Title: Optima
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Title: Optima
Series Title: Optima
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Language: English
Creator: Mathematical Programming Society, University of Florida
Publisher: Mathematical Programming Society, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: November 1993
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Volume ID: VID00041
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P


MATHEMATICAL PROGRAMMING SOCIETY NEWSLETTER


XV
International
Symposium on
Mathematical
Programming
All Mathematical Programming Society members
should have received the second announcement of
the XV International Symposium on Mathematical
Programming, which will be held Aug. 15-19,1994, at
the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, MI, USA.
The conference chairs are John Birge and Katta Murty.
' The opening conference session on Monday, Aug.
15,1994, will include a special presentation in celebra-
tion of George Dantzig's 80th birthday by R. Wets. The
opening session also will include the awarding of
Society prizes: the George B. Dantzig prize (for major
contribution in mathematical programming, joint with
SIAM), the Fulkerson Prize (for discrete mathematics,
joint with AMS), the Beale-Orchard-Hays Prize (for
computational mathematical programming), and the
A.W. Tucker Prize (for outstanding student paper).


Second
Announcement
Mailed


CONFERENCE NOTES 2-3
JOURNALS 4


BOOK REVIEWS


7-10


PAGE ELEVEN I
GALLIMAUFRY 12


T


I


No
41
Nov.
1993


I~




PAGE 2 N 41 NOVEMBER 1993





CONFERENCE








MONTREAL, MAY
30-JUNE I, 1994

Call for Proposals
99ORS71
Optimization
Days
MONTREAL, MAY

30-JUNE I, I994
Call for Proposals

S. INTERNATIONAL
S.. MATHEMATICAL
PROGRAMMING
SYMNPOSIUNI





PAE3N 'NOEBR19


CORS 1994 & Optimization Days




Montreal, May 30-June 1, 1994


For the first time in their histories, the
Canadian Operational Research Society
(CORS) and Optimization Days will be
holding their annual meetings jointly in
Montreal May 30, 31 and June 1, 1994.

This first joint conference is expected to
have around 50 or more sessions, with
more than 200 papers, making it the
largest O.R. meeting of its kind to be
held in Montreal.
Plenary speakers will be:
* M. Brandeau, Stanford University
O.R. and AIDS Research
* H. Mahmassani, University of Texas
Intelligent Vehicle-Highway Systems
* J.-M. Rousseau, GIRO
Marketing O.R.:
From l1ni; .. -ili to Industry
" S. Zenios, Wharton School
Parallel Computing
Tutorials will be given by:
* E. Erkut, University of Alberta
Logistics of Hazardous Materials
* M. Gendreau, Universit6 de Montr6al
Tabu Search
* P. Hansen, cole des Hautes ttudes
Commerciales
Classification Algorithms
* P. L'Ecuyer, Universit6 de Montr6al
Simulation/Optimization Hybrid
Algorithms
* R. Sharda, Oklahoma State University
LP-ILP Software


The site will be the Delta Hotel, located in
the downtown area of this exciting bi-cul-
tural city within easy walking distance of
business, -1,..ppin, dining and entertain-
ment districts. Oversized guest rooms,
some with balconies, have views overlook-
ing Mount Royal and the St. Lawrence
River.
The theme of the conference will be "Trans-
portation and Logistics." However, the
conference welcomes papers dealing with
all aspects of O.R.: Mathematical program-
ming; stochastic methods; applications to
engineering, transportation, economics,
management sciences, urban and environ-
mental problems, fisheries, forestry, oil in-
dustry, military operations, health care, bi-
ology, and telecommunications; networks;
robotics; expert systems; decision support
systems, etc.
The languages of the conference will be
English and French. A 50-150 word abstract
clearly defining the content of the presenta-
tion should be sent before Dec. 31, 1993, to
the program chairman. Authors will be no-
tified concerning acceptance of their papers
by March 31, 1994.
C(-11. i Laporte, Program Chairman
Center for Research on Transportation
University de Montreal
P.O. Box 6128, Station A
Montreal, Canada H3C 3J7
Telephone: (514) 343-6143
FAX: (514) 343-7121
Delta Hotel
450 Sherbrooke St. West
Montreal, Canada H3A 2T4
Telephone: 1-800-387-1265
FAX: (514) 284-4342
Ask for the CORS'94 special rate.


Callfor Proposals

1997 INTERNATIONAL
MATHEMATICAL

PROGRAMMING

SYMPOSIUM

The XV International Mathematical
Programming Symposium will be held
in Ann Arbor, MI, Aug. 15-19, 1994.
Proposals for the location of the XVI
International Mathematical Programming
Symposium in 1997 are being solicited now.
The Symposium will be held every three
years under the auspices of the Mathemati-
cal Programming Society. According to a
certain tradition of the society, the site of the
Symposium should alternate between places
in and out of North America. Thus, for the
1997 Symposium, locations outside of North
America are preferred. However, proposals
for any site will be considered. The meeting
preferably should take place during the
month of August.
The main criteria for selection of the
location are:
1) Existence of mathematical programming
researchers in the geographic area who
are interested in organizing the
Symposium.
2) Attendance open to prospective
participants from all nations.
3) Availability of an attractive facility with
a sufficient number of meeting rooms,
standard lecture equipment, etc.
4) Availability of a sufficient supply of
reasonably economical hotel and/or
university dormitory rooms fairly
near the meeting facility.
A copy of the Society's "Guidelines for
Submission of Proposals" and further
information can be obtained from the
chairman of the Advisory Committee:
Bernhard Korte, Research Institute of
Discrete Mathematics, Nassestrasse 2,
D-53113 Bonn, Germany,
e-mail: dm@or.uni-bonn.de.
The advisory committee consists of J. Birge,
Ann Arbor; C. Gonzaga, Rio de Janeiro;
B. Korte, Bonn; and A. Schrijer, Amsterdam.


NQ 41


NOVEMBER 1993


PAGE 3







PAE4N0'NVMBR19


Contents ofMathematical Programming


Vol. 61 No. 1


Michele Conforti and M.R. Rao,
"Testing balancedness and perfec-
tion of linear matrices."
Jorge Nocedal and Ya-Xiang
Yuan, "Analysis of a self-scaling
quasi-Newton method."
Ilan Adler and Ron Shamir,
"A randomization scheme for
.-. Il. ,iL up ; I.., ,i i'ii for linear
and convex programming prob-
lems with I'i 1, constraints-to-
variables ratio."
Yves Cramer, "Concave exten-
sions for nonlinear 0-1 maximiza-
tion problems."
Arnon Boneh, Shahar Boneh
and Richard J. Caron, "Con-
straint classification in math-
ematical programming."
Le Dung Muu, "An algorithm
for solving convex programs with
an additional convex-concave
restraint."
S. Bolintineanu, "Minimization
of a quasi-concave function over
an efficient set."
Stein W. Wallace and Tiecheng
Yan, i-i..,i,. l multi-stage sto-
chastic programs from above."
G.S.R. Murthy, T. Parthasarathy
and G. Ravindran, "A copositive
matrix Q-matriz which is not Ro."


Vol. 61 No. 2


Leonid G. Khachiyan and
Michael J. Todd, "On the com-
i.!. i l. of approximating the
maximal : ... ., ellipsoid for
a polytope."
Donald Goldfarb and Shucheng
Liu, "An O(n3L) primal-dual po-
tential reduction ,1 '... ,~ for
solving convex quadratic pro-
grams."
Jayaram K. Sankaran, "Some
new results regarding spikes and a
heuristic for -pi; construction."
Hedy Attouch and Roger J.B.
Wets, "Quantitative stability of
variational systems: III. e-approxi-
mate solutions."
Paul H. Calamai, Luis N.
Vicente and Joaquim J. Judice,
"A new technique for generating
programming test problems."
Kazuyuki Sekitani and
Yoshitsugu Yamamoto, "A re-
cursive .ri iii, for finding the
minimum norm point in a polytope
and a pair of closest points in two
polytopes."
Jonathan M. Borwein, "On the
failure of maximum entropy recon-
struction for Fredholm equations
and other infinite systems."


Vol. 61 No. 3


Masakazu Kojima, Nimrod
Megiddo and Shinji Mizuno,
"A primal-dual ip. ,I', ,it, rior-
point Il ..- 0i ,l for linear
programming."
Jia Hao Wu, Michael Florian
and Patrice Marcotte, "A general
descent framework for the mono-
tone variational inequality
problem."
Franqois Louveaux and Maarten
J. Van Der Vlerk, "Stochastic pro-
gramming with simple integer
recourse."
B. Curtis Eaves and Uriel
Rothblum, "A class of "onto"
multifunctions."
G.S.R. Murthy, "A note on suffi-
cient conditions for Q, and Q0 fP0
matrices."
Jianming Miao, "Ky Fan's N-ma-
trices and linear complementarity
problems."
Paul Armand, "Finding all maxi-
mal rt:. .. .,i faces in multiobjective
linear programming."
John J. Dinkel and Marietta J.
Tretter, "Clo,i I., ir:.ilo, of per-
turbed mathematical programs and
interval analysis."
X. Zhou, F. Sharifi Mokhtarian
and Z. Zlobec, "A simple con-
straint qualification in convex
C', .' qi ii .' '. "


__ I~


N2 41


NOVEMBER 1993


PAGE 4




NOVEMBER 1993


}\ 1/tt's


NEW

from


SIAM?


Society for
Industrial and
tIp/liedl
Mathematics


Optimization Software Guide

Jorge J. MORE and Si -'.._ r J. WRIGHT
Frontiers in. .. 'Mathematics 14
Here is a reference tool that includes
discussions of developments in -. 'i :. i
theory, .' II h emphasis on large
problems and on IH,. ri .. : methods for
linear , i .. and names software
.that incorporate the results of
theoretical research.
Contents
Preface: Part 1 Overiew of '
Optimization Problems and Software;
Unconstrained ,' Nonlinear Least
Squares; Nonlinear h Linear
Quadratic : r Bound-Constrained
I ,[ Constrained i I Network
Integer Programming; Miscellaneous
( ,' . .i Part 1: Software
AMPL; BQPD; BT; BTN; CNM; CONOPT; CONSOL-
OPTCAD; CPLEX; CWHIZ; DFNLP; DOC; DOT;
FortLP; i GAMS; GAUSS; GENESIS; GENOS;
GINO; C ii iMSL Fortran and C
Library; .' .. LNOS;
LNGO; LPsolver; LSNNO; LSSOL I.
and !I MATLB; MINOS; MINPACK-1;
MIPIII; MODULOPT NAG C *' r NAG Fortran
Library; -I .- .- -TSOL;
11 I .. i


I I : i 1 "



1993/ Approx. /Softcover

I r I T .. P?.


Interior Point Polynomial Algorithms in

Convex Programming

Yurii NESTEROV and Arkadii NI 'lii:).OVSKII

Studies in Applied Mathematics 13
Here is the first unified theory of polynomial-time interior-point
methods. This focus on the theoretical aspects allows for new
possibilities for constructing efficient methods for nonlinear
convex problems. Researchers involved in the development of
interior-point methods can investigate more general problems
rather than focusing on linear programming.
Contents
Self-Concordant Functions and Newton Method; Path-Following Interior-
Point Methods; Potential Reduction Interior-Point Methods; How to
Construct Self-Concordant Barriers; Applications in Convex Optimization;
Variational Inequalities with Monotone Operators; Acceleration for Linear
and Linearly Constrained Quadratic Problems; Bibliography; Appendix 1;
Appendix 2.
Available November 1993 / Approx. 400 pp. / Hardcover / 0-89871-319-6 / List Price 568.50
SIAM Member Price $54.80 / Order Code AM13


SIAM Journal on Optimization

Contains research and expository articles on the theory and
practice of optimization, and papers that link optimization theory
with computational practice and applications. Among the areas
addressed are linear and quadratic programming, large scale
optimization including the solution of large nonlinear systems of
equations, stochastic optimization, combinatorial optimization,
mixed integer programming, nonsmooth optimization, convex
analysis, numerical optimization including optimization algorithms
for p Atillel architectures, and applications in engineering,
management, and the sciences. Published quarterly.
Editor-in-Chief: J.E. Dennis, Jr., Rice University
1994 List Price: $188.00 domestic / $215.00 overseas ,
1994 SIAM Member Price: S44.00 domestic / $47.00 overseas
r--- F .


INTEREST

Handbook of Writing for
the Mathematical Sciences
Nicholas J. HIGHAM
Contents
Preface; General Principles; Writer's
Tools and Recommended i .. .
Mathematical Wr,._ i, I -. i Usage;
When English is a Foreign Language;
S.r 11.... a Paper; Revising a Draft;
Publishing a Paper; Writing a Talk;
Computer Aids for Writing and
Research; Appendices: The Greek
Alphabet; Summary of TeX and LaTeX
Symbols; GNU Emacs-The Sixty+
Most Useful Commands;
Mathematical Organizations; Winners
of Prizes for Expository 11.
Glossary; Bibliography; Index.
1993 / xii + 241 pages / Softcover
0-89871-314-5 / List Price $21.50 / SIAM
Member Price $17.20 / SIAM Student Member
Price $12.00 / Order Code OT39
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_ __ _~_~


I-- - -------


NQ 41


PAGE 5




PAGE 6


40% discount


Special offer to members of the
Mathematical Programming Society




COMPUTING

edited by E.G.Coffman Jr., J.K.Lenstra and A.H.G.Rinnooy Kan

Handbooks in Operations Research and Management Science 3


The chapters in this volume can be
grouped into three parts. Part I
provides an introductory course in
the design and operation of
computers and computer
systems. It conveys a knowledge
of the basic principles of computer
systems along with perspectives
on the history and future of
computers. The study of
ni.,-.. ithn,-; is contained in Part II
including matrix computations,
fundamental algorithms and data
structures, design and analysis of
efficient algorithms, and
computational complexity. Part III
brings out the relation between
computer systems and operations
research applications.This volume


was dr- n ::lrit-id and written for use
in the operations research and
management science community.
Apart from the background
provided by the first five chapters,
the emphasis is on the
computational tools, I-i itlnrl .i
languages, and systems that
assist the problem solver.

Contents:Computer Systems -
Past, Present Future (H.J. Sips).
Programming Languages
(H.E. Bal and D. Grune). Operating
Systems The State of the Art
(A.S. Taren-,-un. ) Databases and
Database Management
(G. Vossen). Software Engineering
(R.T. Yeh, M.M. Tanik, W. Rossak,


P.A. Ng and F. Cheng). A Survey of
Matrix Computations (C. Van
Loan). Fundamental Algorithms
and Data Structures (J. van
Leeuwen and P. Widmayer).
Design and Analysis of Efficient
Algorithms (D. Gusfield).
Computational Complexity
(L.J. Stockmeyer). Computer
System Models (I. Mitrani).
Mathematical Programming
Systems (J.A. Tomlin and
J.S. Welch). User Interfaces
(C.V. Jones). Subject Index.

1992 x + 682 pages
List price: Dfl. 310.00 / US$ 165.00
Discount price: US$ 99.00
ISBN 0-444-88097-6


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NOVEMBER 1993





NOVEMBER 1993


PAGE 7 NQ 41












R E V I E W S




















Linear Programs and Related Problems
by Evar D. Nering and
Albert W. Tucker
Academic Press, San Diego, 1993
ISBN 0-12-515440-2
A good introductory textbook in any mathematical field should possess care-
fulexposition, clear, i,.i ill itm; ii. ii .- iI. -, I '- .. n ,.i to the greatest
extent possible, unification in the underlying mathematics. This text has all
these in abundance. The motivating examples in the first chapter are so clear,
and so carefully developed, that they lead naturally into the careful and el-
egant mathematical exposition of linear programming which follows.
A good introductory textbook also should give the student a grasp of the field
as it is practiced, and the ability to build on the acquired knowledge to obtain
full technical competence in the field. Here, unfortunately, the book has se-
rious deficiencies.
For the past decade, linear programming has been a subject of intensive re-
search. This research has led to such great improvements in algorithms for
solving linear programming problems that workstations now solve in min-
utes problems that just a few years ago were considered intractable on
supercomputers. While the topic of most of the research activity has been on
interior-point methods, the improvements in the simplex method have been
dramatic, leading to computational efficiency comparable to interior-point
codes on the problems of a size previously considered to be totally beyond
the simplex method's capabilities.


-~~----------~





PAGE 8


This vast explosion of knowledge makes the task
of the textbook writer complex, for it is difficult to
decide what shouldbe included in an introductory
text. Certainly, it is not unreasonable for an intro-
duction to focus on the simplex method and re-
lated topics, while largely ignoring interior-point
methods as the proper subject of a second course.
However, the method of development of the sim-
plex method should be such that current imple-
mentations can be made understandable. Here,
the book clearly fails.
Specifically, the problem lies with the fact that the
entire theory is developed using Tucker tableaus.
The concept of basis matrix is never mentioned,
and is not even mentioned in the index. The greatly
increased i!,.,- i. of modern simplex codes is
derived in large measure from better basis crashes,
improved partial pricing algorithms, primal and
dual steepest-edge algorithms, and more stable
basis factorizations. All of these topics are easily
explained in the standard basis matrix develop-
ment of the simplex method, and are cumbersome
at best and impossible at worst in the tableau de-
velopment of this book. Further, such important
developments as random perturbation of degen-
erate non-optimalbasic solutions cannotbe devel-
oped within this context.
The book is divided into two parts. The first deals
with the classic development of linear program-
ming using Tucker tableaus, with brief digressions
on the ellipsoid method and Karmarkar's method.
The second part deals with related topics and is far
more extensive than is standard for introductory
texts. The topics covered include matrix games,
assignment and matching problems, the transpor-
tation problem, network flow problems, the trans-
shipment problem, and nonlinear programming.
The chapters on assignment and matching prob-
lems, the transportation problem, network flows
and the transshipmentproblem are extremely good.
Special algorithms, such as the Ford-Fulkerson
algorithm and the Hungarian algorithm, are care-


fully developed and clearly explained. Many clear
illustrative examples are included. This material
i- .A,! 1'-"' T'. ;' !'.. .1 i. roductorycourse,al-
though, as the authors state in the preface, the total
content of the text is more than a student could
hope to absorb in one semester.
One easy omission would be the chapter on non-
linear programming. This is a field so rich that it
is difficult to fit anintroductory course into a single
semester. The topics covered here are a minute
i.i. ii .- , i, -, l. r...0 ,,,, ._ i,, hly spe-
cialized in content. They add little to the remain-
der of the book, and in no way represent current
practice in solving the problems addressed.
Throughout, the book contains many well-
thought-out problems, together with a complete
solutionset, which contains illuminating explana-
tions for some of the problems.
Overall, the book is a valuable reference for any-
one knowledgeable in the field, an excellent source
of problems for an instructor, and a valuable text
for many of the topics developed in the second sec-
tion. It also is useful for the examples of the first
section, but, in the opinion of this reviewer, is not
the proper introduction to modern linear pro-
gramming required by the great advances of the
last decade. I recommend it as a valuable addition
to anyone's reserve list, but not as the principal text
for an introductory course.
DAVID SHANNO







"Overall, the book is a
valuable reference for
anyone knowledgeable
in the field, an excellent
source of problems for
an instructor, and a
valuable text for many
of the topics developed
in the second section."


Matroid Decomposition
by Klaus Truemper
Academic Press, San Diego, 1993
ISBN 0-12-701225-7
The present book develops a structure theory of
matroids, especially binary matroids, in great
depth from the point of view of the decomposition
and composition of matroids. The author has been
carrying out a series of very active researches on
matroid decompositions, wt 1; 1 1-. ,.I.. p
this book.
The book begins with an elementary introduction
of matroids and is, for the most part, self-con-
tained. Even readers who are not ,Iil,, with
matroids can enjoy the matroid theory from an
elementary level to its forefront of recent re-
searches on matroid decompositions.
The structure theory of matroids has two facets:
one is concerned with characterizations of a class
of matroids in terms of excluded minors and the
other is with decompositions (or compositions) of
matroids into (or from) basic elements. The latter
1r. ,, ,.1 t..t...l ,J. tv, .,i ,i -,.i lh t f.., r ... .
ing certain properties and relevant structures of
matroids, which also gives constructive proofs of
excluded-minor characterizations of matroids.
1 ,. i ,. ,.1 i -, i- -; takes the latter constructive
approach to the structure theory of matroids.
Though extensions to general matroids also are
offered, emphasis is placed on binary matroids
throughout this book. The argument frequently
uses (standard) matrix representations of (binary)
matroids. Readers should get used to the useful
framework of matrix representations given in
Chapter 2 before moving into the principal part of
the book, starting form Chapter 3.


~i~ii~~C~"3E~C-~~


N 41I


NOVEMBER 1993


6 1%ai~lli "Rammumm"~




PAGE 9 N 41 NOVEMBER 1993
-...-......----...- .----- ---- u --S-S----B '-----


Chapter 1 gives a summary of the book and his-
torical notes on matroid decompositions.
Chapter 2 offers basic definitions of technical
terms on graphs and matrices and briefly of com-
putational complexity.
In Chapter 3, starting from graphic matroids, basic
matroidal notions are defined and a characteriza-
tion of binary matroids is given.
Chapter 4 treats elementary constructions of
graphs and binary matroids by series-parallel
steps and delta-wye exchanges.
Chapter 5 furnishes an important proof technique,
called the path-shortening technique, which is
used for determining the connectivity and for solv-
ing the problems of intersection and partitioning
of matroids.
Chapter 6 introduces the notion of (exact) k-sepa-
ration associated with connectivity and gives the
so-called separation algorithm, one of the main
tools for the subsequent development.
The results of Chapters 4-6 lay the basis for the
latter development of constructive proofs and
polynomial algorithms for matroid decomposi-
tions.
Chapter 7 introduces the concept of splitters and
gives their characterization, called the splitter
theorem, due to P.D. Seymour. From the splitter
theorem follow some existence theorems of se-
quences of nested minors that give Tutte's wheel
theorem for graphs as a corollary. A result about
sequences of nested minors also offers a tool for
Thomassen's ingenious proof of Kuratowski's
characterization of planar graphs.
Chapter 8 discusses the decomposition and com-
position of binary matroids by k-sums. Also con-
sidered are D-sums and Y-sums as alternatives of
3-sums.


Chapter 9 investigates regular matroids and their
excluded-minor characterization. A characteriza-
tion of ternary matroids also is given.
Chapter 10 is concerned with graphic matroids.
Characterizations of planar matroids, nongraphic
regular matroids, graphic or cographic matroids,
etc. are investigated. Also, a polynomial algorithm
... i, i. ..- ._ -, -. 1, .. .-r I h .-,I-, ,-,I ,, .1- ; ,- -_ a .
Chapter 11 shows Seymour's celebrated decom-
position theorem for regular matroids, employing
the results and tools developed in Chapters 2-10.
Chapter 12 considers almost regular matroids by
introducing the notions of alpha-balanced graphs,
minimal violation matrices of regularity, comple-
ment totally unimodular matrices, almost repre-
sentative matrices, etc.
In Chapter 13, the author considers the max-flow
min-cut matroids, i.e., the matroids on which the
max-flow min-cut theorem holds. Structural prop-
erties of max-flow min-cut matroids are examined
and a polynomial max-flow algorithm is shown.
This book is an excellent exposition of the struc-
ture theory of (binary) matroids and shows us,
especially, a nice pathway to Seymour's decom-
position of regular matroids and the author's
structural and algorithmic development of
matroid decompositions.
- SATORU FUJISHIGE


"This book is an excellent
exposition of the structure
theory of(binary) matroids
and shows us, especially, a
nice pathway to Seymour's
decomposition of regular
matroids and the authors
structural and algorithmic
development ofmatroid
decompositions."





PAGE TO N 41
.......-----.--..--.--.---. ---- ~ 8 ~ C------


NOVEMBER 1993
_ ..........


Model Solving in

Mathematical

Programming
by H.P. Williams,
John Wiley and Sons,
Chichester, 1993
ISBN 0-471-93722-3
This is an excellent book, which uses a unique style
to introduce the different methods used in solving
mathematical programs. The author carefully ex-
plains the ideas behind each method, then uses
numerical examples to clarify and remove any
ambiguity related to the topic under discussion.
A few questions are raised through additional
special-case examples, but, once again, the author
intervenes to help his readers by providing insight
into the problem.
Chapter 1, "The Nature of Mathematical Program-
ming," describes the main models used in math-
E -, r ,- I -. I 1 11 1, 1 1 r. , .1 C -lin ear
and integer programs. Simple examples are pre-
sented with their graphical interpretations. The
concepts of convexity, local and global optimum,
and complexity also are introduced.
In the second chapter, "General Methods for Lin-
r P!. .! '-, i,, I I'i.. "Gaussian elimination and the
concept of a basic solution are presented. The steps
of the simplex algorithm, and the different strat-
egies for choosing an entering variable, to avoid
cycling (circling), also appear in this chapter. The
author goes on to discuss the concept of duality
and the related theorems, and develops the dial
simplex algorithm using the optimality conditions
of a linear program.
"Methods for Specialist Linear Programming
Models" is the title of Chapter 3. It considers some
of the topics related to network programming:
minimum-cost and maximum flow through a
network. The Hungarian method for solving the
assignment problem then is mentioned briefly.
I found Chapter 4, "Computational Implementa-
tion of the Simplex Algorithm," very interesting.
It talks about an important issue that often is ig-
nored in linear programming books: efficient com-


puter implementation of the simplex algorithm.
The author starts with the revised simplex algo-
rithm and the product form of the inverse. He then
goes on to discuss the advantages of using L/U
decomposition and how one can update the de-
composition at the end of each simplex iteration.
Instead of devoting a separate chapter for sensi-
tivity a i i i i .-],,! i i. l . ,i : ,nI- , n .I ,
are presented at the end of this one, which, in my
opinion, disturbs the smooth flow of the ideas
presented earlier in the chapter.
The book introduces the reader to "Non-Calculus
Methods for Non-Linear Programming." The
author is able to describe, through a nice example,
the concept of separability in non-linear programs,
and shows how the program can be approximated
using a piecewise-linear function. A word at the
end of the chapter is given to Kuhn-Tucker con-
ditions for local optimality.
"General Methods for Integer Programming" is
the topic of Chapter 6. Branch-and-bound and
cutting planes methods are presented and applied
to a couple of examples. The duality gap is shown
through an example. As in the linear case, the book
discusses "Computational Implementation of the
Linear-Programming-Based Branch-and-Bound
Algorithm."
The book's last chapter is titled "Specialist Meth-
ods for Integer Programming Models." Methods
for problems with pure 0-1 variables, such as
implicit enumeration and boolean algebra are
studied. Some special problems, such as the
matching problem, traveling salesman problem,
etc. are studied in some depth. The reader is intro-
duced to heuristics and local search methods in the
last few pages of the book.
At the end of each chapter, numerous exercises are
provided to strengthen one's understanding of the
material, and encourage further research of the
topic. The book is intended for both undergradu-
ate and first-year graduate students who have not
had a previous knowledge of this topic. I think the
style of this book makes it an excellent self teacher
for those who want to learn more about math-
ematical programming.
-SAMERTAKRITI


"The book is intendedfor both
undergraduate andfirst-year
graduate students who have
not had a previous knowledge
of this topic. I think the style
of this book makes it an
excellent self teacherfor those
who want to learn more about
mathematical programming. "


I I~ ~







PAEII 04 OEBR19


FROM PAGE ONE

XV International
Symposium on
Mathematical
Programming


The Sunday preceding the opening will
include a golf outing on the University of
Michigan course and an evening concert
presentation ofan original composition
by the Pulitzer Prize-winning composer,
William Bolcum. A reception for all
participants will be hosted on Monday
evening. The MPS business meeting will
be on '.\ '..i i'9 afternoon, followed by a
banquet at the historic Greenfield Village.


The program will include multiple parallel
sessions on a wide range of topics in math-
ematical programming. Several one-hour tu-
torial lectures also have been scheduled.
One-hour tutorial speakers include:
R. Bixby, W. Cook, G. Cornuejols, C.
Gonzaga, A. Frank, A. Griewank, J. Holland,
N. Karmarkar, U. Karmarkar, R. Karp, L.
Lovasz, J. Mulvey, W. Murray, G.
Nemhauser, A. Nemirovski, J. Nocedal,
P. Pardalos, R.T. Rockafellar, G. Smale
and P. Toth.


arly registration deadline is
April 29, 1994. Abstracts are
due by June 1. Hotel reservations
should be made before July 15.
Registration for members is $150 before April
29 and $190 after April 29. Reduced student
and retiree fees also apply. The banquet fee is
$36.50. Addresses, forms and other informa-
tion appear in the announcement. The sym-
posium coordinators' address is:
University of Michigan
Conferences and Seminars, Room 112
541 Thompson St.
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1360 USA
Telephone: (313) 764-5305
FAX: (313) 764-2990
e-mail: xvismp@um.cc.umich.edu


c[pplication for cJVlembership


Mail to:
The Mathematical Programming Society, Inc.
c/o International Statistical Institute
428 Prinses Beatrixlaan
2270 AZ Voorburg
The Netherlands

Cheques or money orders should be made
payable to The Mathematical Program-
ming Society, Inc., in one of the currencies
listed below. Dues for 1993, including sub-
scription to the journal Mathematical
Programming, are Dfl.100.00 (or $55.00
or DM85.00 or 32.50 or I Fi Ii 1111 or
Sw.Fr.80.00).
Student applications: Dues are 1 the
above rates. Have a faculty member verify
your student status and send application
with dues to above address.


I wish to enroll as a member ofthe Society. My subscription is for
my personal use and notfor the benefit of any library or institution.
I enclose payment asfollows:
Dues for 1993


NAME


MAILING ADDRESS (PLEASE PRINT)



SIGNATURE

FACULTY VERIFYING STATUS

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~ I~ __


N9 41


PAGE, IT


NOVEMBER 1993






0 P T I M A
OPTIMA
N 41 Nov. 1993

11 vin Lustig, formerly at Princeton Univer-
-11 y, is now Director of Numerical Optimiza-
tion at CPLEX Optimization, Inc. His e-mail
address is irv@dizzy.cplex.com. A work-
shop on Parallel Processing of Discrete Op-
timization Problems will be held at the Cen-
ter for Discrete Mathematics and Theoretical
Computer Science (DIMACS), Rutgers Uni-
versity, April 28-29, 1994. Organizers are
P.M. Pardalos, University of Florida
(pardalos@math.ufl.edu), and M.G.C.
Resende (mgcr@research.att.com) and K.G.
Ramakrishnan (kgr@research.att.com) of
AT&T Bell Labs. IDeadline for the next
OPTIMA is Feb. 1,1994.


Books for review should be
sent to the Book Review Editor,
Professor Dolf Talman
Department of Econometrics
Tilburg University
P.O. Box 90153
5000 LE Tilburg
Netherlands

Journal contents are subject
to change by the publisher.


Donald W. Hear, EDITOR
Dolf Talman, ASSOCIATE EDITOR
PUBLISHED BY THE MATHEMATICAL
PROGRAMMING SOCIETY AND
PUBLICATION SERVICES OF THE
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING,
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA.
Richard Jones, ASSISTANT EDITOR
Elsa Drake, DESIGNER


O P T I M A
MATHEMATICAL PROGRAMMING SOCIETY

* .. UNIVERSITY OF
F FLORIDA
Center for Applied Optimization
303 Weil Hall
PO Box 116595
Gainesville FL 32611-6595 USA


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