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 Material Information
Title: Franklin chronicle
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: Russell Roberts
Publication Date: 01-11-2008
Copyright Date: 2007
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
Coordinates: 29.725278 x -84.9925 ( Place of Publication )
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Franklin





^ Chronicle


50"
PERIODICAL
POSTAGE
PENDING


Bears and beavers vex county


BY RUSSELL ROBERTS
Chronicle Staff
If it's not the bears, it's the
beavers.
Either way, those animals
have been the topic of discussion
at recent Franklin County


Carrabelle

Commission

explains

P&Z plan
City attorney selected
BY SKIP FRINK
Chronicle Correspondent
During the Jan. 3 Carrabelle
City Commission meeting, Rod
Gasche, one of the former
Carrabelle Planning and Zoning
board members, asked city com-
missioners for an explanation of
the future of the P&Z. In a sur-
prise move last month, the com-
mission had voted to ask for
blanket resignations from all
board members, as well as the
city attorney.
Commissioner Jim Brown,
who had voiced the resignation
request in December, answered
Gasche's question. "My idea is
to have each city commissioner
appoint one board member, and
then have each new board mem-
ber appoint one more member."
Brown added that he thought
that the former board chair, Jan
Stoudemire, had done a fine job
and that he hoped she would
rejoin P&Z. The commission
then voted to proceed as was
described.
Commissioner Ray Tyre
then expressed his feeling that
other members of the commis-
sion had met illegally to plan the
"resignation" request in Decem-
ber. Commissioner Sands was
absent.
In a related matter, the com-
mission hired Dan Hartman as
City Attorney. City Attorney
Dan Cox, seated at this meeting,
agreed to follow through with


Commission meetings.
The County Commission
recently asked the state Fish and
Wildlife Conservation Commis-
sion to consider ways to control
the bear population, including
the possibility of limited hunt-


ing. At the Jan. 2, County
Administrator Alan Pierce
reported that the FWC had
replied that hunting alone will
not solve the problem, and that a
statewide approach needs to be
taken.


"Among other things,"
Pierce's report summarized, "the
FWC has entered into a cost-
sharing agreement with Waste
Pro and Defenders of Wildlife to

Continued on Page 2


PHOTO BY SKIP FRINK
Framed by a window, Randy Timm and Traci Justice work to open a new restaurant on
Tallahassee Street next to The Old Carrabelle Hotel. At this month's Carrabelle City
Commission meeting, Randy Timm requested approval to open the new restaurant at 203
Tallahassee Street, which was once an oyster-shucking plant. The board could not act, since
a beer/wine sales request must first be advertised.


the Lanark Village Water &
Sewer case, but not any other
cases. Hartman's hire fits into the
see-saw cycle of the past few
years: each "Dan" has been
hired twice, and each has been
fired or resigned, or both.
Also, City Manager John
McInnis thanked city employees
for many hours of work put into
December's Holiday on The
Harbor celebration. Attendance
estimates were as high as 4000,
-for the joint City-Chamber of
Commerce effort, which is also


subsidized by the Tourism Dev-
elopment Council :through the
Bed Tax.
McInnis also reported the
following:
In his city road work
report, there were 1,800 no-cost
inmate hours (equivalent to
$14,400) and 130 bags of street-
side trash picked up.
The Coast Guard is in the
process of changing the harbor
range lights, and boaters should
pay special attention until the
changes are complete.


January 24, at. the
Carrabelle Senior Center, the
first Waterfronts planning public
meeting will take place.
McInnis suggested that
ECT, the city consulting engi-
neers and waterfront project
designers, be selected to land-
scape design the new wildlife
park. The commission voted to
approve this. ,
City Attorney Dan Cox
voiced his opinion on the status

Continued on Page 2


Inside
The Franklin Chronicle debuts
the weekly magazine American
Profile, inserted into this week's
newspaper.

Golf carts

allowed on

St. George
BY RUSSELL ROBERTS
Chronicle Staff
Golf carts scooting around
the streets of St. George Island
isn't an unusual sight to see. But
thanks to an ordinance enacted
by the Franklin County Com-
mission this month, now they're
legal.
The ordinance makes golf
carts legal on county roads on
the Island other than Gulf Beach
Drive. It also prohibits them on
Franklin Boulevard, which is a
state road, except at one desig-
nated crossing to be approved by
the county and the state Depart-
ment of Transportation.
Here are some highlights of
the ordinance:
It defines golf carts as a
motor vehicle for sporting or
recreational purposes that is not
capable of speeds of more then
20 miles per hour, excluding
four-wjreelers.
It sets up minimum safety
requirements, including a
rearview mirror and reflectors on
the front and rear.
Carts can only be operated
during daylight hours, however,
if they are equipped with head-
lights, brake lights, turn signals
and a windshield they can be
driven at night also.
Drivers must have a valid
driver's license.
Golf carts must be regis-
tered with the county, in order
for the county to obtain an accu-
rate count of the number of golf
carts on the island.
Businesses will be allowed
to rent up to five carts.
Commissioner Russell Crof-
ton, who represents the-Island
and Eastpoint district, said the
situation previously was danger-
ous, since golf carts were driven
illegally. The ordinance will
allow the county to restrict their
use in a safe way, he said. He
noted that the provision for a
valid driver's license will prevent
golf carts from being driven by
someone who has lost their
license.


Outdoors events at state parks beckon


As a new year begins, Florida histo-
ry education opportunities and fit-
ness are on the schedule for special
events at two of the Florida State
Parks within, or near to Franklin
County.
Mark your calendar and
take your first step towards better
health and fitness in 2008 by
attending the Step Up Florida-


St. George Island State Park
Guided Beach Walk on
Saturday, Feb. 2 from 10-11 a.m.
The Department of Envir-
onmental Protection's Dr. Julian
G. Bruce St. George Island State
Park will host its second annual
Step Up, Florida event. Step Up,
Florida events are organized to
help promote healthy living in


local communities. This year's
activity will be a one-hour guid-
ed beach walk. During the walk
the park ranger will identify sea
shells, shore birds and answer
questions about beach habitat.
Participants should wear com-
fortable walking shoes and
appropriate clothing.
For more information, con-


tact: Melody Sapp, (850) 927-
2111.
While you are at the park,
ask about the current State Park
Photo contest, or visit the
Florida State Park site on the
internet for entry forms, photo
archives, and past winners.
For a fascinating day of
Florida history, plan to visit


Jackson Mounds Archeological
State Park and take a visit back
in time to see what life was like
when Hernando de Soto's party
set up their winter camp.
Find out how and why the
Native Americans went to all the
trouble to pile dirt up, a basketful
at a time, to build mounds in
Continued on Page 2


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Page 2 January 11, 2008


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


Bears from Page 1

expand use of wildlife resistant
commercial dumpsters at 'hot-
spot' locations in the county.
Regarding hunting, FWC
responded, 'Prior to considera-
tion of a harvest for bears in
Florida, we need to develop an
overall management plan for the
Conservation of bears. This will
no doubt be an issue that many
citizens will feel passionately
about and we hope we can devel-
op a plan that has broad public
support across the state. Regard-
less of whether we institute a
harvest in the future, we recog-
nize that hunting alone will not
solve human-bear interaction
problems. A number of states
that have bear hunts also have
serious problem bear issues."
Commissioner Bevin Putnal
was skeptical about more secure


dumpsters.
"All you're going to do is
make them angrier and hungrier
and they're going to start break-
ing into more houses and dog
pens and stuff because they're
going to get to where the food
is," he said. He noted that it's dif-
ficult to hunt in the Apalachicola
National Forest because of the
large number of bears, and that
vehicle accidents caused by bears
are becoming more common.
Commissioners designated
Extension Director Bill Mahan
to represent the county in future
discussions with FWC about
bears.
Beavers are also posing a
problem. They may be less dan-
gerous than bears, but it seems
no less difficult to solve.
Mahan reported that he
spoke with FWC about options


to control beavers. FWC suggest-
ed that the county obtain a per-
mit for steel traps. The permit
would cover a county employee,
or a wildlife trapper working
under the county's supervision to
trap problem beavers on county
property. However, Commis-
sioner Putnal said steel traps
would be dangerous to the many
hunting dogs in Franklin
County.
Other options include live-
trapping and relocating the prob-
lem beavers, or issuing a gun and
light permit for hunting beavers.
Mahan said destroying a beaver
dam is often unproductive since
beavers simply use this "as an
opportunity to practice their
dam-building skills" to rebuild
the dam.
Mahan said he'd continue
his research and report back.


PIPOTO BY SKIP ERINI
This is the actual former Carrabelle lighthouse keeper's house, now a private residence
between Carrabelle and Eastpoint.


P&Z from Page 1
of the Lanark Village Water and
Sewer situation. He holds that all
proceedings are fine at present,
except that Lanark has not dis-
closed its total debt obligations
(including attorney fees). At his
suggestion, the commission
voted to convene a voting meet-
ing only after there is full disclo-
sure. Carrabelle will assume
debts as well as assets at the
changeover.
Carrabelle will not make
any immediate change in the
sanitation contract with WMI.
The existing contract will extend
one more year, during which
time questions such as the neces-
sity and cost of bear-resistant
containers will be discussed.
John McInnis reported that it
would not be cost-effective for
the city "to go into the trash busi-
ness," and it was noted that the


Outdoors from Page 1
their villages. The answer lies at
Lake Jackson Mounds Archae-
ological State Park During the
Desoto Winter Camp event. In
the perfect place to get away
from the bustle of the city, learn
about the history of the area,
explore nature trails, picnic and
enjoy the beauty of The Real
Florida.
More than eight centuries
ago, Native Americans inhabited
the area around Lake Jackson,
just north of Tallahassee. The
park site was part of what is now
known as the Southeastern
Ceremonial Complex. Today, it
encompasses six earthen temple
mounds and one possible burial


commissioners want to be care-
ful not to "put a local man out of
business" with their decision.
Bobby Roddenberry approa-
ched the meeting with a prelimi-
nary plat for his Windward sub-.
division. The 15 single-family
home lots are positioned off
Highway 67 south of Franklin
Correctional. The Catch-22 then
appeared: he did not have a P&Z
board recommendation, since
there is no P&Z board. Commis-
sioners delayed a -vote for that
reason, noting that a P&Z board
may be seated by the regular
meeting date in January, the
third Thursday.
Randy Timm requested
approval to open a new restau-
rant at 203 Tallahassee Street,
next door to The Old Carrabelle
Hotel. Plans include a complete
rebuilding and landscaping of
the facility (once an oyster-


mound. The largest mound is
278 feet by 312 feet at the base
and approximately 36 feet in
height. Artifacts of pre-
Columbian societies have been
found here including copper
breastplates, necklaces, bracelets,
anklets, and cloaks. Visitors will
enjoy a short hike past the
remains of an 1800s grist mill or
picnic on an open grassy area
near the largest mound. The park
is located off U.S. 27, two miles
north of I-10 in Tallahassee.
Take Crowder Road and turn
right onto Indian Mounds Road
to attend the Desoto Winter
Encampment, hosted by the
Department of Environmental
Protection Jan. 9-11 from 9 a.m.
to 2 p.m. Volunteer interpreters


shucking plant), and introduc-
tion of some innovative menu
selections. The board could not
act, since a beer/wine sales
request must first be advertised.
In other matters
The lighthouse sewer ex-
tension will start construction in
April, and the Sands Field
stormwater pond/park construc-
tion will start in June.
Ken Smith, architect of the
recent lighthouse renovation,
was unanimously selected to
design the replica keeper's house
to be built on the property.
Ben Withers Construction
was selected as low bidder to
begin the Carrabelle Wharf con-
struction.
Mayor Curley Messer
noted that the almost-sunk barge
in the harbor is due to be floated
soon.


and re-enactors from across the
state will join participants from
the Florida Park Service, the
Florida Department of State
Division of Historical Resour-
ces, Living History re-enactors
from Mission San Luis and the
National Park Service to bring
this exciting event to life.
Students and other visitors will
tour a series of campsites depict-
ing life as it was when Hernando
de Soto and his band took over
the Apalache village of Anhaica
and set up their winter camp.
For more information, call
(850) 922-6007.
Information compiled and con-
densed by Laurel Newman from
State Park sources.


iotIytt4


SFri
1/11


68/49
Scattered
thunder-
storms.
Highs in the
upper 60s
and lows in
the upper
40s.
Sunrise:
7:35 AM
Sunset:
5:58 PM


Sat Sun Mon Tue
1/12 1/13 1/14 /5


68151
Showers.
Highs in the
upper 60s
and lows in
the low 50s.



Sunrise:
7:35 AM
Sunset:
5:59 PM


63/42
Cloudy with
showers
and thun-
derstorms..




Sunrise:
7:35 AM
Sunset:
5:59 PM


59/38
Sunny..
Highs in th<
upper-50s
and lows in
the upper
30s.


Sunrise:
7:35 AM
Sunset:
6:00 PM


We Celebrate Horm
Stores for and about hometowns u
... .ook.for us.eachweek-i


Florida At A Glance


61/45


Tampa
SC,'63


Area Cities


Clearwater 80 63
Crestview 62 40
Daytona Beach 79 57
Fort Lauderdale 80 70
Fort Myers 82 62
Gainesville 77 54
Hollywood 80 66
Jacksonville 71 51
Key West 78 70.
Lady Lake 81 59
Lake City 72 51
Madison 71 50
Melbourne 80 61
Miami 79 68
N Smyrna Beach 79 58

National Cities


Atlanta
Boston
Chicago
Dallas
Denver
Houston
Los Angeles
Miami


t-storm
rain
t-storm
t-storm
t-storm -
t-storm
t-storm
t-storm
pt sunny
t-storm
t-storm
t-storm
t-storm
t-storm
t-storm


pt sunny
rain
sn shower
mst sunny
pt sunny
sunny
sunny
t-storm


Ocala 81
Orlando 82
Panama City 66
Pensacola 61
Plant City 85
Pompano Beach 80
Port Charlotte 82
Saint Augustine 74
Saint Petersburg 75
Sarasota 78
Tallahassee 70
Tampa 80
Titusville .80
Venice 80
W Palm Beach 79


Minneapolis
New York
Phoenix
San Francisco
Seattle
St. Louis
Washington, DC


Moon Phases







New First Full Last
Jan 8 Jan 15 Jan 22 Jan 30


UV Index

Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue
1/11 1/12 1/13 1/14 1/15
4 4 4 4 4 3
Moderate Moderate Moderate Moderate Moderate


58/43
More clouds
than sun.
Highs in the
upper 50s
and lows in
the low 40s.


Sunrise:
7:35 AM
Sunset:
6:01 PM


t-storm
t-storm
t-storm
t-storm
t-storm
t-storm
t-storm
t-storm
t-storm
t-storm
t-storm
t-storm
t-storm
t-storm
t-storm


cloudy
rain
sunny
cloudy
rain
cloudy
rain


I





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The Franklin Chronicle A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER January 11, 2008 Page 3


Glad holidays are gone? Not really
Lots of people, after boxes they came out of, only to
Christmas and New Year's come find out that they didn't fit, even
and leave, go around saying, though I use less of those boxes'
"I'm so glad to see the end of the contents every year.
holidays." I'm sure there is a special
I don't believe it. I think Murphy's Law at work there.
most people are at least a little And to add insult to holiday
sad to see a return to the undec- deprivation (although I know
orated, no special meaning daily there is a large portion of the
routine of life. population who actually wel-
No bright, multi-colored 44 Q 244d& comes this period), there is the
light decorations on homes and all-pervasive phenomenon of tel-
stores, no familiar music, sacred By Laurel Newman vision programming pre-emp-
and popular, that has been a part tion for sports presentation (read
of every year's end, no silly "75% Off!" baskets, while the FOOTBALL) which is absolute
inflated cartoon figures dis- prime shelves they have been torture for non-rabid sports fans.
played in snow-crusted balloons evicted from are busy sprouting This year, in addition, we have
even (especially) in the South, or items and candy of the the hair-by-nosehair analysis of
alternatively, no Nativity scenes Valentine's Day persuasion for political campaigns and con-
on lawns to keep us reminded of their own brief six-week run for tenders, "News Flash!" poll
"the reason for the season," no the money. updates and predictions, and
inspirational e-mails filled with Personally, it has always dueling trendy analysts to deal
nostalgic, faith-inspired themes been a tradition in my home to with by the moment.
and lovely images, no excuse to take the tree and related decora- This campaign year's buzz-
keep one more box of frosted tions, except perhaps the house word, as everyone knows by
cookies .or chocolate cherries lights, down on New Year's Day. now, unless they are self-exiled
hiding in the cupboard, and That was a tradition I began or in an otherwise unfortunate
above all, no more Christmas when I first had my own home; state of coma, is "Change."
tree to light up the front window my mother never could bear to Barack Obama has been the
after dark with that one-of-a-kind part with Christmas. Of course, most successful in the candidate
glow. she had a houseful of beautiful, conga line with this banner,
It always makes me a bit sad one-of-a kind heirloom decora- although ignoring the actual
to see the icicle and twinkle tions, glassware, dinnerware, and meaning, as obvious as it is in
lights melt from the eaves of lighting accessories to pack reference to political office.
stores and homes, trees appear away, so I suppose for her, it was According to Webster's New
naked and withered on the trash like putting old friends out of World dictionary, "Change" is
heaps, surrounded by crumpled sight and out of mind for anoth- defined as "to put a thing in
remains of gift-wrap and bedrag- er year. She consoled herself and place of something else," which
gled tangles of ribbon, the inflat- her seamstress heart by immedi- is of course, inevitable and nec-
able decorations lying limp and ately planning the year's essary when the incumbent has
dead on the drab brown lawns Christmas-themed project to served out his maximum allowed
(after all, why waste power while make a start on before the end of term. The secondary definition is
someone gets around to packing January. For me, it's just the "to make different, to alter,"
them up?) Holiday decorations thought of repacking all the stuff which demands a demonstrable
making their last, lemming rush it seems like I just dug out from
to the front of the stores for the the back of a closet into the same Continued on Page 6


FS ,, /


The following information is
from the report of Bill Mahan,
Franklin/UF-IFAS Extension
Director, at the Franklin County
Commission's Jan. 2 meeting.
Red Tide: A harmful algal
bloom persists in patches in bay
regions in Okaloosa County and
in Baldwin County, AL. As of
December 31st, satellite imagery
is obscured by clouds. A fully
updated bloom report is not
available and the region will con-
tinue to be monitored. Strong
northerly winds this week may
promote westward transport and
intensification of remaining
harmful algae along the coast.
Upcoming Meeting: The
next Gulf of Mexico Fishery
Management Council meeting is
scheduled for January 28-31,
2008 in St. Petersburg. Agenda
topics include-Aquaculture
Amendment, Final Action on
Reef Fish Amendment 30A
(Greater Amberjack & Gray
Triggerfish), Final Action on
Generic Aquaculture Amnend-
ment, Spiny Lobster Scoping
Document and -Exempted
Fishing Permits (if any). The Ad
Hoc Recreational Red Snapper
Advisory Panel is to meet
January 9 11 in Tampa.
Beaver Control: Mahan
spoke to Ms. Susan Carroll-
Douglas at the FWC's.Regional
Office in Panama City, about
control options for beavers. Ms.
Douglas reported that for trap-
ping on private property, a steel
trap permit is required for each


specific site. However, since our
situation involved multiple sites
on county property, she thought
a "blanket steel trap permit"
could be issued to the county, but
she would have to check. After
checking, she called me back and
reported that the county could be
issued a blanket steel trap permit
and recommended that it be put
in the Road Department's name.
The permit would cover a coun-
ty employee, or for-hire nuisance
wildlife trapper working under
the department's supervision to
trap problem beavers on county
property. She also recommend-
ed that if the County hires a
licensed trapper, to be sure that
the person hired has experience
trapping beavers, since they are
not easy to catch. Other options
are live-trapping and relocating
the problem beavers, and gun &
light permits. In doing addition-
al research on beavers, Mahan
found that regularly "breaching"
the beaver's dam and removing
"building materials" has mixed
results. Some beavers will aban-
don the area while others will
use it as an opportunity to prac-
tice their dam-building skills.
Another option is inserting a
water control device in the
beaver's dam can effectively con-
trol excess flooding. Finally in
one report it stated that the land-
owner needs to understand that
even removing a problem beaver
may only be a temporary fix,
Continued on Page 6


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A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


January 11, 2008 Page 3


The Franklin Chronicle


A








Page 4 January 11, 2008


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


Can we say goodbye to

federal income tax?
For what it's worth, I hate the Internal Revenue Service.
One reason is that I'm making monthly payments to Uncle Sam
for the tax I owe from 2006. I haven't figured my 2007 taxes yet, but
my guess is I'll owe more in 2008.


Another reason is that many years
ago the IRS incorrectly refunded $1,200
of my money to someone else. When I
caught the error, an IRS employee
admitted it was a mistake. Then she
said, basically, too bad for me, my
money was gone and there was nothing
I could do about it.
I'll never forget the arrogance and
cavalier attitude.
So that explains why-despite all
the logical arguments against it-I real-
ly like Mike Huckabee's proposal to
abolish the federal income tax and


replace it with a national sales tax.
I know the arguments: Sales tax is regressive. It hurts poor peo-
ple more than rich people. Somehow, though, it just makes sense to
me that if I buy something, I pay the same rate of tax everyone else
does. Both me and Mr. Deeppockets pitches in the same amount of
pennies every time we buy a lump of coal.
But Mr. Deeppockets spends more money than me. He'll buy a
more expensive car, so will pay more sales tax-than me when I buy a
cheap used clunker. He'll spend more money, so pays more sales tax.
It's true that income tax assesses people in higher incomes a larg-
er percentage than poor folks. But I suspect it's the rich folks who can
afford to hire accountants who can take advantage of all the tax shel-
ters, while us poor folks simply fill out their short form and pay Uncle
Sam every year.
If you think this is an endorsement of Mike Huckabee, you're
wrong. I don't think he'll get the GOP nomination, and even if he
does, he won't get my vote in November.
But Huckabee has brought renewed attention to this radical idea.
According to Americans for Fair Taxation, the national sales tax
would be 23 percent to replace the federal income tax.
Floridians, of course, should be experts in this concept, since this
is one of the states that have no state income tax. Instead, Florida
relies in large part on a state sales tax for revenue. Although the
downside in a tourism-dependent state like Florida is that when the
economy is weak, sales tax revenue decreases and the state budget
suffers. But I haven't heard many people complain about the unfair-
ness of Florida's sales tax.
In fact, if you want to hear complaints, propose eliminating the
state sales tax and replacing it with a state income tax.
So if it works in Florida, why not the whole country?


e The

SFranklin

SChronicle
POST OFFICE BOX 590
EASTPOINT, FLORIDA 32328
Office: 850-670-4377
Fax: 877-423-4964
E-Mail: info@franklinchronicle.net
Volume 17, Number 2 January 11, 2008
Publisher & Editor
Russell Roberts
Computer Graphic Designer
Diane Beauvais Dyal
Writers
'Skip Frink, Richard E. Noble, Tom Loughridge,
Laurel Newman, Harriett Beach
Circulation Associates
Jerry Weber, Tom Loughridge, Rick Lasher

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S .t, .gz- "




Fish cages offshore pose problems


A number of years past, we were introduced to
aquaculture here in Franklin County. An introduc-
tory experiment was conducted here in our sleepy
little fishing village and a good deal of controversy
resulted.
The experiment was rejected by the county and
"leasing" or the privatization of Apalachicola Bay
was prohibited by a 3
to 2 vote of the Coun-
ty Commission at that
time.
I really don't know
what has happened
since that time
around the state of
Florida but recently it
was announced at a
County Commission TA i
meeting that the State
of Florida was about By Richard E. Noble
to approve another
experiment in aqua-
culture in the Gulf-offshore aquaculture fish rais-
ing cages.
I was covering the County Commission at the
time of this announcement and I expected to hear
a large outcry. But instead there was virtual silence
on the matter from the entire fishing community-
local environmentalists and fishermen alike.
This silence prompted me to do a little research
and the following is a brief exposure to some of the
present controversial issues involved in this matter.
Aquaculture is growing all over the world. Its
advocates are claiming it as one solution in feeding
the poor of the planet. At its current rate of growth
it has been reported that it will only be a matter of
time before more fish and other editable seafood
products are farmed than are caught at sea. The
prestigious NOAA organization is predicting $5
billion in aquaculture production, 600,000 jobs and
$2.5 billion in goods and services by the year 2025.
But all of this good news is not without.an ade-
quate supply of bad news.
Although aquaculture is being established rap-
idly in third world countries and touted as a cure
for poverty, in reality, it seems to be producing just
the opposite.
Struggling poor coastal fishermen are being
put out of their traditional work and replaced by'
armed guards who are hired to protect the shrimp
farms at poverty wages. The farm owners are usu-
ally from "big business" who are basically exploit-
ing the poor coastal regions with no concern for the
natives or their poverty or prosperity.
For the most part shrimp are being grown in
these regions for sale to wealthier nations. The
native people growing the shrimp can't afford to
buy them and the small fish that they once caught
for their home markets and local consumption are
being monopolized by the Big Farmer
Corporations as shrimp food. So now the poor


indigenous people are out of work, both tradition-
al and otherwise, and their food has been confiscat-
ed as feed for the farms. Once again it seems the
rich get richer while the poor get even poorer.
But for those who are willing to accept pover-
ty as an inevitable consequence of prosperity,
wealth and growth, there are other negatives to
consider. One big negative is the consequence to
the natural environment.
The negative environmental impacts from
coastal.shrimp farming and offshore intensive fish
farming are causing many consumer and environ-
mental groups to ask their supporters not to buy
ANY farm raised fish or shrimp.
One of the big problems with the fish farms
and cages is the negative impact on the wild fish
population. You may have read about the Alaskan
Salmon problem-farm raised fish escape from
their cages and bring new diseases to the wild pop-
ulations which the wild fish are not able to over-
come. This same problem applies to the farm raised
shrimp also.
There is also a problem with quick growth
.chemicals and antibiotics used in the intensive
farming which add to the other perils already fac-
ing the human consumers.
Congested fish raised in cages are polluting the
ocean bottom. Fish excretion is high in ammonia,
nitrite and nitrate. Overfeeding of the congested
fish population fouls the water and pollutes the bot-
tom. Huge areas in Europe where these intensive
fish cages are used have miles and miles of sea bot-
tom that is completely dead. The farm shrimp may
contain dissolved cobalt and lead-"heavy metal
bioaccumulation and lead poisoning in humans is
not an exaggeration."
If you start perusing articles on the Internet
concerned with the perils of commercialized
seafood farming (privatization of the oceans) you
will come upon other familiar terms such as nitro-
gen enrichment, algal blooms, red tide, genetic pol-
lution of indigenous stocks, decreased oxygen lev-
els, poor water quality, fish diseases, mangrove for-
est devastation epizootic ulcerative syndrome and
vibriosis with symptoms such as boils, tail rot etc.
If you have any connection with the seafood
industry or you are concerned about world hunger
and world poverty, the health of the oceans, bays
and the food supply in general, you may want to
take a look at some of this.
Actually these offshore fish cages may even be
a concern to some of you sport fisherman. I doubt
that you will get your prop tied up in one of them
but you may find down the road that your grouper
holes are drying up and the few wild fish that you
are catching are starting to look and taste rather
peculiar.
This essay is, of course, pure speculation and a
little trust and faith in your fellow man and the free
market system may take care of everything. I
mean, who knows? It is all a matter of perspec-
tive-is the ocean half polluted or half healthy?


Ty R ll Ro
By Russell Roberts









The Franklin Chronicle A LOCALLY OWNED NE WSPA PER January 11, 2008 Page 5


Nelson lauds bill benefiting
military, vets and families


Lawmakers passed an
important piece of legislation
that benefits our military, veter-
ans, and their families before
wrapping up the first session of
the 110th Congress.
The Defenders of Freedom
Tax Relief Act (H.R. 3997) gives
a number of new tax benefits
and makes some temporary
measures permanent. I was
proud to sponsor the companion
bill to this measure in the Senate
and ultimately to vote for its pas-
sage. Some of the most signifi-
cant benefits include:
A permanent allowance for
soldiers to count their nontax-
able combat pay when figuring
their earned income tax credit
eligibility;
A tax cut for small busi-
nesses when they continue pay-
ing some salary to members of
the National Guard and Reserve
who are called to duty;
An end to cumbersome
rules for reporting of income
when companies continue pay-
ing those salaries, making it easi-
er for reservists to file their taxes
and simpler for employers to
keep contributing to those
employees' retirement plans;
Provisions allowing fami-


te MNdw
U.S. Senator

lies of reservists killed in the line
of duty to contribute up to 100
percent of survivor benefits to
retirement savings accounts or
education savings accounts and.
to collect life insurance and other
benefits provided by civilian
employers;
The ability for active duty
troops to withdraw money from
retirement plans, and an
allowance of two years to
replace the funds without penal-
ty; and
Extension of a provision
that gives retired veterans more
time to claim a tax refund on
some types of disability benefit
payments.
The president is expected to
sign the bill in January.


Letters to the Editor policy
The Franklin Chronicle welcomes your typed letters to the edi-
tor on issues of public concern. Letters may edited for fair-
ness. Please e-mail your letter to the editor to
news@FranklinChronicle.net.




MARKS INSURANCE

AGENCY, INC.




WRITING:
Home, Auto, Life, Business, Marine, Bonds
and Other Lines of Insurance
.See us for your insurance needs at:
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850-653-2161 800-586-1415





THE CHRONICLE


NEEDS YOU

The Franklin Chronicle wants to add to its staff
of community correspondents. If you have a
knack for writing and like the idea of being a
newspaper reporter, mail your resume to P.O.
Box 590, Eastpoint, FL 32328, or e-mail it to
info(afranklinchronicle.net.

We also have an opening for ad sales staff to
work part time on commission basis.


LETTER TO THE EDITOR


In memory of Jerry Judge


On Christmas Eve my
friend, Mr. Jerry Judge died. He
was the person my priest asked
me to help. So began my adven-
ture with the Lanark Village
Water and Sewer District's
issues. Jerry was a great guy and
served in the U.S. Army during
the Korean War. He often
described his time in Korea. He
told me about sleeping in a tent
near the war zone, with bullets
going off in the back ground. He
slept with one eye open, so the
enemy would not get him. Jerry
learned much about life during
the time he served in Korea.
Jerry was quite a sweet man,
as well as an interesting charac-
.ter. He had a warm voice and
presence when he spoke. Above
all, -Jerry believed in democracy
and the rights of the little person.
These were talents he
brought to a campaign against
the misguided Lanark Village
Water and Sewer District. He
spoke out about the actions of
the LVWSD Commissioners and
may have been the recipient of at
least one gaveling out by Barbara
Rorhs... There were unkind
comments made by Commis-
sioner Rorhs and others which
paled in comparison to the threat
he faced during active duty in
-war time.
Jerry was at the LVWSD
budget meeting that landed Billy
Snyder in Weerrs Hospital.
.During the fight when it
appeared Mr. Snyder was being
beaten up, Mr. Jerry helped stop
Joey Rowell from continuing to
hurt Billy, who lay uncon-
scious...
Nonetheless, the activities of
Commissioner Rorhs and her
attorney, were as much as an
affront to democracy as the
Communists in Korea. Jerry
campaigned tirelessly against the
injustice of the situation, even
through illness.
At first we wondered as to
the reason for the Lanark county
commissioner's seemingly lack


of urgency on the part of the cit-
izens when we attended county
meetings or called for help. We
were grateful when the Franklin
County Board of Commission-
ers finally stepped up to support
the people of Lanark and said
they would attend our monthly
meetings. Jerry was there at the
county meeting to witness their
support.
In December the LVWSD
situation looked promising for
the majority of the Lanark voters
and land owners. I assured Jerry
that it seemed like the LVWSD
fiasco would soon end. Jerry, in
his wisdom, warned me that it
would not be over until the con-
tracts were signed.
It bothered us that the elder-
ly and other Lanark residents
were not heard by their county
commissioner until another set
of referendum ballots were col-
lected, once again, to prove that
the majority of the voters wanted
to merge with Carrabelle. It is
disconcerting that at the same
meeting where Lanark's asset
transfer with Carrabelle was dis-
cussed, a plan to ask for money
for a regional water study was
announced. This announcement
was unexpected, but not a sur-
prise considering the circum-
stances.
As Jerry's time neared his
end, at the last December 2007
Franklin County Commission
meeting and after the LVWSD
asset transfer was on the agenda,
the Board voted to ask their State
Representatives, including the
individual representing Lanark,
for additional money to study a
regional water system and men-
tioned that in the future the
Board perhaps could discuss the
need for government utility
authority (or whatever name
they decide to call it).
This is not to say that a
regional resource sharing plan is
a bad thing. We all know there is
a problem with the scarcity of
water in the region. Any money


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that can be brought to Franklin
County is a good thing, if it is
used in a productive way.
However, the timing of and
motives for asking for so much
money, well over one million
dollars, should be transparent in
my opinion. Why is a regional
water authority more important
than a study of the impact of
decreased water flowing into the
Apalachicola Bay or fixing the
existing problems in Franklin
County, such as displaced work-
ers in the oyster industry? It
seems to' me that given the cur-
rent financial constraints of
Florida State government, meas-
urable outcomes should be clear-
ly stated before any money
requested. For example, how
would the proposed study add
additional jobs in Franklin
County or enhance the local
economy?
Special interest, pork barrel
politics during a recession is a bit
hard to digest; especially when
the pocketbook calls for a basic
diet. My friend, Mr. Jerry's wis-
dom and concern for others will
be missed.
Jerry, as always, was correct
when he said it would not be
over until the contract is signed.
My hope for 2008 is that we
can close this sad chapter in
Franklin County politics by sign-
ing the asset transfer on January
21, 2008. We owe this to the
memory of Jerry Judge, the vot-
ers of Lanark, and to the kind
people of Carrabelle.
As always, this letter was
written in its entirety by me.
Best wishes to all for a
happy and healthy 2008 with
safe water to drink before 2009!
Pauline Sullivan
Commissioner Lanark Village
Water and Sewer District


Florida

discount

drug card

launched
Gov. Charlie Crist has
launched the Florida Discount
Drug Card by visiting pharma-
cies and senior centers around
the state educating Floridians
about the card.
"The health of all Floridians
is tremendously important.
Floridians eligible for this pro-
gram have demonstrated their
hope for a healthier lifestyle by
signing up," Crist said.
Individuals qualify for the
card if they are age 60 and older
and do not have prescription
drug coverage or if they are in
the Medicare Prescription Drug
Coverage gap. Individuals, fami-
lies and seniors under age 60
may be eligible if they. have an
annual income of less than 300
percent of the Federal Poverty
Level and do not have prescrip-
tion drug coverage.
To apply for the FL Dis-
count Drug Card, visit www.
FloridaDiscountDrugCard.com
and complete an online applica-
tion or by calling 1-866-341-8894
or TTY 1-866-763-9630.


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


January 11, 2008 Page 5


The Franklin Chronicle









Page 6 January 11, 2008


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


Johnson explains property tax


amendment on Jan. 29 ballot


The Franklin County Commission approved the expenditure of.
$637,836.38 at their December" 18, 2007 meeting. The bills are listed
as follows, published for the Board by the County Finance Office.


ACS GOV'T FINANCIAL SYSTEM
12/18/2007 11: Check Register
BANK VENDOR CH
BANK GENERAL BANK ACCOUNT
000315 ADAPCO, INC.
002157 AIRGAS SOUTH
001670 ALLTEL
000214 AMERIGAS
002172 APALACHICOLA ACE HARDWARE
002281 ARAMARK
001000 BAKER AND TAYLOR
002826 BARINEAU HEATING AND
001880 BCC LANDFILL TIPPING
002766 BEGOS/KEVIN
002822 BIRCHWELL/ANNE
000965 BRINKLEY/ROBIN
001367 BROOKS CONCRETE SERVICE
000605 BUD'S LOCKSMITH SHOP
000230 CARSON & ADKINS
002210 CERTIFIED PLUMBING &
002624 CHEMICAL & JANITORIAL SP
060192 CITY OF APALACHICOLA
.04605 CITY OF CARRABELLE
000869 CITY OF CARRABELLE
000593 CLERK OPERATIONAL ACCOUNT
000540 CLERKS TRUST ACCOUNT
002801 COASTAL E SOLUTIONS LLC
002088 COUCH READY MIX USA
002340 CROWN TROPHY DOTHAN
002659 CYPRESS SOFTWARE
002663 DAN ROTHWELL
002339 DIXIE THEATRE
000202 EASTPOINT WATER & SEWER
002346 ELAN FINANCIAL-SERVICES
000557 FEDERAL EXPRESS CORP.
002265 FIRST CALL TRUCK PARTS I
001921 FLORIDA COMBINED LIFE IN
001149 FLORIDA LIBRARY ASSOCIATE
001671 FLORIDA MUNICIPAL INSURA
000586' FLORIDA RESEARCH, INC.
002112 FREIGHTLINER OF TAMPA LL
002331 GADSDEN COUNTY BOARD OF
001830 GANDER AUTO PARTS
002606 GE CAPITAL
002808 GEIGER & ASSOCIATES
002285 GULF COAST AGGREGATES LL
000187 GULF STATE BANK
000138 GULFSIDE I.G.A. (APALACH
000309 GULFSIDEIGA (CARRABELL
000140 H & B INDUSTRIES, INC.
.04606 HEATHER AND JARROD
002828 HUCKSTER
000144 J. V. GANDER DISTRIBUTOR
'002725 JACKSON AUTO PARTS
000918 JANKOWSKI ELECTRIC INC
002736 JOHNSON PETERSON ARCHITE
002271 JUDITH RUNDEL
000211 KETCHUM, WOOD & BURGERT
001805 KING'S PLUMBING
000429 LEITZ OFFICE PRODUCTS
000298 LEON COUNTY BD OF CO COM
002437 LEON COUNTY BOCC
001060 LEVY LAW FIRM
001503 LIBERTY COMMUNICATIONS
002676 LOCKLEY'S PORTABLE TOILE
.001402 LUBERTO'S
002731 M E BRAMBLETT
000777 MAHAN JF. 'WTILTP1 T.
.04607 MARCIA j :'i,'-:li
002114 MASTERS FARM SUPPLY
002063 MEDIACOM
001260 METROPLEX INDUSTRIAL SUP
001610 MIKE PARRISH
001360 MUNICIPAL SUPPLY & SIGN
002561 : EE.E TIFC I E 'JT',' -F. .C
002037 PArliJJiL.LCL LIBFAfi' A:.-:-E 3
000162 PITNEY BOWES
".. :I PREBLE-RISH, INC.
Si -I PROFORMA PRINT SOURCE U
.04604 PROGRESS ElNri
002194 PROGRESS CliEfPI.' FL'FPIC A.
002723 PROQUEST IrI-F'iij 'lA:ll
002394 iFDD" TCE ALBAir."
,6R4 P FE-.ITEr. PAMEILA
"',,1:,i,1 D FELi ABLE I::*RF RAT i: tl
.jI Dm F IFiG3 PO 'IEP C',F-.-,kATi.111'
,:.j.)C, la 'Z ,. Li-iBf-,
CO .) i -Si-, P!FiT SEF.';i:E- -:LrPAil '
.-;Z IB' Si.r.r ifEl E PI'I.'F '-iPFL'' i
000205 THE APALA':HiC':LA TIIIE3
".,4 :'L THE CFAlir iFtirri'JTE
,:'A.-, NTiRE Di- F i' AL -.E '.iCE'i
i)..1i,) "- L; IVi ERSi TY'i T Tr L..'l.iIA
002425 Alji.L4A COUi.nJT.' Bi'AFD OF
001725 WAITE ItiUAIEMEiT OF P.7
001993 wATE. RIlAlA'li:1Eti II Ek.'ICE
002827 w.'itiEP TRET ;EAFi,'OC
002770 '-4 AiFFitfl ':-:',MlrJijC
GENERAL BANK ACCOUNT
FjiuD DESCRIPTION
7 ., ----------------------
001 GENERAL FUND
120 FINE AND FORFEITURE
130 TOURIST DEVELOPMENT FUND
137 FRANKLIN CO PUBLIC LIBRARY
139 BALD POINT TRUST FUND
140 ROAD AND BRIDGE
141 LOOT ROAD PAVING .
142 MOSQUITO CONTROL
143 BOATING IMPROVEMENT FUND
163 ENHANCED 911 FUND
170 AIRPORT FUND
180 AFFORD.HOUSING ASSIST TRUST
304 LANDFILL TIPPING FEE FUND
TOTAL ALL FUNDS


Bill Mahan from Page 3

since another beaver may move
into the neighborhood.
Rare Purple Pearl: The
Associated Press reported about
a man who found a rare irides-
cent purple pearl while eating his
order of steamed clams at a
restaurant in Lake Worth. The
clam was originally thought to
be from Apalachicola, but addi-


Holidays from Page 3

example of "what, how, when"
and in some possible situations,
"who, and why?"
In true political style, none
of the candidates have made an
attempt to define their meaning
of this rallying cry, relying on the
voters who they want to put
them in office to imagine that the
candidate means exactly what


FRANKLIN COUNTY
GL540R-V06.74 PAGE 1


:ECK# DATE

40528 12
40529 12
40530 12
40531 12
40532 12
40533 12
40534 12
40535 12
40536 12
40537 12
40538 12
40539 12
40540 12
40541 12
40542 12
40543 12
40544 12
40545 12
40.546 12
40547 12
40548 12
40549 12
40550 12
40551 12
40552 12
40553 12
40554 12
40555 12
40556 12
40557 12
40558 12
40559 12
40560 12
40561 12
40562 12
40563 12
40564 12
40565 12
40566 12
40567 12
40568 12
40569 12
40570 12
.40571 12
40572 12
40573 12
40574 12
40575 12
40576 12
40577 12
40578 12
40579 12
40580 12
4'0581 12
40582 12
40583 12
40584 12
40585 12
40586 12
40587 12
40588 12
40589 12
40590 12
40591 12
40592 12
40593 i
40594 K
40595 i1
40596 1I
40597 i1
40598 1;
40599
40600 i
40601 1
40602
40603 iL
40604 1I
406067-1
40606 12
40607 12.
40608 12,
40609 12.
40610 12.
40611 12,
40612 12.
40613 12,
40614 12,
40615 12,
40616 12
40617 12
40618 12,
40619 12/
40620 12,
40621 12/


AMOUNT


Q. Do you have any infor-
mation on the proposed property
tax measures being put to the
voters on January 29th?
A. Franklin County's local
government has a responsibility
to the citizens and a commit-
- r -A U -


/18/07 130.63 ment to sareguara your nara
/18/07 100.55
/18/07 950.42 earned dollars. We should con-
/18/07 795.96
/18/7 496.47 tinually look for ways to be more
/18/07 384.18
/18/07 42.47 cost effective, enhancing the
/18/07 85.00
/18/07 980.13 delivery of services that improve
/18/07 2,805.00
/18/07 32.98 the quality of the citizens' lives.
/18/07 234.80
//07 2,668.00 In last year's budget, we reduced
!11817 90.00
18/07 4,699.63 property tax revenues by 10.25
/18/07 7,471.75
/18/07 519.720 percent and reduced the millage
/18/07 10,3522.2083
/18/07 "120.15 rate. Rapidly rising property val-
18/07 864.21 ues caused those taxes collected
/18/07 82.50
18/07 778.11 by the County, the Cities, and
IJ,.- 1,013.00
o60L 1 the School Board to increase.
7,50 11.01 We also saw an increase in visi-
27,500.00
S/18/07 282.56 tor and residential population,
/18/07 11.49
18/07 38.19 and increased costs of fuel,
/18/07 71.90
/18/07 1828.08 insurance, and pension costs.
/18/07 315.00
1807 125157.00 With the ballot initiative, you
/18/07 346.00 33
/18/07 8,754.3 need to know: 1- will it have an
/18/07 32:61
/18/07 19776 impact on your pocketbook?
/18/07 6,250.00
18/07 7.; 3073 And 2- what impacts will it have
/18/07 93,621.99
/18/07 9 76.45 on your community, state, and
/18/07 167.05
/18/07 10.2 education funding? The most
/18/07 10,000.00
/18/o7 101 89 optimistic estimates by econom-
/18/07 1,080.06 ic experts show the average
/18/ 07 316.62
/18/07 12,080.00 homeowner will save $240 per
/18/07 2,679.81
/18/07 92.51 year.
/18/07 3,388.00
/18/07 285.00 The proposed constitutional
/18/ 07 115.60
/18/07 6296.66 amendment will increase the
/18/07 6,235.98
/8/07 3,592.59 homestead exemption by
/18/07 90.65
/18 07 150.00 $25,000 for homes worth more
/18/07 4,750.00
/1807 147.00 than $50,000, but the exemption
/18/07 292.69
'8 34 80.00 doesn't apply to school taxes.
1 ,," 340.00 ap
S125.26 Businesses would get a $25,000
i ,' 202.27
'1"' 8,233.34 exemption for personal tangible
'i6 ." 487.50
1 :.4 36.84 property, usually things like
8 :u 14.6800
S 28,070 .7 equipment. All commercial and
I '' 2 218,070.75
2 0: 208621. non-homestead property like
S, 2,055.0067 second homes, rental homes, or
167.20 investment property or other
/1 147.80
L ''' 16+6 .-7
/ i :,6 --4 -lands. ouown that you don't live
/18/07 564:5 on permaneniftyg-wuld.bpro-
/18/07 141 96
/18/7 1,359 : tected by a 10 percent annual
/18/07 597 0
/18/07 3,2500o assessment increase cap. This
/ ', particular provision does sunset,
"' t"' 32,096 .72
.l[ '' 99.48 or expire, in 10 years and doesn't
1 150.00
iB ,C, 8,641.08- apply to school taxes.
637,836.38 The amendment also makes
DISBURSEMENTS accrued "Save our Homes"
425,905.21 assessment protections portable
S72,79.o0 to new homes when homestead-
3,918.31
1,212.86 ers move. In other words, home-
14, 4.19 stead property owners would be
2,563.73
6,200.00 able to transfer their "Save our
3,086.98
712.11 Homes" accrued 3 percent annu-
18,315.84
30,807.44
637,836.38 I


tional research has shown that
the clam didn't come from
SFranklin County. The exact site
is still unknown, however, Cedar
Key is the most probable place.
At least one "expert" says the
pearl may be worth thousands.
(County Commissioner Cheryl
Sanders noted that if the diner
had bitten down on the pearl, he
might need the "thousands" for
dental bills.)


the voter would change if he/she
was in office, thus setting them-
selves up for eventual disappoint-
ment and disillusion after the
ballots are counted.
One thing is fated: It won't a
literal meaning; it will be a
meaning crafted to the specifica-
tions of the spinmeisters, and
molded to be subtle, elastic, and
elusive.


The Franklin Chronicle is

available in Walkstreet, Kickstone & Newman

Books on 86 Tallahassee St. in Carrabelle


I i



By Marcia Johnson,
Clerk of Circuit Court

al assessment cap benefit to a
new homestead within 1 year
and not more than 2 years after
relinquishing their previous
homestead. There are excep-
tions. If passed, and if the new
homestead is established on Jan.
1, 2008, the previous homestead
must have been relinquished in
2007. If the new homestead has
a higher just value than the previ-
ous one, the accumulated benefit
can be transferred, but, if the
new homestead has a lower just
value, the amount of the benefit
transferred will be reduced. The
transferred benefit may not
exceed $500,000 and applies to
all taxes. The proposal also pro-
vides for homestead exemptions
to be repealed altogether if a
future constitutional amendment
provides for assessment of
homestead "at less than just
value" rather than as currently
provided "at a specified percent-
age" of just value.
Voters will decide on this
Amendment on January 29,
2008. It requires 60 percent
approval for passage. According
to an article in The Tallahassee
Democrat, if passed, it is esti-
Smated it will cut taxes and rev-
enues to local governments
statewide by 1.27 billion dollars
in 2008, including161.3 million
dollars from our schools. Over
five years, it's projected-to-eut
taxes 9.31 billion including 1.56
billion less for schools.
The proposal is uncharted
territory, and no one really
knows what effect it will have on
our County and future projects.
A reliable, stable tax structure is
necessary for counties to make
financial plans. Local govern-


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Vehicle is going so fast that it


explodes the air in front of it.














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ments are mandated to fund
projects like increasing costs
from workers compensation,
Medicaid and healthcare for the
uninsured, solid waste recycling
grants loss, revenue sharing loss,
and court facilities, amid pres-
sures of population growth,
inflation, and the expectations of
our citizens. The State doesn't
always provide the counties with
funding to help, and local tax-
payer dollars have to fill the void
which affect the county's ability
to maintain other services such
as public safety, public welfare
and transportation. Those serv-
ices include security enhance-
ments, new deputies for county
roads and facilities, technology
upgrades, costs associated with
hurricane planning and res-
ponse, road projects, infrastruc-
ture, and personnel costs, to
name a few. There are other pro-
posals being championed that
call for simply capping all taxes
at a certain percent of the prop-
erty's just value or call for legisla-
tive changes in the way property
is assessed, but these are not on
this ballot amendment. There is
no easy answer, and voters put
taxes and government spending
at the top of their list of the most
important issues.. I recognize the
imbalances of the system and the
importance of providing fairness
and equity to all property tax-
payers. I don't believe it's right
for state government to place the
burden of property tax relief on
local governments while state
funding responsibilities are
assessed to local governments.
As your clerk, I will continue to
follow the directives of legisla-
tion passed. This is a complicat-
ed ballot issue, and. perhaps the
information provided will be of
assistance in deciding your vote
on January 29th.

If you have questions or comments
about this column, please forward
them to: Marcia Johnson, Clerk of
the Court, 33 Market St., Ste. 203,
Apalachicola, Florida, 32320, or by
email to: mmjohnson@franklin-
clerk.com. Visit the Clerk's Web site
at www.franklinclerk.com.









The Franklin Chronicle A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER January 11, 2008 Page 7


FWC releases annual

manatee death count


A preliminary report from
the Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission indi-
cates there were 317 manatee
deaths in state waters in 2007.
The total number of carcasses
documented in Florida last year
falls below the five-year average
of 355.
Watercraft strikes and red
tide continue to contribute to a
high percentage of manatee mor-
tality, accounting for more than
half of the total deaths in 2007
where scientists could determine
the cause of death. Necropsy
results identify watercraft strikes
as the cause of 73 deaths and red
tide as responsible for 52 deaths
in 2007.
FWC researchers report that
watercraft and red tide-related
deaths were high in Southwest
Florida. The combination of
these factors was identified as a
concern for this region in the
recently approved manatee man-
agement plan.
The FWC uses trends in
mortality figures to monitor
ongoing and emerging threats to
the manatee population. A
recent report analyzing threats to
the species, coauthored by
researchers from the United


Nw4 /4o FWe


States Geological Survey and the
FWC, points to watercraft-relat-
ed mortality as the most signifi-
cant long-term threat to the man-
atee population. However, the
FWC is encouraged that the
number of watercraft-related
deaths in 2007 is below the five-
year average.
The FWC is committed to
conservation actions that reduce
human-caused manatee deaths.
The FWC's manatee manage-
ment plan outlines measures to
address watercraft-related mor-
tality, as well as other threats fac-
ing the manatee population.
To report a dead or injured
manatee, call the FWC Wildlife
Alert hotline at 888-404-FWCC.


Students invited to enter art contest


Middle and high school art
students are invited to submit
their manatee artwork for con-
sideration in the 17th annual
Manatee Decal Art Contest
sponsored by the Florida Fish
and Wildlife Conservation
Commission.
Students must work through
their school's art teacher to sub-
mit artwork since only five art
entries are allowed per school.
Sales from the manatee
decals provide funds for the
state's manatee protection pro-
gram. Decals are available at
county tax collectors' offices in
Florida with a donation of $5 or
more to the Save the Manatee
Trust Fund. Money from the
sale of these decals supports
manatee protection efforts, such
as rehabilitation, rescue, re-
search, enforcement and public
education. In June, 15,000
decals with artwork provided by
.Coral Reef Senior High School
student Natasha Thornton were
distributed statewide for sale
until June of 2008.
Requirements for the Mana-
tee Decal Art Contest are as fol-
lows:
All entries must be the sole
original work of the artist.
Student artists must attend
- a Florida public, private or home


r~


I -- ''Mf i wT- Iw I
A Coral Reef Senior High student's artwork was the state's
16th winner of the Manatee Decal Art Contest. Natasha
Thornton, 14, created a "wonderful drawing of a manatee
mother and calf pair."


school for middle or high school.
Students must submit their
artwork through their school or
art teacher.
Art teachers should submit
no more than five entries per
school.
The designs should be in
full color in a medium of the
artist's choice and may be realis-
tic or abstract as long as the
image depicts a recognizable
manatee.
The artwork image and
page size should be no larger
than 8.5" x 11" with the image


centered. (Note: Do NOT add
any text or captions to the art-
work).
Mount artwork on art
board with a protective paper
covering. (No frames, glass cov-
erings or dry mounting).
Design entries will be
accepted only if postmarked on
or before Jan. 31. On Feb. 14,
FWC staff will judge all quali-
fied entries. The winning design
will be used to create a final
decal for distribution to county
tax offices in July.


Roundup of
FRANKLIN COUNTY
On Saturday, December
22, Officer Travis Huckeba
boarded a commercial fishing
vessel in the Apalachicola River.
Upon inspection he discovered
43 illegal red grouper. The fish
were seized and appropriate cita-
tions were issued.
On December 26 while on
patrol on the "Sea Hawk,"
Officer Faris Livesay issued a
citation to a subject for possess-
ing red snapper during closed
season.
On December 29 while on
.water patrol on the "Sea Hawk,"
Officer Michael Slotin issued a


FWC enforcement actions in the Panhandle


citation for possession of red
snapper during closed season in
federal waters.
GULF COUNTY
Officer Tony Lee respond-
ed to a commercial Individual
Fishing Quota (IFQ) landing of
red snapper in Port St. Joe. It
was after 6 p.m. and the captain
of the vessel had already
unloaded approximately 108
pounds of fish from the vessel to
his truck. National Marine
Fisheries Service Agents have
been contacted by Officer Lee
concerning the case. Federal
charges are pending.


GADSDEN COUNTY
On December 22, Lt.
Harry Parker and Officer Mike
Fish cited two Alabama subjects
for taking over the possession
limit of speckled perch on Lake
.Talquin.
LIBERTY COUNTY
On December 30, Officer
Lane Bentley cited two Liberty
County men for attempting to
take deer at night with a gun and
light in the Apalachicola
National Forest.
SANTA ROSA COUNTY
On December 22, Officers


Andy Maltais and Keith Clark
were on patrol completing
license and game inspections
along the Escambia River
WMA. During one of the
inspections at the Cotton Lake
boat ramp, a hunter was checked
and found to be in possession of
a firearm with a non-expiring
domestic violence injunction.
The hunter was issued a criminal
citation and the rifle seized.
The hunter admitted borrowing
the firearm.
OKALOOSA COUNTY
On December 23, Officers
Alan Kirchinger and David


Brady checked an area on
Blackwater Wildlife Manage-
ment Area after receiving infor-
mation about ATV activity
from Investigator Shelby Will-
iams. While patrolling the area
on foot, Officers Kirchinger and
Brady located a baited area and
tree stand. The two officers later
observed a subject operating an
ATV on the WMA and hunting
from the tree stand that was posi-
tioned over the bait. The subject
was identified and cited for hunt-
ing deer over bait in a WMA,
not having a quota permit, and
operating an ATV on a WMA.









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The Franklin Chronicle


January 11, 2008 Page 7









Page 8 January 11, 2008


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


County EMS receives donated


pet oxygen masks from DART


The Franklin County Commission approved the expenditure of
$1,073,891.98 at their January 2, 2008 meeting. The bills are listed as
follows, published for the Board by the County Finance Office.


Check Register


ADVANCED BUSINESS SYSTEM
AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIA
AMERICAN PLANNING ASSOCI
APALACHEE CENTER, INC
APALACHEE REGIONAL PLANN
APALACHICOLA ACE HARDWARE
APALACHICOLA BAY CHAMBER
ARAMARK
ARNOLD/HARRY
ATCO INTERNATIONAL
BCC WEEMS HOSPITAL
BLUE CROSS BLUE SHIELD O
BRIDGERS COACHES INC
CARLTON APPRAISAL CO
CDW GOVERNMENT, INC.
CEDAR BAY COMPANY INC/TH
COASTAL E SOLUTIONS LLC
DEPT OF MANAGEMENT SERVI
FEDERAL EXPRESS CORP.
FLORIDA ASSOC OF COUNTIES
FLORIDA COMBINED LIFE IN
FLORIDA MEDICAID-COUNTY
FMCA DODD SHORT COURSES
GANDER AUTO PARTS
GIBBS/DORIS S.
GLOBAL EQUIPMENT COMPANY
H & B INDUSTRIES, INC.
HARRIS,JR./JAMES A.
HAYES E-GOVERNMENT
HUNT INSURANCE GROUP
INTERSTATE SHELLFISH
JACKSON AUTO PARTS
JOHNSON/MARCIA M.
JONES/MELISSA A
KELLEY FUNERAL HOME
LOCKLEY'S PORTABLE TOILE
MCCALL SOD FARM
MELLON TRUST OF NEW ENGL
MIKE PARRISH
MIKE PARRISH AND
MOCK/MIKE
NEXTEL PARTNERS INC
OCALA HILTON
OFFICE DEPOT
PENDLETON/DORIS B.
POLOUS/JAMES DEWITT
PROFORMA PRINT SOURCE -UN
QUALITY WATER SUPPLY
REGISTER/PAMELA
RING POWER CORPORATION
SCOTT/WILLIAM E.
SHULER/THOMAS M.
SIGN DESIGN
SOWELL TRACTOR COMPANY,
SPIRIT SERVICES COMPANY
STONE/MELANIE R
SWITZER/LORI
TAX COLLECTOR, FRANKLIN
TAYLOR.BUILDING SUPPLY
TAYLOR BUILDING SUPPLY
TAYLOR BUILDING SUPPLY
TAYLOR BUILDING SUPPLY
WEFING'S
674 FAIRPOINT COMMUNIC


GENERAL BANK ACCOUNT
FUND DESCRIPTION
001 GENERAL FUND
120 FINE AND FORFEITURE
130 TOURIST DEVELOPMENT FUND
137 FRANKLIN CO PUBLIC LIBRARY
140 ROAD AND BRIDGE
142 MOSQUITO CONTROL
170 AIRPORT FUND
180 AFFORD.HOUSING ASSIST TRUST
TOTAL ALL FUNDS


Highlights of action during
the Jan. 2 Franklin County Com-
mission meeting:
Commissioners learned
that Gulfside IGA has agreed to
be a pay station for Progress
Energy, pending training.
Commissioner Bevin
Putnal mentioned that an
Eastpoint resident raised the
need for streetlights on certain
areas of the sidewalk along U.S.
98. The county will contact the
state Department of Transporta-
tion about the potential safety
problem.
The commission approved
a motion to invite Bailey, Bishop
and Lane of Tallahassee to nego-
tiate providing engineering de-
sign for boat ramps at
Ochlocknee Bay and Eastpoint.
A county committee listed them
number one, following by
Preble-Rish and Baskerville-
Donovan. The projects are being
paid with a state grant.
Commissioners approved a
recommendation to release the
bond for Phase 1 of Summer
Camp. The engineer of record
has sent statement of satisfactory
completion of the infrastructure,
and county staff met with St. Joe
Company representatives in
December to observe the project.
Approved a motion to pay
two invoices for widening and
resurfacing County Road 67 in
the amounts of $468,967.45 and
$73,920.52.
Circuit Clerk Marcia
Johnson introduced Linda
Phillips as the new finance direc-


ACS GOVT FINANCIAL SYSTEM
12/31/2007 16:
BANK VENDOR
BANK GENERAL BANK ACCOUNT


CHECK# DATI

40625 01
40626 01
40627 01
40628 01
40629 01
40630 01
40631 01
40632 01
40633 01
49634 01
40635 01
40636.01
40637 01
40638 01
40619 01
40640 01
40641 01
40642 01
40643 01
40644 01
40645 01
40646 01
40647 01
40648 01
40649 01
40650 01
40651 01
40652 01
40653 01
40654 01/
40655 01,
40656 01/
40657 01,
40658 01,
40659 01,
40660 01,
40661 01,
40662 01,
40663 01,
40664 01,
4'0665 01,
4.0666 01,
40667 01,
40668 01O
40669 01,
40670 01,
40671 01O
40672 01/
40673 01
40674 01.
40675 01.
40676 01,
40677 01,
40678 01/
40679 01/
40680 01,
40681 01,
40682 01O
40683 01,
40684 01,
40685 01,
40686 01O
40687 01,
40688 01,


tor, assisted by Erin Griffith and
Connie McKinley, following the
retirement of Ruth Williams.
There will be no new hires at this
time due to the county hiring
freeze.
Voted to have County
Attorney Michael Shuler discuss
with the state Department of
Revenue instructions for local
businesses for collecting and
remitting the 1% health-care
sales tax, which local businesses
should have began collecting on
Jan. 1.


The Big Bend Disaster
Animal Response Team
(DART), a nonprofit organiza-
tion whose volunteers respond
during disasters and emergen-
cies, recently donated a set of pet
oxygen masks to Franklin
County's Emergency Manage-
ment Services.
EMS director Butch Baker
and Mike Rundel accepted the
donated masks from DART
members at the Emergency
Operations Center in Apalachi-
cola.
The pet oxygen masks are
made specifically to fit on ani-
mals. In house fires, pets as well
as their owners are often over-
come by smoke inhalation and
these high-quality masks will aid
firefighters in reviving pets over-
come by smoke during house
fires. "Purchasing the masks has
been a great project for our
team," noted Haven Cook, cur-
rent President of Big Bend
DART. "Most people probably
wouldn't like to see tax dollars
spent on something like this, so
our group decided to buy the
masks and donate them to fire
departments in the Big Bend
area. With these masks on hand,
a firefighter can be prepared to
save somebody's pet."


Mike Rundel accepts a donated mask from DART.


FRANKLIN COUNTY
GL540R-V06.74 PAGE 1
- AMOUNT

/02/08 41.97
/02/08 93.00
/02/08 60.00
/02/08 2.033.33
/02/08 4,750.00
/02/08 139.83
/02/08 4,044.89
/02/08 81.43
/02/08 2,000.00
/02/08 390.85
/02/08 201,050.00
/02/08 95,261.62
/02/08 8,685.00
/02/08 3,250.00
/02/08 1,444.81
/02/08 12,343.00
/02/08 1,425.08
/02/08 68.78
/02/08 25.65
/02/08 1,152.41
/02/08 7,515.78
/02/08 7,175.79
/02/08 205.00
/02/08 1,120.80
/02/08 20,295.00
/02/08 150.62
/02/08 336.32
/02/08 43,301.00
/02/08 636.80
/02/08 1,699.11
/02/08 360.00
/02/08 30.01
/02/08 24,457.00
/02/08 150.00
/02/08 1,470.00
/02/08 150.00
02/08 21,530.00
/02/08 2,034.18
/02/08 1,362.50
/02/08 8,200.00
/02/08 424,265.00
/02/08 44.05
/02/08 436.00
/02/08 593.26
/02/08 155,543.00.
/02/08 382.00
/02/08 217.00
/02/08 278.25
/02/08 300.00
/02/08 555.00
/02/08 221.02
/02/08 3,272.00
/02/08 800.00
/02/08 647.48
/02/08 586.95
/02/08 150.00
/02/08 2,625.00
/02/08 2,151.23
/02/08 49.91
/02/08 29.94
/02/08 92.85
/02/08 7.58
/02/08 7.60
/02/08 115.30
1,073,891.98
DISBURSEMENTS
554,849.47
470,680.06
5,469.97
3,951.86
11,810.49
2,463.58
136.05
24,530.50
1,073,891.98


0006P5S
001104
000659
000255
000222
002172
000394
002281
002576
001174
002645
000194
002829
.04610
001731
002791
002801
000872
000557
000821
001921
000226
.04611
001830
000184
001877
000140
000635
002524
000273
001874
002725
002329
002514
000283
002676
001507
002816
001610
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002330
002343
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002554
001949
000852
002171
001972
002486
000168
000217
000729
002029
001411
000132
002513
002424
001995
002670
002671
002673
002674
000178
002770


Blast of Arctic air drops


temperature into the 20s


BY LAUREL NEWMAN
Chronicle Correspondent
Franklin County made it to
the top of the weather news last
week with an influx of Arctic air
that blew in on a high front, with
minimal moisture that did little
to mitigate the temperature
Effect, and had residents drag-
ging out the thermal underwear,
gloves, extra-thick socks, sweat-
ers, sweatshirts, and padded
jackets.
They were also busy cover-
ing gardens, wrapping water
pipes, heating animal pens or
bringing the pets inside, double-
checking on the elderly and heat-
ing gas supplies, and antifreeze
levels in vehicles.
Local weather forecasters
were fairly accurate with their
dire predictions, coming up with
a low Wednesday morning of
mid-to-upper 20s, the recorded


low for Franklin County was 26
degrees, and warm-up tempera-
tures in the low 40s. It made it all
the way to 41 degrees, but the
brisk wind kept it feeling in the
mid-30s. The overnight 'sub-
freeze did not result in much ice
in the morning, because of low
overnight humidity, except for a
crisp of ice on lawns, and tender
foliage reduced to what looked
like piles of cooked collards
tossed out to dry on bare branch-
es.
Thursday was somewhat
better, but still frigid, starting out
at 30 degrees, although at 9:30
a.m., the Gulf State Bank in
Carrabelle's temperature reading
was still only 33 degrees; warm-
ing up gradually throughout the
day to a high of about 54
degrees, not quite makingtthe
forecast of high 60s. That mean
'wind chill factor was much
milder, however, and the weather


(thankfully) moderated over the
weekend to more normal highs
in the high 60s.
Of .course, it is only the
beginning of our winter, which
here translates into-a series of
up-and -down weather shifts,
from "normal" to "brrr."
Archived January lows have
plummeted as far as 9 degrees
back in 1985, and highs have
reached 80 degrees as recently as
2005, which was one of our
hottest years on record as well.
According to NOAA,' the
Panhandle, on average, is expect-
ed to experience above-average
highs this year. No word yet on
the expected lows for the winter
months.
So the message is: Remain-
prepared to deal with below-
average lows for the next few
weeks, and continue to look for-
ward to the warm weather to
come.


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Each set of masks, which
sells for $55 a set, contains a
small, medium and large mask
which can fit dogs, cats, ferrets,
and hamsters, and other animals.
Another advantage of the masks
is that they are reusable and
won't need constant replace-
ment. As Emergency Services
Director Butch Baker noted,
"This is one more way we can
better serve the community." He
added that Franklin County
Emergency Services is develop-
ing expertise in being prepared to
handle animals and livestock


evacuations.
DART teams are made up of
volunteers trained to retrieve pets
and livestock left behind during
emergencies, disasters, or evacu-
ations. The team also sets up and
staffs "pet friendly" shelters for
the Capital Area Chapter of the
American Red Cross during dis-
asters and evacuations through-
out the eight-county area of the
Big Bend. More information on
Big Bend DART and the pet oxy-
gen mask project can be found at
www.bigbenddart.org.


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Peter E. Crowell Presents

Weekly economic update for
the week of January 7, 2008


Quote of the week
"If we all did the things we are capable of doing, we would liter-
ally astound ourselves." -Thomas Edison
New year, weak numbers
The year opened with some worrisome indicators. The Labor


Sponsored by Pete
Crowell, CFP
Record oil & gold prices


Department's latest jobless claims
report showed unemployment at 5.0%,
a two-year high. Employers added just
18,000 jobs in December, the lowest
monthly gain since August 2003.
Average wages rose 0.4% in December,
slightly above the expectations of econ-
omists. Meanwhile, the Institute of
Supply Management's manufacturing
index showed that manufacturing
shrank in December after 10 straight
months of growth. To top it all off, the
dollar also hit a four-week low on
Wednesday.


On Thursday, crude oil prices cracked the$100 ceiling, reaching
$100.05 per barrel in intraday trading on the New York Mercantile
Excharige. The rally was aided by news from the Energy Department
that commercial crude inventories were at a two-year low.
Meanwhile, gold set a record at $861.30 an ounce in midday trading
on the NYMEX on Wednesday. Gold closed Friday at $865.70-up
an astonishing $23 for the week-and oil pulled back to end the week
at $97.91 per barrel.
Mortgage rates & mortgage apps down
Averages on 30-year FRMs dropped .1% last week to 6.07%, the
lowest rates in a month.6 But the Mortgage Bankers Association
reported mortgage applications down 11% for the week ending
December 28.7 Freddie Mac chief-economist Frank Nothaft fore-
casts roughly 5.09 million new and existing home sales for 2008,
which would be an 11% drop from 2007.
Sputtering start for Wall Street
The jump in oil prices and the disappointing unemployment and
manufacturing- indicators added up to a kick in the gut for the stock
market. The DJIA ended the opening week of 2008 at 12,800.18.
% Change 1-Week 4-Week 2007
DJIA -4.42 -6.45 +6.43
NASDAQ -6.78 -8.05 +9.81
S&P 500 -4.74 -6.59 +3.53
(Source: CNNMoney.com, USATodaycom,1/4/08)
Riddle of the week
Dan held a dinner party. For every 2 guests, he served a plate of
meat. For every 3 guests, he served a plate of rice. For every 4 guests,
he served a plate of sauce. Given that he served a total of 65 dishes,
how many guests did he have? Read next week's udatefor the answer.
Last week's riddle
Ten ice cream bars and 6 ice cream cones cost $13. But if you buy
6 ice cream bars and 10 ice cream cones, the bill will be $11. How
much does an ice cream bar cost? Answer: Ice cream bars cost $1, and
cones cost 50.
Peter F Crowell is a Certified Financial Planner in Tallahassee and a
Franklin County property owner Questions for him can be e-mailed to
info@franklinchronicle.net, or mailed to PO. Box 590, Eastpoint, FL32328.
The Dow Jones Industrial Average is a price-weighted index of 30 actively trad-
ed blue-chip stocks. The NASDAQ Composite Index is an unmanaged, market-weight-
ed index of all over-the-counter common stocks traded on the National Association of
Securities Dealers Automated Quotation System. The Standard & Poor's 500 (S&P
500) is an unmanaged group of securities considered to be representative of the stock
market in general. It is not possible to invest directly in an index. NYSE Group, Inc.
(NYSE:NYX) operates two securities exchanges: the New York Stock Exchange (the
"NYSE") and NYSE Arca (formerly known as the Archipelago Exchange, or
ArcaEx, and the Pacific Exchange). NYSE Group is a leading provider of securities
listing, trading and market data products and services. The New York Mercantile
Exchange, Inc. (NYMEX) is the world's largest physical commodity futures exchange
and the preeminent trading forum for energy and precious metals, with trading con-
ducted through two divisions--e NYMEX Division, home to the energy, platinum,
and palladium markets, and the COMEX Division, on which all other metals trade.
These views are those of Peter Montoya Inc., and not the presenting Representative or
the Representative's Broker/Dealer, and should not be construed as investment advice.
All information is believed to be from reliable sources; however we make no represen-
tation as to its completeness or accuracy. All economic and performance is historical
and not indicative of future results. The market indices discussed are unmanaged.
Investors cannot invest in unmanaged indices. Please consult your Financial Advisor
for further information. Additional risks are associated with international investing,
such as currency fluctuations, political and economic instability and differences in
accounting standards.

This Week's Answer

Cogno's Corner

Answer to question #293 is: False.
Imagine an airplane traveling slower than 1200 kilometers
per hour (the speed of sound). The sound waves it creates hit
the ground in the same order that the waves come off the plane.
But past the speed of sound, the plane races ahead of sound
waves it created the moment before, and adds more sound to
them. This creates a tidal wave of noise that reaches your ear
and makes a "booming" sound.


ACROSS
1. Perry's aide
6. Powdery mineral
10. Martial arts actor
Jackie
14. Celestial hunter
15. Tater topper
16. Saintly symbol
17. Rest stop part
19. Keen on
20. Getty of "The
Golden Girls"
21. Pinch-hit
23. Jane Austen
classic
25. Graceful steed
26. Tourist's take-
along
30. Poster holder
32. Take steps
35. Out of whack
36. IOU's
37. Moo pork
38. On deck
39. Does a KP chore
40. Related
41. Binary digit
42. "Mrs. _Goes to
Paris"
43. Canyon of
comics
44. Byrnes of old TV
45. Old pros
46. In heaven
47. Abrasive stuff
49. VCR supplanter
51. Tried to shoot
54. Snappy
comebacks
59. Tennis score
after deuce
60. Incriminating
records
S62. Editor's strikeout
63. Idyllic spot
64..Web mag
65. Circular word
66. Knock senseless
67. Meted out


26. Hiawatha's craft
27. Modify, as a law
28. Single-dish meat
assortment
29. Guinness suffix
31. Has a bug
33. Sour cream
morsel
34. In perfect pitch
36. Gift doc.
39. Recorded ahead
of time
40. stroke
(suddenly)
42. Raring to go
43. Like some kitchen
spoons
46. "As (letter
closing)


48. Actress
Zellweger
50. Goddess of
peace
51. They come and
go
52. Brain wave
53. Bit of mock vocal
fanfare
55. Rice-shaped
pasta
56. One way to
travel
57. Trident prong
58. Iditarod entry
61. Dispenser candy


Crossword Puzzle Answer on Page 12


FHP
checkpoints
State troopers will conduct
driver's license and vehicle
inspection checkpoints during
daylight hours at the following
locations in Franklin County:
Jan. 4-10: S.R. 384, S.R.
67, S.R. 377, S.R. 385
Jan. 11-17: C.R. 370, C.R.
157, C.R. 59
Jan. 18-24: C.R. 374, C.R.
30A, S.R. 300 (St. George Island
Causeway)
Jan. 25-31: S.R. 30, S.R.
30A, S.R. 65


. 7 "" ,r




.. . ..'. :. .
a 2. 9 ,
:d0ter.fort-ton

Page 12.



I. '


Stacy's Hair Design

850-6701772
Hours: Tues-Fri 10-5, after 5 by apt. Sat. 10-until
TAKING CARE OF
Stacy Williams, ALL YOUR HAIR
Stylist CARE,
347 Highway 98 MANICURES,
P.O. Box 977. PEDICURES &
Eastpoint, FL 32328 ACRYLICS



SCISSOR'S PALACE

& PAY SPA
European Pedicure Spa European Facials
Body Wraps & Waxing o Hair Gel Nails
SPhone: 850-670-5220
338 Highway 98, Eastpoint, FL 32328
WALK-INS WELCOME OWNER: ANGELA CREAMER



Want to purchase minerals

and other oil/gas interests.

Send details to:

P.O. Box 13557

Denver, Colorado 80201


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


January 11, 2008 Page 9


The Franklin Chronicle


American Profile Hometown Content


DOWN
1. Venetian
magistrate
2. Time line divisions
3. Telemarketing aid
4. Slim down
5. Buck features
6. Clan emblem
7. Boxer Laila
8. Some July births
9. Job-seekers' ins
10. Wedgwood
offering
11. Carrier for a small
load
12. Height: Prefix
13. Time for a bite
18. Soprano Gluck
22. Clumsy boats
24. O'Hair, for one









Page 10 January 11, 2008


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


January 12, 2008
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|Monday Evening January 14, 2008

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32006 Homennwn Content, listing by Zap2it


Tuesday Evening January 15, 2008

I1ILaughs |Laughs Jim |Carpooler |Boston Legal Local Nightine Jimmy Kimmel Live
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I


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K arT WIllam ,










The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


January 11, 2008 Page 11


Wednesday Evening January 16, 2008

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THURSDAY, JANUARY 10

* 5:30 to 7 p.m.: Apalachicola Chamber Business After Hours,

Harry A's, 28 West Bayshore, St. George Island.

FRIDAY, JANUARY 11

* 10 a.m.: Ribbon cutting and open house for St. George Island

Visitor Center and Lighthouse Museum.

THURSDAY, JANUARY 17

* 10 a.m. CST: Northwest Florida Transportation Corridor

Authority meeting, South Walton Courthouse Annex, 31 Coastal

Centre, Santa Rosa Beach.

SATURDAY, JANUARY 26

* Fall Festival to benefit Sumatra Volunteer Fire Department in

Sumatra, on State Road 65 at the Liberty/Franklin County line.

Send your announcements of upcoming meetings and other special occa-

sions to the Community Calendar at news@FranklinChronicle.net. We'll

also announce birthdays in this column at no charge.


Thursday Evening January 17, 2008

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Churchgoers sit in their cars at the Daytona Beach Drive-In Christian Church at
Daytona Beach Shores (pop. 4.299), where worship services have been held since
1953 at the Former Neptune Drive-In Theatre.









I':.


Three young women frolic along the beach on St. George Island in this photo taken in 1952.
According to the Archives of Florida History photo collection, they are identified as Ruth
Hall, Pat Baxter and Dorothy Rose Matthews.

Residents of 'green' communities studied


Homebuyers appreciate the
benefits of "green" communi-
ties, but residents don't necessar-
ily lead more eco-friendly lives
than their neighbors in tradition-
al homes, according to two
'University of Florida studies
conducted in the fast-growing
state.
The findings could mean
some homeowners in green com-
munities don't know enough
about how to reduce their envi-
ronmental impact, said \Mark
Hostetler, an associate professor
with UF's Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences.
Green communities are
designed to have less environ-
mental impact than traditional
housing developments. The
homes often feature energy-sav-
ing appliances, extensive insula-
tion and yards with native plants;
common areas typically include
lots of green space and drainage
systems that minimize stormwa-
ter runoff.
People moving into green-
developments may simply be
interested in open space, energy
efficient homes or the chance to
see wildlife, Hostetler said, and
may not bring with them a strong
commitment to environmental
issues.
"You have to engage the
people that live in these commu-
nities," Hostetler said. "It's a
combination of things, of .not
only education, raising aware-
ness, but understanding the bar-
riers that everyday people have,
to make it easier for them to





D E.ATL N
DELLA TALC CHAN
ORITN OLEO HALO



N E ESTATE N INT
A LE A 1A I D
ONE ARRIS STEVE
E D T EL A T E D
GR IT T I.VoN
FIREDAT RETORTS
ADN PAPER RAIL
LE EDA E Z I N E
9 D A Z EZ D 0 L ED


involve themselves in sustainable
type of living."
In the studies, Hostetler and
graduate student Krystal Noiseux
queried new homeowners in two
pairs of Florida communities.
Each pair consisted of a green
housing development and a tra-
ditional one of similar. size,
home value and location.
The researchers mailed
questionnaires to more than 900
households in total, of which
340 responded. The question-
naires were sent in June 2006
and mailed only to residents who
bought their homes in the past
two years.
Residents of both types of
communities were concerned

THE
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
WELCOMES YOU

+ +










850-653-9550
Highway 98 & 6th Street
Apalachicola
EST. 1836
SUNDAY
8:00 A.M.
10:30 A.M.


with indoor air quality, green
space and energy efficiency, all
of which are usually priorities in
green developments.
But residents of both types
of communities had only a mod-
erate- to low-level commitment
to environmental issues, respons-
es showed. The questionnaire
contained a total of 40 questions
about environmental knowledge,
attitudes and behaviors.
Those results are significant,
Hostetler said, because all home-
owners can influence their own
environmental impact. Day-to-
day choices such as setting the
thermostat, watering the lawn or
Continued on Page 13


St. George Island
United Methodist Church

YOU ARE INVITED TO
SUNDAY WORSHIP AT 9:00 A.M.


201 E. Gulf Beach Drive on the Island
Phone: 927-2088 Website: sgiumc.org
Pastor: Themo Patriotis Dir. of Creative Ministries: Dusty Turner


Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine
blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1
to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sec-
tions that you've already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you
can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine
squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is
completed when you correctly fill every square. Answer to this
week's Sudoku Puzzle is on page 13.

1 2 3

1 2 *4

5 6 2 7

2 1 4 6

5 7 8 2

4 39 1

4 7 5 6

26 9

3 8 9


Now is the time to

subscribe to the

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Ji~Wt Japtidt eAwi
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501 E. Bayshore Drive
850-927-2257
R. Michael Whaley, Pastor
Join us as we praise and
worship the living Christ!

Sunday Bible Study 10:00 a.m.
Worship & Praise 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Night 7:00 p.m.
Wed. "Power Hour" 7:00 p.m.

"Walking in Christ"


Page 12 January 11, 2008


A LOCALLY OWNED NE WSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle









The Franklin Chronicle A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER January 11, 2008 Page 13


Pamper your pets with home improvement projects


Our pets are more than just
loyal friends-they're members
of our families. As J. Jerome
wrote in 1889, "There are many
families where the whole interest
of life is centered upon the dog."
More than a century later, the
same holds true for our dogs,
cats, birds, reptiles and other pets
and now we have scientific verifi-
cation of the value of loving an
animal. Studies have shown that
having a pet can be good for your
health in terms of lowering your
blood pressure.
Butas much as they love us,
even pets need a little time to
themselves. You want to be sure
there is a place in your home that
you pet can call their own.
Whether it's a dog house, a cat
bed, a cage for your iguana,
whatever-you want to give your
pet retreat to that where he or
she can relax and feel safe.
A luxury doghouse
Remember when a dog-
house consisted of four walls
and a roof? Doghouses have
come a long way. Nowadays dog
houses come in all sizes, even
duplexes for more than one pet.
Many companies are willing to
sell you custom-made dog hous-
es. These can run anywhere from
a couple of hundred dollars into
the thousands. Many people cus-
tom their dog house by breed; for
example, a Swiss chalet for a
Bernese mountain dog, a Span-
ish mission for a Chihuahua, etc.
If you really want to lavish
your dog with the best, consider
doghouse amenities. Floor
length windows, air conditioners
and marble floors are all avail-
able in a custom made doghouse.
With that kind of opulence why
not throw a housewarming
party?
You can always design and
build your own dog house. If
you do, make sure it's twice the
size of your dog, the wood is fin-
ished, and the flooring is
durable. Simple dog house kits
can be ordered starting at about
$150.
Consider the location of the
doghouse as well. If your dog
sleeps outdoors in cold weather
you want to be sure to provide as
much insulation as possible.
Your pet may be good at keeping


Green from Page 12
choosing plants for the yard
influence a household's resource
consumption. The studies indi-
cate that residents of green com-
munities .don't necessarily con-
serve resources better than resi-
dents of traditional develop-
ments.
He believes that in any com-
munity, green or traditional,
there's a small percentage of


re J "e
By Heidi Baker
and Eden Jarrin
themselves warm, but you want
them to be comfortable.
Carpeting is great, but it attracts
insects and is an ideal flea breed-
ing ground. So, you might want
to consider using a foam pad
instead with a washable vinyl
cover.
Cat enclosures
Many animal-rights organi-
zations endorse the practice of
keeping cats indoors, but how do
you keep them entertained?
Pampering your cat can come in
the form of introducing them to
the great outdoors with a cat run
or enclosure.
Like doghouses, cat enclo-
sures come in the luxury variety.
These large, fenced-in rooms
come with a variety of plants,
secret hideaway tunnels, even a
koi pond! Enclosures can be an
add-on to your home, similar to
a screen porch, or it can stand
alone in the yard, like a giant
bird cage. Again, enclosures can
be built by a professional for a
ton of dough or you can build
your own according to your cat's
preferences.
Another option is a cat run.
Remember those plastic tunnels
at the playground? This is essen-
tially the same idea, though the
tunnel is made of mesh. Cat runs
allow your pet to explore your
backyard without falling prey to
disease, automobiles, or the dog
next door!
Cat trees
Not only will a cat tree keep
your cat from scratching your
favorite furniture, it can also be a
great place for your cat to hang
out. Usually covered with carpet-
ing, cat trees come with all sorts
Sof features that cats can't resist;
the height of the structure is just
one factor. Nowadays cat trees


people who'd go all-out to live
sustainably, and another group
who'd refuse to inconvenience
themselves in the least.
The rest-perhaps 80 to 90
percent, by his estimate-are
willing to reduce their resource
consumption but may not under-
stand how. For example, using
ceiling fans rather than an air
conditioner may save hundreds
of dollars per year, but a home-
owner may not think to do it.


come outfitted with feathers, spe-
cialized scratching posts,
enclosed hideaways and catnip
trays.
Amenities and the number
of "stories" will ultimately deter-
mine the price. Expect to pay $50
and up for one, though they are
frequently on sale, so shop
around.
Devine ivans
A custom-made bed for your
pet is not only an indulgence, but
it may also keep them off your
furniture! Even if you don't con-
sider yourself a seamstress you
can easily build your own dog
bed. Get your hands on a pillow
pattern, buy some sewing essen-
tials, and you are on your way.
Sewing your own bed allows you
to match the material to your
decor, or the luxury doghouse
you have just built!
If you aren't too keen on
building Fido's bed yourself, cus-
tom made beds are available in
virtually any style or fabric.
Although you can find a simple
dog bed at any pet store, why not
go for an oak trundle bed with
300-thread count sheets?'
Hammock time
Cat hammocks are easy to
install and a feline favorite. Some
can be mounted onto a win-
dowsill to allow your cat to laze
in the sunshine and while keep-
ing an eye on the neighborhood.
Other cat hammocks are free-
standing or can be placed on the
radiator. If you have ever discov-
ered your cat asleep on your lap-
top, this may be the item for you!
They are priced at under $50,
and can usually be found at any
pet store.
Reptile Retreats
If your pet is of the reptile
variety, he or she needs a good
home too. The most important
factor in the health and happi-
ness of your pet is temperature.
The temperature of the cage or
habitat will depend on the ani-
mal but if you are in the market
to adopt a reptile, make sure his
or her home is built first.
Keeping a reptile in the cold too
long is very bad news.
Though heat is important,
don't forget to also provide
shade. A place where your pet


It's hard to say how much
the UF findings can be general-
ized to other parts of the coun-
try; the studies need to be repli-
cated elsewhere, Hostetler said.
However, the results do indicate
that developers of green commu-
nities should thoroughly educate
home buyers.
What's certain is that home
buyers-and the general pub-
lic-will be hearing more about
green homes and communities,






Sudoku Solution #92
9 1 4 812 7 6 3 5
8 7 3 1 615 2 4 9
5 6 2 9 3 4 1 8 7
2914 7 8 5 6 3
3 5 7 6 91 8 2 4
6 4 8 21513 9 7 1
4 8 9 3 1 2 7 5 6
726549318
135786492


can escape the light is essential.
You may also want to provide a
branch that he or she can
climb-reptiles love surveying
their surroundings!
Substrate is the substance
which lines the reptile habitat,
and similar to the temperature, it
depends on what kind of pet you
have. It can consist of ripped
strips, of newspaper, bark, sand
or soil. The most important
thing is that you keep the living
space clean! You wouldn't want
to live in a dirty house, so why
should your pet? So, be sure the
substrate is easy to change.
Finally, make sure the lid is
secure! You don't want to find
your pet-crawling around the
house unattended!
Though we love our pets and
want to be around them all of
the time, they need a place of
their own. Too often we find our-
selves yelling at them to get off
the furniture, the bed, the win-
dow sill, etc., but this can easily
be combated by giving them
their own retreat. The space
needn't be elaborate or expen-
sive, and in the end it will benefit
both of you!
For more great project infor-
mation and advice, please visit
us at www.BeJane.com.
Heidi Baker and Eden Jarrin, oth-
erwise known as The Janes, lived in
homes they didn't love. They decided
to do something about it, but when
they looked for support and advice
there wasn't anything out there that
spoke directly to women. So with
sheer will and determination,
through trial and error they began
transforming their homes into some-
thing that reflected their individual
personalities. And in the process,
they were surprised at how this
change affected others in their lives.
Suddenly their friends felt empow-
ered to take on their own home
improvement projects and Heidi and
Eden realized a change within them-
selves: they had developed more self-
confidence through doing home
improvement projects that transcend-
ed into other parts of their lives. The
Janes quickly realized that there was
a community of hundreds of thou-
sands of women that were just like
them. They took it upon themselves
to create the top resource for women
in home improvement, thus was
born, Be Jane.


said Hal Knowles, a consultant
for UF's Program for Resource
Efficient Communities, part of
the Florida Cooperative Exten-
sion Service.
Green construction became
popular in the United States dur-
ing the 1990s, following the for-
mation of the U.S. Green Build-
ing Council, a nonprofit that pro-
motes sustainable building prac-
tices and offers a widely recog-
nized certification program,
Knowles said.
Green certification can be
an important marketing tool,
said Nancy Richardson, director
of Audubon International's
Audubon Signature Programs,
which certify new developments.
"A developer is looking for
something that makes them
unique in the marketplace,"
Richardson said. "There's no
doubt that (certification) does
help."
But some environmentalists
debate which standards are
needed, Hostetler said.
"There is much discussion
about the bar being set too low in
these certifications and it's too
easy being green," he said.


Dear EarthTalk:
Green groups don't seem to
discuss human population
growth, but I think the biggest
issue confronting the planet is
the collective demand we put
upon it. And what is the differ-
ence "in impact between popula-
tion growth in Third World
countries, which are poor,
against that in the U.S., where
we consume and waste so much
more?
- Ronald Marks, via e-mail
The global rate of human
population growth peaked
around 1963, but the number of
people living on Earth-and
sharing finite resources like
water and food-has grown by
more than two-thirds since then,
topping out at over 6.6 billion
today. Human population is
expected to exceed nine billion
by 2050. Environmentalists don't
dispute that many if not all of
the environmental problems-
from climate change to species
loss to overzealous resource
extraction-are either caused or
exacerbated by population
growth.
"Trends such as the loss of
half of the planet's forests, the
depletion of most of its major
fisheries, and the alteration of its
atmosphere and climate are
closely related to the fact that
human population expanded
from mere millions in prehistoric
times to over six billion today,"
says Robert Engelman of
Population Action International.
According to Population
Connection, population growth
since 1950 is behind the clearing
of 80 percent of rainforests, the
loss of tens of thousands of
plant and wildlife species, an
increase in greenhouse gas emis-
sions by some 400 percent and
the development or commercial-
ization of as much as half of the
Earth's surface land. The group
expects that half of the world's
population will be exposed to
"water-stress" or "water-scarce"
conditions feared to "intensify
difficulties in meeting...con-
sumption levels, and wreak dev-
astating effects on our delicately
balanced ecosystems" in the
coming decades.
In less developed countries,
lack of access to birth control, as
well as cultural traditions that
encourage women to stay home
and have babies, lead to rapid
population growth. The result is
ever increasing numbers of poor
people across Africa, the Middle
East, Southeast Asia, and else-
where suffering from malnour-
ishment, lack of clean water,
overcrowding and inadequate
shelter, and AIDS and other dis-
eases.
And while population num-
bers in most developed nations
are leveling off or diminishing
today, high levels of consump-
tion make for a huge drain on
resources. Americans, who rep-
resent only four percent of world
population, consume 25 percent
of all resources. Industrialized
countries also contribute far
more to climate change, ozone
depletion and overfishing than
developing countries.


EARTH


TALK
Questions & Answers
About Our Environment


COLIRUS, INC.
198 Fifth Street
Apalachicola, FL 32320
850-653-8486 850-653-7013

Cora L. Russ, Broker/Realtor

PRICE REDUCTION ON PRIME LOTS:
145 21st Avenue: 90' x 100', $90,000
251 11th Street: 60' x 100', $85,000
149 8th Street: 60' x 100", $130,000
S325 Cottage Hill Road: 50' x 100', $85,000

Some owner financing considered.


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


January 11, 2008 Page 13


The Franklin Chronicle











SFlorida Classified


*FC Advertising Network

Each of the classified ads in this section reaches an audience of 1.8 million

subscribers through 112 Florida newspapers!

SThe Chronicle can place your advertising into this network. Please call the paper with the
FLORIDA REACH at 850-670-4377, fax: 877-423-4964, e-mail: info@franklinchronicle.net


Announcements
What Destroys Relationships?
Answer pg. 371 Buy and Read
Dianetics by L. Ron Hubbard
Send $20.00 to: Hubbard
Dianetics Foundation, 3102 N.
Habana Ave., Tampa, FL 33607
(813) 872-0722.
GET COVERED ... Run your
ad STATEWIDE! You can run
your classified ad in over 100
Florida newspapers for $475.
Call this newspaper or (866) 742-
1373 for more details or visit:
www.florida-classifieds.com.
Building Supplies
METAL ROOFING. SAVE $$$
buy direct from manufacturer. 20
colors in stock with all acces-
sories. Quick turn around.
Delivery Available ... (352) 498-
0778 Toll free (888) 393-0335
code 24. www.GulfCoastSupply
.com.
Business Opportunities
ALL CASH CANDY ROUTE
Have Fun and Get Paid! 30
Machines, Free Candy All for
$9,995. (888) 629-9968
BO2000033. CALL US: We will
not be undersold! "
AMERICA'S FAVORITE Coff-
ee Dist. Guaranteed Accts. Multi
Billion $ Industry. Unlimited
Profit Potential. Free Info. 24/7
(800) 729-4212.


Business Services
Your logo in the spotlight. Shirts,
hats, uniforms, mugs, badges,
etc. Since '92. Embroidery, silk
screening, customized. (800)
390-1280 ameripin@aol.com.
Employment Services
Notice: Post Office Positions:
Now Available. Avg. Pay
$20/hour or $57K annually
including Federal Benefits and
OT. Get your exam guide materi-
als now. (866) 713-4492 USWA.
Fee Req.
Financial
STOP Your Foreclosure Now.
Stay in Your Home. 100%
Guaranteed. We Negotiate with
Your Lender and Save Your
Home. Never Too Late.
www.HomeAssure.com/offer or
(866) 371-0721.
Help Wanted
Advertising Sales Manager-
National Newspaper Placement
Services (N2PS) is seeking an
experienced sales person with
management experience to lead
the sales team. N2PS, a sub-
sidiary of the Florida Press
Association, sells and services
print and online advertising for
newspapers. Successful account
management, proven leadership
skills required and an undergrad-
uate degree or equivalent related
experience required. Email your


cover letter, resume and salary
history to: hr@n2ps.com. EOE,
drug-free workplace.
Advertising Sales Representative
-National Newspaper Place-
ment Services (N2PS) is seeking
an experienced sales person to
sell print and online advertising.
N2PS, a subsidiary of the
Florida Press Association, sells
and services print and online
advertising for newspapers.
Demonstrated success with pre-
vious media sales and an under-
graduate degree or equivalent
related experience required.
Online sales experience a plus.
Email.your cover letter, resume
and salary history to:
hr@n2ps.com. EOE, drug-free
workplace.
Drivers: CALL TODAY! Bonus
& Paid Orientation 36-43cpm
Earn over $1000 weekly
Excellent Benefits Class A and 3
mos. recent OTR required (800)
635-8669.
Part-time, home-based internet
business. Earn $500-$1000/
month or more. Flexible hours.
Training provided. No selling
required. FREE details, www.
K738.com.
Driver: DON'T JUST START
YOUR CAREER, START IT
RIGHT! Company Sponsored
CDL training in 3 weeks. Must
be 21. Have CDL? Tuition reim-
bursement! CRST. (866) 917-


2778.
Drivers-Flatbed Recent Aver-
age $1,012/wk. Late Model
Equipment, Strong Freight
Network, 401K, Blue Cross
Insurance (800) 771-6318 www.
primeinc.com.
Homes For Rent
3BR/2BA Foreclosure! $32,100!
Only $255/Mo! 5% down 20
years @ 8% apr. Buy, 6/BR
$199/Mo! For listings (800) 366-
9783 Ext. 5798.
Miscellaneous
AIRLINES ARE HIRING-
Train for high paying Aviation
Maintenance Career. FAA
approved program. Financial aid
if qualified-Job placement
.assistance. CALL Aviation
Institute of Maintenance (888)
349-5387.
ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE
from home. Medical, business,
paralegal, computers, criminal
justice. Job placement assistance.
Financial aid and computer pro-
vided if qualified. Call (866) 858-
2121, www.OnlineTidewater
Tech.com.
NOW AVAILABLE! 2008
POST OFFICE JOBS. $18-
$20/HR. NO EXPERIENCE.
PAID TRAINING. FED BEN-
EFITS. VACATIONS. CALL
(800) 910-9941 TODAY! REF
#FL08.


Real Estate
Beautiful NC Mountains-
Boone, Blowing Rock, Banner
Elk. Let the local experts at
MAP Realty find that perfect
property for you. (828) 262-5655
or www.maprealtyboone.com.
VIRGINIA MOUNTAINS: 5
acres riverfront on Big Reed
Island Creek near New River
State Park, fishing, view, private,
good access $89,500. (866) 789-
8535.
Tennessee-Affordable lake
properties on pristine 34,000
acre Norris Lake. Over 800 miles
of shoreline. Call, Lakeside
Realty TODAY! (888) 291-5253
or visit www.lakesiderealty-
tn.com.
LAKEFRONT SALE! 3.2 acres
$44,900 w/deep dockable water.
Huge winter savings on gorgeous
wooded acreage. Boat directly to
Gulf of Mexico! Must see!
Excellent financing. Call about
"No Closing Costs" special (800)
564-5092, x 954.
Steel Buildings
BUILDINGS FOR SALE!
"Rock Bottom Prices!" 25x30
Now $4100. 25x40 $5400. 30x40
$6400. '35x50 $8790. 35x70
$11,990. 40x80 $14,900. Others.
MANUFACTURER DIRECT
since 1980... (800) 668-5422.


Unwanted calls tops Floridians'

consumer complaints for 2007


Violations of Florida's DP
Not Call law once again lead the
list of written complaints filed
with the Department of Agricul-
ture and Consumer Services in
2007. However, the number of
complaints dropped by more
than 500 from the previous year.
Department Secretary Char-
les Bronson releases the list of
top ten complaints each year so
people will have a better idea of
the types of consumer issues and
crimes that are impacting the,
state and can take steps to pro-
tect themselves. The depart-
ment is- the clearinghouse for
consumer complaints in Florida,
regulating 11 industries from
travel to telemarketing, and
mediating complaints against
unregulated businesses.
"We have been able to assist
a lot of people who were victims
of unfair and deceptive business
practices," Bronson saiA. "But it
is always better to educate people
about their rights and responsi-
bilities as consumers so they
won't be targeted in the first
place."
More than 25 thousand
complaints were filed with the
department in calendar year
2007 and the deparpnent was
able to recover nearly 4.7 million


dollars for consumers.
As in previous years, the
largest number of complaints
involved violations of Florida's
"Do Not Call" program which
prohibits most telemarketing
calls to people who are on the
list. There were 4,223 com-
plaints in 2007 compared to
4,782 in 2006. Bronson says it
may be that businesses are start-
ing to recognize that the depart-
ment aggressively pursues viola-
tors with fines and are paying
more attention to the list. The
department collected $252,500
in fines against telemarketers
who violated the law in 2007.
Consumers can pay a fee of
$10 with a $5 annual renewal fee
to have their home telephone
numbers placed on the list and
avoid unwanted sales calls. The
fee is used only to administer the
program. The types of calls that
are exempt from the list can be
found at http://www.
800helpfla.com/nosales.html.
Travel/vacation plans rank-
ed second on the top ten list with
2,494 written complaints, a drop
of more than 1,300 complaints
over 2006. There were 1,960
complaints about communica-
tion issues, motor vehicle repair
problems generated 1,664 com-


plaints, credit/banking had
1,623 complaints and there were
1,259 complaints about con-
struction problems, all ten cate-
gories receiving fewer com-
plaints than the previous year.
"I hope the reduction in the
number of complaints means
people are becoming savvier
about consumer issues and not
allowing themselves to fall prey
to shoddy business practices,"
Bronson said.
Rounding out the top 10 list
of written complaint categories
are: motor vehicle sales/acces-
sories with 1,214 complaints,
other telemarketing calls with
1,104 complaints, electronic
equipment with 754 complaints
and landlord/tenant issues with
746 complaints.
Bronson urges consumers to
contact the Department's Con-
sumer Hotline at 1-800-HELP
FLA (1-800-435-7352) or 1-800
FL AYUDA (1-800-352-9832) to
register any complaints but also
to find out the complaint history
against a company before con-
ducting any business. Consum-
ers can also file complaints
online by visiting the Division of
Consumer Services website at
www.800helpfla.com.


Florida Tractor Auction
9:30 a.m. Friday, Feb. 15: Florida Flywheelers
Grounds, Fort Meade, FL. Consignment auction
of rare and collectible antique tractors, parts and
implements from all manufacturers.
Still consigning: Call today!
Auctioneer: Dennis Polk & Associates
For a complete listing:
www.mcmanusheartlandauctions.com
For more information: Jeff McManus at Heartland
Auctions. (309)791-1450; Jmcmanus2(,.winco.net



A\NJ F
ADVEPTIWjliCG NIFTWfOR.S' CiF FIOPItDA
Clas.iric I UD:pla.y I Metr,- Lalily



The key to advertising success









1-866-742-1373


www.florida-classifieds.com


522 e. yu4 q,-eow4 $21 e. i44 5ee *dtsii Ng 12


Page 14 January 11, 2008


A LOCALLY O WNED NE WSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle










The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


January 11, 2008 Page 15


Do you have an item you want to
sell? A service you want to offer?
The Franklin Chronicle will pub-
lish your classified ad free for the
first 20 words. Longer ads will be
charged $5 for each additional 20
words, payable in advance. Only
one free ad per telephone num-
Sber. E-mail your information to
info@franklinchronicle.net.

Call Gene K. Strickland Con-
struction for additions, sun
rooms, gutters, siding, decks and
more. Call (850) 528-4992.

40 acres, Pine Coast Plantation
on Crooked River, $350,000.
Call for details. Bobby Turner,
850-528-3306.

Alligator Point 2 bed/2 bath
home $850/month, 6/12 month
lease, furnished or unfurnished.
Pets. Credit & references
required. 349-2408.

NEED to READ? Find what


you're looking for at Walkstreet,
Kickstone and Newman Books
in Carrabelle. 86 Tallahassee
Street. 697-2046.

1980 Dodge R/V, runs good,
good tires, needs interior work,
good hunter's camper. MUST
SELL! $1000 OBO. Greg 228-
6239.

Advertising salesperson. The
Franklin Chronicle is accepting
applications for an advertising
salesperson in Carrabelle. Full or
part time. Send your resume to
sales@FranklinChronicle.net, or
to PO Box 590, Eastpoint, Fl.
32328.

Erickson's Cleaning Services
will clean homes, rentals, offices
-in Franklin County. 850-381-
6627.

Topper for small pickup truck,
$75, 670-4377.


PHOTO BY RUSSELL ROBERTS

St. George Visitor Center hosts open house

The public is invited to the open house and ribbon cutting for the St. George Island Visitor
Center and Lighthouse Museum Friday, Jan. 11, at 10 a.m. The event will begin with an
update by Dennis Barnell, president of the St. George Lighthouse Association, regarding the
rebuilding of the lighthouse. Bricklayers have been hard at work for over three weeks and
the lighthouse currently stands about 15 feet high. A ribbon cutting to celebrate the opening
of the visitor center will follow. Ribbon cutters will include Rep. Will Kendrick, Franklin
County Commissioner Russell Crofton, and the Chairman of the Franklin County Tourist
Development Council, Paul Parker.


FRIDAY Jan 11
12:00 aVn/pm Community Calendar,
12:15 .ii/pm 'Restaurant & Shopping Guide
12:3020, ips This Week On FCTV
12:45 ,nVpm Environmental or Entertainment
1:00 niasns Forgotten Coast Outdoors
1:15,mV/pm '
1:30 am/psm Cooking with Jerry
1 45 a.pm Unique Homes
2.00 jaVpsm Things to Do, Places to Stay,
2:15 lumpm [ Groceries/Gourmet, Services


2:30 amnpm Forgotten Coast Ino -
2:45 am/pm Franklin County History
3"00 !mnnm Foraotten Coast Outdoors


3:301jampm Shorelines Fishing Report
3:451am/pm Forgotten Coast Info
4:00 am/pm IEnvironmental or Entertainm


SForgotten Coast TV Program Guide Your Local Community Channel January 11l,2008
Channel 3 Mediacom and Channel 9 St. George Cable IP. Box848,Apalachcola,.FL 32329 www.forqottencoasttv.com I

This 12-hour schedule repeats from midnight to 12 noon, EXCEPT 7:15 am DAIL Y & MON evening IThis 12-hour schedule repeats from midnight to 12 noon, EXCEPT 7:15 am DAILY & MON evening
SATURDAY Jan 12 SUNDAY Jan 13 MONDAY Jan 14 TUESDAY Jan 15 WEDNESDAY Jan 16 THURSDAY Jan 17
Community Calendar iCommunity Calendar -Community Calendar Community Calendar Community Calendar Community Calendar 12:00 am/pm
Restaurant & Shopping Guide JRestaurant & Shopping Guide Restaurant & Shopping Guide Restaurant & Shopping Guide Restaurant & Shopping Guide Restaurant & Shopping Guide 12:15 ;mipm
This Week On FCTV This WeekOnFCTV This Week On FCTV This WeeOnFCTTh Week On FCTV This Week On FCTV This Week On FCTV j12:30 ;aanpm
Environmental or Entertainment Environmental or Entertainment Forgotten Coast Info Environmental or Entertainmenne nent Environmental or Entertainment Environmental or Entertainment 1245/p
SForgotten Coast Outdoors Forgotten Coast Outdoors Forgotten Coast Outdoors Forgotten Coast Outdoors 'Forgotten Coast Outdoors Forgotten Coast Outdoors 1:00 ;;m-p


Cooking with Jerry ICooking with Jerry
Unique Homes Unique Homes
!Things to Do, Places to Stay, Things to Do, Places to Stay,
Groceries/Gourmet, Services r Groceries/Gourmet, Services


iForgotten Coast Info
'Franklin County History
Forgotten Coast Outdoors


:Shorelines Fishing Report
Forgotten Coast Info
SEnvironmental or Entertain


4:15 anmpm The Best Deals! The Best Dealsl
4:30 am/pm Government Updates Government Updates
4:45 |ampm IFranklin County History Franklin County Histc


5:00 nm/mnm Foroott


5:30 nam/pun


Things to Do, Places to Stay,


5:45 am/pm Grocer
6:00 am/pm Communl


6:15 am/pms
6:30 am/pm
6:45 am/pmr
7:00 am/prm


Restaurant & Shopping Guide
Foreclosure Information
Shorelines Fishing Report
Environmental or Entertainment


Forgotten Coast Outdoors

Things to Do, Places to Stay,
Groceries/Gourmet, Services
Community Calendar
I Restaurant & Shopping Guide
Foreclosure Information
Shorelines Fishing Report
!Environmental or Entertainment


7:15 m/pm IThis Week On FCTV This Week On


7:30 am/pms


8:30


Seahawks Update


ISeahawks Up


tal or Entertainment Environmental or Entertainment


9:00 am/p Forgotten Coast Info
9:15 am/pm Restaurant & Shoppir
9:30 anspn Environmental or Ent/


9:45 am/pmr


Music on the Coast


10:00 am/pm Forgotten Coast Infot
10:15 am/pm Cooking with Jerry
10:30lam/pm |Unique Homes


11 45 asnpm


Music on the Coast


his Week On FCTV This Week On FCTV .
things to Do, Places to Stay, Things to Do, Places to
Groceries/Gourmet, Services I Groceries/Gourmet, S


FRIDAY Jan 11


7:15 AM __
ONLY


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Cooking with Jerry
jUnique Homes
Things to Do, Places to Stay,
] Groceries/Gourmet, Services


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Government Updates
Franklin County Histo


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Things to Do, Places to Stay,
Groceries/Gourmet, Services


Foreclosure Information


Restaurant & Shopping Guide
it Environmental or Entertainment
Music on the Coast
Forgotten Coast Info
Cooking with Jerry
Unique Homes
Franklin County History
Foreclosure Information
This Week On FCTV


Forgotten Coas s


Shorelines Fishing Report


Forgotten Coast info
ainment Environmental or Entertainment
The Best Deals!


Forgotten Coast Outdoors


Cookino with Jerrv


Cooking with Jerry


Cooking with Jerry


1:30 !an/m


!Unique Homes Unique Homes Unique Homes 1:45 asnpm
Things to Do, Places to Do, Places to Things to Do, Places toStay, Thngs to Do, Places to Stay, 2:00 !an/pm
Groceries/Gourmet, Services Groceries/Gourmet, Services Groceries/Gourmet, Services 2:151am/pm
Forgotten Coast Info Forgotten Coast Info Forgotten Coast info 2:30 anmpm


Franklin County History Franklin County History Fr
Forgotten Coast Outdoors !Forgotten Coast Outdoors Fc


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Groceries/Gourmet, Services Groceries/Gourmet, Services Groceries/Gourmet
Community Calendara Community Calendar Community Calendar


Meeting


PRIME TIME


7 pm to 11:30 pm
repeats at 1.00 am Tues morning


Things to Do, Places to Stay,


vices Grocerlk
_ Ii __


vices


This Week On FCTV


This Week On FCTV


Environmental or Entertainment Environmental or Entertainment


Environmental or Entertainment


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Unique Homes
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3:00 a5m/pm
3:15 am/pro


iShorelines Fishing Report 3:30 3mipm


Forgotten Coast Info


SGovernment Updates
Franklin County Histol
Forgotten Coast Outdo


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Shorelines Fishing Report


3:45 am/p.
4:00 am/pm
4:15 am/pm
4:30 am/pm


5:15 am/prm
Stay, 5:30 am/pm
Services 5:45 umtpm
6:00 am/pm
Guide 6:15 m/pi
a 6:30 amW/p,


6:45 nm/pm


nment Environmental or Entertainment 7:00 anr/pm


This Week On FCTV
Seahawks Update

Environmental or Enl


7:15 ami/pm
7:30am/ps,
7:45 aouns
8:00 am/pus


8:15 um/pm
8:30 am/pu
8:45 am/pmr
gotten Coast Into 9;00 am/pm
lurant & Shopping Guide 9:15 am/pm


Environmental or Entertainment Environmental or Entertainment
Music on the Coast Music on the Coast
Forgotten Coast Info Forgotten Coast Info


Cooking with Jerry


Foreclosure Information


Cooking with Jerry


Foreclosure Information


9:30 am/pm


10:15 arm/pm
10:30 am/pm
n Museum 10:45 am/pm


11:00 am/prm


SThis Week On FCTV |This Week On FCTV 11:15 am/pm


Things to Do, Places to Stay,


SUNDAY -AM Only MONDAY AM Only TUESDAY AM Only
Yoga on the Beach I Yoga on the Beach Yoga on the Beach


Things to Do, Places to Stay,


11:30 am/pm


ces Groceries/Gourmet, Services M11:45 am/pm
S I THURSDAY Jan 17
ily I THURSDAY AM Only i 7:15 AM
i Yoga on the Beach I ONLY


The BUSINESS CARD DIRECTORY in the Chronicle pages is an efficient way to promote your business to the public and save money at the same time. These ads
are strictly business cards magnified to 2 columns by two inches, offered to you at 50% discount for two insertions. Send your business card or copy: Franklin
Chronicle, P.O. Box 590, Eastpoint, FL 32328 or fax 877-423-4964 or e-mail: info@franklinchronicle.net. Your check for $15.00 will guarantee position in next issue.


Start Your New Year in the Fast Lane

Drive for Schneider National and bring
your career up to speed

Higher Pay Packages

Company-provided CDL training for
qualified candidates

Increased time-at-home


schneideriobs.com SCHNEIDER.
1-800-44-PRIDE 1-800-441-7433 --"E
EOE WF/ON|


S~1F4r 4 4&4 et ~ 4( ~&!uo


The Franklin Chronicle

FOR ADVERTISING INFORMATION



P.O. Box 590 33 Begonia Street
Eastpoint, FL 32328
(850) 670-4377 (Office)
news@franklinchronicle.net
FranklinChronicle.net


( 1.JYlnVpm


-- -- --


-- --


.-I


amTnm









Page 16 January 11, 2008 A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER The Franklin Chronicle








flavor up





your ga e da party

FAMILY FEATURES

in a variety of dishes It'C sure to make 'ou the NI'P of 0" -
the party. There's no easier '.,\ to add i1., ior to anm part .
than with juicy, greal-ta.ting ~Jaugjoc From breakfast lirks to
bratwurst, Italian or smoked rurke,. cerairle sausage stars
in breakfast casserole.. Jppet~zer i and main dishes recipes
from the kitchen at Johnt ii ilie -that \v. Il please 'your
hungry sports fans all da long
Visit www.johnson Ile.comn tfor great recipes to
flavor up any get-together' .


Philly Brats
Servings: 5
Prep/Cook: 25 minutes nill mir-ln.:
1 package (19.76 ounces Iohnsonmilk
Original Brata urt
I medium sweet red pepper. ilicrd
1 medium yellow pepper, shicrd
1 medium green pepper. sliced
1 large onion, sliced
3 tablespoons oli e oil
3/4 cup Cheez Whi7 process
cheese sauce
5 hoagie rolls, split
Grill. brats according to pia kag dkc3no ..
keep warm. In skillet, saule p~Fper Ind cnlrn .,- .
in oil until tender. Place i t nr Inr each roll Top -
with peppers, onions and clich ,e :.c ce"...

Touchdown Italian Chili
Servings: 12
Prep: 35 minutes Cook: 20 minutes
1 package (19.76 ounces) Johnsonville Italian Sausage Links
1 cup chopped onion
3 celery ribs, cut into 1/2-inch pieces
1 each large sweet red, yellow and green pepper, cut into 1-inch pieces
1 tablespoon minced garlic
3 tablespoons olive oil
3 cans (14-1/2 ounces each) Italian recipe stewed tomatoes
1 can (16 ounces) dark red kidney beans, rinsed and drained
1 can (15 ounces) butter beans, rinsed and drained
S. 1 can (6 ounces) tomato paste
3/4 cup sliced black olives
1/4 cup cream sherry, optional
1 tablespoon chopped fresh basil
1-1/2 teaspoons baking cocoa
1/2 to 1 teaspoon pepper
Grill Italian sausage according to package directions; cut into half moon slices and
set aside. In soup kettle, saut6 onion, celery, sweet peppers and garlic in oil until
tender. Add sausage and remaining ingredients; bring to a boil. Reduce heat; cover
and simmer 20 minutes or until flavors are blended.
Tip: Sprinkle chili with grated Asiago, Romano or Parmesan cheese.


















Italian Seafood Portobellos
Servings: 25 to 30 appetizers
Prep: 30 minutes Bake: 20 minutes
25 to 30 medium portobello mushrooms (about 1-1/2 pounds)
2 tablespoons olive oil
1/4 teaspoon each salt, pepper and garlic powder
1 can (6 ounces) lump crabmeat, drained
1 package (5 ounces) frozen cooked salad shrimp, thawed
1/2 cup shredded mozzarella cheese Cheese-filled Breakfast Puffs
1/2 cup crumbled blue cheese he -fldBra asPus
2 tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese ,, 1 t u
1/4 teaspoon minced garlic Cook Prep_'0 ,, mure Bake I -lmnote:
1/4 teaspoon pepper I package (l2 ounces) Johnson ille Original
1 package (16 ounces) Johnsonville All Natural Ground ; Breakfast Sausage Links
Italan Sausage e'2 rubes (8 ounces each) refrigerated crescent
1 egg roll dough
Remove stems from mushrooms; chop stems and set aside. Place 5 slices deli cheese. cut into thirds
mushroom caps on waxed paper, bottom side up. Mist or brush caps Cook saus.,e ackoJdny to package dire non-. dr n
with oil; sprinkle with salt, pepper and garlic powder..Cok"rUroll recent ,oug,. i eprace nnd I" ir.argle
In food processor, combine crabmeat, shrimp, cheeses, garlic, hraolre etrdough lcil icon11
pepper and mushroom stems. Pulse 10 to 15 seconds until coarsely hand I nt e joug rInK onl- PlaP ce one np ch nleee
chopped. Transfer to large bowl. Crumble sausage over crabmeat mix- Roll up, stanag w Ith w Ide end. Place seam side Jo n
ture. Add egg; mix just until combined. Spoon into mushroom caps. on ungreased baking sheets. Bake at 3750F 10 to 12
Place in greased shallow baking pans. Bake at 3500F for 20 to minutes or until golden brown.
25 minutes or until thermometer inserted into filling reads 160oF.
Tips: For a spicier version, add 1/2 teaspoon cayenne and 1/4 or spicy Jam.
teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes.
To make this appetizer a meal, serve over a bed of pasta with
Alfredo sauce.




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