Title: CTSI newsletter
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Title: CTSI newsletter
Series Title: CTSI newsletter
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: Clinical and Translational Science Institute, University of Florida
Publisher: Clinical and Translational Science Institute, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: September 2008
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Bibliographic ID: UF00090016
Volume ID: VID00003
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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Training and
Development in the
CTSI: An Overview

Growing Qualified
Faculty: The KL2
Program

Pre-Doctoral T32
Training Program

Clinical Research
Coordinator Train-
ing and Certificate
Programs

Other
Announcements


Next month's newsletter
will feature articles about
the CTSI's Translational
Technologies and Resourc-
es Program. This program
will integrate several of
UF's technology-based
cores, add additional
relevant resources, make
organizational changes,
and improve communica-
tion in order to enhance the
accessibility, quality and
quantity of translational
technologies and resources
available to investigators.


Volume 1, Issue 3 September 2008


INSIDE THIS ISSUE


Clinical and Translational Science Institute University of Florida Gainesville, FL 352.265.8909


This edition of the CTSI Newsletter focuses on strategies designed to
create career paths for and to build a new cadre of multidisciplinary
and interdisciplinary Clinical and Translational Science (CTS) inves-
tigators who will become the CTS leaders of tomorrow. Such highly trained
and sought-after individuals would integrate at various levels in the CTS
workforce, be it in academia, industry or government.

To accomplish this goal, the CTSI has developed a new trans-college
program called the Training and Professional Development (TPD) Program.
The overarching mission of this initiative is to provide educational
opportunities that facilitate the training of clinical and basic science
investigators, clinical trialists, laboratory technicians, study coordinators
and other key personnel who are required to establish and support multi-
and interdisciplinary clinical and translational researchers and research
teams. The program is creating the infrastructure for the education of
pre-collegiate, undergraduate and graduate students and junior faculty
who will comprise this new CTS workforce. It provides a rich portfolio
of interdisciplinary educational opportunities across the continuum from
preclinical training to community practice (Figure). The director of the
program is Dr. Marian Limacher, Professor of Medicine (lmacmc@
medicine.ufl.edu).

The trainees chosen by the TPD program are selected from highly
motivated, talented individuals who will be mentored at every stage of
their early career to become the CTS leaders of tomorrow. The program's
curriculum prepares pre- and post-doctoral trainees and faculty for success
in conducting multi- and interdisciplinary clinical and translational research.

The basis for all programs is a new three-component core curriculum that all
trainees will complete. The new KL2 Program offers Clinical Research (CR)
Scholars (mainly junior faculty members in a health-related profession)
a comprehensive didactic component that consists of core courses and
electives together with extensive practical experiences that will lead to an
MS in CTS, an MS in Epidemiology or a Certificate in CTS.

The new T32 Program, which is described further in this newsletter, offers a
new minor concentration in CTS for pre-doctoral students who are currently
in discipline-focused programs and will also develop a new Ph.D. with a
















Volume 1, Issue 3 September 2008


FROmeIT


major in CTS. The CTS Ph.D. program
crosses department and college bound-
aries to emphasize the interdisciplinary
nature of CTS. Students in professional
doctoral programs are eligible to pursue
a joint MS or Ph.D. in CTS with their
primary MD, DMD, DVM, or PharmD
program.

All investigators and coordinators are
required to complete an Institutional
Review Board (IRB)-based program of
competencies. Coordinators may also
select additional training and experi-
ence under the auspices of the College
of Health and Human Performance that
will lead to a Certificate in Clinical
Research Coordination. Finally, the TPD
Program links with current UF programs
targeting high school and undergraduate
students with interests in science careers
to introduce CTS research options and
partner with campuswide resources at
UF to ensure appropriate enrollment in
all programs by women and underrepre-
sented minorities.

We're looking for trainees, so let us
know you're interested!


Public Medicine
Health &
Hth Prof.


Dentistry I


Engineering


\ /Pr
Pre-Doctoral


MDIDO :


Pharmacy I


Nursing DMD
SPost-Doctoral
Training
Veterinary (Including KL2)
Medicine
K


PhD


Health &
Human
Perform.


Training and Professional Development (TPD) Program. All trainees will
participate in the CTSI Core Curriculum (center white box). Predoctoral
candidates from 12 colleges (yellow) may pursue a PhD with CTS minor or
major emphasis (yellow), CTS certificate or MS degrees (yellow-green).
Post-doctoral candidates (blue) and other professionals (green) may pur-
sue the CTS certificate or MS degrees. Coordinator trainees (orange) will
complete the Coordinator certificate


Peter W. Stacpoole, Ph.D., M.D.
Director, CTSI


Clinical and Translational Science Institute University of Florida Gainesville, FL 352.265.8909


CTS1 Newsletter I














Volume 1, Issue 3 September 2008


Building on success and overcoming barriers to train a new generation of
scientists and clinicians


In 1999, UF was awarded funding to establish its
Advanced Postgraduate Program in Clinical In-
vestigation (APPCI). This Program provides clini-
cal research training in a mentored research setting. As
of Fall 2007, 64 trainees have enrolled in the APPCI,
including 30 women and 34 men, 8 Hispanic, 8 Asian,
4 African-American and 1 Pacific Islander. Trainees
have included MDs (residents, fellows-in-training, and
faculty), PhDs, PharmDs and DMDs, and DOs from
24 departments and 5 colleges across the Health Sci-
ence Center.

Despite the success of the APPCI Program, several
traditional institutional barriers hinder the progress of
clinical and translational research and its expansion
across multiple disciplines. These barriers include the
lack of clear career pathways for junior investigators;
the difficulty clinicians have to commit sufficient time
to research because of patient care duties; insufficient
time for senior faculty to devote to mentoring;
insufficient incentive for investigators to apply for and
lead training programs; the absence of infrastructure
specifically dedicated to clinical research training
in multiple disciplines; and importantly a dearth of
communication and integration among individual
research "silos".

The major limitation of the APPCI training program
has been the inability to provide salary support
and protected time for promising trainees as they
participate in the structured training and research
programs. In addition, resources and offerings
available through the existing training programs have
no mechanism for integration and


cross-communication.

The strong institutional support committed for the
CTSI outlined in letters from Deans of participating
colleges, the Senior Vice President for Health Affairs
and the Vice President for Research ensures that
such barriers will be overcome through the Training
and Professional Development (TPD) Program. UF
institutional support includes sizeable financial and
space resources, new clinical research facilities, the
commitment to allocate time to the CR Scholars and
mentors for the Program, and the plans for promotion
and tenure of CR Scholars, all of which provide the
tools and resources to enhance the communication
and integration of the multidisciplinary components
required for effective training in CTS.

Training and professional development are key
to the mission of the CTSI. The goal is providing
the sort of training that helps all the individuals
working within the CTSI, from support staff through
students at various levels, to junior faculty members.
To reach this goal the TPD Program will provide
educational opportunities and create the infrastructure
for the education of pre-collegiate, undergraduate
and graduate students and junior faculty who will
comprise this new clinical and translational science
(CTS) workforce. The Program will not be a simple,
one-note training exercise, but will provide a wide
variety of interdisciplinary educational opportunities
across a continuum from preclinical training to
community practice. In order to meet the overall goal
of the training program, five individual goals will be
accomplished:


Clinical and Translational Science Institute University of Florida Gainesville, FL 352.265.8909


CTS1 Newsletter I















Volume 1, Issue 3 September 2008


TRAINN AN DE EO M N IN THE C S PRFSINLPSIILTE RNLN R


Create a curriculum of coursework and practical ex-
perience for trainees.
New thinking in clinical research translation requires
a new curriculum and the curriculum within TPD will
prepare pre- and post-doctoral trainees and faculty
for success in conducting multi- and interdisciplinary
clinical and translational research. The new course-
work will revolve around a new three-component Core
Curriculum required of everyone passing through the
program.

Institute a new mentored research career development
program for junior faculty.
Clinical and Translational Science (CTS) is develop-
ing as a collection of disciplines that can be chosen as
a professional concentration unto itself. The program
for junior faculty will offer Clinical Research (CR)
Scholars a comprehensive educational component that
consists of core courses and electives together with ex-
tensive practical experiences that will lead to an MS in
CTS, an MS in Epidemiology or a Certificate in CTS.

Institute a new pre-doctoral training program for
highly qualified students seeking either a PhD degree
in CTS or a doctoral level professional degree (MD,
DMD, DVM, PharmD) combined iith a MS or PhD in
CTS.
This program will develop a new minor concentra-
tion in CTS for pre-doctoral students currently in a
discipline-focused program and will also offer a new
PhD program with a major in CTS. The CTS PhD
program will be independent of department or col-
lege and will emphasize the interdisciplinary nature of
CTS. Students in professional doctoral programs will
be eligible to pursue a joint MS or PhD in CTS with
their primary MD, DMD, DVM, or PharmD program.


Establish a Clinical Research Coordinator training
program. All Coordinators will be required to com-
plete an IRB-based program of competencies. They
may also select additional training and experience un-
der the auspices of the College of Health and Human
Performance that will lead to a Certificate in Clinical
Research Coordination.

Implement a recruitment and retention plan to de-
velop an outstanding cadre ofpre- and post-doctoral
trainees of diverse race, ethnicity and gender In
accomplishing this goal, we will reach out to current
programs targeting high school and undergraduate
students with interests in science careers to introduce
clinical and translational research options, and will
partner with campus-wide resources at UF to ensure
appropriate enrollment in all programs by women and
trainees of minority status.

The TPD Program represents a strong added value to
UF and allows progress in cross-disciplinary training
that otherwise would not be possible. Furthermore, the
CTSI centralized Academic Home and communica-
tion plans will enhance the effects of the TPD's work
and help alleviate the critical deficiencies associated
with the current separate and competing departments,
schools, and divisions that will together make up the
CTSI.


Clinical and Translational Science Institute University of Florida Gainesville, FL 352.265.8909


CTS1 Newsletter I














Volume 1, Issue 3 September 2008


Teaching translational science across disciplines will help create a new genera-
tion of scientists and health-care professionals
The goal of the KL2 Program is to prepare highly motivated and talented junior faculty at UF to work
in multidisciplinary teams, to appreciate that collaboration and teamwork are the expected goals and to
have the skills necessary to work successfully in multidisciplinary clinical and/or translational research.
Trainees of the Program will be known as KL2 Clinical Research (CR) Scholars.


Program Leadership
The KL2 program will be directed by Marco
Pahor, MD, Professor and Chair, Department
of Aging and Geriatric Research and Director
of the UF Institute on Aging. Dr. Pahor is a nation-
ally and internationally known scientist in the areas
of aging, disability and cardiovascular disease in
population-based studies. He has extensive expertise
in leading multidisciplinary research and mentoring
teams and is the Director of the newly NIH-funded
Claude Pepper Older Americans Independence Center
(OAIC), which has a major focus on research career
development and mentoring of junior investigators. He
has a total of 23 years of mentoring and training expe-
rience in clinical research in multidisciplinary settings.

The KL2 Director and the Multidisciplinary Advisory
Committee (MAC) will provide overall scientific
leadership and direction of the Program. They will
assure coordination of resources; communicate
with other CTSI Programs; facilitate compliance
with guidelines and regulations regarding fiscal
policy, human subject and animal care and use; set
productivity benchmarks; monitor progress; and
promote productivity and efficiency.


Requirements for Candidates

We expect that the vast majority of eligible
candidates to the KL2 Program will be rela-
tively junior faculty on tenure-track lines.
CR Scholar candidates must have a clinical doctorate
or PhD degree or its equivalent in health sciences, be
a US citizen or permanent resident, be able to commit
at least 50-75 percent of full-time professional effort
in the Program and its related clinical research activi-
ties and not be or have been a Principal Investigator,
except for R03 and R21 awards.

The CR Scholar selection process will follow the NIH
review format. The Program Director will assign a
primary and two secondary reviewers chosen from
the MAC. An additional external reviewer may be
appointed, if needed. All applications will be discussed
and scored according to the following criteria:


(This article continues on Page 6)


Clinical and Translational Science Institute University of Florida Gainesville, FL 352.265.8909


CTS1 Newsletter I















Volume 1, Issue 3 September 2008


GRO ING QUALIFIED FACULTY: THE KL2 PROGRAM FRANKLIN, JR.


The CR Scholar selection process will follow the NIH
review format. The Program Director will assign a
primary and two secondary reviewers chosen from
the MAC. An additional external reviewer may be
appointed, if needed. All applications will be discussed
and scored according to the following criteria:

* Scholarly record: excellence, expertise and
multidisciplinary scope in prior training, funded
research, publications and other written material
(100 points);
* Training and mentoring plan: multidisciplinary
scope, team approach appropriateness of the
career plan, training plan, quality and appro-
priateness of mentors, personal statement and
recommendation letters (100 points);
* Career: potential to become an independent
investigator, a leader and a team player in multi-
disciplinary clinical research (100 points);
* Research plan: scientific merit, multidisciplinary
team clinical research scope, feasibility of the
research plan, utilization of resources (100
points);
* Departmental support: level of support from the
Scholar's home department to develop a career
in multidisciplinary clinical research, and labo-
ratory and other infrastructure support (100
points).

Based on the information provided in the applica-
tion process, the MAC will assign each CR Scholar
a mentoring team composed of primary and second-
ary mentors and at least one MAC member. During
the second program year, incoming CR Scholars will
also be assigned a senior CR Scholar as part of their
mentoring team which will ensure that the senior CR
Scholar will acquire mentoring expertise, an important
part of the training experience.


The Mentor's Importance

A close relationship between the CR Scholars
and their mentors is essential for fostering the
development of a successful research career.
Mentors play a critical role in transmitting to the CR
Scholars the high value placed on scientific integrity
through role-modeling. A major factor in the selection
of the mentors is their ability to convey the importance
of scientific ethics and integrity. The primary mentor
will be responsible for:

* advising the CR Scholars about the TPD core
curriculum and elective courses and the degree
requirements for the KL2 program;
* identifying the resources required for the train-
ees to accomplish their research;
* helping CR Scholars identify research team mem-
bers;
* monitoring research progress for critical mile-
stones including course completion, scientific
presentations, publications and applying for
extramural funding;
* academic strategic career planning; and
* facilitating professional development contacts
within the institution and nationally.

The primary mentor will meet twice per month with
the CR Scholar and more frequently as needed. The
CR Scholar will meet monthly with the full mentor-
ing team including the senior CR Scholar appointed to
the team. Primary mentors provide written and verbal
input during the final tenure and promotion review.

The new core curriculum for CTS will integrate train-
ees across disciplines and encourage novel research
focusing on medically-important questions. The avail-
ability of research experiences and successful mentors


Clinical and Translational Science Institute University of Florida Gainesville, FL 352.265.8909


Ctinica and Tanstatonat Scence Istitut














Volume 1, Issue 3 September 2008


GRO IN A FACUL THE m m PROGRAM FRANKLIN, JR.


will provide high quality experiences for all levels
of trainees participating in multidisciplinary research
teams. Another innovative feature of the CTSI is the
involvement of department chairpersons of the par-
ticipating colleges in the recruitment, promotion and
tenure of the CTSI trainees. Department chairpersons
play a critical role in fostering the academic careers
of clinical investigators working in multidisciplinary
settings. To ensure that the TPD Program is integrated
at the departmental level in the colleges of the Health
Science Center, the chairs are involved in several


program aspects including: collaborating with the TPD
Program in recruiting promising trainees and junior
faculty; providing input into the trainees' selection of
mentors; and incorporating written and verbal input
from mentors and the TOC into the tenure and promo-
tion process for CR Scholars who are junior faculty.
All department chairs have agreed to incorporate in-
formation about the faculty CR Scholar's performance
into the discussion and decision-making about tenure
and promotion.


Clinical and Translational Science Institute University of Florida Gainesville, FL 352.265.8909


CTS1 Newsletter I















Volume 1, Issue 3 September 2008


*~ ~* BY


Traditionally, researchers have been involved
in only a single aspect of medicine: They have
either cared for patients or conducted basic
science investigations into the diseases making them
ill. Recognizing the need to help speed these basic
science investigations into treatments that can be used
more effectively in patients, CTSI leaders will launch
a new program aimed at training clinical and trans-
lational science (CTS) investigators for the dual role
they'll play in both facets of this transfer from bench
to bedside.

UF and the CTSI are responding to these challenges
by creating a foundation on which to build the CTS
discipline across campus by instituting a new pre-doc-
toral T32 training program that will initially include
a universitywide doctoral degree interdisciplinary
concentration minor in CTS, and a full CTS Ph.D. de-
gree program within five years. Once the CTS minor
receives official UF approval, the average amount of
time for doctoral students to receive their degrees with
the CTS minor will be five to six years.
The goals of the T32 program will be to prepare
trainees from departments in 12 colleges campuswide,
including many outside the Health Science Center, to
work in multidisciplinary teams, to help them embrace
the idea of collaboration and teamwork as expected
goals, and to provide them with the skills necessary to
successfully conduct interdisciplinary CTS research.
One of the basic tenants of the CTS model is to train
students to consider in more broad terms how their
"non-traditional" backgrounds in the arts, humanities
and social sciences make them ideally suited to fill an
important void in population-based and health policy
domains of expertise required to complete the "bench-
to-bedside-to-community" mission of translational
medicine.


Critically important to this transformation is that the
T32 program will expose graduate students from disci-
plines across campus to the fundamental principles of
CTS. The program, to be co-directed by Drs. Stephen
Hsu, M.D., Ph.D., and Wayne T. McCormack, Ph.D.,
also will augment UF's existing doctoral curricula by
affiliating students with a focused group of CTS facul-
ty mentors and by providing advanced courses, journal
clubs and seminars aimed at enhancing their transla-
tional knowledge and experiences. Hsu, an interna-
tionally recognized multidisciplinary clinician and
scientist, is the R. Glenn Davis Associate Professor
of Clinical and Translational Medicine in the College
of Medicine's Division of Nephrology, Hypertension
and Renal Transplantation and the director of UF's
MD/PhD Program. McCormack has been involved in
virtually every facet of graduate program planning,
curriculum development, recruiting, admissions and
administration, having served as the UF College of
Medicine Associate Dean for Graduate Education,
as Ph.D. program director and as MD/PhD program
co-director. He is also active nationally in biomedical
science graduate education, serving in leadership posi-
tions in the AAMC Graduate Research, Education and
Training (GREAT) Group. Hsu and McCormack will
be provided input and guidance on all aspects of the
program by a Training Advisory Committee consisting
of leadership representatives from all 12 CTSI-affiliat-
ed colleges.

The T32 program will train highly qualified students
seeking either a Ph.D. in CTS or a dual doctoral level
professional degree (MD, DMD, DVM, PharmD)
combined with a master's or doctorate in CTS. The
MD/PhD program already began implementing the
program this summer by enrolling several trainees
in an Introduction to Clinical/Translational Science
course. Full implementation of and recruitment for the


Clinical and Translational Science Institute University of Florida Gainesville, FL 352.265.8909


Ctinica and Tanstatonat Scence Istitut














Volume 1, Issue 3 September 2008


*~ ~* BY


T32 program is expected to begin in the summer of
2010 in anticipation of award monies to support four
pre-doctoral trainees in the program annually through
the National Institutes of Health's CTS funding mech-
anism. UF will also provide funding to help support
those who are selected for the program. Ph.D. students
enrolled in the program will be able to apply for T32
funding during their first year of graduate study for
support during their second and third years.

Students will be recruited through traditional activi-
ties and through special "feeder" programs targeting
students in high school and early in their college and
graduate educations. Like students participating in
other CTSI Training and Professional Development
programs, T32 trainees will be required to complete
the core curriculum. Advanced elective coursework
relevant to CTS will emphasize communication skills
and professional development, and trainees will be
able to participate in career development seminars and
workshops, covering issues such as laboratory man-
agement, literature studies, budgeting, conflict resolu-


tion, teamwork, intellectual property, entrepreneurship
and mentorship skills.

Most Ph.D. students in the program also will com-
plete rotations in the laboratories of potential men-
tors, who will be nationally recognized UF faculty
members from major disciplines, centers, institutes
and programs. Each student will be co-mentored by
at least one basic scientist and one clinician-scientist
who will serve as co-chairs of the student's graduate
supervisory committee. An off-campus expert will be
appointed to function as an external member of the
trainee's graduate committee and who can serve as a
key contact for future study and networking.

The CTSI also hopes to broaden awareness and ap-
preciation of CTS by educating and engaging both
non-academic professionals and the public, and in the
future will adapt elements of the program for distance
education via the Internet in an effort to transfer CTS
knowledge and ideals to anyone anywhere in the
world.


For more information on these training programs, contact: Dr. Stephen I.
Hsu, stephen.hsu@medicine.ufl.edu, (352) 273-7987 or (352) 273-6888; or
Dr. Wayne McCormack, mccormac@pathology.ufl.edu, (352) 273-8603.


Dr. Stephen I. Hsu
stephen. hsu@medicine. ufl. edu
(352) 273-7987


Dr. Wayne McCormack
mccormac@pathology. ufl. edu
(352) 273-8603


Clinical and Translational Science Institute University of Florida Gainesville, FL 352.265.8909


CTS1 Newsletter I















Volume 1, Issue 3 September 2008


CLIICA REEAC CORDNAO TRINN AN CETFCT PRGRM BY. .A A


A clinical research trial aimed at finding a
new therapy or a cure for a disease or con-
dition is a complicated, arduous and exact-
ing undertaking. The investigators involved must be
experts not only in the science behind what they are
testing and in tracking their participants, but they must
also carry out a host of time-consuming administrative
tasks.

So they can spend more time on the specifics of
their trial protocols, researchers hire clinical trial
coordinators when possible to assist with some
of these duties, including screening, recruitment,
submitting required regulatory documents and
conducting study visits. However, these highly
sought-after coordinators are in short supply at UF
and nationwide a problem CTSI officials expect
to address by instituting a new Clinical Research
Coordinator Training Program.

The most successful clinical research studies are
conducted by researchers who have protected time
from clinical responsibilities and researchers who have
trained, experienced research coordinators, said Teresa
d'Angelo RN, nurse manager of UF's General Clinical
Research Center (GCRC) and one of the two people
who developed the new training program. "A good
study coordinator can make the difference between a
successful study and an unsuccessful study."

D'Angelo, who has worked for 5 years managing
the GCRC where most of UF's investigator initiated
clinical trials are conducted, and James Cauraugh
PhD, a professor and the associate dean of research
for the College of Health and Human Performance,
will oversee the new Clinical Research Coordinator
Certificate program. The nine- to 12-month-long
curriculum will help ensure the smooth progression


and success of clinical trials by training coordinators
in necessary skills, such as screening and recruitment,
consenting, budgeting, maintaining source documents,
submitting regulatory documents, conducting study
visits, preparing laboratory specimens and planning
for site visits by trial sponsors and monitors.

Nurses and other health professionals, such as
dieticians, psychologists, respiratory therapists,
exercise physiologists and health educators, with
undergraduate degrees are eligible to be trained under
the program. In addition, the curriculum will be made
available to coordinators hired to work with CTSI
projects and to investigators. As the program develops,
nurses and other health professionals with associate's
degrees will also be able to enroll in the curriculum.

"People fall into these coordinator positions and don't
have the necessary training" because opportunities for
training are lacking, d'Angelo said. They learn the job
through "trial by fire" and that's not the best way.

"And we can make it easier for them" through this
program, Cauraugh said.

The training has already begun with a pilot project
d'Angelo instituted in January 2007 with one of
her nurses. Three nurses have now completed the
curriculum and have worked part time as coordinators
with UF investigator-led trials while also continuing to
work part time as nurses caring for research subjects
on the GCRC.




(This article continues on Page 11)


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II New slette















Volume 1, Issue 3 September 2008


All coordinators and investigators
working with CTSI-funded projects
will be required to complete a new
IRB Competency Program. This
Collaborative IRB Training Initiative
(CITI) is an Internet-based program
developed with NIH funds that
addresses Good Clinical Practice in
research. Coordinators participating
in the Clinical Research Coordinator
Certificate Program must take
additional training. Trainees must
participate in the UF course called
"Introduction to Clinical and
Translational Sciences," one of the
CTSI's core classes, as well as an 8 -
10 week evening course in "Research
Methods and Experimental Design"
offered by the College of Health and
Human Performance. These trainees
also will participate in laboratory
experiences in one of several of Pamela Schreck RN, MSN (Left) functioned as a mentor to Janet King RN (seated)
the College of Health and Human and Glenna Paguio RN, BSN, while they were enrolled in the Clinical Research
Coordinator Training Program. Schreck is the assistant director for clinical pro-
grams for Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine at UF. King and Paguio are both
physiology laboratories. Finally, staff nurses on the General Clinical Research Center.
trainees will become involved in a
mentored internship/practicum in
one of the CTSI's Clinical Research Units (CRUs). An important goal of this program is to match a trainee's
interests to the experiences offered by a UF mentor.

Through this training program we'll be able to facilitate the interaction of research being conducted all
across UF, Cauraugh said, "and then maybe the science will go quicker from this research arena out into the
community."


Clinical and Translational Science Institute University of Florida Gainesville, FL 352.265.8909


CTS1 Newsletter I
















Volume 1, Issue 3 September 2008


OT E AN O N E NTI


New NIH Initiative: Translational
ROls

As part of its Roadmap for Biomedical Research, the Na-
tional Institutes of Health announced on September 9 it was
accepting applications for transformative Research Proj-
ect Grants (R01) for exceptionally innovative, high risk,
original and/or unconventional research with the potential
to create new or challenge existing scientific paradigms.
Projects must clearly demonstrate potential to produce a
major impact in a broad area of biomedical or behavioral
research. The NIH intends to commit $25 million dol-
lars in FY 2009 to fund up to 60 applications submitted in
response to this FOA. Application deadline is January 29,
2009. Additional general information can be found at
http://www.grants.gov/search/search.do?&mode=VIEW&f
lag2006=true&oppld=18350, and the complete announce-
ment is available at http://grants.nih. ,, ,,it, :.,. ,. ,I-
j/.. *. i '.\-i' \l-r,'-029.html.




Subscribe to the CTSI Newsletter

For a few months now the Newsletter has been sent out
to many faculty and staff. While we will continue to do
this for a while, you can ensure that you receive future
editions of the Newsletter by subscribing to the CTSI-
ANNOUNCE-L Listserv. It's quick and easy to do and will
ensure that you also receive other CTSI announcements as
they are distributed. To subscribe, simply send an email to
listserv@lists.ufl.edu with the message:

SUBSCRIBE CTSI-ANNOUNCE-L your-first-
name your-last-name


NIH Peer Review Improvement
Timeline Announced

The National Institutes of Health announced on Friday its
initial implementation timeline for various initiatives aimed
at enhancing the NIH peer review system. The initiatives
are a result of a process begun in June 2007 involving
external and internal working groups. Among the initiatives
and their implementation dates:

* Review criteria-based scoring on a 1 to 7 scale will
commence in May 2009
* A shorter (12-page research plan) R01 application
(with other activity codes scaled appropriately) will
be restructured to align with review criteria for Janu-
ary 2010 receipt dates.

The NIH notice also reported, "To ensure that the largest
number of high quality and meritorious applications receive
funding earlier and to improve system efficiency, NIH is
considering separate percentiling of new and resubmitted
applications and permitting one amended application."

Lastly, the NIH announced it will establish an Early Stage
Investigator (ESI) designation. In 2009, NIH will evaluate
clustering ESI applications for review. The same approach
will be considered for clinical research applications. The
Advisory Committee to the Director recommended piloting
the clustered review and ranking of early investigator ap-
plications. The ACD did not recommend clustering clinical
research applications and the consideration of such a move
surprised some observers.

For more information, visit: http://grants.nih.gov/grants/
guide/notice-files/NOT-OD-08-118.html


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