0026-9 AYIR BUISILDING SUPPLY
l;: "i T. AYLOR SUILDISGL SUPPLY
002l71i T'AYLO.R BUILDING SUPPLY
OU2 6" *i'TAYiLR FBULDING, SUpPLY
02?673 'AYLOR BUILDING SUPPLY
000175 TAY. RE'r .39,IL01'!C SUPPLY
00261 ''R AI IERICn LABUPToRIKn
;)136,1'/ THE LS 1RJ0 Y 'STOR3, INC,
0022"5- r TROY FIAIN I;;ISUlRICE CO
00281,6 TRUCK OUTFITTRIF. .
002215 WIARiC INTSRNATIONc'AL TRUCK
00O598 WA3RE/-/'CRFF
002291 WARRiN fi .- r .I.'
001725 WASTSE 1'.'-- 1i T 0F PC
001993 WATER "' ..-E: ',:l SCRVICEI
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140 ROAU A0D 5RI5DC
142 MOSQUITO CONTROL
170 AIRPORT FUND
190 AIFOR. HOUSING 0 -ASSIS'r TRUST
"04 IAS1:PILL TIPPI2NO 1K4 FUtND
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ACROSS
1. can't be!"
5. Power networks
10. Crimson Tide,
familiarly
14. Roof overhang
15. Rosie's fastener
16. Pizazz
17. Actor Kaplan,
after a diet?
19. "Say it so,
Joe"
20. Inventor Nikola
21. Stir up
23. Williams in the
Hall
25. Zesty dips
26. Lipton unit
30. Any "Jurassic
Park" beast
32. Realtor's unit
33. Wheat or rye
35. Marble feature
39. Merry king of
rhyme
40. In the past
41. "You're
something !"
42. Granny, for one
43. Roulette bets
45. Place to stash
cash
46. Xbox user
48. Whole bunch
50. Cost, informally
53. Pep rally yell
54. Typically
57. Pile up
62. WWW part
63. Inclination of a
bandstand?
65. List-ending abbr.
66. From the keg
67. Hefty volume
68. Beats it
69. Yuletide airs
70. Author Bagnold


Mixed Vegetables
11 12 13 4-


DOWN
1. Sound check
word
2." "a good one!"
3. Currier's
colleague
4. Put up on eBay
5. Exam for college
srs.
6. Unbending
7. Dr. Pavlov
8. Society newbies
9. Western topper
10.Snoopy
examiners?
11. AKA follower
12. Large ray
13. Pot builders
18. British "bye-bye"
22. Author Fleming


24. Cackleberry
26. Poster holder
27. B-school subj.
28. Woody's son
29. Borscht-making
tools?
30. B-baller
31. Motown gridder
34. Boffo review
36. Y-sporting
collegians
37. Archipelago unit
38. Dickens's Little
43. "Nature" essayist
44. Healthful retreat
47. Get grayer
49. Ill-fated whaler
50. Woodworker's
fastener
51. Novelist Loos


52. ", I'm Adam"
53. Fit for a king
55. extra cost!"
56. Scandal suffix
58. Apportion, with
"out"
59. Bell-ringing
cosmetics
company
60. CBer's wheels
61. Gravity-driven
vehicle
64. Mini-LPs


Crossword Puzzle Answers on Page 12


-U6&-)IV




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,,I Give thanks for hunting seasons galore in November


I New4 oFWC


Say so long

red snapper

for another

season
The recreational harvest sea-
son for red snapper in the Gulf
of Mexico closed Nov. 1.
This closure occurs each
year to help rebuild overfished
red snapper stock, meaning the
harvest and possession of red
snapper by sport fishers is pro-
hibited beginning Nov. 1 in all
Gulf waters.
The reopening date for next
year's Gulf red snapper sport
season has not been formally
established; however, it is likely
to be in late spring 2008. New
regulations for Gulf red snapper
are being developed by the
Florida Fish and Wildlife
Conservation Commission and
federal fisheries managers.
These regulations should be
finalized by February 2008.
Avian Flu Tests
FFWC and United States
Department of Agriculture
Wildlife Services biologists will
collect samples from hunter-har-
vested ducks at several wildlife
management area check stations
throughout the state, to test for
highly pathogenic avian influen-
za-H5N1.
Hunters will not need to sur-
render their ducks, and participa-
tion is voluntary. The sampling
will involve swabbing the ducks'
respiratory and digestive tracts.
Samples will be shipped to a
diagnostic lab, where they will be
tested for avian influenza and
other diseases.
The sampling is part of a
continuing international surveil-
lance effort to determine if
migratory birds carry the H5N1
strain of avian influenza in
North America. Last year, more
than 85,000 samples were col-
lected nationwide. None of the
samples tested positive for the
virus.
While it is extremely unlike-
ly that hunters could contract
avian influenza from wild birds
in Florida, officials recommend
taking common-sense precau-
tions to reduce the risk of con-
tracting any disease from
wildlife. For instance, do not har-
vest or handle wild birds that are
obviously sick or found dead;
wear rubber gloves while clean-
ing game; clean game outdoors
and upwind; and do not eat,
drink or smoke while cleaning
game.
It's also important to wash
hands with soap and water or
alcohol wipes immediately after
handling game or cleaning bird
feeders and wash tools and work
surfaces used to clean game birds
with soap and water, then disin-
fect with a 10-percent bleach
solution.
The FWC recommends
cooking birds thoroughly. Meat
should reach an internal temper-
ature of 165 degrees Farenheit.


November means it's time to
gas up the truck and break out
your shooting' iron, because the
2007-08 hunting season's here.
This month, general gun,
fall turkey, quail and gray squir-
rel, snipe and the second phase
of mourning and whitewinged
dove hunting seasons open.
The first thing you need to
do is pick up a $17 Florida resi-
dent hunting license. Non-resi-
dents pay $46.50 for a 10-day
license or $151.50 for 12 months.
If you plan to hunt one of
Florida's many wildlife manage-
ment areas (WMAs), you'll also
need a $26.50 management area
permit, and don't forget to study
the brochure for the specific area
you plan to hunt, because dates,
bag himit stand rules differ greatly
-from area to area. You can get
these brochures at tax collectors'
offices and regional Florida Fish
and Wildlife Conservation
Commission (FWC) offices in
close proximity to the area, or
you can download them from
the FWC's Web site-
MyFWC.com/hunting.
You can buy your license
and permits over the telephone
by calling toll-free 1-888-HUNT-
FLORIDA or online at
www.wildlifelicense.com. Just
have your
credit card ready. You also
can purchase them from tax col-


*- ; . .. .


O4utt t Woo


By Tony Young, FWC
lectors' offices and most retail
outlets that sell hunting and fish-
ing supplies.
The general gun season runs
Nov. 10 Jan. 20 in the Central
Hunting Zone. In the Northwest
Zone, it comes in Thanksgiving
Day and lasts four days until
Nov. 25. Two weeks later, the
season reopens Dec. 8 and runs
through Feb. 13. For readers
hunting the South Hunting
Zone, the general gun season's
already in and lasts until Jan. 6.
Hunters can take bucks hav-
ing at least one antler 5 inches or
longer. On private lands, the
daily bag limit for deer is two.
On private lands, hunters can
take wild hogs year-round with
no bag or size limits. On most-
but not all-public lands, there's
also no bag or size limit on wild
hogs, and hunters can take them
during any hunting season


except spring turkey. Check the
WMA brochure to be certain.
The highly anticipated
antlerless deer season, often
called "doe week," is Dec. 15-21
in the Northwest Zone, Nov. 17-
23 in the Central Zone and Nov.
3-9 in the South Hunting Zone.
During doe week, the daily bag
limit's one buck and one doe or
two bucks. You may not take two
does in one day like you may
during archery season, and spot-
ted fawns are not legal game.
WMAs do not have a doe week.
If you hunt with deer dogs
anywhere in Florida, special
rules and registration require-
ments may apply. Call the FWC
for details.
Fall turkey season in the
Northwest Hunting Zone is Nov.
22-25 and Dec. 8 Jan. 13. In
the Central and South zones, it's
Nov. 10 Jan. 6. Only bearded
turkeys and gobblers are legal
game, and you must have a $5
turkey permit to hunt them. The
bag limit's one bird per day, and
a total of two during the archery,
crossbow, muzzleloading gun
and fall turkey seasons com-
bined. It's against the law to hunt
turkeys in Holmes County dur-
ing the fall season.
Quail and gray squirrel sea-
son runs statewide Nov. 10 -
March 2. There's a daily bag
limit of 12 for each, and shoot-


ing fox squirrels is against the
law.
Shooting hours for deer,
turkeys, quail and gray squirrels
is a half hour before sunrise to a
half hour after sunset. All legal
firearms, muzzleloaders, bows,
crossbows and handguns are
legal for taking these resident
game animals during the general
gun, antlerless deer, fall turkey,
and quail and gray squirrel sea-
sons.
Snipe hunting in Florida
ranks second in the nation in
number of birds harvested each
year, and the season runs Nov. I
- Feb. 15 statewide.
The second phase of the
mourning. and white-winged
dove season also comes in this
month and runs Nov. 10-25.
Shooting hours for migratory
birds are one half hour before
sunrise to sunset.
The bag limits are eight for
snipe and 12 for doves.
You must get a no-cost
migratory bird permit if you
plan to hunt snipe, doves or any
other migratory game birds.
The FWC even provides an
online "Dove Hunters' Hotline"
that gives up-to-date information
on Florida's public dove fields.
The address is MyFWC.corni
dove, and it's updated every
Continued on Page 9


-I. .-l -l-. i i






On The Apalachicola East Bay [

Phone: 850-670-1111

Fax: 850-670-8316 I


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- --r- - -


Page 8 November 9, 2007


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


SCALLOPS
CRAWFISH CA6ES


The Franklin Chronicle









The Franklin Chronicle A LOCILLY OWNED NE L~SPA PER November 9, 2007 Page 9


Here's wishing you all a
linnnr nnl I ti


Tlhuirsd-i' throughout the doYve '" 1dK 1'"" Vyfll d *U "-
Thtirday throughout the dove nappy Thanksgivmg ana a suc-
season. Information includes cessful hunting season.
dove densities, previous week's Tony Young is an avid sportsman
harvests and field conditions, and native Floridian who i n man-
Whether small-g.tmiic hunt- ages the wildlife and rinlcr resources
Iri with friends and family or on family p'roperli in Franklin
hunting solo, going after that County. He's the media relations
monster buck, boar hog or big coordinator for the FIt c's Division
tom, November brings loads of of Hunting and Game Management
great hunting opportunities. and lives in Tallahassee.


Warning issued about work-at-home scams


State Attorney General Bill
McCollum and Agriculture and
Consumer Services Commis-
sioner Charles H. Bronson have
issued a consumer advisory in
cooperation with the National
Hispanic Institute, warning con-
sumers about work-at-home


scams.
The advisory paitiiul,iil\
targeted envelope-stuffing "opp-
ortunities" and the state leaders
expressed concern that many of
the schemes were taking advan-
tage of non F'I1)ngli speaking cit-
izens, a concern shared by Gus


West, Board Chairman of the
National Hispanic Institute, a
national non-profit organization.
"My office has received hun-
dreds of complaints about work-
at-home programs, most from
consumers claiming they paid a
fee but never received wages they
were promised," said McColl-
um. "Even worse, many of these
operations are targeting our citi-
zens by advertising in another
language, but printing dis-
claimers in English, thus confus-
ing or misleading the interested
consumers. We want to make
sure that Floridians know where
they can receive assistance if
they have been victimized by
these deceptive practices."
Bronson echoed the Attorn-
ey General's concerns: "Our citi-
zens are being duped into laying
out money with promises of
returns that are rarely realized.
These scams typically target
those who can least afford to lose
anything."
Earlier this month, the
Federal Trade Commission
(FTC) announced a widespread
review of work-at-home ads and
revealed that nearly 60 percent of
the Spanish-language ads for
work-at-home opportunities
were potentially deceptive. FTC
staff has been working with
Spanish-language media on
identifying potentially fraudulent
advertising claims for work at
home opportunities and other ad
types.
"We commend the Attorney
General and the Commissioner
for issuing this advisory," said
Chairman West. "We hope that
our participation helps Latinos
and all Floridians to be more vig-
ilant in safeguarding against
fraudulent business practices."
According to complaints
received by the Attorney
General's Consumer Services
Division and the Department of
Agriculture and Consumer
Services' fraud hotline, many
complainants claimed they had
paid a $45 "registration deposit"
to various companies, but never
heard from the companies again.
Other consumers report they had
been told the only way to earn
the promised money was to
replicate the fraudulent enve-
lope-stuffing scheme by making
the same false claims to other
consumers.
McCollum and Bronson
both urged consumers who
believe they have been victim-
ized to contact state authorities
to report the fraud. The Attorney
General's fraud hotline is 1-866-
966-7226 and complaints can
also be filed online at
http://www.myfloridalegal.com.
The fraud hotline for the
Department of Agriculture and
Consumer Services is 1-800-435-
7352 and its Web site, where
complaints can be filed, is
www.800helpfla.com.
Complaints can also be filed
with the FTC by calling 877-382-
4357 or by writing to: Consumer
Response Center, Federal Trade
Commission-Rm. 130, 600
Pennsylvania Ave., N.W,
Washington, D.C. 20580.








Q w., .
;: r^^&


Q~~Zacw^A


Outta Woods from Page 8


A LOC4LL Y OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chron icle


November 9, 2007 Page 9










Crowd catches a good time at Seafood Festival


FESTIVAL PHOTOS BY ROYCE ROLSTAD III
~i$'J


and eating contests didn't disap-
point. The oyster shucking fea-
tured shells spraying and hands
flying, and ended with two for-
mer winners taking the top two
honors: National Oyster-Shuck-
ing Champion Scotty O'Neal
taking first place, with Robert
Daffin of Dusty's -in Panama
City coming in a close second.
The oyster eaters came on
next, beginning with the ladies'
competition, with only three
contestants this year. But the
three did suck down copious
quantities of the shellfish, and
ended with two still standing,
first-place winner (for the first
time out of three tries) Angie
Harnage of Jacksonville, Ga.,
who edged her way over the top
with 13 dozen oysters. The sec-
ond-place winner, three-time for-


three dozen oysters, were count-
ed and consumption was veri-
fied, emcee Dan Garlick
announced the results. First was
Ernest Hare of Seffner, a walk-
away win with 25.6 dozen oys-


ters; second went to Brad Shiver
of Eastpoint, with six dozen and
four, and third place was taken
by Barry Gentzel, of Tallahas-
see, with a respectable 13 dozen.
"He (Hare) made it look so
easy," runner-up Shiver said.
The rest of the day was
spent watching the children's
crab races, listening to a steady
stream of good music from the
live entertainment scheduled
throughout the afternoon, and,
of course, eating more seafood.
The evening concluded with
a performance by country-music
star Sammy Kershaw, who took
the stage at 8 p.m.


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Page 10 November 9, 2007


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle







The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


November 9, 2007 Page 11


Boyd pushes for greater
fiscal responsibility in Iraq


In the wake of reports from
the nonpartisan Congressional
Budget Office (CBO) that the
costs of the wars in Iraq and
Afghanistan could total as much
as $2.4 trillion, U.S. Rep. Alien
Boyd (D-North Florida) has
called on the House leadership
to demand greater fiscal respon-
sibility in Iraq by supporting the
War Funding Accountability Act
(HR 714).
This legislation would re-
quire the President to report to
Congress 30 days after the pas-
sage of any supplemental fund-
ing measure about how military
and reconstruction funds in Iraq
have been-spent.
The War Funding Account-
ability Act also requires the
Administration to provide a
detailed accounting of the con-
tracts awarded on behalf of the
United States and expresses the
sense of Congress that sanctions
would be imposed against any
contractors who have engaged in
fraud, abuse, or war profiteering.
Recently, Congressman Boyd
joined his fellow Blue Dogs in
sending a letter to Speaker
Nancy Pelosi calling for her sup-
port of HR 714, which is critical
in the wake of President Bush's
request for an additional $46 bil-
lion in funding for the war in
Iraq.
"The need for increased fis-
cal oversight and accountability
in Iraq is clear," said Boyd, a
leader of the Blue Dog Coalition
and a member of the House
Budget Committee.


"The President has asked for
nearly $200 billion in funding for
the 2008 fiscal year alone. The
taxpayers have a right to know
that the billions being spent in
Iraq are spent responsibly. We
must replace waste and fraud
with proper oversight and
accountability and that's what
this sensible bill aims to do."
To date, more than $600 bil-
lion has been provided for the
wars in Iraq and Afghanistan,
$450 billion for Iraq alone,
according to the Congressional
Research Service. Recently, the
President submitted another
emergency war funding request
totaling $46 billion. This
increases the Administration's
2008 request to $196 billion,
causing the overall cost in Iraq to
reach $800 billion.
The Director of the CBO,
Dr. Peter Orszag, testified before
the House Budget Committee
that the total costs of war opera-
tions could reach nearly $2.4 tril-
lion by 2017.
"These are staggering sums
by any standard of measure-
ment," Boyd stated. "Our coun-
try is making a major investment
in Iraq, and we must do every-
thing we can to ensure that our
tax dollars are going where they
belong; supplying our troops
with the resources they need. As
the President asks Congress for
billions of dollars more in Iraq,
it's my hope that this
Administration will rethink how
we are using our assets."


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PHOTO BY RUSSELL ROBERTS
This home on St. George Island could pass for site-built, but
it isn't; it's a modular home.

Two arrested on drug charges


Deputies arrested two carni-
val workers on marijuana
charges at the Florida Seafood
Festival on Friday, Nov. 2,.
according to the Franklin
County Sheriff's Office.
While providing security at
the front gate of the Seafood
Festival in Apalachicola, Deputy
Jason Register arrested a man
who is an employee of the carni-
val (Reithoffer) for possession of
marijuana. The man said he had
purchased the marijuana from a
co-worker at the carnival.
Officers were directed to a
suspect, and Deputy Register
along with other officers made
their way through the crowd to
the location given in an attempt


to contact the other man.
Deputy Register spoke with the
suspect, who was very uncooper-
ative with the investigation.
Deputy Register brought -K9
Kato to conduct a sniff of the
vehicle. K9 Kato is trained to
detect the odor of controlled sub-
stances. K9 Kato gave a positive
alert on the carnival vehicle that
was located behind one of the
rides. After the positive alert,
officers searched the vehicle.
Located behind the seat was a
drawer, containing individual
black plastic bags ready for sale.
The man was placed under
arrest on charges of possession
of controlled substance with
intent to sell.


Modular

home fits

in fine on

St. George

BY RUSSELL ROBERTS
Chronicle Staff
The term "factory-built
home" doesn't conjure visions of
an upscale house on St. George
Island.
But factory-built homes
aren't what they used to be.
Don't believe it? Just take a
look at the factory built home-
more precisely called a modular
home-being built on St. George
Island.
It's a two-story home that
would look right in place in any
nice subdivision or country
estate around. And it looks just
fine on Gulf Beach Drive on St.
George Island, too.
Franklin County Adminis-
trator Alan Pierce said he's got-
ten a few telephone calls from
Island residents inquiring about
the legality of erecting a modular
home on St. George. But Pierce
explained to them that it's per-
fectly legal and properly permit-
ted. In fact, he called modular
homes a "cost-effective" method
of building.
It's not the first modular
home on the island, he said..
History shows that just about
any time a modular home is
built, someone calls to inquire
about whether it's legal. The
reality is that modular homes are
constructed to the same building
code that site-built homes follow.
The home, which is still
under construction, has a sign in
front stating "Highway 90 Home
Center," with a message saying
to contact Hugh Tomlinson for
information. The Chronicle tried
to get additional information
about the house, but repeated
calls and an e-mail to Tomlinson
went unanswered.
Although its components
are built in a factory, modular
homes are different than mobile
homes. Mobile homes (techni-
cally, the correct term is HUD-
Code home) are completely built
in a factory following the federal
HUD Code. They are then
,towed to the site and installed.
HUD-Code homes come on a
chassis with axles.


Butterfly


tagging

underway
THE CLIPPER SHOPPE
Franklin County Extension
BEAUTY SALON Office Director Bill Mahan has
been working with the staff at
the Research Reserve to conduct
Dorothy Cooper and the annual monarch butterfly
Dina Hamilton, Stylists tagging program.
130 Avenue F Apalachicola, FL Mahan reported to the
County Commission on Tues-
Phone: 850-653-2255 day, Nov. 6, that a year ago at
g this time, hundreds of monarchs


were being seen. So far this year,
the highest daily count has been
about 100. One possible reason
for the decrease is that the coun-
ty had not had the strong cold-
front at that time.
One monarch previously
tagged in Virginia was recap-
tured, documented and released
recently, he said.
Mahan has also been taking
some of the butterflies to class-
rooms to teach students about
the monarch tagging program.


Want to purchase minerals

and other oil/gas interests.

Send details to:

P.O. Box 13557

Denver, Colorado 80201


I








Page 12 November 9, 2007 A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER The Franklin Chronicle


Photo above: this photo
taken in 1958 shows
Carrabelle Telephone Ex-
change equipment and sup-
plies, according to the
Florida State Archives. OK,
it looks like a big mess, but
as long as the calls got
through, that's all that mat-
ters. And is that a fan
whirring in the back of the
room? The photo was taken
in June, so our hunch is that
the fan was a crucial piece of
equipment.




Mixed Vegetablos
T H IS G R I D S B A M. A
E A V EI R I VIE T E L A N
S V E LTE G AB E AINT
T E S LA I N S TI G A T E


St. George Island
United Methodist Church

YOU ARE INVITED TO
SUNDAY WORSHIP AT 9:00 A.M.


201 E. Gulf Beach Drive on the Island
Phone: 927-2088 Website: sgiumc.org
Pastor: Themo Patriotis Dir. of Creative Ministries: Dusty Turner


Now is the time to
subscribe to the

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501 E. Bayshore Drive
850-927-2257
R. Michael Whaley, Pastor
Join us as we praise and
worship the living Christ!
Sunday Bible Study 10:00 a.m.
Worship & Praise 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Night 7:00 p.m.
Wed. "Power Hour" 7:00 p.m.

"Walking in Christ"


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The Franklin Chronicle


Page 12 November 9, 2007


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


ITl F ON S I AI LS, I l S


I







The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


November 9, 2007 Page 13


Take precautions if you refill your plastic water bottles


From the Editors of
E/ The Environmental
Magazine
Dear EarthTalk:
Are the rumors true that refilling
and reusing some types of plastic
bottles can cause health prob-
lems?
- Regina Fujan, Lincoln, NE
Most types of plastic bottles
are safe to reuse at least a few
times if properly washed with
hot soapy water. But recent reve-
lations about chemicals in Lexan
(plastic #7) bottles are enough to
scare even the most committed
environmentalists from reusing
them (or buying them in the first
place). Studies have indicated
that food and drinks stored in
such containers-including tho-
se ubiquitous clear Nalgene
water bottles hanging from just
about every hiker's backpack-
can contain trace amount of
Bisphenol A (BPA), a synthetic
chemical that interferes with the
body's natural hormonal mes-
saging system.
The same studies found that
repeated re-use of such bottles-
which get dinged up through
normal wear and tear and while
being washed-increases the
chance that chemicals will leak
out of the tiny cracks and
crevices that develop over time.
According to the Environment
California Research & Policy
Center, which reviewed 130
studies on the topic, BPA has
been linked to breast and uterine
cancer, an increased risk of mis-
carriage, and decreased testos-
terone levels. BPA can also
wreak havoc on children's devel-
oping systems. (Parents beware:
Most baby bottles and sippy cups
are made with plastics contain-
ing BPA.) Most experts agree
that the amount of BPA that
could leach into food and drinks
through normal handling is
probably very small, but there
are concerns about the cumula-


EARTH


TALKS
Questions & Answers
About Our Environment
tive effect of small doses.
Health advocates also rec-
ommend not reusing bottles
made from plastic #1 (polyethyl-
ene terephthalate, also known as
PET or PETE), including most
disposable water, soda and juice
bottles. According to The Green
Guide, such bottles may be safe
for one-time use, but reuse
should be avoided because stud-
ies indicate they may leach
DEHP-another probable hu-
man carcinogen-when they are
in less than perfect condition.
The good news is that such bot-
tles are easy to recycle; just about
every municipal recycling system
will take them back. But using
them is nonetheless far from
environmentally responsible:
The nonprofit Berkeley Ecology
Center found that the manufac-
ture of plastic #1 uses large
amounts of energy and resources
and, generates toxic emissions
and pollutants that contribute to
global warming. And even
though PET bottles can be recy-
cled, millions find their way into
landfills every day in the U.S.
alone.
Another bad choice for
water bottles, reusable or other-
wise, is plastic #3 (polyvinyl
chloride/PVC), which can leach
hormone-disrupting chemicals
into the liquids they are storing
and will release synthetic car-
cinogens into the environment
when incinerated. Plastic #6
(polystyrene/PS), has been
shown to leach styrene, a proba-
ble human carcinogen, into food
and drinks as well.
Safer choices include bottles


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crafted from safer HDPE (plastic
#2), low-density polyethylene
(LDPE, AKA plastic #4) or
polypropylene (PP, or plastic
#5). Consumers may have a hard
time finding water bottles made
out of #4 or #5, however.
Aluminum bottles, such as those
made by SIGG and sold in many
natural food and product mar-
kets, and stainless steel water
bottles are also safe choices and
can be reused repeatedly and
eventually recycled.
CONTACTS: The Green
Guide, www.thegreenguide.com;
Environment California, www.
environmentcalifornia.org/repor
ts/environmental-health/envi-
ronmental-health-reports/toxic-
baby-bottles; SIGG, www.
mysigg.com.
GOT AN ENVIRONMEN-
TAL QUESTION? Send it to:
EarthTalk, c/o E/The Environ-
mental Magazine, P.O. Box
5098, Westport, CT 06881; sub-
mit it at: www.emagazine.
com/earthtalk/thisweek/, or e-
mail: earthtalk@emagazine.
com. Read past columns at:
www.emagazine.com/earth-
talk/archives.php.
Dear EarthTalk:
Is it true that global warm-
ing can exacerbate allergies?
- Alex Tibbetts, Seattle, WA
Global warming can make
allergies worse simply because
the major pollen producers that
trigger allergic reactions thrive
and flourish in warmer air. A
recent report from the nonprofit
Natural Resources Defense
Council (NRDC) entitled
"Sneezing and Wheezing: How
Global Warming Could Increase
Ragweed Allergies, Air Pollution
and Asthma" details how rag-
weed, one of the most common
allergens in the U.S., grows faster
and for longer periods as air tem-
peratures rise due to climate
change.
Ragweed also thrives on
direct exposure to carbon diox-


ide (C02), so as we emit more of
this chief greenhouse gas from
our tailpipes and smokestacks,
we are unwittingly also causing
more allergy-aggravating pollen
to be produced. According to
Kim Knowlton of NRDC, the
group's analysis shows that
"there is a clear interplay"
between the onslaught of global
warming and increasingly higher
levels of ragweed pollen, espe-
cially in warmer urban areas
already plagued with allergens.
"People living in some of
the most populated regions of
this country may be feeling the
effects of global warming every
allergy season," says Knowlton.
The NRDC report concludes
that an increasing number of the
110 million Americans who live
in areas with existing ragweed
problems will suffer the conse-
quences of global warming as
their noses begin to run and their
eyes begin to water. Major met-
ropolitan areas in the U.S. likely
to be most affected include
Atlanta, Philadelphia, Milwau-
kee, Los Angeles and Chicago,
among other locales.
Public health statistics show
that about 36 million Americans
suffer from some form of season-
al allergy. While allergies can be
annoying in their own right, they
are also a main contributor to
asthma and other serious respira-
tory problems, making them a
serious health threat in their own
right. Some 17 million Ameri-
cans suffer from asthla, with
well over half of them also sensi-
tive to the allergens tat can
spark an asthma attack.
Meanwhile, C02 emissions also
contribute to smog, another trig-
ger for asthma. Thus glbal
warming represents a do ble
whammy for asthmatics with
pre-existing allergies.
"Global warming-through
both its components and by-
products-is creating a perfect
storm of sneezing and wheezing
for allergy and asthma suffers in


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the U.S.," says Gina Solomon, a
senior scientist in NRDC's
health program. She adds that
her group's recent analysis
"shows us that people through-
out the U.S.-in the North,
South, East and West-will be
very personally affected by glob-
al warming, and we need pollu-
tion controls throughout the
country to help offset this prob-
lem."
According to NRDC, indus-
trial and personal actions can
help reduce increases in allergens
and ) combat their effects.
Federal, state and local govern-
ments can protect communities
by reducing the sources of global
warming pollution and by creat-
ing better resources for citizens
in need of information about
pollen levels in their areas.
Individuals can reduce their own
exposure to ragweed and other
allergens by checking news out-
lets for daily pollen counts before
venturing outside for long peri-
ods of time.
CONTACT: NRDC, "Snee-
zing and Wheezing," www.nrdc.
org/globalwarming/sneezing/c
ontents.asp.
GOT AN ENVIRONMEN-
TAL QUESTION? Send it to:
EarthTalk, c/o E/The Environ-
mental Magazine, P.O. Box
5098, Westport, CT 06881; sub-
mit it at: www.emagazine.
com/earthtalk/thisweek/, or e-
mail: earthtalk@emagazine.
com. Read past columns at:
www.emagazine.com/earth-
talk/archives.php.



In other

action
Here is a summary of some
of the other actions at the
Tuesday, Nov. 6, Franklin
County Commission meeting:
Commissioners heard a
report from Clerk of the Court
Marcia Johnson that there was a
decrease of 2.35% in the taxable
value from the anticipated tax-
able value. This means the coun-
ty will collect $334,089 less in
property tax this year.
The commission voted to
reinstate a county hiring freeze,
with essential positions needing
County Commission approval
before they can be replaced. The
action came on County Admin-
istrator Alan Pierce's recommen-
dation, based on the uncertainty
of the impact on Franklin
County if the Legislative initia-
tive on property tax is approved
by votes in January.
Instructed County Attorn-
ey Michael Shuler to present at
the next meeting wording of bal-
lot language for a mail-out bind-
ing vote of Alligator Point prop-
erty owners on beach renourish-
ment.









Page 14 November 9, 2007 A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER The Franklin Chronicle


Florida Classified


FCN Advertising Network

Each of the classified ads in this section reaches an audience of 1.8

million subscribers through 112 Florida newspapers!

The Chronicle can place your advertising into this network. Please call the paper with the
FLORIDA REACH at 850-670-4377, fax: 877-423-4964, e-mail: info@franklinchronicle.net


Announcements
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Alligator Point 2BR/2BA home
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salesperson in the Carrabelle
area. Commission pay. Send
your resume to sales@Franklin
Chronicle.net, or to P.O. Box
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Page 14 November 9, 2007


A LOCAL Y OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle







The Franklin Chronicle


A L OCiLL Y OfXED NE T SP PEIR


November 0). 2007 Page 15


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Lanark from Page 1
aimed at dissolving the District.
When asked if he was encour-
.iaed by Armstrong's statements,
Concerned Citizens Chairman
Bill Snyder replied, "If I could
believe it I would be."
"We don't trust that ,,, that
(District) Board will ever allow
that to happen," Snyder said of a
possible merger with Carrabelle.
Armstrong said the petitions
gathered by the Concerned
Citizens were based on "false
pretenses" of exaggerated claims
about drastic rate hikes and a 2-
mill property tax, a claim Snyder
denied.
Armstrong said he feels
"very confident that this can
happen; this can happen the
right way."
Whether Armstrong's state=
ment will become reality may be
clearer after the Water District
Board meets with representatives


from the City of Carrabelle at a
public meeting on Monday. Nov,
12, to discuss a i.Illll' of assets,
Au isitng said his recom-
mendation to the Board to trans-
fer its assets is in the best inter
ests of the residents. When asked
by County Commissioner Noah
Lockley whcrber he would be
willing to put his position in
writing. Armstrong replied that
he would put in writing his ree=
commendation and his belief that
the Board would approve such a
transfer,
Of course, Armstrong's job
is to give legal advice, not to set
policy, so the decision will be
made by the three-member
Water District Board, Armstrong
said he has spoken individually
with two Water Board members,
"And I know this can go for-
ward.., I know for sure that
those two, on that basis, can
approve this transfer; I'm hope-
ful the third one will as well."


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The Franklin Chronicle
GUY MARKHAM
ADVERTISING SPECIALIST

P.O. Box 590 '33 Begonia Street
Eastpoint, FL 32328
(850) 670-4377 (Office)
(616) 366-7110 (Cell)
news@franklinchronicle.net
FranklinChronicle.net
11-02/11-09


It's possible the agreement
could be negotiated between the
District and the cr i in time to
present it for .ippin,.il on Nov
12. The meeting is at Chillas
Hall in Lanark beginning at 6:30
p.m.
"I want to be there to see it,"
Commissioner Cheryl Sanders
said,
County Commissioners app-
eared relieved they didn't have to
take a position on the issue, but
they also didn't seem to be total
ly convinced that an agreement
would be reached.
"I've never heard this attor-
ney stand before the Board and
say that his recommendation is
going to be to transfer the assets
of the District to the City of
Carrabelle," said Commissioner
Sanders, "I've never heard that,"
"You know," Commissioner
Russell Crofton told Armstrong,
"If it doesn't happen, your credi-
bility is zero."
Attorney Nick Yonclas, who
represents the Concerned
Citizens, told county commis-
sioners that he is going to file the
petitions with the county proper-
ty appraiser to be certified. If the
signatures are certified to repre-
sent at least 10% of landowners
in Lanark Village, the issue
would return to the County
Commission to set a vote of
landowners. However, if
Armstrong's statement is an
accurate indication, %-the Nov.
12th Lanark Water Board meet-
ing could make action by the
County Commission unneces-
sary.
"We'll know by the 12th if
this is real," Yonclas said.


Big Bend Hospice thanks our Chaplains for bringing peace,
Comfort and hope to our patients and their families.


The Rev. Dennis Ackerson
Rev. Dr. Ronald A. Bradley
Rev. Darwin Box
Rev. Andrew Creel
Rev. Jim Gibbs
The Rev. Shari Hobby
Chaplain Nancy Horbowy
Chaplain Ed Lyon
The Rev. Deacon Trina McCarthy
Rev. Candace McKibben
.Rev. Tan Moss
Rev. Karen Pellett
The Rev. Charles J. Scrivens
Rev. Jack Stroman
Chaplain Charlotte Tremoule


Thanks also to the many wonderful
trained volunteer chaplains and clergy
in our community who respond so
graciously when called upon.


g Bend
hospice


vour hometown hospice, licensed since 1983
850-878-5310 or toll free 24 hours a day 800-772-5862 1723 Mahan Center Blvd


FM~4L C4&


I __ ____ ___ __ _1____ __11______ _il_


r~p-----------------l
Ilf'T 111II fll~TU
L~,~,i~,~Laeal~











You can get a good wine for under $15


BY TOM MARQUARDT AND PATRICK DARR
We are constantly amazed by the number of wines
on the market that cost less than $15. There used to be a
time when we had to search hard for every-day plonk that
will deliver good fruit for the money. Now, the rush of
wines from South America, Australia and Spain shows
that there are plenty of inexpensive wines for the con-
sumer to choose from.
Several months ago we visited with Peter Gago,
winemaker at Penfolds, known for its legendary Grange
but also for its value wines made under the Koonunga
Hills label. Penfolds started to blend its shiraz and caber-
net in 1976 and sold it to the locals for $2 a bottle. Today,
the wine is $11-still a steal more than 30 years later.
There are six different wines made under the
Koonunga Hills label and all are great values. They aren't
meant to be aged, yet we were stunned recently to taste
a 20-year-old Koonunga Hills cabernet that was still alive.
This wine isn't the only value wine in the local mar-
ket. In fact, we stopped at several wine shops one recent
day to find out what else wine enthusiasts were buying.
Our only demand of the sales staff was that the wine had
lots of fruit, ready for immediate consumption and under
$15.
Penfolds Koonunga Hill Cabernet Sauvignon 2004
($12). Black currant aromas, medium body, black berry
fruit with a velvet texture and long finish. It has the guts
to stand up to beef and wild game.


Penfolds Koonunga Hill Shiraz Cabernet 2005 ($12).
Violet aromas followed by sweet plum and blackberry fla-
vors, chocolate and sweet vanillin oak. It begs for a refill.
Chateau Millegrand Minervois 2004 ($12). Bright
blueberry and wild berry flavors with a nice finish and
balance.
Tement Temento 2004
($14). We were delighted
with the simple, fresh flavors
of this white Austrian blend
of sauvignon blanc and
welschries grapes.
S Pineapple, citrus flavors and
S easy acidity make this a
good apertif or a match for
seafood.
4 Morgante Nero d'Avola
2005 ($13). Here's a crowd-
pleasing red gem from Sicily
that wowed the crowd it was
poured to recently. Nero
d'Avola is the grape variety and it shows off black cherry
and chocolate flavors.
Almira Los Dos Old Vines Grenache-Syrah 2006
($9). Ripe plum and black cherry fruit make this a quaf-
fable Spanish wine for any occasion. Great with grilled
food or by itself.
2 Up Shiraz 2006 ($12). Jammy, black berry fruit
with a touch of spice. Another great value from Down


Under.
Goats do Roam 2006 ($10). This beauty from South
Africa has loads of black cherry and raspberry flavors
with a hint of black pepper and a velvet texture.
Bodegas. Zabrin Garnacha de Fuego Old Vines
2005 ($10). We're a sucker for inexpensive Riojas
because of their simple yet opulent fruit characteristics.
This one has ripe sweet cherry and plum flavors with a
dash of white pepper and subtle oak. The grapes are
grown in high altitudes on difficult terrain.
Cycles Gladiator Syrah 2005 ($11). Using grapes
from California's Central Coast, this wine exudes lus-
cious dark berry fruit. Easy to drink, medium body and
good finish. The label is a mythological image of a
winged bicycle.
Castano Monsatrell 2005 ($10). We made this a
party wine several times this year. From Spain, it has a
burst of dark berry fruit and a medium body to serve you
proud as a sipper or with grilled beef, pasta and simple
fare.
Wine of the Week
Menage a Trois California White Table Wine 2005
($12). A terrific blend of chardonnay, moscato and
chenin blanc, with the moscato dominating the nose with
floral notes that really invite you to taste this wine. A ter-
rific beverage wine that has peach and melon flavors that
can stand on it's own or accompany light fare.


Harry Restaurant & Bar

The Freshest Local Seafood Steais, Sandwiches, Salads & tKids Menu

The Family Friendliest Place Live Entertainment Nightly

Large Parties Welcome OPEN FOR BPL6EAFAST AT 8:oo A.M.


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DAILY SPECIALS
Lunch from 11:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.
Dinner from 4:00 p.m. to 11:00 p.m.
MONDAY
Lunch: Sandwich Baslet with Coleslaw $4.95/
Pinner: I Dozen Wings $5.95
TUESDAY
Lunch: Hamburger Steak with Mashed Potatoes
and Veggie of the Day $5.95/Pinner:
Hamburger SteaK Dinner with Mashed Potatoes,
Veggie of the Day, Garlic Toast and Side Salad
$7.95
VW6EDNE$DAY
Lunch: 3 Hard or Soft Shell Tacos with BlacK
Beans and Rice $3.l5/Dinner: 3 Hard or Soft
Shell Tacos with BlatK Beans and pice $3.95
THURSDAY
Lunch: Spaghetti with Garlic Toast $4.95/
Dinner: All You Can Eat Spaghetti with Garlic
Toast and Side Salad $1.95
FRPIPAY
Lunch: Catch of the Da Fish Sandwich with
Coleslaw $4.15/Dinner: All You Can Eat Peel &r
Eat Shrimp with Coleslaw and New Potatoes
$1.15
SATURDAY
Lunch: SteaK (( oz.. 1ibeje) Sandwich with
Coleslaw $(.195/Pinner: Surf hr Turf (I Shrimp
Skewer & 12. oz. pibeye) with garlic Toast, New
Potatoes and Side Salad $14.15
SUNDAY
Lunch: Country Dinner (All Dal) Meat,
Potatoes, Veggie of the Day, Garlic Toast and
Side Salad $s.15/
Pinner: Country Dinner (All Dal) Meat,
Potatoes, Veggie of the Dal, 6iarlic Toast and
Side Salad $8.95

No Substitutions/o% Added to
All "To 6o" Orders


L 7 ~eL~l L


The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


Page 16 November 9, 2007




PRIVATE ITEM
Digitization of this item is currently in progress.
Franklin chronicle
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS MAP IT! PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00089928/00320
 Material Information
Title: Franklin chronicle
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: Russell Roberts
Publication Date: 11-09-2007
Copyright Date: 2007
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
Coordinates: 29.725278 x -84.9925 ( Place of Publication )
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I The 0
Fi nklin




w Chronicle


Lanarks

attorney

supports

dissolving
816 signed petitions
presented to county
BY RUSSELL ROBERTS
Chronicle Staff
The attorney for the Lanark
Village Water & Sewer District
Board assured Franklin County
Commissioners on Tuesday,
Nov. 6, that he supports transfer-
ring the District's assets to the
City of Carrabelle, which would
effectively dissolve the water dis-
trict.
Although attorney Brian
Armstrong said his position is
nothing new, the announcement
appeared to stun supporters of a
merger, who came to the County
Commission meeting armed
with 816 petitions calling for dis-
solving the District.
Even Carrabelle City
Administrator John Mclnnis a
key person in negotiations
between Lanark and Carrabelle
Swas surprised, telling the
County Commission that this
was the "clearest I've heard" that
Armstrong is recommending the
transfer of all assets and liabili-
ties. "You got me shocked," he
said, turning to shake Arm-
strong's hand.
More. skeptical were repre-
sentatives of the Concerned
Citizens of Lanark Village, who
organized the petition effort
Continued on Page 15


505


Even the crabs had fun this year
A crowd cheers their favorite contestants in the annual crab races, one of the most popular
events at the annual Florida Seafood Festival in Apalachicola. This year's event last week-
end drew a large crowd and great weather helped make the event a success. For details and
more photos, see page 10.


Mullet Festival nets Eastpoint couple as king and queen


Joseph Nichols and his wife,
Mary Evans Nichols, both of
whom come from several genera-
tions of commercial fishing fam-
ilies, have been named king and
queen of the 2nd annual Mighty
Mullet Maritime Festival, to be
held Saturday, Nov. 10, at
Panacea's Woolley Park.
Rex Hodge, news anchor at
ABC 27 News, and Master of
Ceremon-ies for the festival, will
crown and cape the 2007 festival
king and queen. Hodge will also
introduce the judges for the sec-
ond annual $2,000 International
Mullet Cook-Off.
Joe Nichols, who is original-
ly from Panacea, said all of the
Nichols family have been com-
mercial fishermen since the days
of his great-grandfather.
"It all started with the mul-
let," Nichols said. "Mary and I
did it all....shrimping, oystering,


Joseph Nichols and wife Mary Evans Nichols are royalty at
Mighty Mullet Festival.


and mullet fishing. But it was the
mullet that kept us going."
He noted that mullet sold for
about 2-'/2 cents a pound when
he first started fishing 52 years
ago.
Mary said she was a full
partner in the commercial fish-
ing from the start, and-as she
explained it-was "still skinny"
and often worked the boat with
Joe while wearing her bathing
suit.
Nichols, 69, said he has seen
many changes over his lifetime
here in the Big Bend. He said
that when he began fishing there
were "hundreds of commercial
boats on the water." He
explained that they used to say
"I'm going to the bank" when
they headed out to fish, because

Continued on Page 5


Voters

pass tax
Franklin County voters
approved a one-cent sales tax in
an election Tuesday, Nov. 6.
The vote was 1,540 in favor
of the tax, and 705 against it.
There was a 30% turnout.
The sales tax will be used to
operate, construct, and maintain
health-care facilities and pro-
grams in the county. Specifically,
the question on the ballot asked
whether a one-cent sales surtax
should be imposed in Franklin
County to build a health-care
facility in Carrabelle, upgrade
the ambulance service, and pay
the cost of operations and
health-care infrastructure and
services including the construc-
tion and paying debt service on
bonds to construct a new public
hospital to replace Weems
Memorial.


Re-lighting ceremony for the
Crooked River Light will
highlight December 8th holi-
day event.

Let there

be light
BY SKIP FRINK
Chronicle Correspondent
The special highlight of this
year's Holiday on the Harbor cel-
ebration will not be on the har-
bor. After years of dedicated
work by many volunteers, the
Grand Re-Lighting ceremony for
the Crooked River Light will be
held before the Boat Parade.
The Governor and other dig-
nitaries will be invited to help
mark the event.
City Administrator John
McInnis announced at the Nov.
1st City Council meeting that the
pirate ship "Carrabella," to be
built as a playground for child
visitors, will be completed. The
new park area will be cleared,
picnic areas ready, and the repli-
ca lens will be lit. A fresh coat of
red, white and black paint will
make the lighthouse appear as
new as its first day on the job.
No detailed information was
offered concerning the planned
sweep pattern or strength of the
new light. Carrabelle's actual
Fresnel lens, property of the
Coast Guard, was removed in
1976 and is on display in the
USCG New Orleans district
offices. In late August of 1995,
the light in the Crooked River
Lighthouse was turned off, just
months short of its 100th
Continued on Page 2


* - .. .-


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Page 2 November 9, 2007


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


L-ocl For cst
1 ^ ^ ( g^^CTig~~s

g .. * B r z^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^


PHOTO BY SKIP FRINK
City Administrator John McInnis shows first sample brick for Veterans Wall project.


Let Be Light from Page 1
anniversary. With the easy avail-
ability today of GPS navigation
to all seafarers, lighthouses do
not have the life-or-death neces-
sity they once did, but continue
to stand as symbols of hundreds
of years of vigilance and safe
harbor.
Administrator Mclnnis cited
the contribution that the
Crowder organization had made
to the lighthouse park work by
doing all the clearing and
groundwork at their cost, and
thanked Jimmy Crowder.
McInnis: "I thought they
had forgotten the first '1' from in
front of the other numbers."
Council Meeting Details
This meeting started with no
public comment and no commis-
sioner reports. Jim Brown is still
under medical care and did not
attend, and commissioners voted
to excuse him from all meeting
attendance for an initial period
of 90 days while he recovers.
Lanark Water and Sewer
District's potential merger with
Carrabelle has lumbered back to
the front burner. McInnis related
that the boards of Carrabelle and
Lanark would meet Nov. 12 at
6:30 p.m. The goal is to attempt
to reach an agreement over the
management of the utility. Films
of Lanark Water and Sewer
meetings, with their Jerry
Springer-like proceedings, have
recently been featured on
YouTube.com on the Internet for
all the world to see and hear.
Courtney (Millender)
Dempsey was complimented for
being the youngest City Clerk on
record to achieve the Certified
City Clerk designation, and for
her excellent work ethic and atti-
tude.
Carrabelle Wharf, the
Marine Street boat ramp project,
has finally received permitting
that will allow construction to
start once bids are let and selec-
tion is made.
The Carrabelle Veteran's
Wall, spearheaded by Commis-
sioners Tyre and Sands, starts
construction in early November
and is scheduled to be complete
by the Camp Gordon Johnston
WWII reunion weekend in


March. McInnis showed a sam-
ple of the memorial brick pavers,
which are available for donation
and engraving, to be part of the
landscape. The $35 bricks may
be bought to commemorate any
veteran of any war who once
lived in Carrabelle. Commis-
sioner Sands disclosed that Ms.
Pat Bragdon, in memory of her
late husband Sonny Bragdon, is
funding the project.
American Legion Post 82
donated a POW/MIA flag to be
flown over Veteran's Park.
Civic projects are starting
in every direction: soon also to
begin is the Sands Field/Buck
O'Neal Park remodeling of the
four city blocks that are current-
ly the ballfields on Highway 98
east. There will be walking
paths, benches, playground
equipment and landscaping
around a central water feature
which actually will be the city's
main eastside stormwater catch-
basin. This pond will slow down
and filter groundwater on its way
to the bay.
GreenSteel, the new build-
.ing products factory, has walls
and roof up and plans to hire the
first group of employees to start
soon. The building, approxi-
mately the size of a football
field, will anchor a planned cor-
porate campus that is slated to
employ hundreds once it is in
production and its business
matures.
From the McInnis Report
of city progress, in October the
city had the benefit of 2,548 no-
cost hours of inmate labor. The
city removed 37 truckloads of
trash from streetsides, and 161
bags of trash.
Tamara Allen, Waterfronts
Florida chief, announced the
pursuit of a $50,000 matching
grant that would amplify the cur-
rent two-year grant efforts of
Waterfronts Florida. DEP and
NOAA sponsor this Coastal
Partnership Initiative grant, and
the Waterfronts Florida status
will aid in attaining the grant.
She describes the five planned
initiatives that will come to life
with the program:
1. a floating dock at the stag-
ing dock, for ease of accessibility
2. vegetative shoreline stabi-
lization plantings


3. a fish-cleaning station
modification for access by chil-
dren and wheelchairs
4. park benches, bike racks,
recycle stations, trash cans
5. a historic Carrabelle har-
bor info kiosk with archival pho-
tos, designed like a mini-pavil-
ion. "Not everybody knows that
our riverfront pavilion was mod-
eled after the train station which
was in that spot," she said.
Inovia Consulting received
the nod to design the Sands Field
reconstruction project, provide
plan review service for the city,
and to design the lighthouse
sewer force main extension.
Ashley Teat presented a
lengthy A/V show to propose his
fire inspection services. Commis-
sioners voted to recommend him
to the county.
Baywood Estates 'and
Bayou Harbor subdivisions
requested consideration for
street paving. Much discussion
resulted in agreement that the
city would develop a priority list
for paving. Neither area has any
paved roads or city water or
sewer, and it was also observed
that those utilities should be
completed before paving. There
was disagreement between John
McInnis and Gene Langston
(developer of Bayou Harbor)
with Dan Cox, city attorney,
over whether each subdivision
indeed must first dissolve their
homeowners associations to
qualify for city paving.
The board voted to approve
the lowest and best bid for disas-
ter debris removal to Crowder
Disaster Recovery, with the sec-
ond bidder Bamaco awarded the
number two position in the case
that the Crowder team is unavail-
able or overextended.
The commission voted to
allow 5-foot rear building set-
backs in the city, to allow room
for accessory buildings, but not
the main residence. Ten feet
applies to the main building, and
25 feet in the front.
Resolution 23-2007 was
passed to authorize the mayor to
negotiate and execute a joint par-
ticipation agreement with the
Florida DOT to provide 100%
grant funding to construct T-
hangars at the Carrabelle
Thompson Airport.


Fri
11/9


70/46
Mainly
sunny.
Highs in the
low 70s and
lows in the
mid 40s.


Sunrise:
6:58 AM
Sunset:
5:46 PM


Sat
11/10


Sun
11/11


I I I'


73/50
Abundant
sunshine.
Highs in the
low 70s and
lows in the
low 50s.


Sunrise:
6:59 AM
Sunset:
5:46 PM


74153
Times of
sun and
clouds.
Highs in the
mid 70s and
lows in the
low 50s.

Sunrise:
7:00 AM
Sunset:
5:45 PM


Mon
11/12


76/58
Abundant
sunshine.
Highs in the
mid 70s and
lows in the
upper 50s. .


Sunrise:
7:01 AM
Sunset:
5:44 PM


Tue
11/13


76/58
Scattered
thunder-
storms.
Highs in the
mid 70s and
lows in the
upper 50s.

Sunrise:
7:02 AM
Sunset:
5:44 PM


Florida At A Glance


SJacksonville
\ 66/49


I71;/ll
71/52


rrabelle
70/46


Tampa
74'50


Area Cities


Clearwater 73
Crestview 72
Daytona Beach 71
Fort Lauderdale 81
Fort Myers 78
Gainesville 70
Hollywood 80
Jacksonville 66
Key West 77
Lady Lake 71
Lake City 68
Madison 70
Melbourne 77
Miami 79
N Smyrna Beach 72


sunny
sunny
ptsunny
ptsunny
mst sunny
sunny
pt sunny
mst sunny
pt sunny
mst sunny
sunny
sunny
rain
pt sunny
rain


I cata inHsun


Ocala
Orlando
Panama City
Pensacola
Plant City
Pompano Beach
Port Charlotte
Saint Augustine
Saint Petersburg
Sarasota
Tallahassee
Tampa
Titusville
Venice
W Palm Beach


mst sunny
mst sunny
sunny
sunny
sunny
pst sunny
mst sunny
ptsunny
sunny
sunny
sunny
sunny
rain
mst sunny
rain


National Cities


Atlanta
Boston
Chicago
Dallas
Denver
Houston
Los Angeles
Miami


pt sunny
cloudy
pt sunny
mst sunny
pt sunny
pt sunny
cloudy
pt sunny


cinny HLouoy


Minneapolis
New York
Phoenix
San Francisco
Seattle
St. Louis
Washington, DC


clouay
cloudy
pt sunny
pt sunny
rain
mst sunny
rain


Moon Phases






Last New First Full
Nov 1 Nov 9 Nov 17 Nov 24


UV Index
Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue
11/9 11/10 11/11 11/12 11/13
5 5 5 5 5
Moderate Moderate Moderate Moderate Moderate
The UV Index is measured on a 0 11 number scale, O 11
with a higher UV Index showing the need for greater
skin protection.


i


-t


I -- ... I .. . ... I -- - ---


1 it y -^^^^^^ - H *Mi S~ Lo Cond


M44 4140-4 T4 a444.- 1104 14 44

20 woik. W44 w4vw 4,ta









The Franklin Chronicle A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER November 9, 2007. Page 3


County

accepting

home rehab

applications
Do you need your home
repaired?
If so, you might be interest-
ed to know that the Franklin
County Commission, through
the State Housing Initiative
Partnership (SHIP) Program,
would like to announce that
applications are currently being
accepted for the Owner
Occupied Rehabilitation and the
Emergency Repair Programs.
To submit an application
you must not have had assistance
from the SHIP Program in the
last 5 years; you must own and
occupy the home; and you must
meet SHIP Program eligibility
guidelines.
The SHIP Program does not
work on mobile homes.
The deadline for submitting
an application is Nov. 7.
These programs are on a
first come, first served basis-and
only serve very low and low
income applicants.
For more information, con-
*tact Lori Switzer at 850-653-
8199 or come by the office at 29
Avenue E, Suite 8, in Apalach-
icola between 9 a.m. and 11 a.m.
Monday through Thursday or by
appointment.


FHP

announces

checkpoints
The Florida Highway Patrol
has announced that state troop-
ers will be conducting driver
license/vehicle inspection check-
points during daylight hours at
the following locations in
Franklin County:
* Nov. 9-15: County Road 370,
County Road 157, County Road
59;
* Nov. 16-22: County Road 374,
County Road 30A, S.R. 300 (St.
George Island Causeway);
* Nov. 23-29: S.R. 30, S.R. 30A,
S.R. 65;
* Nov. 30: S.R. 384, S.R. 67, S.R.
377, S.R. 385.

S Ue 44W
:F wtzl^~tc ~c^


PHOTO BY ROYCE ROLSTAD III
Members of the cast of "A Christmas Carol" pose for a photo during a rehearsal.

Panhandle Players season to begin with

"A Christmas Carol" at the Dixie Theatre


Christmas? A humbug?
Not if the ghosts of Jacob
Marley (Jeff Ilardi), Christmas
Past (Megan Lamb), Christmas
Present (Dan Wheeler), and
Christmas Yet To Come (Hank
Koslowsky) have their will with
disagreeable old Ebenezer
Scrooge (Tom Loughridge).
Their attempts to turn the
old miser into a true believer in
the Christmas spirit and a man of
real generosity is the subject of
the upcoming presentation by
the Panhandle Players. The
Players will start their season
with a production of the Cora


Wilson Greenwood adaptation
of "A Christmas Carol" at the
Dixie Theatre on Nov. 16, 17
and 18.
Other cast members will be,
Laura Baney as Scrooge's
fiance in his youth, David
Bowen in the dual roles of the
young scrooge and Bob Cratchit,
Jeana Crozier as Mrs. Cratchit,
Jathan Martin as Tiny Tim, Dan
Wheeler as a collector for
Christmas charity, and Whitney
Vause as one of the Ciatchit
daughters. The actors playing
Peter Cratchit and the other
Cratchit daughter will be


announced. The Spirit of
Christmas, who narrates much
of the action, will be played by
Liz Sisung.
The production is directed
by Royce Rolstad III, aided by
assistant director Megan Lamb
and assisted by stage and proper-
ty master Pam Vest and cos-
tumer Caroline Ilardi.
For an evening of traditional
Christmas entertainment includ-
ing a carol sing-along, be sure to
bring your family to "A
Christmas Carol" at the Dixie
Theatre.


Bike path on

St. George

Island is

ready to roll
State Rep. Will Kendrick (R-
Carrabelle) recently met with
Florida Department of Trans-
portation Secretary Stephanie
Kopelousos and is pleased to
announce that the Florida DOT
and the Federal Highway Ad-
ministration have agreed to
release funds to begin construc-
tion of the St. George Island bike
path.
The approval of the project
to proceed means funds have
been authorized and the county
is now in a position to begin con-
struction. First the county will
have to advertise the project for
bids for a minimum of three
weeks. The bids will then be
reviewed and the project will be
awarded according to criteria.
"The completion of the bike
path is important to me and the
residents and visitors to St.
George Island. It will provide
not only recreational benefits but
will be an enhanced safety fea-
ture for our residents and the
many tourists that are an eco-
nomic factor in the county," said
Rep. Kendrick.
According to Department of
Transportation officials, an allo-
cation of $703,000 has been
authorized for completion of the
bike path. Construction should
begin as soon as the first of the
new year.


Curtis to

run for


Reforms recommended to stem loss of rural lands House seat


1000 Friends of Florida has
released a study identifying
strategies to stem the dramatic
loss of Florida's rural lands over
the next 50 years.
Working to Sustain Florida's
Rural and Natural Lands: A
Call to Action, is a follow-up to
the group's report, Florida 2060,
which included the projection
that the amount of urbanized
land in Florida will double by
2060, based on current develop-
ment patterns.
"Losing 7 million acres of
rural lands to urban develop-
ment is unconscionable," says
1000 Friends of Florida Chair-


man Emeritus Nathaniel Reed.
Unwilling to accept this proposi-
tion, Reed met with some of the
state's leading conservationists,
developers, planners and agricul-
tural leaders to help chart a dif-
ferent course for Florida's future.
Reed used that input as he
crafted the report, Working to
Sustain Florida's Rural and
Natural Lands. It includes a
series of recommendations on
how to better protect Florida's
vanishing natural lands, covering
such topics as visioning and pub-
lic policy, economic strategies,
planning strategies and citizen
involvement.


Whether you're looking for the perfect place to unwind for a weekend or a lifetime,
our associates can help find your place.






Ron Bloodworth Ben Bloodworth Kay Barnett Sam Gilbert BJ Neshat Billlie Grey Jan Grey
Realtor, Realtor, Realtor, Realtor. Realtor, Rental Manager Reservations Agent
Sales Associate Sales Associate Sales Associate Business Manager Sales Associate


Call or stop by our offices at
224 Franklin Boulevard, St. George Island
800-341-2021 850-927-2282
www.uncommonflorida.com


Reed notes 1000 Friends
intends to work with Agriculture
Commissioner Charles Bronson,
DCA Secretary Tom Pelham,
DEP Secretary Mike Sole, DOT
Secretary Stephanie Kopelousos
and other state leaders to help
implement the recommenda-
tions. The report will also be
presented to the Century
Commission for a Sustainable
Florida and other statewide bod-
ies to incorporate into their rec-
ommendations.
Bronson stressed the need
for action.
"The environmental and
agricultural communities are in
agreement on this issue...
Without rural land, the environ-
mental health and beauty of
Florida will degrade, we will be
unable to grow crops to feed our
people, and the state's economy
will be deprived of one of its
largest economic engines."


Don Curtis of Lake Byrd,
Fla. announced his candidacy
for Florida House District 10,
which includes part of Franklin
County, on Tuesday, Nov. 6, in
Tallahassee.
According to a statement
from the Curtis campaign, Rep.
Will Kendrick of Carrabelle and
House Speaker-Designate Ray
Sansom attended to show their
support of Curtis' bid for the
Florida House of Represen-
tatives. Kendrick is the current
representative for House District
10. He is term-limited out of that
office and is expected to run for
Franklin County Superintendent
of Schools.
Besides Franklin, other
counties in the 10th District are
Dixie, Hamilton, Madison,
Taylor, and parts of Alachua,
Columbia, Jefferson, Levy and
Wakulla.


PRN and On-Call nurses are needed for the various
counties: Wakulla/Franklin, Jefferson/Madison/
Taylor and Gadsden/Liberty. Must have current
Florida license.

Big Bend Hospice, Human
Resources Dept., 1723 Mahan
Center Blvd., Tallahassee, FL he
32308, (850) 701-1374. Jee


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


November 9, 2007 Page 3


The Franklin Chronicle







Page 4 November 9, 2007


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


Guest column

Designing a road to the

future of Franklin County
Editor's note: From time to time, The Franklin Chronicle will publish guest
columns on subjects of public interest. This week's guest column is written by
Steven W Allen, Team Leader for the Transportation Priorities and Cross
County Road Sub-committee, Citizens Advisory Committee of Franklin
County.
The line in the movie says, "Build it and they will come." The
question is will they stop? Or stay? Are they coming to enjoy our
county or are they just passing through on the way to somewhere
else? And how many are they? And how fast will they be going? Will
they spend their money here? Will they respect the Franklin County
way of life? And what will they bring with them? And what will they
leave behind?
These are a few questions we might ask ourselves as we begin the
process of evaluating the Northwest Florida Transportation Corridor
Authority (NFTCA) Master Plans for the Panhandle and specifically
Franklin County. Plans are being made to consider widening U.S. 98,
a new east-west passage through Franklin County close to U.S. 98 or
in-land, or bypassing Franklin County altogether. These are points of
concern for those who have been following the process across the
Panhandle region. We believe you would have a valuable opinion if
you knew more about what options are being considered.
In truth, we do have transportation needs in Franklin County.
Most people agree that roads are good. Most of us use them every
day. Improved north-south evacuation routes, a road that can with-
stand the brute force of a mighty storm surge, or an alternate bypass
between Carrabelle and Eastpoint, which can be used temporarily
while repairs are made, would be useful. Back beach roads, improved
bridges, alternate or improved evacuation routes and truck bypasses
are possible solutions to future problems or needs that the county
may face. Continued financial support for U.S. 98 is an important
consideration in the decisions that will ultimately be made.
In the year 2007, the fact that we only have one red light in the
county is truly remarkable. I sometimes mention this when trying to
describe the old-fashioned character of the area. The possibility that
there may never be one at every intersection says a lot about the
unique nature of our part of Florida. If the road to the future is filled
with stop lights, turning lanes and traffic jams, how many would be
perfectly happy just winding their way along U.S. 98 at the steady
speed of 45? Around here, we don't really mind slowing for deer or at
bear crossings and for us, rubbernecking is slowing to catch sight of

Continued on Page 5
II. l1


POST OFFICE BOX 590
EASTPOINT, FLORIDA 32328
Office: 850-670-4377
Fax: 877-423-4964
E-Mail: info@franklinchronicle.net
Volume 16, Number 25 November 9, 2007
Publisher & Editor
Russell Roberts
Computer Graphic Designer
Diane Beauvais Dyal
Writers
Skip Frink, Richard E. Noble, Carol Noble, Tom Loughridge,
Laurel Newman, Harriett Beach
Circulation Associates
Jerry Weber, Tom Loughridge, Rick Lasher
Advertising Sales
Guy Markham
History
Tom W. Hoffer started the Franklin Chronicle in 1991 in Tallahassee after
retiring from FSU as a communications professor. Editor Brian Goercke
worked with the Chronicle for four years, then left to join the Peace Corps in
Africa. Computer Graphic Designer, Diane Dyal, joined the staff in 1996 and
then a short three years later her husband, Andy, became Circulation Director
(and later Director of Operations). Tom Hoffer moved The Chronicle to
Eastpoint at the end of 2002. He built two duplexes on the property. And local
writers joined the staff. On December 9, 2006 he passed away, but the
Chronicle still goes on with some new staff members.
Subscriptions
Changes in subscription addresses must be sent to The Chronicle
in writing. In-county subscriptions are $22.00 a year; out-of;j
county subscriptions are $29.00 a year.
To Submit News and Ads
Submit news and ads to info@franklinchronicle.net or to P.O. Box
590, Eastpoint, FL 32328. Deadline is Monday at noon for that
week's issue.
All contents Copyright 2007
Franklin Chronicle, Inc.


The river flows to the Bay...or does it?


It was at the Courthouse in Apalachicola over
20 years ago. A group of "politicos" had come to
our tiny "fishing village" from the big city of
Atlanta-one fancy dressed squirt, in his suit and
tie, was from the Georgia governor's office in that
land of prosperity and unrestricted growth.
They were here to explain to us why they had
the right to take water from the Apalachicola River


System for their grow-
ing, prosperous, big
city in Georgia.
The Courthouse
was near capacity,
packed with white
boots, jeans, and base-
ball caps-no suits
and ties.
All the seafood
workers knew that the
bay needed the river.
All of us didn't know
exactly why the bay
needed the river, but


By Richard E Noble
By Richard E. Noble


you didn't have to be a real genius to see that there
was a connection.
We were all there to learn and the first thing we
learned was that as Atlanta grew in size and popu-
lation, the Apalachicola River got lower and lower.
There was a big lake up there called Lake Lanier
and the city of Atlanta was draining water from the
river system and storing it in Lake Lanier for drink-
ing water. So the argument was kind of slanted.
The suits and ties from Atlanta wanted to know
what was more important the lives of prosperous,
hard working, successful citizens up in Atlanta or a
few oysters or shrimp down here in this dying "lit-
tle fishing village" at the bottom of this long river;
a village that was filled with dilapidated (rustic) tin
shacks and a small group of workers who had the
misguided notion that maintaining their subsis-
tence level and traditional livelihoods was being
successful.
As the argument progressed, our side down
here at the mouth of the river was looking shabbier
and shabbier. The suits and ties talked about "citi-
zens" and constitutional rights and prosperity and
growth, and MONEY. In Atlanta they all made
MONEY!
The fishermen were all very understanding of
growth and prosperity, but they pointed out that
this was not exactly an argument of people against
"oysters;" it was actually some people against some
other people. The people down here in
Apalachicola caught the oysters and other seafood,
and sold it to other people and made their living. It


was people vs. people, not people vs. Polar Bears or
Blue Nosed Sap-sucking Yellow Peckered Warblers.
The suits and ties understood people needing
to make a living but they didn't understand why the
seafood workers couldn't just do something else.
Like in the Willie Nelson song, "Don't let your
sons grow up to be cowboys, let them be lawyers
.and doctors and such,"-why didn't the seafood
workers in Apalachicola just let their children
become doctors and lawyers and such and forget.
about catching oysters and crabs and shrimp.
Here we had the Will Rogers-type country
talking' simple folk in a debate with the Atlanta
school of wannabe Harvard graduates with a
Southern drawl. Talk about living in two different
worlds; well here they were.
The suits and ties had flown down here in their
space ships and the locals had carted themselves
over on their buckboards and the two were here dis-
cussing the future.
One group knew exactly what their intentions
and goals were and what they were going to do.
And the other group was being told to move and
make way. And that was it; pure and simple.
Finally one of the white boots and baseball cap
crowd said: "Yeah but what about our rights? Ain't
we citizens too? I have always heard that this is a
country where all men are created equal; where we
all have equal rights and freedom. How can you
guys just do whatever you want up there and tell us
down here to all go to hell?"
"Well, we aren't telling you to go to hell.
You're missing the point," said the representative
from the Georgia governor with his wily wannabe
Harvard lawyer's smirk. "In fact, if you would like,
you could all move to Atlanta too. We'd. love to
have you all join us up there."
The white boot man then said, "So you ain't
exactly telling us that we can all go to hell; you are
just asking us to all voluntarily move there."
Unfortunately we seem to be getting an instant
replay of this past scenario. Only this time it is
coming directly from the horse's mouth. Now due
to overdevelopment and lack of foresight, a new
Georgia governor demands more water for their
lawns and putting greens and recommends poten-
tial devastation for our commercial and sport fish-
ing paradise. Come on People!
Richard E. Noble has been a resident of Eastpoint for
around 30 years now. He has authored two books: "A
Summer with Charlie," which is currently listed on
Amazon.com, and "Hoboing America," which should be
listed on Amazon in the not too distant future. Most
recently he completed his first novel "Honor Thy Father
and Thy Mother," which will be published soon.


4 *.. -j! ,.
Q0 ; i1 ..- ,..44 (4..g,,, / "..







The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


November 9, 2007 Page 5


Guest Column from Page 4 Honoring our veterans today & tomorrow


an eagle or osprey catching a fish, a school of mullet, or an oyster-
man tonging in the bay. My dad is the type of guy who will drive 20
miles out of the way to avoid rush hour at midnight and call it a
short-cut. I figure there are a lot of people around here that would do
the same.
On the practical side, a few well placed turning lanes, some alter-
native back roads, and improvements along our existing north-south
county and state roads might just do the trick. If all the people who
live west of us need to get east, or vice versa, could we find an alter-
native further north?
At what cost is progress? Let us never sacrifice a one of a kind
local treasure that draws people to Franklin County. I sincerely hope
we never have to say "the road through Tate's Hell was paved with
good intentions." I hope that the state's plans to assist us doesn't
change the very essence of this place and put us smack in the middle
of a traffic jam.
Wherever the roads to our future lead, the chance to plan and set
priorities is a good thing. The first public hearing for Franklin
County's proposed plan will occur Nov. 13th starting at 5 p.m. at the
Senior Citizens Center in Carrabelle. Mark it on your calendar or tie
a ribbon around your finger, because it doesn't get more important
than this. If we are going to have a say in the roads built in this area,
this is where to begin. The NFTCA and HDR1 will be unveiling its
plan for Franklin County which will be a blank map ready for input
from the public. Come one, come all, let's talk roads and help place
these roads where they best suit our community.
Who: Citizens of Franklin County, NFTCA and HDR1.
What: Public Workshop on the Northwest Florida Transportation
Corridor Authority's project in Franklin County.
When: Tuesday, Nov. 13, 5 -7 p.m.
Where: Carrabelle Senior Citizens Center-Avenue F (off County
Road 67) in Carrabelle.


Letters to the Editor policy
The Franklin Chronicle welcomes your typed letters to the editor
on issues of public concern. Letters may be edited. E-mail your letter
to the editor to news@FranklinChronicle.net. Include a contact tele-
phone number.


Mullet from Page 1
their catch kept everything going
and paid the bills.
Today there are an estimated
20 families from Apalachicola to
Panacea that are able to live from
what they catch commercially.
Joe and Mary reside at 497
Avenue A in Eastpoint. Their
two sons and three daughters
also reside in Eastpoint, where
four of them are carrying on the
family commercial fishing tradi-
tion.
For attendees who would
like an up close and personal
look at mullet, a new feature of
this year's festival will be the.
availability of T-n-T Hide-A-
Way canoes and kayaks for use
on Dickerson Bay, which adjoins
Woolley Park.
Other features will include
food stands, arts and crafts ven-


dors, a maritime sell and swap
flea market, children's games, a
photography contest, classic
boats, historic re-enactors, story
tellers, maritime displays, and a
"fishy fashion show" with live
models.
Gates will open at 9 a.m.
with the Coastal Optimist Club
on hand to serve breakfast to
early goers. The festival will con-
clude at 4 p.m. following the
judging of the mullet cook-off
and a Harley-Davidson raffle
drawing by the Wakulla County
Sheriff's Office to benefit
Citizens for Humane Animal
Treatment. Raffle tickets will be
available at the festival.
Additional information,
plus registration forms, rules and
fees, are available from festival
organizer Bill Lowrie at 850-962-
7845.


Each Nov. 11th, our country
comes together to honor the mil-
lions of brave men and women
who have served our country in
uniform.
Veterans Day gives us the
opportunity to express our col-
lective gratitude to the 24 million
veterans in America for their
noble service to our country and
reaffirm our commitment to
them. We also must remember
that our troops currently serving
in Iraq, Afghanistan, and around
the world will become the veter-
ans of tomorrow. Our support
for these men and women does
not end once they return home.
Our nation has a proud legacy of
appreciation to the men and
women who have worn the uni-
form in defense of this country.
We must be united in seeing that
every soldier, sailor, airman, and
marine is welcomed back with
all the care and compassion our
grateful country can bestow.
In Washington, I am work-
ing hard to keep the promises we
have made to our veterans. This
year, Congress passed legislation
to increase the Department of
Veterans Affairs (VA) budget by
$6.7 billion above the 2007 level,
the largest increase in our
nation's history. Included in the
House-passed fiscally responsi-
ble budget, the proposed increase
will provide the VA with a total
of $43.2 billion for medical care
and veterans' health programs.
The bill also provides additional
claims processing personnel and
facility improvements so that vet-
erans will receive better health
care, more mental health and


By Rep. Allen Boyd

post-traumatic stress disorder
services, and shorter waiting
times for doctors' appointments.
At home, I also am working
to make sure that the critical
needs of our veterans are
addressed. Earlier this year, I
announced that a new communi-
ty-based outpatient clinic
(CBOC) will be coming to
Jackson County. This new clin-
ic is an extraordinary victory for
our veterans in North Florida.
Currently, veterans in Jackson
County and surrounding areas
must travel to Panama City,
Tallahassee, Lake City,
Pensacola, or Biloxi, Mississippi,
for their health-care needs,
resulting in long travel times and
overcrowding at these facilities.
The VA anticipates that 3,574
existing patients and 310 new
patients will be treated. at the
new CBOC in Jackson County.
Veterans in Jackson County and
surrounding areas have traveled
too far, for too long, to get the
health care they need and
deserve, and the new clinic will
ensure that North Florida's vet-
erans have more convenient


access to proper medical care.
We are making great strides
to provide our veterans with first-
rate and uncompromised bene-
fits. As a combat veteran myself,
I am proud of the work we are
doing in Congress to fulfill our
moral obligation to those who
have defended our great country.
However, our work is far
from over. In 2008, the number
of veterans receiving treatment is
expected to include over 300,000
men and women returning from
Iraq and Afghanistan. We must
prepare to care for the veterans
of current conflicts by seriously
addressing the long-term health-
care needs of our combat veter-
ans.
As thousands more soldiers
come back from Iraq and
Afghanistan, it is our duty to.
provide sufficient resources so
that our veterans can receive the
quality care they were promised
and deserve. Through the
responsible budget passed by
Congress this year and adequate
federal funding that Congress is
poised to provide in the upcom-
ing year, we can enhance our vet-
erans' programs and honor the
commitment that we have made
to our veterans.
This Veterans Day, as we
show our respect and gratitude
for the men and women who
bravely answered the call to duty,
including the 75,000 veterans liv-
ing in North Florida, let us also
recognize their service by provid-
ing our veterans with the respect,
benefits, and services they have
earned and deserve now and in
the future.


LETTER TO THE EDITOR

Nelson says voting bill ensures confidence


Electronic touch voting
machines won't be used in future
presidential and congressional
elections if Congress passes a bill
I filed that bans most touch-
screen devices and requires all
voting machines to produce a
paper receipt.
I met with Florida's chief
elections overseer, Kurt Brown-
ing, in the nation's capital. As
you may know, Florida recently
imposed a state ban on touch-
screen voting machines, and I


modeled my bill, in part, after
that statute. The Voter
Confidence and Increased
Accessibility Act of 2007 would
require all voting machines to
produce a voter-verified paper
trail by next year's presidential
election and provides up to $1
billion for states to use for new
voting equipment.
But most importantly, the
bill would phase out the use of
touch-screen voting machines in
federal elections by 2012, a


measure Browning said he sup-
ports.
A companion version of my
bill in the House was passed by a
key committee and awaits a vote
by the full chamber.
Citizens must have confi-
dence in the integrity of their
elections. The bottom line is we
have to ensure every vote is
counted-and counted properly.
U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson


TEAK FURNITURE: ANTIQUE & NEW

CONTAINERS ARRIVING WEEKLY


203 U.S. Highway 98
Eastpoint, Florida 32328
Visit us at www.teakimportsusa.com
Email: traderjerry@hotmail.com
Phone:. 850-670-1003


Huge Selection of Quality Patio Garden and
In Home Furniture.
We also have Asian Antiques.
Hours: Monday through Saturday
10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.







Page 6 November 9, 2007 A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER The Franklin Chronicle


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 9
Jazz Festival at the Dixie Theatre. Call 653-3200 for details.
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 10
Jazz Festival at the Dixie Theatre. Call 653-3200 for details.
9 a.m. to 4 p.m.: Mighty Mullet Maritime Festival in Woolley Park,
Panacea. Proceeds benefit Big Bend Maritime Center. $3.
10 a.m.: Veterans Day Parade in downtown Carrabelle.
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 11
S4 p.m.: Scottish Fiddle Orchestra concert at Trinity Church in
Apalachicola. $2 for adults, $1 for children.
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 12
11 a.m.: Franklin/Gulf Retired Educators Association membership
luncheon, New Bethel AME, Port St. Joe. For information call 653-
8493;
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13
5 p.m.: Northwest Florida Transportation Corridor Authority public
meeting and workshop to get citizens' opinions on future road plans for
Franklin County at the Franklin County Senior Citizen's Center in
Carrabelle.
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 14
11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.: Franklin County Elder Care Services spon-
soring Caregivers Seminar, Fellowship Hall of the United Methodist
Church in Carrabelle. 670-8261
Send your announcements of upcoming meetings and other special occasions ro the
Comninnuut Calendar at n 'ii,,(FranklitChiromcle net. We'll also announce- b-thdays in
this column at no charge


First Homecoming for FCHS
The 2007 Franklin
County Seahawks
Homecoming Parade
was held in Carrabelle
on Friday, Nov. 2, the
i first Homecoming for
Sthe newly consolidated
'- Franklin County
school. Rae Noel Tyre,
S ;. the Supreme Winner
-' Miss Franklin County
2007-08, joined the
Homecoming Court to
wave to passersby.
PHOTO BY
LAUREL
NEWMAN

Waiting for meeting to resume











The Carrabelle City Commission meeting on Nov. 1, was interrupted for a
brief executive session between the commissioners and their attorney.

That ribbon is history
Local dignitaries and officials with Water Street Hotel & Marina cut the cere-
monial ribbon on Thursday, Nov. 1, in Apalachicola. Then on Saturday, Nov. 3,
the hotel hosted an open
house, allowing visitors
attending the Florida
Seafood Festival to stop by
for a tour. The hotel is based. ,
on the condo-hotel concept.
Thirty condo suites and 20 .
deep-water marina slips I
offer a different style accom-
modation to travelers to the
community. The project
took almost two years to .
complete. The hotel has cre-
ated 25 new jobs and is I
expected to generate new
revenues for nearby restau-
rants and shops.
PHOTO BY RUSSELL ROBERTS


Question #264: True or False...
If you visited the planet Venus,
you could take off your helmet
for a minute as long as you
remembered to hold your breath.


--


aslej laIsuV





2007 DoubleStar, LLC www.cogno.com



CARRABELLE REALTY, INC.
P.O. Drawer 708 Carrabelle, FL

1 (850) 697-2181 1 (800) 530-1473

Ruby J. Litton, Broker 850-528-1101
Dale Millender, Realtor Associate 850-519-7048











This home has 6.5 acres that can be Golf Course: Prestigious lot on the 9th
divided, 3BR/2BA, fireplace, wood & tile tee, corner lot, reduced to $299,000
floors, enclosed garage, separate large owner/agent.
workshop. MAKE OFFER! Asking
$345,000, appraised at $395,000-
$50,000 equity. A great investment to
have a home and sell off some
acreage!
NEW LISTINGS:
Beach lot in private area, 50'x100', $895,000.
One acre on Harbor Rd., high & dry, $89,900.
*44 acre parcels in Pine Coast Plantation, $225,000.
1.97 acre homesite, cleared, Baywood Estates, $98,900.
*10 acres in Riverbend Plantation, $225,000.
2.53 acres with large pond, Baywood Estates, $164,900.
*8 acres Riverbend Plantation, approximately 500' Crooked
River, $349,000.
*2.2 acres Creekfront, Victorian Village, shared dock,
$395,500.
*1-1/2 city lots with riverview, $225,000.
*Bayfront, 50x1 62, $324,500.
Riverview, 2BR/1BA, TWO LOTS, fenced front yard, needs
a little TLC, $165,000.
Great Weekend Retreat, close to water, 2BR/1 BA Cottage,
$118,200.00.
* Two Lots, near bay on Carolina Street, has old MH on it (AS
IS), asking $160,000.

OWNER FINANCING WITH 10% DOWN AND 7% INTEREST.


Page 6 November 9, 2007


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle










The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


November 9, 2007 Page 7


From Page 6


Cogno's Corner Answer


Answer to question #264 is: False.

Having air to breathe is just one of the things that makes it diffi-
cult to survive on many other planets. For instance, on the surface of
Venus it can get very hot-around 480 degrees Celsius on the surface
of the planet. I wouldn't take my helmet off, would you? Oh, and one
other little detail: The atmosphere is full of sulfuric acid, which could
be very damaging to your skin and eyes.


The Franklm County Commission approved the.expenditure of
$835,785.98 at their November 6, 2007 meeting. The bills are listed
as follows, published for the Board by the County Finance Office.


ACS OOV'T FINAIIA SYSTEM
11/0-/200"' 6-


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000214 wrAMEiCA
C02172 AFAL-ACKICOLA ACE HARDWARE
002281 ARAHARIE
00104 ARD'S PINA
002576 AkNOLD/HARRY
D01174 ATCO ITER4ATION.3L
091536 BAKIBR JR.WHLBUUrN L.
002124 BEN MBAD)'W
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0019.94 CAPITAL TP.2ICK, INC.
002809 CAROLINA DOOCR CONT.CLS
0011230 CARSON &; ADKINS
027l91 CIEAR D8A COMPANY niC1/Tl
002210 CERTIPTED PLlUBINC &
001097 CF.AMIO CHEVROLET
004595 CHARLESS L HARDY
002193 CRRLSwiT PRE OLAE ETT A
000192 CITY OF APAL.ACLICL'-ILA
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000642 SIJHADE TREE TOWN
0001/29 SHULLR/T1HMAS1 M.
000993 SMALL COUNT COALITION
000132 SPIRIT SERVICES COMPANY
001642 ST.JOE -HNT-ALL. INC.
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