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In this issue: Your Story We Need Your Feedback Uneven age Management of Southern Pines The Passive Alternative: Is the Group Selection System a Viable Forest Management R egime? Congratulations Bill McMillan: Florida Tree Farmer of 2010 Inspector of 2010 Congratulations Certified Forest Stewards and Tree Farmers Stewardship Event Announcement Timber Pr ice Update Events Calendar The Florida Forest Steward A Quarterly Newsletter for Florida Landowners and Resource Professionals Volume 18, No. 1 Spring-Summer 2011 Your Story By Chris Demers As the economic crisis continues to unfold and state and Federal legislatures decide what projects and programs are next in line for cutting, it is becoming increasingly important for us to communicate the impacts of our educational and assistance programs. As a part of this process we are collecting feedback from people on all aspects of the Forest Stewardship Program. Please take a moment to share if you have been Stewardship Program: Planning and Assistance Do you have a Forest Stewardship Management Plan for your property? Has the plan helped you in the process of reaching the goals you have set for your property? Has a county forester, biologist, county extension agent, consultant or other professional provided valuable assistance with your management planning or practice? Education and Networking Have you attended any Forest Stewardship Program workshops, tours or other events? Did the information and materials presented there help you in some way with planning, management, or Inside : Uneven age management of southern pines a viable alternative ?

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2 pursuit of financial assistance or a tax related benefit? Did you get any new ideas, encouragement or inspiration from another landowner or professional? Did you make any new contacts that have helped you in some way? What about this Newsletter? Has it provided useful information or ideas that have helped you in some way? Your story is an important part of the to share any feedback please email me at cdemers@ufl.edu If you are on Facebook, your feedback is also invited at the Florida Forest Stewardship Program and Cooperative Extension System pages. Uneven-aged Management of Southern Pines By Don M. Handley, Joshua C. Dickinson and Chris Demers With fuel costs soaring and stumpage prices for small-diameter trees low as usual, many landowners may be seeing very little financial incentive to plant trees after a final stand harvest. Those with stands nearing financial maturity may be wondering if it will be worth it to replant after the current stand is harvested. In the last issue we discussed the important economic and ecological benefits that can be realized by extending pine rotations, in concert with thinning and prescribed fire. another pine management system that can minimize, or even eliminate, the high upfront costs of site preparation and planting, maintain a continuous forest cover, provide more frequent income and achieve other important wildlife habitat and recreation objectives. Uneven-aged management (UAM) of pine can offer many benefits to forest owners, the environment, foresters and the timber industry as a whole. UAM can offer the potential for more frequent and continuous income from the forest than even-aged management of a plantation or high-grading an unmanaged forest. Wildlife, hydrologic and aesthetic values may be better maintained as well. UAM involves a long-term relationship between the forest owner and a forester with the appropriate skills and experience, rather than the forester serving as a one-time broker for a sale, site preparation and planting. History of uneven-aged management Uneven-aged management is not new, only largely forgotten by foresters and forest owners. The practice of what evolved into uneven-aged management dates back to the mid 1920s in Arkansas when foresters L. K. Pomeroy and E. P. Connor founded the Ozark Badger Lumber Company. Their approach stood logging of old growth pine forests that perspective was strongly influenced by observation of centuries-old German attitude of guardianship of this [forest] wealth for future generations was a point entirely strange to me as an American This model has been perpetuated in Arkansas by the U.S. Forest Service with establishment of the Crossett Experimental Forest in 1933. -stocked shortleaf/loblolly stand was established to demonstrate to farmers that good income can be generated under uneven-aged management, even from relatively small

PAGE 3

3 forest properties. This 40 acre parcel is still being managed and harvested today. Don Handley, of Handley Forest Services, began his forestry career working in UAM in southern Arkansas. He has successfully introduced UAM to clients in South Carolina and southeast North Carolina. Your starting point Unmanaged stands : If your timber stands are largely unmanaged with a mix of pine and low-value hardwoods, the idea of starting over may not be attractive. The cost of stand establishment is high and a return on the investment will be more than 2-3 decades in the future. If you are looking for revenue from an unmanaged signs along rural roads. These buyers may offer what appears to be an attractive price result in a valuable or healthy residual stand. The best merchantable stems will be removed, leaving the poorest and/or unhealthiest trees as the residual stand. Most unmanaged stands across north Florida and much of the Southeast consist of loblolly pine mixed with various hardwood species. Loblolly is the most forgiving of the southern pine species, producing abundant seedlings when hardwoods are removed and a prescribed burn carried out. A single herbicide application is generally required to release the pine seedlings from hardwood competition, after which the dominant seedlings become the second age and size class in an uneven-aged stand. Once the new trees are established, the original pines in the unmanaged stand can be thinned to generate revenue. The hardwoods can also be sold as pulpwood or chipped for biomass fuel, where markets exist. Managed pine plantations : Owners of plantations nearing rotation age have a few options to continue forest management on the site. They can be cut and regenerated artificially by preparing the site and planting seedlings, regenerated naturally using an even-aged seed tree or shelterwood approach, or converted, via periodic harvests and natural regeneration, to an uneven-aged stand structure. Don Handley has successfully converted loblolly plantations to profitable uneven-aged stands. Making Uneven-aged Management work The secret to the success of uneven-aged management is maintaining a balanced structure of age classes across the stand through periodic sales of mature trees. Pines are shade intolerant so they will generally require larger gaps to regenerate naturally. This is generally best accomplished by harvesting groups of trees vs. single trees throughout the stand. This periodic harvesting of groups of trees assures abundant replenishment of young seedlings and competition control in a multi-aged forest, while maintaining near full stocking. Some smaller, low quality, sick or damaged trees should also be removed in order to improve stand health and value. Steady income, coupled with the hydrological, wildlife, and aesthetic value of maintaining a fully stocked forest ecosystem, are among the benefits of uneven-aged management. Economics Comparison of even and uneven-aged management is complex, but critical if

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4 family forest owners are to have a valid basis for judging which management option to choose. The table above illustrates an example of a forest owner in South Carolina with a 20 year-old loblolly plantation. He chose to convert the stand to uneven-aged management. Actual economic returns are compared with a simulation of returns had even-aged management been continued. The results illustrated are comparable to cases where the owner chooses to convert an unmanaged stand to uneven, rather than even-aged management. Were the comparative model shown to be extended through a second rotation, the economic benefit of uneven-aged management increases significantly. Note again that revenues reflect yields in South Carolina and that the table reflects only the merchantable timber present after the cut. The future value of the planted even-age stand is not reflected. Conclusion Uneven-aged management can offer many benefits to landowners with multiple-use objectives. Income from the stand will be from smaller, but more frequent, harvests of high value trees. This management option creates a diverse mosaic of horizontal and vertical vegetative structure which, when combined with prescribed fire, is beneficial to a variety of game and nongame wildlife. Finally, for landowners who want a diverse and beautiful forest, an uneven-aged stand is second to none. The Forest Management Trust is prepared to facilitate opportunities for forest owners and foresters to observe successful UAM in the field. In the next article Jeff Main, a Florida consulting forester, provides some local perspective on this topic. UAM Resources: Uneven-aged Silviculture for Loblolly and Shortleaf Pine Forest Cover Types, http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/gtr/gtr_so118.pdf Opportunities for Uneven-aged Management in Second Growth Longleaf Pine Stands in Florida, http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fr132 Uneven-aged Management of Longleaf Pine Forests: A Scientist and Manager Dialogue, http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/gtr/gtr_srs078.pdf About the Authors: Don M. Handley Handley Forest Services, Inc., Florence, SC ( www.handleyforestry.net ; handl eyfor@aol.com) Joshua C. Dickinson The Forest Management Trust, Gainesville, FL (josh.foresttrust@earthlink.net) Chris Demers University of Florida, Gainesville (cdemers@ufl.edu)

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5 The Passive Alternative: Is the Group Selection System a Viable Forest Management Regime in the North Florida Flatwoods? By Jeff Main Since the advent of commercial forestry in north Florida has predominantly been by successive even-age plantation establishment and harvest rotations. There is much to be said for the financial and productivity advantages of this type of regime. However, drastic changes in timberland ownership, stumpage markets and owner goals and objectives have caused resource professionals to seek alternatives that would better serve a portion of the timberland owning public. One alternative making the rounds is a variant of the selection system. Traditionally used in the hardwood regions of the upper and mid-south, the selection system involves the periodic harvest of individually selected trees to maintain and improve an uneven aged hardwood forest. A similar approach has been practiced on Longleaf pine forests in the pine producing Piedmont and Coastal Plain regions. Referred to as the Stoddard-Neel approach after its two best known practitioners, an uneven aged, naturally regenerated pine forest is managed at low stocking levels by the individual and thoughtful selection of harvest trees. Selections are based on tree qualities, spacing, the need for openings and other factors. The beautiful quail plantations of the Red Hills regions of north Florida and South Georgia are a result of this approach. However, in the pine forests of north Florida the hardwood selection model does not work due to pine trees being intolerant, meaning they cannot live in shade. They require full sunlight to regenerate and prosper. Single tree selection as practiced in hardwoods does not provide openings large enough for pine regeneration. The Stoddard-Neel approach gets around this by carrying very low stocking levels. Where a 30 year old thinned commercial pine stand will carry 100 square feet of basal area, the Longleaf quail plantations are maintained at 30 square feet. These low stocking levels limit total volume growth and thus the financial returns possible from the land. Of course timber production is not the primary goal of the quail plantations. In truth this system has limited application outside the Longleaf pine regions due to species and soil differences. lack of sunlight but still want more stocking than a quail plantation what do you do? One option may be the Group, or Gap selection system. With it, gaps are periodically made in the timber base large enough for intolerant species to grow and prosper but sized appropriately for natural seeding from the adjacent trees. The effect is a variety of even aged units scattered throughout the land base. When successful, this system reduces site preparation and regeneration costs significantly when compared with commercial planted pine regimes. Success is not automatic. The quality and quantity of the seed source, timing and type of harvests and competition control are some of the factors affecting the establishment of an acceptable stand. Once established, naturally regenerated stands will always have stocking levels that are too high or too low (or both) as measured by optimum productivity. While the carpet-like natural regeneration

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6 that occurs in some pine stands is familiar to all of us, we know that it is not necessarily the norm, nor is it desired. Finally, economies of scale require a fairly large land base to make this system feasible. Contractors must have enough work to make their site prep and harvest operations profitable. Natural regeneration requires adequate seed quantity and bare mineral soil. Pine seedfall in north Florida occurs in the fall, so harvest should be timed in mid to late summer if the harvested trees do not contain cone bearing trees (to allow the logging process to produce bare mineral soil) or October/November if they do (to get scarification and viable seed directly on the site). Seedfall varies from year to year with a heavy seedfall about every three years. If the groundcover is thick and impenetrable a burn may be required. Seed trees may be necessary in the gaps if adjacent seed sources are inadequate. Some form of mechanical scarification may be in order. However, keep in mind that in a good seed year every square inch of exposed mineral soil will be covered with seedlings. Bottom line is there is a balance required to achieving and maintaining a good stand. A primary appeal of Group selection is that this approach provides benefits beyond stand establishment. Stand edges, the boundaries between stands of different ages favored by wildlife, are increased. Flora and fauna diversity within the forest holding increases the recreational and aesthetic qualities of the property. One obvious advantage is the reduced stand establishment costs although this can be overstated. Some professionals believe Group selection financially outperforms traditional planted pine silviculture, primarily because the carrying costs of the site prep and planting are reduced or eliminated. I have yet to find a real world example of this in north Florida. Although site prep costs are high and stumpage rates are what they are, the poor genetics, reduced growth, stocking dynamics, competition and other factors inherent in naturally regenerated stands make group selection less profitable than a planted stand on the same site. If production is the goal, reasoned order must be brought to the crop. Farmers y throw corn seeds on their fields for a reason. Despite that, the initial positive effect on personal cashflow (i.e. not paying for site prep and planting) makes this system appealing to some landowners. Of course, certain timberland holdings are better suited to this system than others. As stated, maximum profitability is not the only end pursued by many forest landowners. I practice both selection and planted pine silviculture on my personal land. I enjoy the diversity and aesthetics of the natural stand and the productivity of the planted pines. This provides the best of both worlds. Jeff Main is President of Land & Timber Services Group, Tallahassee, FL and member of the Association of Consulting Foresters. Congratulations Bill McMillan: s Tree Farmer of 2010 by Cathy Hardin, Florida Division of Forestry Bill McMillan, a lifelong resident of Gadsden County, received the 2010 Tree Farmer of the Year award for his outstanding commitment to responsible forest management. The 400+ acre property has been in his family for five

PAGE 7

7 generations. Mr. McMillan has worked hard to make his working forest sustainable, aesthetically pleasing and attractive to wildlife. Bill McMillan says the work he does each When asked how the family has maintained an interest in the land generation to generation, Mr. McMillan your own time and effort into it to take ownership something that is more than The pride and love he has for his land shows in the healthy, frequently burned stands of mature pines, wildlife openings and food plots. Stewfarm demonstrates good stewardship of wood, water, recreation and wildlife. His forest and its products are used and enjoyed, but he is careful that it is all done in a manner that will allow his children and grandchildren to gain the same benefits. Congratulations Brian Cobble: Tree Farm Inspector of 2010 By Phil Gornicki, Florida Forestry Association It only took a few years of working with the Tree Farm program for Brian Cobble (Senior Forester, Suwannee County, pictured above) to claim the distinction as the top Tree Farm Inspector in Florida. As part of his job working for the Florida Division of Forestry, Brian has put much energy behind bringing the Tree Farm message of forest conservation, management and sustainability to the landowners of Suwannee County. During calendar year 2010 Brian conducted 45 inspections, on 13,809 acres, including bringing 9 new properties into the American Tree Farm system. Brian has proven himself as a valuable asset to very deserving recipient of the Tree Farm Inspector of the Year Award! Get Email Updates! an email to cdemers@ufl.edu to be added to the Stewardship listserv. Bill McMillan shares his land management story at a tour of his property last December, photo by Cathy Hardin, DOF.

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Doug Smith (L) and Tony Golden, Holmes County Bruce and Karen Butts, Holmes County George & Claudia Barthelmes Suwannee County Al Hartzog (R) with Geoff Cummings (DOF), Bay Cou nty Roger Bryan, Suwannee County Jason Sapp (L) and son with Brian C obble (DOF), Suwannee County Congratulations Certified Forest Stewards and Tree Farmers! For more information about becoming a C ertified Forest Steward or Tree Farmer, call your County Forester or learn about it at: http://www.fl dof.com/forest_management/cfa_steward_index.html http://www.floridaforest.org/tree_farm.php

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& The FL GA Game Management Update Series Present: Balancing Timber & Wildlife for Upland Game Tour May 13, 2011; 8:30 am 1 pm Cobey Family Property, Gadsden County Join us for a tour of the Cobey Property. At t his Gadsden Co family game reserve, you can see for yourself the result of 25+ years of professional forestry/wildlife management focused on converting rolling pasture to a quail plantation landscape of planted loblolly pine. T rees have been marked and th inned to optimize both the return from timber products a s well as wi ldlife habitat for upland game. Prescribed fire and herbicides have been used regularly. Planted food plots and wildlife corridors are embedded in the upland timber stand. An extensive har dwood drain and a naturalistic man made lake compliment the uplands. Pasture to plantation in 20 years... a field tour of the Cobey family's "Mary Land" is an excellent opportunity to see what a landowner can accomplish with consistent, aggressive manageme nt! Topics include: Thinning pines for timber and wildlife production Using prescribed fire for habitat management Wildlife food plots Bahiagrass control Best Management Practices for protecting water quality Where: The Cobey Property Off CR 159 in Gadsden County, FL (directions on back) Registration: Please RSVP by May 11 th Fee is $10, includes lunch and materials. To register or for more information, please go to http://flgagmus.eventbrite.com or contact Chris Demers at (352) 846 2375 cdemers@ufl.edu Florida Department of Agricultur e and Consumer Services Division of Forestry and a grant from the Sustainable Forestry Initiative.

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Driving directions to "Balancing Timber and Wildlife for Upland Game" May 13 th 2011 Coming from Tallahassee, and east and south of Tallahassee : From I 10 in Tallahassee, take the US 27 N e xit (Monroe St) toward Havana. Cross the Ochlockonee River into Gadsden Co. About 1 mi past the bridges, turn L onto SR 270. Travel approx. 2.5 mi to the first intersection with CR 159, and turn L. Go approx. 3/4 mi down CR 159. Gate is at top of hill on R Coming from east and north of Tallahassee : From US 27 or SR 12 in Havana, take US 27 S of Havana to the 2nd intersection with CR 159 to the R (the first one is marked "To Quincy"). At the 2nd one, turn R and travel approx 2 mi until CR 159 T's into CR 2 70. Turn L onto CR 270 and go about 1/4 mi to where CR 159 T's in from the R. Turn R on CR 159. Go approx. 3/4 mi down CR 159. Gate is at top of hill on R. Coming from west of Tallahassee and Quincy northward : Driving E on SR 12 toward Havana, turn R and take CR 159 S at the blinking light outside Havana, and proceed for approx. 1/2 mi to its junction with US 27 S of Havana. Turn R and go S on US 27 for approx. 1.5 mi. At the intersection with CR 159 to the R, turn R and travel approx. 2 mi until CR 159 T' s into CR 270. Turn L onto CR 270 and go about 1/4 mi to where CR 159 T's in from the R. Turn R on CR 159. Go approx. 3/4 mi down CR 159. Gate is at top of hill on R. Coming from west of Tallahassee and Quincy southward : From I 10 W of Tallahassee, take t he US 90 N exit toward Quincy. In approx 2 miles you'll reach the crossroads of "downtown" Midway, turn R onto CR 159. Go approx. 5 mi N on CR 159. Gate is on L along the hilltop, right before the hill drops off. as you get close. Just in case, #: (352) 514 0819

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Timber Price Update The timber pricing information below is useful for observing trends over time, but does not necessarily reflect current conditions at a particular location. Landowners considering a timber sale are advised to solicit the services of a consulting forester to obtain current local market conditions. Note that Southeast average price information for biomass fuel is now included P rice ranges reported in the 1 st Q uarter 20 1 1 Timber Mart South (TMS) report were: Florida Stumpage Prices B iomass Fuel Prices Pine pulpwood : $2 0 $ 3 3 /cord ($ 7 $ 1 2 /ton), from 4 th Qtr 2010 Pine C N S : $ 31 $ 5 6 /cord ($1 1 $ 2 1 /ton), slightly Pine sawtimber : $ 64 $ 9 6 /cord ($ 2 4 $ 3 6 /ton), Pine plylogs : $ 65 $ 102 /cord ($ 2 4 $ 3 8 /ton) same Pine power p oles : $1 3 0 $ 1 7 2 / cord ($ 49 $ 6 4 /ton) slightly Hardwood pulpwood : $ 1 5 $ 27 /cord ($ 5 $ 9 /ton) slightly In woods whole tree pine : $1 4 $ 2 1 /ton In woods whole tree hardwood : $1 2 $ 20 /ton *Southeast average low and high price r anges per to n, fuel quality chips from tops, limbs, limited bole material or otherwise pre commercial material Trend Report Average s tumpage prices in the first quarter 2011 were very similar t o last cross much of Florida and the Southeast region bu t all were well below prices in the same period last year Continuing weak housing markets and high fuel prices are keeping prices d own for most products. Several new bio energy projects across the s outh reinforce this new market for biomass products. In Florida, c MW biomass power MW facility in

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U pcoming Stewardship, Small Farm and Other Events Date Event, Location, Contact May 4 Forest Stewardship Workshop e: Tree / Plant Identification 9 am 3 pm ET, Morningside Nature C enter, Gainesville, FL $10 fee includes lunch and materials. Details and registration online at http://fsp workshop050411.eventbrite.com/ May 12 Forest Stewardship Workshop: Manage the Pond, Mind the Creek 9 am 3 pm ET, UF IFAS Highlands County Extension Office, 4509 George Blvd, Sebring, FL 33 872 Details and registration on line at: http://fsp workshop051211.eventbrite.com/ May 12 Lee County Natural Areas and Woods Workshop in Fort Myers, UF IFAS Lee County Extension Office, Fort Myers, FL. W ill focus on non native invasive species ma nagement. for pesticide u se categories. D etails at http://lee.ifas.ufl.edu/AgNatRes/AgNatResHome.shtml .To register, contact Martha Avila, (239) 533 7506, avilamc@leegov.com May 13 2010 11 FL GA Game Management Updat e Series, Balancing Timber & Wildlife for Upland Game Cobey Property, Gadsden County, FL Cost is $10, lunch and materials included. Details and registration on line: http://flgagmus.eventbrite.co m/ May 20 Orchard Management Series Part 3: Spring Orchard Management UF IFAS Suwannee Valley Research and Education Center, Live Oak, FL For more informat ion, contact Sarah White at 386 362 1725 ext. 102 or sewhite@ufl.edu June 16 Lee County Tree Farming and Tree Health Workshop Division of Forestry Office in Fort Myer FL W ill discuss management plans , and food plot options. $ 15 fee in advance, $20 at door Call Michael Weston at (239) 690 3500 Ext. 118 or email Michael.Weston@freshfromflorida.com for info June 2 6 Hendry County Tree Farming and Tree Health Workshop UF IFAS Hendry County Extension in LaBelle ,FL W ill discuss and food plot options $15 fee in advance, $20 at door Call Michael Weston at (239) 690 3500 Ext. 118 or email Michael.Weston@freshfromflorida.com for info July 15 17 2011 Florida Small Farms and Alternative Conference Osceola Heritage Park, Kissimmee, FL. Hosted by University of Florida IFAS and Florida A&M University. Deta ils at http://conference.ifas.ufl.edu/smallfarms/index.html July 31 2011 Wildlife Expo UF iFAS West Florida Research and Education Center, Milton, FL. For more information please contact Ms. Robin Vickers at ( 850) 983 5216 x 113 or rvickers@ufl.edu Au gust 11 Orchard Management Series Part 4: Summer Orchard Management UF IFAS Suwannee Valley Research and Education Center, Live Oak, FL For more information, c ontact Sarah White at 386 362 1725 ext. 102 or sewhite@ufl.edu August 26 WFREC Extension Farm Field Day UF IFAS West Florida Research & Education Center Research Facility, Jay, FL. For more information please contact Ms. Robin Vickers at ( 850) 983 521 6 x 113 or rvickers@ufl.edu For more Forest Stewardship Program information see : sfrc.ufl.edu/forest_stewardship The Florida Forest Steward is a University of Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Florida Division of Forestry and Florida Tree Farm j oint project: Chris Demers ( editor ), School of Forest Resources & Conservation, UF, P.O. Box 110410, Gainesville, FL 32611 0410, (352) 846 2375, cdemers@ufl.edu Dr. Michael Andreu ( co editor ), School of Forest Resources & Conservation, UF, (352) 846 035 5, mandreu@ufl.edu Tony Grossman (co editor) Florida Division of Forestry, 3125 Conner Blvd, Room R2, Tallahassee, FL 32699 1650, (850) 414 9907, Anthony.Grossman@freshfromflorida.com Joseph Prenger (co editor) Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Com mission, 2574 Seagate Drive Tallahassee FL 32301 (850) 410 5268 Joe.Prenger @MyFWC.com Jon Gould (co editor), Florida Tree Farm Committee, 4923 Windwood Circle, Birmingham, AL 35242, (205) 991 9435, gouldjh@bellsouth.net Dr. Bill Giuliano (co editor) D epartment of Wildlife Ecology & Conservation, UF, PO Box 110430, Gainesville, FL 32611 0430, (352) 846 0575, docg@ufl.edu


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The Florida Forest Steward

A Quarterly Newsletter for Florida Landowners and Resource Professionals


Volume 18, No. 1 Spring-Summer 2011

In this issue: Your Story
By Chris Demers
Your Story We Need Your Feedback
Uneven-age Management of Southern Pines As the economic crisis continues to
The Passive Alternative: Is the Group Selection unfold and state and Federal legislatures
System a Viable Forest Management Regime? decide what projects and programs are
Congratulations Bill McMillan: Florida's Tree
Farmer of 2010 next in line for cutting, it is becoming
Congratulations Brian Cobble: Florida's Tree increasingly important for us to
Inspector of 2010 communicate the impacts of our
Congratulations Certified Forest Stewards and educational and assistance programs. As
Tree Farmers a part of this process we are collecting
Stewardship Event Announcement feedback from people on all aspects of
Timber Price Update
STimber Price Update the Forest Stewardship Program. Please
Events Calendar .
Events Calendar _take a moment to share if you have been
served by some part of Florida's Forest
SStewardship Program:

Planning and Assistance
Do you have a Forest Stewardship
Management Plan for your property?
Has the plan helped you in the process of
reaching the goals you have set for your
property? Has a county forester,
biologist, county extension agent,
consultant or other professional provided
valuable assistance with your
management planning or practice?

Education and Networking
Have you attended any Forest
Inside: Uneven-age management of Stewardship Program workshops, tours or
southern pines a viable other events? Did the information and
alternative? materials presented there help you in
some way with planning, management, or


S* I'DA

O5


Iff UNIVERSITY of 0
U FLORIDA
IFAS P 3 11 I









pursuit of financial assistance or a tax
related benefit? Did you get any new
ideas, encouragement or inspiration from
another landowner or professional? Did
you make any new contacts that have
helped you in some way?

What about this Newsletter? Has it
provided useful information or ideas that
have helped you in some way?

Your story is an important part of the
Forest Stewardship Program. If you'd like
to share any feedback please email me at
cdemers(@iufl.edu. If you are on
Facebook, your feedback is also invited at
the Florida Forest Stewardship Program
and Cooperative Extension System pages.


Uneven-aged Management of
Southern Pines
By Don M. Handley, Joshua C. Dickinson
and Chris Demers

With fuel costs soaring and stumpage
prices for small-diameter trees low as
usual, many landowners may be seeing
very little financial incentive to plant trees
after a final stand harvest. Those with
stands nearing financial maturity may be
wondering if it will be worth it to replant
after the current stand is harvested. In the
last issue we discussed the important
economic and ecological benefits that can
be realized by extending pine rotations, in
concert with thinning and prescribed fire.
What happens next in your stand when it's
ready for harvest? Let's take a look at
another pine management system that can
minimize, or even eliminate, the high
upfront costs of site preparation and
planting, maintain a continuous forest
cover, provide more frequent income and
achieve other important wildlife habitat
and recreation objectives.


Uneven-aged management (UAM) of
pine can offer many benefits to forest
owners, the environment, foresters and
the timber industry as a whole. UAM can
offer the potential for more frequent and
continuous income from the forest than
even-aged management of a plantation or
high-grading an unmanaged forest.
Wildlife, hydrologic and aesthetic values
may be better maintained as well. UAM
involves a long-term relationship between
the forest owner and a forester with the
appropriate skills and experience, rather
than the forester serving as a one-time
broker for a sale, site preparation and
planting.

History of uneven-aged management

Uneven-aged management is not new,
only largely forgotten by foresters and
forest owners. The practice of what
evolved into uneven-aged management
dates back to the mid 1920s in Arkansas
when foresters L. K. Pomeroy and E. P.
Connor founded the Ozark Badger
Lumber Company. Their approach stood
in sharp contrast to the "cut and run"
logging of old growth pine forests that
had prevailed for decades. Pomeroy's
perspective was strongly influenced by
observation of centuries-old German
forestry practices. Pomeroy noted, "Their
attitude of guardianship of this [forest]
wealth for future generations was a point
entirely strange to me as an American
lumberman."

This model has been perpetuated in
Arkansas by the U.S. Forest Service with
establishment of the Crossett
Experimental Forest in 1933. The "Good
Farm Forestry Forty", a well-stocked
shortleaf/loblolly stand was established to
demonstrate to farmers that good income
can be generated under uneven-aged
management, even from relatively small









forest properties. This 40 acre parcel is
still being managed and harvested today.
Don Handley, of Handley Forest Services,
began his forestry career working in UAM
in southern Arkansas. He has successfully
introduced UAM to clients in South
Carolina and southeast North Carolina.

Your starting point

Unmanaged stands: If your timber stands
are largely unmanaged with a mix of pine
and low-value hardwoods, the idea of
starting over may not be attractive. The
cost of stand establishment is high and a
return on the investment will be more than
2-3 decades in the future. If you are
looking for revenue from an unmanaged
stand, beware of the "We buy timber"
signs along rural roads. These buyers may
offer what appears to be an attractive price
for the timber but the harvest likely won't
result in a valuable or healthy residual
stand. The best merchantable stems will
be removed, leaving the poorest and/or
unhealthiest trees as the residual stand.

Most unmanaged stands across north
Florida and much of the Southeast consist
of loblolly pine mixed with various
hardwood species. Loblolly is the most
forgiving of the southern pine species,
producing abundant seedlings when
hardwoods are removed and a prescribed
burn carried out. A single herbicide
application is generally required to release
the pine seedlings from hardwood
competition, after which the dominant
seedlings become the second age and size
class in an uneven-aged stand. Once the
new trees are established, the original
pines in the unmanaged stand can be
thinned to generate revenue. The
hardwoods can also be sold as pulpwood
or chipped for biomass fuel, where
markets exist.


Managed pine plantations: Owners of
plantations nearing rotation age have a
few options to continue forest
management on the site. They can be cut
and regenerated artificially by preparing
the site and planting seedlings,
regenerated naturally using an even-aged
seed tree or shelterwood approach, or
converted, via periodic harvests and
natural regeneration, to an uneven-aged
stand structure. Don Handley has
successfully converted loblolly
plantations to profitable uneven-aged
stands.


Making Uneven-aged Management
work

The secret to the success of uneven-aged
management is maintaining a balanced
structure of age classes across the stand
through periodic sales of mature trees.
Pines are shade intolerant so they will
generally require larger gaps to
regenerate naturally. This is generally
best accomplished by harvesting groups
of trees vs. single trees throughout the
stand. This periodic harvesting of groups
of trees assures abundant replenishment
of young seedlings and competition
control in a multi-aged forest, while
maintaining near full stocking. Some
smaller, low quality, sick or damaged
trees should also be removed in order to
improve stand health and value. Steady
income, coupled with the hydrological,
wildlife, and aesthetic value of
maintaining a fully stocked forest
ecosystem, are among the benefits of
uneven-aged management.

Economics

Comparison of even and uneven-aged
management is complex, but critical if






Uneven-Age Management vs Even-Age Management


Actual Case History 45 Acre Stand
John Livingston Land Company
YEAR ACTIVITY COST GROSS
INCOME
1988 First pulpwood thinning $15,188
1993 Small sawtimber sale $35,367
1997 Sawtimber sale $49,148
1998 Herbicide application $4,320
1999
2003 Sawtimber sale $40,650
2008 Sawtimber sale $31,605
Fees mgt plan, etc. $17,599
M010 TOTALS $21,919 $171,958

MET INCOME $150,040
Marketable timber present in 2010 inventory $77,000
.. ...... . .....i ii A .I .iI .. .


UNt:VtN-A~it MRNAbtMINI I >


S227.040


family forest owners are to have a valid
basis for judging which management
option to choose.

The table above illustrates an example of a
forest owner in South Carolina with a 20
year-old loblolly plantation. He chose to
convert the stand to uneven-aged
management. Actual economic returns are
compared with a simulation of returns had
even-aged management been continued.
The results illustrated are comparable to
cases where the owner chooses to convert
an unmanaged stand to uneven, rather than
even-aged management. Were the
comparative model shown to be extended
through a second rotation, the economic
benefit of uneven-aged management
increases significantly. Note again that
revenues reflect yields in South Carolina and
that the table reflects only the merchantable
timber present after the cut. The future value
of the planted even-age stand is not reflected.

Conclusion

Uneven-aged management can offer many
benefits to landowners with multiple-use
objectives. Income from the stand will be
from smaller, but more frequent, harvests
of high value trees. This management
option creates a diverse mosaic of
horizontal and vertical vegetative structure
which, when combined with prescribed


Estimated earnings 30 year rotation under even-age management
Final harvest value based on cruise made in 1995
YEAR ACTIVITY COST GROSS
INCOME
1988 First pulpwood thinning $15,188
1993 Small sawtimber sale $35,367
1997
1998 Final harvest @ age 30 $112,500
1999 Prepare site & replant $7,740
2003
2008
Fees mgt plan, etc. $16,306
2010 TOTALS $24,046 $163,055

NET INCOME $139,010
Marketable timber present in 2010 inventory $0


EVEN-AGE MANAGEMENT>


$139.010


fire, is beneficial to a variety of game and
nongame wildlife. Finally, for
landowners who want a diverse and
beautiful forest, an uneven-aged stand is
second to none. The Forest Management
Trust is prepared to facilitate
opportunities for forest owners and
foresters to observe successful UAM in
the field. In the next article Jeff Main, a
Florida consulting forester, provides
some local perspective on this topic.

UAM Resources:

Uneven-aged Silviculture for Loblolly and
Shortleaf Pine Forest Cover Types,
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/gtr/gtr so 18.pdf

Opportunities for Uneven-aged Management in
Second Growth Longleaf Pine Stands in Florida,
http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fr132

Uneven-aged Management of Longleaf Pine
Forests: A Scientist and Manager Dialogue,
http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/gtr/gtr srs078.pdf

About the Authors:

Don M. Handley, Handley Forest Services, Inc.,
Florence, SC (www. handlevforestrv. net;
handleyfor@aol. corn)

Joshua C. Dickinson, The Forest Management Trust,
Gainesville, FL (iosh.foresttrust@earthlink.net)

Chris Demers, University ofFlorida, Gainesville
((,/,. ; ,, i n l ,, h, I









The Passive Alternative: Is the
Group Selection System a Viable
Forest Management Regime in the
North Florida Flatwoods?
By Jeff Main

Since the advent of commercial forestry in
the 1950's upland pine management in
north Florida has predominantly been by
successive even-age plantation
establishment and harvest rotations. There
is much to be said for the financial and
productivity advantages of this type of
regime. However, drastic changes in
timberland ownership, stumpage markets
and owner goals and objectives have
caused resource professionals to seek
alternatives that would better serve a
portion of the timberland owning public.
One alternative making the rounds is a
variant of the selection system.

Traditionally used in the hardwood regions
of the upper and mid-south, the selection
system involves the periodic harvest of
individually selected trees to maintain and
improve an uneven aged hardwood forest.
A similar approach has been practiced on
Longleaf pine forests in the pine
producing Piedmont and Coastal Plain
regions. Referred to as the Stoddard-Neel
approach after its two best known
practitioners, an uneven aged, naturally
regenerated pine forest is managed at low
stocking levels by the individual and
thoughtful selection of harvest trees.
Selections are based on tree qualities,
spacing, the need for openings and other
factors. The beautiful quail plantations of
the Red Hills regions of north Florida and
South Georgia are a result of this
approach.

However, in the pine forests of north
Florida the hardwood selection model does
not work due to pine trees being intolerant,


meaning they cannot live in shade. They
require full sunlight to regenerate and
prosper. Single tree selection as practiced
in hardwoods does not provide openings
large enough for pine regeneration.

The Stoddard-Neel approach gets around
this by carrying very low stocking levels.
Where a 30 year old thinned commercial
pine stand will carry 100 square feet of
basal area, the Longleaf quail plantations
are maintained at 30 square feet. These
low stocking levels limit total volume
growth and thus the financial returns
possible from the land. Of course timber
production is not the primary goal of the
quail plantations. In truth this system has
limited application outside the Longleaf
pine regions due to species and soil
differences.

So if you can't regenerate a stand due to
lack of sunlight but still want more
stocking than a quail plantation what do
you do? One option may be the Group, or
Gap selection system. With it, gaps are
periodically made in the timber base large
enough for intolerant species to grow and
prosper but sized appropriately for natural
seeding from the adjacent trees. The
effect is a variety of even aged units
scattered throughout the land base. When
successful, this system reduces site
preparation and regeneration costs
significantly when compared with
commercial planted pine regimes.

Success is not automatic. The quality and
quantity of the seed source, timing and
type of harvests and competition control
are some of the factors affecting the
establishment of an acceptable stand.
Once established, naturally regenerated
stands will always have stocking levels
that are too high or too low (or both) as
measured by optimum productivity.
While the carpet-like natural regeneration









that occurs in some pine stands is familiar
to all of us, we know that it is not
necessarily the norm, nor is it desired.
Finally, economies of scale require a fairly
large land base to make this system
feasible. Contractors must have enough
work to make their site prep and harvest
operations profitable.

Natural regeneration requires adequate
seed quantity and bare mineral soil. Pine
seedfall in north Florida occurs in the fall,
so harvest should be timed in mid to late
summer if the harvested trees do not
contain cone bearing trees (to allow the
logging process to produce bare mineral
soil) or October/November if they do (to
get scarification and viable seed directly
on the site). Seedfall varies from year to
year with a heavy seedfall about every
three years. If the groundcover is thick
and impenetrable a bur may be required.
Seed trees may be necessary in the gaps if
adjacent seed sources are inadequate.
Some form of mechanical scarification
may be in order. However, keep in mind
that in a good seed year every square inch
of exposed mineral soil will be covered
with seedlings. Bottom line is there is a
balance required to achieving and
maintaining a good stand.

A primary appeal of Group selection is
that this approach provides benefits
beyond stand establishment. Stand edges,
the boundaries between stands of different
ages favored by wildlife, are increased.
Flora and fauna diversity within the forest
holding increases the recreational and
aesthetic qualities of the property. One
obvious advantage is the reduced stand
establishment costs although this can be
overstated.

Some professionals believe Group
selection financially outperforms
traditional planted pine silviculture,


primarily because the carrying costs of
the site prep and planting are reduced or
eliminated. I have yet to find a real world
example of this in north Florida.
Although site prep costs are high and
stumpage rates are what they are, the
poor genetics, reduced growth, stocking
dynamics, competition and other factors
inherent in naturally regenerated stands
make group selection less profitable than
a planted stand on the same site. If
production is the goal, reasoned order
must be brought to the crop. Farmers
don't arbitrarily throw corn seeds on their
fields for a reason. Despite that, the initial
positive effect on personal cashflow (i.e.
not paying for site prep and planting)
makes this system appealing to some
landowners. Of course, certain timberland
holdings are better suited to this system
than others.

As stated, maximum profitability is not
the only end pursued by many forest
landowners. I practice both selection and
planted pine silviculture on my personal
land. I enjoy the diversity and aesthetics
of the natural stand and the productivity
of the planted pines. This provides the
best of both worlds.

Jeff Main is President of Land & Timber
Services Group, Tallahassee, FL and
member of the Association of Consulting
Foresters.

Congratulations Bill McMillan:
Florida's Tree Farmer of 2010
by Cathy Hardin, Florida Division of
Forestry

Bill McMillan, a lifelong resident of
Gadsden County, received the 2010 Tree
Farmer of the Year award for his
outstanding commitment to responsible
forest management. The 400+ acre
property has been in his family for five









generations. Mr. McMillan has worked
hard to make his working forest
sustainable, aesthetically pleasing and
attractive to wildlife.

Bill McMillan says the work he does each
year on his farm is his "stress relief'.
When asked how the family has
maintained an interest in the land
generation to generation, Mr. McMillan
replied, "It's not something you can teach.
It's a connection to the land. It's putting
your own time and effort into it to take
ownership -something that is more than
buying and selling a piece of property."
The pride and love he has for his land
shows in the healthy, frequently burned
stands of mature pines, wildlife openings
and food plots.


--

Bill McMillan shares his land management
story at a tour of his property last
December, photo by Cathy Hardin, DOF.
Also enrolled in Florida's Forest
Stewardship Program, Bill McMillan's
farm demonstrates good stewardship of
wood, water, recreation and wildlife. His
forest and its products are used and
enjoyed, but he is careful that it is all done
in a manner that will allow his children
and grandchildren to gain the same
benefits.


Congratulations Brian Cobble:
Tree Farm Inspector of 2010
By Phil Gornicki, Florida Forestry
Association

It only took a few years of working with
the Tree Farm program for Brian Cobble
(Senior Forester, Suwannee County,
pictured above) to claim the distinction as
the top Tree Farm Inspector in Florida.
As part of his job working for the Florida
Division of Forestry, Brian has put much
energy behind bringing the Tree Farm
message of forest conservation,
management and sustainability to the
landowners of Suwannee County. During
calendar year 2010 Brian conducted 45
inspections, on 13,809 acres, including
bringing 9 new properties into the
American Tree Farm system. Brian has
proven himself as a valuable asset to
Florida's Tree Farm program, and is a
very deserving recipient of the Tree Farm
Inspector of the Year Award!


Get Email Updates!
Don't miss out on upcoming events. Send
an email to cdemers@ufl.edu to be added
to the Stewardship listserv.







Congratulations Certified Forest Stewards and Tree Farmers!


Doug Smith (L) and Tony Golden,
Holmes County


Bruce and Karen Butts, Holmes County


George & Claudia Barthelmes,
Suwannee County


CE IF1


TRERB


Al Hartzog (R) with Geoff Cummings (DOF),
Bay County


Roger Bryan, Suwannee County


Jason Sapp (L) and son with Brian Cobble
(DOF), Suwannee County


For more information about becoming a Certified Forest Steward or Tree Farmer,
call your County Forester or learn about it at:
http://www.fl-dof.com/forest management/cfa steward index.html
http://www.floridaforest.or2/tree farm.ohp


TREE
PA










Florida's Forest Stewardship Program



The FL-GA Game Management Update Series

Present:


Balancing Timber & Wildlife for Upland Game Tour
May 13, 2011; 8:30 am 1 pm
Cobey Family Property, Gadsden County

Join us for a tour of the Cobey Property. At this Gadsden Co family game reserve, you can see for
yourself the result of 25+ years of professional forestry/wildlife management focused on converting
rolling pasture to a quail-plantation landscape of planted loblolly pine. Trees have been marked and
thinned to optimize both the return from timber products as well as wildlife habitat for upland game.
Prescribed fire and herbicides have been used regularly. Planted food plots and wildlife corridors are
embedded in the upland timber stand. An extensive hardwood drain and a naturalistic man-made
lake compliment the uplands. Pasture to plantation in 20 years... a field tour of the Cobey family's
"Mary Land" is an excellent opportunity to see what a landowner can accomplish with consistent,
aggressive management!

Topics include:
Thinning pines for timber and wildlife production
Using prescribed fire for habitat management
Wildlife food plots
Bahiagrass control
Best Management Practices for protecting water quality

Where:
The Cobey Property
Off CR 159 in Gadsden County, FL (directions on back)

Registration: Please RSVP by May 11th
Fee is $10, includes lunch and materials.
To register or for more information, please go to http://flgagmus.eventbrite.com
or contact Chris Demers at (352) 846-2375, cdemers@iufl.edu.

Tww UNIVEKsirY OF GEORGIA0
6A, COOPERATIVE EXTENSION
IFAS Extension *I. ,l i. ii il.iJ. O lr i, .
sFr


Funding for Florida's Forest Stewardship Program is provided by the USDA Forest Service through the
Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services Division of Forestry
and a grant from the Sustainable Forestry Initiative.









Driving directions to "Balancing Timber and Wildlife for Upland Game"
May 13th, 2011


Coming from Tallahassee, and east and south of Tallahassee: From 1-10 in Tallahassee, take the
US 27 N exit (Monroe St) toward Havana. Cross the Ochlockonee River into Gadsden Co. About 1
mi past the bridges, turn L onto SR 270. Travel approx. 2.5 mi to the first intersection with CR 159,
and turn L. Go approx. 3/4 mi down CR 159. Gate is at top of hill on R.

Coming from east and north of Tallahassee: From US 27 or SR 12 in Havana, take US 27 S
of Havana to the 2nd intersection with CR 159 to the R (the first one is marked "To Quincy"). At the
2nd one, turn R and travel approx 2 mi until CR 159 T's into CR 270. Turn L onto CR 270 and go
about 1/4 mi to where CR 159 T's in from the R. Turn R on CR 159. Go approx. 3/4 mi down CR
159. Gate is at top of hill on R.

Coming from west of Tallahassee and Quincy northward: Driving E on SR 12 toward Havana,
turn R and take CR 159 S at the blinking light outside Havana, and proceed for approx. 1/2 mi to its
junction with US 27 S of Havana. Turn R and go S on US 27 for approx. 1.5 mi. At the intersection
with CR 159 to the R, turn R and travel approx. 2 mi until CR 159 T's into CR 270. Turn L onto CR
270 and go about 1/4 mi to where CR 159 T's in from the R. Turn R on CR 159. Go approx. 3/4 mi
down CR 159. Gate is at top of hill on R.

Coming from west of Tallahassee and Quincy southward: From 1-10 W of Tallahassee, take the
US 90 N exit toward Quincy. In approx 2 miles you'll reach the crossroads of "downtown" Midway,
turn R onto CR 159. Go approx. 5 mi N on CR 159. Gate is on L along the hilltop, right before the
hill drops off.




Look for "Forest Stewardship Tour" signs as you get close.


Just in case, Chris Demers' cell #: (352) 514-0819










Timber Price Update


The timber pricing information below is useful for observing trends over time, but does not
necessarily reflect current conditions at a particular location. Landowners considering a timber
sale are advised to solicit the services of a consulting forester to obtain current local market
conditions. Note that Southeast average price information for biomass fuel is now included.

Price ranges reported in the 1st Quarter 2011 Timber Mart-South (TMS) report were:


Florida Stumpage Prices

* Pine pulpwood: $20 $33/cord ($7 $12/ton), ,from4thQtr2010
* Pine C-N-S: $31 $56/cord ($11 $21/ton), T slightly
* Pine sawtimber: $64 $96/cord ($24 $36/ton), [
* Pine plylogs: $65 $102/cord ($24 $38/ton), same
* Pine power poles: $130 $172/cord ($49 $64/ton), [ slightly
* Hardwood pulpwood: $15 $27/cord ($5 $9/ton), T slightly


Biomass Fuel Prices*

* In-woods
whole tree pine: $14 $21/ton I
In-woods
whole tree hardwood: $12 $20/ton I

"Southeast average low and high price ranges
)er ton, fuel quality chips from tops, limbs,
limited bole material or otherwise pre-
:ommercial material


Trend Report

Average stumpage prices in the first quarter 2011 were very similar to last quarter's across much
of Florida and the Southeast region, but all were well below prices in the same period last year.
Continuing weak housing markets and high fuel prices are keeping prices down for most
products. Several new bio-energy projects across the south reinforce this new market for
biomass products. In Florida, construction on American Renewables' 100-MW biomass power
facility in Gainesville is scheduled to begin this summer, while ADAGE's proposed 50-MW
facility in Hamilton County is on hold due to "poor power market conditions".


Average Pine Stumpage Prices for Florida
1st Qtr 1997 through 1st Qtr 2011
140
120
100
S80
60
40
20

1997 1998 1999 200 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011
Year (beginning first quarter 1997)
| pulpwood -- chip-n-saw sawtimber







University of Florida Non Profit Org.
School of Forest Resources and Conservation US Postage
PO Box 110410 PAID
Gainesville, FL 32611-0410 Florida
Gainesville
Permit No. 94


Date Event, Location, Contact
Forest Stewardship Workshope: Tree/Plant Identification, 9 am 3 pm ET, Momingside Nature Center, Gainesville, FL. $10 fee
includes lunch and materials. Details and registration online at http://fsp-workshop050411.eventbrite.com/
Forest Stewardship Workshop: Manage the Pond, Mind the Creek, 9 am 3 pm ET, UF-IFAS Highlands County Extension Office,
S 4509 George Blvd, Sebring, FL 33872. Details and registration on-line at: http://fsp-workshop051211.eventbrite.com/
Lee County Natural Areas and Woods Workshop in Fort Myers, UF-IFAS Lee County Extension Office, Fort Myers, FL. Will focus
May 12 on non-native invasive species management. CEU's offered for pesticide use categories. Details at
http://lee.ifas.ufl.edu/AgNatRes/AgNatResHome.shtml.To register, contact Martha Avila, (239) 533-7506, avilamciAleegov.com.
2010-11 FL-GA Game Management Update Series, Balancing Timber & Wildlife for Upland Game, Cobey Property, Gadsden
County, FL. Cost is $10, lunch and materials included. Details and registration on-line: http://flgagmus.eventbrite.com/

Orchard Management Series Part 3: Spring Orchard Management, UF-IFAS Suwannee Valley Research and Education Center,
S Live Oak, FL. For more information, contact Sarah White at 386-362-1725 ext. 102 or sewhitedaufl.edu.

Lee County Tree Farming and Tree Health Workshop, Division ofForestry Office in Fort Myer, FL. Will discuss management
June 16 plans, tree crops to consider; creating a fire safe forest; silvicultural BMP's, and food plot options. $15 fee in advance, $20 at door.
Call Michael Weston at (239) 690-3500 Ext. 118 or email Michael.Westonflfreshfromflorida.com for info.
Hendry County Tree Farming and Tree Health Workshop, UF-IFAS Hendry County Extension in LaBelle,FL. Will discuss
June 26 management plans tree crops to consider; creating a fire safe forest; silvicultural BMP's, and food plot options. $15 fee in advance,
$20 at door. Call Michael Weston at (239) 690-3500 Ext. 118 or email Michael.Westonflfreshfromflorida.com for info.
2011 Florida Small Farms and Alternative Conference, Osceola Heritage Park, Kissimmee, FL. Hosted by University of Florida -
July 15-17
IFAS and Florida A&M University. Details at http://conference.ifas.ufl.edu/smallfarms/index.html.

2011 Wildlife Expo, UF-iFAS West Florida Research and Education Center, Milton, FL. For more information please contact Ms.
Robin Vickers at ( 850) 983-5216 x 113 or rvickersp(ufl.edu

Orchard Management Series Part 4: Summer Orchard Management_UF-IFAS Suwannee Valley Research and Education Center,
ugu ive Oak, FL. For more information, contact Sarah White at 386-362-1725 ext. 102 or sewhitepaufl.edu.

Aug 6 WFREC Extension Farm Field Day, UF-IFAS West Florida Research & Education Center Research Facility, Jay, FL. For more
information please contact Ms. Robin Vickers at ( 850) 983-5216 x 113 or rvickersfaufl.edu



The Florida Forest Steward is a University of Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Florida Division of Forestry and Florida Tree Farm
joint project:

Chris Demers (editor), School of Forest Resources & Conservation, UF, P.O. Box 110410, Gainesville, FL 32611-0410, (352) 846-2375,
cdemers(Aufl. edu
Dr. MichaelAndreu (co-editor), School of Forest Resources & Conservation, UF, (352) 846-0355, mandreu(iufl.edu
Tony Grossman (co-editor), Florida Division of Forestry, 3125 Conner Blvd, Room R2, Tallahassee, FL 32699-1650, (850) 414-9907,
Anthony.Ci ..... 4.. ,,1, ..; .1. .,
Joseph Prenger (co-editor), Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, 2574 Seagate Drive, Tallahassee, FL 32301, (850) 410-5268,
Joe.Prenger(M/vFWC. corn
Jon Gould (co-editor), Florida Tree Farm Committee, 4923 Windwood Circle, Birmingham, AL 35242, (205) 991-9435, gouldih(i.bellsouth.net
Dr. Bill Giuliano (co-editor), Department of Wildlife Ecology & Conservation, UF, PO Box 110430, Gainesville, FL 32611-0430,
(352) 846-0575, docg(aufl.edu




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