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 Material Information
Title: Franklin chronicle
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Publisher: Russell Roberts
Publication Date: 11-02-2007
Copyright Date: 2007
 Subjects
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Franklin -- Apalachicola
Coordinates: 29.725278 x -84.9925 ( Place of Publication )
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Source Institution: Florida State University
Holding Location: Florida State University
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
System ID: UF00089928:00319

Full Text


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I The

Franklin




Aa lChronicle


50"


Welcome to the Florida Seafood Festival


.f-.


~E- j


PHOTO/IMAGE COURTESY WWW.FLORIDASEAFOODFESTIVAL.COM.
King Retsyo watches over the fleet, in this image from the Florida Seafood-Festival Web site.


BY LAUREL NEWMAN
Chronicle Correspondent
There's plenty of fishy busi-
ness going on in Apalachicola
this weekend, with the annual
celebration of seafood in all its
splendors, the 44th annual
Florida Seafood Festival, billed
as "the state's oldest maritime
exhibit."
Officially starting Friday at 4
p.m. with the annual Blessing of
the Fleet by three clerics from
the city dock, and followed by
the disembarkations of the
Seafood Festival Queen and
King Retsyo from a shrimp boat
and their promenade to the fair-
grounds, the two-day event
annually draws thousands of vis-
itors to this scenic historic town
at the mouth of the Apalachicola


I Festua Sde4l1e Ie


River.
For the uninitiated, Retsyo is
"oyster" spelled backward, and
the role has traditionally been
chosen by the year's queen, usu-
ally someone involved in the
seafood business. This year's
King is seafood dealer Steve
Rash, and the lovely Seafood
Festival Queen is Parrish
Johnson from Eastpoint, the
daughter of Darren and
Chimene Johnson. Parrish is a
junior at Franklin County High
School.
On Saturday, the fun begins
at 8 a.m. with the annual 5k
Redfish Run, commencing at the
historic Gibson Inn. Participant


registration begins at 7 a.m.
Attendance at this event is
legendary, and in tiny
Apalachicola, parking is at a pre-
mium, so come early Saturday,
and don't move your vehicle
until you are ready to -leave!
Saturday's events include hourly
crab races for the kids, an event
reinstated last year by the festival
board, said board vice-president
John Solomon.
"People really missed the
races," he said, "so we brought
them back last year."
An unpopular practice be-
gun several years ago was the
standing in line for food tickets.
"We've done away with that,


too," Solomon said. "No more
ticket lines for food."
Two popular events at the
festival are the oyster-shucking
and eating contests. Don't try to
grab front-row seats for either of
these; the fly-out from the shuck-
ers is just shells and oyster
liquor; the eaters may unavoid-
ably bless the audience with
something more substantial.
There will be plenty of food,
art and craft vendors to keep
everyone occupied until the
entertainment begins, and goes
on through the afternoon and
evening, getting everyone ready
for this year's headliner, Sammy
Kershaw, who takes the stage at
8 p.m.
Have fun, the weather is pre-
dicted to be fine.


Health-care tax referendum is Tuesday


PRO
The following essay from
Weems Memorial Hospital presents
the casefor the one-cent sales tax.
On November 6, 2007 the
residents of Franklin County
will be given the opportunity to
vote to improve the delivery of
healthcare in Franklin County.
In a special referendum, the vot-
ers of Franklin County will
make their desires known regard-
ing a one-cent sales tax that will
be levied only on the same items
that currently have a sales tax.
Food, drugs and other items that
are currently not taxed will not
be taxed. All taxes will be col-
lected at the time of purchase
just as they currently are. The
taxes will begin being collected
January 1, 2008.
According to the Florida
Department of Revenue, a one-
cent sales tax for all of Franklin


County will generate approxi-
mately two million dollars. The
cities of Apalachicola and
Carrabelle will have to sign an
agreement with the County in
order for the County to receive
all of the proceeds from the tax.


All plans for the use of the tax
are based on the cities of
Apalachicola and Carrabelle
agreeing with the County.
A Healthcare Trust Fund
will be set up to receive the tax
Continued on Page 6


CON
The following essay from Allan
J Feifer, president of the Concerned
Citizens of Franklin County, pres-
ents the case against the one-cent
sales tax.
In point of fact, the new
sales tax is not for "health care"
and does not in any way guaran-
tee to shift the burden of running,
Weems from property owners to
a straight sales tax.
The facts as we know them
now are, that the money may be
spent on a new hospital, clinics,
indigent care, general expenses
of Weems, raises, new employee
benefits, feasibility studies or just
about anything, including glossy
and expensive public relations
campaigns to garner support for
their positions. Make no mistake
about it, the truth is as
Commissioner Parrish inadver-
Continued on Page 5


K. ..- .. :
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Voters m Franklin County will decide Tuesday, Nov. 6, the
fate of a one-cent sales tax that will be used to operate, con-
struct, and maintain health-care facilities and programs in the
county. Today. The Chronicle is publishing a pro and con look at
the issue.
Regular polling places will be openfrom 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. All
voters registered in Franklin County are eligible to cast ballots.
Following is the wording of the ballot:
Shall a one cent sales surtax be imposed in Franklin County
for the sole purpose of improving the quality and delvery of
healthcare by constructing a healthcare facility in Carrabelle
first, upgrading the ambulance service, and paying the cost of
operations and healthcare infrastructure and services including
the construction and paying debt service on bonds to construct
a new public hospital facility to replace Weems Memorial
Hospital? (Vote for one) Yes, for the one cent tax; No, Against
the one cent tax.


Judge

refuses

injunctions

in Lanark

water case

BY TOM LOUGHRIDGE
Chronicle Correspondent
A request to impose injunc-
tions against frequent Lanark
Village Water and Sewer District
Board critic Billy Snyder was
refused during a hearing at the
Franklin County Courthouse on
Tuesday, Oct. 23.
Second District Circuit
Judge James C. Hankinson
heard the cases of five Lanark
Village residents seeking the
injunctions against Snyder. The
injunctions petitioned for "pro-
tection against repeat violence."
Although the main impetus
for the petitions seems to stem
from a violent scene at the Oct. 8
meeting of the Water Board at
Chillas Hall in Lanark Village,
the petitioners alleged numerous
other offenses. Joseph (Joey) H.
Rowell, Paul Rohrs, Barbara L.
Rohrs, Patricia (Pat) Dingier
Lively and Donald W Lively
alleged in their separate petitions
that Snyder: attacked petitioner
with a cane, pointed his finger at
petitioner, filmed the petitioners,
tried to run Paul Rohrs off the
road, drove by Rohrs' house
slowly, took videos and pictures
over the back fence, stole water,
pushed his way into the Water
District office, threatened Pat
Lively, trespassed on Water
Continued on Page 9



2



"'
7


Time to

fall back!
Spring forward, fall back.
The end of Daylight Saving
Time is coming up this weekend,
so be sure to turn your clock
back, or you will find yourself
arriving an hour early all day
Sunday.
On Sunday, Nov. 4, at 2
a.m., DST ends, and Americans
will be turning their clocks back
one hour, returning to Standard
Time.
If it seems that DST lasted
longer than usual this year, it did
just that. From 1986 to 2006,
DST was observed from the first
Sunday in April to the last
Sunday in October, but starting
in 2007, it is observed from the
second Sunday in March to the
first Sunday in November,
adding about a month to
Daylight Saving Time. This was
initiated in August 2005, when
Congress passed an energy bill
that included extending Daylight
Saving Time by about a month,
as an energy conservation meas-
ure.
So set your clocks back
before you go to bed Saturday
night, and enjoy an extra hour of
sleep Sunday morning!


~~LIC
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Page 2 November 2, 2007


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


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Don MacLean, who teaches the harmonica classes at the Carrabelle Library, demonstrates
how easy the instrument is to play to a young music fan.


What's happening this week


November is here, and the
holidays are upon us, faster than
it seems possible. Another year
on the way out!
In addition to all the usual
holiday happenings, which will
be detailed here in future
columns, there are a lot of
assorted events, learning oppor-
tunities and just plain fun to be
had in and around Carrabelle
this month.
Kicking off the month is the
Florida Seafood Festival, begin-
ning this year on Friday at 4 p.m.
with the traditional Blessing of
the Fleet, and the arrival of the
Seafood Festival Queen and
King Retsyo (oyster spelled back-
ward.) Saturday's events include
live entertainment, the 5K
Redfish Run, commencing at 8
a.m. from the historic Gibson
Inn, a parade at 10 a.m., and
what many consider the high-
light of the day, the oyster shuck-
ing and eating contests at 1 p.m.
Crab races will be held every
hour, and there will be plenty of
food, art and craft vendors, and
lots more to do and see. For
more information and some his-
tory, go to www.floridaseafood-
festival.com.
For a short jaunt out of
town, check out the Second
Annual Mighty Mullet Maritime
Festival in Panacea on Saturday,
November 10th, featuring a mul-
let cookoff and plenty of other
fishy happenings. All proceeds
benefit the Big Bend Maritime
Center. For more information,
check out www.mightymullet.


By Laurel Newman

com.
Here in Carrabelle, there is
always something going on at
the Carrabelle Branch of the
Franklin County Public Library.
Every Monday and
Thursday, there are free yoga
classes from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m.,
and every Tuesday at 5 p.m. is
"Story Time" for the kids.
If yoga classes are not
appealing, how about joining the
musical marvels of the
Carrabelle Harmonica Band,
which starts with beginners (all
levels welcome) at 4 p.m. on
Thursday, and moves to more
advanced players at 5 p.m.
The class is taught by Don
MacLean, who insists, "The har-
monica is the easiest instrument
to learn. Anyone can learn to
play in just a couple of lessons.
You don't even have to know
how to read music."
On the second Thursday of
this month at 5 p.m., Nov. 8, the
Book Social will focus on Wilbur
Smith's "Elephant Song", a
rousing African adventure. For
those who have not "discovered"


Smith and his African sagas, it's
well worth the effort. For more
information on library happen-
ings, call 850-697-2366.
Finally, Franklin County
Elder Care Services is sponsor-
ing a Caregivers Seminar, to be
held 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
November 7th and 14th at the
Fellowship Hall of the United.
Methodist Church in Carrabelle.
Those attending will receive free
lunch, your choice off the menu
from the Carrabelle Junction.
"We will be bringing people over
from Tallahassee to talk to care-
givers attending the seminar,"
said Bert Ivey, director of
Franklin County Elder Care
Services. "We know how diffi-
cult and stressful it can be. We
hope to create a network of care-
givers for mutual support in
Franklin County. There is a high
level of burnout and stress
among caregivers, and our goal
is for them to have others with
whom they can communicate."
If a caregiver wants to
attend the seminar, and has to
ask a family member or friend
take over for them so they can
attend, Elder Care Services will
help them with a small reim-
bursement for the temporary
care while the primary caregiver
is at the seminar. For more infor-
mation, call Elder Care Services
at 850-697-3756.
That's all for this week! If
you have an event or Carrabelle
story, contact Laurel Newman at
850-697-2046 days, or e-mail lau-
rne59@aol.com.


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 2
* 10 a.m.: Gates open, no admission charge
* 4 p.m.: Blessing of the Fleet and arrival of King
Retsyo & Miss Florida Seafood
* 5 p.m.: Entertainment by Pam Nobles Dance
Studio
* 6 p.m.: Entertainment by Tu-Tone
* 8 p.m.: Entertainment by King Cotton
* 10 p.m.: Park closes
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 3
* 7 a.m.: Registration for Redfish Run
* 8 a.m.: Redfish Run (Gibson Inn)


* 10 a.m.: Gates open, $5 admission (kids under
12 free)
* 10 a.m.: Parade (Avenue E/Highway 98)
* Noon: Free Fire Dance and Drama
* 1-5 p.m.: Hourly crab races (kids under 12)
* 1 p.m.: Oyster shucking contest followed by oys-
ter eating contest
* 2 p.m.: Music by Smackwater Retrievers
* 4 p.m.: Music by Rebel Syndicate
* 6 p.m.: Music by Locomotive
* 8 p.m.: Headliner Sammy Kershaw
* 11 p.m.: Park closes


Fri
11/2


77/54
Partly
cloudy.
Highs in the
upper 70s
and lows in
the mid 50s.


Sunrise:
7:53 AM
Sunset:
6:51 PM


Sat
11/3


75/53
Sunshine.
Highs in the
mid 70s and
lows in the
low 50s.



Sunrise:
7:54 AM
Sunset:
6:50 PM


Sun
11/4


74/53
Abundant
sunshine.
Highs in the
mid 70s and
lows in the
low 50s.


Sunrise:
7:54 AM
Sunset:
6:50 PM


Mon
11/5


77/56
.Mostly
sunny.
Highs in the
upper 70s
and lows in
the mid 50s.


Sunrise:
7:55 AM
Sunset:
6:49 PM


Tue
11/6 _


76/56
More sun
than clouds.
Highs in the
mid 70s and
lows in the
mid 50s.


Sunrise:
7:56 AM
Sunset:
6:48 PM


Florida At A Glance


Pensacola
76,55


Tampa
83/64


Area Cities
Cyi Cond.


cyLC d
Pt sunn


Clearwater 82
Crestview 77
Daytona Beach 78
Fort Lauderdale 84
Fort Myers 85
Gainesville 74
Hollywood 85
Jacksonville 72
Key West 85
Lady Lake 78
Lake City 73
Madison 76
Melbourne 82
Miami 85
N Smyrna Beach 79


pt sunny
mst sunny
rain
rain
pt sunny
pt sunny
rain
rain
windy
pt sunny
pt sunny
pt sunny
rain
rain
rain


National Cities
C ityiL CSod.


Atlanta
Boston
Chicago
Dallas
Denver
Houston
Los Angeles
Miami


pt sunny
sunny
mst sunny
pt sunny
mst sunny
pt sunny
ptsunny
rain


Ocala 79
Orlando 78
Panama City 77
Pensacola 76
Plant City 85
Pompano Beach 85
Port Charlotte 86
Saint Augustine 75
Saint Petersburg 81
Sarasota 85
Tallahassee 78
Tampa 83
Titusville 78
Venice 86
W Palm Beach 83


MinTnepo L ioCnstin


Minneapolis
New York
Phoenix
San Francisco
Seattle
St. Louis
Washington, DC


pt sunny
rain
mst sunny
mst sunny
pt sunny
rain
pt sunny
rain
pt sunny
pt sunny
pt sunny
pt sunny
rain
pt sunny
rain


mst sunny
sunny
mst sunny
sunny
pt sunny
sunny
sunny


Moon Phases






Last New First Full
Nov 1 Nov 9 Nov 17 Nov24


UV Index

Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue
11/2 11/3 11/4 11/5 11/6
6 6 6 5 6 5
High High High High Moderate
The UV Index is measured on a 0 11 number scale, 0 11
with a higher UV Index showing the need for greater
skin protection.


Seafood Festival Schedule


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The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


November 2, 2007 Page 3


Reconstruction begins on St. George Island Lighthouse
-0. ~BY TOM LOUGHRIDGE
Chronicle Correspondent
Three trailer loads of forty
foot long, steel reinforced, con-
S- *: : create pilings rolled onto St.
.. George Island the morning of
SMonday, Oct. 29, destined to be
"-.. /' the supporting foundation of the
,- ., 'P'" j* e-' 77-foot tall restored St. George
'" " .^ '' Island Lighthouse.
$;ao MN '. CDS Manufacturing, Inc. of
S Quincy manufactured the pilings
hammering them to depth the

.^' '^ W r'4The body of the lighthouse
T BY TOM will be made from brick salvaged


lighthouse were transported to
SY S unteers f rom Th e St. George
4s .c Lighthouse Association have
been cleaning and preparing the
7 2t" bricks from the original structure
. .a :bseo t lighofthous e we a will bed
Sc a l e : i l r i the top and will be formed most-
so.;ld a 35 di e .Pae -. e Eastpoint in April 2006 and vol-






PHOTO BY TOM LOUGHRIDGE ly from original bricks. The top
Workers drive a stake into the ground as constructions begins. of the lighthouse, the part that
enclosed the light, is a carefully
designed replica of the original.th
CLAIM OF LIEN NOTICE CLAIM OF LIEN NOTICE Dennis Barnell, chairman of the
lori Sthatsuts n (3) (Per Florida Statutes 713.78 (3)i (b) oFilte 7No8. Lighthouse Association, says
Per Florida Statutes 713.78 (3) (b) le No from they expect to have the structure
Dt of ce 10/08/07 IvoiNo 14376 Date of this Notce 10/08/07 InvoiceNo 14375 completed by the aend of this
Description of Vehicle: Make Ford Model Ranger Color Red Description of Vehicle: Make Chevrolet Model Truck Color L Gray year.
TagNo.I120HV Year 1989 State FL VinNo. IFTCRI5T7KPA]3253 TagNo.NoTag Year 1998 State FL VinNo. IGCECl4Z5PE109577 The St. George lighthouse
Association was formed in 2004
To ner Charles Adam Coo Lien HolderTo OwPHOner Lucille ThopsonBY TOM Lien HolderasLOUGHRIDGE ly a group dedicated to preserv- top
67 24th Street o 160 Avenue E as constructions _ing the old and classic structure.
Apalachicola, FL 32320 Apalachicola, FL 32320 They were planning ways to save
and restore the increasingly lean-
ing lighthouse and had applied
You and each of you are hereby notified that the above vehicle was You and each of you are hereby notified that the above vehicle was for a grant to protect the building
towed on 10/03/07 at the request of FCSO that said towed on 10/03/07 at the request of FCSO that said in 2005, just two weeks before
vehicle is in its possession at the address noted below. They the under- vehicle is in its possession ahevrolet Model Truck ss noted below. TheGray gravity won out and the light-
signed claim alien for towing, storage and ost. FThe vehicle will be signed claim alien for towing, storage and cost. The vehicle will be house fell and shattered on the
sold after 35 days from the date of impound free of prior liens. Payment sold after 35 days from the date of impound free of prior liens. Payment beach. They admit to feeling
by the above date of notice in the amount $6290.70 plus storage by the above date of notice in the amount $_244.50 plus storage very good about seeing their
charges occurring at the rate of $ 22.00 per day from the date charges occurring at the rate of $ 22.00 per day from the date dream of a restored Lighthouse
hereof will be sufficient to redeem the vehicle laom the lien of the hereof will be sufficient to redeem the vehicle from the lien of the nearing completion. Their plan-
lienor; that subsection (4) of Florida Statute 713.78. lienor; that subsection (4) of Florida Statute 713.78. ning and hard work is paying off
in the addition of another impor-
tant historical attraction to our
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE OF LIEN AND OF INTENT TO SELL NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE OF LIEN AND OF INTENT TO SELL ever more popular island.
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE OF LIEN AND OF INTENT TO SELL NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE OF LIEN AND OF INTENT TO SELL ever more popular island.


PHOTO BY TOM LOUGHRIDGE
Replica top of the light to be
installed on the finished
structure.


Whether you're looking for the perfect place to unwind for a weekend or a lifetime,
our associates can help find your place.







Ron Bloodworth Ben Bloodworth Kay Barnett Sam Gilbert BJ Neshat Billie Grey Jan Grey
Realtor, Realtor Realtor. Realtor, Realtor Rental Manager Reservations Agent
Sales Associate Sales Associate Sales Associate Business Manager Sales Associate


Call or stop by our offices at
224 Franklin Boulevard, St. George Island
800-341-2021 850-927-2282
www.uncommonflorida.com


0EL


THE CLIPPER SHOPPE

BEAUTY SALON

Dorothy Cooper and
SDina Hamilton, Stylists
130 Avenue F Apalachicola, FL
Phone: 850-653-2255





Want to purchase minerals

and other oil/gas interests.

Send details to:

P.O. Box 13557

Denver, Colorado 80201


VEHICLE PURSUANT
To subsection (5) of Florida Statute 713.78

You and each of you are hereby notified that on 11/06/07 at 12:00 noon
o'clock, the vehicle described above will be sold at public auction
at: 620 Houston Rd., Eastpoint, FL From the proceeds will first be paid
all towing and storage charges plus all costs including cost for this sale. Any
excess will be deposited with the Clerk of the Circuit Court.
You and each of you are urged to make satisfactory arrangements to pay all
charges and take possession of the said vehicle. In order to obtain a release
of the vehicle you must present personal identification, driver's license and
PROOF OF OWNERSHIP (title, registration, etc.) at the address below and
pay the charges.
SHADE TREE TOWING
P.O. Box 971
Eastpoint, FL 32328
(850) 670-8219


VEHICLE PURSUANT
To subsection (5) of Florida Statute 713.78

You and each of you are hereby notified that on 11/06/07 at 12:00 noon
o'clock, the vehicle described above will be sold at public auction
at: 620 Houston Rd., Eastpoint, FL From the proceeds will first be paid
all towing and storage charges plus all costs including cost for this sale. Any
excess will be deposited with the Clerk of the Circuit Court.
You and each of you are urged to make satisfactory arrangements to pay all
charges and take possession of the said vehicle. In order to obtain a release
of the vehicle you must present personal identification, driver's license and
PROOF OF OWNERSHIP (tifle, registration, etc.) at the address below and
pay the charges.
SHADE TREE TOWING
P.O. Box 971
Eastpoint, FL 32328
(850) 670-8219


I








Page 4 November 2, 2007


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


Great job, Seahawks!

This initial season of Franklin County High School football has
been tough on the field. Growing pains are reflected on the score-
board, as the Seahawks struggle for that first win.
But while a win has been elusive, the Seahawks have scored a vic-
tory. It came in the form of a report from an official who worked the
game between the Seahawks and Freeport. We hope all of our read-
ers saw the news report in our last issue.
Here's an excerpt:
"The game played by Franklin
County on this Friday night in Freeport
was extraordinary," said the report from
official Gerald Goodman to the
Southeast Football Officials Associa-
tion."Not because of the score because
they lost resoundingly. The game was
extraordinary because of heart, determi-
T7V E i nation and SPORTSMANSHIP. No
matter the score throughout the game,
Franklin County represented themselves
By Russell Roberts as a class act. I have bfficiated football at
the high school level for 16 years, but I
have never experienced the turnaround in a program like this. The
players on the field are an extension of their coach. The coach for
Franklin County must teach his players that heart, determination and
sportsmanship area must for his team. Franklin County is a combi-
nation of two previous schools (Apalachicola and Carrabelle) that
historically battled against each other. That Friday night in
September, you couldn't see anything but unity, support, sportsman-
ship throughout the entire game."
That's a victory worthtclipping from the newspaper and sticking
on your refrigerator.
At its best, a local sports team can be a way of bringing a com-
munity together. Be it high school, college or professional, a local
team can help instill a sense of pride. At its worst, it can rip a com-
munity apart.
Congratulations to the Seahawks on a great victory, not on the
scoreboard, but in your character. You have given Franklin County a
reason to be proud.
Newspaper News
On page 2 of today's paper is the first of what I hope will be
weekly installments of a new column called Around Carrabelle.
Written by veteran journalist Laurel Newman, it is designed to be a
roundup of items of interest to those living in and near Carrabelle.
We hope you like it.



Rov The

Franklin

SOChronicle
POST OFFICE BOX 590
EASTPOINT, FLORIDA 32328
Office: 850-670-4377
Fax: 877-423-4964
E-Mail: info@franklinchronicle.net
Volume 16, Number 24 November 2, 2007
Publisher & Editor
Russell Roberts
Computer Graphic Designer
Diane Beauvais Dyal
Writers
Skip Frink, Richard E. Noble, Carol Noble, Tom Loughridge,
Laurel Newman, Harriett Beach
Circulation Associates
Jerry Weber, Tom Loughridge, Rick Lasher
Advertising Sales
Guy Markham
History
Tom W. Hoffer started the Franklin Chronicle in 1991 in Tallahassee after
retiring from FSU as a communications professor. Editor Brian Goercke
worked with the Chronicle for four years, then left to join the Peace Corps in
Africa. Computer Graphic Designer, Diane Dyal, joined the staff in 1996 and
then a short three years later her husband, Andy, became Circulation Director
(and later Director of Operations). Tom Hoffer moved The Chronicle to
Eastpoint at the end of 2002. He built two duplexes on the property. And local
writers joined the staff. On December 9, 2006 he passed away, but the
Chronicle still goes on with some new staff members.
Subscriptions
Changes in subscription addresses must be sent to The Chronicle
in writing. In-county subscriptions are $22.00 a year; out-of-
county subscriptions are $29.00 a year.
To Submit News and Ads
Submit news and ads to info@franklinchronicle.net or to P.O. Box
590, Eastpoint, FL 32328. Deadline is Monday at noon for that
week's issue.
All contents Copyright 2007
Franklin Chronicle, Inc.


*WkS a4t*t1 WacueW 4fCf4-, STATE FARM INSURANCE Ca


The Eastpointer's unique solution to

lack of health and property insurance


If you have lived in Eastpoint any length of
time then you have probably met a FEMA repre-
sentative once or twice. It doesn't seem all that long
ago that my wife and I had that pleasure.
It was a very inspiring experience.
A rather difficult hurricane had settled onto
our little section of
paradise and the wife
and I had been affect-
ed somewhat adverse-
ly.
We had some
small damage to our
home and a number
of trees had been
uprooted in our yard.
But our biggest prob- -4
lem was that our oys-
ter boat had been By Richard E. Noble
wrecked and the Bay
was closed down and
it wasn't going to open again for some time.
Without the Bay, there wasn't a heck of a lot to do
around here for work in those days. We had pay-
ments on everything. We had a few dollars in the
bank but we couldn't stay idle for long.
Word had spread all over town that FEMA
was down at the school house and that they had a
"plan." Anyone and everyone who was in any kind
of trouble was advised to go downtown and talk
with the FEMA guy. So my wife and I headed
downtown and got in the line. There were hun-
dreds and hundreds of people hanging out and
waiting around to see somebody.
We finally got to sit down across from this very
nice, smiley-faced guy. He was really quite inspir-
ing. He assured us that all would be well from now
on. He asked us questions and every time we told
him something pertinent, he gathered up some
papers and put them into a folder. By the time we
left we had this huge folder about six inches thick.
Basically all that we had to do was go home fill out
the applications in this folder and send them to the
specified addresses and all of our problems were
over.
Our understanding was that much of what we
had lost would be paid for from some grant pro-
grams; what wasn't covered by a grant would be
covered by low-interest loans from the federal gov-
ernment or the Small Business Administration or
some other group or program which would be list-
ed in our six-inch folder.
This was great! My wife and I left the school-
house, if not thrilled, very optimistic. In fact, out-
side of the schoolhouse there was stationed a
bunch of reporters. One of them ran up to us with
a microphone and a cameraman on his tail.
"Did you get any satisfaction?" he asked.


"Oh yeah," I said. "It seems that there is a gov-
ernment agency somewhere that will take care of
every problem that we have. I lost my oyster boat
and the man says that they will buy me a new one;
we had damage to our home and they are going to
pay to have it fixed; the Bay won't be opened for
maybe a year but they say I will be able to get some
kind of unemployment compensation even though
I am self-employed and have never been able to
afford any insurance."
"Wow! So how do you feel about all of that?"
"Well, I can't really believe it. Nothing like this
has ever happened to us before. It certainly makes
a dim future look a whole lot brighter. This is a
great country."
When we got back to "the cabin" and started
to read all the information, the "dimness" started
to return. The papers were very confusing in fact
we thought they were unintelligible. We eventually
called the FEMA office and told them the difficul-
ty that we were having with all the paperwork. He
suggested going to a lawyer.
We went to three different lawyers. They all
said that they were swamped with applications.
One offered to take us on but that there would be a
minimum fee of $300 to $500.
We went back home and tried to fill out the
applications ourselves-but it was truly beyond our
abilities.
So that brings us to our homeowner's insur-
ance and insurance in general.
I am happy to announce that after 25 years of
prompt payments with not one claim in all those
years, our policy has recently been canceled.
My adjoining neighbors have also been can-
celed. When I called my insurance agent about the
situation he was not even aware that our policy had
been canceled. He said that he would get back to us
but I guess he forgot. We went and spoke to him
nevertheless. The coverage that we had would now
be seven to ten times higher than what we had been
paying for the last 20 years or so-if he could find
somebody who wanted to insure us.
I suppose I might as well get this all off my
chest while I'm'groaning here.
Health insurance-I have never, ever had any.
I have worked a million jobs all over America, with
thousands of people working on all sides of me
and they had no health insurance either. I have
been in management-no health insurance. I have
been self-employed-couldn't afford it.
When I finally sold my business, the first thing
that I did was run down to my insurance man to
find out about health insurance for my wife and
me. To make a long story short because of our
"advanced age" and our pre-existing conditions it

Continued on Page 5








The Franklin Chronicle A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER November 2, 2007 Page 5


The Eastpointer from Page 4 LETTER TO THE EDITOR


would cost us a minimum of $800 a month to a maximum, with
fines, penalties and deductibles, of $1,200 a month-if they could
find anybody that wanted to take us on and if we could pass the phys-
ical. The health insurance companies, it seems, really weren't looking
for people like us.
My wife and I are conservative so we always have a back up plan.
If our house blows away, we are going to clear everything off our lot
and sell the land, buy a tent and move into the Apalachicola National
Forest. If either of us gets seriously ill, we have each agreed that the
sick one will go off into the woods and die-like the Eskimos used to
do in Alaska. The other will report the person missing. If we make it
to 65 we have Social Security-I think.
I haven't talked to anybody about it. I'm a little nervous. I hope
there's not a whole lot of paperwork.
Richard E. Noble has been a resident of Eastpointfor around 30 years now.
He has authored two books: 'A Summer with Charlie, which is currently list-
ed on Amazon.com and "Hobo-ing America," which should be listed on
Amazon in the not too distant future. Most recently he completed his first
novel "Honor Thy Father and Thy Mother," which will be.published soon.

Con from Page 1
tently said at a healthcare workshop, it's about keeping a lot of jobs
in Apalachicola.
The sales tax will not fund all the goodies promised. There is no
way that a 25-bed rural hospital funded almost exclusively by
Medicare and Medicaid can be profitable with a bed count usually
under five each night and sometimes 0. (We don't think the sleep clin-
ic should count in the nightly census as an acute care need.)
The CCFC has taken the position that an outside, nationally rec-
ognized health-care consulting firm should be contracted to study
health care alternatives in Franklin County, taking into account the
wants and needs of the county and the fiscal realities. In fact, at the
August 30th Apalachicola Hospital Workshop, the CCFC presented
to the Board of County Commissioners an alternative healthcare
approach and wording for the November 6th ballot question. They
would not discuss nor even consider our proposal.
For those of you not in the know, Sacred Heart is building a new
hospital right now 15 minutes west of Apalachicola which will be in
direct competition with a replacement hospital in Franklin County. I
guarantee this is just one of the many factors that have not been con-
sidered in the current push to building a low-balled $20 million
replacement-hospital in Apalachicola among other promises.
Franklin County is the not the poster child for economical con-
struction either. For a forewarning of what a new hospital might cost,
just take a look at our still under construction $43 million dollar (and
growing) 1,100-student school. I've wondered if the new school is the
most expensive school in the state on a per pupil basis. The CCFC
was not around yet when the new school was approved but we're here
now and sounding the alarm.
Again, the CCFC and its members are not against good health
care for Franklin County. The way the issue has been framed by vest-
ed interests, anyone who disagrees or even questions the process is
portrayed as stingy, cruel, unfeeling and generally against good health
care in Franklin County. We know our readers are savvy enough to
figure this out. Sooner or later, the county will be back to hit the prop-
erty owners to support the "new" Franklin County health plan. With
notes due each month there will be no choice but to reach into your
pocket as the "full faith and credit" of Franklin County will have
been pledged to secure poorly thought-out choices.

-. . .c .
t,,.i- . F.4.. S 44


Lanark water commissioner writes


Dear Editor,
As a member of the Lanark Village Water
and Sewer District Board, I am an elected official.
It would not have been my first choice to be in pub-
lic office. However, it is my privilege to be able to
do this. I am grateful to those who asked me to run
for the Lanark Village Water and Sewer District
commission. I thank all those who have supported
me and even those who have not. You challenge
me to find answers to hard questions and as a con-
sequence become a better person.
I believe Lanark Village Water and Sewer
District board members owe transparency in gov-
ernment to the constituents who financially sup-
port this district. It is on behalf of the Lanark
Village Water and Sewer District constituents that
I question the practices of past and current majori-
ty commissioners and their special interest attor-
ney.
First, I asked about the appropriateness of
LVWSD commissioners receiving paid health-
insurance benefits. Twice audits report it an
unwise practice given the financial conditions of
this district. Customers have asked me questions
about the LVWSD finances and answers were pro-
vided them when I was finally allowed in the office.
Secondly, I questioned the appropriateness of
the attorney representing the entire Lanark Village
Water and Sewer District Board given his bias
against my using the American Bar Association
Model Rules of Conduct, which are not used in
Florida. I questioned ethical behavior, which is dif-
ferent than what the law allows. Ethics are moral
decisions, often based upon what is expected by a
just society or religious teaching. On the other
hand, law articulates relationships regulated by
contracts or government rules. Thus moral deci-
sions should not be confused with law. So while the
special interest attorney's actions are within
Florida law, his moral behavior is questionable.
At the last meeting, the Lanark district attor-
ney advised the other commissioners to file ethics
charges against me regarding an e-mail press
release that I copied to the other commissioners as
a courtesy. I used the same address format used by
the Florida Rural Water Association when commu-
nicating with the LVWSD board. Their e-mail was
addressed to all the LVWSD commissioners, the
attorney and others on Friday, Aug. 10, at 12:43
p.m. In addition, I have received at least one e-mail
from the LVWSD secretary reading "Dear
Commissioners." In addition, the LVWSD attor-
ney sent an e-mail to the office and requested it be
sent to all board members. Since I followed exam-
ples used by others in communicating with board
members, it would have been useful if the ... attor-
ney for the district had alerted us to the problems
associated with this type of communication in
August.
The ethics charges currently against me are, in
my opinion, spiteful retaliation for asking ques-
tions about how the Lanark Village Water and
Sewer District is run. So be it. I have cooperated


fully with all investigations involving Lanark
Village Water and Sewer District and will continue
to so do in the future. In fact and before receipt of
any ethics charges, I am in the process of turning
over all my communications with the Lanark
Village Water and Sewer District to investigators.
The United States founders questioned why
they were taxed without representation and we are
all the better for it. Transparency is part of demo-
cratic due process.
It is important that voters in the Lanark Village
Water and Sewer District address the issues at
hand, rather than distractions created by the board
and their special interest attorney who lost his bid
for elected office in Tallahassee. One can only
question why the other water commissioners want
him to run our board meetings when voters in
Tallahassee did not even want him in their govern-
ment structure.
Carrabelle water and sewer charges are afford-
able and they have a professionally run and operat-
ed water and sewer system. Lanark Village still has
a leaking pipe (over two months) on Highway 98
and had to get help from Carrabelle to fix an
August water main break. Carrabelle has
resources, grants and low-interest loans to fix some
Lanark Village Water and Sewer District concerns
identified by the people from Florida Rural Water
Association.
It is most important to note we have a sworn
and signed statement from Mr. Sterling Carroll say-
ing he, Commissioner Rohrs, Mr. Armstrong and
Mr. Conrad "attended the Franklin County Board
of Commissioners meeting held on June- 5 2007.
Mr. Armstrong and I (Sterling Carroll) spoe-in
favor of a merger with the City of Carrabelle."
According to Mr. Sterling Carroll,
Commissioner Rohrs, Mr. Armstrong and Mr.
Conrad, a merger is in the best interests of Lanark
Village Water and Sewer District residents. Yet
they wrote a plan to grow LVWSD and sell its
water.
Running a water district may be a bit complex
because of the technicalities and laws required to
operate it. However, many other industries face
similar challenges and do not need a hired lawyer
to run meetings and educate women about the way
to "do things."
In order to become a water commissioner, Ii
received more names on my petition than either of
the other two commissioners or their attorney,
obtained in votes. Democracy is about the demo-.
cratic process and those with the greatest number
of votes should not be erroneously cast as a
"minority" point of view.
In the United States, rights come with respon-
sibilities. We have witnessed the Franklin County
Sheriff's organization efforts in support of orderly
democratic due process. The democratic process
expects those in public office to be true to their
words and act in the best interests of the majority

Continued on Page 7


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A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


November 2, 2007 Page 5








Page 6 November 2, 2007 A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER The Franklin Chronicle


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 2
10 a.m. to 10 p.m.: Florida Seafood Festival, no admission charge.

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 3
7 10 a.m.: Pancake breakfast at First United Methodist Church of
Apalachicola, 73 Fifth St., adults $6, children $3.
10 a.m. 11 p.m.: Florida Seafood Festival, $5 admission, kids under
12 free.'
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 5
4:30 5:30 p.m.: Every Monday free yoga classes at the Carrabelle
branch of the county library.
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 6
7 a.m. to7 p.m.: don't forget to vote on the health-care sales tax.
5:30 p.m.: monthly meeting of the Carrabelle Lighthouse Association,
Carrabelle library. All lighthouse aficionados invited.
5 p.m.: Every Tuesday, Story Time for the kids at the Carrabelle
branch of the county library.
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 7
11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.: Franklin County Elder Care Services spon-
soring Caregivers Seminar, Fellowship Hall of the United Methodist
Church in Carrabelle.
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 8
5:30 p.m.: Book Social on Wilbur Smith's "Elephant Song" at the
Carrabelle Library.
4 p.m.: Every Thursday, the Carrabelle Harmonica Band, beginners at
4 p.m., advanced at 5 p.m.
4:30 5:30 p.m.: Every Thursday, free yoga classes at the Carrabelle
branch of the county library.
Send your announcements of upcoming meetings and other special occa-
sions to the Community Calendar to nevws@(FranklinChronicle.n et. We'll
also announce birthdays in this column.

Pro from Page 1
proceeds. The Trust Fund will be maintained by the Franklin County Clerk of the
Court under the direction of the Weems Hospital Board as authorized and directed by
the Franklin County Board of County Commissioners. The limited purpose of this
Trust Fund will be to operate, construct, and maintain healthcare facilities and pro-
grams serving Franklin County, FL.
For the past couple of years the County Commissioners have allocated over a mil-
lion per year from ad valorem taxes to help keep Weems Memorial Hospital and the
ambulance service operational. In the County budget for the fiscal year 2007- 2008
another one million dollars has been allocated for the hospital and ambulance service.
If the voters of Franklin County approve this one cent sales tax these ad valorem taxes
would stop going to the hospital. The hospital and ambulance service would be support-
ed solely from the proceeds of the sales tax.
Use of the Sales Tax
According one County Commissioner, the proceeds of the sales tax should be used
to, "Improve the delivery and quality of healthcare in Franklin County." In order to
accomplish this request it is necessary that this sales tax be used to provide both new
facilities and new services. Based upon the healthcare needs of the county, the support-
ing demographics, and the financial data the following uses of the sales tax should be
considered.
The first use of the sales tax proceeds will be to develop a new Medical Complex
in Carrabelle. Carrabelle and the surrounding eastern part of Franklin County is the
most medically underserved area of the County. Given its distance from any type of
emergent care and the large influx of active tourist an Urgent Care Center is being con-
sidered. An Urgent Care Center would have enough diagnostic equipment to determine
the plan of treatment for a patient along with treatment areas to handle minor emergen-
cies. The hours of operation would be extended in the evening and the clinic should be
open for weekend accidents and medical emergencies. This is not a free standing
Emergency Room and will not be open twenty four hours a day seven days a week.
The building being considered is approximately'6000 square feet And has the design
to easily be added on to in the future if necessary. It can house two physicians and will
have space for rotating specialist. In addition it will have rehab space and other areas
designated for reoccurring services such as dialysis or chemo therapy. As proposed the
facility cost should be approximately as follows:
Building Construction Cost: $600,000
Site Prep & Utilities: $25,000
Furnishings & Med. Equip. Allow: $200,000
Fees & Other Soft Cost: $140,000
ESTIMATED TOTAL: $$965,000
Land cost is yet to be determined because a specific site has not been located.
Revenues to pay for the facility will be accumulated from the tax proceeds collect-
ed during the time of planning and construction. The project could be completed by the
end of the year 2009. During that time approximately $1,660,000 would have been col-
lected from one half cent of sales tax and be available to pay off a construction loan
used to build the facility so that the facility could open with no debt.
The second use of the sales tax proceeds will be a replacement facility for the cur-
rent Weems Memorial Hospital. The replacement facility is planned to be built at the
current location of the hospital. Given the cost of land and the site and utilities cost the
current location allows the cost of the project to be within the budget of a one cent sales
Continued on Page 12


SQuestion #256: If you wanted to
see objects in space as clearly as
possible, where would you
choose to put your telescope?
a) on top of a tall-building
on Earth
b) on top of a mountain on
Earth
c) under an ocean
d) on the Moon.
(p J.am gv'





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Page 6 November 2, 2007


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


hi~c. I







The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


November 2, 2007 Page 7


From Page 6

Cogno's Corner Answer

Answer to question #256 is: d) on the Moon.
The more you can remove a telescope from the bright city lights,
atmosphere and cloud cover of Earth, the more clearly it will show
objects in space. The dark side of the Moon would be a great spot for
your telescope, or even simpler is mounting it on a satellite in orbit
around the Earth.

Letter to the Editor from Page 5
of the people they represent.
My elected responsibility is to all the people, regardless of
income or level of ability, in the Lanark Village Water and Sewer
District. I am not obligated to a special interest attorney's agenda.
Our community needs to come together and answer the question of
who will control our water and sewage.
At the end of the day, it seems that all involved with the running
of the Lanark Village Water and Sewer District have said a merger
with Carrabelle is in the best interest of LVWSD residents. In my
opinion, it is important for landowners in LVWSD to sign the peti-
tions requesting its dissolution in order to move forward with the
merging of our water and sewer systems. Carrabelle has been most
generous in extending us another opportunity to merge.
This letter was written in its entirety by me. I have been educat-
ed about rate making, break even analysis, and demand forecasting,
as well as consumer laws during my doctoral studies at New York
University. I can think for myself and thank my parents for teaching
me to do so. Thus I do not need an attorney to tell me what to do or
how to think.
In closing, I am a bit old fashioned in my beliefs. However, those
who wisely wrote our constitution were most correct when they
talked about government for the people and by the people. The spe-
cial interest LVWSD attorney and his "expert" cronies do not repre-
sent the best interests of the voters. Their views should not dictate
how LVWSD operates. In my opinion, their numbers and arguments
are wrong.
Please sign the petition to dissolve Lanark Village Water and
Sewer District now.
Pauline Sullivan, Commissioner
Lanark Village Water and Sewer District


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ACROSS
1. Sticks up
5. Big bash
9. Scissors sounds
14. Continental coin
15. Author Bagnold
16. Fortuneteller's
card
17. Be particular
about formalities
20.. Apt. feature
21. Cleveland's lake
22. Halloween color
23. Like much of
MTVs
viewership
25. Fourth down
option
26. Grand Opry
27. Dipstick wiper
28. Pint, to a quart
32. acid (protein
component)
35. Cut off
37. Lav, in London
38. Don't play for a
full year
41. Lyricist Gershwin
42. Gogol's"_
Bulba"
43. Palm leaf
44. Put up on eBay
46. Black or
chocolate pooch
47. Relative of ante-
48. Hard to grasp
50. Ballerina Moira
54. _-Matic (classic
tabletop baseball
game maker)
57. Neighbor of
Cambodia
58. "The odds ..."
59. Be a slacker
62. Burns partner
63. Division word
64. Weigh down
65. Hacienda
drudges
66. Like excellent
corned beef
67. Author Silverstein


Lower and Lower


DOWN
1. Bowling alley
button
2. Protruding navel
3. "I for animals"
4. Business partner,
perhaps
5. Babe Ruth's
given first name
6. Sandy's owner
7. Mature nits
8. Suffix with
cannon
9. Howard of Siriu.s
radio
10. Football's
"Broadway Joe"
11. Spinach is rich in
it
12. Beer (bar
game)
13. Eyelid woe


18. Distribute, as
cards
19. Red cosmetics
24. ", Nanette"
25. Blacktops, say
27. "Drying out"
program
29. To boot
30. Bird on a
Canadian dollar
31. Warmly
affectionate
32. Buyer's caveat
33. Mucky stuff
34. Slanted: Abbr.
35. Like an alley cat
36. Update, as a
computer screen
39. Soap maker's
need
40. Surface figure
45. Like a sinker


64 2
67
071028
47..Particle with zero
mass
49. Some jackets or
-collars
50. Year-end temp
51. Big Indian
52. Chip away at
53. James Dean
persona
54. Assault from Moe
55. Mah-jongg piece
56. Move, in Realtor
lingo
57. Without company
60. Zilch
61. Ernie of the PGA


Crossword Puzzle Answers on Page 14


limf, 6,FtNDfF-
WILL TY-AVfL:
Stump and root rind-
iP6.Lnd-
n r
No job t
ing, reduced to XP6.
tum
No job too small or
IrvNr
00 small 0 r
largo. C-all (larence
"1 laronc
cod to VD
o LawtI00
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Page 8 November 2, 2007


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


Riverkeeper wants Florida to resist Georgia's water demand


Georgia Sen. Johnny Isak-
son has filed Senate Bill 2165 to
suspend the Endangered Species
Act and require the U.S. Army
Corps of Engineers to withhold
water from Florida's Apalachi-
cola River.
Opponents believe Isakson's
action is just one more attempt
by Georgia to hide from the real-
ity that Atlanta's uncontrolled
growth has outrun its water sup-
ply.
"Atlanta's failure to con-
serve water and control growth
has caused this crisis," says Dan
Tonsmeire, Riverkeeper for the
Apalachicola Riverkeeper.
The Apalachicola River-
keeper, an advocacy group dedi-
cated to the stewardship of the
Apalachicola River and Bay and
the economies and communities
it sustains, is calling for the State
of Florida to oppose Isakson's
proposal.
"Senator Isakson's bill will
cause the demise of extremely
rare and endangered mussels and
the Gulf sturgeon, but more
importantly it will accentuate the
already Severe impact on the
commercial oyster, shrimp and
fin fisheries of the Apalachicola
Bay estuary and the livelihood of


thousands of Florida residents,"
says Tonsmeire.
Isakson's bill calls for agen-
cies that manage federal river
basins to suspend all provisions
of the Endangered Species Act if
the Secretary of the Army or
Governor determines that a
drought threatens the health,
safety, or welfare of a region's
population.
Although the current drou-
ght appears to be among the
worst on record, the Corps has
stated that "there will be enough
water available below the conser-
vation pool in Lake Lanier to
support the needs of metro
Atlanta for several additional
months, even if there is absolute-
ly no precipitation. By that time
we will be well into springtime
and it is likely that rainfall will
return to the basin," says Col.
Byron Jorns, commander for the
Mobile District of the Corps.
The Apalachicola River-
keeper opposes Isakson's efforts
and recommends that if it goes
forward, it: 1) Requires that the
state seeking to suspend the ESA
unequivocally show that it has
mandatory, monitored and
meaningful water conservation
policies in place that are being


Boyd joins effort to protect
Apalachicola Bay water


U.S. Rep. Allen Boyd (D-
North Florida) is spearheading
an effort with the members of
the Florida Congressional
Delegation to block Georgia's
request to drastically alter the
Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-
Flint (ACF) reservoir releases,
which would have serious and
adverse effects on Florida's
Apalachicola River and Apa-
lachicola Bay.
The letter that will be sent to
the House and Senate
Leadership expresses the delega-
tion's strong opposition to bills
H.R. 3847 and S. 2165 intro-
duced by the Georgia Delegation
that would empower any
Governor or Secretary of the
Army to suspend the protections
provided by the federal
Endangered Species Act (ESA).
"Knee-jerk legislation is not
the answer to our water sharing
challenges," said Boyd.
"Instead of working with the
state of Florida to develop a suc-
cessful long term water manage-
ment. solution, the Georgia
Delegation has introduced irre-
sponsible legislation that would
have devastating consequences
in Florida and nationwide. The
water supply problems in
Georgia did not happen
overnight, and they certainly are
not exclusive to Georgia. We
must work together toward a
measured, adaptive, and reason-
able solution to address our
water sharing challenges."
Earlier this month, Georgia
Gov. Sonny Perdue asked the
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to


reduce the minimum flow of
water to the Apalachicola River
to the detriment of two power
plants, three endangered species,
and numerous communities that
depend on water released from
Lake Lanier. The Corps of
Engineers has stated in court
documents that the Atlanta area
has enough water to last well
into spring, even if there is no
more rain, despite claims by the
state of Georgia that the drain-
ing of a federal reservoir on the
Chattahoochee River threatened
the state's drinking water supply.
"The Apalachicola River
and the Apalachicola Bay
already have suffered consider-
ably, while water use in Georgia
remains practically unrestricted
until recently and the Flint River
water consumption continues
unabated," Boyd stated. "The
state of Florida should not have
to bear the full brunt of this
problem. The Apalachicola
River and the Apalachicola Bay
are critical to our environment,
our economy, and the quality of
life for hundreds of thousands of
residents. The Florida Delega-
tion stands together to make sure
that these resources are protect-
ed."
In addition to Boyd, the let-
ter has been signed by Senators
Bill Nelson (D-FL) and Mel
Martinez (R-FL) and Represent-
atives Alcee Hastings (D-FL),
Corrine Brown (D-FL), Ken-
drick Meek (D-FL), Debbie
Wasserman Schultz (D-FL), and
Kathy Castor (D-FL).


Help someone quit smoking
The Big Bend Area Health Education Center presents Quit
Smoking NOW Facilitator Training on Friday, November 9, from
12:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. at the Ramada Inn and Conference Center
located at 2900 N. Monroe St., Tallahassee. To register for this train-
ing, call Angie Parker at (850) 224-1177. The training is free.



omnnsww^^j^^Q^^w^B


enforced and that those provi-
sions are achieving quantifiable
on the ground results; 2)
Requires that the state seeking to
suspend the ESA have mandato-
ry, enforceable growth manage-
ment policies in place that keep
growth from outstripping the
ability of natural resources, par-
ticularly water, to sustain it; 3)
Requires that the other states
dependent on the water source
participate in the determination
of and concur with the policies
in #1 and #2; 4) Prohibits
increases in current water con-
sumption and development of
reservoirs;. 5) Requires a bal-
anced, verifiable, scientific
assessment of the flow require-
ments necessary to maintain the
health, water quality, and pro-


ductivity of all components of
the ACF ecosystem; and 6)
Requires the affected states and
federal agencies to form a bal-
anced regulatory commission to
manage the interstate water
resources.
The Apalachicola River and
Bay support a local seafood
industry worth $100 million per
year and provide one of the pri-
mary ecological nurseries for the
billion dollar Gulf of Mexico
seafood industry. Apalachicola
Bay and its estuaries are a nurs-
ery for shrimp, blue crabs, and
important recreational and com-
mercial fish species such as
striped bass, flounder, grouper,
redfish, snapper and speckled
trout. The bay provides 90% of
Florida's oysters and 13% of the


nation's. "We are already seeing
negative impacts in the
Apalachicola River floodplain
and in the Bay," says Tonsmeire,
adding, "where the higher salini-
ties from the lower flows allow
salt water predators like oyster
drills and conch to come in and
decimate oyster beds. Oystermen
report that 50% of the oysters
they tong up are dead."
Floridians should call their
state and federal legislators, the
Governor, and the Florida
Department of Environmental
Protection and ask them as cus-
todians and elected representa-
tives to stand up for Florida's
Apalachicola River and Bay and
oppose the Isakson bill,
Tonsmeire said.


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Bristol /10956 NW State Road 20 / 850-643-2221
Carrabelle / 912 Northwest Avenue A / 850-697-5626
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The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


November 2, 2007 Page 9


Lanark from Page 1
District property, and stalked
them. Barbara Rohrs also stated
in her petition that Snyder "inti-
mates (sic) me at district office,"
and, "He fed bears outside my
place of business to have them
possibly attack me."
The petitions specifically
asked that Snyder be prohibited


from going within 500 feet of the
petitioners or their families,
within 500 feet of their residence
or business, within 100 feet from
their cars or within 500 feet of
the post office, food store, or any
Lanark Village Water & Sewer
District board meeting or job
sites. It was further asked that he
be prohibited from going near


the Water District office or the
home David Kight, who is a
member of the Concerned
Citizens of Lanark Village, a
group which Snyder chairs.
To more fully understand
the circumstances surrounding
the petitions, connections of the
petitioners and their relationship
with Snyder needs to be report-


ed. Snyder has-been a long-time
and vocal critic of the Water
District board policies and
actions. On behalf of the
Concerned Citizens of Lanark
Village, he has recorded meet-
ings on audio and video tape and
has purchased full-page ads in
The Franklin Chronicle strongly
criticizing the actions of the


Water District Board and some
of its individual members. He
(again on behalf of the
Concerned Citizens) has also
purchased large numbers of
Chronicle newspapers, added
fliers to them and distributed
them to Lanark Village residents.
While waiting for the Oct. 8th
meeting of the Water District
Board to commence at Chillas
Hall, a fight broke out involving
Snyder and Rowell resulting in
the postponement of the meet-
ing, the Franklin County
Sheriff's Office being summoned
and Snyder being transported by
ambulance to the hospital for
treatment of his injuries. When
last contacted, Major Chester
Creamer of the Sheriff's Office
said that the investigation into
the incident was continuing and
deferred further comment until
the investigation was complete.
Previous to that, and also under
investigation, was an incident
involving a laser pointer during
which Snyder says Paul Rohrs
pointed the device at him and
damaged his eye. Paul Rohrs is
married to Barbara Rohrs, chair-
person of the Water District
Board. Although Don and Pat
Lively are next-door neighbors
and at one time were friendly
with Snyder, they currently sup-
port Water District Board poli-
cies and now are politically
opposed to Snyder's position.
This has caused bad feelings
between the old acquaintances.
Rowell, the Rohrs, and the
Livelys appeared at the hearing
acting as their own counsels.
Snyder was represented by attor-
ney Nicolas Yonclas. Yonclas
asked for a dismissal on the
grounds that the petitions were
legally and factually not in order
but Judge Hankinson decided to
hear all sides and listen to further
facts before rendering his deci-
sion. He began by explaining the
law relating to repeat violence
injunctions, stalking, and harass-
ment. There are two require-
ments of a repeat violence
injunction; first, that the conduct
alleged is against the petitioner.
Conduct against another person
is irrelevant. Secondly, there
must be two criminal acts of vio-
lence committed against the peti-
tioner. There is an exception to
the second requirement in that
stalking violations can be used to
meet the second requirement.
Stalking requires multiple inci-
dents that have no purpose other
than the harassment of the peti-
tioner. Taking photos, pointing
at, speaking to, or watching
another person for any reason
other than harassment does not
constitute stalking. Stalking is
also a personal thing. It is irrele-
vant that another person may
have been harassed.
While the petitioners waited
in a conference room, Judge
Hankinson listened to testimony
from each petitioner in a sepa-
rate office with Snyder and
Yonclas present. The atmos-
phere in the conference room
was silent and tension was in the
air as witnesses and petitioners
waited to be heard. There was
some minor chit-chat but mostly
people were wrapped up in their
own thoughts, possibly hesitant
to speak with a reporter listening
to them.
Finally the tension was bro-
ken as the last witnesses, Snyder,
and Yonclas came out of the
hearing room and announced
that the judge had refused all the
petitions because of a lack of evi-


Continued on Page 14


~EE~S:












ATTENTION LANARK VILLAGE


PROPERTY OWNERS

Hi, I'm Bill Snyder and I'm the chairman of the Concerned Citizens of Lanark Village. Once again we are asking the
Land owners of the Lanark Village Water and Sewer District to Sign a petition to dissolve the District. We need to dis-
solve the district in order to merge our system with the city of Carrabelle's. As most of you remember we were work-
ing on this a few months ago and a large number of you signed petitions to dissolve. Our attempt to dissolve our dis-
trict and merge the two systems failed at that time. We withdrew our support on that attempt at the last minute because
we felt the deal we were being offered was not in the people of Lanark's best interest. At that time the officials of the
city of Carrabelle did not understand how important some of the issues were to our Village, thus we were unable to
endorse the deal that Carrabelle proposed in the end. Since then, we have talked to them a great deal, and we all agree
that a merger is the only thing that makes sense for both towns.
We have worked out our differences. Carrabelle's officials have proposed, at their last meeting, to work together and
make a merger happen. They told the people of Lanark that if we merge we would be a part of their system. We would
be treated the same as their citizens. They said that we would be charged the same as anyone that is outside of their city
limits. They also assured us that we would not lose a few of the key pieces of land that are needed in the Village. They
say they will be happy to give us at least a hundred year lease at a dollar a year for the property that the association uses
for boat and RV storage. They will offer the same deal for the two lots that the office trailer is situated on. They also
agreed that the fire department will need more land for future expansion and room for training exercises. We have asked
that they get three acres with the same lease agreement. We were told that this would not be a problem.
Please read the petition carefully and if you agree with it, sigrr it and get it back to us as soon as possible. Everyone
whose name appears on a property deed within the Lanark district can sign.
If you have any questions or concerns please feel free to call 850-697-3189. You can get more information and
updates at the following website: http://www.freewebs.com/lvwsdsaga/. You can e-mail us at
lanarkyayhoos@yahoo.com. The Concerned Citizens of Lanark Village, 2332 Enabob St., Lanark Village, FL
32323.



Petition To Dissolve The Lanark Village Water And Sewer District
By signing this petition we agree that we own property within the Lanark Village Water and Sewer District
and we wish to dissolve the Lanark Village Water and Sewer District. We believe that the Lanark Village
Water and Sewer District located in Franklin County Florida does not serve the needs of the people, and
thus should be dissolved.

Signature: Lanark Village Property Address:


Print:


Signature: Lanark Village Property Address:


Print:


Signature: Lanark Village Property Address: _


Print:



if you agree with this petition, please sign it an4 return it to:
The Concerned Citizens of Lanark Village; P.O. Box 442; Lanark Village, Florida 32323


PAID ADVERTISEMENT BY THE CONCERNED CITIZENS OF LANARK VILLAGE


_ _I -I


The Franklin Chronicle


Page 10 November 2, 2007


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER












SIGN THE PETITION AND AVOID


A 2 MILL AD VALOREM TAX


AND HIGHER WATER AND SEWER RATES


The budget for 2007/2008 has more than doubled and a rate study has been done by The Florida
Rural Water Association engineers to determine what your water and sewer rates will be. The result
was that your bill can go as high as $109.00 per month, or you might be charged a 2 mill ad val-
orem tax.

The proposed millage tax will affect everyone who owns property in the district, even if water and
sewer is not available to you. The district runs from the Ho Hum camp ground to the Catholic
Church.

If you agree that a merger with Carrabelle is the best solution, please sign the petition and get it
back as soon as possible. We plan to turn the petitions in on November 6th.

Everyone whose name appears on a property deed can sign. This includes husband and wife teams.

THE CONCERNED CITIZENS OF LANARK VILLAGE 2332 ENABOB ST. LANARK VILLAGE, FL 32323


Florida Rural Water Association
Member: Lanark Village Water & Sewer District
Project: Rate & Connection Fee Report

COMPARISON OF ALTERNATIVES


County:
PWS:


Franklin
1190414


Proposed 2008 Rates


Budget


Average
Revenue Residential
Water Bill


Average
Residential
Wastewater
Bill


Total Estimated
Average Bill Increase


Current Rates & 2008
uet t$447,769.00 ($381,981.67)
Budget
Balanced Budget 2008
$447,769.00 $447,791.61
Rates
Balances Budget w/
Recommended $618,175.17 $619,520.32
Reserves

Proposed Water & Sewer Improvements with 0% Grant


Rates Supporting
Improvments

1 MIL ad valorem tax

2 MIL ad valorem tax

Proposed Water & Sewer

Rates Supporting
Improvements

1 MIL ad valorem tax

2 MIL ad valorem tax

Proposed Water & Sewer

Rates Supporting
Improvements

1 MIL ad valorem tax

2 MIL ad valorem tax


$908,451.57

$908,454.64

$908,452.45

Improvements

$855,282.43

$855,301.76

$855,349.32

Improvements

$802,184.13

$802,084.66

$802,208.32


$908,483.68

$908,534.90

$908,498.28

with 20% Gran

$855,664.72

$855,986.90

$856,779.48

with 45% Gran

$804,026.32

$802,368.50

$804,429.48


$24.00

$27.30


$37.55


&100% Loan

$58.68

$46.30

$34.45

t & 80% Loan

$56.50

$42.80

$31.30

t & 55% Loan

$52.55

$41.35

$27.55


PAID ADVERTISEMENT BY THE CONCERNED CITIZENS OF LANARK VILLAGE


$24.00

$25.25


$37.55




$50.55

$40.05

$28.55



$45.05

$37.05

$25.05



$43.05

$30.05

$22.55


$48.00

$52.55


$75.10




$109.23

$86.35

$63.00



$101.55

$79.85

$56.35



$95.60

$71.40

$50.10


9%


56%




128%/

80%

31%



112%

66%

17%



99%

49%

4%


ii i


The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OH IED NE PAPER


November 2, 2007 P'age 11








Page 12 November 2, 2007 A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER The Franklin Chronicle


This photo on file at the Florida State Archives in Tallahassee was taken in July of 1911 in
what is identified as "Carrabelle Bank." The men are unidentified. We wonder if they
dressed up like that in July because they knew they were getting their photo taken. Probably
not; our guess is this was the way everyone dressed back then, right down to the spiffy hats.


Pro from Page 6
tax. Additionally, since the
Federal Government has desig-
nated Weems Hospital as a
Critical Access Hospital and
endowed upon it the favorable
reimbursement from Medicare
and without this reimbursement
it would not be financially feasi-
ble to do any capital healthcare
improvements special considera-
tion should be given to protect
this status.
A new replacement hospital
will be approximately 45,000
square feet. The hospital will
maintain its current twenty five
bed license with the ability to use
all beds except the two proposed
ICU beds as skilled swing beds.
The planned patient services for
the new hospital will include
Emergency Services, Medical/
Surgical Nursing, Imaging
Diagnostics, Surgery, Lab,
Pharmacy, Sleep Center, .Res-
piratory and Outpatient Care.
The timing of the replace-
ment hospital is anticipated to be
as follows:
April 2008 September 2008:
Design of Facility
September 2008 January 2009:
Equipment Planning
January 2009 April 2009:
Licensing & Plan Review
April 2009 July 2009:
Financing
July 2009 January 2011:
Construction
January 2011 April 2011:
Equipment Installation
April 2011: Open
The third purpose of the
sales tax will be for the ongoing
support of the hospital and
ambulance operations. As the
county continues to develop and
attract new visitors and families
to the area additional ambu-
lances will need to be put in loca-
tions to cover the growth. Right
now full time ambulances are in
Lanark and Eastpoint. During
times of high visitor traffic an
ambulance is located on St.
George Island on weekends.
Right now plans are being stud-
ied that would provide for anoth-
er ambulance to be in the county
when one of the existing two is


on a long run. An excellent
ambulance service is very impor-
tant to a county such as Franklin
County given its remoteness and
configuration.
Lastly the sales tax should
be used to recruit new physicians
to Franklin County. Both pri-
mary care physicians as well as
specialist need to be brought to
the area. Currently Weems is
looking at working with teaching
programs to provide a rural rota-
tion for Family Practice resi-
dents. Tallahassee Memorial
Hospital is working with Weems
on telemedicine and rotating
specialist. As TMH put it,"the
relationship between our two
hospitals is very important to all

THE
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
WELCOMES YOU












850-653-9550
Highway 98 & 6th Street
Apalachicola
EST. 1836
SUNDAY
8:00 A.M.
10:30 A.M.


our patients within the area."
Additional clinical services,
capital equipment replacement,
advancing technologies and
improving preventative care are
some other items that will be
looked at in the future. All of
these will need some capital.
This one cent sales tax can
improve lifestyle and create an
economic stimulus for the people
of Franklin County.











I --



5i6t J31apt(t e&iwidi
St. George Island
501 E. Bayshore Drive
850-927-2257
R. Michael Whaley, Pastor
Join us as we praise and
worship the living Christ!
Sunday Bible Study 10:00 a.m.
Worship & Praise 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Night 7:00 p.m.
Wed. "Power Hour" 7:00 p.m.

"Walking in Christ"


St. George Island
United Methodist Church

YOU ARE INVITED TO
SUNDAY WORSHIP AT 9:00 A.M.


201 E. Gulf Beach Drive on the Island
Phone: 927-2088 Website: sgiumc.org
Pastor: Themo Patriotis Dir. of Creative Ministries: Dusty Turner


Now is the time to
subscribe to the

FRANKLIN

CHRONICLE

The Chronicle is published every Friday.
Mailed subscriptions within Franklin County
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Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine
blank squares.-Fill in all 81 squares On the puzzle with numbers 1
to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sec-
tions that you've already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you
can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine
squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is
completed when you correctly fill every square.


1 23 45

5 3 6 4

4 1 2

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7 8

9 1 3

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84 923
~ ^~^~3 __^ l_


^ _J ___4_
U L __ 2_


Page 12 November 2, 2007


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle








The Franklin Chronicle


A LOCALLY OWNED NE i SP1 PER


November 2, 2007 Page 13


10 tips for making your home a happy haven for birds


Dear Jane,
One of my favorite ways to
cni,'\ coffee in the morning is by
sitting in my kitchen and watch-
ing the birds. Do I have to lose
that with fall now here?
Margaret L.

Dear Ma rgarer,
Shorter days, cooler nights,
leaves falling-there's no deny-
ing that summer's behind us,
Being a Jane,
you've probably
already put away
the outdoor furni-
ture, gussied up
the guest bed-
room, and begun
to winterize your
home.
You're ready
for the on-slaught
of relatives,
friends, and neigh-
bors who seem to
pop out of the
woodwork when the holidays
come around. But as you prepare
for the dormant days ahead, take
a little time to make your home
an inviting spot for your guests
who won't be hunkered down
inside your well-insulated house:
the wild birds who call your
neighborhood home, too.
Shelter from the Storm
Birds need protection from
the elements and from predators.
Locate your birdhouses away
from prevailing winds; usually
your home's southern and east-
ern exposures will provide the


*


warmest, calmest spots. Brush
pil-e are also an excellent source
of shelter and food for birds. If
you needed an excuse not to get
rid of those dead branches and
leaves, here's your chance! All
that brush offers shelter from the
w\c,ulii and also provides a
steady source of worms and bugs
that birds need to survive.
Needs To Breathe!
Even though
you want to keep
the birds warm, you
want to be sure to
provide air vents as
well. You can
accomplish this by
Either leaving gaps
between the roof
and the sides of the
bird house or use
44 your drill to make a
line of quarter inch
size holes just
below the roof line.
Feeding Your Feathered
Friends
Keeping your feeders clean
and full is especially important in
winter and fall. Because birds
come to rely on local sources of
food, letting a feeder go empty
for long can be life threatening.
Hummingbirds in particular
appreciate feeders in the fall,
since their regular sources of
nectar are greatly diminished.
Different species appreciate dif-
ferent feed mixes; woodpeckers,
nuthatches and chickadees in
particular appreciate suet-rich


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formulas. You can also make a
treat by rubbing a pinecone with
hardened fat (like bacon grease)
and covering it with birdseed or
crumbs.
Water, Water Everywhere
Birds need increased sources
of water in the fall, Many of
their regular sources are dried up
and their metabolisms are work-
ing hard to fight increasingly
cool temperatures. Birdbaths,
fountains, and ponds can all be
havens. Make sure they're clean
(check them daily for fallen
leaves), filled with fresh water,
and try not to let it freeze over.
Drain it?
Although birds need water,
you don't want to have standing
water at the bottom of your bird
house. Just like your home, you
need to make the bird house with
a roof with an appropriate slope
and overhang. You might also
consider drilling the entrance
hole on an upward slant. Unfor-
tunately, there will be those
storms that will force rain water
into the bird house, so make sure
you have proper drainage by cut-
ting away the corners of the box
floor.
Protect the Food Supply
Regularly check your feed
containers for bugs, mildew or
rot. Make sure the container is
easy for you to get to, protected
from rain and drips, and sealed
off from nuisances like neighbor-
hood cats or squirrels.
Unwelcome Guests
With food being readily
accessible, you might attract a
few unwanted guests such as
squirrels, mice, insects and some-
times snakes. You might also
find an overly, protective mother,
so, be careful when looking
inside. Also, be on the look out
for smaller vermin such as flies,
fleas, mites and lice in the bot-
tom. If you find any, be careful
to only use insecticides that are
proven to be 100% safe for birds.


Plan a Bird-Friendly Backyard
To attract and keep the
broadest variety of birds coming
back to your property, you'll
need a landscape plan that's bird-
friendly. Ideally, your grounds
will include a combination of
ground cover, shrubs, small and
large trees. A variety of plants
will do more than attract a spec-
trum of birds and animals; it'll
provide color and breadth that
can help complete a rich overall
outdoor scene.
Keep Out!
Starlings, house sparrows
and other predators will try to
find a way in. So, limit their
options by making sure there is
only one entry point. Bird hous-
es with numerous points of entry
are usually not the 'hotel' of
choice as most birds don't like to
'share. And although a perch just
outside the entry might seem like
a good idea, it's often just a con-
venient place for a predator to
wait for their prey.
Design It!
Have fun with your bird-
house by using colors that are
appealing to your senses. Keep in
mind the tips given above, but
feel free to take a little creative
liberty with the look of your
birdhouse. Be sure to use paints
that are eco-friendly as well as
materials that will stand up to
the weather. Stay away from
adding padding or other materi-
als to the inside of the bird house
as many birds are rather particu-
lar and will prefer to make their
own bed. But, as far as the look
of the outside of the bird house
goes, it's up to you, so have fun
With it!
Check with your local
Audubon Society or other bird-
ing groups for more tips on
species in your area and enjoy
the opportunity to provide a little
aid and comfort to the wild ani-
mals that nest in your neighbor-
hood. For detailed information
and more great projects ideas,
visit www.BeJane.com.


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I- I I --C~P- I


I J


I


EARTH


TALK,
Questions & Answers
About Our Environment

Should cats stay
inside?
BY EDITORS OF E/THE
ENVIRONMENTAL
MAGAZINE
Dear EarthTalk:
Please help settle the debate
about whether or not my cats
should stay in or go out. My
neighborhood is relatively safe
for cats, vis-A-vis car traffic, and 1
think it is more natural f6r them
to be outside and not always
inside. They do kill wildlife,
including birds, but aren't they
just taking the place of natural
predators that once did the
same?
- Bill Thomson, Bangor, ME
Most environmental advo-
cates believe that keeping cats
indoors is better for both the
health of the felines themselves
and for their prey. Scientists esti-
mate that the typical free-roam-
ing housecat kills some 100
small animals each year. This
means that the 90 million
domestic housecats living in the
U.S. alone are killing hundreds
of millions if not billions of
birds, small mammals, reptiles
and amphibians every year. And
while housecats on the prowl
may serve to replace the natural
predators long ago extirpated by
humans, their popularity as pets
puts their population density far
ahead of those that came before
them.
"Cat predation is an added
stress to wildlife populations
already struggling to survive
habitat loss, pollution, pesticides
and other human impacts," says
the American Bird Conservancy
(ABC), which in 1997 launched
its controversial Cats Indoors!
campaign to educate animal
lovers about the benefits of keep-
ing Tabby inside. ABC also
points out that free-roaming cats
are exposed to injury, disease,
parasites and collisions with
cars, and can get lost, stolen or
poisoned. Cats can also transmit
diseases and parasites such as
rabies, cat-scratch fever and tox-
oplasmosis to other cats, wildlife
or people. To help drive its point
home, ABC produces a wide
range of educational materials
(including a brochure, "Keeping
Cats Indoors Isn't Just For The
Birds") and public service
announcements in the service of
their ongoing campaign.
Nonetheless, many cat
lovers believe that it is inhumane
to confine felines indoors, since
they have evolved as hunters and
thrive on the natural stimulation
only available outside. To help
soften the blow and wean your
cat off of the outdoors slowly,
ABC suggests gradually curtail-
.ing your cat's out-of-doors time
over the course of a few months
until it is eventually not let out at
all. In doing so, you will need to
provide your cat with a lot of
attention and play indoors. New
scratching posts and toys are a
good bet as they may entertain
cats that ordinarily occupy them-
selves chasing birds and rodents.
ABC suggests hiding various
Continued on Page 15


.im2b -







Page 14 November 2, 2007


A LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER


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Announcements
GET COVERED: Run your ad
STATEWIDE! You can run
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3BR/2BA Foreclosure! $14,000!
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years @ 8% apr. Buy, 5/BR
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(800) 366-9783 Ext. 5853.
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years @ 8% apr. Buy, 4/BR
$301/Mo! For listings (800) 366-
9783 Ext. 5760.
Miscellaneous
DIVORCE$275-$350*COVERS
children, etc. Only one signature
required! *Excludes govt. fees!
Call weekdays (800) 462-2000,
ext. 600. (8 a.m.-6 p.m.) Alta
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Steel Buildings
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Do you have an item you want to
sell? A service you want to offer?
The Franklin Chronicle will pub-
lish your classified ad free for the
first 25 words. Longer ads will be
charged $5 for each additional 20
words, payable in advance. Only
one free ad per telephone num-
ber. E-mail your information to
info@franklinchronicle.net.

1980 Dodge R/V, runs good,
good tires, needs interior work,
good hunter's camper. MUST
SELL! $1000 OBO. Greg 228-
6239.

PANCAKE BREAKFAST at
FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH of APALACHICO-
LA, 73 5th Street on Saturday,
November 3, 2007,-7:00am-
10:00am Adults $6.00, Children
$3.00.

Erickson's Cleaning Services will
clean homes,rentals, offices in
Franklin County. 850-381-6627.

Topper for small pickup truck,
$75, 670-4377.


No ExperienceP No Problem.

* Company-provided CDL training for
qualified candidates
New higher pay packages
Nearly 2/3 of.Schneider drivers get
home daily or weekly

schneiderlobs.com cNEIDER
-860044-PRIED* 1400447-33 .-irt2-Z-


Lanark from Page 9
dence of the elements of multi-
ple criminal acts of violence or
stalking against the petitioners.
He did, however, strongly cau-
tion Snyder against taking his
pictures or acting in a manner
that could be considered harass-
ing.
Snyder said later that he was
hanging up his camera.
However, other members of the
Concerned Citizens have said
they will continue to attend and
record the public meetings. As
long as their actions remain
political and don't move into the
personal realm, there will be lit-
tle cause to worry about further
petitions.


FM MWD4 I


Chronicle correspondent Tom
Loughridge can be contacted at:
tjloughridge@mchsi.com.




Lower and Lower
Ro BIS EGIA L A S I I P S
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S T A|N D.OIN C|E E MIO N Y
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A L L EN IIN TO LAD E
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[TThe FakIn"ChronicleTA TTL III E ITRII I27PI 15


The BUSINESS CARD DIRECTORY in the Chronicle pages is an efficient way to promote your business to the public and save money
at the same time. These ads are strictly business cards magnified to 2 columns by two inches, offered to you at 50% discount for two
insertions. Send your business card or copy to: Franklin Chronicle, P.O. Box 590, Eastpoint, FL 32328 or fax 877-423-4964 or e-mail:
info@franklinchronicle.net. Your check for $15.00 will guarantee position in the next issue.
i-- l-- r-- r+ wl!tl


AUCTION
Tuesday. November 6th @ 12 Noon
Jacksonville Hlr.u. h FL
(2) NeL Homes, Beach Side
Thursday. November 8th @ 12 Noon
Tavaires. FL
Mt. Dora Lake Front Home
&
Leesburg. FL
(2) 7+ Acre Wooded Lots
PLEASE VIEW OUR WEB SITE AND PREVIEW THESE LUXURY
PROPERTtES FOR AUCTION WfITl ALLTERMS AND CONDITIONS
www.soldhyauction.net/nov

SOLD by AUCTION
Call for Info @ 407-353-4121
Attend the Auctions for Chance to Win A\
NEW CAR


SThe onallon Is tx deductllhle
Sr Pick-up Is free.
Vor theIl~ We take care of all the paperwork.

18 D N T A (


On The Apalachicola East Bay

Phone: 850-670-1111

Fax: 850-670-8316


LUNCH .................. $5. 5
With French Fries and ColeSlaw
Mullet
Catfish
SteaK Wrap
ChicKen Wrap




NIGHTLY MCALS ........... ..015
Country Fried SteaK
Alfredo ChicKen or Shrimp

WEE(KEND MEAL ......... .$1.95
$urf fr Turf


Served All Day Long

Choice of Seafood Below: $q.95
MULLET
FLOUND6l .
MAHI
CATFISH
SHRPIMP
CFAN FISHi
SCALLOPS
CPAWFISH CAECS$

Seafood Below: $4.00


OYSTERZS ON THE HMALF SHELL


The Franklin Chronicle
GUY MARKHAM
ADVERTISING SPECIALIST
P.O. Box 590 33 Begonia Street
Eastpoint, FL 32328
(850) 670-4377 (Office)
(616) 366-7110 (Cell)
news@franklinchronicle.net
FranklinChronicle.net
11-0211-09


Woman dies;
car runs off
causeway
An Ap.i.u-hiLili woman
died last weekend after die car
shel' w.is diivin1g ln f11 the
Apalachicola Bridge Causeway
into the water, the Florida
Highway Patrol reported.
The accident happened at
3:13 a.m. Sunday on the cause-
way between Apalachicola and
Eastpoint. Thl highway is offi-
cii,llv ilscignii.cd ai State Road
31). II II' idcniaeled the woman as
Tione Nicole Rochelle, 25, who
was pronounced dead at Weems
Hospital. Two pias'scngier in the
car were identified .i% Angelta
Tomesia Stephens, 18, of Apal-
achicola; and Jerome Prince, 24,
of Apalachicola. They both
received non .lifc-htcitening
injuries and were transported to
Weems llospit.l for treatment.
The FlIP report states the
20011 Toyota was westbound
when the driver tried to pass
ainolthir vehicle and lost control.
The car traveled onto the south
grass shoulder, continued and
struck a rock barrier that sepa-
rates the grass shoulder from
Apalachicola Bay, went over the
rocks and overturned into the
bay on the southside of the high-
way. The car ended up upside
down in about five feet of water.
Earth Talkfrom Page 13
toys around the house so cats
can sniff them and not miss so
much the thrill-of the hunt out-
doors.
One last bit of important
advice: Many fear.that confining
their cats indoors will lead to
more shredded upholstery. But-
de-clawing your cat should never
be an option. According to
Veterinarian Dr. Christianne
Schelling, cats' claws are a vital
part of their anatomy. De-claw-
ing is not simply fingernail trim-
ming but the removal of the last
joint in a cat's "toes." It is a
painful procedure and can lead
to serious physical, emotional
and behavioral complications.
Alternatives to de-clawing
include providing scratching
posts in various locations around
the home, and trimming your
cats nails occasionally. This
involves trimming only the clear
tip of the nail (never the pink or
dark fleshy parts, which are skin)
and should be done only upon
first consulting with a veterinari-
an. Another option is a product
called Soft Paws, lightweight
vinyl caps that you apply over
your cat's own claws. They have
rounded edges, so your cat's
scratching doesn't damage your
home and furnishings.
CONTACTS: Cats Indoors!
www. abcbirds.org/cats/;
Declawing Cats: More Than Just
a Manicure, www.hsus.org/
ace/11780; Soft Paws, www.soft-
paws.com.
GOT A QUESTION? Send
it to: EarthTalk, P.O. Box 5098,
Westport, CT 06881; submit it at
www.emagazine.com/earth-
talk/thisweek/, or e-mail: earth-
talk@emagazine.com. Read at:
w w w magazine.
com/earthtalk/archives.php.


Hours: 11:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Mon. to Thurs./11:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. Fri. & Sat.
Ask your server for Special Prices
We cater weddings, office parties, etc.
------ -----II a 'I


Ilr Il I I .....


--c~-~rcr-~CrC-~ls -le -t-l


---~---~~


A LOCALLY OIl NED NEWSPAPER


The Franklin Chronicle


November 2, 2007 Page 15


I's to
lusiut










Taking a new look at a disrespected wine


BY TOM MARQUARDT AND PATRICK DARR
When we started writing this column more than a
decade ago, rieslings didn't get a lot of attention. Known
best in Germany where the exported versions are often
vinified sickly sweet, rieslings were once regarded as infe-
rior wines no American producer would attempt to emu-
late.
How times have changed.
Not only has a new, dry riesling gained a foothold in
the U.S. market, but its sales are rapidly making up
ground against chardonnay and sauvignon blanc.
Riesling is simply hot.
It has been argued that riesling's dramatic change in
popularity can be attributed to a new generation of wine
enthusiasts who never experienced the variety's dark
days. Although the Alsace region of France always made
dry riesling, it struggled to develop a market here because
of archaic labels and an 'association with Germany's
sweeter wines. (In defense of Germany, much of its ries-
ling is vinified dry but its exports are often sweet).
No matter where it is grown, riesling has an affinity
for showing off its soil origin. Grown in slate, for
instance, the wine reveals distinct mineral notes. Because
of this enviable characteristic, riesling can be incredibly
fragrant and intense.
Not fermented or aged in oak barrels, riesling retains
the distinctive qualities of the grape variety and its natu-
ral acidity. That alone makes it a versatile wine for food.
Invariably, we reach for riesling before chardonnay when
we have seafood. Its distinctive flavor also stands out
when paired against neutral food like turkey, so keep this
in mind for the Thanksgiving table.


The grape likes cooler climates. In the United States
it has soared in colder states like Washington and New
York. The rieslings made in the Finger Lakes region are
simply spectacular.
Warmer climates in California have not produced
great rieslings, but unsuspecting grape-growing regions,
like Australia, have produced some interesting riesling
that again speaks for the soil.
Riesling's biggest hurdle
remains its broad reach of
styles. It can be sweet in
Germany, minerally in Alsa-
ce, floral in Washington. It
can be label Johannisberg
Riesling, white riesling or
just riesling. Nonetheless, its
defenders argue that the
range in style in actually an
Asset.
If you like your wines a
bit sweet, there are several
rieslings here and abroad to
suit your palate. Unfortun-
ately, the residual sugar in a wine is rarely printed on the
label, so you never know until you taste the wine. Most
palates won't pick up the presence of sugar until .5%.
Here are a few recommendations of this nation's best
rieslings to get you started:
Chateau Ste. Michelle Eroica Riesling 2006 ($24).
One of our all-time favorites, this Washington state ries-
ling is a collaboration of Germany's Dr. Ernst Loosen
and Chateau Ste. Michelle. winemaker Bob Bertheau.


Specially selected vineyards in the cool Yakima Valley
provide a racey, mineral style to this exotic riesling. Lots
of dimension in this wine dominated by citrus,-peach
notes, a touch of spice and fresh acidity.
Chateau Ste. Michelle Columbia Valley Dry Riesling
2006 ($15). Made originally for just the Northwest mar-
ket, this Washington state wine gained popularity'and is
now available nationwide. An excellent value for what it
offers, this wine sports peach, apricot and orange flavors.
Dr. Konstantin Frank Dry Riesling 2006 ($18). Dr.
Frank, a Ukrainian immigrant, is the riesling patriarch of
the Finger Lakes region. Peach and tangerine notes with
a floral note and just a touch of residual sugar balanced
by crisp acidity. Dr. Frank was the first to plant the grape
in New York in the 1950s.
Gainey Vineyards Santa Ynez Riesling 2006 ($15).
This cooler region of California is best known for pinot
noir, syrah and now riesling. Pineapple, grapefruit flavors
with bright acidity.
J. Lohr Monterey County Bay Mist White Riesling
2006 ($9). Jerry Lohr has been making riesling for 30
years because he has always enjoyed the variety's
approachability. Good for him. The wine is highlighted
by peach and apricots with a touch of green apple and a
bit of residual sugar for those of you. who like off-dry
wines.
Pacific Rim Dry Riesling 2006 ($11). Spun off by
Bonny Doon, Pacific Rim specializes in riesling. Nearly
80 percent of the grapes come from Washington; the rest
are from the Mosel Valley-quite a blend of divergent
grape-growing regions.


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