Franklin chronicle
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089928/00332
 Material Information
Title: Franklin chronicle
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: Russell Roberts
Publication Date: 03-14-2008
Copyright Date: 2007
 Subjects
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
Coordinates: 29.725278 x -84.9925 ( Place of Publication )
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Source Institution: Florida State University
Holding Location: Florida State University
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: sobekcm - UF00089928_00332
System ID: UF00089928:00332

Full Text



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Lanark dissolution a done deal


Carrabelle will
pay off loan debt
BY SKIP FRINK
Chronicle Correspondent
The much-ballyhooed Car-
rabelle/Lanark water and sewer
merger was signed into reality at
the Carrabelle City Commission
meeting on Thursday, March 6.
The ceremony was accom-
panied by brief statements from
the principals present, including
County Commissioner Cheryl
Sanders. Each speaker got much
applause, evidence of the citi-
zens' relief and approval over the
decision.
Once the signing and speak-
ing was complete, Bill Snyder of
Lanark Village volunteered to be
the first to pay his new Carra-
belle water bill. Snyder is chair-
man of Concerned Citizens of
Lanark Village, the group that
spearheaded the campaign to
merge with Carrabelle.
Earlier in the meeting, the
Carrabelle City Commission
voted unanimously to use all
available funds to finally retire all
the Rural Development loan
debt of both Carrabelle and
Lanark. The check for
$1,692,112.09 will put the city
in, "A much better position to
attract lower interest rates," says
City Manager John McInnis.
"There are very few cities out
there who can say they are debt-
free."
"I've never even seen a
check that large," he joked later.
The status report from Muni
Financial, the city's financial
auditor, was good. Lee Evett of
Muni agreed with the debt pay-
off move. One of his comments:
"Every time I think we have


PHOTO BY SKIP FRINK
Signing an agreement in front of the Carrabelle City Commission that makes the dissolution
of the Lanark Water and Sewer District official are, from left, Lanark District Chairperson
Pauline Sullivan, District Commissioner Ray Courage and (former) Carrabelle city attorney
Dan Cox.


come up with a good program,
John Mclnnis has thought it over
again and thinks of something
better."
Later in the meeting, much
time was spent by McInnis
explaining the plan for water
bills in the future. There is no
doubt that .the fees will rise,
because current fees are not hit-
ting a break-even. Soon there
will be a new "base transition
rate" that will be a $5 increase in
each (water and sewer). The
"base" is a constant amount,
then customers will pay a cost
per 1,000 gallons used. No
change is planned in the per gal-
lon rate at this time. This meet-
ing's information was in the
form of a First Reading, so there


will be no action until the April
meeting at the soonest.
In related matters, in a first-
time move for Carrabelle,
McInnis stated that once
approved (and it was approved),
all past-due water and sewer bills
would be turned over to a
Panama City collection agency
to collect. When asked how
"past" due the bills needed to be
to go to collection, he replied
"one day." The extent of the
city's past-due problem at this
point is $57,550.
After some explanation and
discussion, the board voted to
"buy out" the contract for sewer
and reuse water services to St.
James Bay. By so doing, the city
stands to profit up to 50% more


from the eventual tap fee pay-
ments as homes are built.
Other action
Following the water and
sewer ceremony, another cere-
mony took place. Police
Corporal Craig Kincaid was pro-
moted to sergeant. Once his new
insignia had been installed on his
epaulets, the new sergeant com-
mented: "Over 30 years I have
served under seven mayors and
seven chiefs of police. I think I'm
getting the. hang of this job."
Kincaid came recently to
Carrabelle from the Chicago
area.
' Commissioners who chose
to comment during the reports
Continued on Page 17


Veterans' memorial dedicated
BY LAUREL NEWMAN -1- --
Chronicle Correspondent
The Carrabelle Memorial Wall, erected to honor veterans who :
lived or presently-live in Carrabelle, and served at any time in any
branch of the U.S. Military service and were honorably discharged,
was dedicated last Saturday, March 8, in
honor of a popular Carrabelle citizen, Alva
"Sonny Boy" Bragdon, who passed away
For more from December 2006.
His widow, Pat Bragdon, attended the
Camp Gordon ceremony, which was presided over by '
Ohnson Days, Mayor Wilburn"Curley" Messer, City
Manager John McInnis, and the Rev. Gene
see Page 19 Hallstrom.
Carrabelle Assistant Chief of Police Joe
Hamm presided over the color guard, and
the city manager and the mayor gave thanks
for the sacrifices made by all the veterans being honored.
Mrs. Bragdon thanked the city in general for honoring her
deceased husband, and said that, in his lifetime, he loved his life in PHOTO BY LAUREL NEWMAN
Carrabelle, and "wouldn't have changed a moment of it." The Carrabelle Memorial Wall was dedicated Saturday.

?- ,-' .-7-1L -- 1


Chronicle


WASHINGTON, D.C.-
Congressman Allen Boyd (D-
North Florida) testified before
the Subcommittee on Water
Resources and Environment re-
garding the Apalachicola-Chat-
tahoochee-Flint water sharing
issue and the immediate need for
the three states-Florida, Geor-
gia, and Alabama--to revive tri-
state discussions and develop a
responsible and workable solu-
tion to address the region's water
needs.
"The federal government
will keep pressure on the three
states to renew tri-state negotia-
tions," said Boyd. "Today's con-
gressional hearing helped to
raise the profile of this issue, and
it is my hope that this will be the
first of many. more hearings and
discussions on water supply
planning in the southeast."
During his testimony,
Congressman Boyd outlined the
following key points that he
encouraged the three states to
include in a transparent and col-
laborative process:
Use independent and local
experts to determine the water
flows that the Apalachicola
River and Bay need to maintain
their productivity;
Set limits on water use with-
in the Tri-State Basin (For exam-
ple, cap the water use to ensure
that the river flow requirements
can be met.);
Assess the water conserva-
tion potential among all users in
the basin-agricultural, munici-
pal, and industrial-and deter-
mine the most cost-effective
investments and who will pay for
them; and
Embody these agreements in
a durable, Tri-State Compact
with strong enforcement mecha-
nisms.
At the hearing, Boyd also
pointed out that over the past 35
years the state of Florida has
been ahead of the game when it
comes to water supply planning
through the development of a
long term, statewide water man-
Continued on Page 13

Sand plan

panned
Alligator Point property
owners have rejected a proposed
beach renourishment project.
The vote in the mail-in ballot
was 300-264.
The renourishment would
have cost property owners up to
$3,300 per year for eight years to
widen the beach and protect the
main Alligator Point road. The
state would pay about half of the
$11 million price, with the coun-
ty pitching in $225,000. After the
vote was tallied, Franklin
County Commissioners voted
unanimously to shelve the proj-
ect.
Beach renourishment proj-
ects are controversial. While
they increase the beauty, value
and safety of waterfront proper-
ty, they are not permanent solu-
tions. Critics often say the expen-
sive process must be repeated
periodically, especially in storm-
prone areas such as Florida.








Page 2 March 14, 2008


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


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3/14 3/15 3116 31 17 3118


PHOTO BY TOM LOUGHRIDGE
Recycle bins have been installed on St. George Island.

News from the Island & Eastpoint


I've been listening to the
politicians again. Winston
Churchill (1874-1965), British
prime minister (1940-45 & 1951-
55), could not have said it better
when he observed, "After trying
every other conceivable option,
Americans always do the right
thing."
I guess we sometimes do
look pretty silly trying to win at
the costs of truth, fairness and
relevance. In the present cam-
paign, trivial, silly, irrelevant
things are being chewed over and
over by the media and capital-
ized upon by politicians hoping
we will suspend our intelligent
reasoning powers long enough to
give their candidate an advan-
tage. I'm sure you all know of
several examples being used
against every candidate in the
race.
That being said, we have the
finest slate of candidates for the
president this country has seen
in a very long time! Any of the
three candidates would make a
fine leader who could bring this
nation back toward its role as a
world leader and regenerate the
respect for the United States that
has diminished in the world over
the past seven years. Much of
what has been said about these
three fine people is pure claptrap!
McCain is not a senile warmon-
ger, Clinton is not a shrill social-
ist shrew, and Obama is not a
radical Muslim terrorist. I have
my favorite for whom I will vote
but that does not diminish the
qualities of the others. At the
same time, none of them is per-
fect. Lord preserve us from the
"perfect" person! Remember,
Babe Ruth struck out 1,330
times, Ernest Hemingway
rewrote the last paragraph of "A
Farewell To Arms" 39 times, and
Jim Denny, manager of the
Grand Ole Opry, told Elvis
Presley, "You ain't goin'
nowhere, son. You ought to go
back to driving' a truck." 'Nuff
said.
I hope you have all caught
up with your sleep after the
"spring forward" disruption to


Fl t (4,0


By Tom Loughridge

your biological clocks. I really
have no serious objection to
"daylight saving time" although
I don't think it "saves" anything.
As I get older, however, I am
growing to dislike any change in
my schedule more and more. I
wish we could keep one or the
other all year.
The Island was happy to see
so many deputies and state
patrolmen here during the chili
cook-off last weekend. More
than a few underage drinkers
were rounded up and carried off
in the paddy wagon and I heard
a few roughnecks were shown
the door before their fighting
could spread. Thanks, officers.
We love our Island and appreci-
ate your efforts at keeping it from
getting the reputation of a rowdy
resort where anything goes.
Keep up the good work.
Speaking of keeping the
island clean, a set of recycle bins
has turned up between Harry
A's and the Blue Store. We
haven't had recycle facilities on
the Island for several years. It's
good to know there is a place for
my old newspapers and plastic
bottles other than the landfill.
I stopped in at the old Surf
Dog on Gorrie and talked to
Pam Spitler, a partner in the new
restaurant, Eastons. She says
they hope to be open for business
in about 30 days. She and Sam
Ginoplos had several friends in
to help them clean and paint,
hoping to get it open on time.
Spitler claims the best home-
made barbeque sauce in the area
and I, for one, can't wait to see if
she speaks true.


Speaking of "best" things,
Aunt Ebby's at 147 E. Gulf
beach Dr. on the Island, advertis-
es the second best hamburgers
on the Island. Mark Goldman,
owner, doesn't say who he thinks
is best but, having tasted his
burgers, I can't imagine any bet-
ter. Goldman planned to open
the popular ice cream and sand-
wich shop for the 14th year on
Wednesday, March 12, with
hand dipped Blue Bunny and
Haagen Dazs ice cream still fea-
tured. He will continue to feature
subs and homemade chicken
salad. Although Goldman has
been running the gift store and
restaurant for the next to longest
of any restaurant on the Island,
he says the real estate or busi-
nesses are for sale. He feels it's
time to retire and give someone
else the fun of running an Island
business.
It's Rib Cookoff time again
at the Eastpoint Volunteer Fire
Department Saturday, March
15, from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. at 6th
St. and CC Land Rd. in
Eastpoint. This will be the 7th
annual Cookoff. BBQ dinners
will be served from 11 a.m. until
they run out...and did I mention
chicken, pork rinds, and apple
dumplings with ice cream. (I.
think my belt size just went up an
inch thinking about last year)
For more information go to
www.eastpointribcookoff.com.
Let me leave you with this
final thought: "And at the end, if
we are brave enough to love,
strong enough to forgive, gener-
ous enough to rejoice in anoth-
er's happiness, and wise enough
to know there is enough love to
go around for us all, then we can
achieve a fulfillment that no
other living creature will ever
know. We can re-enter Paradise."
Written by rabbi Harold S.
Kushner (1935-) in "How Good
Do We Have to Be"(Little,
Brown & Co)
God Bless, stay in touch,
and remember, to contact me,
phone 850-927-2899 or e-mail
tjloughridge@mchsi.com.


Florida Trii
Benjamin Green, a pharmacist in Miami Beach, FL, invented the first suntan cream. Coppertone
Suntan Cream, in 1944. He cooked cocoa butter and other ingredients in a granite coffeepot on the
stove, testing each batch on his bald head.


I Cit Hi L Con. I


city Hi Lo Cond.


Ifty Hi Lo Canda


I it H L Cnd











It's never 'too cold to shop!'


There is a certain club in
Carrabelle; there are no member-
ship dues, no cards, no real meet-
ings. We all recognize each
other, mainly because we all
share the same weakness.
We simply can't pass a yard
sale, whether it's a pathetic card
table on the side of the road or a
gigantic community-style flea
market occupying a huge public
park or parking lot.
We had one of those here
last Saturday, and if it wasn't
exactly gigantic, it certainly was
not for lack of effort on the part
of the organizers, the good vol-
unteers who are the strong arm
of Carrabelle Cares, and the
recipients of many e-mails and
donation requests, reminders
and gentle hints requesting vol-
unteers.
Bundled up like polar bears,
and all busy looking through
everyone else's "stuff," it was a
typical yard sale, except for the
frigid wind blowing off the river


Carrabelle Christian Center
Donald B. Carroll,
Senior Minister
142 River Road, Carrabelle
Sunday Worship Service,
10 a.m., nursery provided
Sacred Heart of Jesus Parish
Catholic Church
2653 U.S. Hwy. 98,
Lanark Village
Sunday Mass, 10 a.m.,
no nursery


By Laurel Newman


and chilling the bones until they
rattled.
The stalwart volunteers kept
their woolen scarves and knitted
caps on, and only one weakling
of a customer wimped out with
the comment: "It's too cold to
shop!"
The hard-core yard-salers
got the good stuff!
Quilt Show
Another good event for
Saturday entertainment coming
up is the Quilt Show!


Living Waters Assembly of
God
Pastor (Rev.) Lois Long
1580 Bluff Road, Apalachicola
Sunday Worship, 10:45 a.m.,
nursery provided
Panacea Congregational
Holiness. Church
Rev. Ronnie Metcalf
1127 Coastal Highway, Panacea
Sunday Worship, 11 a.m.,
no nursery


The Lanark Village Wan-
dering Star Quilters presents the
Quilt Show 2008, on Saturday,
March 29, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
at Chillas Hall in Lanark Village.
Admission is free, and will fea-
ture quilting demonstrations, a
Voters-Choice award, boutiques
and door prizes, as well as an
opportunity quilt raffle (tickets at
the door).
Guest vendor will be
Needles and Thread of Port St.
Joe (A quilters' dream of a
store). Of course the real treat is
the display of beautiful quilts of
all sizes, styles and colors some
of them truly marvels of creativ-
ity and patience!
Lunch of hot dogs and/or
hamburgers available from
Chillas Hall Association.
For hiore information, con-
tact Janice Weldy, show chair, at
697-8547, or Virginia French,
president, at 697-2802.
It's a great show, so don't
miss it!


First Pentecostal Holiness
Church
Revs. Emory and Susan Roach
379 Brownsville Road,
Apalachicola
Sunday Worship, 11 a.m., nurs-
ery provided
To be included in our Church
Services listing, submit information
by e-mail to info@franklinchroni-
cle. net or by mail to P.0. Box 590,
Eastpoint, FL 32328.


PHOTO SUBMITTED BY FRANKLIN COUNTY SHERIFF'S OFFICE
This small motor home off Jefferson Street in Eastpoint was
searched Tuesday.

Eastpoint meth lab

in RV dismantled


On Tuesday, March 11,
members of the Franklin County
Sheriff's Office Narcotics Unit
received information of an oper-
ational "meth lab" in a small
motor home located off of
Jefferson Street in Eastpoint.
The Narcotics Unit had
received reliable information of
the lab and petitioned the courts
for a search warrant on the loca-
tion. Narcotics Unit Officers
called in the assistance of the
Bay County Sheriff's Hazardous
Materials Team (HAZ-MAT) for
the safe handling and disposal of
the potentially hazardous chemi-
cals.
After serving the search war-
rant, officers collected more than
400 grams of prepared metham-
phetamine along with precursor
chemicals. A contracted HAZ-
MAT team has been called in to
decontaminate the area, which
required the removal of chemical


substances present at the scene.
The resident was placed
under arrest and after being
decontaminated on scene, was
transported to the Franklin
County Jail and booked on the
charges of manufacturing meth-
amphetamine, trafficking more
than 200g of methamphetamine,
three counts of possession of
listed chemicals, manufacturing
paraphernalia, possession of
paraphernalia, and possession of
less than 20g of cannabis.
In another, case involving
drugs, in the early morning
hours of March 5, 14 drug relat-
ed arrests were made around
Franklin County. The Sheriff's
Office along with the FL Depart-
ment of Law Enforcement par-
ticipated in "Operation Byrne
Drugs, where state and local law
enforcement officials can collec-
tively use resources to crack
down on illegal drugs.


CONGRATULATIONS



w Prudential Resort Realt



TOP PRODUCERS

For Their Achievement in 2007


JERRY THOMPSON
#1 Realtor for Volume Sold
Realtor Association Diamond Award
Prudential Real Estate Affiliates
Chairman's Circle Gold Award


s*e


PANDORA SCHLITT
#3 Realtor@ for Volume Sold
#3 Realtor for Transaction Sides Closed
Realtor Association Platinum Award
Prudential Real Estate Affiliates
President's Circle Award


KARA LANDISS
Realtor Association
Gold Award
Prudential Real Estate Affiliates
Honor Society Award








HELEN SPOHRER
REALTOR Association
Gold Award


REALTOR Association Awards as Recognized by REALTOR Association of Franklin and Southern Gulf Counties for Eastern Division.


~r~ I~- l


I


-A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


March 14, 2008 Page 3


The Franklin Chronicle


01. 9-


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AL









Page 4 March 14, 2008


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


Matters of opinion
By definition, when you express an opinion, not everyone agrees.
And by definition, matters of opinion usually have no right or
wrong. Otherwise they'd be matters of fact, not opinion.
In newspapers, the "editorial page" is where opinion is
expressed. The Franklin Chronicle calls its opinion pages "Editorial and
Commentary." That's where you'll find columns, letters to the editor
and editorial cartoons that express opinions of the writer.
Some newspapers publish unsigned editorials that, in theory,
reflect the opinion of "the newspaper." Of course, a newspaper is an
inanimate object and can't have an opinion. So in reality, unsigned
editorials express the opinion of either
the publisher or (at larger newspapers) a
small committee of editors.
That's one reason why I don't like
unsigned editorials. Earlier in my career
when I was editor of a daily newspaper,
I wrote many unsigned editorials. But I
was never comfortable with taking a
position that was actually supposed to
reflect the opinion of someone else, i.e.,
Th E the publisher. Most days, the publisher
\ didn't know what opinion I had con-
jured up for him until he read it in the
By Russell Roberts paper.
So when I became publisher and
editor of The Chronicle, I decided that all opinion pieces would carry
a byline, and not reflect the opinion of anyone but the writer.
I believe it's important for the newspaper's opinion page to reflect
a variety of opinions. Some of those opinions, I don't agree with and
you don't agree with. But if they've tweaked your sensibilities, if
they've challenged the conventional way of thinking, if they've given
a voice to an unpopular opinion, they've done a valuable service.
In a recent e-mail sent to me, a newspaper columnist wrote, "I
realize my point of view is very unconventional and not in line with
the conventional wisdom ... But isn't that the whole point of having
a column? To get people to challenge, agree or at least respond?'"
While I don't agree that that's "the whole point," I do I think
that's a large part of the reason for writing an opinion piece. What's
the point of expressing an opinion that consistently parrots popular
opinion?
So if you ever want to express your opinion on a matter of pub-
lic interest, rest assured I'll publish it, unless you get into the realm of
libel or launch an attack on someone without giving them a chance
to respond.
And if you'd rather not publish your opinion, feel free to call me
at 670-4377 or send an e-mail to info@franklinchronicle.net. I may
not agree with what you say, but you have a right to express your
opinion.

SLetters to the Editor policy
The Franklin Chronicle welcomes your typed letters to the editor on
issues of public concern. Letters may edited for fairness Please e-mail
your letter to the ecdtor to news@FranklinChronicle.net

I ,ll


'Help! I've fallen and I can't get up'

should not be a punch line


BY RICHARD E. NOBLE
I was sitting out on my front porch when I
heard a yell. It sounded like a call for help. It was
coming from the campground in front of my home.
My first thought was that it was just some children
playing. But then the
voice whined out for
a second time. I
couldn't imagine why
someone would be


whining for help in
this thriving, peaceful
metropolis of
Eastpoint but when
the voice continued
several more times, I
decided to put down
my book and stroll
around to take a look


By Richard E. Noble
By Richard E. Noble


just in case.
I followed the sound of the voice and ended up
behind an old trailer where I found an elderly gen-
tleman sitting on the ground. Something had start-
ed leaking inside his trailer and he had come to the
back of his trailer to shut off the water. He walked
with the help of a cane and his cane was laying on
the ground beside him. It seems that he had got
down on one knee to enable himself to reach the
cutoff valve and found that he was unable to get
himself back up to a standing position. He told me
that he had been sitting there for over an hour call-
ing out for help.
I tried to get the man to a standing position,
but I couldn't. He was a large man and he had very
little strength in his legs. I went knocking on doors
in the park to get someone to help me.
The first trailer I tried had an elderly man who
had just returned from the hospital himself. He had
tubes up his nose and was wheeling an oxygen bot-
tle around with him. The next home had a woman
who had just had a knee operation. She was also
living by herself and, of course, was unable to
assist me. I went to several other trailers. They all
were occupied by elderly folks who couldn't possi-
bly help me get a 200 pound man up and onto his
feet.
Finally I flagged down an SUV that was pass-
ing through the campground. I think, at first, they
thought that I might be crazy, or maybe that I was
a part of a roadside hold-up gang but eventually the
man who was driving the vehicle came with me.
We were able to get the old buck up onto his
feet but it wasn't easy. He had been squatting there
behind his trailer so long that his legs were just
about useless. We managed to get him over to his
front steps. He didn't want us to call an ambulance


or anything like that. He just wanted to sit awhile
and regain his strength.
In assisting this man I couldn't help thinking
about my older sister who is 70 years old and lives
by herself on the second floor in a condo in San
Diego. She had some bad luck recently and was
also using a cane to help her get around.
About a week or so later I was looking up the
demographics on this big city I was reading about.
The city had a population of 80 thousand and one
of the statistics listed in describing this community
was that 10% of the population was elderly who
lived alone. The city was approximately seven
square miles. It had 10,000 people per square mile.
It was obviously filled with apartment houses and
tenements. So it seems there were 10,000 old peo-
ple living in tenement house apartments. Many on
second and third floors, I would imagine. This was
also listed as a poorer inner city community. It had
a senior housing development for those with limit-
ed funds, but there was a five to seven year waiting
list.
One can not help but to think about all those
jokes about "I've fallen-and I can't get up" or those
electric wheelchair commercials where we see all
of those old people buzzing around apparently
having the time of their lives in their new "free-
dom" chairs. They seem to be having so much fun,
I imagine that some younger people watch the
commercial and find themselves yearning to grow
old.
One of the disadvantages with being old
enough to collect a Social Security check is that
you now are old enough to die with everyone's
approval. I mean nobody says, "Oh what a shame,
and he was only 65 or 71."
Every year old people die from the heat in the
summer. In the winter hundreds maybe thousands
of old people die because their apartment gets too
cold. I've read that on the average it costs $1,500 a
month to heat a home up north during the winter
and we all know the expense of cooling a home
here in Florida during a hot spell.
I wonder how many old people are living alone
here in the United States? I wonder how many are
living alone in trailer parks or on the second floor
in a slum tenement house or condo? I wonder how
many call out for help and no one comes? I wonder
how many fall down and never get up?
Richard E. Noble is a freelance writer and has been a res-
ident of Eastpoint for around 30 years. He has authored
two books: 'A Summer with Charlie, which is currently
listed on Amazon.com and "Hobo-ing America," which
should be listed on Amazon in the not too distant future.
Most recently he completed his first novel "Honor Thy
Father and Thy Mother, which will be published soon.


POST OFFICE BOX 590
EASTPOINT, FLORIDA 32328
Office: 850-670-4377
Fax: 877-423-4964
E-Mail: info @franklinchronicle.net
Volume 17, Number 11 March 14,2008
Publisher & Editor
Russell Roberts
Computer Graphic Designer
Diane Beauvais Dyal
Correspondents
Harriett Beach, Skip Frink, Tom Loughridge,
Laurel Newman, Richard E. Noble, Paul Puckett
Circulation Associates
David Mills and Rick Lasher

The Franklin Chronicle is published weekly at 33 Begonia Street,
Eastpoint, FL 32328 by The Hoffer Trust. Application to mail at
periodicals postage rates is pending at Eastpoint, FL and addition-
al mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The
Franklin Chronicle, P.O. Box 590, Eastpoint, FL 32328.
Changes in subscription addresses must be sent to The Chronicle
in writing. In-county subscriptions are $22.00 a year; out-of-
county subscriptions are $29.00 a year.
Submit'news and ads to info@franklinchronicle.net or to P.O. Box
590, Eastpoint, FL 32328. Deadline is Monday at noon for that
week's issue.
All contents Copyright 2008
Franklin Chronicle, Inc.










The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


March 14, 2008 Page 5


TDC supports

April showers bring, well, be showing, selling
they bring a bushelfull of art fes- strating their tale:
tivals and cultural events all to 6 p.m. The festi
along Florida's Forgotten Coast into the evening w
supported by the Franklin ing at 6 p.m. A
County Tourist Development chefs will prepare
Council. restaurants pared
Artwalk & Wine Fest April 5 wines.
This year's e
April brings the Historic children's artarea
Apalachicola Artwalk and Wine draw and paint th
Festival on Saturday April 5. piece while parent
Visitors stroll the downtown dis- grown-uph version
trict looking for collectible fine information call (g
arts during the day as more than
30 artists and vendors exhibit Antique and Clas
their wares on the sidewalks at Show April 26
this annual springtime event. The 10th A
Fine art in all forms will be and Classic Bc
woven in and around pictur- Apalachicola's Ve
esque downtown Apalachicola April 26 is an
where artists and musicians will pleaser for vintage


lg
nt
ivi
'it]
fte
d



ve
w
eir
ts
n.
85
;si


In
oa
te
an
e


many spring

and demon- asts. All types of antique boats,
s from noon classic examples of traditional
cities continue vessels, work boats, fiberglass
h a wine tast- classics, antique outboard
erwards area motors and antique cars will be
ishes at their on display. There will also be a
with special dinner and a lecture at 6 p.m.
Reservations for the lecture are
nt features a required. For more information
here kids can call (850) 653-9419.
Sown master- Carrabelle Riverfront Festival
shop for the April 26
For more The Carrabelle Chamber of
0) 653-9419 Commerce will host its 18th
c Boat annual Carrabelle Riverfront
Festival on Saturday, April 26,
ual Antique 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Sunday,
t Show in April 27; 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The
rans Park on two-day spring festival features
annual crowd regional and award winning
boat enthusi- artists with original works and


events, festivals


prints, authentic custom-design-
ed pottery, stained glass, sculp-
ture, unique metal art, wood
carvings, yard art and more. The
festival is located downtown on
scenic Marine Street along
Carrabelle's beautiful Riverwalk.
There will be food, maritime
exhibits, sand sculpting and a
"kids' zone." Entertainment this
year will be by the Alabama
Blues Brothers and Locomotive.
For more info call 697-2585.


Spring Tour of Homes May 3

On May 3, the Trinity
Church in Apalachicola will
mark its 16th year of sponsoring
Apalachicola's Tour of Historic
Homes. Many of Apalachicola's
private homes and buildings can
only be viewed from the exterior
except for this unique day. For a
$12 donation you can take a
guided tour through significant
homes, churches & commercial
buildings. Call (850) 653-9550.


The Franklin County Commission approved the expenditure of
$842;158.48 at their March 4, 2008 meeting. The bills are listed as
follows, published for the Board by the County Finance Office.


ow I Prime -.50/

Mjow as o asPri


On a Home Equity

Line of Credit


Current monthly payment:

Credit Card: $217

Credit Card 2: $188

Credit Card 3: $157

Auto Loan: $364


Total:


$926


One new single payment:

Credit Card: 0

Credit Card 2: 0

Credit Card 3: 0

Auto Loan: 0

Home Equity Payment: $525


[This example is based on an equity line of $35,000 with an APR of 5.50% and a monthly payment of 1.5% of the
outstanding balance.]




If you want to put more money into your pocket every month, now's the time to get

a Superior Home Equity Line. You can consolidate bills, renovate your home, or take

a vacation anything you want. Best of all, we make it easy with no closing costs,

no application fees and the interest may be tax deductible.** Simply call or visit one

of our friendly offices today.




Apalachicola / 58 4th Street / 850-653-9828
U PI R A Carrabelle / 912 Northwest Avenue A / 850-697-5626

U PER IO R B V K Mexico Beach /1202 Highway 98 / 850-648-5060
al Friendly Superior. Panama City / 400 West 23rd Street / 850-763-8500
Port St Joe /.418 Cecil G. Costin Blvd./ 850-227-1416




www.superiorbank.com I Member FDIC


*The Wall Street Journal Prime Rate is the base rate on corporate loans posted by at least 75% of the nation's 30 largest banks. The Wall Street Journal Prime Rate is subject to change.
APR stands for Annual Percentage Rate. "*Superior Bank pays customary dosing costs up to $500 induding: credit report, flood certification, collateral valuation, property report, signing
and recordingservices. To be eligible for $500 waiver of losing costs, you must take an initial draw of $10.000 or 100% of the line of credit Customarydosing costsdo not include ewre
fees, tte insurance premiums, or appraisal fees, if applicable. You must pay any difference between actual dosing costs and costs paid by Superior Bank. Typical dosing costs on an
Equity Lne of Credit range between $0 and $1,500 Yo also pay state taxes applicable. Offer limited to owner-occupied, primary residences in Alabama and Florda (manufactured
homes are ineligible) with combined loan-to-value (induding the amount of your new line) of less than 85% based on property inspection or appraisal sasfactory to Superior Bank. Supe-
nor Bank must have a first or second en position n your primary single-family residence at closing. Superior Bank may require a title and flood insurance policy, and you must provide
evidence of hazard insurance coverage in an amount acceptable to Superior Bank which is at least equal to the lesser of 100% of the replacement guaranteed coverage or the amount of
this line phs any other outstanding lines or loans o the property. Consult a tax advisor to determine tax-deductibility of interest.


ACS 03VlT FIrFlCIAli. SYSim
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002195 R ACEWELL INC
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002581 CARR, R10G & INIGAM LLC
002022 CARROT-TOP IAUSTRIS
001731 CDW GOVERNMENT, INC.
002791 CEDAP A AP CAHPAnfl TiC/Tni
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001610 IIKE RAMIHS
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002343 PXTEL PARDBERS I1C
002554 OPPICE DBPOT
000285 OFFICE 01 TBE STATE 12AT
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CHECK# DATE

41018 03/04/08
41019 03/04/08
41021 03/04/08
41022 03/040o
410Z3 oa/'oBre
41023 01/04./08
41025 03/04/08
41026 03/04/09
41027 03/04/08
41026 03/04/08
4102.9 Oj/0/08O
41030 03/04/08
41031 03/041/0
41032 03/0/065
4J033 03/04/,08
410o4 03/04/08
41035 03/04/08
41036 03/04/08
41037 03/04/08
41018 03/04/08
41039 0O3'04/0a
41040Io o.'0 4'0a
41041 03/0a4/O0
41042 07'41i/0
41043 u,3oifcs
41044 S.4 01.4,'
4104t 013/04/03
4.o46 03/04/09
41045 03/04 O/
41OS5 a/o04/o0
41051 01/04/08
4-1051 OI104/08
41052 03j04109
41053 03/04/B0
41055 01/04108
41056 03/04/08
41057 03/04/09
41058 03/04/06
A1059 03/04/0B
4106o 03/04/08
410f2 03/04/08
41061 01/94/08
41064 D0/04/08
4106 '03/04/08
41i06 03/04/06
42a0"' 03/04/o9
410l9 03/04/09
41069 03/04/00
41071 03/04/00
41071 03/04/09
41073 03/04/08
41073 03/04/0O
41075 03/04/09
41075 03/04/08
41077 03/04/05
41077 03/04/01
41078 OI/0OB
41079 03/04/05
41070 03/04/08
410a1 03/91/O
41082 03/04/06
41053 03/00/08
4104 03/04/08
41095 03/04/08
41086 03/04/08
41089 03/04/08
40oes 03/04/01
41089 01/04/08
41090 03/04o/o
41091 03/04/68
41092 01/04/06
410p3 01/04/05
41094 03/94/90
4umo. 93to04/0
4106 0/osB/
41.0qi 03/04/0
419ps oI/o4/08
41099 03/4/4/08

41102 os/c*/b6
41100i 3/04/08
41105 03/04/O8

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41107 03/04/00
41108 03104/0B
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411 2 03/04/oa
411153 0/04/00
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411i6 03/04/08


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atG540R-VO.174 PA=S I


AMOUNT

2,013-$0
405,SO
93,23
1,312.82
3,858.75
275.00
1,021,89
752.45
376.22
2,000.00
505.26
31.50
1,000.00
107.64
72,72
93,157-76
7,400.00
1)236.00
650.00
9,886.00
114.51
240.99
12,341.00
614.26
1,700-06
1,634.11
19,733,.8
74.00
778 .1
4,193.12
664 01
5,500.00
;4.31
161.00
690.,00
290,00
nr, aso.. .
1,350-86
330.00
14,105.00
4.S36 50
539.21
17.,87.00
20,295.00
25.640.84
25.2c
43,301.00
l,43t.01
i,317.17
19 58
2.261.16
24,457 00

394.31
'125-51
"U5.17
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2034 .1500
7,400.00
634.25.00
11.92
1,370.30
5e.07
17840
27 00
930.00

536024
702.00
140.80



1,200.10
157. 51
S1x.63

X, 56,09
-15271.71
21,70.00
1,200.10


75.63 .
2,625.00
.176.04
526.12
.21.60
19.06
403.61i
11.48
174.42


1,101..
3,093.25
442,158.4t
DIBBOREuATS


261,6 51.44
*Si, 4657.99
4,95o.15
4,404.49
17,461.86
5,113.93

31,490.00
42,15s.fl


CtrT


,
LI C







Page 6 March 14, 2008


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


Country concert was well received


A REVIEW
BY TOM LOUGHRIDGE
Chronicle Correspondent
Country came to Apalachi-
cola Friday and Saturday night
to delight enthusiastic crowds at
the Dixie Theatre. On Friday,
Charlie Black and Dana Hunt
Black teamed up with Steve
Bogard to showcase some of the
many hit songs they have written
for well-known country stars.
Charlie Black has written 14 No.
one songs and has been named
songwriter of the year three
times. He has written such hits
as: "Shadows in the Moonlight,"
recorded by Anne Murray and "I
Don't Know You Anymore," as
recorded by Tommy Overstreet.
Dana Hunt Black wrote "Check
Yes or No," which was made
into a No. 1 hit in 1995 by
George Strait. She also wrote
"The Thrill is Back," sung by
Alan Jackson. Steve Bogard,
President of the National
Songwriters Association, has
written many prizewinners
including this years Grammy
nominee, "Every Mile a
Memory."
The show was relaxed and
had the feel of sitting around
with musical friends throwing
back a few beers and singing a
few songs. The audience loved it!
They gave the three a standing
ovation. Jack and Dottie from
Boston expressed the general
sentiment-when they said, "We
loved the show. We really
enjoyed it."
On Saturday, four country
musicians and songwriters per-
formed to an equally apprecia-
tive crowd. Travis Meadows'
songs tended toward the narra-
tive style. As he sang to us why
he drank his coffee black, I and a


Crucifixion pi

Sunday at Tri
The Crucifixion, a Medita-
tion on the Passion of the Holy
Redeemer, composed by John
Stainer, will be presented by the
Apalachicola Bay Area Choral
Society on Sunday, March 16, at
4 in the historic Trinity
Episcopal Church in Apalachi-
cola.
This Palm Sunday perform-
ance by the 32-voice chorus
under the direction of Merel
Young and accompanied by Dr.
R. Bedford Watkins will be
joined by soloists Dr. Tamara
Marsh, Virginia Harrison, and
Donald West in singing this pop-
ular work by Stainer (1840-
1901).
Other solo performances at
the scene of The Crucifixion will
be done by Tom Loughridge,
DeWitt Galloway, David Mc-
Lain, Dick Derby, Carolyn M.
Williams, Dusty Turner and
Young.
The rest of the chorus for
this Ilse Newell concert will be
the following area residents and


PHOTO BY TOM LOUGHRIDGE
Ed Hill (left) and Luke Laird perform.


Coming to the
Dixie Theatre
6th Annual Apalachicola
Music Fest, March 14 & 15.
Bob Patterson, folklorist
and humorist, March 21,
22, 23.

few others sort of felt our eyes
dampen a little. You don't want
to miss a word when he sings. He
sings about life with a kind of
gravelly vocal ability that makes
his work memorable. He has
written for George Strait, Faith
Hill, Tim McGraw, and others.
Luke Laird writes for Universal
Music Publishing Group and has
been recorded by such greats as
Lee Ann Womack, Rascal Flatts
and others. Ed Hill has had hit
songs on the charts for 30 years
and has written for Kenny
Chesney, Reba McEntire, and


resented

nity Church
winter visitors: Sopranos;
Shirley Adams, Connie McGin-
nis, Fay Phillips, Mary Virginia
Robinson, Hollie Stott, Billie
Sytsma, Eugenia Watkins, and
Helene West, Altos; Susan
Galloway, Barbara Hatrsfield,
Sue Leach, Judi Little, Ina
Margaret Meyer, Audrey
Schmidt, Shirley Taylor and
Mary Frances Willock, Basses;
all are mentioned above, Tenors;
Tom Adams, Curt Blair, Fred
Genter, Pat Leach, Judi Rundel,
Liz Sisung, and Jack Zurawka.
Price of admission is $2.
An interesting note about
The Crucifixion is that Stainer
composed the work for the use
by a friend and pupil, William
Hodge, to be performed at the
church where Hodge was organ-
ist, St. Marylebone in London. It
was first performed on Good
Friday in 1887 and has been per-
formed every Good Friday since
in that church. Queen Victoria
knighted John Stainer in 1888.


others. David Lee is the cowboy
of the group. His western style
songs easily place him as being
from Texas where he is a third
generation guitar player and
singer. His first No. 1 song was
"Nineteen Somethin'," recorded
by Mark Wills.
Having played guitar and
sung in the nightspots of the
west where cowboys and farmers
gathered, I could appreciate the
fine guitar work and well pre-
sented show these performers
gave us. I've played alongside
some good ones and some bad
ones and these are the best.
Good guitar work is becoming
more rare as young musicians
seem to think the only thing you
need to do is beat the strings in
time to the music. It's a real
pleasure to listen to players who
know the difference between
"sound" and music. Thanks for
the demonstration, guys.




Uq&k Z4,%4


P44*20 4vmA
5u 4y 1.


Question #129: You could
make a trip to Mars faster by:
a) using more fuel; b) using a
heavier (more massive) ship; c)
looping around the Sun; or d)
getting a running start before
you jump onto the rocket.


GENERAL CONTRACTORS
RG0055056


Tractor Work
* Aerobic Sewage Treatment Systems
Marine Construction
Septics Coastal Hauling


CARRABELLE


REALTY, INC.

P.O. Drawer 708 Carrabelle, FL

Ruby J. Litton, Broker
850-962-7894
Dale Millender, Realtor Associate
850-519-7048


Foundation Pilings
Commercial Construction
Utility Work-Public &
Private


k-l-------- ------ --- --
Golf Course: Prestigious lot on the 9th
tee, corner lot, reduced to $299,000
owner/agent.


NEW LISTINGS:

* One acre, Harbor Road, high & dry, $89,900.

* 1.97 acre Homesite, Baywood Estates, cleared, $98,900.
0 *10 acres in Riverbend Plantation, $225,000.

* 2.53 acres with large pond, Baywood Estates, $164,900.
* *2.2 acres Creekfront, Victorian Village, shared dock, $395,500.

* 1-1/2 City Lots with riverview, $225,000.


OWNER FINANCING WITH 10% DOWN AND 7% INTEREST.


MARKS INSURANCE

AGENCY, INC.




WRITING:
Home, Auto, Life, Business, Marine, Bonds
and Other Lines of Insurance
See us for your insurance needs at:
61 Avenue E
Apalachicola, Florida 32320
850-653-2161 800-586-1415


Gene K Strickland Construction
* Additions- Remodels Repairs
* Sun Rooms -Screen Rooms-Windows
* Gutters-Siding-Overihags
SDecks- Boardwalks Docks
(850) 528-4992
jcncrme i cr


I


I


I


I


iia !;


(e -lemc:uvl


@2008 DOWOleutai LLQ WWYW.cognol,(oom







The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


March 14, 2008 Page 7


Peter F. Crowell Presents

Weekly Economic Update for
the week of March 10, 2008
Quote of the week
"There are two motives for reading a book: one, that you enjoy
it; the other, that you can boast about it." -Bertrand Russell
Payrolls shrink ... again
Another recession signal flashed last week: the Labor
Department reported 63,000 fewer jobs in February, marking the sec-
ond straight month of contracting pay-
rolls. (The U.S. economy lost 22,000
jobs in January.) "All the lights are flash-
ing red," expressed Global Insight Inc.
chief economist Nariman Behravesh.
"We're in a recession. I don't think there
is any doubt about it at this point." The
median forecast of 76 economists polled
in a Bloomberg News survey predicted a
gain of 23,000 jobs for February.
E tt t1f c Home equity levels below 50%
Sponsored by For the first time since 1945, home-
Peter F Crowell, CFP owner mortgage debt exceeds home-
owner equity. A new Federal Reserve
report says homeowners' percentage of
equity fell to 49.6% in 2Q 2007 and 47.9% in 4Q 2007. More unnerv-
ingly, Moody's Economy.com foresees roughly 10.3% of U.S. home-
owners having 0% or negative equity at the end of March.
Rising foreclosure rates
Last week, the Mortgage Bankers Association announced new
delinquency and foreclosure highs for the last quarter of 2007: 2.04%
of U.S. mortgages in foreclosure, 5.82% of mortgages delinquent.
MBA economist Doug Duncan noted that the national numbers were
sent north by abnormally high foreclosure rates in Nevada,
California, Florida and Arizona.
Stocks struggle to advance
On Friday, the Dow Jones Industrial Average fell below 12,000
for the first time since January. The S&P 500 closed the week at
1,293.37, a low-water mark unseen since September 2006. Yet even
with the current financial climate, stocks are still up spectacularly
within the last few years. The Fed has lifted the limits on its scheduled
March 10 and March 24 auctions to $50 billion from $30 billion to
help banks with liquidity needs.
& Change Y-T-D 1-Year 5-Year
DJIA -10.34 -2.51 +34.92
NASDAQ -16.58 -7.33 +41.00
S&P 500 -11.92 -7.62 +35.91
(Source: CNNMoney.com, USAToday.com, 3/7/08)
Riddle of the week
What can explode slowly, with no smoke or flame? Read next
week's Update for the answer
Last week's riddle
At the sound of me, people may dream or stamp their feet, laugh
or sometimes weep. What am I? Answer: Music.
Peter E Crowell is a Certified Financial Planner in Tallahassee and a
Franklin County property owner Send your questions for him to
info@franklinchronicle.net or to PO Box 590, Eastpoint, FL 32328.
The Dow Jones Industrial Average is a price-weighted index of 30 actively trad-
ed blue-chip stocks. The NASDAQ Composite Index is an unmanaged, market-weight-
ed index ofl over-the-counter common stocks traded on the National Association of
Securities Dealers Automated Quotation System. The Standard & Poor's 500 (S&P
500) is an unmanaged group of securities considered to be representative of the stock
market in general. It is not possible to invest directly in an index. NYSE Group, Inc.
(NYSE:NYX) operates two securities exchanges: the New York Stock Exchange (the
"NYSE") and NYSE Arca (formerly known as the Archipelago Exchange, or
ArcaEx, and the Pacific Exchange). NYSE Group is a leading provider of securities
listing, trading and market data products and services. The New York Mercantile
Exchange, Inc. (NYMEX) is the world's largest physical commodity futures exchange
and the preeminent trading forum for energy and precious metals, with trading con-
ducted through two divisions-the NYMEX Division, home to the energy, platinum,
and palladium markets, and the COMEX Division, on which all other metals trade.
These views are those of Peter Montoya Inc., and not the presenting Representative or
the Representative's Broker/Dealer, and should not be construed as investment advice.
All information is believed to be from reliable sources; however we make no represen-
tation as to its completeness or accuracy. All economic and performance is historical
and not indicative of future results. The market indices discussed are unmanaged.
Investors cannot invest in unmanaged indices. Please consult your Financial Advisor
for further information. Additional risks are associated with international investing,
such as currency fluctuations, political and economic instability and differences in
accounting standards.


Easter comes to

Carrabelle March 22


The public is invited to help
commemorate Easter at a cele-
bration First Baptist Church of
Carrabelle on Saturday, March
22, from 4-7 p.m.
The event will begin at 4
p.m. with an Easter Egg Hunt for
the children. Everyone is encour-
aged to participate in the Easter
Bonnet Contest (ladies, gentle-
men, boys, girls, and pets). There


will be games and races, face
painting, food, inflatable bounc-
er, puppet show, outdoor movie,
visit to the empty tomb, and lots
more. And it's all free. Residents,
friends, and visitors are wel-
comed.
The event is sponsored by
First Baptist Church of
Carrabelle.


ACROSS
1. Ming artifacts
6. No-goodniks
10. of Life
(rescue device)
14. Disney's Darby

15. Border on
16, Send out
17. John McCain's
immigration bill
co-sponsor
19. "Dumb (old
comic)
20. Blowup: Abbr.
21. Texas hold'em
starter
22. Photo holder,
maybe
24. Casey, The Old
Professor"
26. Perfume holder
27. Suffix with
chariot
28. In error
32. Smooths down
35. Rating a blue
ribbon
36. out (allot)
37. Quatrain rhyme
scheme
38. Campus rushers,
for short
39. Seckel or Anjou
40. PC pop-up
41. Turer offilm
42, "Anybody
home?"
43. Really shine
45. "Survivor" abode
46. Crier's employer
47. Mystic chants
51. "Brokeback
Mountain"
director
54. Polly, to Tom
55. Lawyers' org.
56. Famous Amos
57. Freddie the
Freeloader's
portrayer


Where's Ed?


60. unrelated
note ...
61. Composer Satie
62. Chaucer pilgrim
63. Prevailing style
64. Say no to
65 More irritated

DOWN
1, Write-ins e.g.
2. Go-between
3. Move like a crab
4. Lodge member
5 Heavy hammers
6 Lock site
7. Genesis victim
8. Total flop
9 Salon workers
10. "Beverly
Hillbillies"
patriarch
11 Bad way to run


12. Horse race finish
line
13.-"Hurry!" in the OR
18. -do-well
23 Muesli morsel
25. Creator of dime
novels
26 Far-reaching
view
28. Had in mind
29, Bow-to-stern
structure
30. List abbr.
31, Wolfe of
whodunits
32. Club (retail
chain)
33. Help in a heist
34. Zola heroine
35. Wernher von
38. Blossomed


M I





42. Gatherers'
partners
44. Buck's partner
45, Unit of yam
47, Like some scents
for men
48. "PG" or"X"
assigned
49. Superior to
50. Less dotty
51. Quark's place
52. Taboo act
53. Mortarboard
tosser
54. Tennis score
after deuce
58. Bard's before
59. Sign before Vlrgo


Crossword Puzzle Answer on Page 13


Now serving some of the
best seafood on the coast!
LUNCH BUFFET
Sunday Friday
HOBO'S ICE CREAM
1593 West Highway 98-Carrabelle
697-2776
"Worth Driving 100 Miles For."
OPEN
Sun. Thurs. 11:00 a.m. 8:00 p.m.
Friday & Saturday 11:00 9:00 p.m.
Closed Tuesday


lime (AV-INDFV-
WILL TPV61-:

Stump and root grinding,
roduce.4 to chips. No job
too small or large.. C-all
C-larence, De*ade in
LanarY. Village, at (Pql-
FFzfl ESTIMNTES.


Stacy's Hair Design

850-670-1772
Hours: Tues-Fri 10-5, after 5 by apt. Sat. 10-until
TAKING CARE OF
Stacy Williams, ALL YOUR HAIR
Stylist CARE,
347 Highway 98 MANICURES,
P.O. Box 977 PEDICURES &
Eastpoint, FL 32328 ACRYLICS


SALES & SERVICE
CATERPILLAR DETROIT CUMMINS
TRANSMISSION* GENERATOR

MARINE SYSTEMS

ERI PFEUFER SHOP: (850) 697-2660
HwY. 98 FAX: (850) 697-2670
CARRABELLE, FL MOBIE: (850) 524-2259


This Week's Answer

Cogno's Corner
Answer to question #129 is: True.
Rockets move by pushing burned-fuel from the
rear of the rocket, pushing the rocket forward. Long
distance trips require high speed, which require a lot
of acceleration and fuel.-The cost and weight of the
fuel make it impractical for deep space travel. Solar
wind and ion propulsion are examples of potentially
more efficient fueIs for long distance efficient trips.






Page 8 March 14, 2008


The Franklin Chronicle


TIDE CHART FOR APALACHICOLA RIVER


DATE DAY


HIGH TIDE


HIGH TIDE


LOW TIDE


LOW TIDE


15 Sa 1002pm 1.3 708am -0.2
16 Su 428pm 1.0 1155pm 1.2 820am -0-2 733pm 0.9
17 Mo 430pm 1.0 917am -0.2 850pm 0.8
18 Tu 145am 1.2 440pm 1.0 1004am -0.1 944pm 0.6
19 We 307am 1.2 450pm 1.0 1041am 0.0 1029pm 0.4
20 Th 410am 1.2 457pm 1.0 1112am 0.2 1109pm 0.3
21 Fr 504am 1.2 503pm 1.1 1136am 0.3 1146pm 0.2

TIDE CHART FOR CARRABELLE RIVER
DATE DAY HIGH TIDE HIGH TIDE LOW TIDE LOW TIDE
15 Sa 809pm 2.4 420am -0.3
16 Su 235pri 1.9 1002pm 2.2 532am -0.3 445pm 1.8
17 Mo 237pm 1.9 1152pm 2.2 629am -0.3 602pm 1.4
18 Tu 247pm 1.9 716am -0.2 656pm 1.1
19 We 114am 2.2 257pm 1.9 753am 0.0 741pm 0.8
20 Th 217am 2.2 304pm 1.9 824am 0.3 821pm 0.5
21 Fr 311am 2.2 310pm 2.1 848am 0.6 858pm 0.3

TIDE CHART FOR CAT POINT
DATE DAY HIGH TIDE HIGH TIDE LOW TIDE LOW TIDE
15 Sa 854pm 1,6 516am -0.1
16 Su 320pm 1.3 1047pm 1.5 ._'3mni -0.1 541pm 0.7
17 Mo 322pm 1.3 725am -0.1 658pm 0.5
18 Tu 12, i.n 1.5 332pm 1.3 812am -0.1 752pm 0.4
19 We 159am 1.5 34 rn 1.3 849am 0.0 ; :- 7prr 0.3
20 Th 302am 1,5 349pm 1.3 920am 0.1 917pm 0.2
21 Fr 356am 1.5 355pm 1.4 944am 0.2 954pm 0.1

TIDE CHART FOR WEST PASS
DATE DAY HIGH TIDE HIGH TIDE LOW TIDE LOW TIDE
15 Sa 907pm 1.3 606am -0.2
16 Su 333pm 1.0 1100pm 1.2 718am -0.2 631pm 1.1
17 Mo 135pm 1.0 J 815am -0.2 T4;pm 0.9
18 Tu 1250am 1.2 345pm 1,0 902am -0.1 64Ipm, 0.7
19 We 212am- 1.2 355pm 1.0 939am 0.0 -Iprni 0.5
20 Th 315am 1 2 402pm 1.0 1010am 0.2 1007pm 0.3
21 Fr 4jam 1. 408pm 1.1 1034am '. 4 104pm 0 .

TIDE CHART FOR SIKES CUT
DATE DAY HIGH TIDE HIGH TIDE LOW TIDE LOW TIDE
15 2 Sa 836pm 1.5 511am -0.2
16 Su 302pm 1.2 1029pm 1 4 623am -0.2 536.pr, 1.1
17 Mo 304pm 1 2 720arm .r 653pm 0.
18 Tu 1219am 1.4 314pm 1.2 80'?,m -0.1 747prr 0.7
S We 141am 31.4 324pm 1.2 844am 0.0 832pm 0.5
20 Th 244am 1.4 331pm 1.2 915am 0.2 91:pm 0.3
21. Fr 338am 1.4 3- j7pm 1.3 939am 0.4 949pm 0.2


Yard sale

will benefit

scholarships
The Franklin/Gulf County
Retired Educators Association
(F/GREA) will be holding a
yard sale, craft and bake sale on
Saturday, March 15, from 9 a.m.
to noon at the Gulf State Bank in
Carrabelle to raise money for the
FGREA Scholarship fund.
Money raised from this
event will be used to fund schol-
arships for high school seniors.
This event will be an oppor-
tunity'for residents of Gulf and
Franklin counties to buy useful
many one-of-a-kind items at very
reasonable prices and have their
money contribute to furthering
the education of high school sen-
iors. Raffle tickets for a Split-the-
Pot $250 prize are also available
for this worthwhilecause.
For information call Arlene
at 697-9790 or Marty at 927-
2243.


297d' --BED LINERS
-"-ACCESSORIES
--REPAIRS
--RESTORATIONS
850-926-6181- -CUSTOM BODY
WORK

F MI. PERFORMANCE SPRAY-ON BED LINERS
WWW.MIKESPAINTANDBODY.COM




S* Ard's Service *

407 Highway 98

(850) 670-8463

New and Used Tires and Rims
Gasoline and Diesel


Now/ r ate Vi to bUcribU t t1 2
F-0,4oWlt QI P^ L 12.


Windy in the Keys and

good to be back home


Wind! The bane of fisher-
men everywhere.
Well, the wind was blowing
25 to 30 miles per hour the
whole time I was in the Keys last
week. However, I did manage to
get in a trip with Capt. Tim
Carlyle out of Sugarloaf Key.
We fished the flats looking for
permit.
A cold front had come
through a few days before and
the bonefish and tarpon had left
for deeper water. Tim managed
to spot several permit in the less
than ideal conditions and one
was enticed to eat a half dollar-
sized live crab. The hook was set
and the. battle was on. After
about 15 minutes back and forth,
long runs and short runs, a beau-
tiful 15 pound permit was
released at boatside. These fish
put up a great battle on 10 pound
spinning gear and-they are at
their best on the flats in 2 to 3
feet of water.
For those unfamiliar with
the permit, picture a pompano
on steroids a disc of molten, liv-
ing silver. Permit are good to eat
but the fish are so valuable in the
Keys as quarry, for bait fisher-
man as well as fly casters, they
are almost always released
unharmed. Permit are very wary.
The day I was out I presented
baits to at least a half dozen fish
but only one ate. Permit can also
be caught on shallow water
wrecks in the Gulf of Mexico
near the Lower Keys, but the
fight is not the same as on the
flats. Permit.are rarely, if ever,
encountered in our area of the
Gulf.
If you are considering a trip
to the Keys, the most consistent
fishing on the flats is May or
June. There are plenty of tarpon
available then and they can be
huge. I caught my biggest one
ever in June-a '170 pound fish
near Sugarloaf Key. Also, my
wife Carolyn and I and several
friends have all managed to catch
grand slams (tarpon, permit, and
bonefish, all on the.,same day) in
June. The offshore fishing for
mahi-mahi, blackfin tuna, and
wahoo heats up in June and lasts
throughout the summer. Reef
fishing for various snappers and
grouper is generally best from
May through November.
Speckled trout season is now
open in our area and you can bet
I'll be up the river or in the bay
this week trying to catch some.,


L1f*


By Jeff llardi

Some of the good spots include
Cat Point Bar, on a falling tide
right after a high tide. Other
good places to try are either end
of the causeway which is part of
the old bridge to St. George
Island. You can also try the dry
bar which is in the vicinity of St.
Vincent Island, the West Pass
between Little St. George and St.
Vincent Islands, and at the
mouths of the St.Marks and the
East Rivers, where they run into
East Bay.
By far, the most popular bait
for trout is shrimp-either live,
fresh dead, or frozen. These can
be fished either under a cork
such as Cajun Thunder or on a
Carolina rig. A 1/0 J hook or cir-
cle hook is about right. -Use
shrimp imitations such as the
Berkley Gulp! Using either the
new penny or molting pattern
fished on a 1/8 1/4 ounce jig-
head will work. Vary your speed
and depth of retrieve until you
find the right formula. These
baits can also be fished under
corks like natural baits. Small
bait fish like pinfish, pilchards,
and finger mullet will also pro-
duce and often catch bigger fish.
Remember the bag and size lim-
its-5 trout per person and the
fish must be at least 15 inches
long and only one can be over 20
inches.
Please carefully release any
fish that will not be kept.
In columns to come, strate-
gies for catching trout in warmer
weather will be described.
It's good to be back home
and fishing on the Forgotten
Coast!
Correction
In last week's column an
error appeared. Instead of using
four 6 ounce sinkers for grouper
fishing, it should have read one
sinker between 4 and 6 ounces.


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Accupressure and Deep Massage
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ii 850-670-3777








The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


March 14, 2008 Page 9


Rep. Ker
March 4, 2008 was the
beginning of the final session in
the Florida House of
Representatives for State Rep.
Will Kendrick (R-Carrabelle).
He is serving his fourth and final
consecutive term which will end
in November due to term limits.
Kendrick serves as Chair-
man of the Committee on
Conservation and State Lands.
In outlining his priorities for
the session, Kendrick reported
that he will be spearheading
efforts to rally support for a suc-


idrick enters final session


cessor program to Florida
Forever in the coming months.
Florida Forever funds $300 mil-
lion each fiscal year to various
state agencies and water man-
agement districts for acquisition
and preservation of wetlands,
lands with endangered species,
historic sites, parks, wildlife,
community oriented recreational
facilities, just to name a few.
"We must be stewards of the
land," said Kendrick. "Not only
is it necessary to make sure that
public dollars go to buy public


lands to be available for public
use, but we must make sure those
lands are preserved for future
generations."
Kendrick is also sponsoring
HB 623, which will provide
breakfast to middle and high
school students by the beginning
of the 2010 school year. Studies
have shown that starting the day
with good nutrition improves
attention, behavior, and grades.
If passed, this legislation will not
limit breakfast to.a cafeteria style
setting, but will provide for alter-


native sites to ease the availabili-
ty for students.
In another area, HB 819
filed by Rep. Kendrick would
ease the bureaucracy in applying
for a hunting license for military
personnel with a current military
identification card. The legisla-
tion would eliminate the
required shooting range portion
currently required for obtaining
a license. This is one way to
show appreciation for the service
of our military personnel.


Calhoun & Liberty counties ask state for $10.5 million


BY CAROLINE BREWSTER
Your Capitol Bureau
Calhoun and Liberty coun-
ties have requested $10.5 million
from the state to pay for five proj-
ects. They include
improvements to the town
of Altha sewer system
($8,000,000),
installation of larger pipes
for drinking water in Altha
($1,250,000),
improvements to Calhoun-
Liberty Hospital ($750,000),
installation of security
equipment in Calhoun County
Courthouse ($200,000), and


construction of a records
storage facility for the Liberty
County Commission ($300,000).
The Florida Legislature con-
vened March 4 for its 60-day
Regular session to create the
state's 2008-2009 budget.
Water projects have a higher
possibility of getting funded than
other local projects because
water projects affect a greater
part of the community, said
David Ash, legislative assistant
to Sen. Al Lawson, D-Quincy.
"To the senator, all projects and
all counties are considered prior-
ities. It's a matter of whether or


not the funds are available."
Rep.' Marti Coley, R-
Marianna, said the Calhoun-
Liberty Hospital has a good
chance of receiving state money
this session, although the
requests for the facility have been
vetoed in the past.
Coley said the hospital,
under private management, was
"so mismanaged that it was left
in a financial mess." As the only
hospital in Calhoun and Liberty
counties, Coley said the future of
the hospital is important to coun-
ty residents.
"In an emergency situation,


without the local hospital, it
could take an hour to get to the
nearest medical services," Coley
said. "It is crucial for this hospi-
tal to remain open."
Coley said if requests for
funding of the hospital are
denied this session, she will cop-
tinue to fight for funding next
year. "Keeping the hospital open
has been my top priority. I am
hopeful this session, but it will be
difficult," Coley said. "We've
been fighting to keep (the hospi-
tal) in the budget."


Make your list totally unforgettable


BY FAMILY FEATURES
Have you ever made a gro-
cery list and forgotten to take it
with you? Don't worry, you're
not alone. A recent American
Heart Association survey
showed that nearly 70 percent of
female grocery shoppers that
make grocery lists forget to take
them to the store. Let new tech-


nology help you make forgotten
grocery lists a thing of the past.
The American Heart Associa-
tion has a free online grocery list
builder that lets you save your
grocery list and download it to
your Web-enabled mobile phone
or PDA.
Start by making your list
online. Go to heartcheckmark.


org and click on "My Grocery
List." Choose from hundreds of
foods certified by the American
Heart Association to be low in
saturated fat and cholesterol.
You can also add other needed
items in the My Items category.
Enter your e-mail address to save
your list for future use. Then
print and go, or download the list


from your Web-enabled mobile
phone or PDA by visiting
mylist.heartcheckmark.org.
From there enter your e-mail
address and click retrieve.
For more information about
"My Grocery List" or the
American Heart Association's
Food Certification Program,
visit heartcheckmark.org.


SNZtw (thOn FWQ


The Florida Fish and Wild-
life Conservation Commission is
offering a free hunter safety
Internet completion course in
Wakulla County.
The course will be at the
Wakulla County Sheriff's De-
partment, 15 Oak St. in
Crawfordville. Instruction will
take place from 6-10 p.m.
Thursday, March 20, and 9 a.m.
- noon Saturday, March 22, and
will include the mandatory firing
range portion of the course.
Individuals must bring a
copy of the final report from the
computer portion of the course
in order to be admitted.
Children under 16 must be
accompanied by an adult at all
times. Students are encouraged
to bring a pencil and paper with
them to take notes.
The hunter safety course is
required for anyone born on or
after June 1, 1975, to purchase a
hunting license. The FWC
course satisfies hunter safety
training requirements for all
other states and Canadian
provinces.
People interested in attend-
ing this course can register
online and obtain information
about future hunter safety classes
at MyFWC.com/huntered or by
calling FWC's regional office in
Panama City at 850-265-3676.
Bowhunting
FWC is also is sponsoring a
bowhunting field day in
Jefferson County on March 22
for serious archers who have
taken the online portion of the
course.
The class runs from 9 a.m.
to 5 p.m. at the Beau Turner
Youth Conservation Center,
9194 S. Jefferson Highway in
Monticello.
"The purpose of this class is
to provide advanced instruction
to the bowhunter on such topics
as the fundamentals.of bowhunt-
ing, safety, hunting techniques,
stalking, trailing and sportsman-
ship," said David Crosariol,
regional hunter safety officer.
"Even though it is not required
in Florida, completion, of a
bowhunting class is required in
at least 14 other states before a
hunter can purchase a bowhunt-
ing license."
Participants must have com-
pleted the online National
Bowhunter Education Founda-
tion (NBEF) course and bring
the official NBEF Field Day
Qualifier Voucher with them. In
addition, participants should
dress for hunting and bring their
own archery equipment, includ-
ing bows and arrows (field points
or target points), pen or pencil
and a packed lunch.
People interested in attend-
ing this course can register
online and obtain information
about future bowhunting classes
at myfwc.com/huntered or call
FWC's regional office in
Panama City at 850-265-3676.


"Steps to Unlimited
Possibilities"
"Whoever wants to soar freely on the unlimited pathway of
possibilities must first take steps"
SEAHAWK SENIORS 2008
Dear Community Member and Business Owner,
The First Graduating Class from the new consolidated Franklin
County Schools will be the "Seahawk Seniors 2008". We are honored,
thankful and proud to be part of this community and school. We
would like to team up with you to help make our graduating year'the
most memorable. We have thought hard and long to come up with a
fundraiser that truly brings us all together as a community and recog-
nizes you as a donor.
Leave Your Mark! In appreciation to our community and your sup-
port, we are offering the first "Steps to unlimited possibility" stepping
stones that will pave the pathways along the new school. These step-
ping stones will represent a pathway to a successful education experi-
ence. Each stone you purchase will be placed on the school grounds
for each generation of students to see and be proud that their commu-
nity is supporting them each step of their way.
1. Each stone will be personally engraved with your message to make
it unique to each donor, as seen above. Engravement: up to 2 Lines
with 16 letters each line.
2. Stones are approximately 12" round in diameter and 1" thickness
with smooth edges made of genuine slate stone. A naturally textured
top surface will give each stone depth and beauty
3. Each stepping stone will be $100 and you may purchase as many
stones as you would like, each having a unique personalized message.
Each stones will be displayed at the new school. You may purchase
additional stones for your private garden to show your expanded
school spirit.
Name:
Phone Number:
Address:
Personal Engravement:

Stones Purchased: Check Enclosed $:
MAKE AND MAIL CHECK TO: Project Graduation 2008
(All donations are tax deductible). 661 U.S. Hwy. 98, Eastpoint,
FL 32328.
Thank you very much for teaming with the Seahawk Seniors 2008 in creating a
stronger sense of community, history and in being part of this new and exciting
educational fundraising. All the proceeds will be used as a scholarship to ALL
2008 GRADUATING SENIORS who attend project graduation 2008, For
Questions please contact: (850) 323-0380.


Living Tree Donation Program
Dear Community Member and Business Owner,
Thank you in advance for taking an interest in our children. This let-
ter comes from the parents of the first Consolidated School 2008
Graduating Class of Franklin County.
This project is a first, for Franklin County Schools and for our com-
munity. You will be the first to be part of this great "Living Tree
Donation Program". When you purchase a tree from the Living
Tree Donation Program, you will be helping a graduating senior
expand their possibilities. Many students might not have the
resources to further their education, but with your help they can
achieve avenues they thought would not be possible. The proceeds
from this program will be used as follows: Project Graduation 2008
and to beautify our new Franklin County School Campus.
Project Graduation has been a very successful program in Franklin
County. Immediately after graduation, all seniors return to the
school gym, where they will stay-until the next morning. We call it
Lockdown, during that time; we have safe and entertaining activi-
ties for them that will last all night until the next morning. These
activities will also include educational information regarding col-
lege and how to manage their money and time well. All who attend
will be awarded equal amounts of the Project Graduation 2008
.Scholarship Fund that comes directly from the Living Tree
Donation Fundraiser.
This program not only helps the graduating students, you will also
be beautifying our new "Franklin County School Campus" all the
trees purchased will be planted of the school grounds for all to see
for future years to come. As an appreciation to your donations, we
will be placing your name on the beautiful Donor Tree Wall for all
who enter the Franklin County School Campus to see. Your dona-
tion will always be known and appreciated.

TREES PURCHASED & PLANTED (All trees are native to
our area): Palms/Chase Tree/Southern Magnolia/Live Oak.
DONATION (You may donate as many trees as you would
like): $150 per tree.
Your Name:
Address:
Phone Number:
How many trees will you be donating:
MAKE AND MAIL CHECK TO: Project Graduation 2008
(All donations are tax deductible). Questions: (850) 323-0380.
661 U.S. Hwy. 98, Eastpoint, FL 32328.

GO SEAHAWKS!










Page 10 March 14, 2008


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


I a if You Car' _____________14__PA_____


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VISIT THE FRANKLIN CHRONICLE AT WWW.RANKLINCIRONICLE.NE' .


In the Shadow of the ancient lunar neighbor, a quarter beautiful snapshot of how
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DVD ($19.98) America At Home of "home." It truly is, as the old
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captured during one week last
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The BBC Natural
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If you've somehow never
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Saturday Evening


MarchI15. 2001I 11Sunday Evening


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The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


March 14, 2008 Page 11


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The Franklin Chronicle publishes classified, ads
free for the first 20 words. Up to two free ads
per telephone number. E-mail your informa-
tion to info@franklinchronicle.net.

REWARD: For information leading to stolen
1969 model 2000 Ford tractor diesel, blue and
gray, rusty, 2 old Michelin tires on front, 1 new
turf tire on rear; 5 foot International red bush
hog. Stolen across from St. James golf course
on Hwy. 98. Call (828) 342-9177.

FOR SALE OR RENT: Lanark Village
townhouse for sale or rent. End unit, all new
interior, fully furnished with antiques. Rent
$595 monthly or buy now. Reduced from
$135,900 to $89,900!! 653-3838.

FOR SALE: Carrabelle. 5 city lots reduced
from $80,000 to $65,000. 653-3838.

JOB OPENING: Realty office needs recep-
tionist. Strong interpersonal, computer and
communication skills. Detail oriented, able to
track multiple tasks. Entry level. For details,
see ad on page 15.

FOR RENT: 1 bedroom, 1 bath, historic
downtown Apalachicola second-floor apart-
ment, with balcony facing Market Street. $750


a month. All appliances. First, last, plus secu-
rity; 850-323-0599.

YARD SALE: Franklin/Gulf Retired
Educators Yard Sale for Scholarships, 9 a.m.
to noon, Saturday, March 15, at Gulf State
Community Bank in Carrabelle.

FOR SALE: Plymouth Voyager (87). Not
pretty, but good transportation. A/C works,
needs paint job. Get on the road for $400. Call
Greg, 228-6876.

FOR RENT: 1 bedroom townhouse,
Newman Drive, Lanark Village, $550 per
month, includes water, can be furnished, front
unit, carport, washer/dryer. Call 1-229-377-
4144 or 1-229-200-3212.

ANNOUNCEMENT: Could you have used
extra cash this past holiday season? Local
handmade items. Get started now! Carrabelle
Bazaar Dec. 2008.

FOR SALE: 40 acres, Pine Coast Plantation
on Crooked River, $350,000. Call for details.
Bobby Turner, 850-528-3306.

FOR RENT: Alligator Point 2 bed 2 bath
home $850/month, 6/12 month lease, fur-
nished or unfurnished. 349-2408.


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Franklin County is no stranger to storms, as this photo published in 1899, shows. This
unidentified ship was grounded by a hurricane on Dog Island, according to the photograph-
ic files of the Archives of Florida History.


Get set for the 6th Annual

MusicFest at the Dixie


On Friday and Saturday,
March 14 and 15, the Dixie
Theatre in Apalachicola will
present the 6th Annual
Apalachicola MusicFest. This
year's talent hails from
Gainesville, Florida and Atlanta.
On Friday, March 14, vocal-
ist Brenda Bayne, who is a regu-
lar on the Florida jazz scene,
presents her repertoire of popu-
lar standards and overlooked
gems. Brenda has played with
many fine musicians, including
Gene Bertoncini, Manfredo
Fest, Richard Drexler, Barry
Greene, Don Scaletta, Kevin
Sanders, and Mark Neuensch-
wander-to name a few. She
recently performed in New York
City at the Museum of Modern
Art. Friends of Jazz & Blues
and has released the recording
"Brenda Bayne Live at the
Thomas Center." Brenda has
made recent appearances in the
New England area including per-
forming at the well-known jazz
club The Press Room in Ports-
mouth.


Performing with Brenda will
be bassist Mark Neuensch-wan-
der. Originally a French hornist,
Mark adopted the bass in order
to perform more jazz and con-
temporary music. He has worked
with Rosemary Clooney, Billy
Eckstine, Marvin Hamlisch, Red
Skelton, Leslie Uggams, and
Roger Williams. Neuenschwan-
der has performed regularly at
the USF Suncoast Jazz Festival
and Clearwater Jazz Holiday.
The third member of the trio is
Robert D'Amico who is a profes-
sor of philosophy at University
of Florida and currently the
department's chair. He hails
from a family of professional
and amateur musicians; he
inherited a life-long love of jazz
and those standards that make
up what is now called The
American Song Book.
On Saturday, March 15, the
Julie Gribble Band will perform.
Darren Michaels and Sean
Bennett round out the band.
Gribble's music has been fea-
tured on Lifetime movie "Dive


IXIE
THEATRE

APALACHICOLA, FLA,


Tickets & Reservations
850-653-3200
www.DixieTheatre. cor
Info Line: 653-3456


COUNTY FLORIDRf


H FLORIDA E .
Humanities
COUNCIL


at Clauson's Pier," popular
Nickelodeon shows "Zoey 101,"
"Drake and Josh" and their TV
movie "Drake & Josh Go to
Hollywood," as well as "South
of Nowhere," Noggin and
"Smallville" on the WB. Guest
appearances include The Late
Late Show with Craig Ferguson
and The Tyra Banks Show on
CBS. She received the 2005 LA
Music Award for Best Adult
Alternative Artist and the
American Idol Underground
featured her as one of the Best
Emerging Artists of 2006. She
has also been featured in Music
Connection Magazine's Hot 100
unsigned bands as well as the
Top 25 demo critiques. Gribble
has currently been signed on for
deals with MUZAK and
TruSonic. Her latest release,
"Echoes in my Head," had
worldwide release in early sum-
mer, 2007.
The shows start at 8 p.m.
Tickets are $25. Call the Dixie
Theatre Box Office at 653-3200.


Presents...
The 2008
Professional Season


Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section
has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle
with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any
one of the nine sections that you've already used elsewhere
in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once
in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical
column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you
correctly fill every square. Answer to this week's Sudoku
Puzzle is on page 13.


1 2

3 4 5

2 3 6 47

8 7 9 61 1

7 9

9 4 2 5 8

39 27 6

6 1 4

2 8


Now is the time to
subscribe to the

FRANKLIN

CHRONICLE
The Chronicle is published every Friday.
Mailed subscriptions within Franklin County
are $22.00 including taxes for one year. The
out-of-county rate is $29.00 including taxes.

Subscriber
Address
City -.._ State
Zip
Telephone
E-Mail ..

El Renewal! If renewal, please include mailing label.
O Out-of-County: $29.00
O In-County: $22.00

Date: -
Please send this form to: Franklin Chronicle
Post Office Box 590
Eastpoint, Florida 32328


SThe DIXIE Does Nashville

S6th Annual Apalachicola
MUSIC FEST
SBOB PATTERSON
(on March 21, 22, 23)


Housing arrangements for
performers are provided in
0part by the Water Street
Hotel and Marina in
downtown Apalachicola. www.waterstreethotel.com


I


~IEJ~


I


A L CALL Y 0 WNE NE WSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


Page 12 March 14, 2008


17- '


sl-


-e
1
L
(p~p\' ~~ ~t~ 1. I







The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


March 14, 2008 Page 13


How to create a multi-purpose office/guest room


Dear Jane,
I am struggling on how to
create a home office/guestroom
in the space I have. I need the
room to function well as an
office because I have my own
home-based business, but I want
it to look great for guests. My
thoughts are to create a wall bed,
desk and shelves, but I don't
know the first place to start. Can
you help?
Melissa
Dear Melissa,
Your dilemma is a common
one: how do you make one room
serve two purposes? With guests
visiting only a few times a year, a
spare bedroom is rarely used for
anything other than storage. But
it doesn't have to be that way!
Amy, a Jane-in-training, had
the very same problem. She too


Congressfrom Page 1
agement strategy. In 1972, the
state of Florida created five
water management districts that
were given broad statutory
authority and were charged with
developing regional water supply
plans, amongst other things. In
stark contrast, the state of
Georgia has allowed for unbri-
dled development with little to
no thought of its increased water
needs until recently.
"In order for us to success-
fully and responsibly address the
water sharing issue, we must
look at the big picture and tackle
both our short term and long
term problems," Boyd stated. "In
the short term, we must reach a
tri-state agreement with strong
enforcement measures so that
our immediate need for fresh
water can be addressed. In the
long term, states must plan for
their continuing water supply
needs, which Georgia has failed
to do."
Kevin Begos, the Executive
Director of the Franklin County
Oyster & Seafood Task Force
and a member of the
Apalachicola River Riparian
County Stakeholders Coalition,
also testified before the
Subcommittee on Water
Resources and Environment. He
explained the hardships caused
by lack of freshwater flowing
downriver.

THE
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
WELCOMES YOU










Jdnitcj

850-653-9550
Highway 98 & 6th Street
Apalachicola
EST. 1836
SUNDAY
8:00 A.M.
10:30 A.M.


Be J"he
By Heidi Baker
and Eden Jarrin
worked from home and regularly
entertained guests. Jennifer envi-
sioned that glamorous, old-
Hollywood look for the room,
but more importantly, she didn't
want her guests to feel like they
were sleeping in an office!
To kick off this soon-to-be
dual-functioning room, we
removed her closet and convert-


ed it into a chic work station,
complete with lights, shelves and
storage space. The space could
be hidden by long floor-to-ceil-
ing curtains when guests were
staying with Jennifer, and pulled
back when she was at work.
Since we removed Jennifer's
closet altogether, we built a new
one! Constructed in a day, this
mini-closet holds enough clothes
for a guest to hang their hats for
a couple of days. Hopefully you
don't host guests who stay much
longer than that! You could also
purchase a large armoire or
rolling storage unit.
To give the room that old
Hollywood appeal and make it
cozy, we painted the.walls a dark
metallic grey, then added plush
wall panels made of a thin piece
of wood wrapped with foam and
a luxurious yellow flocked che-


nille fabric. Not only do these
fancy-up the room, but the pan-
els add softness and absorb
sound.
Finally, we mounted mirrors
on the wall to keep the space
looking roomy. We purchased
six full-length mirrors for under
$10 a piece, painted the frame
white, and arranged them clus-
tered together on the wall.
Jennifer did have a day bed
which helped cut down on space
allocated to furniture, and dou-
bles as a great couch. A wall-bed
is a good idea too if you want
something completely up off the
floor. But make sure you have
enough room to pull the bed
down.
The overall result? Adual-
purpose room that's both glam-
orous & workable!


Outside of Rep. Allen Boyd's Washington, D.C. office are (left to right) Chad Taylor, Kevin
Begos, Rep. Boyd, Joseph (Smokey) Parrish and Dave McLain.


"This is not a case of people
versus mussels. It is about find-
ing a way for all the vital needs
along the river to be fairly bal-
anced, from cities to farms, to
seafood producers to the envi-
ronment. The seafood industry
drives our economy in Franklin
County, and many of our neigh-


bors upstream rely on the
Apalachicola River."
Also in Washington for the
hearing were other members of
the Apalachicola River Riparian
County Stakeholders Coalition:
Franklin County Commissioner
Joseph (Smokey) Parrish, Dave
McLain, Coordinator of the


Apalachicola River Riparian
County Stakeholders Coalition
and Senior Policy Director of the
Apalachicola Riverkeepers; and
Chad Taylor, one of the repre-
sentatives from Jackson County
on the Riparian Coalition.


Volunteer ag readers sought
Florida agriculture industry representatives, University of brate Florida Ag Literacy Day's
volunteers are asked to register Florida IFAS Extension and 4-H fifth anniversary.
to read for Florida Agriculture agents, FFA teachers and stu- Registration for Florida
Literacy Day 2008 by visiting dents are invited to read a special Agriculture Literacy Day is
Florida Agriculture in the children's book developed in available online at Florida Ag in
Classroom, Inc.'s web site honor of this year's event. the Classroom's web. site
www.agtag.org "These Florida Farms" -is a www.agtag.org for the first time.
The event is scheduled for children's book developed by the The registration deadline is
Thursday, April 10, 2008 and Florida Department of Agricul- Friday March 28 for agriculture
hundreds of farmers, ranchers, ture and Consumer Services' industry volunteers who plan to
growers, 'agriculture industry Division of Marketing to cele- read on April 10.


St. George Island
United Methodist Church

YOU ARE INVITED TO
SUNDAY WORSHIP AT 9:00 A.M.


201 E. Gulf Beach Drive on the Island
Phone: 927-2088 Website: sgiumc.org
Pastoc Themo Patriotis Dir. of Creative Ministries: Dusty Turner


VISIT US AT: WWW.FRANKLINCHRONICLE.NET


Whafesrld7

0 G I L E -W I T KIEI
E C CI


S D8 M E EdT, E,

u L A E6 IL L 0I
N l olu Tsr i E~I

TIO R I E 0 s L yLICI

T 11 r[R EI I K N IIE E V
VAS DIENES DAYS JAWS E
M1oilOEDlENiYinSlilERIE!


EARTH


TALKS
Questions & Answers
About Our Environment
Dear EarthTalk:
I just read an article that said
air fresheners contain chemicals
that can cause health problems
when inhaled. Are scented can-
dles any better?
-Leanne Chacksfield, Cincin-
nati, OH
Like most air fresheners,
many scented candles contain
and release phthalates, potential-
ly harmful. chemicals that have
been linked to the disruption of
hormonal systems and other
health problems in people
exposed to them: Burning can-
dles can also emit small amounts
of acetaldehyde, formaldehyde
and naphthalene, organic chemi-
cals that are also potentially
harmful and that can leave nasty
black soot deposits on floors and
other surfaces.
According to Pamela
Lundquist of the nonprofit
Children's Health Environment-
al Coalition (CHEC), this black
soot deposit "is primarily made
up of elemental carbon, but may
also contain phthalates and
volatile organic compounds like
benzene and toluene, which can
cause cancer and neurological
damage."
Children can easily ingest
these chemicals if their hands
have been wandering and end up
in their mouths. The chemicals
can lodge deep in the lungs, dis-
rupting the lower respiratory
tract, exacerbating existing prob-
lems like asthma, and potentially
causing other longer term breath-
ing problems.
Despite laws against it,
many candlewicks still contain
lead, long linked to impaired
learning and brain damage in
children. Lead dispersed from
burning candles can be breathed
in and also constitute part of the
dreaded black soot deposit.
Candles with lead-containing
wicks are on the U.S. Consumer
Product Safety. Commission
ban/recall list now (thanks to
efforts by nonprofits like U.S.
Public Interest Research Group
(PIRG), but many are still out
there on store shelves.
Consumers can avoid them by
sticking to candles with soft cot-
ton wicks, not stiff, metal ones.
Eco-conscious candle burn-
ers should also avoid paraffin-
based candles, which are made
from waxes derived in the
process of refining crude oil and
literally consist of fossil-fuel gen-
Continued on Page 15





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Following is a list of the
February 2008 dispositions of
cases in 2nd Circuit Court, Judge
James C. Hankinson presiding.
Bentley, Franklin J.: Probation
violation hearing for original
charge of Burglary of a dwelling
and Grand Theft of a firearm on
June 15 2004. Defendant adjudi-
cated guilty-probation revoked.
Defendant sentenced to 24
months at DOC with credit for
time served of 125 days.
Defendant to pay transportation
charges of $804.20, submit to
DNA test.
Brooks, Randy C.: Pre-trial con-
ference for original charge (s) on
May 22 2007 for 2 counts of
Lewd or Lascivious Battery. (1
count reduced to lesser battery
on a child; other count dropped
by SAO) Defendant entered plea
of No Contest-adjudicated
guilty. Defendant sentenced to
263 days in jail, with credit for
time served of 263 days; 60
months probation, no contact
with victim, no unsupervised
contact with minors, not to be
within 1000 ft of school, day-
care, playground; can not work,
live or volunteer at school, day-
care, playground; curfew 10pm
to 6am; appeal rights waived,
submit to DNA testing, proba-:
tion may transfer to Alabama.
$762 costs.
Brooks, Randy, C.: Defendant
charged on January 6 2008 with
Battery on Law Enforcement
Officer. Defendant entered a plea
of No Contest-adjudicated
guilty. Defendant credited with
37 days of jail time served.
Concurrent with above case.
Brown, Roosevelt III: Proba-
tion violation hearing for origi-
nal charge of 2 counts of Battery
on Child on Aug 7 2006.
Defendant entered a plea of
guilty-probation reinstated.
Defendant sentenced to 434 days
in jail with credit for time served
of 434 days. Defendant to sub-
mit to DNA test. Any other con-
ditions not met to be reimposed.
Burch, Kimberly Ann: Case
management hearing for original
charge c;- July 2 2006 for
Possession of Controlled Sub-
stance with Intent to Sell within
1000 ft of church. Defendant
admitted probation violation-
adjudicated guilty. Defendant
court ordered for substance eval-
uation-follow treatment recom-
mendations; no use of alcohol,
24 months community control
and any conditions not met are
reimposed. Defendant credited
with 93 days jail time served.
Counts and cases concurrent.
Burch, Kimberly Ann: Case
management hearing for original
charge on December 24 2007 for
Grand Theft. Defendant entered
a plea of No Contest-adjudicat-
ed Guilty. Defendant referred for
substance abuse evaluatibn-fol-
low treatment recommenda-
tions; 24 months community
control, no use of alcohol or
drugs, no contact with specified
person. $410 costs. Counts and
cases concurrent.
Buzbee, Christopher: Probation
violation hearing for original
charge of Aggravated Assault on
Dec 13 2006. Defendant adjudi-
cated guilty-sentenced to 158
days in jail with credit for time
served of 158 days. Defendant


sentenced to 24 months proba-
tion (new)-with standard condi-
tions of*probation. Defendant to
submit to random urinalysis test-
ing and pay costs thereof, as well
as submitting to DNA tests.
Creamer, James D.: Probation
Violation Arraignment for origi-
nal charge on August 1 2006 for
Grand Theft Motor Vehicle.
Defendant found in violation of
probation-adjudicated guilty-
probation revoked. Defendant
sentenced to 11 months 29 days
DOC, with credit for time served
of 300 days, submit to DNA test-
ing.
Crum, Lonnie Nathan: Case
management hearing for original
charge on December 11 2007 for
Sale or Possession of Marijuana
with Intent to Sell within 1000 ft
of schools. Defendant entered a
plea or No Contest-adjudicated
guilty. Defendant sentenced to
46 days in jail with credit for
time served of 46 days; referred
for substance abuse evaluation-
follow treatment recommenda-
tions-sign up for treatment with-
in 39 days; no use of alcohol or
drugs; pay costs of alcohol-drug
testing, 24 months probation,
submit to DNA tests. $510 costs.
Dean, Charles R.: Disposition
hearing for original charge on
September 13 2007 for
Trafficking in Controlled Sub-
stance. Defendant pled No
Contest on October 9 2007.
Reduced to lesser charge of Sale
of a Controlled Substance.
Defendant adjudicated guilty-
sentenced to 36 months proba-
tion, credit for time served in jail
of 27 days, submit to substance
abuse evaluation-follow treat-
ment recommendations, no use
of alcohol or drugs, submit to
DNA testing. $510 costs. Defen-
dant admitted violation of pro-
bation-adjudicated guilty-proba-
tion revoked. Defendant entered
a plea of no contest on charges 6-
7, adjudicated guilty. Defendant
sentenced to 1 yr and 1 day at
DOC for count #6, credit on
DUI charge for 31 days jail time
served, 6 months license suspen-
sion, 10 day vehicle impound-
ment, DUI school level 1, 50


hours community service, sub-
mit to DNA testing, all counts
concurrent.
Drucker, Carl J.: Probation vio-
lation hearing for original charge
of Possession of Controlled
Substance Cocaine, and Felony
Driving While License Sus-
pended. Defendant adjudicated
guilty-probation revoked.
Defendant sentenced to 1 year
and 1 day at DOC with credit for
time served of 90 days.
Defendant will also submit to
DNA tests.
Ellis, David: Disposition of
original charge on September 13
2007 for Sale of Cocaine.
Defendant plea of No Contest
entered January 15 2008-adjudi-
cated guilty. Defendant sen-
tenced to 18 months probation,
credit for jail time served of 2
days, 6 months community serv-
ice, referred for substance abuse
evaluation-follow treatment rec-
ommendations, no use of alco-
hol or drugs; pay costs of alco-
hol-drug testing.$410 costs.
Estes, Robert C.: Disposition of
original charges) on February 1
2007 for Possession of
Controlled Substance with In-
tent to Sell of Deliver and
Introducing Contraband into a
County Detention Facility and
three (3) counts of Sale of
Controlled Substance. Defen-
dant plea of No Contest entered
on June 12 2007-adjudicated
guilty. Defendant sentenced to
36 months at DOC (jail credit to
be determined) followed by 10
years probation and 2 years com-
munity service on each count, to
be served concurrently. Submit
to DNA testing.
Evans, Carl Eric: Disposition of
original charge on January 12
2007 for Possession of Firearm
by Convicted Felon and Inter-
fering with FWC Officer.
Defendant plea of No Contest
entered on January 15 2008-
adjudicated guilty. Defendant
sentenced to 6 months in jail
with credit for time served of 6
days, 18 months probation with
standard conditions, jail time to
count as part of probationary
period, submit to DNA testing.


$410 costs.
Graham, Anthony J.: Probation
Violation Arraignment for origi-
nal charge on December 22 2006
for Sale of Cocaine. Defendant
admitted violation of probation-
adjudicated guilty-probation re-
voked. Defendant sentenced to 1
year and 1 day at DOC with
credit for time served of 69 days;
submit to DNA testing.
Hicks, Lorne Jr.: Probation
Violation Arraignment for origi-
nal charges (3) on September 21
2007 for (1) Burglary of
dwelling; (2) Dealing stolen
property, and (3) Criminal mis-
chief 3rd degree felony.
Defendant admitted violation of
probation-probation reinstated
and modified. Defendant sen-
tenced to 40 days in jail with
credit for 40 days time served,
submit to DNA testing; any con-
ditions not met in initial proba-
tion reimposed.
Jackson, Jenna W: Defendant
charged on January 12 2008 for
(1) Introduction of Contraband
into a County facility, January
24 2008 for (2) Possession of
Controlled Substance Cocaine
and January 12, 2008 for (3)
DUI. Defendant entered a plea
of No Contest-adjudication
withheld on count 2, adjudicated
guilty on cqunt 3. Defendant
sentenced to 24 months proba-
tion on count 2, referred to sub-
stance abuse evaluation-follow
treatment recommendations
(DUI), DUI School Level 1, 10
days vehicle impound, 50 hours
community service, no use of
alcohol or drugs, pays costs for
alcohol-drug testing, drivers
license suspended for 6 months,
submit to DNA testing. $710
costs.
Jones, Christopher J.: Proba-
tion violation hearing for origi-
nal charge of Sale of Cocaine on
April 9 2007. Defendant found
in violation-adjudicated guilty.
Defendant sentenced to 111 days
in jail, with credit for time served
of 111 days; and sentenced to 24
months probation; curfew 7pm-
7am. Defendant to submit to
DNA tests.
Loos, Samuel Lawrence: Case


management hearing for original
charge on December 27 2007 for
Uttering. Defendant entered a
plea of No Contest-adjudication
withheld. Defendant referred for
substance abuse evaluation-fol-
low treatment recommenda-
tions-sign up for treatment with-
in 30 days; no alcohol or drug
use, pay costs of alcohol-drug
testing, submit to DNA testing,
60 months probation. Defendant
also to pay $9425 restitution to
victim at rate of $150 per month.
$410 costs.
Mahon, Heather: Probation vio-
lation hearing for original charge
of 2 counts of Child Neglect
Without Great Harm. Defen-
dant found in violation of condi-
tions of probation-adjudicated
guilty-probation revoked. Defen-
dant sentenced to 1 year and 1
day in DOC, with credit for jail
time served of 112 days. Counts
to run concurrent. Defendant to
submit to DNA tests.
Marshall, Edkah L.: Defendant
charged on September 5 2007
with 3 counts of Sale of
Controlled Substance Marijua-
na. Defendant entered a plea of
No Contest-adjudicated guilty.
Defendant sentenced to 36
months at DOC with credit for
160 days time served. Defendant
to submit to DNA testing. $820
costs.
Martin, Bobby Clay: Defendant
charged with Resisting Officer
with violence; felony battery.
Defendant entered a plea of No
Contest-adjudicated guilty. De-
fendant sentenced to 34 days in
jail with credit for time served of
34 days; referred for substance
abuse evaluation-follow treat-
ment recommendations-enter
treatment within 30 days, no
alcohol or drug use, pay costs of
alcohol-drug testing, 36 months
probation, submit to DNA test-
ing. Defendant also to attend
counseling per DCF recommen-
dations. $762 costs.
McDaniel, Roger: Probation
Violation Arraignment for origi-
nal charge on December 22 2006
for Worthless check over $150
dollars. Defendant admitted pro-
Continued on Page 15


STEVEN P. GLAZER

Attorney and Counselor at Law

Criminal and Juvenile Defense

State and Federal Courts

3 High Drive, Crawfordville, FL

Defending people accused of crimes since 1988

DFNDR720@AOL.COM


850.926.1234



.. .. .. .


A L OCALL Y 0 KWE NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


Page 14 March 14, 2008








The Franklin Chronicle A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER March 14, 2008 Page 15


Court Report from Page 14
bation violation-probation re-
voked-adjudicated guilty. Defen-
dant sentenced to 51 months
probation, credit for jail time
served of 76 days; sentence con-
current with any sentence now
serving; attend and complete
NPI and Aftercare (to remain in
jail until taken).
Moses, Charles D.: Case man-
agement hearing for original
charge (multiple) for DUI,
Felong Fleeing or Attempt to
Elude, Resisting Officer with
Violence and Felony Battery.
Warrant dismissed-conditions
met. Probation completed-termi-
nated.
Nichols, Bob Nelson: Probation
Violation Arraignment for origi-
nal charge on October 16 2006
for Flagrant Violation of Net
Law. Defendant admitted viola-
tion of probation-probation
modified and reinstated. Defend-
ant credited with 34 days jail
time served, sentenced to sign up
within 30 days and attend
Batterer's Intervention program,
submit to DNA testing, any con-
ditions not met reimposed.
Richards, Christopher Ralph:
Defendant charged on January
13 2008 for (1) Driving While
License Suspended Felony, and
(2) DUI. Defendant entered plea
of No Contest-adjudicated
guilty. Defendant sentenced to 1
year and 1 day at DOC for count
1 (DWLS), Count No 2 DUI-
sentenced to 31 days in jail with
credit for 31 days jail time
served, 6 months license suspen-
sion, DUI School Level 1, 10 day
vehicle impound, 50 hours com-


munity service. All counts to run
concurrent. Additionally defen-
dant to submit to DNA testing.
$710 costs.
Richards, Christopher Ralph:
Probation Violation Arraign-
ment originally charged on
September 15, 2006 for (1)
Felony Fleeing or Attempting to
Elude, (2) Grand Theft Motor
Vehicle, (3) Possession of
Prescription Drug without Pre-
scription, (4) Criminal Mischief
3rd Degree Felony, (5) Driving
While License Suspended
Felony; new charges January 13
2008 for (6) Driving while
license suspended felony, and (7)
DUI.
Shahan, Dustin C.: Defendant
charged on October 26 2007
with Possession with Intent to
Sell Marijuana. (State Attorneys
office to drop charge.) Defendant
charged on Nov 21 2007 with
Burglary of a Dwelling, (State
Attorneys office to drop charge.)
Grand Theft 3rd degree, posses-
sion of marijuana, possession of
drug paraphernalia. Defendant
entered a plea of No Contest-
adjudication withheld. Defend-
ant sentenced to attend and com-
plete NPI, remain in jail until
taken, credit for time served of
83 days, 30 months probation,
no use of alcohol and/or drugs,
random testing, submit to DNA
testing. $510 costs.
Stephenson, Frank H.: Defen-
dant charged on September 15
2007 with (1) felony fleeing or
attempting to elude officer, and
(2) DUI. Defendant entered a
plea of no contest-adjudicated
guilty on DUI charge; felony
fleeing charge dropped by State


Attorneys Office. Defendant sen-
tenced to 6 months probation,
substance abuse evaluation-fol-
low treatment recommendations
(part of DUI school), sign up
with DUI school Level 1 within
30 days, 10 days vehicle im-
pound, 6 months license suspen-
sion, 50 hours community serv-
ice at 10 hrs per month. $670
costs.
Stepp, Daniel Alan: Defendant
charged on November 20 2007
for (1) grand theft, and (2) deal-
ing stolen property. Defendant
entered a plea of no contest-
adjudicated guilty. Defendant
sentenced to 24 months commu-
nity control followed by 24 and
36 months probation, credit for
75 days jail time served, submit
to substance abuse evaluation-
follow treatment recommenda-
tions-sign up within 30 days, no
use of alcohol or-drugs, submit
to random testing, .submit to
DNA testing, no contact with
specified parties, $2695 restitu-
tion to victim at $150 per month,
$7000 to another victim at $150
per month. $820 costs.
Thompson, Vernon: Case man-
agement hearing for original
charge on December 29 2006 for
Possession of Controlled Sub-
stance without Prescription.
Defendant entered plea in absen-
tia-admitted probation violation.
Defendant credited with 12 days
jail time served and probation
reinstated and modified. Defen-
dant sentenced to substance
abuse evaluation-follow treat-
ment recommendations; 10 day
vehicle impound, DUI school
level 1, 6 months Dept of
Licensing suspension, 50 hours


community service, submit to
DNA testing and any conditions
not met are reimposed, $710
costs.
Turrell, Jeremy J.: Case man-
agement hearing for original
charge on September 13 2007 for
Sale of Cocaine. Defendant
entered a plea of No Contest-
adjudication withheld. Defend-
ant sentenced to 30 days in jail
with credit for time served of 2
days-defendant to turn himself
into jail at 5pm on February 18
2008; sentenced to 24 months
probation, referred for substance
abuse evaluation-follow treat-
ment recommendations, pay
costs of alcohol-drug testing, no
use of alcohol or drugs, submit
to DNA testing. $410 costs.
Wallace, Kenneth L.: Defend-
ant charged on January 17 2008
for Sale of Controlled Substance.
Defendant entered a plea of No
Contest-adjudicated guilty.
Defendant sentenced to- 24
months at DOC with credit for
28 days jail time served, submit
to DNA testing. Sentence con-
current with other charges.
Wallace, Kenneth L.: Probation
Violation Hearing for original
charges; (1) August 10 2004 for
aggravated battery on pregnant
victim; and (2) March 30 2005
for battery by inmate. Defendant
admitted violating probation-
found in violation-adjudicated
guilty-probation revoked. Defen-
dant sentenced to (1) 72 months
at DOC with credit for 641 days
jail time served; (2) 60 months at
DOC with credit of 778 days jail
time served; sentences concur-
rent with these charges and pre-
vious charge above.


Earth Talk from Page 13
rating hydrocarbons. Unfortun-
ately, the vast majority of com-
mercially available candles are
made from paraffin, though
many alternatives are now avail-
able.
Soy-based candles are a pop-
ular choice, as they are made
from plant waste and emit less
soot than the paraffin variety.
Beeswax candles are another
nice alternative, as well, especial-
ly if you can pick them up at a
local farmers' market. For scent-
ed or aromatherapy candles,
look for varieties that use only
pure plant essential oils instead
of synthetic chemicals with
unintelligible names. Some
leader makers of Earth- and peo-
ple-friendly candles include Blue
Corn Naturals, Honeyflow
Farm, Vermont Soy Candles and
Aveda.
CONTACTS: Children's
Health Environmental Coalition
(CHEC), www.checnet.org; Blue
Corn Naturals, www.bluecorn-
naturals.com; Honeyflow Farm,
www. honeyflowfarm. com;
Vermont Soy Candles, www.ver-


montsoycandles.com;
www.aveda.com.


Aveda,


GOT AN ENVIRONMEN-
TAL QUESTION? Send it to:
EarthTalk, c/o E/The Environ-
mental Magazine, P.O. Box
5098, Westport, CT 06881; sub-
mit it at: www.emagazine.
com/earthtalk/thisweek/, or e-
mail: earthtalk@emagazine.
com. Read past columns at:
www.emagazine.com/earth-
talk/archives.php.


%/ MARTIN'S


-HOUSE


OF COINS


WE BUY OLD COINS

The coin market is on fire!

Cash in before it cools down.

We just paid $1425.00 for a jar of coins that
someone's grandmother left to them!
If you can't come to us, we will come to you.


martinshouseofcoins@msn.com



850653666 o


850-697-3189~


We also have an opening for ad sales staff to work part time on commission basis.


MOTIVATED RECEPTIONIST WANTED
FOR BUSY REAL ESTATE OFFICE
ON ST. GEORGE ISLAND
If you are energetic, quick to learn, love to multi-task and meet people,
this is the job for you. Must have strong interpersonal skills, computer
skills and communication skills (both verbal and written). Must be
detail oriented and able to track multiple tasks simultaneously. Entry
level position. Please phone 850-927-2666 and ask for Rose Drge, or
send your resume by email to:
ROSE DRYE, PRESDEN, PRUDENTIAL RESORT REALTY
irdre@stgeorMeislancdcom




SCISSOR'S PALACE

& DAY SPA
European Pedicure Spa o European Facials
Body W ps & Waxing Hair Gel Nails
Phone: 850-670-5220 I
338 Highway 98, Eastpoint, FL 32328
S WALK-INS WELCOME o OWNER: ANGELA CREAMER








Send details to:
P.O. Box 13557
Denver, Colorado 80201




Ft&1i4 Tw4i
Talk about being made of money. The dining room walls of
Florida's Cabbage Key Inn and Restaurant--(in Cabbage
Key) are covered in dollar bills-more'than $10,000
worth-held in place with masking tape. Each bill is signed .
by the tourist who put it. th re. .-- .-:


A L OCALL Y 0 WNE NE WSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


March 14, 2008 Page 15










SPanhandle Players annual meeting

is open to all lovers of theatre


THURSDAY, MARCH 13
5:30 7 p.m.: Apalachicola Bay Chamber of Commerce
Business After Hours, Coombs House Inn, 80 Sixth Street,
Apalachicola.
6 p.m.: Concerned Citizens of Franklin County symposium
on Florida Sunshine laws, Eastpoint Firehouse. Conducted by
the First Amendment Foundation. Everyone invited to learn
about your rights to government information and get a better
understanding of the Florida Sunshine laws.
FRIDAY, MARCH 14
8 p.m.: Apalachicola Music Fest, Dixie Theatre, Call (850)
653-3200 for info.
SATURDAY, MARCH 15
8 a.m. 9 p.m.: Easrpoint Fire Department Charity Rib
Cookoff, Eastpoint Firehouse, BBQ ribs and chicken, live
music, car show, face painting and rides. Prizes will be awarded
to rib cookoff contestants and car show contestants. For more
information call (850) 670-9000
9 a.m. noon: Franklin/Gulf Retired Educators Yard Sale
for Scholarships, Gulf State Community Bank in Carrabelle.
8 p.m.: Apalachicola Music Fest, Dixie Theatre. Call (850)
653-3200 for info.
SUNDAY, MARCH 16
4 p.m.: Historic Trinity Church in Apalachicola, The
Crucifixion, presented by the Apalachicola Bay Area Choral
Society. Admission, donation $2.
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 19
11 a.m. 3 p.m.: Beverly Mount-Douds invites the public to
Dolores's Sweet Shoppe & Restaurant, 29 Ave. E, Apalachicola,
to share historic photos of Apalachicola for a book she is
researching. For information, contact her at
bmdouds2002t@yahoo.com or call (850)-229-1094.
SATURDAY, MARCH 22
9 a.m. 4 p.m.: Green Living & Energy Expo at Riversprings
Middle School, 800 Spring Creek Highway, Crawrodville. Free
Admission. For information, visit www.greenlivingenergyex-
po.com.
TUESDAY, MARCH 25
7 p.m.: The Panhandle Players Annual Membership meeting
at the Carriage House of the Raney House Museum at Avenue
"F" and Market Street in Apalachicola. Anyone interested in
theater is invited.
Send your announcements of upcoming meetings and other special occa-
sions to the Community Calendar at news@(FranklinChronicle.net.
We'll also announce birthdays in this column at no charge.


Carrabelle man arrested

after shooting incident


A Carrabelle man was
arrested on charges of attempted
murder this month after an early
morning brawl.
Carrabelle police reports
said the man was also charged
with shooting into a vehicle, dis-
charging a firearm in public and
possession of a firearm by a con-
victed felon.
Here's what happened,
according to police reports:
At about 4 a.m. on March "
authorities received reports u.
shots being fired on Northeast


SThird Street. Shortly thereafter,
the car the suspect reportedly
was driving was found at his
home on Sanborn Road, where
he was arrested.
While investigating the
shooting scene, officers discov-
ered that a 1986 Chevy pickup
had been shot several times.
According to witnesses, the
shooting came after a fight
involving a handful of people.
After his arrest, the man was
treated at the hospital for injuries
sustained in the fight.


PHOTO BY SKIP FRINK
Carrabelle Officer Craig Kincaid receives his new Sergeant
rank from City Manager John McInnis and Commissioner
Richard Sands (right to left) during this month's Carrabelle
City Commission meeting.


Bored? Need to get out of
the house more? Ever dream of a
life on the stage? Do you envy
Chuck Norris or Keira
Knightley? Well, if so, do we
have a deal for you! The
Panhandle Players Annual
Membership Meeting is coming
up on Tuesday, March 25th, at 7
p.m. at the Carriage House of
the Raney House Museum at
Avenue "F" and Market Street in
Apalachicola.
You don't have to be a mem-
ber to attend, just have an inter-


BY DANY RAY
Library Assistant
The Franklin County Public
Library, Eastpoint Branch will
host this month's library adviso-
ry board meeting: The public is
invited to attend the March 17,
meeting at 5:30 p.m. in the youth
room.
Both branches of the library,
Carrabelle and Eastpoint, will
close at noon on Friday, March
21, and all day Saturday, March
22, in observance of Good
Friday and the Easter holiday.
The library will open for regular


Florida Highway Patrol will con-
duct driver license/vehicle in-
spection checkpoints during day-
light hours at the following loca-
tions:
* March 14-20: CR 370, CR


est in any aspect of the theatre.
There are opportunities for peo-
ple of all ages who are interested
in acting, stage craft, costuming,
makeup, or publicity, to name a
few of the many roles you might
play as a member of The Players.
The Panhandle Players pro-
vides opportunity and encour-
agement to all persons to become
involved with the many aspects
of theatrical and performing arts
and membership is open to any
person interested in the develop-
ment of and participation in the


hours, on Tuesday, March 25
Children's Story Adventures
will move from Thursday after-
noons to 10 a.m. every Thursday
morning, beginning Thursday,
March 13. Children preschool to
age three are invited to partici-
pate in the Thursday morning
story adventure, which include
stories, crafts, games, and activi-
ties. Children in Carrabelle are
invited to attend Story Time
with Miss Tonia every Tuesday
at 5 p.m.
If you or someone you know
needs large print books, the


theatrical community in the
Florida Panhandle.
The cast of local theatrical
talent will welcome visitors and
acquaint you with the possibili-
ties available to members.
There will be a social time
after the meeting to meet the
members and ask questions and
talk about your particular inter-
ests and talents. If you have fur-
ther questions about the meet-
ing, contact Panhandle Players
president Liz Sisung, at (850)
670-8261.


Franklin County Public Library
has a large collection of fiction
large print. Library staff recently
shelved large print in a special
section that gives patrons the
opportunity to select large print
without the bother of searching
from the regular stacks. Don't
forget the extensive collection of
audio books on tape and audio
CDs at both branches; the collec-
tion is always growing.
For more information about
any of. the library programs,
phone 697-2366 in Carrabelle
and 670-8151 in Eastpoint.


.


157, CR 59.
* March 21-27: CR 374, CR 30A
SR 300 (St. George Island
Causeway).
* March 28-31: SR 30, SR 30A,
SR 65.


Harry A's


Restaurant & Bar

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SteaKs, Sandwiches, Salads f tKids Menu

The Family Friendliest Place

Live Entertainment Nightly

Large Parties Welcome

OPEN FORP BPEAFAST AT :00o A.M.
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LATE -NIGHT MENU:
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PHON6: 850 -927-3400

www.HarrjA'sFestaurant.com


The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLYOWNVED NEWSPAPER


Page 16 -MR~arch 14, 2008











The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


March 14, 2008 Page 17


Lanark from Page 1

segment all made mention of the
recent vandalism of our new
Veteran Memorial.
A week previous, someone
removed all four soldiers from
the new walkway and damaged
one. All were found and re-
installed. Mayor Messer threat-
ened the culprit: "Whoever you
are, we will find you." In addi-
tion, the mayor revealed his plan
to force "60 days guard duty" on
the apprehended criminal.
Commissioner Ray Tyre
added that Assistant Chief Joe
Hamm has taken some "meas-
ures" and that the city needs to
make sure that all politics are
taken out of law enforcement.
Commissioner Richard Sands
added: "It doesn't matter who
you are or who you are related
to."
On a much brighter note,
Mclnnis noted that 2007 law
enforcement statistics showed
that Carrabelle enjoyed a 70.2%
drop in crime and a 50% clear-
ance rate. This is the stat that
indicates what part of crimes
reported are actually solved.
The city's Waterfronts
Florida group requested that the
bounds of the waterfront area of
concern be extended to the end
of Three Rivers Road. The city
owns a lot at the northwest
extreme of the city limits. The
spot is alternately known as the
boat ramp (no official boat ramp
is there), the turnaround (it is a
cul-de-sac) or The River (its pri-
vate nature has led to some
alleged illegal activity in the
past). The motion passed, and
now the area will be considered
in the master plan coming from
the two-year grant period to plan
the future of our waterfront use.


PHOTO BY SKIP FRINK
Pauline Sullivan thanks Carrabelle officials for their role in the dis-
solution of the Lanark Village Water and Sewer District. She is
joined by, left to right, District Commissioner Ray Courage,
County Commissioner Cheryl Sanders and Lanark resident Billy
Snyder (seated).
The lighthouse extension had been tabled twice, this deci-
should be under construction by sion was two months in coming.
the end of April. The. ballfield The Long Pointe litigation
renovation has been designed, subject was scheduled for
and the Buck O'Neal Park addi- Thursday, March 20, after the
tion to it will be shown at the P&Z meeting. Commissioners,
April meeting. city manager and city attorney
Commissioners approved will meet in executive session.
the application to change the Meetings on subjects that are in
property near the airport from the courts are exempt from
Industrial to Mixed-Use Com- Sunshine Law regulations.
mercial; and the formulation of Michelle Clark, Chairman
the new Planning and Zoning of this year's Big Bend Saltwater
selection criteria. The third read- Classic fishing tournament, was
ing was the First Reading of the complimented by almost all on
water/sewer rates outlined their handling of the event last
above. year. Ray Tyre was the lone dis-


The Seaside Village Com-
munity Development District
agreed that their infrastructure
work will pass all Carrabelle
engineering and performance
standards. Seaside is the new
large subdivision on the north-
east side of town.
The Funky Oyster Cabin, to
be the new restaurant behind the
Old Carrabelle Hotel, was
approved to apply for a state beer
and wine license. As the issue


senter, saying that "alcohol sales
bring not one good thing."
The last item under New
Business was a motion to accept
a gift clock donated by a local
person for Veteran's Park, an
"atomic" clock (stays set auto-
matically). The showpiece clock
is said to be fronted with high-
impact glass, and be capable of
playing chime tunes from a selec-
tion of 1,200 melodies.


Artists to capture the


coast on canvas


This spring, more than 20
nationally acclaimed painters
from throughout the country will
converge on Florida's Forgotten
Coast to participate in the 3rd
Annual Plein Air Invitational
May 8-18.
The "great paint-out" is a
10-day event sponsored by Gulf
Alliance for Local Arts (GALA),
the tri-county arts agency devot-
ed to coordinating, encouraging
and promoting the arts and arts
education in the region.
From Mexico Beach to
Carrabelle, painters will set up
their easels and pull out their
brushes to capture the landscape
and lifestyle of this last vestige of
authentic Old Florida.
The artists, who hail from as
far away as Maine and Oregon,
will gather with those as close as
Lynn Haven and Tarpon Springs
to paint the unspoiled beaches,
the vast marshlands, the wide
river, and the historic streets of
waterfront towns.
The communities of
Apalachicola, Mexico Beach,
Port St. Joe, Cape San Bias,
Eastpoint, St. George Island,
Carrabelle and Wewahitchka
have joined forces to produce the
most impressive art event seen
along the coast. Plein Air has
been well received by area spon-
sors, the Apalachicola Bay and
the Gulf County Chambers of
Commerce and the Mexico
Beach CDC", said Joe Taylor,
Event Co-chair.
Funding from both the Gulf
and Franklin County Tourist
Development Councils has been


used to promote the event to a
national market aiming to attract
art enthusiasts and collectors.
An Artists Reception will
kick-off the event on Friday,
May 9, from 6-8 pm at the newly
completed WindMark Village
Center. The "meet-and-greet"
with plein air artists, patrons and
event organizers is free and open
to the public. The reception will
provide a preview of the St. Joe
Collection before the week long
exhibit opens.
Art, fresh off of the easel,
will arrive daily at the historic
Cotton Exchange on the water-
front in downtown Apalachi-
cola. This "wetroom" will be
open from 11 a.m. 5 p.m. for
viewing and the purchase of
these masterfully produced
paintings. The Wetroom
Opening will be held on
Saturday evening, May 10, from
6-8 p.m. Tickets are $10 and
include light hors d'oeuvres,
wine, and music.
The public is invited,
encouraged even, to locate, stop
and watch the painters through-
out the week. A series of demon-
strations, presentations, lunch-
eons, cocktail parties and a
Student Art Day will be detailed
in the event program,' offering
visitors and locals an opportuni-
ty to meet the artists and experi-
ence the plein air process. To
view the entire schedule of
events visit the website,
www.pleinairfl.com.


Forgotten Coast TV Program Guide Your Local Community Channe
Channel 3 Mediacom and Channel 9 St. George Cable P.O. Box848. Apaiacmcla. FL 32329
i This 12-hour schedule rents from midnight to 12 noon. EXCEPT MON evening This 12-hour schedule repeats from midnlaht to


FRIDAY Feb29 I SATURDAY ar SUNDAY MarA MONDAY Mar3


TUESDAY Mar4


l 7 Marchl4,2008
WWWit? CitSDCOSSitVCO


12 noon, EXCEPT MON evening
WEDNESDAY Mar 5 THURSDAY Mar 6


UOCalendar Community uar _Calendar IImmunly Calenda IIurn ..mu.,.. Caear.omntyClna Community cale ndar u.. ....,.a. a..m,., . .a r . I.-


12:30 am/pm Thls Week On FCTV


This Week On FCTV


This Week On FCTV


12:45 a/pm IEnvironmental or Entertainment Environmental or Entertainment Environmental or Entertainment Forgotten Coast Info 3
-- ~ ~~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ - -- -- -


1:30 apm Cooking with Jerry iCookng with Jerry


1:45am/pm 'Unique Homes
2:00 am/pm Thlngs to Do, Places to Stay,
Groceries/Gourmet, Services
2:30 am/pm iForgotten Coast Info 1


2:45'am/pm Franklin County History
3:001ainm/m Foraotten Coast Outdoors


3:30,amnpm Shorelines Fishing Report
3:45;anmpm ForgottenCoast Info 2
4:00am/pm ,Environmental or Entertainment
4:15 anmpm Community Heroes
4:30 amipm Environmental or Entertainment
4:45 'ampm 'St. Marks Lighthouse
5:00 amrpm_ Forgotten Coast Outdoors


i unique Homes ,
!Things to Do, Places to Stay,


Groceries/Gourmet, Services
Forgotten Coast Info 2


Franklin County History
Forgotten Coast:Outdoors


noreiines rihnnin nRepout.
Forgotten Coast Info 3
Environmental or Entertainment
Community Heroes
Environmental or Entertainment
St. Marks Lighthouse
Forgotten Coast Outdoors


ulde :Restaurant & Shopping Guide Restaurant& hopping Guide Restaurant & Shopping Guide 12:15 umTpm
This Week On FCTV This Week On FCTV This Week On FCTV _12:30 a.mpm
Environmental or Entertainment Environmental or Entertainment Environmental or Entertainment 12:45 oanpm
Forgotten Coast Outdoors Forgotten Coast Outdoors Forgotten Coast Outdoors_ 1:00 amipm


1Cooking with Jerry Cooking with Jerry ICooking witwith Jerry Cooking with Jerry
Unique Homes :Unique Homes Unique Homes _Unique Homes_ Unique Homes__ ___
IThings to Do, Places to Stay, Things to Do, Places to Stay, *Things to Do, Places to Stay, Things to Do, Places to Stay, Things to Do, Places to Slay,
Groceries/Gourmet, Services Groceries/Gourmet, Services Groceries/Gourmet, Services Groceries/Gourmet, Services Groceries/Gourmet, Services
Forgotten Coast Info 3 Forgotten Coast Info 4 Forgotten Coast Info 1 Forgotten Coast Info 2 Forgotten Coast Info 3_
Franklin County History Franklin County History Franklin County History Franklin County History Franklin County History
Forgot oast Outdoors Forgotten Coast Outdoors Forgotten Coast Outdoors ogottn oat dForgotten Coast Outdoors Forgotten Coast Outdoors


Shorelines Fishing Report Shorelines Fishing Report Shoreines Fishing Report
Forgotten Coast Info 4 Forgotten Coast Info 1 Forgotten Coast Info 2
SEnvironmental or Entertainment Tourist Development Council: Environmental or Entertainment
;Community Heroes Franklin County Visitor Centers Community Heroes
SEnvironmental or Entertainment Restaurant & Shopping Guide Environmental or Entertainment
St. Marks Lighthouse Forgotten Coast Info 2 St. Marks Lighthouse
iForgotten Coast Outdoors The Riverkeeper Show_ Forgotten Coast Outdoors


Shorelines Fishing Report Shorelines Fishing Report
Forgotten Coast Info 3 Forgotten Coast Info 4
Environmental or Entertainment Environmental or Entertainment
Community Heroes Community Heroes
Environmental or Entertainment Environmental or Entertainment
St. Marks Lighthouse St. Marks Lighthouse
Forgotten Coast Outdoors Forgotten Coast Outdoors


1:30 aumppm
1:45 am/pm

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3:45 am/pm
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4:30 am/pm
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5:30nam/pm Things Do, Placs to Do, Places to Say, Thngs Do, Places to Say, Thngs to Do, Places to Stay, Things to Do, Places to Stay, Thingsto Do, Places to Stay, Things to Do, Places to Stay, Things to Do, Places to Stay, 5:30 p
Groceries/Gourmet, Services Groceries/Gourmet, Services Groceries/Gourmet, Services Groceries/Gourmet, Services Groceries/Gourmet, Services Groceries/Gourmet, Services Groceries/Gourmet, Services
6:00 am/pm Community Calendar Community Calendar community Calendar Community Calendar Communt Community Calendar y C r 6:00 amrpm
6:15 am/pr Restaurant & Shopping Guide Restaurant & Shopping Guide Restaurant & Shopping Guide Restaurant & Shopping Guide Restaurant & Shopping Guide Restaurant & Shopping Guide Restaurant & Shopping Guide_ 615 ampm
6"30 am/pm Foreclosure Information Foreclosure Information Foreclosure Information Environmental or Entertainment Foreclosure Information Foreclosure Information Foreclosure Information 6:30 am/pm
6:45am/nipm Shorelines Fishing Report Shorelines Fishing Report Shorelines Fishing Report Cooking w/Jerry-Waterstreet Hotel Shorelines Fishing Report Shorelines Fishing Report Shorelines Fishing Report 6:45 anmpm
7:00 am/pnp Environmental or Entertainment Environmental or Entertainment _Environmental or Entertainment Franklin County Commission Environmental or Entertainment Environmental or Entertainment Environmental or Entertainment 7:00 anmpm
7:15am/pm !This Week WeeF On FCTV ee n FCTV IT Week On FCTV MeeThis Week On FCTV This Week On FCTV This Week On FCTV_ 7:15 am/pp
7:30iam/pm Seahawks Update Seahawks Update :Seahawks Update Seahawks Update Seahawks Update_ Seahawks Update 7:30 ampm
PRIME TIME
8:00 am/pm Tourist Development Council: Tourist Development Council: Tourist Development Council: GV. OVERNMENT_ Tourist Development Council: Tourist Development Council: Tourist Development Council: 8:00 am/pm
:Franklin County Visitor Centers Franklin County Visitor Centers Franklin County Visitor Centers MONDAY Franklin County Visitor Centers Franklin County Visitor Centers Franklin County Visitor Centers
8:30 ampm The RIverkeeper Show The Riverkeeper Show The Riverkeeper Show The Riverkeeper Show The Rverkeeper Show The Riverkeeper Show 8:30 am/pm


9:00 pamp
9:15 aompm
930 ai,/pm,,
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11:30 am/pm


Forgotten Coast Info 3
Restaurant & Shopping Guide
Community Heroes
Forgotten Coast Outdoors
Cooking w/Jerry-Waterstreet Hotel
Unique Homes
Music on the Coast
Foreclosure Information
Forgotten Coast Info 4
Things to Do, Places to Stay,
Groceries/Gourmet, Services
FRIDAY Feb 29


ForgottenCoast Ino 4
Restaurant & Shopping Guide
Community Heroes
Forgotten Coast Outdoors


Cooking w/Jerry-Waterstreet Hotel
Unique Homes
St. Marks Lighthouse_
Foreclosure Information
Forgotten Coast Info 1
Things to Do, Places to Stay,
Groceries/Gourmet, Services
SATURDAY Mar


Forgotten Coast into 1
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Cooking w/Jerry-Waterslreet Hotel
Unique Homes
Music on the Coast
Foreclosure information
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Groceries/Gourmet, Services
SUNDAY Mar 2


7m to 11:30 pm
repeats at 1:00 am Tues morning


Things to Do, Places to Stay,
Groceries/Gourmet, Services
MONDAY Mar 3


Forgotten Coast Info 3
Restaurant & Shopping Guide
Community Heroes
Forgotten Coast Outdoors
Cooking w/Jerry-Waterstreet Hotel
Unique Homes
St. Marks Lighthouse
Foreclosure Information
Forgotten Coast Info 4
Things to Do, Places to Stay,
Groceries/Gourmet, Services
TUESDAY Mar 4


Forgotten Coast Info 4
Restaurant & Shopping Guide
Community Heroes
Forgotten Coast Outdoors


Cooking w/Jerry-Waterstreet Hotel
.Unique Homes
Music on the Coast
Foreclosure Information
Forgotten Coast Info 1
Things to Do, Places to Stay,
Groceries/Gourmet, Services
WEDNESDAY Mar 5


_ forgotten Coast Info 1
Restaurant & Shopping Guide
Community Heroes
Forgotten Coast Outdoors


Cooking w/Jerry-Waterstreet Hotel
Unique Homes
St. Marks Lighthouse
Foreclosure Information
Forgotten Coast Into 2
Things to Do, Places to Stay,
Groceries/Gourmet, Services
THURSDAY Mar6 .


9:00 am/pm
9:15 am/pco
_9:30 am/p.
9:45 am/pm
10:15 am/pm
10:30 am/pm
10:45 am/pm
11:00 a.mpm
11:15 am/pm
11 30 am/pm


MONDAY MORNING (AM) ONLY
7 00 am/pm Environmental or Entertainment
7:30m anpii Seahawks Update
8.00 anvpm Tourist Development Council:
Franklin County Visitor Centers
8:30 am/pm The Riverkeeper Show


9 00 am/pm
9 15 am/pm
9:30 am/pm
9:45 am/pm


Forgotten Coast Info 3
Restaurant & Shopping Guide
Community Heroes
Forgotten Coast Outdoors


S10:15 arpn. Cooking w/Jerry-Waterstreet Hotel
10:30 am/m Unique Homes
10:45 am/pm Music on the Coast
11:00 amnpm Foreclosur Information
11:15 amrpm ThtsWeek OnFCTV


Kesiaumi


~~.. -__ ^


NCIOI.Wp. Kesiaumnt &Shopping Gpllly de t Iiestaurant osnop ing Guide Restaurant& 5nopping u uulde ewmumn,, u r vyng uur


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:1 =.........+=. esmaname, enses.


Aesta...nt.& Shoooina Guide


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=,........ on-e n..manne


1:0011anVLm Foraotten Coast Outdoor


I











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Page 18 March .14, 2008


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle










The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


March 14, 2008 Page 19


Results of the 5K Red Pepper Run

St. George Island, Florida


Name

1 Vince Molosky
2 Karl SluOer
3 Alex Clota
4 Hobson Fulmer
5 Pater McCauley
6 Jason Bazemore
7 Mark Weber
8 Bryar Farley
9 Casey Golden
10. Fran Flynn
11. Meghan Kennedy
12. John Forehand
13. Daniel Martin
14. Rush Combs
15 Alek Hoffman
16. Steve Graham
17. Dan Brys
18. Jon McKee
19. Sarah Purcell
20. Jeremiah Mercer
21. Nathan Landrum
22. Frankie Warren
23. James Auten
24. Jessica Avant
25. J. Gordon Snuler
26. Louis Cordova
27. Keli Scot-CioIa
28. Ace Haddock
29. Chuck Meek
30. ChrisTanner
31. Josh Reader
32 Graham Klrvin
33. Brad Buzzett
34. Susan Fox
35- Skip Frink
36. Liv Warren
-37, John Scott
38. Terry Thomas
39 John Stacklyn
40. Charles EvereUl
41, Sherrie Nunn
42. John Culbertson
43. Mary Auten
44. Mark Hilis
45. Molly McKinstry
46. Todd McMllan
47. Josh WillIams
48. Chelsea Williams
49 Kenny Ayers
50, Scott Snyder
51 Maggie Hayes Snyder
52. Don Hansard
53. Jim Brown
54. Margaret Jorgensen
55. Bo Spring
56. Phil Jones
57_ Jeremy Novak
58. Adrianna Reeder
59. Shaun Donahoe
60. Mike Esser
61. Oav.' MciNef-
62. Cr-ar.n K0in
63. Karl Crowder
64. Bill Cook
65. Marcelo Viera
66. Juliet Stacklyn
67. GaryWilHams
68. Richard Addison
69. Georg i K oril
70. Be- DaMiio,
71. Emily Buko
72. Lauren Spr1ng
73. Janed McKee
74. Nicole Sealy
75, Mark King
76, Elizabeth Wainwright
77. Joseph Sparks
78, Don Gunther
79. Janet McKinley
80. Caryn Vorster
81. Britney Ferraris
82. Roni Ann McKee
83. Megan Newell
84. Stephanie White
85. Mairea V rnitla
86. Eliz. t.ih ,Ir. l; .
87. Jim Kinman .
88. Carrie Kinman
89. Mariel Henske
90, Linda Gunther
91. Amber Peebles
92. Dylan Peebles
93. Lori Michel
94. Paula Thoreen
S95. Carol Rhinehart
96. Susan Abernathy
97, Whitney Heyser
98. John Nicholson
99. Lois Britner
100.Elaine Flournoy
101.Jackie Mossburg
102.Dick Henske
103.Sue Skinner
104.Barbara Sanders
105.Lee Cerk
106.Bonnie Thomas
107.Ken Thomas
108 Rita Weber
109.Eric Weber
11O.Rachel Calandra
111 John Medeiros
112.Dorea SowInski
113-Deane Sparks
114.Maureen Fagan
115 A!lte Kirvin
116.Elizabeth Kirvin
117.Jody Plummer
118.Junie Dahlem
119.Jamie Luten
120 Kim Wren
121.NorbertWeber
122.Sue Mahoney


Mar


Tallahass
Weidman
Saratoga
St. Georg
Atlanta, G
Tallahass
Long Bea
Port St. J
Eastpoint
Tallahass
Tallahass
Tallahass
Carrabell
Port St. J
St. Georg
North Vea
Marietta,
Panama
Tallahass
Carrabell
St. Georg
Bainbrldg
Buford, G
SI Georg
Apalacnic
Port SL J
Saratoga
Sopchopr
Jacksonv
Hoover;
Apalachlb
Apalachlc
PortSt J
Mayville,
Carrabell
Baintl rig

Douglasv
Tallahass
Boston.G
Gainesyll
St Georg
Buford, G
Winter Pa
Tallahass
Tallahass
Fayettevi
Fayettavi
Tallahass
ThllahaE
T ail.r..; -.
Tallahass
Suwaneem
Fairfax, V
Port St. J
S- Georg
Pjr 51I j.
Apalachic
Apalachic
Panama
Apalachic
Tallahass
Adairsville
Tallahass
Sjlldanas.
Fdj eIll-ll

Tarp.:-.n Si

Port St. J
Panama .
Si Georg
Hoover A
SI Geoig
Signal Mf
Ni.'ln Ma
Orsigie P
Orange P
PanIama C
ApiaarJii.
Cra tur,1,
Crawfordn
Tallahass
Macon, G
Macon, G
Manitowis
Signal Mo
Crawfordv
Crawfordi
Houston,
Houston,
Winter Ha
Mary Esth
Ap.,tiirr.r.
Crawfordv
Many, LA
Crawfordv
St. Georg
Manitowis
Tallahass
St. Georg
Watersme
Mableton.
Mableton,
Mendota,
St, Louis,
Stl Georgt
Eastpoint,


ch 1,2008

City Age Time Place

ee. FL 28 17:23 1I' males overall
i. MI 48 19:31 Master, males
Springs. NY 32 19;38 1". males, 30-34
e Island FL 52 20.31 Grand Master, me
3A 50 21:19 1". males 50-54
ee. FL 24 21;25 1" males 20-24
ach. CA 46 21:30 I. males 45-49
oe, FL 30 21:34 2'". males 30-34
, FL 17 21:40 1", males 15-19
see, FL 49 21:45 2"", males 45-49
see, FL 27 21:47 1, females over
see. FL 39 22:05 1. males 35-39
e, FL 21 22:45 2Z, males 20-24
oe, FL 30 22:45 3', males 30-34
e Island, FL 21 23:29 1", males. St. Ge
*non, IN 60 23:36 1. males 60-64
GA 32 23:40
City. FL 39 23:45 2', males 35-39
see, FL 16 23:53 1 females 15-19
e. FL 17 24'11 2'". males 15-19
le Island, FL 30 24.19
ae, GA 17 24:19 2L, females 15-i
'A 52 24;25 2. males 50-54
le Island. FL 28 24:45 1, females. St. G
:ols FL 46 24:46 r males 45-49
oe, FL 42 24:47 I, makes 40-44
Springs. NY 37 24:52 1 females 35-3E
py. FL 38 25:08 3' males 5-3'
lIeIAL 42 25:17 2 male 40i.-44
AL 28 25:17 1 ,males25-29
ola, FL 13 25:25 1"1 makes 9-14
ola, FL 11 26255 "males 9-14
oe, FL 32 25;29
Mt 57 25:34 f.Ma-.ic.- fem 1l
e, FL 58 25:45 l"', m.ati. 55.59
IE C4 50 25:48 Crand Mjsisl, I
a NY 61 26:09 ;~* le,3b0--l
illeGA 45 26:21
ee, FL 56 263t 2f"', males 55-59
GA 49 26:56
le, GA 45 27:05 t', females 45-4
a Island, FL 61 27;12 3", males 60-64
A 50 27"35 1' Iui.. Su.-i.
ark, FL 66 27:47 1', males 65-69
ee. FL 42 27'58 1". females 40-44
ee, FL 35 28:33
lle, GA 15 28;47 3', males 16-19
Ie,.GA .9 28:48 ', females 9-14
ee, FL 57 28:49 3', males 5-59
ee FL 36 28:61
w L 5 28:51 .1. .!.J.i,
see. FL 71 28:57 i .- ,,~ 70 and
,GA 33 28:57
A 51 29:33 2", females 50-54
oe, FL 31 29:12
e Isisnd FL 60 29:17
ie FL 33 29:19
ola, FL 11 29:30 2, females 9-14
ola, FL 64 29:51
39 29:55
City, FL 12 3,. 100 3" maLes9 14
ole, FL 12 j, i( 3 ,crr.3n- Ile
ee, FL 36 30:35 2'", tierna.e" 3.-3i
, GA 47 30:43
ee, FL 26 30:50 2", males 25-29
ee FL 54 30:54 3, females 50-54
le GA 67 31:02 2', males 6569
54 31:05 3" males 50.-5
prngs FL 63 31:08
ae. FL 49 31:08 2', females 45-49
ola FL 16 71-,21 3'W, females 15-19
oe, FL 28 3123 !," females 25-29
CRy. FL 10 31:50
e island FL 27 31:56 2R, females 25-2'
>ils IN 44 3238 3", rnalES 40-
L eb 33:20 3"', emales Z5-2'
ae Iland FL 27 33.40 3, males 20-24
unlaii TN 65 33:50 3M' males 65-69
*,esIler IN 64 33:56 1", fmrn.ilesd 60.
ari., FL 35 33:59 3, fernales 35-3'
lrk. FL 16 33:59
Ci, FL 34 34:04
ai3 FL 14 34:46
,,ia. FL 28 34:54
ville, FL 30 34:53
ee, FL 30 35:02 1". females 30-34
A 46 35:03
A 10 35:03
h Waters, W) 66 35:20 1', females 65-69
&unlaln, TN 61 35:22 2", females 60-6'
ville, FL 27 35:26
ville. FL 8 35:26
TX 52 35:30
TX 51 35:30
aven, FL 51 35:30
ler, FL 50 '35:31
Slj. FL 20 35:45 1", females 20-24
ille, FL 52 36:50
47 36:52 3", females 45-49
ille, FL 55 36;52 1", females 55-59
e island. FL 71 37:15 1", females 70 an
;h Walers. WI 72 37:15 2"', males 70 and
ee, FL 57 37:45 2"', females 55-5!
e Island, FL 53 38:11
et. MI 69 38:20- 2"", females 65-69
.GA 60 38:28 3', females 60-64
GA 54 38;28
IL 70 39:22 2'", females 70 ar
MO 33 39:22
e Island, FL 36 39:35
, FL 60 39:39


Tallahassee. FL
St. George Island, FL
St. George Island. FL
Apalachicola, FL
Apalachiootw, FL
St George Island, FL
Many, LA
Apalachicola, FL
Carratelle, FL
Mendota. IL
Tallahassee, FL


ales





ill


9ore







3eorge









7 1i d l :
I


up


d up
up
9d up

9

nd up


3"., females 55-59
2"', females 40-44
3"', females,65-69

3". females 70 and up
2", females 30-34
3". females 30-34
3". males 70 and up


Highlights
130 runners registered and 122 completed the race. Female win-
ner was Meghan Kennedy of Tallahassee with a time of 21:47. Male
winner was Vince Molosky of Tallahassee with a time of 17:23. For
the women, Susan Fox was the Master winner, and Liv Warren was
the Grand Master winner. For the men, Karl Stuber was the Master
winner, and Hobson Fulmer was the the Grand Master winner. First
place male finisher from St. George was Alek Hoffman and first place
female finisher from St. George was Jessica Avant.


CGJ vet one of first nurses


BY LAUREL NEWMAN
Chronicle Correspondent
It wasn't just young men
who were the brave soldiers who
risked their futures on the beach-
es of Europe during the battles of
WWII.
Jane Hawkins was a
nurse with the Army Nurse
Corps who enlisted with the
Army through the American
Red Cross through Vanderbilt
University Hospital. She attend-
ed last weekend's Camp Gordon
Johnston Association Reunion.
"A friend and I decided to
join CGJ shortly after we were
called to service, and we arrived
here in December 1942. We
began by calling on patients, and
I became the surgical nurse
shortly after. I remember a corps-
man, a native American man,
who brought me a coral snake to
see, and he was surprised that I
was afraid of the snake," she
said.
"We left in August 1943 to
go to Fort Bragg, then on to
England to train for the inva-
sion," to a town named Durrsley,
about four miles from London."
During her months at Camp
Gordon Johnston, Jane met a
young combat engineer in train-
ing, "maybe in the Officers' Club
at a dance or some party."
Jane made it to Normandy
on Omaha Beach with the First
Army, and the young engineer
followed the First Arm went in
on the second wave on. Utah
Beach, and he didn't get a
scratch."
And that is how and where
Jane met her husband. They
married, he stayed in the Army
for 27 years, they had two daugh-
ters, a son, and one granddaugh-
ter, who is now studying to be a
surgeon at the University of
Tennessee. Mr. Hawkins died in
1979.
Jane, who is visually handi-


working as a school principal n
her area.
Her two daughters, Carol
Hawkins and Joy Hendrix,
accompanied her on this trip
"down memory lane."


S : ---"
CountV Commissioners Bev-
in Putnal, Cheryl Sanders
and Russell Crofton honor
Pat Bragdon and City Manager John McInnis at the dedica- the veterans at the Memorial
tion of the Memorial Wall. Wall dedication ceremony.



13th CGJ Reunion tops them all


BY LAUREL NEWMAN
Chronicle Corrspondent
According to all attendees,
this year's Camp Gordon
Johnston Days, Parade and
Reunion were the best so far!
"This year's turn-out was the
best ever" declared Museum
Curator Linda Minichiello. "We
had 10 Camp veterans, as well as
three wives of camp veterans
who died this past year.
"We tried a different method
of advertising this year; we


bought some area post cards
with a photo of the museum,
and a mailing list of veterans
organizations, and we got a won-
derful response. Everyone who
came just loved it, and our muse-
um donations were wonderful.
"I think it was an economic
boon for the town's businesses, "
she said. "The people began to
arrive before the weekend, all
rooms were booked, and the
restaurants in town did a great
business, too, I have been told.
"They do say that the best


supporters of veterans' organiza-
tions are other veterans, and I
guess we proved that."
Some repeat paraderss"
joined in again this year in spite
of the cold weather, including
the HOGS motorcycle group,
consisting of many Vietnam vets
and their spouses as well as other
Harley riders from Mobile, AL.,
the Silver Wings brass band, and
our local clubs and American
Legion Posts 82 and 103, school
groups, and many others.


Marion Morris, with the Sea
Oats Garden Club "float"
and mascot.


9

J


4


!
i
i


4


PHOTOS BY LAUREL NEWMAN
Jane Hawkins
--- :-. s .





Page 20 March 14, 2008


A LOCAL -- 'T7T%'NTJ VW,4PAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


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