermore, if this signature event took place in the late afternoon
or early evening, it could bring visitors to the historic area in time to have dinner at local
restaurants. Similarly, annual events can celebrate specific milestones or aspects of St.
Augustine history that become a draw for visitors worldwide. Other suggestions for delivering
the "Story of St. Augustine" included printed tour guides, consistent interpretive signage, and
the Internet.


Objective 1.d. Content:
Develop educational and exhibit programs that are authentic, multidisciplinary, and
demonstrate high standards in stewardship of historic and cultural resources.


Above all, educational programming should link the past to the present, and demonstrate the
relevancy of historic events. The extensiveness of historical and cultural resources in St.
Augustine (including structures, sites and artifacts) requires careful stewardship and
interpretation. To this end, suggestions have been made that a consolidated database
management effort should strive to catalogue information from various resources of public and
private entities including the National Park Service, Florida Museum of Natural History, City of
St. Augustine, Historical Society, Archaeological Association, University and local libraries, etc.
Educational information and building inventories should identify all historically contributing
structures regardless of ownership, and integrate them into the "Story of St. Augustine." Such a
comprehensive educational and exhibit program can keep visitors returning to the area because
it will be impossible to see every site in one day.


Vision


Page 5 of 15










APPENDIX D: ESTIMATES OF COST EXAMPLE


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan Appendix Page D-1


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Appendix Page D-1










Table: Appendix D
Estimates of Cost Example


3900 Government House


Total
Interpretive
Building General Info (2007) Rehab/Reconstruction nte
Cost Content
Cost
0 -- -
0, ua
0 ,O "O O.



m U .=O 0
CS
0 --
4-

O-


25,947


$14,271,000


$550


$14,271,000


$16,720,744


3901 De Mesa Sanchez House 4,068 $25,000 $6 $25,000 $29,291 $15,255
3902 Arrivas House 4,041 $885,000 $219 $885,000 $1,036,918 $15,154
3903 Parades Dodge House 1,392 $1,325,000 $952 $1,325,000 $1,552,448 $5,220
3904 Parades Dodge Outbuilding 231 $0 $0 $0 $0
3905 Gallegos House 905 $198,000 $219 $198,000 $231,988 $3,394
3906 Ribera House 2,168 $271,000 $125 $271,000 $317,520 $8,130
3907 Ribera Kitchen 480 $85,500 $178 $85,500 $100,177 $1,800
3908 Triay House 690 $106,875 $155 $106,875 $125,221 $2,588
3909 Gomez House 314 $57,750 $184 $57,750 $67,663 $1,178
3910 Cerveau House 3,059 $1,682,000 $550 $1,682,000 $1,970,730
3911 Haas House 2,337 $511,000 $219 $511,000 $598,718
3912 Peso de Burgo/Pellicer
House 682 $340,750 $499 $340,750 $399,243 $2,558
3913 Peso de Burgo N Outbuilding 337 $54,750 $163 $54,750 $64,148 $1,264
3914 Peso de Burgo S Outbuilding 260 $56,875 $218 $56,875 $66,638 $975
3915 Joaneda House 1,424 $178,000 $125 $178,000 $208,555 $5,340
3916 Rodriguez House 714 $22,300 $31 $22,300 $26,128
3917 Benet House 2,706 $84,500 $31 $84,500 $99,005 $10,148
3918 Coquina House 2,270 $196,875 $87 $196,875 $230,670
3919 Sanchez De Ortigosa House 1,172 $250,000 $213 $250,000 $292,915
3920 De Hita House 638 $99,750 $156 $99,750 $116,873 $2,393
3921 Gonzales House 519 $32,500 $63 $32,500 $38,079 $1,946
3922 New Blacksmith Shop 242 $30,250 $125 $30,250 $35,443 $908
3923 Florencia House 2,105 $460,500 $219 $460,500 $539,549 $7,894
3924 Spanish Military Hospital 3,522 $220,000 $62 $220,000 $257,765 $13,208
3925 Watson House 2,161 $270,000 $125 $270,000 $316,348 $8,104
3926 Salcedo Kitchen 563 $52,750 $94 $52,750 $61,805 $2,111
3927 Salcedo House 2,191 $274,000 $125 $274,000 $321,035 $8,216
3928 Gonzales Restrooms 182 $24,000 $132 $24,000 $28,120
3929 Sims House 802 $125,500 $156 $125,500 $147,043
3930 Sims Outbuilding 173 $22,000 $127 $22,000 $25,776
3931 Old Blacksmith Shop 363 $11,750 $323 $11,750 $13,767
3932 Harness Shop 2,105 $460,500 $219 $460,500 $539,549
3933 Public Restrooms 624 $78,000 $125 $78,000 $91,389


Total State-Owned Assets $26,671,262 $215,081


17,000 $497 $8,449,000 $9,899,346 $63,750
Grand Total $36,570,608 $278,831


*Interpretive and Museum use eligible for PO&M Funding from the State of Florida
$8.4376 per GSF for air conditioned $6.2447 per GSF not air conditioned (FY2009-10)
**Content is $3.75 per GSF


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan Appendix Page D-2


$97,301


PO&M


'Cr



0
m
O








$218,930
$34,324
$34,096

$11,745


$5,651
4-1













$18,293

$4,050
$5,822
$1,961


$5,754
$2,104
$2,194
$12,015


$22,832



$5,383
$4,379
$1,511
$17,761
$29,717
$18,234
$3,516
$18,487


$143,439
$622,200


St. Augustine Historic Area Strategic Plan


Appendix Page D-2




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs