Title: Optima
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Title: Optima
Series Title: Optima
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: Mathematical Programming Society, University of Florida
Publisher: Mathematical Programming Society, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: April 2002
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Bibliographic ID: UF00090046
Volume ID: VID00067
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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PTI MA
Mathematical Programming Society Newsletter


APRIL2002

















67


Report from [die otLIgoing Preidenc -2


ga.Illimnaufrv 10


mindh1iapenei -4 ISMIP 9






10 P TS,,A,7


Report from the

outgoing President
Jean-Philippe Vial

December 12, 2001


APRIL 2002


PAGE 2


The Mathematical Programming Society is very
special. Its few members are professionally well
established and representative of the
international community. Its objectives are
limited to publishing a scientific journal and to
holding a triennial general symposium and two
conferences on integer and combinatorial
optimization. The journal is top in the field and
the meetings are major events with huge
attendance. Finally, the organization is informal
and rather light, but it proved to be highly
efficient and low cost.
My election as chair of MPS has certainly
been my greatest professional honor. Before my
election, I used to enjoy the facilities the Society
offers, as many members do, but I was not
aware of the involvement in terms of managing
the Society. An informal organization is nice
because it avoids bureaucracy, but one has to
make sure that the information on past
decisions and duties is maintained and
transmitted. In that respect, the overlap in the
presidential terms is very useful. Our new
service provider is also a great help in the
management. A new president has nonetheless
much to discover, however strong is the support
he gets from the outgoing team. I want to share
with you some of what I learned and
accomplished during my period.
The highlight in the presidential term is the
Symposium. Atlanta was a big success, attracting
over a thousand participants. It was praised for
the high quality of the plenary lectures, the level
of the presentations by the participants and the
moving ceremony in honor of founders of our
discipline. Two IPCO meetings were held
during my term, one in Graz (1999) and the
other in Utrecht (2001). The Society was also
asked to sponsor scientific meetings in
optimization, especially one in honor of
Caratheodory (Samos, 2000) and also the first
sino-japanese meeting in optimization (Hong
Kong, 2000).


The second most important purpose of the
Society is the journal. Mathematical
Programming A and B is now published by
Springer. L. Wolsey and W. Cook replaced D.
Goldfarb and J. Birge, as Editors-in-Chief. The
past and the new teams maintain the high
quality of the journal and strive to achieve
proper balance between the different fields that
compose Mathematical Programming. In
addition to these publications, MPS, jointly
with SIAM, launched in the year 2000 a new
book series in optimization, named
Mathematical Programming C. The series aims
to promote books that are likely to become
future references in the field of optimization. J.
Dennis is the first Editor-in-Chief. Finally, our
newsletter OPTIMA has become through the
years a very attractive journal with high quality
featured articles. We are grateful to K. Aardal for
having made this newsletter so lively. J. Clausen
in collaboration with A. Caprara and R. A.
Bosch has taken over recently the editorship and
they will certainly succeed in making the
newsletter an entertaining publication.
It is worth mentioning that the joint venture
with SIAM on MPC has an interesting side
value for MPS members. SIAM extends to all
MPS members the discount on books it offers
to its members. Even though MPS has no tie
with Kluwer, this publishing company will also
offer to MPS members a 30% discount on all
books and journals.
Journals and books are no longer the only
media for communicating scientific
contributions. Fast circulation of preprints is a
necessity. On the initiative of S. Wright, a new
informal electronic distribution of papers has
been launched. It is named Optimization on
Line (http://www.optimization-online.org) and it
is jointly managed by MPS and OTC
(Optimization Technology Center). Please, visit
the site, submit your paper and retrieve material!
The third area of concern is the management






APRIL 2002


of the prizes. Over the years, those prizes have
been attributed to outstanding scholars. They
contribute to highlight key contributions in
optimization. It is the explicit responsibility of
the MPS president to appoint committees to
propose prize winners, and we can thank those
committees for the excellent 2000 vintage.
However modest in monetary terms, the prizes
need funding. A fund raising campaign for the
Fulkerson prize was lead by B. Bixby and J.-K.
Lenstra. They managed to collect over $35000.
The revenues of the endowment will finance the
prize in the long term. A similar situation holds
for the Dantzig prize. Aside from those two
prizes and from the Beale-Orchard-Hayes and
the Tucker prizes, MPS is currently investigating
the possibility of adding a fifth prize to this
collection, in the area of continuous
optimization.
Finally, I wish to let our members know that
MPS is alive thanks to the active support of
many volunteers. One of the most demanding
positions for these volunteers is the one of chair
of the executive committee. This position is not
an elective one, and many may not know of its
existence. The chair of the executive committee
is the main coordinator, and often the one who
makes things work. I want to express deep
thanks to S. Wright, whose competence and
willingness to help have been my best support
during my presidency. F Rendl has taken over
the job near the end of my term. The other
contributors to the Society are the Council
members that are elected, they help deciding by
their advice and their vote on all important
issues. Lastly, the Society works with several
committees, statutory ones like the publication
committee (T Liebling, chair) and the symposium
advisory committee (T Liebling and then G.
Nemhauser, chairs) and ad hoc committees; the


PAGE 3


web site committee (C. Monma, chair), the prize
rules committee (K. Anstreicher, chair) and the
new prize committee (S. Robinson, chair). They,
and the committees they chaired, deserve our
thanks for their dedication.
Financially the Society is sound. Springer, the
new publisher of MPA&B pays royalties
on the library subscriptions. We also benefit
from much better services for the MPS
administration from SIAM organization, and the
managing cost are well covered by our revenues.
In leaving the presidency, I have one regret,
that the membership has not increased during
my term. Despite several promotional
campaigns, the membership is slightly above
800. I feel that we should be more numerous to
preserve this exceptional blend of high scientific,
international and friendly participation. We
need to better advertise the Society. Two
initiatives may help. K. Aardal has prepared a
nice brochure that is available as a hand-out at
conferences. We also decided on a drastic
overhaul of the MPS web site. A. Martin is in
charge of the work. We hope that the new site
will soon be accessible. However, it is our
common duty to attract new members,
especially young people, who will soon become
those who keep Mathematical Programming
alive and flourishing.

NOTE from the editor: In the next issue of
OPTIMA, the new president of MPS, Robert E.
Bixby, will give his view of the status and future
of the Mathematical Programming Society.


SM TI MA 7





APRIL 2002


P f T We invite OPTIMA readers to submit solutions to the problems to Robert Bosch
Sw (bobb@cs.oberlin.edu). The most attractive solutions will be presented in a
forthcoming issue.


'i IE E a


0.2 + 1.3+2.4+3-6+4 47+5-8 +6.5+7 76+8.9+ 94 =277
Figure 1


Figure 1 displays one way to arrange the ten
digit tiles on a 5 x 30 board. Each tile is made
up of white squares (foreground) and gray
squares (back-ground), and each arrangement
can be given a point value. To compute the
point value of an arrangement, we will add up,
over all digits d, d times the number of white
squares touched by the white squares of digit d.
The Figure 1 arrangement, for example, has
point value 277.

Problems
Interested readers may enjoy trying to solve the
following problems. The first two were devised
by Cihan Altay, an engineering student who
runs the Turkish puzzle site www.otuzoyun.com.
The first was one of the "puzzles of the week"
on Ed Pegg's site www.mathpuzzle.com last year.

1. Arrange the digit tiles on a 5 x 30 board (as
in Figure 1) in such a way that the
maximum possible point value is obtained.
2. Arrange the digit tiles on a 5 x 30 board in
such a way that the point value is
minimized.
3. Arrange the digit tiles in an edge-to-edge
fashion (as in Figure 2) in such a way that
the maximum possible point value is
obtained.
4. Arrange the digit tiles in an edge-to-edge
fashion in such a way that the point value
is minimized. (Note: The arrangement
must be connected.)


ii
0-









El


i:iii


m

... l.
"' "


0.3 +1-2
+ 2.9 + 3-6 + 4.5
+ 5.4 +6.10
+ 78 + 8.8
+ 9.3 =285

Figure 2


10 P TS,,I,7


Digit Tiles
Robert A. Bosch
December 17, 2001


fll


MIS


PAGE 4






IPll S I M A67


Two Domino

Problems Revisited
Robert A. Bosch


APRIL 2002


The previous installment of Mindsharpener was
concerned with the construction of pictures
with dominoes. The first problem was to
construct a replica of an abstract picture using
one complete set of double nine dominoes. The
solution is displayed in Figure 3. The second
problem was to use three complete sets to
construct the "best possible approximation" of
Leonardo DaVinci's Mona Lisa. The author's
best solution is displayed in Figure 4. Both of
the solutions were obtained using the same
integer programming formulation.


Constraints

Let s equal the number of sets of dominoes.
The constraint

=I s


stipulates that domino (m, n) is to be used s
times. The constraint


Variables


Each double domino has two orientations: h
(horizontal) and v (vertical). Each non-double
domino has four orientations: h1 (horizontal
with the lower- numbered square on the left), h2
(horizontal with the lower-numbered square on
the right), v1 (vertical with the lower-numbered
square on top), and v2 (vertical with the lower-
numbered square on the bottom). Let x
equal 1 if domino (m, n) is placed in orientation
o with its top left square in the row-i-column-j
square of the board and 0 if not.


Objective Function

Let c,,,, equal the number of mismatchingg
pixels" obtained if domino (m, n) is placed in
orientation o with its top left square in the row-
i-column-j square of the board. (For the Figure
3 problem, the cost of placing domino (4, 9)
horizontally with the 4 in the top left square of
the board is 1 + 2 = 3.) The objective is to
minimize


m,n,o,i, /


states that the row-i-column-j square of the
board must be covered by exactly one domino.


PAGE 5


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m
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10 API 200 IG M667


Results

The Figure 3 (abstract) problem had 20,000
variables and 165 constraints. CPLEX
Linear Optimizer 6.6.0 required 1.6 seconds
and 0 branch-and-bound nodes to find the
optimal solution. The Figure 4 (Mona Lisa)
problem had 62,300 variables and 385
constraints. On this problem, CPLEX
required 44.3 seconds and 0 branch-and-
bound nodes. All computations were
performed on a 800 Mz Pentium III PC
with 384 MB RAM.


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Figure 4


APRIL 2002


PAGE 6






APRIL 2002


MATHEMATICAL
DIAGNOSTICS
Workshop

June 17 -June 25 2002

Ettore Majorana Centre for Scientific Culture
International School of Mathematics "G.
Stampacchia"
Erice Sicily, Italy


PAGE 7


PURPOSE OF THE WORKSHOP
Stating a diagnosis is a decision making process
that takes place in many different fields of the
human activities. It is, of course, a crucial step
in medicine, but also in a wide range of
practical activities, such as finance, pattern
recognition, study of experimental data,
astronomy, engineering diagnostics, data mining
etc. Quite often the diagnostic process reduces
to a classification process, i.e. to select exactly
one set from among several sets an individual
can belong to. This is the typical case of medical
diagnosis, where for a given patient it has to be
decided whether or not he is affected by a
specific pathology. In recent years effective
mathematical tools have been designed to
support diagnostics. Optimization methods as
well as neural networks and decision trees have
been successfully adopted. From the
mathematical point of view, diagnostics is
strictly connected to Hahn-Banach type
theorems (separation properties of sometimes
inseparable sets in finite dimensional spaces).
Many new and sophisticated mathematical
models are of a nonsmooth nature, in the sense
that they require to solve nonlinear optimization
problems that involve nondifferentiable
functions. The workshop is intended for both
people interested in research and in applications;
it is primarily aimed at assessing the state-of-the-
art of the subject, giving to the scientific
community the opportunity of comparing
diverse approaches exposed by experts coming
from different fields. Additional objectives are to
present the new results that many scientists in
several countries are obtaining by using
mathematical programming tools and to
describe significant applications of mathematical
diagnostics. Participation of experts from
application areas as well as that of young
scientists will be strongly encouraged.

TOPICS
Medical Diagnostics
Kernel Methods for Pattern Recognition
Support Vector Machines
Neural Networks
Inductive Inference
Foundations of Computer Learning
Bayesian Classification
Diagnostics of Dynamic Processes
Massive Data Sets
Clustering


INVITED LECTURERS
F. Archetti,
University ofMilano, Italy
K. Bennett,
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, NIY USA
V. Boltyansky,
CIMAT Guanajuato, Mexico
S. Bombardieri,
Facolta di Medicina, Universita di Pisa, Italy
N. Cristianini,
Royal Halloway University ofLondon, UK
R. De Leone,
University ofCamerino, Italy
A. B. Kurzhanski,
Moscow State University, Russia
V. N. Malozemov,
St. Petersburg State University, Russia
L. Murri,
Facolth di Medicina, Universith di Pisa, Italy
D. Pallaschke,
University ofKarlsruhe, Denmark
P. Pardalos,
University of Florida, Gainesville, USA
E. Polak,
University of California at ' USA
A. Rubinov,
University ofBallarat, AUS
N. Shor,
Glushkov Institute of Cybernetics, Kiev, UKR
V. Vapnik,
ATTeLabs-Research, Middletown, NJ, USA
R. Zoppoli,
University of Genova, Italy

APPLICATIONS
Persons wishing to attend the workshop should
write to:

Professor Manlio Gaudioso
D.E.I.S. Universita della Calabria
e-mail: erice2002@deis.unical.it

Closing date for application: April 30, 2002

V. F Demyanov and M. Gaudioso,
Directors of the Workshop
F. Giannessi, Director of the School
A. Zichichi, Director of the Centre


Sll P TI M A67






APRIL 2002


APMOD 2002

Call for papers

Applied Mathematical Programming and
Modelling

University of Milano-Bicocca

June 17-19, 2002
Villa Monastero, VARENNA (Como), ITALY


PAGE 8


THEME
APMOD, is a traditional opportunity to foster
professional contacts and conduct fruitful
scientific discussions for all those involved in the
industrial application of mathematical modelling
and software systems. The symposium is set out
to attract specialists with different background
including academic and industrial researchers.
The theme is open, but contributions on
Mathematical Programming models to solve
large, practical and difficult problems and on the
integration of Mathematical Programming with
Decision Theory and Information Technology are
particularly appreciated.

HISTORY
APMOD2002 is the sixth in the series of
successful events. APMOD91, the first in the
series took place at Brunel University, UK, 1991,
as well as the third and the fifth events, 1995 and
2000, respectively. The second took place in
Budapest, Hungary, 1993 and the fourth in
Limassol, Cyprus, 1998. This series of events
compliments the triennial Mathematical
Programming Symposia and has established a
good tradition for disseminating research results
of this community. In particular each event is
followed by a refereed publication which is well
regarded by the participating scientists.

SITE AND LOCATION
APMOD2002, will be held at Villa Monastero in
Varenna, a picturesque medieval village, rich in
artistic monuments on the east coast of Lake
Como. The location is a tourist destination
traditionally appreciated for its stupendous
nature and landscape.

TOPICS INCLUDE
Large Scale Linear Programming
Integer Programming
Non Linear Programming
Modelling Systems
Stochastic Programming
Financial Investment Models and
Risk Management
Data Mining and Computational Networks
Combinatorial Optimization
Telecommunication Problems
Energy Planning Models
Environmental Management
Supply Chain Management


CALL FOR PAPERS
Those wishing to present papers should send an
abstract of maximum 300 words by February 1,
2002. The abstract, written in a text or word
format file should contain: title, authors,
affiliations (phone, email), three key words and at
most five references. The file should be sent to:
apmod2002@disco.unimib.it or to the following
address:
APMOD2002
Dipartimento di Informatica,
Sistemistica e Comunicazione
University degli Studi di Milano Bicocca
Via Bicocca degli Arcimboldi 8
20126 Milano Italy
Upon notification of acceptance, an extended
abstract is required by May 31, 2002.

PUBLICATIONS
APMOD has developed a tradition of
publication with Baltzer Press and, as before, a
refereed publication within ANNALS of OR
with P. Hammer as series editor is planned.


DATES
Submission of short abstracts
Acceptance notice
Preliminary Programme
Extended Abstracts
Full Programme


February 1, 2002
February 15, 2002
March 15, 2002
May 31, 2002
June 15, 2002


CONTACT
Phone: +39 02 64487838
Fax.:+39 02 64487839
e-mail: apmod2002@disco.unimib.it
URL: http://www.disco.unimib.it/apmod2002

ADDRESS
Dipartimento di Informatica Sistemistica e
Comunicazione
University degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca
Via Bicocca degli Arcimboldi, 8
20126 Milano, Italy


10PTIMA67






APRIL 2002


ISMP 2003 in Copenhagen
Progress Report
Jens Clausen

As described in the last issue of OPTIMA, the next symposium of MPS is to be held in
Copenhagen in August 2003. The planning is progressing, and right now the program committee
is finalizing the list of speakers invited for plenary and semi-plenary talks. The following speakers
have already accepted the invitation from the program committee. The titles are tentative and may
in the final program change slightly.


Kurt Anstreicher,
University of Iowa:
"Quadratic Assignment"

Sanjeev Arora,
Princeton University:
"Approximation of NP-hard
Problems"

Francis Clarke,
University of Lyon-1:
"Control Theory to those with a
mathematical programming culture"

Siemion Fajtlowicz,
University of Houston:
"Mathematical Problems of
Automated Conjectures"

Stephen M. Robinson,
University of Wisconsin:
"Variational Analysis" or
"Dynamic Stochastic Optimization"

Arie Tamir,
Tel Aviv University:
"Facility Location on Networks: Models
and Algorithms"

Robin Thomas,
Georgia Institute of Technology:
"Perfect Graphs"

Mikl6s Simonovits,
Alfred Rinyi Institute of Mathematics,
Hungarian Academy of Sciences:
"Volume Computation"


William J. Cook,
Princeton University:
"Traveling Salesman"

Daniel A. Spielman,
MIT:
"Smoothed Analysis"

Susanne Albers,
University of Freiburg:
"On-line algorithms"

Adrian Lewis,
Simon Fraser University:
"Eigenvalue Optimization"

Laurence A. Wolsey,
University Catholique de Louvain:
Topic yet to be decided.

Renato Monteiro,
Georgia Institute of Technology:
"Interior Point Methods/Semidefinite
Programming"

Tom Luo,
McMaster University:
"Optimization and Engineering, Signal
Processing"

Mikael Ronnqvist,
Linkoping University:
"Optimization in Forestry"


We expect one additional speaker in the final program.
On the social side, the conference dinner is planned to be held on Tuesday August 19 at a
location in the part of Copenhagen, which until 10 years ago housed a Danish Navy base
(Holmen). A boat trip through the channels of the inner Copenhagen will precede the dinner.
On Wednesday August 20, the City of Copenhagen will receive the conference participants
for a reception.


PAGE 9


CALL FOR NOMINATIONS

Optimization Prize for Young Researchers

PRINCIPAL GUIDELINE. The Optimization
Prize for Young Researchers, established in 1998
and administered by the Optimization Section
(OS) within the Institute for Operations
Research and Management Science
(INFORMS), is awarded annually at the
INFORMS Fall National Meeting to one (or
more) young researchers for the most
outstanding paper in optimization that is
submitted to or published in a refereed
professional journal. The prize serves as an
esteemed recognition of promising colleagues
who are at the beginning of their academic or
industrial career.
DESCRIPTION OFTHE AWARD. The
optimization award includes a cash amount of
US$1,000 and a citation certificate. The award
winners will be invited to give a fifteen minute
presentation of the winning paper at the
Optimization Section Business Meeting held
during the INFORMS Fall National Meeting in
the year the award is made. It is expected that
the winners will be responsible for the travel
expenses to present the paper at the INFORMS
meeting.
ELIGIBILITY. The authors and paper must
satisfy the following three conditions to be
eligible for the prize:
(a) the paper must either be published in a
refereed professional journal no more than three
years before the closing date of nomination, or
be submitted to and received by a refereed
professional journal no more than three years
before the closing date of nomination;
(b) all authors must have been awarded their
terminal degree within five years of the closing
date of nomination;
(c) the topic of the paper must belong to the
field of optimization in its broadest sense.
NOMINATION. A letter of nomination should
be sent (preferably by email) on or before this
year's closing date of July 1, 2002, to:
Renato D. C. Monteiro
monteiro@isye.gatech.edu
Georgia Tech
School of ISyE
Atlanta GA 30332-0205

PAST AWARDEES. The past winners of the
Optimization Prize for Young Researchers are:
Year Prize Winner
1999 Francois Oustry
2000 Kevin Wayne
2001 Kamal Jain


SM TI MA 7






APRIL 2002


Short news on persons?



The space is HERE



just contact the editor.


Application for Membership


I wish to enroll as a member of the Society.

My subscription is for my personal use and not for the benefit of any library or institution.

O I will pay my membership dues on receipt of your invoice.

O I wish to pay by credit card (Master/Euro or Visa).


CREDIT CARD NO.


EXPIRATION DATE


FAMILYNAME


MAILING ADDRESS


TELEPHONE NO. TELEFAX NO.

EMAIL

SIGNATURE 0


Mail to:

Mathematical Programming Society
3600 University City Sciences Center
Philadelphia PA 19104-2688 USA

Cheques or money orders should be made
payable to The Mathematical Programming
Society, Inc. Dues for 2002, including
subscription to the journal Mathematical
Programming, are US $80.
Student applications: Dues are one-half the
above rate. Have a faculty member verify your
student status and send application with dues
to above address.

Faculty verifying status


Institution


10PTIMA67


PAGE 10






Simply fax this whole page to

Springer 212-533-5587

Please send me:


E


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Alevras, Padberg, Linear Optimization and
Extensions. US.$4995 $37.46
Ausiello et al., Approximate Solutions of NP-hard
Optimization Problems.US$S 5 $44.96
Aven, Jensen, Stochastic Models in Reliability.
US.$7-95 $53.96
Balakrishnan, Ranganathan, A Textbook of Graph
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