Title: CTSI newsletter
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Title: CTSI newsletter
Series Title: CTSI newsletter
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: Clinical and Translational Science Institute, University of Florida
Publisher: Clinical and Translational Science Institute, University of Florida
Place of Publication: Gainesville, Fla.
Publication Date: August 2008
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Volume ID: VID00002
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
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A New RFA!

Dates to Remember

Who's Eligible?

Some Helpful
Resources


The September newsletter
will feature articles about
the center's Training and
Professional Development
Program, which will pro-
vide educational opportu-
nities for individuals who
will comprise the future
clinical and translational
science (CTS) workforce.
These opportunities will
be available for highly
motivated, talented indi-
viduals starting as early
as high school, as well as
undergraduate and graduate
students and junior faculty,
who will be mentored at
every stage of their early
careers to become the in-
vestigators, clinical trial-
ists, laboratory technicians,
study coordinators and
CTS leaders of tomorrow.


Volume 1, Issue 2 August 2008


Me TE DIRR


Welcome to the second issue of the new
CTSI Newsletter. This will be a short
Director's Note because there is so
much other information here, and a short time for
you to act. The CTSI has grant money available
for members of the CTSI community including
many members who have never been eligible for
grants before.


In the last newsletter we talked about the ways M
that the CTSI is different how its mission and
organization are new. With these grants, we're putting real resources behind
the talk and working to see the CTSI makes a difference in the work of the
research and clinical communities from Day One.

If you have been thinking about translational research, this could be the per-
fect opportunity for initial funding. Look at the information and examples in
this issue, and start working on your proposals now. The staff is here to help,
so don't be afraid to call -just don't wait too long.

We're looking forward to a truly superb response to this initial RFA from the
CTSI's Pilot and Collaborative Project Program we know that the mem-
bers of the research and clinical communities at the University of Florida are
among the most creative in the world.

Good luck!


Peter W. Stacpoole, Ph.D., M.D.
Director, CTSI


Clinical and Translational Science Institute University of Florida Gainesville, FL 352.265.8909


INSIDE THIS ISSUE














Volume 1, Issue 2 -August 2008


ANE A


The CTSI's Pilot and Collaborative Research Projects Program


How early in the investigation and research
process can you decide whether the researcher
is on a fruitful path? How does one gauge
whether to risk investing in a researcher's idea long
before it evolves into a substantive proposal for ex-
tramural funding? These questions frame a recurring
dilemma for division chiefs, department chairs, center
and institute directors and college deans: how to con-
tinuously nurture creativity among trainees and faculty
while maintaining their fiduciary responsibilities to a
broader constituency. These questions are particular
relevant to academia today, when federal support for
investigator-initiated biomedical research is at low
ebb.

Administrators can't afford to let their spending priori-
ties be set by the constantly-shifting winds of extra-
mural funding. Indeed, periods of relative drought in
federal awards are precisely those times that demand
significant and sustained internal support of faculty
and trainees to maximize their competitiveness for
extramural funding. Accordingly, UF is committed to
encouraging and enabling the development of promis-
ing but nascent projects across a broad spectrum of
scientific endeavors by CTSI investigators. We intend
to grow this program substantially in future years
from both institutional and extramural sources through
twice-yearly Request for Applications (RFAs) an-
nounced through this Newsletter. This fall, we begin
by providing seed funds allocated among the follow-
ing categories:


Category 1: To increase opportunities to transform
exciting and innovative CTS ideas by graduate stu-
dents and junior faculty into proof of concept, we will
provide up to $50,000 in new pilot grant awards and
encourage competitive proposals from trainees early in
their research careers.

Category 2: To encourage development of novel
methods and technologies relevant to CTS, the CTSI
faculty and mentored trainees will be eligible to
compete for awards totaling up to $50,000 to support
fundamentally new methodological (e.g., biostatistics,
ethics) or technological (e.g., medical device, analyti-
cal instrumentation) developments.

Category 3: To stimulate interdisciplinary research in
CTS through the CTSI's Major Initiatives Program,
by providing up to $150,000 and a new mechanism to
forge collaborations among new and established inves-
tigators across scientific disciplines. The expectation
is that the success of this program will increase UF's
ability to garner large extramural grants and contacts
based on interdisciplinary CTS.

Continued on page 3.


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CTS1 Newsletter I














Volume 1, Issue 2 -August 2008


ANE A


Translational Funding Opportunities

To receive consideration for funding, research
proposals must focus on the translation of pre-
clinical studies to humans (T1) or the transla-
tion of clinical research/clinical trials to community
engagement and clinical practice (T2). Individual pilot
proposals from graduate students and Clinical Schol-
ars must reflect a new research approach or direction
for the applicant, not originally identified or consid-
ered in his or her initial research plan. In other words,
the funds sought through this program must help
transform the investigator's original scope of research,
including its anticipated outcomes. This year's alloca-
tion of funds is summarized in Table 1.


Pilot Project Review

Each review will be conducted by primary and
secondary reviewers who will be members of
the Program's Executive Advisory Committee
(Table 2 on page 4).

If an award is made through the Pilot and Collabora-
tive Projects Program, the awardee then works with
the Office of Budget Development and Negotiations to
finalize the allocation of the awarded funds and sets in
place a tracking system to maintain communication
with the investigator regarding the timing of the initial
of the grant and its progress. Each awardee is required
to submit an annual progress report to the Institute,
which will consider requests for up to a one year no
cost extension of the original award.


Table 1. Funding Categories for CTSI Pilot and Collaborative Projects.

Available Funding ceiling/ Estimated max. # new
Areas o Support Funds' project projects this yr

Student $15,000 $7,500 2
Junior Faculty $35,000 $20,000 2
Novel Methods & Technologies $50,000 $25,000 2
Major Initiatives2 $150,000 $100,000 2

1 One year awards, i/ iih no-cost carryover in year 2 possible.
2Minimum of 2 PIs from different colleges.


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Volume 1, Issue 2 -August 2008


A A


Table 2. Pilot and Collaborative Projects Program Executive Committee.


Member
Peter Stacpoole (co-director)
N. Lawrence Edwards (co-director)
Christopher Batich
Michael Conlon
R. Peter lafrate
Marian Limacher
Jesse Gregory


Role in CTSI
Director, CTSI
Chair, Scientific Advisory Committee
Associate Director, Operations
Associate Director, Biomedical Informatics
Director, Regulatory Knowledge and Research Support Program
Director, Training and Professional Development Program
Director, Translational Technologies and Resources Program


I DATE TOEMEBERI


Deadline of Electronic Submission to
CTSI (caputcl@medicine. ufl.edu)
September 26, 2008

Proposal Review
September 30, 2008

Award Announcements
October 6, 2008

Earliest Date of Funding
November 1, 2008


Clinical and Translational Science Institute University of Florida Gainesville, FL 352.265.8909


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Volume 1, Issue 2 -August 2008


WOS ELGBLE


A Familiar Format

Proposals to the Pilot and Collaborative Proj-
ects Program will share a common format that
is similar to those currently used by the GCRC
and the UF Opportunity Fund. An Abstract should
summarize the proposed work. Proposals can include
up to 5 pages, according to the NIH R01 format, to
describe:

1. Hypotheses and Specific Aims;
2. Preliminary Studies;
3. Design and Methodologies (including statistical
considerations and need for specific CTSI re-
sources (e.g., technology cores; patient re-
search venues, etc.)).

An NIH-formatted list of References must be append-
ed, followed by a list of the individuals to be involved
in the project and details of their participation. In the
case of applicants who are being mentored (gradu-
ate students and K 30 Clinical Scholars), a one-half
to one page summary of the Mentoring Plan and the
mentoring environments) is required. A detailed
Budget and Justification of expenses can include all
normally allowable costs of research (including meet-
ings with off-campus collaborators) with the exception
of faculty salaries, student stipends and indirect costs.
A specific start date not later than February 1, 2009
should be given. If none is specified, the Program will
assume a start date one month after award notifica-
tion, or approximately two months after the receipt of
applications.

Each applicant must also describe, in up to one page,
plans to obtain continuing external support (in the case
of Major Initiatives), to use Program funds in further-
ing career objectives (students and Clinical Scholars),


or to develop the commercial potential of new meth-
ods or technologies developed with Program support.
This latter description should include a statement of
potential market size and how funding could increase
the marketability of the technology.

Consistent Evaluation

A applications will be scored on the following
criteria:


1. originality and innovation;
2. significance in the field of study;
3. relationship of the proposal to the current re-
search direction of the applicant;
4. likelihood of meeting stated aims within 1-2
years;
5. research environment (including qualifications of
mentors, if applicable); and
6. plans for future funding (not required of gradu-
ate students).

Proposals will be assigned priority scores according
to NIH guidelines; the appropriateness of the budget
request will not be a factor in determining the priority
score. A brief Summary Statement will be provided
each applicant that identifies strengths and weak-
nesses of the application and the allocation of funds,
if awarded. A composite priority score is generated
that will serve as a means of prioritizing applications.
Generally, only those proposals that receive a priority
score in the "Outstanding" (<150) or "Excellent" (151-
200) range will be considered for funding. Thus, it is
possible that less than the minimum number of awards
per category may be made in any year. Revised appli-
cations may be submitted twice.


Clinical and Translational Science Institute University of Florida Gainesville, FL 352.265.8909


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Volume 1, Issue 2 -August 2008


WOS ELGBLE


Students


Graduate students who have been engaged
for at least 1 year in a terminal certificate or
degree program will be eligible to compete for
a one-time individual pilot grant award of up to $7,500
each. Students must be conducting research under
the auspices of one or more members of the CTSI's
Mentoring Core of faculty who represent the 12 col-
leges currently participating in the CTSI. Members
of the Mentoring Core were carefully chosen by their
deans and their college's CTSI Steering and Planning
Committee representatives to undertake this mentoring
role. The mentors, and their email addresses, can be
found in Table 3 on page 11. More faculty undoubt-
edly will join this core over time.

Individuals seeking a Clinical Research Coordinator
certificate or an MS, MPH or PhD with an emphasis
in CTS (including those enrolled in a T32 program)
are eligible to apply. Moreover, the Program's Men-
toring Core of faculty also has one graduate student
representative from each participating CTSI college
as ex officio members of the Core. For the purposes of
pilot project internal award competition, one student
representative will be assigned as a tertiary reviewer
for each application. This individual will evaluate the
mentoring environment of the applicant and the merit
of the applicant's use of the requested funds to further
his or her research objectives.

The CTSI is committed to providing enhanced oppor-
tunities to underrepresented ethnic and racial minori-
ties (women are already extremely well-represented
at all levels of graduate study at UF). Therefore, the
Program intends to earmark in future years at least
one award per year for talented minority graduate


student applicants and at least one award per year
for talented minority Clinical Scholar applicants.
Furthermore, to encourage and promote community-
based studies in pediatrics, the Program will earmark
at least one awardper year for a graduate student and
one awardper year for a Clinical Scholar to conduct
research in this area.


An Example of a Student Proposal

For her thesis project, a graduate student is
conducting T1 (bench to bedside) research by
developing a knockdown of a gene, using small,
interfering RNA, to create an animal model of an
embryonic lethal human genetic disease. During
the course of her experiments, she learns of new
insights into the behavioral phenotype of affected
humans from recently published literature. This
causes her to reassess a previously neglected as-
pect of her original plan to investigate genotype-
phenotype relationships in her animal model.
From consultation with the CTSI's Biobehavioral
Core (contact: Dr. Sara Jo Nixon at: sjnixon@
ufl.edu), she learns about validated experimental
behavior testing methods that could be applied
to extend her characterization of the animals and
better determine their applicability as a model
of human disease. She applies to the Pilot and
Collaborative Projects Program for funding to
support the costs of obtaining relevant expert
faculty guidance and use of equipment in the
Biobehavioral Core to facilitate this new research
objective.


Clinical and Translational Science Institute University of Florida Gainesville, FL 352.265.8909


Ctinica and Tanstatonat Scence Istitut














Volume 1, Issue 2 -August 2008


Junior Faculty

Tenure-track faculty at the Assistant or early Associate Professor level who have been enrolled in the
CTSI Clinical Research Scholars Program (currently restricted to those enrolled in UF's K30 APPCI Pro-
gram) for at least 6 months or who have an active NIH 'K' award are eligible to compete for a one-time
award of up to $20,000. Clinical Scholars must be conducting mentored research toward an MS, MPH or PhD
in CTS. Trainees early in their career gain first-hand experience in the process of grant writing and grant review
involving their own research.



An Example of a Junior Faculty Member Proposal


A Clinical Research Scholar in Gainesville is
investigating the kinetics and biotransformation of
a pro-drug used in the treatment of hypertension.
As part of his original proposal for the CR Scholars
program, he has identified a novel glutathione trans-
ferase (GST) in human liver that is responsible for
the conversion of the pro-drug to its active metabo-
lite. During this process, he discovers three iso-
forms of the gene that, by using the resources of the
CTSI DNA/Tissue Bank Core (contact: Dr. James
Crawford at: Crawford@pathology.ufl.edu), appear
to be unequally distributed among different ethnic
and racial groups. Further in vitro studies by the
investigator determine significant differences in the
Km and Vmax for the pro-drug among the 3 GST iso-
forms. Although his original intent was to conduct
limited pharmacokinetic studies in a few subjects in
the GCRC at Shands Hospital on the


Gainesville campus, he now recognizes the potential
of extending these studies across ethnic and racial
groups. After consulting with the CTSI's Communi-
ty Engagement and Research Program (contact: Dr.
Elizabeth Shenkman at: eas@ichp.ufl.edu) and the
Pharmacogenomics Core (contact; Dr. Julie Johnson
at: Johnson@cop.ufl.edu) he submits a proposal
to the Pilot and Collaborative Projects Program to
fund an extension of his patient-oriented research
to the CTSI's Clinical Research Unit on the Jack-
sonville campus (contact: Dr. Alan Berger at: alan.
berger@jax.ufl.edu). This strategy to strengthen his
T2 (clinical research to community engagement)
investigations will allow him to engage a wide
and a diverse community in participatory research
involving population genotyping and recruitment
of subjects on both UF campuses to examine ethnic
and racial differences in drug metabolism.


Clinical and Translational Science Institute University of Florida Gainesville, FL 352.265.8909


CTS1 Newsletter I













Volume 1, Issue 2 -August 2008


Novel Technologies and Methodologies
C TSI faculty and mentored graduate students are eligible to compete for awards of up to $25,000 each.
Unlike one-time individual pilot awards to graduate students or Clinical Scholars, an applicant is eligi-
ble to receive successive awards to support fundamentally new research projects in methodological (e.g.,
biostatistical, ethics) or technological (e.g., medical device, analytical instrumentation) development, providing
awards are spaced at least 3 years apart.


An Example of a Novel Technologies and Methodologies Proposal


A CTSI biostatistician is assisting a Clinical Schol-
ar who is an Assistant Professor in the
Department of Anesthesiology. The investigator is
PI on a clinical trial designed to shorten hospital
stays of patients undergoing total hip replacement
surgery by employing a combination of continu-
ous femoral nerve blocks and aggressive physical
therapy. This is important T2 research because, as
hospitals and outpatient surgical centers become
increasingly able to provide 24/7 monitoring for pa-
tients, the time to meeting discharge criteria is now
a continuous outcome variable. Further, because
some patients never meet these discharge criteria
(some may need to be discharged before meeting
them, some may need further unexpected care, or
a small number may die in hospital), the right-cen-
sored nature of the data precludes the use of ordi-
nary parametric statistics. Consequently, the


biostatistician applies under the auspices of the
Novel Methods and Technologies program to fund
the development of new software to analyze trial
data of this type and to address two previously un-
solved problems whose solutions would be impor-
tant in conducting hospital discharge-related trials:
1) can the proposed methods be extended to account
for covariates; and 2) can the methods accommo-
date random effects? Both problems would make
excellent thesis topics for future graduate students
who seek PhDs in Biostatistics with an emphasis in
CTS (the CTSI's T32 program; Section 12). Thus,
such a proposal links the initial investment of sup-
port of the biostatistician with new opportunities for
training in T2 research.


Clinical and Translational Science Institute University of Florida Gainesville, FL 352.265.8909


CTS1 Newsletter I














Volume 1, Issue 2 -August 2008


Interdisciplinary Research in CTS through the CTSI's Major Initiatives Program
Tenured and tenure-track faculty who form an interdisciplinary collaboration are eligible to compete as
multiple PIs for 2-year awards of up to $100,000 in total costs. Applicants are eligible to receive succes-
sive awards as PIs to support fundamental new projects in CTS, providing awards are spaced at least 4
years apart.


An Example of a Major Initiatives Program Proposal


A group of faculty members from various disci-
plines in the Departments of Food Science and
Human Nutrition, Biomedical Engineering, Pe-
diatrics and Chemistry decide to collaborate on a
study of the neurological basis, metabolic profile
and treatment of refractory epilepsy in children. The
engineer has patented a new instrument for record-
ing electrical brain activity that provides superior
computer-assisted discriminatory power in differen-
tiating subtle epileptiform spikes from other wave
patterns. The pediatric neurologist runs a regional
clinic for epilepsy and has conducted prior research
on patients using the sleep-study room in the GCRC
(contact: Dr. Peter Stacpoole at: stacpool@gcrc.ufl.
edu). The food scientist has also used the GCRC to
investigate the effects of ketogenic diets of various
fatty acid compositions on patient tolerability and
seizure frequency by collaborating with the neurolo-
gist. The analytical chemist has developed novel
mass spectrometric techniques to create metabolite
'platforms,' by which quantitative information can
be obtained from plasma and skin fibroblasts or
other tissues regarding mitochondrial pathways of
fuel metabolism.

Although distinguished in their own fields ofT1I
research, previous interactions among these


investigators have been limited. The engineer uses
the registry of faculty researchers maintained by the
CTSI's Research Portal (still a work in progress!)
to initiate contact with the other investigators. The
team eventually develops a proposal for a Major
Initiative submission to the Pilot and Collaborative
Projects Program to generate preliminary studies
and to show a track record of collaboration in prepa-
ration for an eventual Program Project or large R01
application. In their proposal they request support
to conduct proof-of-concept studies in the GCRC
on the application of the new electroencephalo-
graphic device and on the effects of ketogenic diets
on seizure activity in relation to both dietary fatty
acid composition and metabolic changes in patients'
plasma and cultured cells. Funds are requested for
consultative support from the CTSI's Research
Design and Analysis Program, the Clinical and Re-
search Ethics Program and the Metabolomics Core
(contact: Dr. David Powell at: (powell@chem.ufl.
edu) and funds to hire a part-time Clinical Research
Coordinator (contact: Ms. Teresa D'angelo, RN, at:
danget@shands.ufl.edu), purchase laboratory sup-
plies and cover routine ancillary patient care costs.
They also request travel funds to present their initial
findings at a national pediatric neurology meeting.


Clinical and Translational Science Institute University of Florida Gainesville, FL 352.265.8909


CTS1 Newsletter I














Volume 1, Issue 2 -August 2008


SOM H


Useful CTSI Programs for Grant Proposals


n the first CTSI Newsletter, we summarized
the various programs that are coming on-line to
facilitate CTS research. For the purposes of this
inaugural CTSI Request For Applications (RFA), some
relevant Institute resources include the following:

The Office of Regulatory Affairs and Licensing pro-
vides for assistance in facilitating research and train-
ing in FDA-compliant matters of investigational
drugs, biologics, nanoparticles and devices. This office
provides full-service consultations on all regulatory
matters and will assist the investigator in writing ap-
propriate IND and IDE applications, when required.
Contact Dr. Wajeeh Bajwa at: bajwaw@gcrc.ufl.edu.

The applicant may also engage the resources of the
Office of Budget Development and Negotiations. This
office will assist in constructing a budget for the pro-
posal within the guidelines established by the Pilot and
Collaborative Projects Program. Contact Ms. Candy
Caputo at: caputcl@medicine.ufl.edu.

If the proposed pilot project includes research involv-
ing vertebrate animals or clinical research (as defined
by NIH guidelines), the investigator may solicit advice
from the Clinical and Research Ethics Program. This
program includes experts in all aspects of the ethical
conduct of animal and human research; the ethics of
drug production, distribution and use; the practices
and procedures of IRBs and IACUCs; and related in-
formation essential to crafting a proposal and consent
form consistent with local and federal ethical and


regulatory guidelines. Contact Bob Kolb, RN, CCRC
at: kolbb@gcrc.ufl.edu.

In addition, the applicant may also require further
consultation from the Research Design and Analysis
Program (RDAP) and the Biomedical Informatics Pro-
gram (BMIP) to ensure hypotheses are based on valid
study design and biostatistical considerations and that
appropriate informatics resources are available for the
acquisition, management and analysis of data. Contact
Dr. Keith Muller at: keith.muller@biostat.ufl.edu for
the RDAP and Dr. Mike Conlon at: mconlon@ufl.edu
for the BMIP


Clinical and Translational Science Institute University of Florida Gainesville, FL 352.265.8909


CTS1 Newsletter I















Volume 1, Issue 2 -August 2008


CTSI S&P Committee Program and Core Directors Mentors (Table 3)


Name E-mail College
Percival, Susan S. percival@ufl.edu CALS
Gregory, Jesse F., III jfgy@ufl.edu CALS
Oliverio, James C. oliverio@ufl.edu CFA
Braith, Randy rbraith@ufl.edu CHHP
Cauraugh, James H. jcaura@hhp.ufl.edu CHHP
Werch, Chudley cwerch@hhp.ufl.edu CHHP
Albarracin, Dolores dalbarra@ufl.edu CLAS
Powell, David powell@chem.ufl.edu CLAS
Sapienza, Christine sapienza@csd.ufl.edu CLAS
Shrivastav, Rahul rahul@ufl.edu CLAS
Yost, Richard A. ryost@chem.ufl.edu CLAS
Bume, Robert rbume@dental.ufl.edu COD
Fillingim, Roger rfilling@ufl.edu COD
Progulske-Fox, Ann apfox@ufl.edu COD
Riley, Joseph JRILEY@dental.ufl.edu COD
Ditto, William L. william.ditto@bme.ufl.edu COE
Ranka, Sanjay ranka@cise.ufl.edu COE
Treise, Deborah M. dtreise@jou.ufl.edu COJ
Choi, Debbie ychoi@jou.ufl.edu COJ
Ferguson, Mary Ann mferguson@jou.ufl.edu COJ
Walsh-Childers, Kim kwchilders@jou.ufl.edu COJ
Allegra, Carmen carmen.allegra@medicine.ufl.edu COM
Allen, William wmallen@ufl.edu COM
Antony, Veena veena.antony@medicine.ufl.edu COM
Atkinson, Mark akinson@ufl.edu COM
Berger, Alan R. alan.berger@jac.ufl.edu COM-Jax
Beyth, Rebecca rbeyth@aging.ufl.edu COM
Block, Edward edward.block@medicine.ufl.edu COM
Bova, Frank bova@ufl.edu COM
Brantly, Mark mark.brantly@medicine.ufl.edu COM


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CTS1 Newsletter I















Volume 1, Issue 2 -August 2008


CTSI S&P Committee Program and Core Directors Mentors (Cont'd)


Name E-mail College
Bussing, Regina rbussing@ufl.edu COM
Byrne, Barry bbyme@ufl.edu COM
Cance, William cance@surgery.ufl.edu COM
Clare-Salzler, Michael salzler@ufl.edu COM
Crawford, James crawford@ufl.edu COM
Dennis, Donn ddennis@anest.ufl.edu COM
Edison, Art aedospm@ufl.edu COM
Foster, Thomas foster@mbi.ufl.edu COM
Garrett, Timothy J. garintt 'rcic.ufl.edu COM
Ghivizzani, Steve sghiv@ufl.edu COM
Goodenow, Maureen goodenow@ufl.edu COM
Grant, Maria maria.grant@medicine.ufl.edu COM
Howland, Dena howland@mbi.ufl.edu COM
Lauzardo, Michael lauzam@medicine.ufl.edu COM
Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan cleeuwen@aging.ufl.edu COM
Limacher, Marian marian.limacher@medicine.ufl.edu COM
Meador, Kimford kimford.meador@neurology.ufl.edu COM
Moldawer, Lyle moldawer@surgery.ufl.edu COM
Morel, Laurence imoiel paotholo.! .ufl.edu COM
Muller, Keith keith.muller@biostat.ufl.edu COM
Murphy, Tania tmurphy@ufl.edu COM
Nelson, David david.nelson@medicine.ufl.edu COM
Nixon, Sara sjnixon@psychiatry.ufl.edu COM
Okun, Michael okun@neurology.ufl.edu COM
Pepine, Carl carl.pepine@medicine.ufl.edu COM
Petersen, Bryon pctc isn ( patholo'. .ufl.edu COM
Reeves, Westley whreeves@ufl.edu COM
Rothi, Leslie gonzalj @neurology.ufl.edu COM
Scarpace, Phil scarpace@ufl.edu COM
Scott, Edward escott@ufl.edu COM


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Volume 1, Issue 2 -August 2008


CTSI S&P Committee Program and Core Directors Mentors (Cont'd)


Name E-mail College
Schatz, Desmond schatz@ufl.edu COM
Shenkman, Elizabeth A. eas@ichp.ufl.edu COM
Sheps, David shepsds@medicine.ufl.edu COM
Shorr, Ron rshorr@aging.ufl.edu COM
Siemann, Dietmar siemadw@ufl.edu COM
Southwick, Fredrick frederick.southwick@medicine.ufl.edu COM
Srivastava, Arun arun@peds.ufl.edu COM
Stacpoole, Peter W. peter.stacpoole@medicine.ufl.edu COM
Staud, Roland staudr@ufl.edu COM
Steindler, Dennis steindler@mbi.ufl.edu COM
Swaminathan, Sankar sswamina@ufl.edu COM
Thompson, Floyd Thompson@mbi.ufl.edu COM
Vieweg, Johannes j.vieweg@urology.ufl.edu COM
Wagenaar, Alexander wagenaar@ufl.edu COM
Wingard, John john.wingard@medicine.ufl.edu COM
Youngblade, Lise lmy@ichp.ufl.edu COM
Bodor, Nicholas nbodor@ufl.edu COP
Haskell-Luevano, Carrie chaskell@ufl.edu COP
Johnson, Julie A johnson@cop.ufl.edu COP
Keller-Wood, Maureen kellerwd@cop.ufl.edu COP
Elder, Jennifer elderjh@ufl.edu CON
Horgas, Ann L. ahorgas@ufl.edu CON
Stechmiller, Joyce stechjk@ufl.edu CON
Andresen, Elena andresen@phhp.ufl.edu CPHHP
Bowers, Dawn dbowers@phhp.ufl.edu CPHHP
Kautz, Steven kautzl50ila hhp ufl cdui CPHHP
Mann, William w mann phhp ufl cdu CPHHP
Robinson, Michael merobin@nersp.nerdc.ufl.edu CPHHP
Vandenbome, Krista kvandenb@phhp.ufl.edu CPHHP
lafrate, R. Peter lafrate@shands.ufl.edu SHANDS


Clinical and Translational Science Institute University of Florida Gainesville, FL 352.265.8909


CTS1 Newsletter I




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